WorldWideScience

Sample records for total phase advance

  1. Allogeneic marrow transplantation following cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of hyperfractionated total body irradiation in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies: a phase I/II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirer, Taner; Petersen, Finn B.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Barnett, Todd A.; Sanders, Jean; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storb, Rainer; Doney, Kristine; Bensinger, William I.; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen; Buckner, C. Dean

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of unshielded total body irradiation (TBI) delivered from dual 60 C sources at an exposure rate of 0.08 Gy/min and given in thrice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with a median age of 28 (range 6-48) years were entered into a Phase I/II study. All patients received cyclophosphamide (CY), 120 mg/kg administered over 2 days before TBI. Marrow from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings was infused following the last dose of TBI. An escalation-deescalation schema designed to not exceed an incidence of 25% of Grade 3-4 regimen-related toxicities (RRTs) was used. The first dose level tested was 13.2 Gy followed by 14.4 Gy. Results: None of the four patients at the dose level of 13.2 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT. Two of the first eight patients receiving 14.4 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT, establishing this as the MTD. An additional 32 patients were evaluated at the 14.4 Gy level to confirm these initial observations. Of 40 patients receiving 14.4 Gy, 13 (32.5%) developed Grade 3-4 RRTs; 46% in adults and 12% in children. The primary dose limiting toxicity was Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 12.5% of patients. Noninfectious Grade 3-4 interstitial pneumonia syndrome occurred in 5% of patients. The actuarial probabilities of event-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years were 0.10, 0.81, and 0.47, respectively, for patients who received 14.4 Gy of TBI. Conclusions: The outcome for patients receiving 14.4 Gy of TBI was not different from previous studies of other CY and TBI regimens in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. These data showed that the incidence of Grade 3-4 RRTs in adults was greater than the 25% maximum set as the goal of this study, suggesting that 13.2 Gy is a more appropriate dose of TBI for adults, while 14.4 Gy is an appropriate dose for children

  2. Advanced Athermal Telescopes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed innovative athermal telescope design uses advanced lightweight and high-stiffness material of Beryllium-Aluminum (Be-38Al). Peregrine's expertise with...

  3. Advances phase-lock techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, James A

    2008-01-01

    From cellphones to micrprocessors, to GPS navigation, phase-lock techniques are utilized in most all modern electronic devices. This high-level book takes a systems-level perspective, rather than circuit-level, which differentiates it from other books in the field.

  4. Organ Preservation in Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a phase II randomized controlled trial evaluating 3-year disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation plus induction or consolidation chemotherapy, and total mesorectal excision or nonoperative management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J. Joshua; Chow, Oliver S.; Gollub, Marc J.; Nash, Garrett M.; Temple, Larissa K.; Weiser, Martin R.; Guillem, José G.; Paty, Philip B.; Avila, Karin; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) includes pre-operative chemoradiation, total mesorectal excision (TME) and post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. This trimodality treatment provides local tumor control in most patients; but almost one-third ultimately die from distant metastasis. Most survivors experience significant impairment in quality of life (QoL), due primarily to removal of the rectum. A current challenge lies in identifying patients who could safely undergo rectal preservation without sacrificing survival benefit and QoL. This multi-institutional, phase II study investigates the efficacy of total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and selective non-operative management (NOM) in LARC. Patients with MRI-staged Stage II or III rectal cancer amenable to TME will be randomized to receive FOLFOX/CAPEOX: a) before induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (INCT); or b) after consolidation neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CNCT), with 5-FU or capecitabine-based chemoradiation. Patients in both arms will be re-staged after completing all neoadjuvant therapy. Those with residual tumor at the primary site will undergo TME. Patients with clinical complete response (cCR) will receive non-operative management (NOM). NOM patients will be followed every 3 months for 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. TME patients will be followed according to NCCN guidelines. All will be followed for at least 5 years from the date of surgery or—in patients treated with NOM—the last day of treatment. The studies published thus far on the safety of NOM in LARC have compared survival between select groups of patients with a cCR after NOM, to patients with a pathologic complete response (pCR) after TME. The current study compares 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in an entire population of patients with LARC, including those with cCR and those with pCR. We will compare the two arms of the study with respect to organ preservation at 3 years, treatment

  5. Organ Preservation in Rectal Adenocarcinoma: a phase II randomized controlled trial evaluating 3-year disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with chemoradiation plus induction or consolidation chemotherapy, and total mesorectal excision or nonoperative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J Joshua; Chow, Oliver S; Gollub, Marc J; Nash, Garrett M; Temple, Larissa K; Weiser, Martin R; Guillem, José G; Paty, Philip B; Avila, Karin; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2015-10-23

    Treatment of patients with non-metastatic, locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) includes pre-operative chemoradiation, total mesorectal excision (TME) and post-operative adjuvant chemotherapy. This trimodality treatment provides local tumor control in most patients; but almost one-third ultimately die from distant metastasis. Most survivors experience significant impairment in quality of life (QoL), due primarily to removal of the rectum. A current challenge lies in identifying patients who could safely undergo rectal preservation without sacrificing survival benefit and QoL. This multi-institutional, phase II study investigates the efficacy of total neoadjuvant therapy (TNT) and selective non-operative management (NOM) in LARC. Patients with MRI-staged Stage II or III rectal cancer amenable to TME will be randomized to receive FOLFOX/CAPEOX: a) before induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (INCT); or b) after consolidation neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CNCT), with 5-FU or capecitabine-based chemoradiation. Patients in both arms will be re-staged after completing all neoadjuvant therapy. Those with residual tumor at the primary site will undergo TME. Patients with clinical complete response (cCR) will receive non-operative management (NOM). NOM patients will be followed every 3 months for 2 years, and every 6 months thereafter. TME patients will be followed according to NCCN guidelines. All will be followed for at least 5 years from the date of surgery or--in patients treated with NOM--the last day of treatment. The studies published thus far on the safety of NOM in LARC have compared survival between select groups of patients with a cCR after NOM, to patients with a pathologic complete response (pCR) after TME. The current study compares 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) in an entire population of patients with LARC, including those with cCR and those with pCR. We will compare the two arms of the study with respect to organ preservation at 3 years, treatment compliance

  6. Total energy calculations for structural phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Y.Y.; Chan, C.T.; Ho, K.M.; Harmon, B.N.

    1990-01-01

    The structural integrity and physical properties of crystalline solids are frequently limited or enhanced by the occurrence of phase transformations. Martensitic transformations involve the collective displacement of atoms from one ordered state to another. Modern methods to determine the microscopic electronic changes as the atoms move are now accurate enough to evaluate the very small energy differences involved. Extensive first principles calculations for the prototypical martensitic transformation from body-centered cubic (bcc) to closepacked 9R structure in sodium metal are described. The minimum energy coordinate or configuration path between the bcc and 9R structures is determined as well as paths to other competing close-packed structures. The energy barriers and important anharmonic interactions are identified and general conclusions drawn. The calculational methods used to solve the Schrodinger equation include pseudopotentials, fast Fourier transforms, efficient matrix diagnonalization, and supercells with many atoms

  7. Betatron phase advance measurement at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.

    1987-02-01

    There are many reasons to determine the betatron phase advance between two azimuthal positions in a circular accelerator or storage ring. We have measured the betatron phase advance between various pairs of azimuthal points in the SPEAR Storage Ring by two different methods. The first method is to excite a steady state coherent betatron oscillation with a network analyzer. The second method is to excite a free coherent betatron oscillation with an impulse kick, and to digitally sample the transverse position of the beam at the pickup stations. The results of these digital samples are Fourier analyzed with a computer to obtain the phase advance. The second method is discussed, and the experimental results compared to theory

  8. Betatron phase advance measurement at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, P.L.; Pellegrin, J.L.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.

    1987-01-01

    There are many reasons to determine the betatron phase advance between two azimuthal positions in a circular accelerator or storage ring. The authors measured the betatron phase advance between various pairs of azimuthal points in the SPEAR Storage Ring by two different methods. The first method is to excite a steady state coherent betatron oscillation with a network analyzer. The second method is to excite a free coherent betatron oscillation with an impulse kick, and to digitally sample the transverse position of the beam at the pickup stations. The results of these digital samples are Fourier analyzed with a computer to obtain the phase advance. The second method is discussed, and the experimental results compared to theory

  9. Advanced Gouy phase high harmonics interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustary, M. H.; Laban, D. E.; Wood, J. B. O.; Palmer, A. J.; Holdsworth, J.; Litvinyuk, I. V.; Sang, R. T.

    2018-05-01

    We describe an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) interferometric technique that can resolve ∼100 zeptoseconds (10‑21 s) delay between high harmonic emissions from two successive sources separated spatially along the laser propagation in a single Gaussian beam focus. Several improvements on our earlier work have been implemented in the advanced interferometer. In this paper, we report on the design, characterization and optimization of the advanced Gouy phase interferometer. Temporal coherence for both atomic argon and molecular hydrogen gases has been observed for several harmonic orders. It has been shown that phase shift of XUV pulses mainly originates from the emission time delay due to the Gouy phase in the laser focus and the observed interference is independent of the generating medium. This interferometer can be a useful tool for measuring the relative phase shift between any two gas species and for studying ultrafast dynamics of their electronic and nuclear motion.

  10. Two pedigrees of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kohtoku; Mishima, Kazuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Ebisawa, Takashi; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2003-06-15

    To determine whether a known missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2 (a human homolog of the Drosophila period gene) for familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in a Caucasian family is involved in Japanese familial advanced sleep phase syndrome pedigrees. We identified 2 new Japanese families with advanced sleep phase syndrome, and a systematic survey was carried out in 28 relatives of theses 2 families. A total of 9 affected subjects were identified. The affected members showed significantly strong morningness tendencies compared with the unaffected members in various circadian parameters including the Horne-Ostberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire score (77.3 +/- 4.8 vs 57.5 +/- 7.6, p sleep-onset time (20:45 +/- 75 min vs 23:16 +/- 64 min, p DNA samples were obtained from 7 affected and 7 unaffected subjects. None of the tested subjects possessed the missense mutation (bp2106 A/G) in hPer2. Furthermore, there is no significant linkage between affected subjects with hPer2 region by 2-point mapping and by direct sequencing of 23 exons of hPer2. These findings support the notion of genetic heterogeneity of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases in humans. The search for more familial advanced sleep phase syndrome cases and for loci other than hPer2 are necessary to further examine the roles of circadian-related genes in genetically determined human circadian rhythm disorders.

  11. Computational advances in transition phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Kondo, S.; Tobita, Y.; Shirakawa, N.; Brear, D.J.; Fischer, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, historical perspective and recent advances are reviewed on computational technologies to evaluate a transition phase of core disruptive accidents in liquid-metal fast reactors. An analysis of the transition phase requires treatment of multi-phase multi-component thermohydraulics coupled with space- and energy-dependent neutron kinetics. Such a comprehensive modeling effort was initiated when the program of SIMMER-series computer code development was initiated in the late 1970s in the USA. Successful application of the latest SIMMER-II in USA, western Europe and Japan have proved its effectiveness, but, at the same time, several areas that require further research have been identified. Based on the experience and lessons learned during the SIMMER-II application through 1980s, a new project of SIMMER-III development is underway at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), Japan. The models and methods of SIMMER-III are briefly described with emphasis on recent advances in multi-phase multi-component fluid dynamics technologies and their expected implication on a future reliable transition phase analysis. (author)

  12. Fronto-Orbital Advancement and Total Calvarial Remodelling for Craniosynostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, E. U.; Aman, S.; Tammimy, M. S.; Ahmad, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the results of fronto-orbital advancement and remodelling for craniosynostosis in children. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Plastic Surgery, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from June 2009 to June 2012. Methodology: All the patients with cranial suture synostosis operated were included in the study. Those patients who were lost to follow-up were excluded. Variables considered were age, gender, type of synostosis, intracranial pressure, and history of previous surgeries for the same problem. Outcome measures were studied in terms of improvement of skull measurements (anteroposterior and bicoronal), duration of surgery, hospital stay, blood transfusions, complications and parents satisfaction. Results: A total of 36 patients were included in the study. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The age ranged from 5 to 54 months. Thirty two patients presented with non-syndromic and four with syndromic craniosynostosis. Fronto orbital advancement and total calvarial remodelling was done in 26 and 10 patients respectively. There was improvement in the skull measurements and the parents were satisfied in all cases with the skull shape. Complications occurred in 11.1% including chest and wound infection and one death. Conclusion: Fronto-orbital advancement and remodelling is an effective procedure for the correction of craniosynostosis, however, individual cases may require other procedures like total calvarial remodelling. (author)

  13. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro, E-mail: agatsuma@nikhef.nl [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beuzekom, Martin van; Schaaf, Laura van der [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Brand, Jo van den [National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-07-11

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO{sub 2} lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance. - Highlights: • The phase camera is being developed for a gravitational wave detector. • A scanner performance limits the operation speed and layout design of the system. • An operation range was found by measuring the frequency response of the scanner.

  14. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Beuzekom, Martin van; Schaaf, Laura van der; Brand, Jo van den

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser modulation/demodulation method is used to measure mirror displacements and used for the position controls. This plays a significant role because the quality of controls affect the noise level of the GW detector. The phase camera is able to monitor each sideband separately, which has a great benefit for the manipulation of the delicate controls. Also, overcoming mirror aberrations will be an essential part of Advanced Virgo (AdV), which is a GW detector close to Pisa. Especially low-frequency sidebands can be affected greatly by aberrations in one of the interferometer cavities. The phase cameras allow tracking such changes because the state of the sidebands gives information on mirror aberrations. A prototype of the phase camera has been developed and is currently tested. The performance checks are almost completed and the installation of the optics at the AdV site has started. After the installation and commissioning, the phase camera will be combined to a thermal compensation system that consists of CO 2 lasers and compensation plates. In this paper, we focus on the prototype and show some limitations from the scanner performance. - Highlights: • The phase camera is being developed for a gravitational wave detector. • A scanner performance limits the operation speed and layout design of the system. • An operation range was found by measuring the frequency response of the scanner.

  15. A solid-phase-radioimmunoassay for total serum thyroxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, G.; Sokolowski, G.

    1978-01-01

    A new solid phase radioimmunoassay for total serum thyroxine was evaluated over a longer time under clinical routine conditions and compared with an established test system. The results show up that the T 4 values are precise, reliable and reproducible, the is incomplicate to handle and well suitable for semiautomatic pipetting systems. (orig.) 891 MG [de

  16. Advanced Situation Awareness Technologies, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Situation Awareness Technologies (ASAT) will facilitate exploration of the moon surface, and other planetary bodies. ASAT will create an Advanced Situation...

  17. Independence and totalness of subspaces in phase space methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourdas, A.

    2018-04-01

    The concepts of independence and totalness of subspaces are introduced in the context of quasi-probability distributions in phase space, for quantum systems with finite-dimensional Hilbert space. It is shown that due to the non-distributivity of the lattice of subspaces, there are various levels of independence, from pairwise independence up to (full) independence. Pairwise totalness, totalness and other intermediate concepts are also introduced, which roughly express that the subspaces overlap strongly among themselves, and they cover the full Hilbert space. A duality between independence and totalness, that involves orthocomplementation (logical NOT operation), is discussed. Another approach to independence is also studied, using Rota's formalism on independent partitions of the Hilbert space. This is used to define informational independence, which is proved to be equivalent to independence. As an application, the pentagram (used in discussions on contextuality) is analysed using these concepts.

  18. Phase change thermal storage for a solar total energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R. E.; Cohen, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is being conducted on a one-tenth scale model of a high-temperature (584 K) phase-change thermal energy storage system for installation in a solar total energy test facility at Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A. The thermal storage medium is anhydrous sodium hydroxide with 8% sodium nitrate. The program will produce data on the dynamic response of the system to repeated cycles of charging and discharging simulating those of the test facility. Data will be correlated with a mathematical model which will then be used in the design of the full-scale system.

  19. Advanced Aqueous Phase Catalyst Development using Combinatorial Methods, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Combinatorial methods are proposed to develop advanced Aqueous Oxidation Catalysts (AOCs) with the capability to mineralize organic contaminants present in effluents...

  20. Advanced Mars Water Acquisition System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Mars Water Acquisition System (AMWAS) recovers and purifies water from Mars soils for oxygen and fuel production, life support, food production, and...

  1. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) reactor to efficiently extract oxygen from lunar regolith. Unlike state-of-the-art carbothermal...

  2. Advanced TCCS for Spacesuit Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent trade study showed that active removal of ammonia (NH3) and formaldehyde (CH2O) is crticial to meeting the 24-hr SMAC limits in the advanced space suit...

  3. Advanced Green Micropropulsion System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systima in collaboration with University of Washington is developing a high performance injection system for advanced green monopropellant AF-M315E micropropulsion...

  4. Advanced Green Micropropulsion System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systima in collaboration with the University of Washington will develop a high performance, advanced green monopropellant microthruster (0.1 – 1.0 N) for small- and...

  5. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, R. A.; Johnson, J.; Sabatella, J.; Sewall, T.

    1976-01-01

    The variable stream control engine is determined to be the most promising propulsion system concept for advanced supersonic cruise aircraft. This concept uses variable geometry components and a unique throttle schedule for independent control of two flow streams to provide low jet noise at takeoff and high performance at both subsonic and supersonic cruise. The advanced technology offers a 25% improvement in airplane range and an 8 decibel reduction in takeoff noise, relative to first generation supersonic turbojet engines.

  6. Optimization of the Phase Advance Between RHIC Interaction Points

    CERN Document Server

    Tomas, Rogelio

    2005-01-01

    We consider the scenario of having two identical Interaction Points (IPs) in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The strengths of beam-beam resonances strongly depend on the phase advance between these two IPs and therefore certain phase advances could improve beam lifetime and luminosity. We compute the dynamic aperture as function of the phase advance between these IPs to find the optimum settings. The beam-beam interaction is treated in the weak-strong approximation and a complete non-linear model of the lattice is used. For the current RHIC proton working point (0.69,0.685) the design lattice is found to have the optimum phase advance. However this is not the case for other working points.

  7. Traveling wave accelerating structures with a large phase advance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramonov, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    The cells RF parameters for the well known Disk Loaded Waveguide (DLW) are considered in higher pass bands of TM01 wave, providing operating phase advance between 180 o - 1230 o per cell. With an appropriate shape optimization and some additional elements proposed traveling wave structures with such large phase advance overlap the classical first band DLW in RF efficiency. Examples of proposed structures together with RF and dispersion properties are presented.

  8. Advanced Gearless Drivetrain - Phase I Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, Sandy; Smith, Jim; Petch, Derek; Sullivan, Brian; Smith, Peter; Pierce, Kirk

    2012-08-31

    Boulder Wind Power (BWP) collaborated with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the economics of scaling an advanced gearless drivetrain technology to 6MW (and larger) turbine applications. The project goal was to show that this advanced drivetrain technology enables a cost of energy of less than $0.10/kWH in offshore applications. This drivetrain technology achieves this Cost of Energy (COE) advantage via a 70% greater torque density versus current state-of-the-art drivetrain technologies. In addition, a new dynamically compliant design strategy is required to optimize turbine system-level COE. The BWP generator is uniquely suited for this new design strategy. This project developed a concept design for a 6MW drivetrain and culminated in a plan for a system-level test of this technology at 3MW scale. The project further demonstrated the advantage of the BWP drivetrain with increasing power ratings, with conceptual designs through 10 MW.

  9. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Installation characteristics for a Variable Stream Control Engine (VSCE) were studied for three advanced supersonic airplane designs. Sensitivity of the VSCE concept to change in technology projections was evaluated in terms of impact on overall installed performance. Based on these sensitivity results, critical technology requirements were reviewed, resulting in the reaffirmation of the following requirements: low-noise nozzle system; a high performance, low emissions duct burner and main burner; hot section technology; variable geometry components; and propulsion integration features, including an integrated electronic control system.

  10. Dynamics Assessment of Advanced Single-Phase PLL Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Monfarad, Mohammad; Freijedo, Francisco D.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several advanced phase locked loop (PLL) techniques have been proposed for single-phase applications. Among these, the Park-PLL, and the second order generalized integrator (SOGI) based PLL are very attractive, owing to their simple digital implementation, low computational burden...

  11. Advanced frequency synthesis by phase lock

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, William F

    2011-01-01

    "An addendum to the popular Frequency Synthesis by Phase Lock, 2nd ed, this book describes sigma-delta, a frequency synthesis technique that has gained prominence in recent years. In addition, Simulink will be employed extensively to guide the reader. Fractional-n, the still-used forerunner to sigma-delta, is also discussed. Sequences of simulated results allow the reader to gain a deeper understanding while detailed appendices provide information from various stages of development. Simulation models discussed in the chapters that are available online."--Provided by publisher.

  12. Digital polarization holography advancing geometrical phase optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sio, Luciano; Roberts, David E; Liao, Zhi; Nersisyan, Sarik; Uskova, Olena; Wickboldt, Lloyd; Tabiryan, Nelson; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-08-08

    Geometrical phase or the fourth generation (4G) optics enables realization of optical components (lenses, prisms, gratings, spiral phase plates, etc.) by patterning the optical axis orientation in the plane of thin anisotropic films. Such components exhibit near 100% diffraction efficiency over a broadband of wavelengths. The films are obtained by coating liquid crystalline (LC) materials over substrates with patterned alignment conditions. Photo-anisotropic materials are used for producing desired alignment conditions at the substrate surface. We present and discuss here an opportunity of producing the widest variety of "free-form" 4G optical components with arbitrary spatial patterns of the optical anisotropy axis orientation with the aid of a digital spatial light polarization converter (DSLPC). The DSLPC is based on a reflective, high resolution spatial light modulator (SLM) combined with an "ad hoc" optical setup. The most attractive feature of the use of a DSLPC for photoalignment of nanometer thin photo-anisotropic coatings is that the orientation of the alignment layer, and therefore of the fabricated LC or LC polymer (LCP) components can be specified on a pixel-by-pixel basis with high spatial resolution. By varying the optical magnification or de-magnification the spatial resolution of the photoaligned layer can be adjusted to an optimum for each application. With a simple "click" it is possible to record different optical components as well as arbitrary patterns ranging from lenses to invisible labels and other transparent labels that reveal different images depending on the side from which they are viewed.

  13. Total robotic radical rectal resection with da Vinci Xi system: single docking, single phase technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, Anup Sunil; Jatal, Sudhir; Saklani, Avanish

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to assess the advantages of Da Vinci Xi system in rectal cancer surgery. It also assesses the initial oncological outcomes after rectal resection with this system from a tertiary cancer center in India. Robotic rectal surgery has distinct advantages over laparoscopy. Total robotic resection is increasing following the evolution of hybrid technology. The latest Da Vinci Xi system (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, USA) is enabled with newer features to make total robotic resection possible with single docking and single phase. Thirty-six patients underwent total robotic resection in a single phase and single docking. We used newer port positions in a straight line. Median distance from the anal verge was 4.5 cm. Median robotic docking time and robotic procedure time were 9 and 280 min, respectively. Median blood loss was 100 mL. One patient needed conversion to an open approach due to advanced disease. Circumferential resection margin and longitudinal resection margins were uninvolved in all other patients. Median lymph node yield was 10. Median post-operative stay was 7 days. There were no intra-operative adverse events. The latest Da Vinci Xi system has made total robotic rectal surgery feasible in single docking and single phase. With the new system, four arm total robotic rectal surgery may replace the hybrid technique of laparoscopic and robotic surgery for rectal malignancies. The learning curve for the new system appears to be shorter than anticipated. Early perioperative and oncological outcomes of total robotic rectal surgery with the new system are promising. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Realizing total reciprocity violation in the phase for photon scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, László; Bottyán, László; Fülöp, Tamás; Merkel, Dániel Géza; Nagy, Dénes Lajos; Sajti, Szilárd; Schulze, Kai Sven; Spiering, Hartmut; Uschmann, Ingo; Wille, Hans-Christian

    2017-02-22

    Reciprocity is when wave or quantum scattering satisfies a symmetry property, connecting a scattering process with the reversed one. While reciprocity involves the interchange of source and detector, it is fundamentally different from rotational invariance, and is a generalization of time reversal invariance, occurring in absorptive media as well. Due to its presence at diverse areas of physics, it admits a wide variety of applications. For polarization dependent scatterings, reciprocity is often violated, but violation in the phase of the scattering amplitude is much harder to experimentally observe than violation in magnitude. Enabled by the advantageous properties of nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation, we have measured maximal, i.e., 180-degree, reciprocity violation in the phase. For accessing phase information, we introduced a new version of stroboscopic detection. The scattering setting was devised based on a generalized reciprocity theorem that opens the way to construct new types of reciprocity related devices.

  15. FreedomCAR Advanced Traction Drive Motor Development Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Josh (UQM Technologies, Inc.); Lutz, Jon (UQM Technologies, Inc.)

    2006-09-01

    The overall objective of this program is to design and develop an advanced traction motor that will meet the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) 2010 goals and the traction motor technical targets. The motor specifications are given in Section 1.3. Other goals of the program include providing a cost study to ensure the motor can be developed within the cost targets needed for the automotive industry. The program has focused on using materials that are both high performance and low costs such that the performance can be met and cost targets are achieved. In addition, the motor technologies and machine design features must be compatible with high volume manufacturing and able to provide high reliability, efficiency, and ruggedness while simultaneously reducing weight and volume. Weight and volume reduction will become a major factor in reducing cost, material cost being the most significant part of manufacturing cost at high volume. Many motor technology categories have been considered in the past and present for traction drive applications, including: brushed direct current (DC), PM (PM) brushless dc (BLDC), alternating current (AC) induction, switched reluctance and synchronous reluctance machines. Of these machine technologies, PM BLDC has consistently demonstrated an advantage in terms of power density and efficiency. As rare earth magnet cost has declined, total cost may also be reduced over the other technologies. Of the many different configurations of PM BLDC machines, those which incorporate power production utilizing both magnetic torque as well as reluctance torque appear to have the most promise for traction applications. There are many different PM BLDC machine configurations which employ both of these torque producing mechanisms; however, most would fall into one of two categories--some use weaker magnets and rely more heavily on reluctance torque (reluctance-dominant PM machines), others use strong PMs and supplement with reluctance torque

  16. Management of Advanced-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, Jerald P

    2016-05-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia represents the poster child of successful precision medicine in cancer, with amazing survival results achieved with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in many patients with chronic-phase disease. Unfortunately, however, this good news has not extended to patients in blast crisis, for whom survival has not clearly been improved with TKIs. During his presentation at the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, Jerald P. Radich, MD, briefly explored the biology behind advanced-stage disease and several of the molecular findings in disease progression. He also reviewed some of the therapeutic options in advanced disease, emphasizing that transplantation, although fraught with some difficulties, offers the best long-term prognosis for patients in blast crisis. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  17. Controlling total spot power from holographic laser by superimposing a binary phase grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Jian; Gan, Yu; Wu, Liying

    2011-04-25

    By superimposing a tunable binary phase grating with a conventional computer-generated hologram, the total power of multiple holographic 3D spots can be easily controlled by changing the phase depth of grating with high accuracy to a random power value for real-time optical manipulation without extra power loss. Simulation and experiment results indicate that a resolution of 0.002 can be achieved at a lower time cost for normalized total spot power.

  18. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behl Susanne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0 with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01, a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage in addition to response to thymostimulin, while an invasive HCC phenotype had no influence in the multivariate analysis. Thymostimulin could therefore be considered a safe and promising candidate for palliative treatment in a selected target population with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, in particular as component of a multimodal therapy concept. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29319366.

  19. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Van Gestel, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan w...

  20. Lunar phase does not influence perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Angermann, Alexander; Weber, Patrick; Wegener, Bernd; Pietschmann, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2012-02-29

    Lunar calendars, publishing recommendations for daily life, are gaining more and more attention in Germany, where 10.5% of the population believe in lunar effects on disease. A widespread and often heard belief is that a full moon has the most negative effects on surgical outcome. The present study evaluates the effects of lunar phase on perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective study with 305 patients being provided with a primary hip arthroplasty. To identify possible influences of the lunar phase on perioperative complications we investigated data such as operation length, blood loss and course of C-reactive protein that were collected during the patients' stay in the hospital and allocated them to moon illumination. There were no significant differences in all collected data concerning the lunar phase (p > 0.05). Although not statistically significant, there were fewer operations during the full moon phase. Therefore there is no evidence that lunar phase has an effect on perioperative complications in total hip arthroplasty. Fewer, though not significantly fewer, operations were performed during the full moon phase. Although this was not a prospective randomized trial, the statistical magnitude of the results does not support any recommendations for scheduling patients for total hip arthroplasty at any particular day of the lunar phase.

  1. Confirming the timing of phase-based costing in oncology studies: a case example in advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Michael; Coutinho, Anna D; Nunna, Sasikiran; Gupte-Singh, Komal; Eaddy, Michael

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of healthcare services and costs among patients with cancer is often estimated by the phase of care: initial, interim, or terminal. Although their durations are often set arbitrarily, we sought to establish data-driven phases of care using joinpoint regression in an advanced melanoma population as a case example. A retrospective claims database study was conducted to assess the costs of advanced melanoma from distant metastasis diagnosis to death during January 2010-September 2014. Joinpoint regression analysis was applied to identify the best-fitting points, where statistically significant changes in the trend of average monthly costs occurred. To identify the initial phase, average monthly costs were modeled from metastasis diagnosis to death; and were modeled backward from death to metastasis diagnosis for the terminal phase. Points of monthly cost trend inflection denoted ending and starting points. The months between represented the interim phase. A total of 1,671 patients with advanced melanoma who died met the eligibility criteria. Initial phase was identified as the 5-month period starting with diagnosis of metastasis, after which there was a sharp, significant decline in monthly cost trend (monthly percent change [MPC] = -13.0%; 95% CI = -16.9% to -8.8%). Terminal phase was defined as the 5-month period before death (MPC = -14.0%; 95% CI = -17.6% to -10.2%). The claims-based algorithm may under-estimate patients due to misclassifications, and may over-estimate terminal phase costs because hospital and emergency visits were used as a death proxy. Also, recently approved therapies were not included, which may under-estimate advanced melanoma costs. In this advanced melanoma population, optimal duration of the initial and terminal phases of care was 5 months immediately after diagnosis of metastasis and before death, respectively. Joinpoint regression can be used to provide data-supported phase of cancer care durations, but

  2. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for

  3. Phase Transitions in Definite Total Spin States of Two-Component Fermi Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir A

    2017-05-19

    Second-order phase transitions have no latent heat and are characterized by a change in symmetry. In addition to the conventional symmetric and antisymmetric states under permutations of bosons and fermions, mathematical group-representation theory allows for non-Abelian permutation symmetry. Such symmetry can be hidden in states with defined total spins of spinor gases, which can be formed in optical cavities. The present work shows that the symmetry reveals itself in spin-independent or coordinate-independent properties of these gases, namely as non-Abelian entropy in thermodynamic properties. In weakly interacting Fermi gases, two phases appear associated with fermionic and non-Abelian symmetry under permutations of particle states, respectively. The second-order transitions between the phases are characterized by discontinuities in specific heat. Unlike other phase transitions, the present ones are not caused by interactions and can appear even in ideal gases. Similar effects in Bose gases and strong interactions are discussed.

  4. Spatio-Temporal Variability of the Phase of Total Ozone Quasi-Decennial Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visheratin, K. N.

    2017-12-01

    The SBUV/SBUV2 (65° S-65° N) and Bodeker Scientific (90° S-90° N) satellite databases have been used for composite and cross-wavelet analyses of the spatio-temporal variability of phase relations between a 11-year cycle of solar activity (SA) and quasi-decennial oscillations (QDOs) of total ozone content (TOC). For globally average TOC values, the QDO maxima coincide in phase with the solar-activity maxima, and amplitude variations of TOC correlate with those of the 11-year solar cycle. According to the analysis of amplitude and phase of QDOs for the zonal average TOC fields, a QDO amplitude is about 6-7 Dobson Units (DU) in the high northern and southern latitudes, and it does not exceed 2-3 DU in the tropic regions. The latitudinal TOC variations are distinguished by a delay of the quasi-decennial oscillation phase in the southern latitudes in comparison with the northern latitudes. The TOC maxima phase coincides with the SA maxima phase in the tropic regions; the TOC variations go ahead of the SA variations, on average, in moderate and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere; the TOC variations are behind the SA variations in the Southern Hemisphere. The phase delay between TOC QDO maxima in the northern and southern latitudes appears to increase in the course of time, and the TOC quasi-decennial variations in the Arctic and Antarctic subpolar regions occur approximately in an antiphase over the last two decades.

  5. Mixed phase clouds: observations and theoretical advances (overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Alexei

    2013-04-01

    Mixed phase clouds play important role in precipitation formation and radiation budget of the Earth. The microphysical measurements in mixed phase clouds are notoriously difficult due to many technical challenges. The airborne instrumentation for characterization of the microstructure of mixed phase clouds is discussed. The results multiyear airborne observations and measurements of frequency of occurrence of mixed phase, characteristic spatial scales, humidity in mixed phase and ice clouds are presented. A theoretical framework describing the thermodynamics and phase transformation of a three phase component system consisting of ice particles, liquid droplets and water vapor is discussed. It is shown that the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process plays different role in clouds with different dynamics. The problem of maintenance and longevity of mixed phase clouds is discussed.

  6. Engineered Materials for Advanced Gas Turbine Engine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop innovative composite powders and composites that will surpass the properties of currently identified materials for advanced gas turbine...

  7. Advanced Technology MEMS-based Acoustic Array, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Interdisciplinary Consulting Corporation proposes a technological advancement of current state-of-the-art acoustic energy harvester for harsh environment...

  8. Advanced Wastewater Photo-oxidation System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pioneer Astronautics proposes an advanced photocatalytic oxidation reactor for enhancing the reliability and performance of Water Recovery Post Processing systems...

  9. Risk factors for early complications after laparoscopic total mesorectal excision for locally advanced rectal cancer: A single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liye Liu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Aged patients, large tumor, lower tumor location and conversion were risk factors in performing laparoscopic TME for locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with these characteristics should be carefully considered before undergoing laparoscopic total mesorectal excision.

  10. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the NASA solicitation Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9-01, "Long Term Cryogenic...

  11. Modular Advanced Networked Telerobotic Interface System (MANTIS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With the goal to reduce astronaut time required to operate experiments on the ISS and advance automated and telerobotic technology, TUI proposes to collaborate with...

  12. Advanced Gas Sensing Technology for Space Suits, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced space suits require lightweight, low-power, durable sensors for monitoring critical life support materials. No current compact sensors have the tolerance...

  13. Advanced Onboard Energy Storage Solution for Balloons, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Balloon Programs at NASA are looking for a potential 100 day missions at mid-altitudes. These balloons would be powered by solar panels to take advantage of...

  14. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a safe, highly-reliable, low-cost and uniquely versatile propulsion...

  15. High Performance Thrusters for Advanced Green Monopropellants, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of an advanced green monopropellant propulsion system could have significant benefits to a wide range of NASA space missions, from deep space...

  16. Advanced On Board Inert Gas Generation System (OBBIGS), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Valcor Engineering Corporation proposes to develop an advanced On Board Inert Gas Generation System, OBIGGS, for aircraft fuel tank inerting to prevent hazardous...

  17. Advanced 3D Object Identification System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optra will build an Advanced 3D Object Identification System utilizing three or more high resolution imagers spaced around a launch platform. Data from each imager...

  18. The Vulcan Advanced Hybrid Manufacturing System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Made In Space is developing the The Vulcan Advanced Hybrid Manufacturing System (VULCAN) to address NASA's requirement to produce high-strength, high-precision...

  19. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a highly-reliable, low-cost and...

  20. Total soluble and endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Berrie; Hoskin, Teagan; Ashcroft, Anna; Burgess, Laura; Keenan, Jacqueline I; Falvey, James; Gearry, Richard B; Day, Andrew S

    2014-06-01

    Recruitment and activation of neutrophils, with release of specific proteins such as S100 proteins, is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Soluble forms of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE), and variants such as endogenous secretory (esRAGE), can act as decoy receptors by binding ligands, including S100A12. The aims of this study were to determine total sRAGE and esRAGE concentrations in patients with IBD and correlate these with C-reactive protein (CRP), endoscopic scores and clinical disease activity scores. EDTA-plasma was collected from patients undergoing colonoscopy including those with Crohn's disease (CD: n=125), ulcerative colitis (UC: n=79) and control patients without endoscopic signs of inflammation (non-IBD: n=156). Concentrations of sRAGE and esRAGE were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and plasma CRP concentrations measured. Standard clinical disease activity and endoscopic severity scores were defined for all subjects. Plasma sRAGE concentrations were lower in UC (but not CD) than non-IBD subjects (pdefine the significance of sRAGE and esRAGE in IBD. Copyright © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  2. Advanced Filtering Techniques Applied to Spaceflight, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IST-Rolla developed two nonlinear filters for spacecraft orbit determination during the Phase I contract. The theta-D filter and the cost based filter, CBF, were...

  3. Advanced Technology Cloud Particle Probe for UAS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II SPEC will design, fabricate and flight test a state-of-the-art combined cloud particle probe called the Hawkeye. Hawkeye is the culmination of two...

  4. Space-Ready Advanced Imaging System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase II effort Toyon will increase the state-of-the-art for video/image systems. This will include digital image compression algorithms as well as system...

  5. A Nanodroplet Processor for Advanced Microencapsulated Drug Formulations, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During this Phase II program we propose to build on the key aspects of the nanodroplet encapsulation technology to demonstrate optimized formulation and...

  6. Recent Advances on Neuromorphic Systems Using Phase-Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Shu-Ren; Wen, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Realization of brain-like computer has always been human's ultimate dream. Today, the possibility of having this dream come true has been significantly boosted due to the advent of several emerging non-volatile memory devices. Within these innovative technologies, phase-change memory device has been commonly regarded as the most promising candidate to imitate the biological brain, owing to its excellent scalability, fast switching speed, and low energy consumption. In this context, a detailed review concerning the physical principles of the neuromorphic circuit using phase-change materials as well as a comprehensive introduction of the currently available phase-change neuromorphic prototypes becomes imperative for scientists to continuously progress the technology of artificial neural networks. In this paper, we first present the biological mechanism of human brain, followed by a brief discussion about physical properties of phase-change materials that recently receive a widespread application on non-volatile memory field. We then survey recent research on different types of neuromorphic circuits using phase-change materials in terms of their respective geometrical architecture and physical schemes to reproduce the biological events of human brain, in particular for spike-time-dependent plasticity. The relevant virtues and limitations of these devices are also evaluated. Finally, the future prospect of the neuromorphic circuit based on phase-change technologies is envisioned.

  7. Recent Advances on Neuromorphic Systems Using Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Shu-Ren; Wen, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Realization of brain-like computer has always been human's ultimate dream. Today, the possibility of having this dream come true has been significantly boosted due to the advent of several emerging non-volatile memory devices. Within these innovative technologies, phase-change memory device has been commonly regarded as the most promising candidate to imitate the biological brain, owing to its excellent scalability, fast switching speed, and low energy consumption. In this context, a detailed review concerning the physical principles of the neuromorphic circuit using phase-change materials as well as a comprehensive introduction of the currently available phase-change neuromorphic prototypes becomes imperative for scientists to continuously progress the technology of artificial neural networks. In this paper, we first present the biological mechanism of human brain, followed by a brief discussion about physical properties of phase-change materials that recently receive a widespread application on non-volatile memory field. We then survey recent research on different types of neuromorphic circuits using phase-change materials in terms of their respective geometrical architecture and physical schemes to reproduce the biological events of human brain, in particular for spike-time-dependent plasticity. The relevant virtues and limitations of these devices are also evaluated. Finally, the future prospect of the neuromorphic circuit based on phase-change technologies is envisioned.

  8. Laser induced ultrasonic phased array using full matrix capture data acquisition and total focusing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratoudaki, Theodosia; Clark, Matt; Wilcox, Paul D

    2016-09-19

    Laser ultrasonics is a technique where lasers are employed to generate and detect ultrasound. A data collection method (full matrix capture) and a post processing imaging algorithm, the total focusing method, both developed for ultrasonic arrays, are modified and used in order to enhance the capabilities of laser ultrasonics for nondestructive testing by improving defect detectability and increasing spatial resolution. In this way, a laser induced ultrasonic phased array is synthesized. A model is developed and compared with experimental results from aluminum samples with side drilled holes and slots at depths of 5 - 20 mm from the surface.

  9. A phase III study of adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, K.-H.; Chang, Y.-C.; Guo, W.-Y.; Leung, M.-J.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Chen, S.-Y; Wang, L.-W.; Lai, Y.-L.; Hsu, M.-M.; Lian, S.-L.; Chang, C.-H.; Liu, T.-W.; Chin, Y.-H.; Yen, S.-H.; Perng, C.-H.; Chen, Kuang Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients, we conducted a randomized Phase III trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy to RT alone in patients with advanced NPC. Methods and Materials: Between November 1994 and March 1999, 157 patients with Stage IV, M 0 (UICC/AJCC, 1992) advanced NPC disease were randomized to receive standard radiotherapy, as follows: 35-40 fractions, 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction/day, 5 days/week, to a total dose 70-72 Gy with or without 9 weekly cycles of 24-h infusional chemotherapy (20 mg/m 2 cisplatin, 2,200 mg/m 2 5-fluorouracil, and 120 mg/m 2 leucovorin) after RT. Of 157 patients enrolled, 154 (77 radiotherapy, 77 combined therapy) were evaluable for survival and toxicity analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 49.5 months, the 5-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rates were 60.5% vs. 54.5% (p = 0.5) and 49.5% vs. 54.4% (p = 0.38) for the radiotherapy-alone group and the combined radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy group, respectively. The Cox regression showed that the hazard rates ratio of combined treatment to RT alone was 0.673 (p value = 0.232); the 95% confidence interval was 0.352 and 1.288, respectively. Patients who received combined treatment had a lower systemic relapse rate than radiotherapy-alone patients, according to relapse pattern analysis. The incidence of leukopenia (≥ Grade 3) occurred in 17 out of 819 (2.1%) cycles of weekly chemotherapy. No patient developed moderate to severe mucositis (≥ Grade 3). Conclusions: We conclude that adjuvant chemotherapy after RT for patients with advanced NPC has no benefit for overall survival or relapse-free survival

  10. Advanced materials for future Phase II LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Dallocchio, A; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Artoos, K

    2009-01-01

    Phase I collimators, equipped with Carbon-Carbon jaws, effectively met specifications for the early phase of LHC operation. However, the choice of carbon-based materials is expected to limit the nominal beam intensity mainly because of the high RF impedance and limited efficiency of the collimators. Moreover, C/C may be degraded by high radiation doses. To overcome these limitations, new Phase II secondary collimators will complement the existing system. Their extremely challenging requirements impose a thorough material investigation effort aiming at identifying novel materials combining very diverse properties. Relevant figures of merit have been identified to classify materials: Metal-diamonds composites look a promising choice as they combine good thermal, structural and stability properties. Molybdenum is interesting for its good thermal stability. Ceramics with non-conventional RF performances are also being evaluated. The challenges posed by the development and industrialization of these materials are ...

  11. The relationship between bioelectrical impedance phase angle and subjective global assessment in advanced colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Digant; Lis, Christopher G; Dahlk, Sadie L; King, Jessica; Vashi, Pankaj G; Grutsch, James F; Lammersfeld, Carolyn A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA) derived phase angle is increasingly being used as an objective indicator of nutritional status in advanced cancer. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) is a subjective method of nutritional status. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between BIA derived phase angle and SGA in advanced colorectal cancer. Methods We evaluated a case series of 73 stages III and IV colorectal cancer patients. Patients were classified as ei...

  12. The effect of phase advance errors between interaction points on beam halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.; Irwin, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Phase advance errors between interaction points (IP) break the symmetry of multi-IP colliders. This symmetry breaking introduces new, lower order resonances which may chance the halo from the beam-beam interaction dramatically. In this paper, the mechanism of introducing new resonances is discussed. Simulation results showing the changes due to phase advance errors are presented. Simulation results are compared with experimental measurements at VEPP-2M

  13. Advanced worker protection system. Topical report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, J.

    1995-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system, maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles.

  14. Three-phase bone scan pattern in asymptomatic uncemented total knee arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubello, D. [Nuclear Medicine-PET Center, General Hospital of Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Caricasulo, D. [Orthopaedics Dept., General Hospital of Bassano del Grappa (Italy); Borsato, N. [Nuclear Medicine-PET Center, General Hospital of Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Chierichetti, F. [Nuclear Medicine-PET Center, General Hospital of Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Zanco, P. [Nuclear Medicine-PET Center, General Hospital of Castelfranco Veneto (Italy); Ferlin, G. [Nuclear Medicine-PET Center, General Hospital of Castelfranco Veneto (Italy)

    1996-10-01

    In this study we investigated the bone scan pattern in a homogeneous group of asymptomatic patients implanted with the same type of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Twenty-nine patients (21 females, 8 males, mean age 62 years), with a total of 30 uncemented Hofmann TKAs, were entered in the study. The time interval from surgery to scintigraphic evaluation ranged from 2 to 4 years. Bone scan was performed using the three-phase technique and images were interpreted by visual analysis using a three-point scale for the dynamic and blood pool phases and a five-point scale for the bone phase. Areas of increased periprosthetic technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake were observed until 4 years after surgery. However, comparing the TKAs implanted 2, 3 and 4 years previously, a decreasing pattern in tracer uptake intensity was noted this being more evident in the femoral and lateral tibial components. In some cases, a persistently elevated tracer uptake, not exceeding a moderate grade, was found in the medial tibial component. In conclusion, increased periprosthetic {sup 99m}TC-MDP uptake is a common finding in asymptomatic uncemented Hofmann TKAs for a prolonged period after surgery, but the uptake intensity is generally mild or moderate and shows a characteristic decreasing pattern over time. Furthermore, in contrast with other types of asymptomatic knee implants previously investigated, no case of high or very high bone uptake was recorded with this type of implant. We may speculate that scintigraphic parameters of normality, and pathology, should be determined for each type of TKA. It is likely that, with the uncemented Hofmann TKA, a high or very high tracer uptake or a progressive increase in the uptake intensity is suggestive of the presence of complications. (orig.)

  15. Three-phase bone scan pattern in asymptomatic uncemented total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubello, D.; Caricasulo, D.; Borsato, N.; Chierichetti, F.; Zanco, P.; Ferlin, G.

    1996-01-01

    In this study we investigated the bone scan pattern in a homogeneous group of asymptomatic patients implanted with the same type of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Twenty-nine patients (21 females, 8 males, mean age 62 years), with a total of 30 uncemented Hofmann TKAs, were entered in the study. The time interval from surgery to scintigraphic evaluation ranged from 2 to 4 years. Bone scan was performed using the three-phase technique and images were interpreted by visual analysis using a three-point scale for the dynamic and blood pool phases and a five-point scale for the bone phase. Areas of increased periprosthetic technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake were observed until 4 years after surgery. However, comparing the TKAs implanted 2, 3 and 4 years previously, a decreasing pattern in tracer uptake intensity was noted this being more evident in the femoral and lateral tibial components. In some cases, a persistently elevated tracer uptake, not exceeding a moderate grade, was found in the medial tibial component. In conclusion, increased periprosthetic 99m TC-MDP uptake is a common finding in asymptomatic uncemented Hofmann TKAs for a prolonged period after surgery, but the uptake intensity is generally mild or moderate and shows a characteristic decreasing pattern over time. Furthermore, in contrast with other types of asymptomatic knee implants previously investigated, no case of high or very high bone uptake was recorded with this type of implant. We may speculate that scintigraphic parameters of normality, and pathology, should be determined for each type of TKA. It is likely that, with the uncemented Hofmann TKA, a high or very high tracer uptake or a progressive increase in the uptake intensity is suggestive of the presence of complications. (orig.)

  16. The advanced launch system: Application of total quality management principles to low-cost space transportation system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, M. G.; Rothwell, T. G.; Rosenberg, D. A.; Oliver, M. B.

    Recognizing that a major inhibitor of man's rapid expansion of the use of space is the high cost (direct and induced) of space transportation, the U.S. has embarked on a major national program to radically reduce the cost of placing payloads into orbit while, at the same time, making equally radical improvements inlaunch system operability. The program is entitled "The Advanced Launch System" (ALS) and is a joint Department of Defense/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (DoD/NASA) program which will provide launch capability in the post 2000 timeframe. It is currently in Phase II (System Definition), which began in January 1989, and will serve as a major source of U.S. launch system technology over the next several years. The ALS is characterized by a new approach to space system design, development, and operation. The practices that are being implemented by the ALS are expected to affect the management and technical operation of all future launch systems. In this regard, the two most significant initiatives being implemented on the ALS program are the practices of Total Quality Management (TQM) and the Unified Information System (Unis). TQM is a DoD initiative to improve the quality of the DoD acquisition system, contractor management systems, and the technical disciplines associated with the design, development, and operation of major systems. TQM has been mandated for all new programs and affects the way every group within the system currently does business. In order to implement the practices of TQM, new methods are needed. A program on the scale of the ALS generates vast amounts of information which must be used effectively to make sound decisions. Unis is an information network that will connect all ALS participants throughout all phases of the ALS development. Unis is providing support for project management and system design, and in following phases will provide decision support for launch operations, computer integrated manufacturing, automated

  17. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R.

    1997-01-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques

  18. Recent advances in two-phase flow numerics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Macian, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The authors review three topics in the broad field of numerical methods that may be of interest to individuals modeling two-phase flow in nuclear power plants. The first topic is iterative solution of linear equations created during the solution of finite volume equations. The second is numerical tracking of macroscopic liquid interfaces. The final area surveyed is the use of higher spatial difference techniques.

  19. Advanced Pumps and Cold Plates for Two-Phase Cooling Loops, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced instruments used for earth science missions require improved cooling systems to remove heat from high power electronic components and maintain tight...

  20. Clinical factors of response in patients with advanced ovarian cancer participating in early phase clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Angela; Kristeleit, Rebecca; Rafii, Saeed; Michie, Caroline O; Bowen, Rebecca; Michalarea, Vasiliki; van Hagen, Tom; Wong, Mabel; Rallis, Grigorios; Molife, L Rhoda; Lopez, Juanita; Banerji, Udai; Banerjee, Susana N; Gore, Martin E; de Bono, Johann S; Kaye, Stan B; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-05-01

    Drug resistance to conventional anticancer therapies is almost inevitable in patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC), limiting their available treatment options. Novel phase I trial therapies within a dedicated drug development unit may represent a viable alternative; however, there is currently little evidence for patient outcomes in such patients. To address this, we undertook a retrospective review of patients with AOC allocated to phase I trials in the Drug Development Unit at Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) between June 1998 and October 2010. A total of 200 AOC patients with progressive disease were allocated to ≥1 trial each, with a total of 281 allocations. Of these, 135 (68%) patients commenced ≥1 trial (mean 1.4 [1-8]), totaling 216 allocated trials; 65 (32%) patients did not start due to deterioration resulting from rapidly progressive disease (63 patients) or patient choice (2 patients). Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) complete/partial responses (CR/PR) were observed in 43 (20%) of those starting trials, including those on poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (18/79 [23%]), antiangiogenics (9/65 [14%]) and chemotherapy combinations (14/43 [33%]). Factors associated with CR/PR included: fewer prior treatments, platinum-sensitive disease, CR/PR with prior therapy, (the United States-based) Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status score, fewer metastatic sites, higher albumin and haemoglobin levels, lower white cell counts and baseline CA125 levels, germline BRCA1/2 mutations and better RMH Prognostic Score. Mean survival was 32° months for patients who achieved CR/PR. Treatments were generally well tolerated. Most patients with AOC (134/200 [67%]) received ≥1 subsequent line of therapy after phase I trials. Our data suggest that phase I trial referrals should be considered earlier in the AOC treatment pathway and before the onset of rapid disease progression particularly with the emergence of

  1. The relationship between bioelectrical impedance phase angle and subjective global assessment in advanced colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grutsch James F

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioelectrical Impedance (BIA derived phase angle is increasingly being used as an objective indicator of nutritional status in advanced cancer. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA is a subjective method of nutritional status. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between BIA derived phase angle and SGA in advanced colorectal cancer. Methods We evaluated a case series of 73 stages III and IV colorectal cancer patients. Patients were classified as either well-nourished or malnourished using the SGA. BIA was conducted on all patients and phase angle was calculated. The correlation between phase angle and SGA was studied using Spearman correlation coefficient. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to determine the optimal cut-off levels of phase angle. Results Well-nourished patients had a statistically significantly higher (p = 0.005 median phase angle score (6.12 as compared to those who were malnourished (5.18. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient between phase angle and SGA was found to be 0.33 (p = 0.004, suggesting better nutritional status with higher phase angle scores. A phase angle cut-off of 5.2 was 51.7% sensitive and 79.5% specific whereas a cut-off of 6.0 was 82.8% sensitive and 54.5% specific in detecting malnutrition. Interestingly, a phase angle cut-off of 5.9 demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy in males who had failed primary treatment for advanced colorectal cancer. Conclusion Our study suggests that bioimpedance phase angle is a potential nutritional indicator in advanced colorectal cancer. Further research is needed to elucidate the optimal cut-off levels of phase angle that can be incorporated into the oncology clinic for better nutritional evaluation and management.

  2. A Phase I study of bizelesin (NSC 615291) in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitot, Henry C; Reid, Joel M; Sloan, Jeff A; Ames, Matthew M; Adjei, Alex A; Rubin, Joseph; Bagniewski, Pamela G; Atherton, Pamela; Rayson, Daniel; Goldberg, Richard M; Erlichman, Charles

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate the toxicities, characterize the pharmacokinetics, and determine the maximum-tolerated dose of bizelesin administered once every 4 weeks. Patients with advanced solid tumors received escalating doses of bizelesin as an i.v. push every 4 weeks. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed with the first treatment cycle. Nineteen eligible patients received a total of 54 courses of bizelesin at doses ranging from 0.1 to 1 microg/m(2). Dose-limiting toxicity of neutropenia was seen in 2 of 4 patients treated at the 1 microg/m(2) dose level. Nonhematological toxicity was generally mild with maximum toxicity being Phase II dose. The area under the concentration time curve increased in proportion to administered dose, and the clearance remained constant over the dose range studied. Correlation analysis demonstrated relationships between dose and area under the concentration with cycle 1 hematological parameters, including absolute neutrophil and leukocyte nadirs. Bizelesin administered every 4 weeks as an i.v. push is well tolerated with dose-limiting toxicity of neutropenia. The maximum-tolerated dose (and recommended Phase II dose) is 0.8 microg/m(2) administered once every 4 weeks.

  3. Advanced computational model for three-phase slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the

  4. Phase 1 Development Testing of the Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Nicholas L.; Eddleman, David E.; Calvert, Marty R.; Bullard, David B.; Martin, Michael A.; Wall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Development Breadboard Engine (BBE) is a pressure-fed liquid oxygen/pump-fed liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) expander cycle engine that was built and operated by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's East Test Area. The breadboard engine was conceived as a technology demonstrator for the additive manufacturing technologies for an advanced upper stage prototype engine. The components tested on the breadboard engine included an ablative chamber, injector, main fuel valve, turbine bypass valve, a main oxidizer valve, a mixer and the fuel turbopump. All parts minus the ablative chamber were additively manufactured. The BBE was successfully hot fire tested seven times. Data collected from the test series will be used for follow on demonstration tests with a liquid oxygen turbopump and a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle.

  5. Recent Developments in Solid-Phase Extraction for Near and Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian W. Huck

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A review with more than 100 references on the principles and recent developments in the solid-phase extraction (SPE prior and for in situ near and attenuated total reflection (ATR infrared spectroscopic analysis is presented. New materials, chromatographic modalities, experimental setups and configurations are described. Their advantages for fast sample preparation for distinct classes of compounds containing different functional groups in order to enhance selectivity and sensitivity are discussed and compared. This is the first review highlighting both the fundamentals of SPE, near and ATR spectroscopy with a view to real sample applicability and routine analysis. Most of real sample analyses examples are found in environmental research, followed by food- and bioanalysis. In this contribution a comprehensive overview of the most potent SPE-NIR and SPE-ATR approaches is summarized and provided.

  6. Relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculation of total muon capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Paar, N.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2009-01-01

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from 12 C to 244 Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the pn-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the pn-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value g A =1.262 by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  7. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  8. Development and evaluation of a magnetic solid-phase radioimmunoassay for total human thyroxine (T4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, S. H.; Hassan, A. M. E.; Abdalla, O. M.; Zahran, A. B.; Shabbo, N. M.; Ali, N. I.; Gubara, A.

    2009-02-01

    In this study a simple and rapid magnetic solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) for human thyroxine (T4) was developed using locally raised sheep thyroxine antibody and radioiodinated thyroxine (T4) tracer by chloramine-T method. The assay involves two hours incubation at ambient temperature rang (30 to 35 o C ) associated with the antibody covalently linked by the easily performed carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) method to magnetic particles obtained from SIPAC. 0.1% triton with sodium azide used as a wash buffer. L-Thyroxine Na-salt peta hydrate from sigma was used for the preparation of standards and quality control sera. The coupled magnetic anti-T4 solid phase titrated in order to find out the suitable antibody concentration (titre) to be used in the assay. Optimizations followed by validation procedures were done. When correlated with kits imported from NETRIA and AMERSHAM, results were found to be highly comparable r=0.965 and p<0.05. Shelf life was also studied, so that the local prepared T4 RIA magnetic reagents can be used for the measurement of total human thyroxine with a very low cost compared to imported kits. (Author)

  9. Advanced computational model for three-phase slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2000-11-01

    In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and

  10. Advanced nonlinear control of three phase series active power filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouelmahjoub Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of controlling three-phase series active power filter (TPSAPF is addressed in this paper in presence of the perturbations in the voltages of the electrical supply network. The control objective of the TPSAPF is twofold: (i compensation of all voltage perturbations (voltage harmonics, voltage unbalance and voltage sags, (ii regulation of the DC bus voltage of the inverter. A controller formed by two nonlinear regulators is designed, using the Backstepping technique, to provide the above compensation. The regulation of the DC bus voltage of the inverter is ensured by the use of a diode bridge rectifier which its output is in parallel with the DC bus capacitor. The Analysis of controller performances is illustrated by numerical simulation in Matlab/Simulink environment.

  11. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2004-01-01

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established

  12. Total soluble and endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in IBD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Berrie; Hoskin, Teagan; Ashcroft, Anna; Burgess, Laura; Keenan, Jacqueline I.; Falvey, James; Gearry, Richard B.; Day, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment and activation of neutrophils, with release of specific proteins such as S100 proteins, is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Soluble forms of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (sRAGE), and variants such as endogenous secretory (esRAGE), can act as decoy

  13. A multicenter phase II study of carboplatin in advanced ovarian carcinoma: final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjorstad, K; Harris, A; Bertelsen, K; Slevin, M; Schultz, H; Hellman, K; Janssens, N; Martin, A; Canetta, R

    1992-03-01

    A phase II trial of single-agent carboplatin in advanced ovarian cancer was performed by 19 institutions from 10 European countries. A total of 260 patients were treated, with a median age of 55 (range: 20-79) years. Karnofsky performance status was 80-100 in about two-thirds of the patients. Prior therapy consisted of surgery only in 31 patients, irradiation in 9, chemotherapy without cisplatin in 45, and with cisplatin in 175. Carboplatin was administered as second-line therapy in about one-half and as third-line or more in one additional third of the study population. Initial dose was 400 mg/m2 in 90, 360 mg/m2 in 152, and 320 mg/m2 or less in 18 patients. A total of 971 courses (mean 3.7, median 2, range: 1-13) of therapy were administered. A total of 16 complete and 46 partial responses were observed in 226 evaluable patients, for an objective response rate of 27%. Efficacy was greater in chemotherapy-untreated patients (51% vs. 23%, p = 0.002). In cisplatin-pretreated patients activity was significantly higher in non-refractory patients (26% vs. 4%, p = 0.015). Myelosuppression was the most significant side effect. However, low hematologic counts seldom translated into clinically significant complications. Patients with impaired baseline creatinine clearance and poor performance status were at higher risk of developing severe myelosuppression during the initial course of treatment. Non hematologic side effects were rare and mild, except for emesis. Carboplatin has a definite role in the treatment of ovarian cancer, but almost complete cross-resistance with the parent compound was observed clinically.

  14. Potential mechanisms of disease progression and management of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Cortés, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in treatment of Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP), advanced stages of CML, accelerated phase or blast crisis, remain notoriously difficult to treat. Treatments that are highly effective against CML-CP produce disappointing results against advanced disease. Therefore, a primary goal of therapy should be to maintain patients in CP for as long as possible, by (1) striving for deep, early molecular response to treatment; (2) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors that lower risk of disease progression; and (3) more closely observing patients who demonstrate cytogenetic risk factors at diagnosis or during treatment. PMID:24050507

  15. First-in-Class, First-in-Human Phase I Study of Selinexor, a Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Razak, Albiruni R; Mau-Sørensen, Morten; Gabrail, Nashat Y

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This trial evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of selinexor (KPT-330), a novel, oral small-molecule inhibitor of exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1), and determined the recommended phase II dose. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In total, 189 patients with advanced solid tumors...

  16. Higher complication risk of totally implantable venous access port systems in patients with advanced cancer - a single institution retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Fang; Lo, An-Chi; Tsai, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Pei-Yi; Sun, Shen; Chang, Te-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Chang, Yuan-Shin; Chen, Jen-Ruei

    2013-02-01

    Totally implantable port systems are generally recommended for prolonged central venous access in diverse settings, but their risk of complications remains unclear for patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of port system failure in patients with advanced cancer. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a comprehensive cancer centre. A detailed chart review was conducted among 566 patients with 573 ports inserted during January-June, 2009 (average 345.3 catheter-days). Cox regression analysis was applied to evaluate factors during insertion and early maintenance that could lead to premature removal of the port systems due to infection or occlusion. Port system-related infection was significantly associated with receiving palliative care immediately after implantation (hazard ratio, HR = 7.3, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 1.2-46.0), after adjusting for probable confounders. Primary cancer site also impacted the occurrence of device-related infection. Receiving oncologic/palliative care (HR = 3.0, P = 0.064), advanced cancer stage (HR = 6.5, P = 0.077) and body surface area above 1.71 m(2) (HR = 3.4, P = 0.029) increased the risk of port system occlusion. Our study indicates that totally implantable port systems yield a higher risk of complications in terminally ill patients. Further investigation should be carefully conducted to compare outcomes of various central venous access devices in patients with advanced cancer and to develop preventive strategies against catheter failure.

  17. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  18. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [' Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  19. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caravatta, Luciana; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Macchia, Gabriella; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Rossi, Marco; Flocco, Mariano; Scapati, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of ≤3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  20. Advanced induction machine model in phase coordinates for wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajardo, L.A.; Iov, F.; Hansen, Anca Daniela

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an advanced phase coordinates squirrel cage induction machine model with time varying electrical parameters affected by magnetic saturation and rotor deep bar effects, is presented. The model uses standard data sheet for characterization of the electrical parameters, it is developed...

  1. Phase I study of 4-demethoxydaunorubicin by oral route in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Andersen, E; Elbaek, K

    1988-01-01

    In a phase I trial 4-demethoxydaunorubicin (4-dm DNR) was administered as oral capsules once a week to 51 adults with advanced mainly gastrointestinal solid tumors. No fatal toxicity was observed at doses up to 25.0 mg/m2. Dose-limiting granulocytopenia and non-hematologic toxicity developed...

  2. Advancement and Application of Multi-Phase CFD Modeling to High Speed Supercavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    October 2008 - December 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advancement and Application of Multi-Phase CFD Modeling to High Speed Supercavitating Flows...influence cavity hysteresis behavior. These observations are used to guide improved supercavitating -vehicle analyses including numerical predictions...experiments, and modeling 15. SUBJECT TERMS supercavitation , computational fluid dynamics, multiphase flow 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  3. Clinical application of immune-enhanced enteral nutrition in patients with advanced gastric cancer after total gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Ling, Wei; Shen, Zhi Yong; Jin, Xin; Cao, Hui

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether immune-enhanced enteral nutrition (EN) was effective on nutritional status, immune function, surgical outcomes and days of hospitalization after total gastrectomy for patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). From August 2005 to May 2011, 78 patients with AGC who underwent a total gastrectomy were enrolled and divided randomly into three groups: immune-enhanced EN (EN + glutamine [Gln]) group, standard EN group and control group. Serum parameters including total protein, albumin, proalbumin and transferrin were examined on preoperative day 1, postoperative day 2 and day 12. Levels of immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin G (IgG), natural killer (NK) cells, CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells were also compared. The formulas were tolerated well in all the patients except 5 with mild complications. The EN + Gln and EN groups showed a faster onset of flatus and shorter hospitalization duration than the control group. On postoperative day 12, serum total protein, albumin, proalbumin and transferrin levels of the EN + Gln and EN groups were significantly higher than those of the control group (P nutritional status and immune function for the patients with AGC after total gastrectomy. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2012 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Lifted linear phase filter banks and the polyphase-with-advance representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brislawn, C. M. (Christopher M.); Wohlberg, B. E. (Brendt E.)

    2004-01-01

    A matrix theory is developed for the noncausal polyphase-with-advance representation that underlies the theory of lifted perfect reconstruction filter banks and wavelet transforms as developed by Sweldens and Daubechies. This theory provides the fundamental lifting methodology employed in the ISO/IEC JPEG-2000 still image coding standard, which the authors helped to develop. Lifting structures for polyphase-with-advance filter banks are depicted in Figure 1. In the analysis bank of Figure 1(a), the first lifting step updates x{sub 0} with a filtered version of x{sub 1} and the second step updates x{sub 1} with a filtered version of x{sub 0}; gain factors 1/K and K normalize the lowpass- and highpass-filtered output subbands. Each of these steps is inverted by the corresponding operations in the synthesis bank shown in Figure 1(b). Lifting steps correspond to upper- or lower-triangular matrices, S{sub i}(z), in a cascade-form decomposition of the polyphase analysis matrix, H{sub a}(z). Lifting structures can also be implemented reversibly (i.e., losslessly in fixed-precision arithmetic) by rounding the lifting updates to integer values. Our treatment of the polyphase-with-advance representation develops an extensive matrix algebra framework that goes far beyond the results of. Specifically, we focus on analyzing and implementing linear phase two-channel filter banks via linear phase lifting cascade schemes. Whole-sample symmetric (WS) and half-sample symmetric (HS) linear phase filter banks are characterized completely in terms of the polyphase-with-advance representation. The theory benefits significantly from a number of new group-theoretic structures arising in the polyphase-with-advance matrix algebra from the lifting factorization of linear phase filter banks.

  5. Advanced gastric cancer. The findings of delayed phase dynamic CT and radiologic-histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzawa, Shuichi; Omata, Kosaku; Nakazima, Hiroto; Yokosuka, Noriko; Ito, Atuko; Araki, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe delayed phase dynamic CT findings of advanced (T2-T4) gastric cancer and to correlate with histopathologic findings. Quadruple phase dynamic CT including delayed imaging taken five minutes after the start of injection of contrast material was performed in 43 patients with 45 advanced gastric cancer and 20 control subjects with no gastric lesions. On delayed phase CT scans, the attenuation of the gastric wall was equal to or lower than that of the liver parenchyma in the control subjects, therefore, the presence of higher attenuation in the gastric wall was considered to be abnormal and defined as delayed enhancement. Histopathologic findings in the tumors showing delayed enhancement were compared with those in the tumors without this feature. Delayed enhancement was seen in 26 (57%) of the 45 tumors. Eleven of 25 differentiated-type tumors and 15 of 20 undifferentiated-type tumors showed delayed enhancement (p<.05). Delayed enhancement was seen in one of five medullary type tumors, in 11 of 25 intermediate-type tumors, and in 14 of 15 scirrhous-type tumors (p<.005). Delayed enhancement was frequently seen in the tumors with abundant fibrous tissue stroma. Delayed phase dynamic CT may be useful for the characterization of advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  6. Josephson phase qubit circuit for the evaluation of advanced tunnel barrier materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline, Jeffrey S; Oh, Seongshik; Pappas, David P [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Wang Haohua; Martinis, John M [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)], E-mail: klinej@nist.gov

    2009-01-15

    We have found that crystalline Josephson junctions have problems with the control of critical current density that decrease the circuit yield. We present a superconducting quantum bit circuit designed to accommodate a factor of five variation in critical current density from one fabrication run to the next. The new design enables the evaluation of advanced tunnel barrier materials for superconducting quantum bits. Using this circuit design, we compare the performance of Josephson phase qubits fabricated with MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} advanced crystalline tunnel barriers to AlO{sub x} amorphous tunnel barrier qubits.

  7. Combined fluorescence and phase contrast imaging at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornberger, B.; Feser, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Vogt, S.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; DeGeronimo, G.; Palmer, B.M.; Experimental Facilities Division; State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook Univ.; BNL; Univ. of Vermont

    2006-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence microprobes excel at detecting and quantifying trace metals in biological and environmental science samples, but typically do not detect low Z elements such as carbon and nitrogen. Therefore, it is hard to put the trace metals into context with their natural environment. We are implementing phase contrast capabilities with a segmented detector into several microprobes at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to address this problem. Qualitative differential phase contrast images from a modified soft x-ray detector already provide very useful information for general users. We are also implementing a quantitative method to recover the absolute phase shift by Fourier filtering detector images. New detectors are under development which are optimized for the signal levels present at the APS. In this paper, we concentrate on fundamental signal to noise considerations comparing absorption and differential phase contrast

  8. Dual-polarization interference microscopy for advanced quantification of phase associated with the image field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Petr; Chmelík, Radim; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2018-02-01

    A new concept of dual-polarization spatial light interference microscopy (DPSLIM) is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The method works with two orthogonally polarized modes in which signal and reference waves are combined to realize the polarization-sensitive phase-shifting, thus allowing advanced reconstruction of the phase associated with the image field. The image phase is reconstructed directly from four polarization encoded interference records by a single step processing. This is a progress compared with common methods, in which the phase of the image field is reconstructed using the optical path difference and the amplitudes of interfering waves, which are calculated in multiple-step processing of the records. The DPSLIM is implemented in a common-path configuration using a spatial light modulator, which is connected to a commercial microscope Nikon E200. The optical performance of the method is demonstrated in experiments using both polystyrene microspheres and live LW13K2 cells.

  9. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Nelson, J.; Holzner, C.; Andrews, J. C.; Pianetta, P.

    2013-12-01

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented.

  10. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Nelson, J; Andrews, J C; Pianetta, P; Holzner, C

    2013-01-01

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented. (paper)

  11. Combination of light and melatonin time cues for phase advancing the human circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Tina M; Markwald, Rachel R; Chinoy, Evan D; Snider, Jesse A; Bessman, Sara C; Jung, Christopher M; Wright, Kenneth P

    2013-11-01

    Photic and non-photic stimuli have been shown to shift the phase of the human circadian clock. We examined how photic and non-photic time cues may be combined by the human circadian system by assessing the phase advancing effects of one evening dose of exogenous melatonin, alone and in combination with one session of morning bright light exposure. Randomized placebo-controlled double-blind circadian protocol. The effects of four conditions, dim light (∼1.9 lux, ∼0.6 Watts/m(2))-placebo, dim light-melatonin (5 mg), bright light (∼3000 lux, ∼7 Watts/m(2))-placebo, and bright light-melatonin on circadian phase was assessed by the change in the salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) prior to and following treatment under constant routine conditions. Melatonin or placebo was administered 5.75 h prior to habitual bedtime and 3 h of bright light exposure started 1 h prior to habitual wake time. Sleep and chronobiology laboratory environment free of time cues. Thirty-six healthy participants (18 females) aged 22 ± 4 y (mean ± SD). Morning bright light combined with early evening exogenous melatonin induced a greater phase advance of the DLMO than either treatment alone. Bright light alone and melatonin alone induced similar phase advances. Information from light and melatonin appear to be combined by the human circadian clock. The ability to combine circadian time cues has important implications for understanding fundamental physiological principles of the human circadian timing system. Knowledge of such principles is important for designing effective countermeasures for phase-shifting the human circadian clock to adapt to jet lag, shift work, and for designing effective treatments for circadian sleep-wakefulness disorders.

  12. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

  13. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allal, Abdelkarim S.; Bieri, Sabine; Bruendler, Marie-Anne; Soravia, Claudio; Gertsch, Philippe; Bernier, Jacques; Morel, Philippe; Roth, Arnaud D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  14. Advanced Parkinson's or "complex phase" Parkinson's disease? Re-evaluation is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titova, Nataliya; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Katunina, Elena; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2017-12-01

    Holistic management of Parkinson's disease, now recognised as a combined motor and nonmotor disorder, remains a key unmet need. Such management needs relatively accurate definition of the various stages of Parkinson's from early untreated to late palliative as each stage calls for personalised therapies. Management also needs to have a robust knowledge of the progression pattern and clinical heterogeneity of the presentation of Parkinson's which may manifest in a motor dominant or nonmotor dominant manner. The "advanced" stages of Parkinson's disease qualify for advanced treatments such as with continuous infusion or stereotactic surgery yet the concept of "advanced Parkinson's disease" (APD) remains controversial in spite of growing knowledge of the natural history of the motor syndrome of PD. Advanced PD is currently largely defined on the basis of consensus opinion and thus with several caveats. Nonmotor aspects of PD may also reflect advancing course of the disorder, so far not reflected in usual scale based assessments which are largely focussed on motor symptoms. In this paper, we discuss the problems with current definitions of "advanced" PD and also propose the term "complex phase" Parkinson's disease as an alternative which takes into account a multimodal symptoms and biomarker based approach in addition to patient preference.

  15. Prototype system for phase advance measurements of LHC small beam oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Olexa, J; Brezovic, Z; Gasior, M

    2013-01-01

    Magnet lattice parameters of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are measured by exciting beam transverse oscillations that allow measuring their phase advance using the beam position measurement (BPM) system. However, the BPM system requires millimetre oscillation amplitudes, with which nominal high intensity beams would cause large particle loss, dangerous for the LHC superconducting magnets. Therefore, such measurements cannot be done often, as they require special low intensity beams with important set-up time. After its first long shut-down the LHC will be equipped with new collimators with embedded BPMs, for which a new front-end electronics has been developed. Its main processing channels based on compensated diode detectors are designed for beam orbit measurement with sub-micrometre resolution. It is planned to extend this system by adding dedicated channels optimised for phase advance measurement, allowing continuous LHC optics measurement with much smaller beam excitation. This subsystem will be based o...

  16. Regorafenib for the Treatment of Advanced Gastric Cancer (INTEGRATE): A Multinational Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Nick; Sjoquist, Katrin M; Martin, Andrew J; Tsobanis, Eric; Yip, Sonia; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Bang, Yung-Jue; Alcindor, Thierry; O'Callaghan, Christopher J; Burnell, Margot J; Tebbutt, Niall C; Rha, Sun Young; Lee, Jeeyun; Cho, Jae-Yong; Lipton, Lara R; Wong, Mark; Strickland, Andrew; Kim, Jin Won; Zalcberg, John R; Simes, John; Goldstein, David

    2016-08-10

    We evaluated the activity of regorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. We conducted an international (Australia and New Zealand, South Korea, and Canada) randomized phase II trial in which patients were randomly assigned at a two-to-one ratio and stratified by lines of prior chemotherapy for advanced disease (one v two) and region. Eligible patients received best supportive care plus regorafenib 160 mg or matching placebo orally on days 1 to 21 of each 28-day cycle until disease progression or prohibitive adverse events occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Final analysis included data to December 31, 2014. A total of 152 patients were randomly assigned from November 7, 2012, to February 25, 2014, yielding 147 evaluable patients (regorafenib, n = 97; placebo, n = 50). Baseline characteristics were balanced. Median PFS significantly differed between groups (regorafenib, 2.6 months; 95% CI, 1.8 to 3.1 and placebo, 0.9 months; 95% CI, 0.9 to 0.9; hazard ratio [HR], 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.59; P regorafenib was seen (median, 5.8 months; 95% CI, 4.4 to 6.8 v 4.5 months; 95% CI, 3.4 to 5.2; HR, 0.74; P = .147). Twenty-nine patients assigned to placebo received open-label regorafenib after disease progression. Regorafenib toxicity was similar to that previously reported. In this phase II trial, regorafenib was effective in prolonging PFS in refractory advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Regional differences were found, but regorafenib was effective in both regional groups. A phase III trial is planned. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Phase advance and β function measurements using model-independent analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-xi Wang; Vadim Sajaev; Chih-Yuan Yao

    2003-01-01

    Phase advance and β function are basic lattice functions characterizing the linear properties of an accelerator lattice. Accurate and efficient measurements of these quantities are important for commissioning and operating a machine. For rings with little coupling, we report a new method to measure these lattice functions based on the model-independent analysis technique, which uses beam histories of excited betatron oscillations measured simultaneously at a large number of beam position moni...

  18. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project

  19. THREE-PHASE ENERGY SUPPLY SYSTEMS SIMULATION FOR THE TOTAL POWER LOSSES COMPONENTS ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Tugay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The goal is to optimize a structure of Matlab-model of the three-phase energy supply system with power active filter. The mathematical model that describes the energy supply system modes of operation which contains additional losses is proposed. Methodology. We have applied concepts of the electrical circuits theory, mathematical modeling elements based on linear algebra and vector calculus, mathematical simulation in Matlab package. Results. We have developed two models of three-phase energy supply system. The first one is based on a vector representation, and the second one on the matrix representation of energy processes. Using these models we have solved the problem of maintaining unchanged the average useful power for 279 cases of energy supply system modes of operation. Originality. We have developed methods of mathematical analysis of a three-phase energy supply systems with polyharmonic voltages and currents in the symmetric and asymmetric modes. Practical value. We have created Matlab-model of a three-phase energy supply system with automated calculation of a correction factor. It allows reducing more than one order the time for energy processes elucidation in multiphase systems.

  20. Phase-II trial of fractionated total body radiation in bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, R.P.; Opelz, G.; Feig, S.

    1979-01-01

    The addition of low doses of fractionated total body irradiation and a radiosensitizing agent to more conventional doses of total body irradiation was well tolerated but did not improve the antileukemic effect. The DAFT regimen was not associated with a higher incidence of GVHD or interstitial pneumonitis. This observation has led us to consider escalation of the dose of FTBI in our next clinical trial

  1. A phase I/II clinical trial for the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Kato, Shingo; Nakano, Takashi; Uno, Takashi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Kuroda, Yuki; Yoshio, Kotaro; Itami, Jun

    2016-08-17

    This paper describes about a study protocol of phase I/II multicenter prospective clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of the hybrid of intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy (HBT) for locally advanced uterine cervical cancer patients. Patients with histologically confirmed FIGO stage IB2, IIA2, IIB, and IIIB uterine cervical carcinoma width of which is larger than 5 cm assessed by MRI will be entered to this clinical trial. Protocol therapy is 30-30.6 Gy in 15-17 fractions of whole pelvic radiotherapy concurrent with weekly CDDP (40 mg/m(2)), followed by 24 Gy in 4 fractions of HBT and central shield EBRT up to 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. Tumor width is assessed again within one week before the first HBT and if the tumor width is larger than 4 cm, patients proceed to the secondary registration. In phase I section, feasibility of this will be investigated. If less than 10 % out of 20 patients experienced greater than grade 3 acute non-hematologic adverse effects, the study proceeds to phase II part. In phase II part a total of 55 patients will be accrued and the efficacy of the HBT will be investigated comparing with historical control data. If the lower margin of 90 % confidence interval of the 2-year pelvic progression-free survival of the HBT trial is higher than 64 %, the HBT is considered to be more effective than conventional ICBT. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the HBT for locally advanced cervical cancer. This trial will clarify the indication, feasibility, and efficacy of this new technique. UMIN000019081 ; Registration date: 2015/9/30.

  2. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  3. Quantitative measurement of total cerebral blood flow using 2D phase-contrast MRI and doppler ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Keum Soo; Choi, Sun Seob; Lee, Young Il [Dong-A Univ., College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To compare of quantitative measurement of the total cerebral blood flow using two-dimensional phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound. In 16 volunteers (mean age, 26 years; mean body weight, 66 kg) without abnormal medical histories, two-dimensional phase-contrast MR imaging was performed at the level of the C2-3 inter vertebral disc for flow measurement of the internal carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries. Volume flow measurements using Doppler ultrasound were also performed at the internal carotid arteries 2cm above the carotid bifurcation, and at the vertebral arteries at the level of the upper pole of the thyroid gland. Flows in the four vessels measured by the two methods were compared using Wilcoxon's correlation analysis and the median score. Total cerebral blood flows were calculated by summing these four vessel flows, and mean values for the 16 volunteers were calculated. Cerebral blood flows measured by 2-D phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasounds were 233 and 239 ml/min in the right internal carotid artery, 250 and 248 ml/min in the left internal carotid artery, 62 and 56 ml/min in the right vertebral artery, and 83 and 68 ml/min in the left vertebral artery. Correlation coefficients of the blood flows determined by the two methods were 0.48, 0.54, 0.49, and 0.62 in each vessel, while total cerebral blood flows were 628{+-}68 (range, 517 to 779) ml/min and 612{+-}79 (range, 482 to 804)ml/min, respectively. Total cerebral blood flow was easily measured using 2-D phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound, and the two noninvasive methods can therefore be used clinically for the measurement of total cerebral blood flow.

  4. Removal of total and antibiotic resistant bacteria in advanced wastewater treatment by ozonation in combination with different filtering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüddeke, Frauke; Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia; Winter, Josef; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Elimination of bacteria by ozonation in combination with charcoal or slow sand filtration for advanced sewage treatment to improve the quality of treated sewage and to reduce the potential risk for human health of receiving surface waters was investigated in pilot scale at the sewage treatment plant Eriskirch, Baden-Wuerttemberg/Germany. To determine the elimination of sewage bacteria, inflowing and leaving wastewater of different treatment processes was analysed in a culture-based approach for its content of Escherichia coli, enterococci and staphylococci and their resistance against selected antibiotics over a period of 17 month. For enterococci, single species and their antibiotic resistances were identified. In comparison to the established flocculation filtration at Eriskirch, ozonation plus charcoal or sand filtration (pilot-scale) reduced the concentrations of total and antibiotic resistant E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci. However, antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci apparently survived ozone treatment better than antibiotic sensitive strains. Neither vancomycin resistant enterococci nor methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were detected. The decreased percentage of antibiotic resistant enterococci after ozonation may be explained by a different ozone sensitivity of species: Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, which determined the resistance-level, seemed to be more sensitive for ozone than other Enterococcus-species. Overall, ozonation followed by charcoal or sand filtration led to 0.8-1.1 log-units less total and antibiotic resistant E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci, as compared to the respective concentrations in treated sewage by only flocculation filtration. Thus, advanced wastewater treatment by ozonation plus charcoal or sand filtration after common sewage treatment is an effective tool for further elimination of microorganisms from sewage before discharge in surface waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  5. A phase II study of concomitant boost radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin for locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Jose Antonio; Rueda, Antonio; Sacchetti de Pasos, Antonio; Contreras, Jorge; Cobo, Manuel; Moreno, Paloma; Benavides, Manuel; Villanueva, Asuncion; Alba, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: This phase II study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of weekly cisplatin along with concomitant boost accelerated radiation regimen in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma. Material and methods: A total of 94 patients (median age, 58 years) with UICC stage III (n=19) and IV (n=75) cancer of the oropharynx, larynx, hypopharynx and oral cavity were included. Patients received radiotherapy with a concomitant boost scheme (1.8 Gy on days 1-40 and 1.5 Gy boost on days 25-40 with a total dose of 72 Gy) and concurrent cisplatin, 40 mg/m 2 weekly, for the first 4 weeks. Results: Most patients (95%) received both radiation and chemotherapy according to protocol. Toxicity was manageable with grade III mucositis and pharyngeal-oesophageal toxicity in 85 and 50% of patients, respectively. Haematological toxicity was mild. Four patients (4%) died due to complications. With a median follow of 41 months, median overall survival and time to progression were 27 and 25 months, respectively. The estimated overall survival at 4 years was 41%. Conclusions: Concomitant boost accelerated radiation plus concurrent weekly cisplatin is a feasible schedule in patients with locally advanced unresectable head and neck carcinoma, with acceptable toxicity and survival data

  6. Effects of Partial and Acute Total Sleep Deprivation on Performance across Cognitive Domains, Individuals and Circadian Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, June C.; Groeger, John A.; Santhi, Nayantara; Arbon, Emma L.; Lazar, Alpar S.; Hasan, Sibah; von Schantz, Malcolm; Archer, Simon N.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background Cognitive performance deteriorates during extended wakefulness and circadian phase misalignment, and some individuals are more affected than others. Whether performance is affected similarly across cognitive domains, or whether cognitive processes involving Executive Functions are more sensitive to sleep and circadian misalignment than Alertness and Sustained Attention, is a matter of debate. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a 2 × 12-day laboratory protocol to characterize the interaction of repeated partial and acute total sleep deprivation and circadian phase on performance across seven cognitive domains in 36 individuals (18 males; mean ± SD of age = 27.6±4.0 years). The sample was stratified for the rs57875989 polymorphism in PER3, which confers cognitive susceptibility to total sleep deprivation. We observed a deterioration of performance during both repeated partial and acute total sleep deprivation. Furthermore, prior partial sleep deprivation led to poorer cognitive performance in a subsequent total sleep deprivation period, but its effect was modulated by circadian phase such that it was virtually absent in the evening wake maintenance zone, and most prominent during early morning hours. A significant effect of PER3 genotype was observed for Subjective Alertness during partial sleep deprivation and on n-back tasks with a high executive load when assessed in the morning hours during total sleep deprivation after partial sleep loss. Overall, however, Subjective Alertness and Sustained Attention were more affected by both partial and total sleep deprivation than other cognitive domains and tasks including n-back tasks of Working Memory, even when implemented with a high executive load. Conclusions/Significance Sleep loss has a primary effect on Sleepiness and Sustained Attention with much smaller effects on challenging Working Memory tasks. These findings have implications for understanding how sleep debt and circadian rhythmicity

  7. Hubbard-U corrected Hamiltonians for non-self-consistent random-phase approximation total-energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patrick, Christopher; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    In non-self-consistent calculations of the total energy within the random-phase approximation (RPA) for electronic correlation, it is necessary to choose a single-particle Hamiltonian whose solutions are used to construct the electronic density and noninteracting response function. Here we...... investigate the effect of including a Hubbard-U term in this single-particle Hamiltonian, to better describe the on-site correlation of 3d electrons in the transitionmetal compounds ZnS, TiO2, and NiO.We find that the RPA lattice constants are essentially independent of U, despite large changes...... in the underlying electronic structure. We further demonstrate that the non-selfconsistent RPA total energies of these materials have minima at nonzero U. Our RPA calculations find the rutile phase of TiO2 to be more stable than anatase independent of U, a result which is consistent with experiments...

  8. Evaluation of advanced two-phase flow instrumentation in SCTF Core-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Sudo, Yukio; Adachi, Hiromichi

    1984-03-01

    In the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-I, advanced two-phase flow instruments have been provided by the USNRC to measure the thermohydraulic behavior in the primary system including pressure vessel during the end of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor. The advanced instruments are turbine meters, drag disks, γ-densitometers, spool pieces, liquid level detectors (LLD), fluid distribution grids (FDG), impedance probes (flag, prong and string probes), film probes, and video optical probes. This report presents evaluated results of the data from these instruments. Some instruments are quantitatively evaluated by comparing with the data from the conventional instruments or the other advanced instruments. Main conclusions are as follows: (1) The spool pieces and the γ-densitometers work well and provide satisfactory results; (2) Some of the turbine meters, the impedance probes and the film probes give partially reasonable results, but still more improvements are required; (3) Most of the LLDs, the FDGs, the impedance probes, and the film probes do not work well due to a hard cable corrosion, and (4) The video optical probes give clear image of the flow pattern. (author)

  9. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Whole-House Prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Rath, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective envelope designs that can be effectively integrated into the plant production process while meeting the thermal requirements of the 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing new envelope technologies. This work is part of a multi-phase effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three methods for building high performance walls. Phase 2 focused on developing viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped narrow the research focus to perfecting a stud wall design with exterior continuous insulation (CI). Phase 3, completed in two stages, continued the design development effort, exploring and evaluating a range or methods for applying CI to factory built homes. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing. During this phase, a home was built with CI, evaluated, and placed in service. The experience of building a mock up wall section with CI and then constructing on line a prototype home resolved important concerns about how to integrate the material into the production process. First steps were taken toward finding least expensive approaches for incorporating CI in standard factory building practices and a preliminary assessment suggested that even at this early stage the technology is attractive when viewed from a life cycle cost perspective.

  10. Phase I study of afatinib combined with nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahleda, Rastislav; Hollebecque, Antoine; Varga, Andrea; Gazzah, Anas; Massard, Christophe; Deutsch, Eric; Amellal, Nadia; Farace, Françoise; Ould-Kaci, Mahmoud; Roux, Flavien; Marzin, Kristell; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-11-17

    This Phase I study evaluated continuous- and intermittent-dosing (every other week) of afatinib plus nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours. In the dose-escalation phase (n=45), maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) were determined for continuous/intermittent afatinib 10, 20, 30 or 40 mg once daily plus continuous nintedanib 150 or 200 mg twice daily. Secondary objectives included safety and efficacy. Clinical activity of continuous afatinib plus nintedanib at the MTD was further evaluated in an expansion phase (n=25). The most frequent dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhoea (11%) and transaminase elevations (7%). Maximum tolerated doses were afatinib 30 mg continuously plus nintedanib 150 mg, and afatinib 40 mg intermittently plus nintedanib 150 mg. Treatment-related adverse events (mostly Grade⩽3) included diarrhoea (98%), asthenia (64%), nausea (62%) and vomiting (60%). In the dose-escalation phase, two patients had partial responses (PRs) and 27 (60%) had stable disease (SD). In the expansion phase, one complete response and three PRs were observed (all non-small cell lung cancer), with SD in 13 (52%) patients. No pharmacokinetic interactions were observed. MTDs of continuous or intermittent afatinib plus nintedanib demonstrated a manageable safety profile with proactive management of diarrhoea. Antitumour activity was observed in patients with solid tumours.

  11. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured

  12. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Patrinee, Traisathit; Gestel, Dirk Van

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan was generated by applying the optimization parameters of the original treatment plan to the anatomy of the second CT scan. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose statistics of the hybrid plan and the adapted plan were compared. The mean volume of the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid gland decreased by 6.1 cm 3 (30.5%) and 5.4 cm 3 (24.3%), respectively. Compared with the hybrid plan, the adapted plan provided a higher dose to the target volumes with better homogeneity, and a lower dose to the organs at risk (OARs). The Dmin of all planning target volumes (PTVs) increased. The Dmax of the spinal cord and brainstem were lower in 94% of the patients (1.6-5.9 Gy, P < 0.001 and 2.1-9.9 Gy, P < 0.001, respectively). The D mean of the contralateral parotid decreased in 70% of the patients (range, 0.2-4.4 Gy). We could not find a relationship between dose variability and weight loss. Our two-phase adaptive IMRT protocol improves dosimetric results in terms of target volumes and OARs in patients with locally advanced NPC. (author)

  13. Needs of people with advanced dementia in their final phase of life: A multi-perspective qualitative study in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Holger; Eisenmann, Yvonne; Golla, Heidrun; Voltz, Raymond; Perrar, Klaus Maria

    2018-03-01

    People with advanced dementia present an important target group for palliative care. They suffer a range of symptoms, and their verbal communication abilities are highly restricted. At present, little is known about their needs in the final phase of life. To identify the needs of people with advanced dementia in their final phase of life and to explore the aspects relevant to first recognize and then meet these needs. Multi-perspective qualitative study using grounded theory methodology conducting group discussions, individual interviews, and participant observation. The study encompassed nursing homes and involved health professionals, relatives, and residents with advanced dementia. Data were collected in six nursing homes. Nine group discussions and three individual interviews were conducted comprising 42 health professionals and 14 relatives. Participant observations aided in giving the perspective of 30 residents with advanced dementia. Data analysis generated a total of 25 physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs divided into 10 categories. Physical needs were classified as follows: "food intake," "physical well-being," and "physical activity and recovery." Categories of psychosocial needs were classified as follows: "adaptation of stimuli," "communication," "personal attention," "participation," "familiarity and safety," as well as "self-determination." Spiritual needs addressed "religion." The results revealed a multitude of key aspects for recognizing and meeting these needs, stressing the importance of personhood. People with advanced dementia in their final phase of life have a multitude of individual and complex needs. This evidence contributes to narrowing the current research gap, offering an orientation framework for research and practice.

  14. An extended PROSPECT: Advance in the leaf optical properties model separating total chlorophylls into chlorophyll a and b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Huang, Jingfeng; Wang, Fumin; Blackburn, George Alan; Zhang, Hankui K; Wang, Xiuzhen; Wei, Chuanwen; Zhang, Kangyu; Wei, Chen

    2017-07-25

    The PROSPECT leaf optical model has, to date, well-separated the effects of total chlorophyll and carotenoids on leaf reflectance and transmittance in the 400-800 nm. Considering variations in chlorophyll a:b ratio with leaf age and physiological stress, a further separation of total plant-based chlorophylls into chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b is necessary for advanced monitoring of plant growth. In this study, we present an extended version of PROSPECT model (hereafter referred to as PROSPECT-MP) that can combine the effects of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids on leaf directional hemispherical reflectance and transmittance (DHR and DHT) in the 400-800 nm. The LOPEX93 dataset was used to evaluate the capabilities of PROSPECT-MP for spectra modelling and pigment retrieval. The results show that PROSPECT-MP can both simultaneously retrieve leaf chlorophyll a and b, and also performs better than PROSPECT-5 in retrieving carotenoids concentrations. As for the simulation of DHR and DHT, the performances of PROSPECT-MP are similar to that of PROSPECT-5. This study demonstrates the potential of PROSPECT-MP for improving capabilities of remote sensing of leaf photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids) and for providing a framework for future refinements in the modelling of leaf optical properties.

  15. Synchronisation of the LHC Betatron Coupling and Phase Advance Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M

    2014-01-01

    The new LHC Diode ORbit and OScillation (DOROS) system will provide beam position readings with submicrometre resolution and at the same time will be able to perform measurements of local betatron coupling and beam phase advance with micrometre beam excitation. The oscillation sub-system employs gain-controlled RF amplifiers, shared with the orbit system, and followed by dedicated diode detectors to demodulate the beam oscillation signals into the kHz frequency range, subsequently digitized by multi-channel 24-bit ADCs. The digital signals are processed in each front-end with an FPGA and the results of reduced throughput are sent using an Ethernet protocol to a common concentrator, together with the orbit data. The phase advance calculation between multiple Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) requires that all DOROS front-ends have a common phase reference. This paper presents methods used to generate such a reference and to maintain a stable synchronous sampling on all system front-ends. The performance of the DOR...

  16. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  17. Intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy after surgery and carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer: phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  18. Multivariable polynomial fitting of controlled single-phase nonlinear load of input current total harmonic distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Roman; Markiewicz, Przemysław; Pabjańczyk, Wiesława

    2018-04-01

    The power systems usually include a number of nonlinear receivers. Nonlinear receivers are the source of disturbances generated to the power system in the form of higher harmonics. The level of these disturbances describes the total harmonic distortion coefficient THD. Its value depends on many factors. One of them are the deformation and change in RMS value of supply voltage. A modern LED luminaire is a nonlinear receiver as well. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the influence of change in RMS value of supply voltage and the level of dimming of the tested luminaire on the value of the current THD. The analysis was made using a mathematical model based on multivariable polynomial fitting.

  19. Multivariable polynomial fitting of controlled single-phase nonlinear load of input current total harmonic distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikora Roman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The power systems usually include a number of nonlinear receivers. Nonlinear receivers are the source of disturbances generated to the power system in the form of higher harmonics. The level of these disturbances describes the total harmonic distortion coefficient THD. Its value depends on many factors. One of them are the deformation and change in RMS value of supply voltage. A modern LED luminaire is a nonlinear receiver as well. The paper presents the results of the analysis of the influence of change in RMS value of supply voltage and the level of dimming of the tested luminaire on the value of the current THD. The analysis was made using a mathematical model based on multivariable polynomial fitting.

  20. Evaluation of total loss of feedwater accident/recovery phase and investigation of the associated EOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the sequence of event and the thermohydraulic behavior during total loss of feedwater accident and recovery procedure, a RELAP5/MOD3 calculation is performed and compared with the LOFT L9-1/L3-3 experiment. Also, the predictability of the code for the major thermohydraulic phenomena following the accident is assessed. As a result, it is found that a pressure control using the spray until the time the water level reaches the top of the pressurizer, an overpressure protection by pressurizer PORV, a recovery of the secondary heat removal capability by refilling steam generator, and an effective cooldown by the continued natural circulation can be perfomed without core uncovery. It is also found that the plantspecific evaluation is necessary to confirm the effectiveness of the current symptom-oriented emergency operating procedure, especially in an overpressure protection performance and steam generator recovery performance. (Author)

  1. Efficacy and safety of bevacizumab for the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review of phase II trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Fang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common cancer associated with a poor prognosis. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that binds vascular endothelial growth factor, a mediator of tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab is currently under investigation as treatment for HCC. We performed a systematic review of the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab for the treatment of advanced HCC. METHODS: PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched using the terms "bevacizumab AND hepatocellular carcinoma AND (advanced OR unresectable". Phase II trials of bevacizumab for the treatment of advanced HCC were included. Outcomes of interest included progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS, tumor response, and toxicities. RESULTS: A total of 26 records were identified. Of these, 18 were excluded. Hence, eight trials involving 300 patients were included. Bevacizumab was given as monotherapy (n = 1 trial or in combination with erlotinib (n = 4 trials, capecitabine (n = 1 trial, capecitabine+oxaliplatin (n = 1 trial, or gemcitabine+oxaliplatin (n = 1 trial. Most trials (five of eight reported median PFS and OS between 5.3 months and 9.0 months and 5.9 and 13.7 months, respectively. The disease control rate was consistent in five of eight trials, ranging from 51.1% to 76.9%. The response and partial response rates ranged from 0 to 23.7%, but were around 20% in four trials. Only one patient had a complete response. Frequently reported Grade 3/4 toxicities were increased aspartate transaminase/alanine transaminase (13%, fatigue (12%, hypertension (10%, diarrhea (8%, and neutropenia (5%. Thirty patients experienced gastrointestinal bleeding (grade 1/2 = 18, grade 3/4 = 12, typically due to esophageal varices. CONCLUSIONS: Bevacizumab shows promise as an effective and tolerable treatment for advanced HCC. The reported efficacy of bevacizumab appears to compare favorably with that of sorafenib, the only currently

  2. Reflooding phase after loss of coolant of an advanced pressurized water reactor with high conversion ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.

    1984-01-01

    The emergency core cooling behaviour of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR) during the reflooding phase of the LOCA with double-ended break is analysed and compared to a common pressurized water reactor (PWR). The code FLUT-BS, its models and correlations are explained in detail and have been verified by numerous PWR-reflood experiments with large parameter range. The influence of core-design on ECC-behaviour as well as the influences of initial and boundary values are examined. The results show the essential differences of ECC-behaviour between PWR and APWR. (orig.) [de

  3. Computed phase equilibria for burnable neutron absorbing materials for advanced pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcoran, E.C. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, St. Forces, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada)], E-mail: emily.corcoran@rmc.ca; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, St. Forces, Kingston, Ont., K7K 7B4 (Canada); Hood, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Sheridan Park, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ont., L5K 1B2 (Canada); Akbari, F.; He, Z. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ont., K0J 1J0 (Canada); Reid, P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Sheridan Park, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ont., L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2009-03-31

    Burnable neutron absorbing materials are expected to be an integral part of the new fuel design for the Advanced CANDU [CANDU is as a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited.] Reactor. The neutron absorbing material is composed of gadolinia and dysprosia dissolved in an inert cubic-fluorite yttria-stabilized zirconia matrix. A thermodynamic model based on Gibbs energy minimization has been created to provide estimated phase equilibria as a function of composition and temperature. This work includes some supporting experimental studies involving X-ray diffraction.

  4. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research Phase II: N+4 Advanced Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    This final report documents the work of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team on Task 1 of the Phase II effort. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. Using a quantitative workshop process, the following technologies, appropriate to aircraft operational in the N+4 2040 timeframe, were identified: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Hydrogen, fuel cell hybrids, battery electric hybrids, Low Energy Nuclear (LENR), boundary layer ingestion propulsion (BLI), unducted fans and advanced propellers, and combinations. Technology development plans were developed.

  5. Treatment of reduced sulphur compounds and SO2 by Gas Phase Advanced Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl; Bluhme, Anders Brostrøm; Ingemar, Jonas L.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced sulphur compounds (RSCs) emitted from pig farms are a major problem for agriculture, due to their health and environmental impacts and foul odour. This study investigates the removal of RSCs, including H2S, and their oxidation product SO2 using Gas Phase Advanced Oxidation (GPAO). GPAO...... is a novel air cleaning technique which utilises accelerated atmospheric chemistry to oxidise pollutants before removing their oxidation products as particles. Removal efficiencies of 24.5% and 3.9% were found for 461 ppb of H2S and 714 ppb of SO2 in a laboratory system (volumetric flow Q = 75 m3/h......). A numerical model of the reactor system was developed to explore the basic features of the system; its output was in fair agreement with the experiment. The model verified the role of OH radicals in initiating the oxidation chemistry. All sulphur removed from the gas phase was detected as particulate matter...

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Materials with X-ray Phase Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhengwei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray radiation has been widely used for imaging applications since Rontgen first discovered X-rays over a century ago. Its large penetration depth makes it ideal for the nondestructive visualization of the internal structure and/or defects of materials unobtainable otherwise. Currently used nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools, X-ray radiography and tomography, are absorption-based, and work well in heavy-element materials where density or composition variations due to internal structure or defects are high enough to produce appreciable absorption contrast. However, in many cases where materials are light-weight and/or composites that have similar mass absorption coefficients, the conventional absorption-based X-ray methods for NDE become less useful. Indeed, the light-weight and ultra-high-strength requirements for the most advanced materials used or developed for current flight mission and future space exploration pose a great challenge to the standard NDE tools in that the absorption contrast arising from the internal structure of these materials is often too weak to be resolved. In this presentation, a solution to the problem, the use of phase information of X-rays for phase contrast X-ray imaging, will be discussed, along with a comparison between the absorption-based and phase-contrast imaging methods. Latest results on phase contrast X-ray imaging of lightweight Space Shuttle foam in 2D and 3D will be presented, demonstrating new opportunities to solve the challenging issues encountered in advanced materials development and processing.

  7. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractionated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute toxicity, post-operative complications, pathologic response and extent of downstaging to high dose pre-operative radiation using a hyperfractionated radiation boost and concurrent chemotherapy in a prospective Phase I trial. Materials and Methods: To be eligible for this study, patients had to have adenocarcinoma of the rectum less than 12 cm from the anal verge with either Stage T4 or T3 but greater than 4 cm or greater than 40% of the bowel circumference. All patients received 45 Gy pelvic radiation (1.8 Gy per fraction). Subsequent radiation was given to the region of the gross tumor with a 2 cm margin. This 'boost' treatment was given at 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54.6 Gy for Level I, 57 Gy for Level II, and 61.8 Gy for Level III. 5-FU was given at 1g/m 2 over 24 hours for a four day infusion during the first and sixth weeks of radiation, with the second course concurrent with the hyperfractionated radiation. Surgical resection was carried out 4-6 weeks following completion of chemoradiation (in curative cases) and additional adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU and Leucovorin was given for an additional 4 monthly cycles Days 1 through 5 beginning four weeks post surgery. Results: Twenty-seven patients, age 40-82 (median 61), completed the initial course of chemoradiation and are included in the analysis of toxicity. The median follow-up is 27 months (range 8-68). Eleven patients were treated to a dose of 54.6 Gy, nine patients to 57 Gy, and seven patients to 61.8 Gy. Twenty-one patients had T3 tumors, and six patients T4 tumors. Grade III acute toxicity from chemoradiation included proctitis (5 patients), dermatitis (9), diarrhea (five), leukopenia (1), cardiac (1). Grade IV toxicities included one patient with diarrhea (on dose Level I) and one patient (on dose Level III) with cardiac toxicity (unrelated to radiation). Surgical resection consisted of abdominal perineal resection in 16 and low anterior resection

  8. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3. Whole-House Prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Mullens, M. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES), New York, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective envelope designs that can be effectively integrated into the plant production process while meeting the thermal requirements of the 2012 IECC standards. This work is part of a multiphase effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three methods for building high performance walls. Phase 2 focused on developing viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped narrow the research focus to perfecting a stud wall design with exterior continuous insulation (CI). This report describes Phase 3, which was completed in two stages and continued the design development effort, exploring and evaluating a range or methods for applying CI to factory built homes. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing. During this phase, a home was built with CI, evaluated, and placed in service. The experience of building a mock up wall section with CI and then constructing on line a prototype home resolved important concerns about how to integrate the material into the production process. First steps were taken toward finding least expensive approaches for incorporating CI in standard factory building practices and a preliminary assessment suggested that even at this early stage the technology is attractive when viewed from a life cycle cost perspective.

  9. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Henrique A; Baracos, Vickie E; Dhillon, Navjot; Hong, David S; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2012-01-01

    Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown. We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI); body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT) images. A body mass index (BMI)≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria. Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%); 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%), including 79% of patients with a BMIbody composition: 215 (71-358) (BMIcancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index. Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  10. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Design Development and Prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kessler, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mullens, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rath, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  11. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3. Design Development and Prototyping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Kessler, B. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Mullens, M. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Rath, P. [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  12. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 5 of 6: Phase Measurement of Galvanneal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristopher Burnett; Ronald Guel; James R. Philips; L. Lowry; Beverly Tai

    1999-05-31

    Augmentation of the internal software of a commercial X-ray fluorescence gauge is shown to enable the instrument to extend its continuous on-line real-time measurements of a galvanneal coating's total elemental content to encompass similar measurements of the relative thickness of the coating's three principal metallurgical phases. The mathematical structure of this software augmentation is derived from the theory of neural networks. The performance of the augmented gauge is validated by comparing the gauge implied real-time phase distribution with the phase distribution independently measured off-line on between the gauge and laboratory measurements and to suggest preferred approaches to be followed in future application of the augmented gauge.

  13. Phase II study of neoadjuvant gemcitabine, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, and docetaxel in locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Grazia; Grazia, Artioli; Mocellin, Simone; Simone, Mocellin; Borgato, Lucia; Lucia, Borgato; Cappetta, Alessandro; Alessandro, Cappetta; Bozza, Fernando; Fernando, Bozza; Zavagno, Giorgio; Giorgio, Zavagno; Zovato, Stefania; Stefania, Zovato; Marchet, Alberto; Alberto, Marchet; Pastorelli, Davide; Davide, Pastorelli

    2010-09-01

    This was a phase II study to assess the activity of a novel neoadjuvant regimen in locally-advanced breast cancer. Fifty patients with histological confirmation of locally advanced breast cancer received treatment with gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) (day 1) followed by gemcitabine 800 mg/m(2) plus docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) 30 mg/m(2) (day 8) every 3 weeks for at least 4 cycles, plus a final 2 additional cycles. Tumour size was T1 (n=2), T2 (n=32), T3 (n=14), T4 (n=2). All 50 patients underwent surgery. Clinical complete, partial and no response were observed in 13 (26%), 24 (48%) and 11 (22%) patients, respectively (overall response rate: 74%). The number of chemotherapy cycles was found to be an independent predictor of a pathologic complete response. The combination of gemcitabine-docetaxel-PLD can yield high tumour response rates in patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who undergo a full treatment of 6 cycles.

  14. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geara, Fady B; Shamseddine, Ali; Khalil, Ali; Abboud, Mirna; Charafeddine, Maya; Seoud, Muhieddine

    2010-01-01

    This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m 2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients) or 50 mg/m 2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients) concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy) for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy) for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44%) of group I and 8 patients (53%) of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix

  15. Recent Advances in Understanding of Kinetic Interplay Between Phase II Metabolism and Efflux Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Xing, Huijie; Zhao, Mengjing; Lu, Danyi; Li, Zhijie; Dong, Dong; Wu, Baojian

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of the metabolism-transport interplay assumes great importance in pharmaceutical fields because the knowledge can help to interpret drug/xenobiotic metabolism and disposition studies as well as the drug-drug interactions in vivo. About 10 years ago, it started to recognize that cellular phase II metabolism is strongly influenced by the excretion (efflux transport) of generated metabolites, a kinetic phenomenon termed "phase II metabolism-transport interplay". This interplay is believed to have significant effects on the pharmacokinetics (bioavailability) of drugs/chemicals undergoing phase II metabolism. In this article, we review the studies investigating the phase II metabolism-transport interplay using cell models, perfused rat intestine, and intact rats. The potential confounding factors in exploring such interplay is also summarized. Moreover, the mechanism underlying the phase II metabolism-transport interplay is discussed. Various studies with engineered cells and rodents have demonstrated that there is an interaction (interplay) between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. This type of interplay mainly refers to the dependence of phase II (conjugative) metabolism on the activities of efflux transporters. In general, inhibiting efflux transporters or decreasing their expression causes the reductions in metabolite excretion, apparent excretion clearance (CLapp) and total metabolism (fmet), as well as an increase in the intracellular level of metabolite (Ci). The deconjugation mediated by hydrolase (acting as a "bridge") is essential for the interplay to play out based on pharmacokinetic modeling/simulations, cell and animal studies. The hydrolases bridge the two processes (i.e., metabolite formation and excretion) and enable the interplay thereof (a bridging effect). Without the bridge, metabolite formation is independent on its downstream process excretion, thus impact of metabolite excretion on its formation is impossible

  16. Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with

  17. Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribas, A.; Kefford, R.; Marshall, Martin; Punt, C.J.A.; Haanen, J.B.; Marmol, M.; Garbe, C.; Gogas, H.; Schachter, J.; Linette, G.; Lorigan, P.; Kendra, K.L.; Maio, M.; Trefzer, U.; Smylie, M.; McArthur, G.A.; Dreno, B.; Nathan, P.D.; Mackiewicz, J.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Gomez-Navarro, J.; Huang, B.; Pavlov, D.; Hauschild, A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients

  18. Diabetes induction by total pancreatectomy in minipigs with simultaneous splenectomy: a feasible approach for advanced diabetes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, Sophie; Ludwig, Barbara; Schubert, Undine; Schmid, Janine; Kiss, Thomas; Steffen, Anja; Bornstein, Stefan; Ludwig, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Safe and reliable diabetes models are a key prerequisite for advanced preclinical studies on diabetes. Chemical induction is the standard model of diabetes in rodents and also widely used in large animal models of non-human primates and minipigs. However, uncertain efficacy, the potential of beta-cell regeneration, and relevant side effects are debatable aspects particularly in large animals. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate a surgical approach of total pancreatectomy combined with splenectomy for diabetes induction in an exploratory study in Goettingen minipigs. Total pancreatectomy was performed in Goettingen minipigs (n = 4) under general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. Prior to surgery, a central venous line was established for drug application and blood sampling. After median laparotomy, splenectomy was performed and the lobular pancreas was carefully dissected with particular attention to the duodenal vascular arcade. Close monitoring of blood glucose was initiated immediately after surgery by standard glucometer measurement or continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS). Exogenous insulin was given by multiple daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injections or via insulin pump systems (CSII). Complete endogenous insulin deficiency was confirmed by intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) and measurement of c-peptide. For establishing a suitable regimen for diabetes management, the animals were followed for 4-6 weeks. Following pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the animals showed a quick recovery from surgery and initial analgetic medication and volume substitution could be terminated within 24 h. A rapid increase in blood glucose was observed immediately following pancreatectomy necessitating insulin therapy. The induced exocrine insufficiency did not cause any clinical symptoms. Complete insulin deficiency could be confirmed in all animals by determination of negative c-peptide during glucose challenge. The two regimen of insulin treatment (multiple daily

  19. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christini, R.A.; Dawless, R.K.; Ray, S.P.; Weirauch, D.A. Jr.

    2001-01-01

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  20. Exatecan in pretreated adult patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma: results of a phase II--study of the EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichardt, P; Nielsen, Ole Steen; Bauer, S

    2007-01-01

    No standard treatment is established for patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma after previous chemotherapy with anthracyclines and ifosfamide, given either in combination or sequentially. Exatecan (DX-8951f) is a totally synthetic analogue of the topoisomerase I-inhibitor camptothecin, which...... was synthesised to impart increased aqueous solubility, greater tumour efficacy, and less toxicity than camptothecin itself, topotecan or irinotecan. Since some activity against soft tissue sarcomas, especially leiomyosarcomas, has been reported for topoisomerase I-inhibitors, a study with a new and more potent...... agent seemed justified. We report on a prospective multicentre phase II study of Exatecan in adult soft tissue sarcomas failing 1 or 2 lines of chemotherapy in advanced phase, performed within the STBSG of EORTC. Thirty-nine patients (16 leiomyosarcomas and 23 other histologies) were included in two...

  1. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengelov, Lisa; Traberg, Anders; Ohlhuis, Lars; Pedersen, Jorgen; Nellemann, Hanne; Kiil Berthelsen, Anne; Eberholst, Frey; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Maase, Hans von der

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated in the present phase-II trial. Patients and methods: Twenty-two patients with locally advanced and surgically non-resectable, histological proven pancreatic carcinoma were included into the trial. The patients were immobilized by the Elekta stereotactic body frame (SBF) or a custom made body frame. SRT was given on standard LINAC with standard multi-leaf collimator. Central dose was 15 Gyx3 within 5-10 days. Results: Evaluation of response was found to be very difficult due to radiation and tumour related tissue reaction. Only two patients (9%) were found to have a partial response (PR), the remaining had no change (NC) or progression (PD) after treatment. Six patients had local tumour progression, but only one patient had an isolated local failure without simultaneous distant metastasis. Median time to local or distant progression was 4.8 months. Median survival time was 5.7 months and only 5% were alive 1 year after treatment. Acute toxicity reported 14 days after treatment was pronounced. There was a significant deterioration of performance status (P=0.008), more nausea (P=0.001) and more pain (P=0.008) after 14 days compared with base-line. However, 8 of 12 patients (66%) improved in performance status, scored less nausea, pain, or needed less analgesic drugs at 3 months after treatment. Four patients suffered from severe mucositis or ulceration of the stomach or duodenum and one of the patients had a non-fatal ulcer perforation of the stomach. Conclusions: SRT was associated with poor outcome, unacceptable toxicity and questionable palliative effect and cannot be recommended for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma

  2. Gas-phase advanced oxidation as an integrated air pollution control technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew A. Adnew

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase advanced oxidation (GPAO is an emerging air cleaning technology based on the natural self-cleaning processes that occur in the Earth’s atmosphere. The technology uses ozone, UV-C lamps and water vapor to generate gas-phase hydroxyl radicals that initiate oxidation of a wide range of pollutants. In this study four types of GPAO systems are presented: a laboratory scale prototype, a shipping container prototype, a modular prototype, and commercial scale GPAO installations. The GPAO systems treat volatile organic compounds, reduced sulfur compounds, amines, ozone, nitrogen oxides, particles and odor. While the method covers a wide range of pollutants, effective treatment becomes difficult when temperature is outside the range of 0 to 80 °C, for anoxic gas streams and for pollution loads exceeding ca. 1000 ppm. Air residence time in the system and the rate of reaction of a given pollutant with hydroxyl radicals determine the removal efficiency of GPAO. For gas phase compounds and odors including VOCs (e.g. C6H6 and C3H8 and reduced sulfur compounds (e.g. H2S and CH3SH, removal efficiencies exceed 80%. The method is energy efficient relative to many established technologies and is applicable to pollutants emitted from diverse sources including food processing, foundries, water treatment, biofuel generation, and petrochemical industries.

  3. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs

  4. Examestane in advanced or recurrent endometrial carcinoma: a prospective phase II study by the Nordic Society of Gynecologic Oncology (NSGO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemann, Kristina; Nordstrøm, Britta; Malander, Susanne; Christensen, Rene D; Mirza, Mansoor R; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Aavall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Vergote, Ignace; Rosenberg, Per; Boman, Karin

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the aromatase inhibitor exemestane in patients with advanced, persistent or recurrent endometrial carcinoma. We performed an open-label one-arm, two-stage, phase II study of 25 mg of oral exemestane in 51 patients with advanced (FIGO stage III-IV) or relapsed endometrioid endometrial cancer. Patients were stratified into subsets of estrogen receptor (ER) positive and ER negative patients. Recruitment to the ER negative group was stopped prematurely after 12 patients due to slow accrual. In the ER positive patients, we observed an overall response rate of 10%, and a lack of progression after 6 months in 35% of the patients. No responses were registered in the ER negative patients, and all had progressive disease within 6 months. For the total group of patients, the median progression free survival (PFS) was 3.1 months (95% CI: 2.0-4.1). In the ER positive patients the median PFS was 3.8 months (95% CI: 0.7-6.9) and in the ER negative patients it was 2.6 months (95% CI: 2.1-3-1). In the ER positive patients the median overall survival (OS) time was 13.3 months (95% CI: 7.7-18.9), in the ER negative patients the corresponding numbers were 6.1 months (95% CI: 4.1-8.2). Treatment with exemestane was well tolerated. Treatment of estrogen positive advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer with exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor, resulted in a response rate of 10% and lack of progression after 6 months in 35% of the patients. Trial identification number (Clinical Trials.gov): http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/NCT01965080. Nordic Society of Gynecological Oncology: NSGO–EC–0302. EudraCT number: 2004-001103-35

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trip, Anouk K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poppema, Boelo J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Siemerink, Ester [Department of Internal Medicine, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Beukema, Jannet C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Plukker, John T.M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sandick, Johanna W. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospers, Geke A.P., E-mail: g.a.p.hospers@umcg.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates.

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk K.; Poppema, Boelo J.; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Siemerink, Ester; Beukema, Jannet C.; Verheij, Marcel; Plukker, John T.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Sandick, Johanna W. van; Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates

  7. Electroglottographic Comparison of Voice Outcomes in Patients With Advanced Laryngopharyngeal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy or Total Laryngectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, Rehan; Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Johnson, Catherine; Prasad, Vyas; Clarke, Peter; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Nutting, Christopher M.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct prospective electroglottographic analyses of voice outcomes after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced laryngopharyngeal cancers and to compare them with patients who have undergone total laryngectomy (TL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients (19 male, 2 female, median age [range] 65 [50-85] years) with Stage III/IV laryngopharyngeal cancer received induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemoradiotherapy. Electroglottography, using the sustained vowel /i/ and connected speech, was performed before treatment and 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. In addition, single voice recordings were taken from 21 patients (16 male, 5 female, aged 65 [50-84] years) who had undergone TL and surgical voice restoration and from 21 normal controls (18 male, 3 female, aged 65 [33-80] years). Results: Before treatment the vocal measures for the chemoradiotherapy patients were significantly different from normal controls in jitter (p = 0.02), maximum phonation time (MPT) (p = 0.001), and words per minute (WPM) (p = 0.01). At 12 months after treatment MPT and WPM had normalized, but jitter and normalized noise energy were significantly worse than in normal controls. Comparison of voice outcomes at 12 months for chemoradiotherapy patients revealed superiority over the TL group in all parameters except MPT (18.2 s vs. 10.4 s, p = 0.06). Analysis of the recovery of voice up to 12 months after treatment revealed progressive improvement in most electroglottographic measures. Conclusions: This prospective study demonstrates significantly better outcome for patients treated with chemoradiotherapy as compared with TL. Progressive normalization of many voice parameters occurs over the 12 months following chemoradiotherapy

  8. Prognostic significance of total lesion glycolysis in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaizen, Yoshiaki [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Azuma, Koichi, E-mail: azuma@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kurata, Seiji [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Sadashima, Eiji; Hattori, Satoshi [Biostatistics Center, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Sasada, Tetsuro [Department of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Imamura, Yohei [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kaida, Hayato [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kawahara, Akihiko [Department of Pathology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Kinoshita, Takashi [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Ishibashi, Masatoshi [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan); Hoshino, Tomoaki [Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Background: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging has been employed as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant tumors. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG) on FDG-PET is calculated by multiplying the mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) by the tumor volume. Unlike the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), which represents the point of greatest metabolic activity within tumors, TLG has been suggested to reflect global metabolic activity in whole tumors. Methods: We retrospectively examined whether or not FDG-PET measurements, including SUVmean, SUVmax, and TLG, could predict progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving chemotherapy. Results: This study involved 81 consecutive patients with NSCLC who received chemotherapy. All of the patients underwent FDG-PET examination before treatment. SUVmean, SUVmax, and TLG on FDG-PET were significantly associated with gender, smoking status, and tumor histology. With adjustment for several other variables, Cox regression analysis showed that TLG was significantly prognostic for both PFS [hazard ratio = 2.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–4.64; P = 0.015] and OS (hazard ratio = 2.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.12–6.96; P = 0.003), whereas SUVmean and SUVmax had no significant association with PFS (P = 0.693 and P = 0.322, respectively) or OS (P = 0.587 and P = 0.214, respectively). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that TLG may be more useful than SUVmean and SUVmax for predicting PFS and OS in NSCLC patients receiving chemotherapy. The TLG measurement on FDG-PET imaging could be routinely recommended to advanced NSCLC patients.

  9. TOTAL NON-STRUCTURAL CARBOHYDRATE (TNC OF THREE CULTIVARS OF NAPIER GRASS (Pennisetum purpureum AT VEGETATIVE AND REPRODUCTIVE PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Budiman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to determine Total Non-structural carbohydrates (TNC of threecultivars of napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum harvested at vegetative and reproductive phases. Thecultivars tested were Taiwan (Gt, King (Gk and Mott (Gm and arranged in a 3 x 2 of treatments withfour replicates following nested design. The results showed that the highest sugar content (P<0.01 wasfound in Gt cultivar and the lowest was in Gm cultivar. The highest starch content (P<0.01 was found inGk cultivar and the lowest was in Gt cultivar. TNC content of Gt and Gk cultivars were not significantlydifferent, but both were significantly higher (P<0.01 compared with the Gm cultivar. It can beconcluded, that there were differences in TNC between cultivars, however, the TNC content in Gkcultivar was not different with Gt cultivar, while Gm cultivar have the lowest (P<0.01 TNC content. Atreproductive phase all cultivars have higher (P<0.01 TNC and starch content than at vegetative phase

  10. Body composition, symptoms, and survival in advanced cancer patients referred to a phase I service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique A Parsons

    Full Text Available Body weight and body composition are relevant to the outcomes of cancer and antineoplastic therapy. However, their role in Phase I clinical trial patients is unknown.We reviewed symptom burden, body composition, and survival in 104 patients with advanced cancer referred to a Phase I oncology service. Symptom burden was analyzed using the MD Anderson Symptom Assessment Inventory(MDASI; body composition was evaluated utilizing computerized tomography(CT images. A body mass index (BMI≥25 kg/m² was considered overweight. Sarcopenia, severe muscle depletion, was assessed using CT-based criteria.Most patients were overweight (n = 65, 63%; 53 patients were sarcopenic (51%, including 79% of patients with a BMI<25 kg/m² and 34% of those with BMI≥25 kg/m². Sarcopenic patients were older and less frequently African-American. Symptom burden did not differ among patients classified according to BMI and presence of sarcopenia. Median (95% confidence interval survival (days varied according to body composition: 215 (71-358 (BMI<25 kg/m²; sarcopenic, 271 (99-443 (BMI<25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic, 484 (286-681 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; sarcopenic; 501 d (309-693 (BMI≥25 kg/m²; non-sarcopenic. Higher muscle index and gastrointestinal cancer diagnosis predicted longer survival in multivariate analysis after controlling for age, gender, performance status, and fat index.Patients referred to a Phase I clinic had a high frequency of sarcopenia and a BMI≥25 kg/m², independent of symptom burden. Body composition variables were predictive of clinically relevant survival differences, which is potentially important in developing Phase I studies.

  11. Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 and Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot (RASSOR) Phase 2 is an excavation robot for mining regolith on a planet like Mars. The robot is programmed using the Robotic Operating System (ROS) and it also uses a physical simulation program called Gazebo. This internship focused on various functions of the program in order to make it a more professional and efficient robot. During the internship another project called the Smart Autonomous Sand-Swimming Excavator was worked on. This is a robot that is designed to dig through sand and extract sample material. The intern worked on programming the Sand-Swimming robot, and designing the electrical system to power and control the robot.

  12. Application of advanced statistical methods in assessment of the late phase of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, R.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a new methodology for improving of estimates of radiological situation on terrain in the late phase of a nuclear accident. Methods of Bayesian filtering are applied to the problem. The estimates are based on combination of modeled and measured data provided by responsible authorities. Exploiting information on uncertainty of both the data sources, we are able to produce improved estimate of the true situation on terrain. We also attempt to account for model error, which is unknown and plays crucial role in accuracy of the estimates. The main contribution of this paper is application of an approach based on advanced statistical methods, which allows for estimating of model error covariance structure upon measurements. Model error is estimated on basis of measured-minus-observed residuals evaluated upon measured and modeled values. The methodology is demonstrated on a sample scenario with simulated measurements. (authors)

  13. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design

  14. Application of advanced statistical methods in assessment of the late phase of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, R.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a new methodology for improving of estimates of radiological situation on terrain in the late phase of a nuclear accident. Methods of Bayesian filtering are applied to the problem. The estimates are based on combination of modeled and measured data provided by responsible authorities. Exploiting information on uncertainty of both the data sources, we are able to produce improved estimate of the true situation on terrain. We also attempt to account for model error, which is unknown and plays crucial role in accuracy of the estimates. The main contribution of this paper is application of an approach based on advanced statistical methods, which allows for estimating of model error covariance structure upon measurements. Model error is estimated on basis of measured-minus-observed residuals evaluated upon measured and modeled values. The methodology is demonstrated on a sample scenario with simulated measurements. (authors)

  15. Diffusion, Thermal Properties and Chemical Compatibilities of Select MAX Phases with Materials For Advanced Nuclear Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoum, Michel [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bentzel, Grady [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tallman, Darin J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sindelar, Robert [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcia-Diaz, Brenda [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hoffman, Elizabeth [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-04

    The demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron irradiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ ºC) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical compatibility of select MAX with potential materials that are important for nuclear energy, as well as to measure the thermal transport properties as a function of neutron irradiation. The chemical counterparts chosen for this work are: pyrolytic carbon, SiC, U, Pd, FLiBe, Pb-Bi and Na, the latter 3 in the molten state. The thermal conductivities and heat capacities of non-irradiated MAX phases will be measured.

  16. Gas-phase advanced oxidation for effective, efficient in situ control of pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Svensson, Erik Anders

    2014-01-01

    In this article, gas-phase advanced oxidation, a new method for pollution control building on the photo-oxidation and particle formation chemistry occurring in the atmosphere, is introduced and characterized. The process uses ozone and UV-C light to produce in situ radicals to oxidize pollution......, generating particles that are removed by a filter; ozone is removed using a MnO2 honeycomb catalyst. This combination of in situ processes removes a wide range of pollutants with a comparatively low specific energy input. Two proof-of-concept devices were built to test and optimize the process...... particulate mass. Secondary pollution including formaldehyde and ultrafine particles might be generated, depending on the composition of the primary pollution....

  17. Separation of total lipids on human lipoproteins using surfactant-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes as pseudostationary phase in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Yu; Chen, Yen-Yi; Yang, Jian-Ying; Lin, You-Sian; Lin, Yang-Wei; Liu, Mine-Yine

    2014-04-01

    Surfactant-coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were used as pseudostationary phase (PSP) in CE to investigate the total lipids of high-density lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins. To optimize the CE conditions, several experimental factors including carbon nanotube concentration, bile salt concentration, sodium phosphate (PB) concentration, organic modifier concentration and buffer pH value have been examined. In addition, the CE capillary temperature and applied voltage have also been examined. The optimal separation buffer selected was a mixture of 3.2 mg/L MWNT, 50 mM bile salt, 10 mM PB, 20% 1-propanol, pH 9.5. The optimal capillary temperature and applied voltage selected were 50°C and 20 kV, respectively. Phosphatidyl choline (PC) has been used as a model analyte and investigated by the optimal CE method. The linear range for PC was 0.1-3 mg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9934, and the concentration LOD was 0.055 mg/mL. The optimal CE method has been used to characterize the total lipids of high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein. At absorbance 200 nm, one major peak and two or three minor peaks showed for the total lipids of lipoproteins within 13 minutes. Resolutions of the total lipids were enhanced using surfactant-coated MWNTs as PSPs in the CE separation buffer. However, resolutions of the total lipids were not enhanced using surfactant-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes as PSPs in the CE separation buffer. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Parkinsonian syndromes presenting with circadian rhythm sleep disorder- advanced sleep-phase type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Garima; Kaul, Bhavna; Gupta, Anupama; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorder-advanced sleep-phase type is a relatively uncommon disorder, mostly seen among the elderly population. Impaired circadian rhythms have been reported in neurodegenerative conditions; however, there are no reports of any circadian rhythm sleep disorder among patients with Parkinsonian syndromes. We report two patients who presented with this circadian rhythm disorder, and were then diagnosed with a Parkinsonian syndrome. The cases. A 65-year-old retired man presented with history of abrupt change in sleep schedules, sleeping around 6.30-7 p.m. and waking up around 3-4 a.m. for the last 2 months. On detailed examination, the patient was observed to have symmetrical bradykinesia and cogwheel rigidity of limbs. A diagnosis of multiple system atrophy was made, supported by MRI findings and evidence of autonomic dysfunction. Symptoms of change in sleep-wake cycles resolved over the next 1 year, while the patient was treated with dopaminergic therapy. A 47-year-old man, who was being evaluated for presurgical investigation for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, presented with complaints suggestive of dysarthria, bradykinesia of limbs and frequent falls for 5 months. Simultaneously, he began to sleep around 7 p.m. and wake up at about 2-3 a.m. Examination revealed severe axial rigidity, restricted vertical gaze and bradykinesia of limbs. A diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy was made. This is the first report of Parkinson's plus syndromes presenting with a circadian rhythm sleep disorder-advanced sleep-phase type. More prospective assessment for circadian sleep disorders may introduce useful insights into similar associations. Copyright 2015, NMJI.

  19. Phase I study of single-agent ribociclib in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshihiko; Hewes, Becker; Kakizume, Tomoyuki; Tajima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Norifumi; Yamada, Yasuhide

    2018-01-01

    The cyclin D-CDK4/6-INK4-Rb pathway is frequently dysregulated in cancers. Ribociclib, an orally available, selective CDK4/6 inhibitor, showed preliminary clinical activity in a phase I study in the USA and Europe for patients with solid tumors and lymphomas. The present study aimed to determine the single-agent maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended dose for expansion (RDE) in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. Ribociclib safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic profile, and preliminary antitumor activity were also assessed. Japanese patients with solid tumors that had progressed on prior therapies received escalating doses of single-agent ribociclib on a 3-weeks-on/1-week-off schedule. Treatment continued until the development of toxicity or disease progression. A dose escalation was planned for patients with esophageal cancer. In the dose-escalation phase, 4 patients received 400 mg ribociclib and 13 patients received 600 mg ribociclib. Four patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities, 3 of whom were in the 600 mg group. The RDE was declared to be 600 mg, and the MTD was not determined. The most frequent adverse events were hematologic and gastrointestinal. Four patients achieved stable disease at the 600 mg dose; no patients achieved complete or partial response. All patients discontinued the study, the majority due to disease progression. No patients discontinued due to adverse events. Dose escalation was not pursued due to lack of observed efficacy in esophageal cancer. At the RDE of 600 mg/d on a 3-weeks-on/1-week-off schedule, ribociclib showed acceptable safety and tolerability profiles in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Phase 2 Study of Bevacizumab Plus Erlotinib in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philip A.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Holen, Kyle D.; Northfelt, Donald W.; Pitot, Henry C.; Picus, Joel; Flynn, Patrick J.; Erlichman, Charles

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are rational targets for therapy in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). METHODS Patients with histologically proven HCC and not amenable to curative or liver directed therapy were included in this 2-stage phase 2 trial. Eligibility included an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of 0 or 1 and Child’s Pugh score of A or B, and 1 prior systemic therapy. Patients received erlotinib 150 mg daily and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Objective tumor response was the primary end point. RESULTS Twenty-seven patients with advanced HCC (median age, 60 years) were enrolled in this multi-institutional study. The proportion of patients with Child’s A classification was 74%. One patient had a confirmed partial response and 11 (48%) achieved stable disease. Median time to disease progression was 3.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-7.1). Median survival time was 9.5 months (95% CI, 7.1-17.1). Grade 3 toxicities included rash, hypertension, fatigue, and diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS In this trial, erlotinib combined with bevacizumab had minimal activity in patients with advanced HCC based on objective response and progression-free survival. The role of targeting EGFR and VEGF in HCC needs further evaluation in molecularly selected patients. PMID:21953248

  1. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at

  2. A phase Ib study of pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer (PembroPlus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Waypa, Jordan; Blaydorn, Lisa; Coats, Jessica; McGahey, Kayla; Sangal, Ashish; Niu, Jiaxin; Lynch, Cynthia A; Farley, John H; Khemka, Vivek

    2017-06-27

    Pembrolizumab (P) is an anti-PD-1 antibody that blocks the interaction between programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) on T-cells and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on tumour cells. A phase Ib trial of P plus chemotherapy was undertaken to evaluate the safety and efficacy. Patients with advanced, metastatic solid tumours were enrolled onto one of six treatment arms. Pembrolizumab was given: with gemcitabine (G), G+docetaxel (D), G+nab-paclitaxel (NP), G+vinorelbine (V) or irinotecan (I) until progression or toxicity, or with liposomal doxorubicin (LD) for up to 15 cycles, progression or toxicity. Safety monitoring and response assessments were conducted. Forty-nine patients were enrolled and treated. The most common adverse events were transaminitis, cytopenias, rash, diarrhoea, fatigue, nausea and vomiting. Arm 2 was closed due to poor accrual. The recommended phase II dose (RP2D) was determined for Arms 1, 3a, 4, 5 and 6. There were eight partial responses across multiple tumour types. Standard dose P can be safely combined with G, G+NP, G+V, I and LD. Efficacy was observed in multiple tumour types and evaluation to determine if response and duration of response are more robust than what would be expected for chemotherapy or immunotherapy alone requires further validation.

  3. Posterior pelvic exenteration and retrograde total hysterectomy in patients with locally advanced ovarian cancer: Clinical and functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berretta

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Our study confirmed that pelvic posterior exenteration associated with retrograde radical hysterectomy represents the safest radical surgical approach to advanced ovarian cancer, which permits preservation of the pelvic autonomic nerve plexus and, therefore, bladder and colorectal functions.

  4. Phase I Trial of Gross Total Resection, Permanent Iodine-125 Brachytherapy, and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chang, Susan; Pouliot, Jean; Sneed, Penny K.; Prados, Michael D.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Malec, Mary K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchell S.; Larson, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: From April 1999 to May 2002, 21 patients with glioblastoma multiforme were enrolled on a Phase I protocol investigating planned gross total resection and immediate placement of permanent I-125 seeds, followed by postoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy at 100 cGy b.i.d., 5 days per week. Median age and Karnofsky performance status were 50 years (range, 32-65 years) and 90 (range, 70-100), respectively. Toxicity was assessed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: Eighteen patients completed treatment according to protocol. The median preoperative tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging was 18.6 cm 3 (range, 4.4-41.2 cm 3 ). The median brachytherapy dose measured 5 mm radially outward from the resection cavity was 400 Gy (range, 200-600 Gy). Ten patients underwent 12 reoperations, with 11 of 12 reoperations demonstrating necrosis without evidence of tumor. Because of high toxicity, the study was terminated early. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 57 and 114 weeks, respectively, but not significantly improved compared with historical patients treated at University of California, San Francisco, with gross total resection and radiotherapy without brachytherapy. Conclusions: Treatment with gross total resection and permanent I-125 brachytherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy as performed in this study results in high toxicity and reoperation rates, without demonstrated improvement in survival

  5. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as 252 Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2

  6. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  7. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  8. Phase I dose escalating trial of hyperfractinated pre-operative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lanciano, Rachelle M.; Scher, Richard M.; Weiner, Louis M.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John P.; Cooper, Harry S.; Provins, Susan; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the acute toxicity, post-operative complications, pathologic response and extent of downstaging to high dose pre-operative radiation using hyperfractionated radiation boost and concurrent chemotherapy in a prospective Phase I trial. MATERIALS and METHODS: To be eligible for this study, patients had to have adenocarcinoma of the rectum less than 12 cm from the anal verge with either Stage T4 or T3 but greater than 4 cm or greater than 40% of the bowel circumference. Pre-operative T-stage was based on digital rectal examination (DRE), endorectal ultrasound or Helmholtz coil pelvic MRI. All patients received 45 Gy pelvic radiation (1.8 Gy per fraction). Subsequent radiation was given to the region of the gross tumor with a 2 cm margin in all directions with the aid of CT simulation. This 'boost' treatment was given at 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 54.6 Gy for Level I, 57 Gy for Level II, and 61.8 Gy for Level III. 5-FU was given at 1g/m 2 over 24 hours for a four day infusion during the first and fifth weeks of radiation, with the second course concurrent with the hyperfractionated radiation. Surgical resection was to be carried out four to six weeks following completion of chemoradiation (in curative cases) and additional adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of 5-FU and Leucovorin was to be given for an additional four monthly cycles Days 1 through 5 beginning four weeks post surgery. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients, age 40-82 (median 61), completed the initial course of chemoradiation and are included in the analysis of toxicity. The median follow-up is 24 months (range 8-39). Eleven patients were treated to a dose of 54.6 Gy, nine patients to 57 Gy, and seven patients to 61.8 Gy. Twenty-one patients had T3 tumors, and six patients T4 tumors. Median tumor length was 5 cm, median diameter 4 cm, and circumferential involvement greater than (1(3)) was present in 20 patients. Nine patients had primaries that were fixed or tethered on DRE. Grade

  9. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). Phase 1: System scoping and feasibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D. J.

    1993-04-01

    As part of this involvement, Solar intends to design and commercialize a unique gas turbine system that promises high cycle efficiencies and low exhaust emissions. This engine of approximately 12-MW will be targeted for the dispersed power markets both urban and rural. Goals of 50% thermal efficiency and 8 parts-per-million by volume (ppmv) nitrogen oxide emissions were established. Reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) will continue to be the most important factors in the competitive marketplace. The other major goal adopted was one of reducing the cost of power produced by 10%. This reduction is based on the cost of power (COP) associated with today's engines that lie in the same horsepower range as that targeted in this study. An advanced cycle based on an approximation of the Ericsson Cycle was adopted after careful studies of a number of different cycles. This advanced intercooled, recuperated engine when fired at 2450 F will be capable of meeting the 50% efficiency goal if the cooling air requirements do not exceed 7% of the total air flow rate. This latter qualification will probably dictate the use of ceramic parts for both the nozzle guide vanes and the turbine blades. Cooling of these parts will probably be required and the 7% cooling flow allowance is thought to be adequate for such materials. Analyses of the cost of power and RAM goals show that the installed cost of this advanced engine can be approximately 50% above today's costs. This cost is based on $4.00 per million Btu fuel and a COP reduction of 10% while maintaining the same RAM as today's engines.

  10. Sorafenib and locoregional deep electro-hyperthermia in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    GADALETA-CALDAROLA, GENNARO; INFUSINO, STEFANIA; GALISE, IDA; RANIERI, GIROLAMO; VINCIARELLI, GIANLUCA; FAZIO, VITO; DIVELLA, ROSA; DANIELE, ANTONELLA; FILIPPELLI, GIANFRANCO; GADALETA, COSMO DAMIANO

    2014-01-01

    The standard treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Hyperthermia inhibits angiogenesis and promotes apoptosis. Potential synergic antiangiogenic and proapoptotic effects represent the rationale for combining sorafenib with electro-hyperthermia (EHY) in HCC. A total of 21 patients (median age, 64 years; range, 55–73 years) with advanced HCC were enrolled in the current study between February 2009 and September 2010. EHY was achieved by arranging capacitive electrodes with a deep hypothermia radiofrequency field of 13.56 Mhz at 80 W for 60 min, three times per week for six weeks, followed by two weeks without treatment, in combination with sorafenib at a dose of 800 mg every other day. According to the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 50% achieved stable disease, 5% achieved partial response and 45% achieved progressive disease. No complete response was observed. The progression-free survival (PFS) rate at six months was 38%, while the median PFS and overall survival times were 5.2 [95% confidence interval (CI), 4.2–6.2) and 10.4 (95% CI, 10–11) months, respectively. The overall incidence of treatment-related adverse events was 80%, predominantly of grade 1 or 2. Grade 3 toxicity included fatigue, diarrhea, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. In the present study, the sorafenib plus EHY combination was feasible and well tolerated, and no major complications were observed. The initial findings indicated that this combination offers a promising option for advanced HCC. PMID:25202410

  11. Characterization and Suppression of the Electromagnetic Interference Induced Phase Shift in the JLab FEL Photo - Injector Advanced Drive Laser System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. G. Wilson, D. Sexton, S. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The drive laser for the photo-cathode gun used in the JLab Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility had been experiencing various phase shifts on the order of tens of degrees (>20{sup o} at 1497 MHz or >40ps) when changing the Advanced Drive Laser (ADL) [2][3][4] micro-pulse frequencies. These phase shifts introduced multiple complications when trying to setup the accelerator for operation, ultimately inhibiting the robustness and overall performance of the FEL. Through rigorous phase measurements and systematic characterizations, we determined that the phase shifts could be attributed to electromagnetic interference (EMI) coupling into the ADL phase control loop, and subsequently resolved the issue of phase shift to within tenths of a degree (<0.5{sup o} at 1497 MHz or <1ps). The diagnostic method developed and the knowledge gained through the entire process will prove to be invaluable for future designs of similar systems.

  12. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  13. Advanced direct liquefaction concepts for PETC generic units. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Concepts for Direct Coal Liquefaction program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1991 to develop technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of producing liquid fuels by the direct liquefaction of coal. The advanced 2-stage liquefaction technology that was developed at Wilsonville over the past 10 years has contributed significantly toward decreasing the cost of producing liquids from coal to about $33/bbl. It remains, however, the objective of DOE to further reduce this cost to a level more competitive with petroleum based products. This project, among others, was initiated to investigate various alternative approaches to develop technologies that might ultimately lead to a 25 % reduction in cost of product. In this project a number of novel concepts were investigated, either individually or in a coupled configuration that had the potential to contribute toward meeting the DOE goal. The concepts included mature technologies or ones closely related to them, such as coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, fluid coking and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Other approaches that were either embryonic or less developed were chemical pretreatment of coal to remove oxygen, and dispersed catalyst development for application in the 2-stage liquefaction process. This report presents the results of this project. It is arranged in four sections which were prepared by participating organizations responsible for that phase of the project. A summary of the overall project and the principal results are given in this section. First, however, an overview of the process economics and the process concepts that were developed during the course of this program is presented.

  14. Biomarker-Based Phase II Trial of Savolitinib in Patients With Advanced Papillary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Toni K; Plimack, Elizabeth; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Jonasch, Eric; Heng, Daniel Y C; Powles, Thomas; Frigault, Melanie M; Clark, Edwin A; Handzel, Amir A; Gardner, Humphrey; Morgan, Shethah; Albiges, Laurence; Pal, Sumanta Kumar

    2017-09-10

    Purpose Patients with advanced papillary renal cell carcinoma (PRCC) have limited therapeutic options. PRCC may involve activation of the MET pathway, for example, through gene amplification or mutations. Savolitinib (AZD6094, HMPL-504, volitinib) is a highly selective MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We report results of a single-arm, multicenter, phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of savolitinib in patients with PRCC according to MET status. Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed locally advanced or metastatic PRCC were enrolled and received savolitinib 600 mg orally once daily. MET-driven PRCC was defined as any of the following: chromosome 7 copy gain, focal MET or HGF gene amplification, or MET kinase domain mutations. Efficacy was assessed according to MET status. Safety, toxicity, and patient-reported health-related quality-of-life outcomes were assessed in all patients. Results Of 109 patients treated, PRCC was MET driven in 44 (40%) and MET independent in 46 (42%); MET status was unknown in 19 (17%). MET-driven PRCC was strongly associated with response; there were eight confirmed partial responders with MET-driven disease (18%), but none with MET-independent disease ( P = .002). Median progression-free survival for patients with MET-driven and MET-independent PRCC was 6.2 months (95% CI, 4.1 to 7.0 months) and 1.4 months (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.7 months), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.52; log-rank P < .001). The most frequent adverse events associated with savolitinib were nausea, fatigue, vomiting, and peripheral edema. Conclusion These data show activity and tolerability of savolitinib in the subgroup of patients with MET-driven PRCC. Furthermore, molecular characterization of MET status was more predictive of response to savolitinib than a classification based on pathology. These findings justify investigating savolitinib in MET-driven PRCC.

  15. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  16. Phase I study of conformal radiotherapy with concurrent gemcitabine in locally advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangar, Vijay K.; McBain, Catherine A.; Lyons, Jeanette; Ramani, Vijay; Logue, John; Wylie, James; Clarke, Noel W.; Cowan, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase I trial was conducted to determine the maximal tolerated dose of gemcitabine given once weekly during hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy to patients with locally advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Eight male patients, median age 69 years, with Stage T2 (n = 4) or T3 (n = 4) N0M0, were enrolled in cohorts of 3. Treatment comprised conformal radiotherapy (52.5 Gy in 20 fractions) within 4 weeks, with concurrent gemcitabine once weekly for four cycles. The weekly gemcitabine dose was escalated from 100 mg/m 2 in increments of 50 mg/m 2 per cohort. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity Grade 3 or greater arising in >1 of 3 patients in each cohort. Tumor response was assessed cystoscopically and radiologically at 3 months. Results: All 8 patients completed radiotherapy, and 6 of 8 completed chemoradiotherapy. No acute toxicity greater than RTOG Grade 1 was seen with gemcitabine at 100 mg/m 2 . Dose-limiting toxicity was observed at 150 mg/m 2 with Grade 3 toxicity seen in 2 of 2 patients (one bladder, one bowel). An additional 3 patients received 100 mg/m 2 with minimal toxicity. No hematologic toxicity was encountered. A complete response was seen in 7 (87.5%) of 8 patients, all of whom were disease free at a median follow-up of 19.5 months (range, 14-23 months). No late toxicity (greater than RTOG Grade 0) has been observed. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose for gemcitabine given once weekly with concurrent hypofractionated conformal bladder radiotherapy was 150 mg/m 2 , with a maximal recommended dose of 100 mg/m 2 . This dose regimen has now entered Phase II clinical trials

  17. A phase I study of vorinostat in combination with bortezomib in patients with advanced malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelman, William R; Traynor, Anne M; Holen, Kyle D; Kolesar, Jill M; Attia, Steven; Hoang, Tien; Eickhoff, Jens; Jiang, Zhisheng; Alberti, Dona; Marnocha, Rebecca; Reid, Joel M; Ames, Matthew M; McGovern, Renee M; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Wright, John J; Wilding, George; Bailey, Howard H

    2013-12-01

    A phase I study to assess the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics (PK) and antitumor activity of vorinostat in combination with bortezomib in patients with advanced solid tumors. Patients received vorinostat orally once daily on days 1-14 and bortezomib intravenously on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 of a 21-day cycle. Starting dose (level 1) was vorinostat (400 mg) and bortezomib (0.7 mg/m(2)). Bortezomib dosing was increased using a standard phase I dose-escalation schema. PKs were evaluated during cycle 1. Twenty-three patients received 57 cycles of treatment on four dose levels ranging from bortezomib 0.7 mg/m(2) to 1.5 mg/m(2). The MTD was established at vorinostat 400 mg daily and bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2). DLTs consisted of grade 3 fatigue in three patients (1 mg/m(2),1.3 mg/m(2) and 1.5 mg/m(2)) and grade 3 hyponatremia in one patient (1.5 mg/m(2)). The most common grade 1/2 toxicities included nausea (60.9%), fatigue (34.8%), diaphoresis (34.8%), anorexia (30.4%) and constipation (26.1%). Objective partial responses were observed in one patient with NSCLC and in one patient with treatment-refractory soft tissue sarcoma. Bortezomib did not affect the PKs of vorinostat; however, the Cmax and AUC of the acid metabolite were significantly increased on day 2 compared with day 1. This combination was generally well-tolerated at doses that achieved clinical benefit. The MTD was established at vorinostat 400 mg daily × 14 days and bortezomib 1.3 mg/m(2) on days 1, 4, 8 and 11 of a 21-day cycle.

  18. Single high dose intraoperative electrons for advanced stage pancreatic cancer: Phase I pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldson, A.L.; Ashaveri, E.; Espinoza, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    Phase I toxicity studies with intraoperative radiotherapy proved to be a feasible adjunct to surgery for unresectable malignancies of the pancreas at Howard University Hospital. There have been minimal side effects or complications related to the combination of limited surgical decompression and intraoperative radiotherapy alone. The toxic effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on normal tissues is being assessed on a dose volume basis. Doses of 2000 to 2500 rad in a single exposure to include the pancreas, regional nodes and duodenum are acceptable if the total treatment volume is less than or equal to 100 cm. The tumoricidal effects on the cancer are demonstratable when one reviews the pathological specimens that illustrate massive tumor necrosis and fibros replacement, but in all cases reviewed, viable cancer was noted. Intraoperative radiotherapy, therefore, represents a significant boost dose for resectable, partially resectable or non-resectable tumors when added to conventional external beam irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary clinical data and minimal toxicity justifies further investigation

  19. Watershed and discharge influences on the phase distribution and tributary loading of total mercury and methylmercury into Lake Superior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babiarz, Christopher; Hoffmann, Stephen; Wieben, Ann; Hurley, James; Andren, Anders; Shafer, Martin; Armstrong, David

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the partitioning and sources of mercury are important to understanding the human impact on mercury levels in Lake Superior wildlife. Fluvial fluxes of total mercury (Hg T ) and methylmercury (MeHg) were compared to discharge and partitioning trends in 20 sub-basins having contrasting land uses and geological substrates. The annual tributary yield was correlated with watershed characteristics and scaled up to estimate the basin-wide loading. Tributaries with clay sediments and agricultural land use had the largest daily yields with maxima observed near the peak in water discharge. Roughly 42% of Hg T and 57% of MeHg was delivered in the colloidal phase. Tributary inputs, which are confined to near-shore zones of the lake, may be more important to the food-web than atmospheric sources. The annual basin-wide loading from tributaries was estimated to be 277 kg yr −1 Hg T and 3.4 kg yr −1 MeHg (5.5 and 0.07 mg km −2 d −1 , respectively). - Highlights: ► The highest mercury yields occurred during spring melt except in forested watersheds. ► Roughly half of the mercury yield occurred in the colloidal phase. ► About 277 kg of Hg T and 3.4 kg of MeHg were delivered annually via tributaries. ► Whole-water MeHg loading was roughly equivalent to the estimated atmospheric loading. ► Watersheds with peat, loam or sandy soils deliver more MeHg than those with clays. - Tributary inputs, which are confined to the near-shore zones of Lake Superior, provide more mercury to these sensitive aquatic habitats than direct atmospheric deposition.

  20. Pooled analysis of phase II trials evaluating weekly or conventional cisplatin as first-line therapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hussain, Syed A

    2013-01-01

    Weekly gemcitabine with GC every 3-4 weeks is considered conventional first-line chemotherapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC). Weekly split-dose cisplatin with wGC might be less toxic and have similar activity, but has not been compared with GC. We pooled published phase II trials of GC an...

  1. Phase I trial of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy with S-1 and weekly irinotecan in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Jin; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Keum, Ki Chang; Cheon, Seong Ha; Shin, Sang Jun; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Choen, Jae Hee; Rha, Sun Young; Roh, Jae Kyung; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Ahn, Joong Bae

    2008-01-01

    S-1 is a novel, oral fluoropyrimidine and a known radiosensitizer. We conducted a phase I trial to establish a schedule of S-1/irinotecan with standard pelvic radiotherapy as a preoperative treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer. Our findings suggest that this new combination is feasible and well tolerable

  2. Advanced fabrication method for the preparation of MOF thin films: Liquid-phase epitaxy approach meets spin coating method.

    KAUST Repository

    Chernikova, Valeriya; Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a new and advanced method for the fabrication of highly oriented/polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films. Building on the attractive features of the liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) approach, a facile spin coating method

  3. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marble, Justin [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  4. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg; Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian; Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David; Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan; Marble, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  5. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsoo Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  6. Limitations of the Conventional Phase Advance Method for Constant Power Operation of the Brushless DC Motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The brushless dc motor (BDCM) has high-power density and efficiency relative to other motor types. These properties make the BDCM well suited for applications in electric vehicles provided a method can be developed for driving the motor over the 4 to 6:1 constant power speed range (CPSR) required by such applications. The present state of the art for constant power operation of the BDCM is conventional phase advance (CPA)[1]. In this paper, we identify key limitations of CPA. It is shown that the CPA has effective control over the developed power but that the current magnitude is relatively insensitive to power output and is inversely proportional to motor inductance. If the motor inductance is low, then the rms current at rated power and high speed may be several times larger than the current rating. The inductance required to maintain rms current within rating is derived analytically and is found to be large relative to that of BDCM designs using high-strength rare earth magnets. Th us, the CPA requires a BDCM with a large equivalent inductance

  7. Application of an advanced cost model in the different design phases of an offshore wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, H.B.; Lindenburg, C.; Kooijman, H.J.T.; Bulder, B.H. [ECN Wind, Petten (Netherlands); Bozelie, J.; Madsen, J.B. [NEG Micon Holland, Rhenen (Netherlands); Halfschepel, R. [Van Oord ACZ, Gorinchem (Netherlands); Molenaar, W. [Ballast Nedam, Amstelveen (Netherlands); Van den Berg, R. [LM Glasfiber Holland, Heerhugowaard (Netherlands); Zaaijer, M. [TU-Delft, Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-09-01

    The goal of the Dutch Offshore Wind Energy Converter (DOWEC) consortium is to develop concepts and technology in order to make large scale offshore wind energy economically feasible. The overall DOWEC development comprises of the design, the construction, and the prototype testing. Onshore testing of a 3 MW research and development prototype is scheduled for the end of 2002. The DOWEC Concept Study aims at the choice of the optimal wind turbine concept. The wind turbine will not be treated as an isolated system. Designs of different wind turbine concepts will be evaluated as an integral part of the complete large-scale offshore wind farm. All significant properties like the structural loads, the power performance, the system reliability, the costs of the electric infrastructure, maintenance costs and installation costs is determined for the optimised designs. A quantitative ranking is then based on the cost of energy generated. Furthermore qualitative criteria like development risk and market potential will be taken into consideration when finalising the choice of concept. An advanced cost model is being developed to facilitate the above evaluation on basis of estimated energy generating costs for each concept. The same methodology will also be used in the system and detail design phase. This paper describes the DOWEC project in general, focusing at the cost modelling aspects including some preliminary results. 4 refs.

  8. Celecoxib plus chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase II TCOG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Lee, Hao-Hsien; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chang; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chien, Chun-Ru; Lin, Tze-Yi; Liu, Tsang-Wu

    2014-05-01

    To report the results of a phase II trial combining celecoxib and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer were treated with radiotherapy of 44 Gy in 22 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oral tegafur-uracil and folinate on days 1-30 and 38-65. Celecoxib (400 mg/day) given from days 1 to 65. Surgery was done on day 70. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in tumor tissues was evaluated microscopically as a prognostic factor. From 2008 to 2011, 53 patients completed CRT+ celecoxib therapy and 47 received radical surgery. Grade 3 diarrhea developed in 5 (9%). Grade 4 anemia was seen in 2 (4%). Pathological complete response (pCR) was seen in 6 (13%). T or N downstaging found in 38 (81%). Sphincter preservation was achieved in 77% of low-positioned tumors. Patients with tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT + celecoxib treatment had inferior pelvic control (P = 0.01), disease-free survival (P = 0.04), and overall survival (P = 0.03) than those with low-level expression. Celecoxib can be safely combined with preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. More intensified adjuvant therapy may be considered for tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT and surgery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Chemo-radiotherapy plus hyperthermia in locally advanced cervical cancer: preliminary results of an institutional phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbani, M.; Marciai, N.; Maluta, S.; Griso, C.; Merlin, F.; Cassandrini, P.; Giudici, S.; Franchi, M.; Zanini, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radiotherapy given concurrently with a cisplatin-based regimen has shown a benefit in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer so becoming the new standard treatment according to EBM criteria. Addition of hyperthermia to radiotherapy has also been proved to yield an advantage in survival and local control in pts affected by recurrent and local advanced cervical cancer in the Dutch Phase III trial so that the Consensus Forum of Kadota (Osaha June 2004) included cervical cancer among tumors treatable with hyperthermia. In our institutional multidisciplinary team a pilot study has been designed in order to evaluate feasibility, outcome and toxicity of tri-modality treatment in pts with locally advanced cervical cancer in our daily practice. Since January 2003 to now eight patients affected by cervical cancer with stage IB2 through IVA N0-N+ pelvic or paraaortic were entered the study. Six patients were treated at initial diagnosis and two patients after chemotherapy which had achieved stable disease. Treatment regimen consisted in 5 courses of weekly chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/mq) with concurrent external radiotherapy to a total dose of 64-66 Gy on CTV1 and 45 Gy on para-aortic nodes plus boost in pts with enlarged nodes identified by imaging. Five weekly sessions of hyperthermia were performed by using BSD 2000 system and sigma 60 applicator. No significant toxicity occurred and all of the patients completed tri-modality treatment in accordance with the study protocol. Seven pts experienced a complete clinical remission and one patient a partial remission as defined by clinical and imaging examinations. After four months from the end of the treatment a patient with Stage IIB bulky tumor plus one pelvic positive node who was in complete remission (Clinical examination, MRI and TAC-PET three months from the end of the treatment were negative for evidence of disease) developed a bleeding recto-vaginal fistula plus central pelvic necrosis for which an

  10. Total On-line Access Data System (TOADS): Phase II Final Report for the Period August 2002 - August 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuracko, K. L. [YAHSGS LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Parang, M. [YAHSGS LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Landguth, D. C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coleman, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2004-09-13

    TOADS (Total On-line Access Data System) is a new generation of real-time monitoring and information management system developed to support unattended environmental monitoring and long-term stewardship of U.S. Department of Energy facilities and sites. TOADS enables project managers, regulators, and stakeholders to view environmental monitoring information in realtime over the Internet. Deployment of TOADS at government facilities and sites will reduce the cost of monitoring while increasing confidence and trust in cleanup and long term stewardship activities. TOADS: Reliably interfaces with and acquires data from a wide variety of external databases, remote systems, and sensors such as contaminant monitors, area monitors, atmospheric condition monitors, visual surveillance systems, intrusion devices, motion detectors, fire/heat detection devices, and gas/vapor detectors; Provides notification and triggers alarms as appropriate; Performs QA/QC on data inputs and logs the status of instruments/devices; Provides a fully functional data management system capable of storing, analyzing, and reporting on data; Provides an easy-to-use Internet-based user interface that provides visualization of the site, data, and events; and Enables the community to monitor local environmental conditions in real time. During this Phase II STTR project, TOADS has been developed and successfully deployed for unattended facility, environmental, and radiological monitoring at a Department of Energy facility.

  11. Comparison of particle image velocimetry and phase contrast MRI in a patient-specific extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Hiroumi D; Sundareswaran, Kartik S; Teisseyre, Thomas Z; Astary, Garrett W; Parks, W James; Skrinjar, Oskar; Oshinski, John N; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2008-08-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) have not been compared in complex biofluid environments. Such analysis is particularly useful to investigate flow structures in the correction of single ventricle congenital heart defects, where fluid dynamic efficiency is essential. A stereolithographic replica of an extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) is studied using PIV and PC-MRI in a steady flow loop. Volumetric two-component PIV is compared to volumetric three-component PC-MRI at various flow conditions. Similar flow structures are observed in both PIV and PC-MRI, where smooth flow dominates the extracardiac TCPC, and superior vena cava flow is preferential to the right pulmonary artery, while inferior vena cava flow is preferential to the left pulmonary artery. Where three-component velocity is available in PC-MRI studies, some helical flow in the extracardiac TCPC is observed. Vessel cross sections provide an effective means of validation for both experiments, and velocity magnitudes are of the same order. The results highlight similarities to validate flow in a complex patient-specific extracardiac TCPC. Additional information obtained by velocity in three components further describes the complexity of the flow in anatomic structures.

  12. Advanced Nanostructured Cathode for Ultra High Specific Energy Lithium Ion Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Integrate advanced nanotechnology with energy storage technology to develop advanced cathode materials for use in Li-ion batteries while maintaining a high level of...

  13. Phase II trial of cytarabine, cisplatin and vindesine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, A; Perez, J E; Machiavelli, M; Leone, B A; Romero, A; Rabinovich, M G; Vallejo, C T; Rodriguez, R; Cuevas, M A; Alvarez, L A

    1990-02-28

    Thirty-two patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were entered in this study to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a chemotherapy schedule including cisplatin (C) 40 mg/m2 intravenously (i.v.) on days 1-3; vindesine (V) 3 mg/m2 i.v. on day 1, and cytarabine (ara-C) 15 mg/m2 subcutaneously every 12 hours on days 1-3 (total dose: 90 mg/m2). Cisplatin was administered simultaneously with one dose of ara-C. Cycles were repeated every 28 days. Five patients out of 28 (18%) fully evaluable for response presented partial remissions. No complete response was observed. Median survival was 8 months and median duration of response was 4 months. Hematologic toxicity was severe in 3 patients. There were no toxicity-related deaths. Other adverse reactions included nausea and vomiting, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. We conclude that this chemotherapy combination is marginally effective against NSCLC showing in this group of patients a low number of responses of short duration without a significant impact on survival.

  14. Biologic lung volume reduction in advanced upper lobe emphysema: phase 2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criner, Gerard J; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Strange, Charlie; Dransfield, Mark; Gotfried, Mark; Leeds, William; McLennan, Geoffrey; Refaely, Yael; Tewari, Sanjiv; Krasna, Mark; Celli, Bartolome

    2009-05-01

    Biologic lung volume reduction (BioLVR) is a new endobronchial treatment for advanced emphysema that reduces lung volume through tissue remodeling. Assess the safety and therapeutic dose of BioLVR hydrogel in upper lobe predominant emphysema. Open-labeled, multicenter phase 2 dose-ranging studies were performed with BioLVR hydrogel administered to eight subsegmental sites (four in each upper lobe) involving: (1) low-dose treatment (n = 28) with 10 ml per site (LD); and (2) high-dose treatment (n = 22) with 20 ml per site (HD). Safety was assessed by the incidence of serious medical complications. Efficacy was assessed by change from baseline in pulmonary function tests, dyspnea score, 6-minute walk distance, and health-related quality of life. After treatment there were no deaths and four serious treatment-related complications. A reduction in residual volume to TLC ratio at 12 weeks (primary efficacy outcome) was achieved with both LD (-6.4 +/- 9.3%; P = 0.002) and HD (-5.5 +/- 9.4%; P = 0.028) treatments. Improvements in pulmonary function in HD (6 mo: DeltaFEV(1) = +15.6%; P = 0.002; DeltaFVC = +9.1%; P = 0.034) were greater than in LD patients (6 mo: DeltaFEV(1) = +6.7%; P = 0.021; DeltaFVC = +5.1%; P = 0.139). LD- and HD-treated groups both demonstrated improved symptom scores and health-related quality of life. BioLVR improves physiology and functional outcomes up to 6 months with an acceptable safety profile in upper lobe predominant emphysema. Overall improvement was greater and responses more durable with 20 ml per site than 10 ml per site dosing. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00435253 and NCT 00515164).

  15. On-the-Fly Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Aqueous Phase Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2015-08-04

    We have developed an on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model to predict the degradation mechanisms and fates of intermediates and byproducts that are produced during aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The on-the-fly KMC model is composed of a reaction pathway generator, a reaction rate constant estimator, a mechanistic reduction module, and a KMC solver. The novelty of this work is that we develop the pathway as we march forward in time rather than developing the pathway before we use the KMC method to solve the equations. As a result, we have fewer reactions to consider, and we have greater computational efficiency. We have verified this on-the-fly KMC model for the degradation of polyacrylamide (PAM) using UV light and titanium dioxide (i.e., UV/TiO2). Using the on-the-fly KMC model, we were able to predict the time-dependent profiles of the average molecular weight for PAM. The model provided detailed and quantitative insights into the time evolution of the molecular weight distribution and reaction mechanism. We also verified our on-the-fly KMC model for the destruction of (1) acetone, (2) trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide AOP. We demonstrated that the on-the-fly KMC model can achieve the same accuracy as the computer-based first-principles KMC (CF-KMC) model, which has already been validated in our earlier work. The on-the-fly KMC is particularly suitable for molecules with large molecular weights (e.g., polymers) because the degradation mechanisms for large molecules can result in hundreds of thousands to even millions of reactions. The ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describe the degradation pathways cannot be solved using traditional numerical methods, but the KMC can solve these equations.

  16. Vapor phase treatment–total reflection X-ray fluorescence for trace elemental analysis of silicon wafer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Hikari; Mori, Yoshihiro; Shibata, Harumi; Shimazaki, Ayako; Shabani, Mohammad B.; Yamagami, Motoyuki; Yabumoto, Norikuni; Nishihagi, Kazuo; Gohshi, Yohichi

    2013-01-01

    Vapor phase treatment (VPT) was under investigation by the International Organization for Standardization/Technical Committee 201/Working Group 2 (ISO/TC201/WG2) to improve the detection limit of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF) for trace metal analysis of silicon wafers. Round robin test results have confirmed that TXRF intensity increased by VPT for intentional contamination with 5 × 10 9 and 5 × 10 10 atoms/cm 2 Fe and Ni. The magnification of intensity enhancement varied greatly (1.2–4.7 in VPT factor) among the participating laboratories, though reproducible results could be obtained for average of mapping measurement. SEM observation results showed that various features, sizes, and surface densities of particles formed on the wafer after VPT. The particle morphology seems to have some impact on the VPT efficiency. High resolution SEM observation revealed that a certain number of dots with SiO 2 , silicate and/or carbon gathered to form a particle and heavy metals, Ni and Fe in this study were segregated on it. The amount and shape of the residue should be important to control VPT factor. - Highlights: • This paper presents a summary of study results of VPT–TXRF using ISO/TC201/WG2. • Our goal is to analyze the trace metallic contamination on silicon wafer with concentrations below 1 × 10 10 atoms/cm 2 . • The efficiency and mechanism of VPT are discussed under several round robin tests and systematic studies

  17. Ursodeoxycholic acid in advanced polycystic liver disease: A phase 2 multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agnolo, Hedwig M A; Kievit, Wietske; Takkenberg, R Bart; Riaño, Ioana; Bujanda, Luis; Neijenhuis, Myrte K; Brunenberg, Ellen J L; Beuers, Ulrich; Banales, Jesus M; Drenth, Joost P H

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) inhibits proliferation of polycystic human cholangiocytes in vitro and hepatic cystogenesis in a rat model of polycystic liver disease (PLD) in vivo. Our aim was to test whether UDCA may beneficially affect liver volume in patients with advanced PLD. We conducted an international, multicenter, randomized controlled trial in symptomatic PLD patients from three tertiary referral centers. Patients with PLD and total liver volume (TLV) ⩾2500ml were randomly assigned to UDCA treatment (15-20mg/kg/day) for 24weeks, or to no treatment. Primary endpoint was proportional change in TLV. Secondary endpoints were change in symptoms and health-related quality of life. We performed a post-hoc analysis of the effect of UDCA on liver cyst volume (LCV). We included 34 patients and were able to assess primary endpoint in 32 patients, 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and 16 with autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease (ADPLD). Proportional TLV increased by 4.6±7.7% (mean TLV increased from 6697ml to 6954ml) after 24weeks of UDCA treatment compared to 3.1±3.8% (mean TLV increased from 5512ml to 5724ml) in the control group (p=0.493). LCV was not different after 24weeks between controls and UDCA treated patients (p=0.848). However, UDCA inhibited LCV growth in ADPKD patients compared to ADPKD controls (p=0.049). UDCA administration for 24weeks did not reduce TLV in advanced PLD, but UDCA reduced LCV growth in ADPKD patients. Future studies might explore whether ADPKD and ADPLD patients respond differently to UDCA treatment. Current therapies for polycystic liver disease are invasive and have high recurrence risks. Our trial showed that the drug, ursodeoxycholic acid, was not able to reduce liver volume in patients with polycystic liver disease. However, a subgroup analysis in patients that have kidney cysts as well showed that liver cyst volume growth was reduced in patients who received ursodeoxycholic acid in comparison

  18. Lightweight, Efficient Power Converters for Advanced Turboelectric Aircraft Propulsion Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is investigating advanced turboelectric aircraft propulsion systems that utilize superconducting motors to drive a number of distributed turbofans. In an...

  19. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m 2 of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m 2 of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  20. Phase I-II study of multiple daily fractions for palliation of advanced head and neck malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, K J; Spanos, W J; Lindberg, R D; Jose, B; Albrink, F

    1993-03-15

    To assess palliation of advance head and neck malignancies with the use of rapid hyper fractionation studies similar to the RTOG 85-02. 37 patients with 39 lesions were entered into the non-randomized Phase I-II protocol, between 1984 and 1991. Previously untreated malignancies were present in 24 lesions, primary recurrent diseases in six patients, metastasis to the head and neck in five patients and skin primaries in the remaining two cases. At presentation 15 of 37 patients (or 17 of 39 lesions) were in operable due to poor medical status, eight patients were considered technically in operable due to extent of disease, 10 patients had distant metastasis and four patients refused surgery. The protocol uses twice a day fraction (370 cGy per fraction) for 2 consecutive days totalling 1,480 cGy per course. Three courses were given at 3-week intervals for a final tumor dose of 4,440 cGy in twelve fraction over 8-9 weeks. Eleven of 39 lesions had complete response; 19 lesions had partial response; 4 lesions had no response; 3 lesions progressed under treatment. Response could not be assessed in two patients. The average survival after completion of therapy was 4.5 months ranging from 2 weeks to 31 months. Palliation was achieved in 33 of 39 lesions. The acute reactions were minimal and no late or long term complications were noted. The absence of significant complications with reasonable response in the high rate of palliation suggests that this rapid hyper fractionation palliation study should be studied for further evaluation.

  1. Phase II study of preoperative radiation plus concurrent daily tegafur-uracil (UFT) with leucovorin for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellier, Patrice; Burtin, Pascal; Campion, Loïc; Boisdron-Celle, Michèle; Morel, Alain; Berger, Virginie; Gamelin, Erick; Leduc, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Vié, Brigitte; Chevelle, Christian; Vendrely, Véronique; Salemkour, Augustin; Carrie, Christian; Calais, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Considerable variation in intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) metabolism can occur due to the wide range of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) enzyme activity, which can affect both tolerability and efficacy. The oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-uracil (UFT) is an effective, well-tolerated and convenient alternative to intravenous 5-FU. We undertook this study in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UFT with leucovorin (LV) and preoperative radiotherapy and to evaluate the utility and limitations of multicenter staging using pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy ultrasound. We also performed a validated pretherapy assessment of DPD activity and assessed its potential influence on the tolerability of UFT treatment. This phase II study assessed preoperative UFT with LV and radiotherapy in 85 patients with locally advanced T3 rectal cancer. Patients with potentially resectable tumors received UFT (300 mg/m/ 2 /day), LV (75 mg/day), and pelvic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, 45 Gy total) 5 days/week for 5 weeks then surgery 4-6 weeks later. The primary endpoints included tumor downstaging and the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in nature. Preoperative grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea (n = 18, 21%) and nausea/vomiting (n = 5, 6%). Two patients heterozygous for dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD) experienced early grade 4 neutropenia (variant IVS14+1G > A) and diarrhea (variant 2846A > T). Pretreatment ultrasound TNM staging was compared with postchemoradiotherapy pathology TN staging and a significant shift towards earlier TNM stages was observed (p < 0.001). The overall downstaging rate was 42% for primary tumors and 44% for lymph nodes. The pCR rate was 8%. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for staging was poor. Anal sphincter function was preserved in 55 patients (65%). Overall and recurrence-free survival at 3 years was 86.1% and 66

  2. Phase I Study of Daily Irinotecan as a Radiation Sensitizer for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouchardiere, Christelle de la; Negrier, Sylvie; Labrosse, Hugues; Martel Lafay, Isabelle; Desseigne, Francoise; Meeus, Pierre; Tavan, David; Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Rivoire, Michel; Perol, David; Carrie, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose of daily irinotecan given with concomitant radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and March 2008, 36 patients with histologically proven unresectable pancreas adenocarcinoma were studied prospectively. Irinotecan was administered daily, 1 to 2 h before irradiation. Doses were started at 6 mg/m 2 per day and then escalated by increments of 2 mg/m 2 every 3 patients. Radiotherapy was administered in 2-Gy fractions, 5 fractions per week, up to a total dose of 50 Gy to the tumor volume. Inoperability was confirmed by a surgeon involved in a multidisciplinary team. All images and responses were centrally reviewed by radiologists. Results: Thirty-six patients were enrolled over a period of 8 years through eight dose levels (6 mg/m 2 to 20 mg/m 2 per day). The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 18 mg/m 2 per day. The dose-limiting toxicities were nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, dehydration, and hypokalemia. The median survival time was 12.6 months with a median follow-up of 53.8 months. The median progression-free survival time was 6.5 months, and 4 patients (11.4%) with very good responses could undergo surgery. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan is 18 mg/m 2 per day for 5 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities are mainly gastrointestinal. Even though efficacy was not the aim of this study, the results are very promising, with a median survival time of 12.6 months.

  3. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix: a phase I/II prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, One Chul; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook; Kim, Yong Man; Kim, Young Tak; Nam, Joo Hyun; Mok, Jung Eun; Lee, Moo Song

    1998-01-01

    Prospective, single arm. Phase I/II clinical trial was performed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of the concurrent chemotherapy and definitive radiotherapy (RT) in patients with previously untreated locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix. From May 1992 to January 1997, a total of 73 patients with advanced cervical carcinoma were entered on the protocol but 5 patients were excluded in analysis because of patients' refusal of treatment. Their ages ranged from 31 to 77 years, median 58 years. The international Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage distribution was as follows: IIB 46, IIIA 2, IIIB 15 and IVA 5. RT consisted of external beam irradiation to 4, 140-5, 040 cGy/23-28 fractions plus high dose rate intracavitary treatments to deliver a dose of 30-35 Gy to point A in 6-7 fractions. During the intracavitary treatments parametrial boost was delivered for point B dose of 60 Gy in stage IIB and 65 Gy in stage IIIB. Two cycles of concurrent 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin (FP) chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m 2 /day continuous infusion for 4 days, day 1-4, 29-32 and cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 /dy intravenous bolus for 3 days, day 1-3, 29-31) administered starting on day 1 of 1 of RT. The median follow-up was 24 months (range 4-68+). Sixty-four patients were evaluable for survival rate in this protocol: The 5-year actuarial and disease-free survival rate were 52% and 64%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial survival for stage IIB and II+IVA patients were 58% and 36%, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rate for stage IIB and III+IVA patients were 71% and 46%, respectively. Of the 68 patients evaluated for patterns of failure, overall recurrence rate was 27.9% (19/68): local failure in 5.9% (4/68), distant metastasis in 10.3% (7/68) and both in 11.8% (8/68). Of the 64 patients evaluated for response at one month after the completion of treatment, the complete response rate was 78% (50/64). Concurrent chemoradiation appear to be a

  4. Report on research and development achievements in fiscal 1980 in Sunshine Project. Development of a total flow electric power plant(Two-phase rotation inflator); 1980 nendo total flow hatsuden plant no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Niso kaiten bochoki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    Out of the development of a total flow power plant in the Sunshine Project, this paper describes a two-phase rotatry inflator. It reports the achievements in fiscal 1980. It is intended to utilize effectively the energy of gas-liquid two-phase fluid (containing a great amount of hot water) often seen in geothermal resources in Japan. Therefore, development is considered on a two-phase rotary inflator as a total flow power generation technology to inflate the gas-liquid fluid as it is without performing separation thereof, and convert it to an external work to draw out output. The inflator is a volume type rotary engine, which has the highest efficiency theoretically, but has not been put into practical use worldwide. Based on the result obtained in the previous fiscal year, development is made on a most suitable seal to be applied to circumferential seal of an external rotor, apex seal, and intake port seal. A rotary inflation performance testing machine is fabricated to study inflation of the gas-liquid two-phase fluid. Setting the engine efficiency of 60% or higher as the target, detailed design, fabrication and assembly shall be completed on two-phase rotation inflators of volume type and self-rotation type of 300 kW class. (NEDO)

  5. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin and radiotherapy: Results of the phase II study in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: usufruct ing the benefits of preoperative adjuvant (biological, functional, surgical, etc.), a phase II essay whose purpose was to evaluate the response and toxicity activated preoperative concomitant radio chemotherapy in the oncological pathology. Material and Methods: Between 01.01.03 and 31.12.09 64 consecutive patients were treated with rectal cancer and histopathology for adenocarcinoma; none of them had been received previous oncological treatment and did not have a second simultaneous neoplasia. The age of the patients had a range between 38 and 69 years with a mean of 57.3 years; 60% belonged to male and according to ECOG performance status was 0≤2. All tumors were at a distance of 12cms ≤ anal margin and were staged as AJCC allowing recruiting 28 patients in stage II (T3, T4) and 36 patients in stage III (N1, N2). Staging was performed with clinical (general and proctologic examination), fibrocolonoscopy, systemic imaging and local (TAC, EER, MRI) and laboratory (CEA) total pelvic X 18 MV photons was irradiated by ICRU-50 in a normo fractionation with daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to a final dose of 45 Gy in 25 sessions using multiple fields (box technique) .The chemotherapy was administered Capecitabine 825mgr / m2 / day in 2 daily doses during the course of radiotherapy and oxaliplatin 50mgr / m2 on days 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 of the same therapy. All patients underwent surgery between 4 and 8 weeks after completing the coincidence. Follow-up it was full and the response was weighted according to the degree of tumor regression (GRT) of Dworak and Toxicity was graded according to RTOG / EORTC. Results: As the TSO the following pathological responses were obtained: GRT 0 (remission Full), 16% GRT 1 and 2 (moderate and low remission), 55% and TSO 3 and 4 (weak or absent remission) 29%. Although there were no deaths therapy, toxicity was severe and frequent with 30% Grade 3 and 4 (skin, gastrointestinal, hematological, neuropathies and

  6. Palliative Radiation Therapy for Advanced Head and Neck Carcinomas: A Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Bernard, E-mail: bfortin.hmr@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Radiation Oncology, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Radiation Oncology, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Filion, Edith; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bujold, Alexis [Radiation Oncology, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Louise [Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Incurable head and neck cancer is hard to manage with usual palliative care. Radiation therapy (RT) in this setting is sometimes omitted because there is an apprehension that the side effects in the head and neck region might counterbalance the benefits. The objective of this phase 2 study was to evaluate whether highly conformal RT could improve the therapeutic ratio with this comprehensive Quality of Life (QOL) and toxicity evaluation. Methods and Materials: Patients from 2 academic centers, deemed unfit for radical treatment because of their poor medical condition or advanced cancer stage by an experienced tumor board, were offered 25 Gy in 5 daily intensity modulated RT fractions over 1 week to the symptomatic tumor volume. QOL was evaluated with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C15-PAL and QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires, and toxicities with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Survival and time to tumor progression were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-two patients were recruited, of whom 66% had at least T4, N3, or M1 disease. The QOL questionnaires completion rate was 86%. Eighty-eight percent of patients received the planned dose. The median overall survival and progression-free survival times were, respectively, 6.5 and 3.2 months. No grade 4 or 5 toxicity was seen. Only 13% of patients had any grade 3 toxicities, and 17% of patients reported no toxicity at all. The QOL was equal or improved, and head and neck symptoms remained equal to or lower than the baseline values for most patients at up to 6 months. Eighty-five percent of patients would have chosen to receive this RT regimen again when asked. Conclusions: This palliative RT regimen was highly tolerable and effective in preserving or improving self-reported QOL in most patients for up to 6 months, which corresponds to this population's median overall survival. Given the minimal side effects

  7. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds. Phase 1, Conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The ``Toxic-Release Inventory`` of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M`s work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  8. Benchmarking of thermalhydraulic loop models for lead-alloy-cooled advanced nuclear energy systems. Phase I: Isothermal forced convection case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) has been established to co-ordinate scientific activities regarding various existing and advanced nuclear fuel cycles, including advanced reactor systems, associated chemistry and flowsheets, development and performance of fuel and materials and accelerators and spallation targets. The WPFC has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in the field of nuclear fuel cycle. The Task Force on Lead-Alloy-Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems (LACANES) was created in 2006 to study thermal-hydraulic characteristics of heavy liquid metal coolant loop. The objectives of the task force are to (1) validate thermal-hydraulic loop models for application to LACANES design analysis in participating organisations, by benchmarking with a set of well-characterised lead-alloy coolant loop test data, (2) establish guidelines for quantifying thermal-hydraulic modelling parameters related to friction and heat transfer by lead-alloy coolant and (3) identify specific issues, either in modelling and/or in loop testing, which need to be addressed via possible future work. Nine participants from seven different institutes participated in the first phase of the benchmark. This report provides details of the benchmark specifications, method and code characteristics and results of the preliminary study: pressure loss coefficient and Phase-I. A comparison and analysis of the results will be performed together with Phase-II

  9. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-03-17

    This scope document defines the work scope for accomplishing the design of the GE MS7001H and MS9001H (7H and 9H) combined-cycle power systems under the original ATS Phase 3 DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-95MC31176, and incorporates changes in scope required to convert Phase 3 to the ''restructured'' Phase 3R as defined in Amendment A012 to the Cooperative Agreement.

  10. σ and η Phase formation in advanced polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, Stoichko, E-mail: santonov@hawk.iit.edu [Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Northwestern University Center for Atom Probe Tomography (NUCAPT), 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Helmink, Randolph C.; Sun, Eugene [Rolls-Royce Corporation, 450 S. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, IN 46225 (United States); Tin, Sammy [Illinois Institute of Technology, 10 W. 32nd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2017-02-27

    In polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys, grain boundary precipitation of secondary phases can be significant due to the effects they pose on the mechanical properties. As new alloying concepts for polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys are being developed to extend their temperature capability, the effect of increasing levels of Nb alloying additions on long term phase stability and the formation of topologically close packed (TCP) phases needs to be studied. Elevated levels of Nb can result in increased matrix supersaturation and promote the precipitation of secondary phases. Long term thermal exposures on two experimental powder processed Ni-base superalloys containing various levels of Nb were completed to assess the stability and precipitation of TCP phases. It was found that additions of Nb promoted the precipitation of η-Ni{sub 6}AlNb along the grain boundaries in powder processed, polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys, while reduced Nb levels favored the precipitation of blocky Cr and Mo – rich σ phase precipitates along the grain boundary. Evaluation of the thermodynamic stability of these two phases in both alloys using Thermo-calc showed that while σ phase predictions are fairly accurate, predictions of the η phase are limited.

  11. Advanced Durable Flexible Ultra Low Outgassing Thermal Control Coatings for NASA Science Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I program proposes to synthesize novel nanoengineered ultra low out gassing elastomers and formulate high temperature capable flexible thermal control...

  12. A phase I study of Triapine in combination with doxorubicin in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelman, William R; Morgan-Meadows, Sherry; Marnocha, Rebecca; Lee, Fred; Eickhoff, Jens; Huang, Wei; Pomplun, Marcia; Jiang, Zhisheng; Alberti, Dona; Kolesar, Jill M; Ivy, Percy; Wilding, George; Traynor, Anne M

    2009-05-01

    To assess the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of Triapine administered in combination with doxorubicin. Patients were treated with doxorubicin intravenously (IV) on day 1 and Triapine IV on days 1-4 of a 21-day cycle. The starting dose (level 1) was doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) and Triapine 25 mg/m(2). PK analysis was performed at various time-points before and after treatment. Twenty patients received a total of 49 courses of treatment on study. At dose level 2 (doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2), Triapine 45 mg/m(2)), two patients experienced DLTs (febrile neutropenia, grade 4 thrombocytopenia). An additional three patients were enrolled at dose level 1 without initial toxicity. Enrollment then resumed at dose level 2a with a decreased dose of doxorubicin (45 mg/m(2)) with Triapine 45 mg/m(2). The two patients enrolled on this level had two DLTs (diarrhea, CVA). Enrollment was planned to resume at dose level 1; however, the sixth patient enrolled to this cohort developed grade 5 heart failure (ejection fraction 20%, pretreatment EF 62%) after the second course. Thus, doxorubicin and Triapine were reduced to 45 and 25 mg/m(2), respectively (level 1a), prior to resuming enrollment at dose level 1, the MTD. The main drug-related toxicity was myelosuppression. Non-hematologic toxicities included mild-to-moderate fatigue, grade 3 diarrhea and grade 4 CVA. There was one treatment-related death due to heart failure. While no objective responses were observed, subjective evidence of clinical activity was observed in patients with refractory melanoma and prostate cancer. Pretreated patients with advanced malignancies can tolerate the combination of Triapine and doxorubicin at doses that achieve subjective clinical benefit with the main treatment-related toxicities being myelosuppression and fatigue. The MTD was determined to be doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) on day 1 and Triapine 25 mg/m(2) on days 1-4 of a 21-day cycle.

  13. Biotemplated Nano-Structured Materials for Advanced Li-ion Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has identified a critical need for pioneering advances in battery technology to give high performance, low-weight, durable and long-life power sources for...

  14. Deep UV Semiconductor Sources for Advanced Planetary Science Instruments, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the need for miniature, narrow-linewidth, deep UV optical sources that operate at very low ambient temperatures for use in advanced in situ...

  15. Advanced Cathode Material For High Energy Density Lithium-Batteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced cathode materials having high red-ox potential and high specific capacity offer great promise to the development of high energy density lithium-based...

  16. Advanced Optical Metrology for XRAY Replication Mandrels and Mirrors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced x-ray observatories such as IXO and GenX will require thousands of thin shell mirror segments produced by replication using convex mandrels. Quality and...

  17. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  18. Advanced Air Evaporation System with Reusable Wicks for Water Recovery, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Advanced Air Evaporation System (AAES) is proposed for recovering nearly 100% of water from highly contaminated wastewater without concern...

  19. Nucleosynthesis in advanced phases of stellar evolution: comparison between theory and observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.A.F.

    1990-01-01

    The contamination of stellar atmospheres in advanced stages of evolution is studied, comparing observable data with theoretical expectations. The observable contaminations in some specific stars are presented. (M.C.K.)

  20. High Efficiency Advanced Lightweight Fuel Cell (HEAL-FC), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Infinity's High Efficiency Advanced Lightweight Fuel Cell (HEAL FC) is an improved version of its current fuel cell technology developed for space applications. The...

  1. Advanced Solid-State Joining Processes for 2219 Aluminum Alloys, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) advances the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process by separating the primary process variables of metal stirring and...

  2. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal and management (APWR) system for incorporation into Polymer...

  3. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal (APWR) system for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)...

  4. Integrated Advanced Monopropellant CMC Thruster / Thermal Stand-Off Assembly, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High performance non-toxic monopropellants offer significant benefits relative to the current state-of-the-art. The benefits of these advanced monopropellants (AMP)...

  5. Development of Advanced Anti-Reflection Coatings for High Performance Solar Energy Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MicroLink Devices will increase the efficiency of multi-junction solar cells by designing and demonstrating advanced anti-reflection coatings (ARCs) that will...

  6. Development of Advanced Anti-Reflection Coatings for High Performance Solar Energy Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MicroLink and its subcontractor Magnolia Solar will develop and demonstrate advanced anti-reflection coating (ARC) designs that will provide a better broadband and...

  7. Phase 1 Study of CK-301 as a Single Agent in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-02

    Lung Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Carcinoma, Small Cell; Malignant Mesothelioma, Advanced; Head and Neck Cancer; Melanoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Urothelial Carcinoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

  8. Metal Advanced Manufacturing Bot-Assisted Assembly (MAMBA) Process, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tethers Unlimited, Inc. (TUI) proposes to develop the Metal Advanced Manufacturing Bot-Assisted Assembly (MAMBA) Process, a robotically managed metal press and...

  9. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced heat engines. Phase 1: Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccio, J.C.; Brehm, P.; Fang, H.T. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States). Garrett Engine Div.] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Emphasis of this program is to develop and demonstrate ceramics life prediction methods, including fast fracture, stress rupture, creep, oxidation, and nondestructive evaluation. Significant advancements were made in these methods and their predictive capabilities successfully demonstrated.

  10. Non-Intrusive, Distributed Gas Sensing Technology for Advanced Spacesuits, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in spacesuits are required to support the ISS and future human exploration. Spacesuit development and ground-based testing tasks require sensing and...

  11. Advances in the implementation of helical tomotherapy-based total marrow irradiation with a novel field junction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeverino, Michele, E-mail: michele.zeverino@istge.it [Medical Physics Department, IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul cancro, Genoa (Italy); Agostinelli, Stefano; Taccini, Gianni; Cavagnetto, Francesca; Garelli, Stefania; Gusinu, Marco [Medical Physics Department, IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul cancro, Genoa (Italy); Vagge, Stefano; Barra, Salvina; Corvo, Renzo [Radiation Oncology Department, IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul cancro, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-10-01

    Given the limitations in the travel ability of the helical tomotherapy (HT) couch, total marrow irradiation (TMI) has to be split in 2 segments, with the lower limbs treated with feet first orientation. The aim of this work is to present a planning technique useful to reduce the dose inhomogeneity resulting from the matching of the 2 helical dose distributions. Three HT plans were generated for each of the 18 patients enrolled. Upper TMI (UTMI) and lower TMI (LTMI) were planned onto the whole-body computed tomography (CT) and on the lower-limb CT, respectively. A twin lower TMI plan (tLTMI) was designed on the whole-body CT. Agreement between LTMI and tLTMI plans was assessed by computing for each dose-volume histogram (DVH) structure the {gamma} index scored with 1% of dose and volume difference thresholds. UTMI and tLTMI plans were summed together on the whole-body CT, enabling the evaluation of dose inhomogeneity. Moreover, a couple of transition volumes were used to improve the dose uniformity in the abutment region. For every DVH, a number of points >99% passed the {gamma} analysis, validating the method used to generate the twin plan. The planned dose inhomogeneity at the junction level resulted within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. Median dose reduction to organs at risk ranged from 30-80% of the prescribed dose. Mean conformity index was 1.41 (range 1.36-1.44) for the whole-body target. The technique provided a 'full helical' dose distribution for TMI treatments, which can be considered effective only if the dose agreement between LTMI and tLTMI plans is met. The planning of TMI with HT for the whole body with adequate dose homogeneity and conformity was shown to be feasible.

  12. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  13. Aluminum-centered tetrahedron-octahedron transition in advancing Al-Sb-Te phase change properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-02-24

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology.

  14. Animal-vehicle crash mitigation using advanced technology : phase II, system effectiveness and system acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    This project was initiated in the fall of 1999. The results through the fall of 2005 (Phase I) have been documented in detail in an earlier report. The accomplishments of Phase I included the following: the identification of existing animal detection...

  15. Fundamental Studies on Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties of Fusion Welds in Advanced Naval Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    naval and structural applications. However, prior to this research project, a fundamental understanding of the phase transformation behavior under the...prior to this research project, a fundamental understanding of the phase transformation behavior under the high heating and cooling rates associated...HAZ mechanical properties. Such a treatment is expensive, time consuming , and cannot be practically applied to large structures. However, the absence

  16. Phase II trial of pazopanib in advanced/progressive malignant pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, Sina; Suman, Vera J; Jimenez, Camilo; Harris, Pamela; Sideras, Kostandinos; Burton, Jill K; Worden, Francis Paul; Auchus, Richard J; Bible, Keith C

    2017-08-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (Pheo/PGL) are rare, vascular, sometimes malignant endocrine tumors. Case reports indicate the activity of vascular endothelium growth factor receptor-targeted kinase inhibitors in these cancers. To assess the antitumor activity and tolerability of pazopanib in progressive malignant Pheo/PGL. This multicenter Phase II trial (MC107C) enrolled individuals  ≥18 years old with disease progression ≤ 6 months prior to registration, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS 0-2, and measurable disease (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors 1.0). Pazopanib was administered in 28-day cycles, with the regimen ultimately being as follows: cycle 1: 400 mg daily on days 1-14, cycle 2: 800 mg daily on days 1-14, and then cycle 2 + : 800 mg daily on all days. The study was halted due to poor accrual. Seven patients were enrolled (05/2011-11/2014). One patient withdrew consent prior to treatment, leaving six evaluable patients. Treatment was discontinued, due to the following reasons: disease progression (4); withdrawal (1); and grade 4 (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (1). The median number of cycles administered was 4 (range: 2-29, total: 49). Four patients had >1 dose reduction due to the following reasons: fatigue (1), abnormal liver tests (2), hypertension and (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (1), and headaches (1). Common severe (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grades 3-5) toxicities were as follows: hypertension (3/6), (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy (2/6), diarrhea (1/6), fatigue (1/6), headache (1/6), and hematuria (1/6). One confirmed partial response was observed in PGL (17%, duration 2.4 years); median progression-free survival and overall survival were 6.5 and 14.8 months, respectively. Pazopanib has activity in Pheo/PGL requiring more study; optimal alpha- and beta-blockade are imperative pre-therapy in patients with secretory tumors, as risk of hypertension and cardiomyopathy are potentially life

  17. Sunitinib versus sorafenib in advanced hepatocellular cancer: results of a randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Lin, Deng-Yn; Park, Joong-Won; Kudo, Masatoshi; Qin, Shukui; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Song, Xiangqun; Xu, Jianming; Poggi, Guido; Omata, Masao; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Lanzalone, Silvana; Yang, Liqiang; Lechuga, Maria Jose; Raymond, Eric

    2013-11-10

    Open-label, phase III trial evaluating whether sunitinib was superior or equivalent to sorafenib in hepatocellular cancer. Patients were stratified and randomly assigned to receive sunitinib 37.5 mg once per day or sorafenib 400 mg twice per day. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Early trial termination occurred for futility and safety reasons. A total of 1,074 patients were randomly assigned to the study (sunitinib arm, n = 530; sorafenib arm, n = 544). For sunitinib and sorafenib, respectively, median OS was 7.9 versus 10.2 months (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; one-sided P = .9990; two-sided P = .0014); median progression-free survival (PFS; 3.6 v 3.0 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8785; two-sided P = .2286) and time to progression (TTP; 4.1 v 3.8 months; HR, 1.13; one-sided P = .8312; two-sided P = .3082) were comparable. Median OS was similar among Asian (7.7 v 8.8 months; HR, 1.21; one-sided P = .9829) and hepatitis B-infected patients (7.6 v 8.0 months; HR, 1.10; one-sided P = .8286), but was shorter with sunitinib in hepatitis C-infected patients (9.2 v 17.6 months; HR, 1.52; one-sided P = .9835). Sunitinib was associated with more frequent and severe adverse events (AEs) than sorafenib. Common grade 3/4 AEs were thrombocytopenia (29.7%) and neutropenia (25.7%) for sunitinib; hand-foot syndrome (21.2%) for sorafenib. Discontinuations owing to AEs were similar (sunitinib, 13.3%; sorafenib, 12.7%). OS with sunitinib was not superior or equivalent but was significantly inferior to sorafenib. OS was comparable in Asian and hepatitis B-infected patients. OS was superior in hepatitis C-infected patients who received sorafenib. Sunitinib-treated patients reported more frequent and severe toxicity.

  18. Two-phase flow measurements with advanced instrumented spool pieces and local conductivity probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnage, K.G.; Davis, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    A series of two-phase, air-water and steam-water tests performed with instrumented spool pieces and with conductivity probes obtained from Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. is described. The behavior of the three-beam densitometer, turbine meter, and drag flowmeter is discussed in terms of two-phase models. Application of some two-phase mass flow models to the recorded spool piece data is made and preliminary results are shown. Velocity and void fraction information derived from the conductivity probes is presented and compared to velocities and void fractions obtained using the spool piece instrumentation

  19. Baseline toxicity of a chlorobenzene mixture and total body residues measured and estimated with solid-phase microextraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leslie, H.A.; Hermens, J.L.; Kraak, M.H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Body residues of compounds with a narcotic mode of action that exceed critical levels result in baseline toxicity in organisms. Previous studies have shown that internal concentrations in organisms also can be estimated by way of passive sampling. In this experiment, solid-phase microextraction

  20. Divergent solid-phase synthesis of natural product-inspired bipartite cyclodepsipeptides : total synthesis of seragamide A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, H.-D.; Rizzo, S.; Nöcker, Chr.; Wackchaure, V.N.; Milroy, L.G.; Bieker, V.; Calderon, A.; Tran, T.T.N.; Brand, S.; Dehmelt, L.; Waldmann, H.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocyclic natural products (NPs) and analogues thereof often show high affinity, selectivity, and metabolic stability, and methods for the synthesis of NP-like macrocycle collections are of major current interest. We report an efficient solid-phase/cyclorelease method for the synthesis of a

  1. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase II project...

  2. Composite advanced polymers for low moisture and oxygen permeability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I program addresses NASA?s need for long duration shelf stable food by developing a high oxygen/moisture barrier...

  3. Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase I project...

  4. Advanced Nongray Radiation Module in the LOCI Framework for Combustion CFD, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiative heat fluxes are important in the design of launch vehicles for Project Constellation. In this Phase II STTR, CFDRC and its partner Mississippi State...

  5. Safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab with chemotherapy in Asian patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC: results from the phase IV MO19390 (SAiL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Ming; Au, Joseph Siu-kie; Chang, Gee-Chen; Cheng, Ashley Chi-kin; Zhou, Caicun; Wu, Yi-long

    2011-06-01

    First-line treatment with bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with advanced, nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSNSCLC) in phase III clinical trials. SAiL (MO19390), an open-label, multicenter, single-arm study, evaluated the safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based treatment in clinical practice. This report presents the results of a preplanned subanalysis of Asian patients enrolled in SAiL. Patients with untreated, locally advanced, metastatic or recurrent NSNSCLC received bevacizumab 7.5 or 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus chemotherapy for up to six cycles, followed by single-agent bevacizumab until disease progression. Eligibility criteria for SAiL permitted enrolment of a broad patient population. The primary end point was safety; secondary end points included time to disease progression and overall survival. The Asian intent-to-treat population comprised 314 of the 2212 patients enrolled in the SAiL trial. In the Asian subanalysis, patients received a median of nine cycles of bevacizumab, and the median follow-up was 16.4 months. The incidence of clinically significant adverse events (grade ≥3) of special interest was relatively low in this population (15.6% overall); proteinuria (7.6%), hypertension (4.8%), and bleeding (2.5%) were the most common. A total of five adverse events related to bevacizumab were reported as grade 5. Disease control rate was 94.1%, median time to disease progression was 8.3 months, and median overall survival was 18.9 months. The safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based treatment in Asian patients with advanced NSNSCLC is consistent with that demonstrated in phase III studies and in the overall SAiL population. There were no new safety signals.

  6. Azacytidine in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced durable responses in patients with advanced phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiu, Mathilde; Oberkampf, Florence; Ghez, David; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Beckeriche, Florence; Cano, Isabelle; Taksin, Anne L; Benbrahim, Omar; Ghez, Stéphanie; Farhat, Hassan; Rigaudeau, Sophie; de Gunzburg, Noémie; Lara, Diane; Terre, Christine; Raggueneau, Victoria; Garcia, Isabel; Spentchian, Marc; De Botton, Stéphane; Rousselot, Philippe

    2017-11-28

    Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) era has brought great improvement in outcome in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), prognosis of accelerated phase or myeloid blast crisis patients or of de novo Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia remains poor. We conducted a retrospective study on patients with advanced phase disease treated with a TKI and azacytidine. Sixteen patients were eligible. Median age was 64.9 years, the median number of previous therapies was 2.5 lines, and median follow-up was 23.1 months. Hematologic response (HR) rate was 81.3%. Median overall survival (OS), event free survival and relapse-free survival (RFS) were 31.5, 23.3, and 32.2 months, respectively. All except one patient were treated as out-patients after the first cycle. Five patients were bridged to allogenic hematopoietic stem cells transplant. The combination of a TKI and azacytidine is a safe and efficient regiment for patients with CML patients in advanced phases.

  7. An advanced ultrasonic technique for slow and void fraction measurements of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccini, J.L.H.; Su, J.; Harvel, G.D.; Chang, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a hybrid type counterpropagating transmission ultrasonic technique (CPTU) for flow and time averaging ultrasonic transmission intensity void fraction measurements (TATIU) of air-water two-phase flow, which is tested in the new two-phase flow test section mounted recently onto an existing single phase flow rig. The circular pipe test section is made of 51.2 mm stainless steel, followed by a transparent extruded acrylic pipe aimed at flow visualization. The two-phase flow rig operates in several flow regimes: bubbly, smooth stratified, wavy stratified and slug flow. The observed flow patterns are compared with previous experimental and numerical flow regime map for horizontal two phase flows. These flow patterns will be identified by time averaging transmission intensity ultrasonic techniques which have been developed to meet this particular application. A counterpropagating transmission ultrasonic flowmeter is used to measure the flow rate of liquid phase. A pulse-echo TATIU ultrasonic technique used to measure the void fraction of the horizontal test section is presented. We can draw the following conclusions: 1) the ultrasonic system was able to characterize the 2 flow patterns simulated (stratified and plug flow); 2) the results obtained for water volumetric fraction require more experimental work to determine exactly the technique uncertainties but, a priori, they are consistent with earlier work; and 3) the experimental uncertainties can be reduced by improving the data acquisition system, changing the acquisition time interval from seconds to milliseconds

  8. Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018-2020 Period Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, John; Buonanno, Michael; Yao, Jixian; Murugappan, Mugam; Paliath, Umesh; Cheung, Lawrence; Malcevic, Ivan; Ramakrishnan, Kishore; Pastouchenko, Nikolai; Wood, Trevor; hide

    2015-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company (LM), working in conjunction with General Electric Global Research (GE GR) and Stanford University, executed a 19 month program responsive to the NASA sponsored "N+2 Supersonic Validation: Advanced Concept Studies for Supersonic Commercial Transports Entering Service in the 2018-2020 Period" contract. The key technical objective of this effort was to validate integrated airframe and propulsion technologies and design methodologies necessary to realize a supersonic vehicle capable of meeting the N+2 environmental and performance goals. The N+2 program is aligned with NASA's Supersonic Project and is focused on providing system level solutions capable of overcoming the efficiency, environmental, and performance barriers to practical supersonic flight. The N+2 environmental and performance goals are outlined in the technical paper, AIAA-2014-2138 (Ref. 1) along with the validated N+2 Phase 2 results. Our Phase 2 efforts built upon our Phase 1 studies (Ref. 2) and successfully demonstrated the ability to design and test realistic configurations capable of shaped sonic booms over the width of the sonic boom carpet. Developing a shaped boom configuration capable of meeting the N+2 shaped boom targets is a key goal for the N+2 program. During the LM Phase 1 effort, LM successfully designed and tested a shaped boom trijet configuration (1021) capable of achieving 85 PLdB under track (forward and aft shock) and up to 28 deg off-track at Mach 1.6. In Phase 2 we developed a refined configuration (1044-2) that extended the under 85 PLdB sonic boom level over the entire carpet of 52 deg off-track at a cruise Mach number of 1.7. Further, the loudness level of the configuration throughout operational conditions calculates to an average of 79 PLdB. These calculations rely on propagation employing Burger's (sBOOM) rounding methodology, and there are indications that the configuration average loudness would actually be 75 PLdB. We also added

  9. Phase II trial of preoperative radiochemotherapy with concurrent bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Jürgen; Höhler, Thomas; Reese, Thomas; Würschmidt, Florian; Engel, Erik; Rödel, Claus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Richter, Michael; Arnold, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-FU or capecitabine is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preoperative RCT achieves pathological complete response rates (pCR) of 10-15%. We conducted a single arm phase II study to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of addition of bevacizumab and oxaliplatin to preoperative standard RCT with capecitabine. Eligible patients had LARC (cT3-4; N0/1/2, M0/1) and were treated with preoperative RCT prior to planned surgery. Patients received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) and simultaneous chemotherapy with capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 bid (d1-14, d22-35) and oxaliplatin 50 mg/m 2 (d1, d8, d22, d29). Bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was added on days 1, 15, and 29. The primary study objective was the pCR rate. 70 patients with LARC (cT3-4; N0/1, M0/1), ECOG < 2, were enrolled at 6 sites from 07/2008 through 02/2010 (median age 61 years [range 39–89], 68% male). At initial diagnosis, 84% of patients had clinical stage T3, 62% of patients had nodal involvement and 83% of patients were M0. Mean tumor distance from anal verge was 5.92 cm (± 3.68). 58 patients received the complete RCT (full dose RT and full dose of all chemotherapy). During preoperative treatment, grade 3 or 4 toxicities were experienced by 6 and 2 patients, respectively: grade 4 diarrhea and nausea in one patient (1.4%), respectively, grade 3 diarrhea in 2 patients (3%), grade 3 obstipation, anal abscess, anaphylactic reaction, leucopenia and neutropenia in one patient (1.4%), respectively. In total, 30 patients (46%) developed postoperative complications of any grade including one gastrointestinal perforation in one patient (2%), wound-healing problems in 7 patients (11%) and bleedings in 2 patients (3%). pCR was observed in 12/69 (17.4%) patients. Pathological downstaging (ypT < cT and ypN ≤ cN) was achieved in 31 of 69 patients (44.9%). All of the 66 operated patients had a R0 resection

  10. Phase I and pharmacodynamic study of vorinostat combined with capecitabine and cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Changhoon; Ryu, Min-Hee; Na, Young-Soon; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Lee, Chae-Won; Maeng, Jeheon; Kim, Se-Yeon; Koo, Dong Hoe; Park, Inkeun; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2014-04-01

    A phase I trial of first-line vorinostat, an orally bio-available histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) was performed to assess recommend phase II trial dose in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Five dose levels of three-weekly vorinostat-XP were tested; vorinostat was dosed at 300-400 mg once daily on Days 1-14, capecitabine at 800-1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily on Days 1-14, and cisplatin at 60-80 mg/m(2) on Day 1. To assess the pharmacodynamics of vorinostat, histone H3 acetylation was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before the study treatment and at Day 8 of cycle 1. In total, 30 patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma were included. Dose-limiting toxicities were thrombocytopenia, fatigue, stomatitis, and anorexia. The following doses were recommended for phase II trial: 400 mg of vorinostat once daily, 1,000 mg/m(2) of capecitabine twice daily, and 60 mg/m(2) of cisplatin. The most common grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (47 %), anorexia (20 %), thrombocytopenia (17 %), and fatigue (13 %). In overall, response rate was 56 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 32-81). With a median follow-up of 14.1 months, the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 7.1 months (95 % CI: 3.8-10.3) and 18.0 months (95 % CI: 4.8-31.1), respectively. The change in H3 acetylation after treatment with vorinostat correlated significantly with the vorinostat dose (300 vs. 400 mg/day) and the baseline level of H3 acetylation before treatment. Three-weekly vorinostat-XP regimen is feasible and recommended for further development in advanced gastric cancer.

  11. ERCC1 and histopathology in advanced NSCLC patients randomized in a large multicenter phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, E; Sørensen, J B

    2010-01-01

    Customized chemotherapy is likely to improve outcome in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker; however, current evidence is inadequate. Impact of ERCC1 status was evaluated among patients participa...

  12. Treatment with docetaxel and cisplatin in advanced adrenocortical carcinoma, a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Pawlak, W Z; Petersen, P M

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with a poor response to chemotherapy. Cisplatin is the most widely investigated drug in the treatment of ACC and in vitro studies have indicated activity of taxanes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin...... combined with docetaxel as first-line treatment of advanced ACC....

  13. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  14. Sustained High Levels of Both Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin in Plasma during the Convalescent Phase of Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Are Associated with Disease Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is characterised by an uncontrolled immune response that causes vascular leakage. Adiponectin (APN is an adipocytokine involved in prorevascularisation and immunomodulation. To investigate the possible effects of APN in the pathogenesis of HFRS, total and high molecular weight (HMW APN levels in the plasma of patients with HFRS were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Compared with those in healthy controls, the plasma total and HMW APN levels in patients were elevated to different degrees from the fever onset and remained high at the convalescent phase. Consistent with these results, western blot analysis additionally showed that low molecular weight (LMW, middle molecular weight (MMW, and HMW APN levels were all elevated and contributed to the elevation of the total APN level. Importantly, sustained high levels of total and HMW APN at the convalescent phase were significantly higher in patients with critical disease than those in patients with mild or moderate disease. Moreover, total and HMW APN levels negatively correlated with white blood cell count and positively correlated with platelet count and serum albumin level. These results may provide insights into understanding the roles of total and HMW APN in the pathogenesis of HFRS.

  15. Irradiation with X-rays phase-advances the molecular clockwork in liver, adrenal gland and pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mareike Hildegard; Rödel, Franz; Rüb, Udo; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-02-01

    The circadian clock of man and mammals shows a hierarchic organization. The master clock, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), controls peripheral oscillators distributed throughout the body. Rhythm generation depends on molecular clockworks based on transcriptional/translational interaction of clock genes. Numerous studies have shown that the clockwork in peripheral oscillators is capable to maintain circadian rhythms for several cycles in vitro, i.e. in the absence of signals from the SCN. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of irradiation with X-rays on the clockwork of liver, adrenal and pancreas. To this end organotypic slice cultures of liver (OLSC) and organotypic explant cultures of adrenal glands (OAEC) and pancreas (OPEC) were prepared from transgenic mPer2(luc) mice which express luciferase under the control of the promoter of an important clock gene, Per2, and allow to study the dynamics of the molecular clockwork by bioluminometry. The preparations were cultured in a membrane-based liquid-air interface culturing system and irradiated with X-rays at doses of 10 Gy and 50 Gy or left untreated. Bioluminometric real-time recordings show a stable oscillation of all OLSC, OAEC and OPEC for up to 12 days in vitro. Oscillations persist after irradiation with X-rays. However, a dose of 50 Gy caused a phase advance in the rhythm of the OLSC by 5 h, in the OPEC by 7 h and in the OAEC by 6 h. Our study shows that X-rays affect the molecular clockwork in liver, pancreas and adrenal leading to phase advances. Our results confirm and extend previous studies showing a phase-advancing effect of X-rays at the level of the whole animal and single cells.

  16. Everolimus for Previously Treated Advanced Gastric Cancer: Results of the Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III GRANITE-1 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Bai, Yu-Xian; Bang, Yung-Jue; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Pan, Hong-Ming; Sahmoud, Tarek; Shen, Lin; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Chin, Keisho; Muro, Kei; Kim, Yeul Hong; Ferry, David; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Smith, Heind; Costantini, Chiara; Rizvi, Syed; Lebwohl, David; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus demonstrated promising efficacy in a phase II study of pretreated advanced gastric cancer. This international, double-blind, phase III study compared everolimus efficacy and safety with that of best supportive care (BSC) in previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of systemic chemotherapy were randomly assigned to everolimus 10 mg/d (assignment schedule: 2:1) or matching placebo, both given with BSC. Randomization was stratified by previous chemotherapy lines (one v two) and region (Asia v rest of the world [ROW]). Treatment continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. Primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and safety. Results Six hundred fifty-six patients (median age, 62.0 years; 73.6% male) were enrolled. Median OS was 5.4 months with everolimus and 4.3 months with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.08; P = .124). Median PFS was 1.7 months and 1.4 months in the everolimus and placebo arms, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78). Common grade 3/4 adverse events included anemia, decreased appetite, and fatigue. The safety profile was similar in patients enrolled in Asia versus ROW. Conclusion Compared with BSC, everolimus did not significantly improve overall survival for advanced gastric cancer that progressed after one or two lines of previous systemic chemotherapy. The safety profile observed for everolimus was consistent with that observed for everolimus in other cancers. PMID:24043745

  17. Vandetanib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer: a randomized, double-blind phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Samuel A; Robinson, Bruce G; Gagel, Robert F; Dralle, Henning; Fagin, James A; Santoro, Massimo; Baudin, Eric; Elisei, Rossella; Jarzab, Barbara; Vasselli, James R; Read, Jessica; Langmuir, Peter; Ryan, Anderson J; Schlumberger, Martin J

    2012-01-10

    There is no effective therapy for patients with advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Vandetanib, a once-daily oral inhibitor of RET kinase, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, has previously shown antitumor activity in a phase II study of patients with advanced hereditary MTC. Patients with advanced MTC were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive vandetanib 300 mg/d or placebo. On objective disease progression, patients could elect to receive open-label vandetanib. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), determined by independent central Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) assessments. Between December 2006 and November 2007, 331 patients (mean age, 52 years; 90% sporadic; 95% metastatic) were randomly assigned to receive vandetanib (231) or placebo (100). At data cutoff (July 2009; median follow-up, 24 months), 37% of patients had progressed and 15% had died. The study met its primary objective of PFS prolongation with vandetanib versus placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.69; P < .001). Statistically significant advantages for vandetanib were also seen for objective response rate (P < .001), disease control rate (P = .001), and biochemical response (P < .001). Overall survival data were immature at data cutoff (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.65). A final survival analysis will take place when 50% of the patients have died. Common adverse events (any grade) occurred more frequently with vandetanib compared with placebo, including diarrhea (56% v 26%), rash (45% v 11%), nausea (33% v 16%), hypertension (32% v 5%), and headache (26% v 9%). Vandetanib demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a phase III trial of patients with advanced MTC (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00410761).

  18. Phase II Study of Autologous Monocyte-Derived mRNA Electroporated Dendritic Cells (TriMixDC-MEL) Plus Ipilimumab in Patients With Pretreated Advanced Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgenhof, Sofie; Corthals, Jurgen; Heirman, Carlo; van Baren, Nicolas; Lucas, Sophie; Kvistborg, Pia; Thielemans, Kris; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-20

    Autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) electroporated with synthetic mRNA (TriMixDC-MEL) are immunogenic and have antitumor activity as a monotherapy in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma. Ipilimumab, an immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody directed against the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 receptor that counteracts physiologic suppression of T-cell function, improves the overall survival of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase II study investigated the combination of TriMixDC-MEL and ipilimumab in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma. Thirty-nine patients were treated with TriMixDC-MEL (4 × 10(6) cells administered intradermally and 20 × 10(6) cells administered intravenously) plus ipilimumab (10 mg/kg every 3 weeks for a total of four administrations, followed by maintenance therapy every 12 weeks in patients who remained progression free). Six-month disease control rate according to the immune-related response criteria served as the primary end point. The 6-month disease control rate was 51% (95% CI, 36% to 67%), and the overall tumor response rate was 38% (including eight complete and seven partial responses). Seven complete responses and one partial tumor response are ongoing after a median follow-up time of 36 months (range, 22 to 43 months). The most common treatment-related adverse events (all grades) consisted of local DC injection site skin reactions (100%), transient post-DC infusion chills (38%) and flu-like symptoms (84%), dermatitis (64%), hepatitis (13%), hypophysitis (15%), and diarrhea/colitis (15%). Grade 3 or 4 immune-related adverse events occurred in 36% of patients. There was no grade 5 adverse event. The combination of TriMixDC-MEL and ipilimumab is tolerable and results in an encouraging rate of highly durable tumor responses in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Results from a Phase I Study of Lapatinib with Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerbone, L; Sternberg, C N; Sengeløv, L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Lapatinib is a potent HER1 and HER2 inhibitor. Gemcitabine-cisplatin (GC) is a standard chemotherapy regimen for advanced/metastatic bladder cancer. This phase I study examined the safety of lapatinib in combination with GC in patients with bladder cancer. The primary aim...... × 3 patients), 1 of the 6 patients presented DLTs (grade 4, treatment-related febrile neutropenia and renal failure). Twelve patients received 6 cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Lapatinib at 750-1,250 mg combined with GC appears safe and tolerable. The MTD of lapatinib combined with GC in bladder cancer was 1...

  20. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichbaum Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. Methods/design The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border, heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Discussion Intensity-modulated WAR provides

  1. Phase II study evaluating consolidation whole abdominal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with advanced ovarian cancer stage FIGO III - The OVAR-IMRT-02 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Debus, Juergen; Kieser, Meinhard; Sterzing, Florian; Krause, Sonja; Lindel, Katja; Harms, Wolfgang; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof

    2011-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with advanced FIGO stage III epithelial ovarian cancer remains poor despite the aggressive standard treatment, consisting of maximal cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. The median time to recurrence is less than 2 years, with a 5-years survival rate of -20-25%. Recurrences of the disease occur mostly intraperitoneally. Ovarian cancer is a radiosensitive tumor, so that the use of whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) as a consolidation therapy would appear to be a logical strategy. WAR used to be the standard treatment after surgery before the chemotherapy era; however, it has been almost totally excluded from the treatment of ovarian cancer during the past decade because of its high toxicity. Modern intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential of sparing organs at risk like kidneys, liver, and bone marrow while still adequately covering the peritoneal cavity with a homogenous dose. Our previous phase I study showed for the first time the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated WAR and pointed out promising results concerning treatment tolerance. The current phase-II study succeeds to the phase-I study to further evaluate the toxicity of this new treatment. The OVAR-IMRT-02 study is a single-center one arm phase-II trial. Thirty seven patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer stage FIGO III having a complete remission after chemotherapy will be treated with intensity-modulated WAR as a consolidation therapy. A total dose of 30 Gy in 20 fractions of 1.5 Gy will be applied to the entire peritoneal cavity including the liver surface and the pelvic and para-aortic node regions. Organ at risk are kidneys, liver (except the 1 cm-outer border), heart, vertebral bodies and pelvic bones. Primary endpoint is tolerability; secondary objectives are toxicity, quality of life, progression-free and overall survival. Intensity-modulated WAR provides a new promising option in the consolidation treatment of

  2. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phases 3 and 4. [variable cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, R. D.; Joy, W.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of various advanced propulsion concepts for supersonic cruise aircraft resulted in the identification of the double-bypass variable cycle engine as the most promising concept. This engine design utilizes special variable geometry components and an annular exhaust nozzle to provide high take-off thrust and low jet noise. The engine also provides good performance at both supersonic cruise and subsonic cruise. Emission characteristics are excellent. The advanced technology double-bypass variable cycle engine offers an improvement in aircraft range performance relative to earlier supersonic jet engine designs and yet at a lower level of engine noise. Research and technology programs required in certain design areas for this engine concept to realize its potential benefits include refined parametric analysis of selected variable cycle engines, screening of additional unconventional concepts, and engine preliminary design studies. Required critical technology programs are summarized.

  3. DE-FOA-EE0005502 Advanced Percussive Drilling Technology for Geothermal Exploration and Development Phase II Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jiann-Cherng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Raymond, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prasad, Somuri V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolfer, Dale R. [Atlas-Copco Secoroc, LLC, Fagersta (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    Percussive hammers are a promising advance in drilling technology for geothermal since they rely upon rock reduction mechanisms that are well-suited for use in the hard, brittle rock characteristic of geothermal formations. The project research approach and work plan includes a critical path to development of a high-temperature (HT) percussive hammer using a two- phase approach. The work completed in Phase I of the project demonstrated the viability of percussive hammers and that solutions to technical challenges in design, material technology, and performance are likely to be resolved. Work completed in Phase II focused on testing the findings from Phase I and evaluating performance of the materials and designs at high- operating temperatures. A high-operating temperature (HOT) drilling facility was designed, built, and used to test the performance of the DTH under extreme conditions. Results from the testing indicate that a high-temperature capable hammer can be developed and is a viable alternative for user in the driller's toolbox.

  4. Advanced Coating Technology for Enhanced Performance of Microchannel Plates for UV Detectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this NASA SBIR Phase I proposal we propose to apply a highly conformal coating of ZnO and AlN or a double layer of GaN to the surface and internal pore walls of...

  5. Recent Advances in Atmospheric Vapor-Phase Deposition of Transparent and Conductive Zinc Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial need for high-throughput and low-cost ZnO deposition processes has triggered the development of atmospheric vapor-phase deposition techniques which can be easily applied to continuous, in-line manufacturing. While atmospheric CVD is a mature technology, new processes for the growth of

  6. Advanced Silicone-based Coatings for Flexible Fabric Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High performance silicone coatings are desired for flexible fabrics used in several space and consumer applications. For instance, the total weight of silicone...

  7. Palliation of advanced pelvic malignant disease with large fraction pelvic radiation and misonidazole: final report of RTOG phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanos, W.J. Jr.; Wasserman, T.; Meoz, R.; Sala, J.; Kong, J.; Stetz, J.

    1987-01-01

    Between October 1979 and June 1982 forty-six patients were entered on a non-randomized Phase I-II protocol for the evaluation of Misonidazole combined with high dose per fraction radiation for the treatment of advanced pelvic malignancies. Pelvic radiation consisted of 1000 cGy in one fraction repeated at 4-week intervals for a total of three treatments. Oral Misonidazole at a dose of 4 gm/m2 was administered 4-6 hr prior to radiation (total dose 12 g/m2). The distribution of histology consisted of 20 gynecologic, 24 bowel, and 2 prostate malignancies. Of the thirty-seven patients completing the three treatments; there were 6 complete responses (14% CR), 10 partial responses (27% PR) 19 minimal or no response (32% NR), and 4 unevaluable. One patient remains NED 5.5 years following radiation. Toxicity directly related to Misonidazole was minimal and consisted primarily of transcient Grade 1, 2 peripheral neuropathy (20% Grade 1, 4% Grade 2) and Grade 2 ototoxicity (4%). Radiation toxicity was significant for late bowel damage. There were 4 (11%) Grade 3 and 7 (19%) Grade 4 gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities. Kaplan-Meier plot of GI toxicity showed a progressive increase in incidence with time for projected rate of 49% Grade 3, 4 by 12-month. GI toxicity (Grade 3, 4) was also related to tumor response. The complication rate was 80% (4/6) for CR, 30% (3/10) for PR and 26% (5/19) for NR or progression. Because of the GI complication rate, this protocol for palliation of advanced pelvic malignancies has been replaced by a protocol that uses 4 fractions over 2 days (b.i.d.) of 370 cGy per fraction repeated at 3-week intervals for a total of 3 courses

  8. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  9. Advanced high speed X-ray CT scanner for measurement and visualization of multi-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Tetsuro; Kawanishi, Kohei; Nishikawa, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    The development of an ultra-fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner has been performed. The object of interest is in a transient or unsettled state, which makes the conventional CT scanner inappropriate. A concept of electrical switching of electron beam of X-ray generation unit is adopted to reduce the scanning time instead of a mechanical motion adopted by a conventional CT scanner. The mechanical motion is a major obstacle to improve the scanning speed. A prototype system with a scanning time of 3.6 milliseconds was developed at first. And, the feasibility was confirmed to measure the dynamic events of two-phase flow. However, faster scanning speed is generally required for the practical use in the thermalhydraulics research field. Therefore, the development of advanced type has been performed. This advanced type can operate under the scanning time of 0.5 milliseconds and is applicable for the measurement of the multi-phase flow with velocity up to 4-5 m/s. (author)

  10. The long-term effects of phase advance shifts of photoperiod on cardiovascular parameters as measured by radiotelemetry in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molcan, L; Vesela, A; Zeman, M; Teplan, M

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure and heart rate, exhibit both circadian and ultradian rhythms which are important for the adequate functioning of the system. For a better understanding of possible negative effects of chronodisruption on the cardiovascular system we studied circadian and ultradian rhythms of blood pressure and heart rate in rats exposed to repeated 8 h phase advance shifts of photoperiod. The experiment lasted 12 weeks, with three shifts per week. Spectral power as a function of frequency for both circadian and harmonic ultradian rhythms was expressed as the circadian–ultradian power ratio. The circadian rhythms of blood pressure, heart rate and locomotor activity were recorded during the control light:dark (LD) regimen with higher values during the D in comparison with the L. Phase advance shifts resulted in a diminished circadian–ultradian power ratio for blood pressure, heart rate and locomotor activity indicating suppressed circadian control of these traits greater in heart rate than blood pressure. In conclusion, rats kept under irregular LD conditions have suppressed circadian control of heart rate, blood pressure and locomotor activity and rely more on an acute response to the LD regime. Their ability to anticipate regular loads can be weakened and in this way chronodisruption can contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. (paper)

  11. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced thyroid cancer: Acute toxicity results of a phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbano, Teresa Guerrero; Clark, Catharine H.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Miles, Elizabeth A.; Mc Nair, Helen; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Warrington, Jim; Dearnaley, David P.; Harmer, Clive; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: This phase 1 study was designed to determine the toxicity of accelerated fractionation IMRT in locally advanced thyroid cancer. Methods: Patients with high risk locally advanced thyroid cancer who required post-operative EBRT were recruited. A single-phase inverse-planned-simultaneous-boost was delivered by IMRT: 58.8 Gy/28F (daily) to the primary tumour and involved nodes and 50 Gy/28F to the elective nodes. Acute (NCICTCv.2.0) and late toxicity (RTOG and modified LENTSOM) was collected. Results: Thirteen patients were treated (7 medullary thyroid, 2 Hurthle cell and 4 well differentiated thyroid cancer). G3 and G2 radiation dermatitis rates were 38.5% and 31%; G3 and G2 mucositis rates 8% and 53% and G3 and G2 pain 23% and 54%. Thirty-one percentage required enteral feeding. G3 and G2 xerostomia rates were 0% and 31%. Recovery was seen, with 62% patients having dysphagia G ≤ 1 2 months after IMRT. Thirty percent of patients developed L'Hermitte's syndrome. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. No dose limiting toxicity was found. Conclusions: Accelerated fractionation IMRT in this group of patients is feasible and safe. The acute toxicity appeared acceptable and early indicators of late toxicity moderate and similar to what would be expected with conventional RT. Longer follow up is required to quantify late side effects

  12. Study of Second Phase Particles and Fe content in Zr Alloys Using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur T. Motta

    2001-11-07

    We have conducted a study of second phase particles and matrix alloying element concentrations in zirconium alloys using synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. The high flux of synchrotron radiation delivered at the 2BM beamline compared to conventional x-ray generators, enables the detection of very small precipitate volume fractions. We detected the standard C14 hcp Zr(Cr,Fe)2 precipitates, (the stable second phase in Zircaloy-4) in the bulk material at a cumulative annealing parameter as low as 10-20 h, and we followed the kinetics of precipitation and growth as a function of the cumulative annealing parameter (CAP) in the range 10-22 (quench) to 10-16 h. In addition, the unique combination of spatial resolution and elemental sensitivity of the 2ID-D/E microbeam line at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (APS) allows study of the alloying element concentrations at ppm levels in an area as small as 0.2 mm. We used x-ray fluorescence induced by this sub-micron x-ray beam to determine the concentration of these alloying elements in the matrix as a function of alloy type and thermal history. We discuss these results and the potential of synchrotron radiation-based techniques for studying zirconium alloys.

  13. Study of Second Phase Particles and Fe content in Zr Alloys Using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Arthur T.

    2001-01-01

    We have conducted a study of second phase particles and matrix alloying element concentrations in zirconium alloys using synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. The high flux of synchrotron radiation delivered at the 2BM beamline compared to conventional x-ray generators, enables the detection of very small precipitate volume fractions. We detected the standard C14 hcp Zr(Cr,Fe)2 precipitates, (the stable second phase in Zircaloy-4) in the bulk material at a cumulative annealing parameter as low as 10-20 h, and we followed the kinetics of precipitation and growth as a function of the cumulative annealing parameter (CAP) in the range 10-22 (quench) to 10-16 h. In addition, the unique combination of spatial resolution and elemental sensitivity of the 2ID-D/E microbeam line at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (APS) allows study of the alloying element concentrations at ppm levels in an area as small as 0.2 mm. We used x-ray fluorescence induced by this sub-micron x-ray beam to determine the concentration of these alloying elements in the matrix as a function of alloy type and thermal history. We discuss these results and the potential of synchrotron radiation-based techniques for studying zirconium alloys

  14. Paired Phase II Studies of Erlotinib/Bevacizumab for Advanced Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma or Never Smokers With Advanced Non-Small-cell Lung Cancer: SWOG S0635 and S0636 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Howard L; Moon, James; Wozniak, Antoinette J; Mack, Philip; Hirsch, Fred R; Bury, Martin J; Kwong, Myron; Nguyen, Dorothy D; Moore, Dennis F; Miao, Jieling; Redman, Mary; Kelly, Karen; Gandara, David R

    2018-01-01

    Before mutation testing of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene was recognized as highly associated with the activity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), clinically defined patient populations with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and never smokers were identified as likely to benefit from EGFR TKIs. From preclinical and clinical data suggesting potentially improved efficacy with a combination of an EGFR TKI and the antiangiogenic agent bevacizumab, the Southwestern Oncology Group (SWOG) initiated paired phase II trials to evaluate the combination of erlotinib/bevacizumab in patients with advanced BAC (SWOG S0635) or never smokers with advanced lung adenocarcinoma (SWOG S0636). Eligible patients with BAC or adenocarcinoma with BAC features (SWOG S0635) or never smokers with advanced lung adenocarcinoma (SWOG S0636) received erlotinib 150 mg/day with bevacizumab 15 mg/kg until progression or prohibitive toxicity. Never smokers with BAC were preferentially enrolled to SWOG S0636. The primary endpoint for both trials was overall survival. A total of 84 patients were enrolled in the SWOG S0635 trial and 85 in the SWOG S0636 trial. The objective response rate was 22% (3% complete response) in the SWOG S0635 trial and 50% (38% confirmed; 3% complete response) in the SWOG S0636 trial. The median progression-free survival was 5 and 7.4 months in the S0635 and S0636 trials, respectively. The median overall survival was 21 and 29.8 months, respectively. Toxicity consisted mainly of rash and diarrhea in both trials. Although the field has moved toward molecular, rather than clinical, selection of patients as optimal candidates for EGFR TKI therapy, these results support the hypothesis that a subset of patients in whom erlotinib is particularly active could receive an incremental benefit from the addition of bevacizumab. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Total recovery of the waste of two-phase olive oil processing: isolation of added-value compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bolaños, Juan; Rodríguez, Guillermo; Gómez, Esther; Guillén, Rafael; Jiménez, Ana; Heredia, Antonia; Rodríguez, Rocío

    2004-09-22

    A process for the value addition of solid waste from two-phase olive oil extraction or "alperujo" that includes a hydrothermal treatment has been suggested. In this treatment an autohydrolysis process occurs and the solid olive byproduct is partially solubilized. From this water-soluble fraction can be obtained besides the antioxidant hydroxytyrosol several other compounds of high added value. In this paper three different samples of alperujo were characterized and subjected to a hydrothermal treatment with and without acid catalyst. The main soluble compounds after the hydrolysis were represented by monosaccharides xylose, arabinose, and glucose; oligosaccharides, mannitol and products of sugar destruction. Oligosaccharides were separated by size exclusion chromatography. It was possible to get highly purified mannitol by applying a simple purification method.

  16. Nanoencapsulation of phase change materials for advanced thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukina, E. M.; Graham, M.; Zheng, Z.

    2018-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) allow the storage of large amounts of latent heat during phase transition. They have the potential to both increase the efficiency of renewable energies such as solar power through storage of excess energy, which can be used at times of peak demand; and to reduce overall energy demand through passive thermal regulation. 198.3 million tons of oil equivalent were used in the EU in 2013 for heating. However, bulk PCMs are not suitable for use without prior encapsulation. Encapsulation in a shell material provides benefits such as protection of the PCM from the external environment and increased specific surface area to improve heat transfer. This review highlights techniques for the encapsulation of both organic and inorganic PCMs, paying particular attention to nanoencapsulation (capsules with sizes energy release/uptake. PMID:29658558

  17. Nanoencapsulation of phase change materials for advanced thermal energy storage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukina, E M; Graham, M; Zheng, Z; Shchukin, D G

    2018-04-16

    Phase change materials (PCMs) allow the storage of large amounts of latent heat during phase transition. They have the potential to both increase the efficiency of renewable energies such as solar power through storage of excess energy, which can be used at times of peak demand; and to reduce overall energy demand through passive thermal regulation. 198.3 million tons of oil equivalent were used in the EU in 2013 for heating. However, bulk PCMs are not suitable for use without prior encapsulation. Encapsulation in a shell material provides benefits such as protection of the PCM from the external environment and increased specific surface area to improve heat transfer. This review highlights techniques for the encapsulation of both organic and inorganic PCMs, paying particular attention to nanoencapsulation (capsules with sizes energy release/uptake.

  18. Phase II study of chemoradiotherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus. Nine Japanese institutions trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Kaoru [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine; Iizuka, Toshifumi; Ando, Nobutoshi; Ide, Hiroko

    1996-10-01

    A phase II study of chemoradiotherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus was carried out cooperatively by nine Japanese institutions. Forty-five patients with thoracic advanced squamous cell carcinoma, who had T4 tumor or distant lymph node metastasis (M1{sub (LYM)}), were enrolled in the study for treatment with cisplatin (70 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 and 36, and 5-fluorouracil infusion (700 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1-4 and 36-39 sandwiched around external beam irradiation (60 Gy over 6 weeks). Of the 45 evaluable patients, 37 (84.1%) completed the treatment. The overall response rate was 64.4%, and the complete response rate 8.9%. The median duration of response was 125.0 days for patients who achieved complete and partial response. The 50% median survival time was 215 days. There was one toxicity-related death due to radiation pneumonitis. The major form of toxicity exceeding grade 2 was myelosuppression and anorexia, but grade 4 toxicity was also observed (2 pulmonary, 1 severe hypoxemia, 1 severe cardiac failure and 1 mental disturbance). The results showed that this form of chemoradiotherapy had a satisfactory effect and might be useful for treatment of inoperable advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  19. Regorafenib (BAY 73-4506) in advanced colorectal cancer: a phase I study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumberg, D; Scheulen, M E; Schultheis, B; Richly, H; Frost, A; Büchert, M; Christensen, O; Jeffers, M; Heinig, R; Boix, O; Mross, K

    2012-01-01

    Background: In a phase I dose-escalation study, regorafenib demonstrated tolerability and antitumour activity in solid tumour patients. The study was expanded to focus on patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Patients received oral regorafenib 60–220 mg daily (160 mg daily in the extension cohort) in cycles of 21 days on, 7 days off treatment. Assessments included toxicity, response, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Results: Thirty-eight patients with heavily pretreated CRC (median 4 prior lines of therapy, range 0–7) were enrolled in the dose-escalation and extension phases; 26 patients received regorafenib 160 mg daily. Median treatment duration was 53 days (range 7–280 days). The most common treatment-related toxicities included hand–foot skin reaction, fatigue, voice change and rash. Twenty-seven patients were evaluable for response: 1 achieved partial response and 19 had stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 107 days (95% CI, 66–161). At steady state, regorafenib and its active metabolites had similar systemic exposure. Pharmacodynamic assessment indicated decreased tumour perfusion in most patients. Conclusion: Regorafenib showed tolerability and antitumour activity in patients with metastatic CRC. This expanded-cohort phase I study provided the foundation for further clinical trials of regorafenib in this patient population. PMID:22568966

  20. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  1. Phase I expansion and pharmacodynamic study of the oral MEK inhibitor RO4987655 (CH4987655) in selected patients with advanced cancer with RAS-RAF mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmer, Lisa; Barlesi, Fabrice; Martinez-Garcia, Maria; Dieras, Veronique; Schellens, Jan H M; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Middleton, Mark R; Calvo, Emiliano; Paz-Ares, Luiz; Larkin, James; Pacey, Simon; Venturi, Miro; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Tessier, Jean J L; Eberhardt, Wilfried Ernst Erich; Paques, Michel; Guarin, Ernesto; Meresse, Valerie; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This phase I expansion study assessed safety, pharmacodynamic effects, and antitumor activity of RO4987655, a pure MEK inhibitor, in selected patients with advanced solid tumor. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We undertook a multicenter phase I two-part study (dose escalation and cohort expansion).

  2. Imatinib mesylate is effective in children with chronic myelogenous leukemia in late chronic and advanced phase and in relapse after stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millot, F; Guilhot, J; Nelken, B; Leblanc, T; De Bont, ES; Bekassy, AN; Gadner, H; Sufliarska, S; Stary, J; Gschaidmeier, H; Guilhot, F; Suttorp, M

    A multicentric phase 2 study was conducted to determine the efficiency and the tolerance of imatinib mesylate in children with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in advanced phase of the disease, in relapse after stem cell transplantation, or in case of failure to an interferon a-based regimen. In

  3. A phase I dose-escalation study of lenalidomide in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav J Ullenhag

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide have both immunomodulatory and anti-angiogenic properties which could confer anti-cancer effects. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of combining lenalidomide with the standard treatment gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer patients with advanced disease.Eligible patients had locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients received lenalidomide days 1-21 orally and gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 intravenously (days 1, 8 and 15, each 28 day cycle. Three cohorts of lenalidomide were examined (Cohort I = 15 mg, Cohort II = 20 mg and Cohort III = 25 mg daily. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of lenalidomide given in combination with gemcitabine was defined as the highest dose level at which no more than one out of four (25% subjects experiences a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Patients should also be able to receive daily low molecular weight heparin (LMWH (e.g. dalteparin 5000 IU s.c. daily as a prophylactic anticoagulant for venous thromboembolic events (VTEs. Twelve patients (n = 4, n = 3 and n = 5 in cohort I, II and III, respectively were enrolled in this study.Median duration of treatment was 11 weeks (range 1-66, and median number of treatment cycles were three (range 1-14. The only DLT was a cardiac failure grade 3 in cohort III. Frequent treatment-related adverse events (AEs (all grades included neutropenia, leucopenia and fatigue (83% each, but there was no febrile neutropenia; thrombocytopenia (75%; dermatological toxicity (75%; diarrhea and nausea (42% each; and neuropathy (42%.This phase I study demonstrates the feasibility of the combination of lenalidomide and gemcitabine as first-line treatment in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. The tolerability profile demonstrated in the dose escalation schedule of lenalidomide suggests the dosing of lenalidomide to be 25 mg daily on days 1-21 with standard dosing of gemcitabine and merits further evaluation in a phase II trial.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  4. A phase I study of imexon plus gemcitabine as first-line therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Steven J; Zalupski, Mark M; Modiano, Manuel R; Conkling, Paul; Patt, Yehuda Z; Davis, Peg; Dorr, Robert T; Boytim, Michelle L; Hersh, Evan M

    2010-07-01

    Imexon is an aziridine-derived iminopyrrolidone which has synergy with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Gemcitabine is a standard therapy for pancreatic cancer. We performed a phase I trial of imexon and gemcitabine to evaluate safety, dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with untreated locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma received therapy in sequential cohorts on regimen A (n = 19; imexon 200 or 280 mg/m(2) intravenously (IV) over 30 min days 1-5, 15-19 and gemcitabine 800 or 1,000 mg/m(2) IV over 30 min on days 1,8,15 every 28 days) or regimen B (n = 86; imexon 280-1,300 mg/m(2) IV over 30-60 min days 1, 8, and 15 and gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) IV over 30 min on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). One hundred five patients received 340 treatment cycles (median 2, range 1-16). median age 63, 61% male, ECOG PS 0/1 50%/50%, 93% metastatic. DLT was abdominal cramping and pain, often with transient, acute diarrhea. Best response was confirmed partial response (PR) in 11.4%, 8.9% unconfirmed PR, and 48.1% with stable disease. There was a dose proportional increase in imexon AUC across the doses tested with terminal half life 69 min at the MTD and no alteration of gemcitabine pharmacokinetics. The recommended phase II dose of imexon is 875 mg/m(2) with gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2). DLT was acute abdominal pain and cramping. Encouraging antitumor responses support further evaluation of this combination in advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. A phase Ib study of everolimus combined with metformin for patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Remco J; van de Venne, Tim; Weterman, Mariëtte J; Mathot, Ron A; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Richel, Dick J; Wilmink, Johanna W

    2018-02-01

    Background The efficacy to monotherapy with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in advanced cancer is often limited due to therapy resistance. Combining everolimus with metformin may decrease the chance of therapy resistance. Methods Patients received everolimus and metformin in a 3 + 3 dose-escalation scheme. Objectives were to determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), maximum tolerated dose, toxic effects, pharmacokinetics and anti-tumour efficacy. Results 9 patients received study treatment for a median duration of 48 days (range: 4-78). 6 patients discontinued due to toxicity and 3 patients because of progressive disease. At the starting dose level of 10 mg everolimus qd and 500 mg metformin bid, 3 out of 5 patients experienced a DLT. After de-escalation to 5 mg everolimus qd and 500 mg metformin bid, considerable toxicity was still observed and patient enrollment was terminated. In pharmacokinetic analyses, metformin was eliminated slower when co-administered with everolimus than as single-agent. After 9 weeks of treatment, 3 patients were still on study and all had stable disease. Conclusion The combination of everolimus and metformin is poorly tolerated in patients with advanced cancer. The pharmacokinetic interaction between everolimus and metformin may have implications for diabetic cancer patients that are treated with these drugs. Our results advocate for future clinical trials with combinations of other mTOR inhibitors and biguanides.

  6. Advanced supersonic propulsion study, phase 2. [propulsion system performance, design analysis and technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A continuation of the NASA/P and WA study to evaluate various types of propulsion systems for advanced commercial supersonic transports has resulted in the identification of two very promising engine concepts. They are the Variable Stream Control Engine which provides independent temperature and velocity control for two coannular exhaust streams, and a derivative of this engine, a Variable Cycle Engine that employs a rear flow-inverter valve to vary the bypass ratio of the cycle. Both concepts are based on advanced engine technology and have the potential for significant improvements in jet noise, exhaust emissions and economic characteristics relative to current technology supersonic engines. Extensive research and technology programs are required in several critical areas that are unique to these supersonic Variable Cycle Engines to realize these potential improvements. Parametric cycle and integration studies of conventional and Variable Cycle Engines are reviewed, features of the two most promising engine concepts are described, and critical technology requirements and required programs are summarized.

  7. HATT: a phase IV, single-arm, open-label study of sorafenib in Taiwanese patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Ming; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Ping-Tsung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Hu, Chi-Tan; Yang, Sien-Sing; Le Berre, Marie-Aude; Liu, Xuan; Mitchell, David Y; Prins, Klaas; Grevel, Joachim; Peña, Carol A E; Meinhardt, Gerold

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib significantly improves survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This phase IV study assessed sorafenib efficacy/safety in Taiwanese patients with advanced HCC and Child-Pugh A status. All patients received 400 mg sorafenib BID. Safety, efficacy, sorafenib pharmacokinetics, and Child-Pugh progression were evaluated. A hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) prevention substudy assessed HFSR incidence and grade/severity and time to HFSR in 29 and 34 patients randomized to corticosteroid and noncorticosteroid ointments, respectively, and in 88 nonrandomized patients. The 151 patients included 120 (80%) male patients and 81 (54%) with stage IV disease. Mean sorafenib dose was 626 mg/day, and median treatment duration was 4.2 months. Median overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and time to progression (TTP) were 8.6, 2.7, and 3.8 months, respectively. Disease control and response rates (partial responses only) were 48 and 6.6%, respectively. Median TTP from Child-Pugh A to B/C was 88 days. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) occurred in 89.4% of patients; none were new or unexpected. The most frequent grade ≥3 drug-related, treatment-emergent AEs were HFSR (13.2%), diarrhea (11.9%), and hypertension (6.6%). Corticosteroid ointment tended to reduce the severity and incidence of all HFSR-associated parameters. Pharmacokinetic exposure was unaltered by Child-Pugh progression. The final pharmacokinetic model predicted 13.1 and 33.8% reductions in sorafenib exposure over 6 and 12 months, respectively. There was a trend of longer OS and TTP in Taiwanese patients with advanced HCC compared with patients with advanced HCC in the Asia-Pacific trial. Sorafenib exposure did not correlate with liver function. Reduced pharmacokinetic exposure over time was unrelated to reduced or interrupted dosing.

  8. Phase I Trial Using Induction Ciplatin, Docetaxel, 5-FU and Erlotinib Followed by Cisplatin, Bevacizumab and Erlotinib With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Peter H; Machtay, Mitchell; Anne, Pramila R; Cognetti, David; Keane, William M; Wuthrick, Evan; Dicker, Adam P; Axelrod, Rita S

    2018-05-01

    Bevacizumab (avastin) and erlotinib (tarceva) had shown early clinical activity against head and neck cancer (HNC). We initiated a phase I trial of induction cisplatin, docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil and erlotinib (TPF-E) followed by cisplatin, bevacizumab and erlotinib (PA-E) with radiotherapy (XRT) for advanced HNC. The goal was to determine maximum tolerated erlotinib dose. Eligible patients had stage IVA or higher HNC with good performance status, hematologic, and renal reserve. Two cycles of induction TPF-E were administered. XRT was administered with concurrent weekly cisplatin and bevacizumab every 2 weeks. Initial erlotinib dose was 50 mg daily from start of induction chemotherapy until radiotherapy completion. Erlotinib dose escalations to 100 and 150 mg were planned. Thirteen patients with previously untreated locoregional disease (11 patients) or oligometastatic (2 patients) HNC were enrolled. Totally, 11 of 13 patients completed XRT as planned. Four of 8 patients in cohort 1 (erlotinib 50 mg), 3 of 4 patients in cohort 2 (100 mg), and 0 of 1 patients in cohort 3 (150 mg) completed the regimen. Two patients had significant gastrointestinal complications (bleeding and perforation), and 1 had dose-limiting diarrhea. Maximum tolerated dose was reached at 50 mg erlotinib. At median 23.4 months follow-up, 5 patients (38%) have no evidence of disease, and 2 (15%) have stable but measurable disease. Erlotinib in combination with induction TPF followed by erlotinib, cisplatin, and bevacizumab with XRT is active but toxic. Gastrointestinal toxicities partly caused high rates of study withdrawal. All doses studied in this protocol caused unexpected toxicities and we do not recommend advancement to phase II.

  9. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumi, I. [Laboratoire d`Etudes Thermiques des Reacteurs, Gif sur Yvette (France); Caruge, D. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    1997-07-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe`s method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations.

  10. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Caruge, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for both one and three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solvers concepts to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the paper presents the numerical method for a one dimensional hyperbolic two-fluid model including differential terms as added mass and interface pressure. This numerical solution scheme makes use of the Riemann problem solution to define backward and forward differencing to approximate spatial derivatives. The construction of this approximate Riemann solver uses an extension of Roe's method that has been successfully used to solve gas dynamic equations. As far as the two-fluid model is hyperbolic, this numerical method seems very efficient for the numerical solution of two-phase flow problems. The scheme was applied both to shock tube problems and to standard tests for two-fluid computer codes. The second part describes the numerical method in the three dimensional case. The authors discuss also some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. Such a scheme is not implemented in a thermal-hydraulic computer code devoted to 3-D steady-state and transient computations. Some results obtained for Pressurised Water Reactors concerning upper plenum calculations and a steady state flow in the core with rod bow effect evaluation are presented. In practice these new numerical methods have proved to be stable on non staggered grids and capable of generating accurate non oscillating solutions for two-phase flow calculations

  11. Effects of hard mask etch on final topography of advanced phase shift masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortenbach, Olga; Rolff, Haiko; Lajn, Alexander; Baessler, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Continuous shrinking of the semiconductor device dimensions demands steady improvements of the lithographic resolution on wafer level. These requirements challenge the photomask industry to further improve the mask quality in all relevant printing characteristics. In this paper topography of the Phase Shift Masks (PSM) was investigated. Effects of hard mask etch on phase shift uniformity and mask absorber profile were studied. Design of experiments method (DoE) was used for the process optimization, whereas gas composition, bias power of the hard mask main etch and bias power of the over-etch were varied. In addition, influence of the over-etch time was examined at the end of the experiment. Absorber depth uniformity, sidewall angle (SWA), reactive ion etch lag (RIE lag) and through pitch (TP) dependence were analyzed. Measurements were performed by means of Atomic-force microscopy (AFM) using critical dimension (CD) mode with a boot-shaped tip. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) cross-section images were prepared to verify the profile quality. Finally CD analysis was performed to confirm the optimal etch conditions. Significant dependence of the absorber SWA on hard mask (HM) etch conditions was observed revealing an improvement potential for the mask absorber profile. It was found that hard mask etch can leave a depth footprint in the absorber layer. Thus, the etch depth uniformity of hard mask etch is crucial for achieving a uniform phase shift over the active mask area. The optimized hard mask etch process results in significantly improved mask topography without deterioration of tight CD specifications.

  12. Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Smutzer

    2010-01-31

    Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order

  13. SPIRIT trial: A phase III pragmatic trial of an advance care planning intervention in ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Unruh, Mark L; Manatunga, Amita; Plantinga, Laura C; Lea, Janice; Jhamb, Manisha; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V; Ward, Sandra E

    2018-01-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is a central tenet of dialysis care, but the vast majority of dialysis patients report never engaging in ACP discussions with their care providers. Over the last decade, we have developed and iteratively tested SPIRIT (Sharing Patient's Illness Representation to Increase Trust), a theory-based, patient- and family-centered advance care planning intervention. SPIRIT is a six-step, two-session, face-to-face intervention to promote cognitive and emotional preparation for end-of-life decision making for patients with ESRD and their surrogates. In these explanatory trials, SPIRIT was delivered by trained research nurses. Findings consistently revealed that patients and surrogates in SPIRIT showed significant improvement in preparedness for end-of-life decision making, and surrogates in SPIRIT reported significantly improved post-bereavement psychological outcomes after the patient's death compared to a no treatment comparison condition. As a critical next step, we are conducting an effectiveness-implementation study. This study is a multicenter, clinic-level cluster randomized pragmatic trial to evaluate the effectiveness of SPIRIT delivered by dialysis care providers as part of routine care in free-standing outpatient dialysis clinics, compared to usual care plus delayed SPIRIT implementation. Simultaneously, we will evaluate the implementation of SPIRIT, including sustainability. We will recruit 400 dyads of patients at high risk of death in the next year and their surrogates from 30 dialysis clinics in four states. This trial of SPIRIT will generate novel, meaningful insights about improving ACP in dialysis care. ClinicalTrials.govNCT03138564, registered 05/01/2017. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced numerical methods for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Gallo, D.; Royer, E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new numerical methods developed for three dimensional two-phase flow calculations. These methods are finite volume numerical methods. They are based on an extension of Roe's approximate Riemann solver to define convective fluxes versus mean cell quantities. To go forward in time, a linearized conservative implicit integrating step is used, together with a Newton iterative method. We also present here some improvements performed to obtain a fully implicit solution method that provides fast running steady state calculations. This kind of numerical method, which is widely used for fluid dynamic calculations, is proved to be very efficient for the numerical solution to two-phase flow problems. This numerical method has been implemented for the three dimensional thermal-hydraulic code FLICA-4 which is mainly dedicated to core thermal-hydraulic transient and steady-state analysis. Hereafter, we will also find some results obtained for the EPR reactor running in a steady-state at 60% of nominal power with 3 pumps out of 4, and a thermal-hydraulic core analysis for a 1300 MW PWR at low flow steam-line-break conditions. (author)

  15. A phase 2 study of vorinostat in locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila H; Heilbrun, Lance K; Barrett, Michael T; Kummar, Shivaani; Hansen, Aaron R; Siu, Lillian L; Piekarz, Richard L; Sukari, Ammar W; Chao, Joseph; Pilat, Mary Jo; Smith, Daryn W; Casetta, Lindsay; Boerner, Scott A; Chen, Alice; Lenkiewicz, Elizabeth; Malasi, Smriti; LoRusso, Patricia M

    2017-05-16

    Vorinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). Based on a confirmed partial response (PR) in an adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) patient treated with vorinostat in a prior phase 1 trial, we initiated this phase 2 trial. Vorinostat was administered orally 400 mg daily, 28 day cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate response rate (RR). Exploratory studies included whole exome sequencing (WES) of selected patients. Thirty patients were enrolled. Median age of patients was 53 years (range 21-73). Median number of cycles was 5 (range 1-66). Lymphopenia (n = 5), hypertension (n = 3), oral pain (n = 2), thromboembolic events (n = 2) and fatigue (n = 2) were the only grade 3 adverse events (AEs) that occurred in more than 1 patient. Eleven patients were dose reduced secondary to drug-related AEs. Two patients had a partial response (PR), with response durations of 53 and 7.2 months. One patient had a minor response with a decrease in ascites (for 19 cycles). Stable disease was the best response in 27 patients. Targeted and WES of 8 patients in this trial identified mutations in chromatin remodeling genes highlighting the role of the epigenome in ACC. Vorinostat demonstrated efficacy in patients with ACC supporting the inclusion of HDACi in future studies to treat ACC.

  16. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Andrew H.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Venook, Alan P.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Dito, Elizabeth R.N.; Schillinger, Brian R.N.; Tempero, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m 2 at 10 mg/m 2 /min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m 2 orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation

  17. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jae Hwan [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun-Gi [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Ah [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Taek-Keun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwang-Ju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  18. Phase advancing human circadian rhythms with morning bright light, afternoon melatonin, and gradually shifted sleep: can we reduce morning bright-light duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2015-02-01

    Efficient treatments to phase-advance human circadian rhythms are needed to attenuate circadian misalignment and the associated negative health outcomes that accompany early-morning shift work, early school start times, jet lag, and delayed sleep phase disorder. This study compared three morning bright-light exposure patterns from a single light box (to mimic home treatment) in combination with afternoon melatonin. Fifty adults (27 males) aged 25.9 ± 5.1 years participated. Sleep/dark was advanced 1 h/day for three treatment days. Participants took 0.5 mg of melatonin 5 h before the baseline bedtime on treatment day 1, and an hour earlier each treatment day. They were exposed to one of three bright-light (~5000 lux) patterns upon waking each morning: four 30-min exposures separated by 30 min of room light (2-h group), four 15-min exposures separated by 45 min of room light (1-h group), and one 30-min exposure (0.5-h group). Dim-light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) before and after treatment determined the phase advance. Compared to the 2-h group (phase shift = 2.4 ± 0.8 h), smaller phase-advance shifts were seen in the 1-h (1.7 ± 0.7 h) and 0.5-h (1.8 ± 0.8 h) groups. The 2-h pattern produced the largest phase advance; however, the single 30-min bright-light exposure was as effective as 1 h of bright light spread over 3.25 h, and it produced 75% of the phase shift observed with 2 h of bright light. A 30-min morning bright-light exposure with afternoon melatonin is an efficient treatment to phase-advance human circadian rhythms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phase advancing human circadian rhythms with morning bright light, afternoon melatonin, and gradually shifted sleep: can we reduce morning bright light duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephanie J.; Eastman, Charmane I.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Efficient treatments to phase advance human circadian rhythms are needed to attenuate circadian misalignment and the associated negative health outcomes that accompany early morning shift work, early school start times, jet lag, and delayed sleep phase disorder. This study compared three morning bright light exposure patterns from a single light box (to mimic home treatment) in combination with afternoon melatonin. METHODS Fifty adults (27 males) aged 25.9±5.1 years participated. Sleep/dark was advanced 1 hour/day for 3 treatment days. Participants took 0.5 mg melatonin 5 hours before baseline bedtime on treatment day 1, and an hour earlier each treatment day. They were exposed to one of three bright light (~5000 lux) patterns upon waking each morning: four 30-minute exposures separated by 30 minutes of room light (2 h group); four 15-minute exposures separated by 45 minutes of room light (1 h group), and one 30-minute exposure (0.5 h group). Dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) before and after treatment determined the phase advance. RESULTS Compared to the 2 h group (phase shift=2.4±0.8 h), smaller phase advance shifts were seen in the 1 h (1.7±0.7 h) and 0.5 h (1.8±0.8 h) groups. The 2-hour pattern produced the largest phase advance; however, the single 30-minute bright light exposure was as effective as 1 hour of bright light spread over 3.25 h, and produced 75% of the phase shift observed with 2 hours of bright light. CONCLUSIONS A 30-minute morning bright light exposure with afternoon melatonin is an efficient treatment to phase advance human circadian rhythms. PMID:25620199

  20. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Shirai, Yoshihiko; Nakagawa, Akihiko; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m 2 /day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m 2 /day, 3 at 70 mg/m 2 /day, and 10 at 80 mg/m 2 /day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m 2 /day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m 2 /day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated

  1. An advanced three-phase physical, experimental and numerical method for tsunami induced boulder transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brückner, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Coasts around the world are affected by high-energy wave events like storm surges or tsunamis depending on their regional climatological and geological settings. By focusing on tsunami impacts, we combine the abilities and experiences of different scientific fields aiming at improved insights of near- and onshore tsunami hydrodynamics. We investigate the transport of coarse clasts - so called boulders - due to tsunami impacts by a multi-methodology approach of numerical modelling, laboratory experiments, and sedimentary field records. Coupled numerical hydrodynamic and boulder transport models (BTM) are widely applied for analysing the impact characteristics of the transport by tsunami, such as wave height and flow velocity. Numerical models able to simulate past tsunami events and the corresponding boulder transport patterns with high accuracy and acceptable computational effort can be utilized as powerful forecasting models predicting the impact of a coast approaching tsunami. We have conducted small-scale physical experiments in the tilting flume with real shaped boulder models. Utilizing the structure from motion technique (Westoby et al., 2012) we reconstructed real boulders from a field study on the Island of Bonaire (Lesser Antilles, Caribbean Sea, Engel & May, 2012). The obtained three-dimensional boulder meshes are utilized for creating downscaled replica of the real boulder for physical experiments. The results of the irregular shaped boulder are compared to experiments with regular shaped boulder models to achieve a better insight about the shape related influence on transport patterns. The numerical model is based on the general two-phase mass flow model by Pudasaini (2012) enhanced for boulder transport simulations. The boulder is implemented using the immersed boundary technique (Peskin, 2002) and the direct forcing approach. In this method Cartesian grids (fluid and particle phase) and Lagrangian meshes (boulder) are combined. By applying the

  2. Icotinib in Patients with Pretreated Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with EGFR Overexpression or EGFR Gene Amplification: A Single-Arm, Multicenter Phase 2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Fan, Qingxia; Lu, Ping; Ying, Jianming; Ma, Changwu; Liu, Wei; Liu, Ying; Tan, Fenlai; Sun, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been reported to be overexpressed and amplified in a high percentage of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The activity of icotinib, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was assessed in previously treated ESCC with EGFR overexpression or amplification. For this phase 2, single-arm, multicenter trial undertaken at six hospitals in China, we included Chinese patients with previously treated, histologically confirmed advanced ESCC and EGFR overexpression (immunohistochemical staining sore of 3+) or amplification (positive fluorescence in situ hybridization result). These patients received oral icotinib (250 mg, three times daily).The primary end point was the proportion of patients with objective responses as assessed by an independent radiology review committee. Between December 5, 2013, and May 28, 2015, a total of 281 patients were screened. Fifty-four eligible patients were enrolled. Nine responses were observed, including one complete response and eight partial responses, and 16 patients had stable disease, resulting in a 16.7% objective response rate (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.7-26.6) and 46.3% disease control rate (95% CI: 33.0-59.6). The median progression-free survival and overall survival times were 52 (95% CI: 40-95) days and 153 (95% CI: 139-218) days, respectively. A total of 43 patients experienced at least one adverse event, but most were only grade 1 to 2 in severity. The most frequent was rash (48.1%), followed by diarrhea (22.2%). Icotinib showed favorable activity in patients with advanced, previously treated ESCC with EGFR overexpression or amplification. These findings suggest further research into EGFR overexpression or amplification for selecting responsive patients. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

    2007-02-01

    This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

  4. Exploitation of Digital Filters to Advance the Single-Phase T/4 Delay PLL System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Zhou, Keliang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    will violate this design rule and it can become a major challenge for digital controllers. To deal with the above issue, this paper first exploits a virtual unit delay (z_v^-1) to emulate the viable sampling behavior in practical digital signal processors with a fixed sampling rate. This exploitation......With the development of digital signal processing technologies, control and monitoring of power electronics conversion systems have been evolving to become fully digital. As the basic element in the design and analysis phase of digital controllers or filters, a number of unit delays (z^-1) have...... been employed, e.g., in a cascaded structure. Practically, the number of unit delays is designed as an integer, which is related to the sampling frequency (e.g., 50 Hz). More common, the sampling frequency is fixed during operation for simplicity and design. Hence, any disturbance in the ac signal...

  5. Advances in simulating non-congruent phase transitions of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welland, M.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Lewis, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    A model is being developed to simulate UO 2 at very high temperatures incorporating the effects of non-congruent phase transitions. In particular, the melting transformation and the possible 'Λ-transition' is being investigated to help support the design and analysis of experimental work being conducted as part of nuclear safety research. This work includes the interpretation of the behaviour of operating CANDU fuel under upset conditions, where centerline melting may potentially occur (particularly if the fuel is oxidized). The model presented here numerically solves a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations as derived from fundamental principles. The results of the model present here compare well against laser flash experiments in recently published literature. (author)

  6. Near Total Laryngectomy: A Versatile Approach for Voice Restoration in Advanced T3 and T4 Laryngeal Cancer: Functional Results and Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maamoun, S.I.; Amira, A.; Younis, A.

    2004-01-01

    Creation of a tunneled mucosal shunt between the trachea and pharynx that is controlled by remaining intrinsic laryngeal musculature with its nerve supply is an acceptable voice restoration procedure for advanced T3 and T4 laryngeal cancer. Such a tunnel will allow unilateral direction of air from lung to pharynx during phonation and will prevent aspiration since deglutition is a vagal mediated response which will induce contraction of tubed laryngeal musculature preventing aspiration. We previously reported our preliminary experience with the technique and we adopted the voice restoration approach based on the concept of the near total laryngectomy thereafter. Methods: Forty five patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx were included in this study (between January 1998 and February 2001). They were 42 males and 3 females with a mean age of 52.6 years. Criteria for selection were a normal vocal process and arytenoid cartilage on the opposite side of the lesion as evidenced by endoscopy and CT scan with no major sub glottic extension. In two patients supraglottic laryngectomy was carried out and in four other patients, complete tumor extirpation necessitated total laryngectomy. Accordingly, near total laryngectomy was carried out in the remaining 39 patients. Following a near total laryngectomy, where all laryngeal mucosa and cartilages are resected sparing the contralateral arytenoid cartilage with the overlying mucosa and surrounding musculature, the shunt was created by tubing the remaining mucosa with augmentation by pyroform sinus mucosa if necessary. The resulting tube was fashioned over 14 FG catheter for diameter control only and the remaining muscles were sutured over the tube. A permanent tracheostomy was established. Voice training was started postoperatively following resumption of oral feeding. Results: Only one patient died in the immediate postoperative period due to massive myocardial infarction. One patient developed

  7. Effects of breathing frequency and flow rate on the total inward leakage of an elastomeric half-mask donned on an advanced manikin headform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinjian; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Bergman, Michael S; Zhuang, Ziqing

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of breathing frequency and flow rate on the total inward leakage (TIL) of an elastomeric half-mask donned on an advanced manikin headform and challenged with combustion aerosols. An elastomeric half-mask respirator equipped with P100 filters was donned on an advanced manikin headform covered with life-like soft skin and challenged with aerosols originated by burning three materials: wood, paper, and plastic (polyethylene). TIL was determined as the ratio of aerosol concentrations inside (C in) and outside (C out) of the respirator (C in/C out) measured with a nanoparticle spectrometer operating in the particle size range of 20-200nm. The testing was performed under three cyclic breathing flows [mean inspiratory flow (MIF) of 30, 55, and 85 l/min] and five breathing frequencies (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 breaths/min). A completely randomized factorial study design was chosen with four replicates for each combination of breathing flow rate and frequency. Particle size, MIF, and combustion material had significant (P plastic aerosol produced higher mean TIL values than wood and paper aerosols. The effect of the breathing frequency was complex. When analyzed using all combustion aerosols and MIFs (pooled data), breathing frequency did not significantly (P = 0.08) affect TIL. However, once the data were stratified according to combustion aerosol and MIF, the effect of breathing frequency became significant (P plastic combustion aerosol. The effect of breathing frequency on TIL is less significant than the effects of combustion aerosol and breathing flow rate for the tested elastomeric half-mask respirator. The greatest TIL occurred when challenged with plastic aerosol at 30 l/min and at a breathing frequency of 30 breaths/min.

  8. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R); TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    1999-01-01

    In the early 90's GE recognized the need to introduce new technology to follow on to the ''F'' technology the Company introduced in 1988. By working with industry and DOE, GE helped shape the ATS program goal of demonstrating a gas turbine, combined-cycle system using natural gas as the primary fuel that achieves the following targets: system efficiency exceeding 60% lower heating value basis; environmental superiority under full-load operating conditions without the use of post-combustion emissions controls, environmental superiority includes limiting NO(sub 2) to less than 10 parts per mission by volume (dry basis) at 15% oxygen; busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems meeting the same environmental requirements; fuel-flexible designs operating on natural gas but also capable of being adapted to operate on coal-based, distillate, or biomass fuels; reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to modern advanced power generation systems; and commercial systems that could enter the market in the year 2000

  9. A phase I study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holländer, Cecilie; Baeksgaard, Lene; Sorensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in patients with non-resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Escalating doses of oxaliplatin every second week and daily tegafur....../uracil were given concurrently with radiotherapy, 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. Cetuximab was given on day 15 (400 mg/m(2)) and weekly (250 mg/m(2)) during radiotherapy. Fixed doses of oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) and tegafur/uracil (300 mg/m(2)) were administered before, and after radiotherapy. RESULTS: Eleven...... patients were included in the study; two were excluded due to allergic reactions to cetuximab. In DL2 (tegafur/uracil 300 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 30 mg/m(2)) two grade 3/4 fistula and one grade 3 neuropathy were observed. Six patients were enrolled in DL1 (tegafur/uracil 150 mg/m(2)/, oxaliplatin 30 mg/m(2...

  10. Investigations of the reflood-phase after a loss-of-coolant-accident of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.; Oldekop, W.

    1983-01-01

    Differences between a high converting advanced pressurized-water reactor (APWR) and a conventional PWR, which are relevant to the reflood-phase after LOCA are presented. The used code and its verification by PWR-reflood experiments is explained. Comparative calculations for APWR and PWR with several conservative assumptions for example cold-leg-injection only, yield nearly the same maximum midplane-temperatures for the average-channel. For the APWR, however, the upper half of the rod shows higher temperatures. Quenchfront and core-water-level increase more slowly. The differences in the reflood-thermohydraulics are analysed in detail. A conservative hot-channel calculation shows maximum temperatures of about 920 0 C. Finally the influence of conservative assumptions is described and the necessity of experiments pointed out. (orig.)

  11. Gender differences on the job satisfaction in the phase of implementing advanced manufacturing technology in the Chinese manufacturing firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Na; Shen, Li Ming; Lewark, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    This research gave an effort to study on gender differences in the job satisfaction for technological innovation at Chinese manufacturing firm. The exploratory study was conducted in four Chinese furniture manufacturing firms, which are all in the phases of introducing advanced manufacturing system. The results of statistical analysis show that general satisfaction of female employees to their jobs is significantly higher than male employees. In addition, supervisory satisfaction of female employees is significantly higher than male employees. The findings of the study reveal that activities are suggested to be carried out to increase the job satisfaction of male employees, especially improve communication and relationship between the managerial and the non-managerial levels in the innovation process. In addition, the higher job satisfaction of female employees could be considered a positive factor for the successful implementation of AMT in the technological innovation, although male employees are still dominated work force in the case study firms.

  12. A novel solid phase extraction procedure on Amberlite XAD-1180 for speciation of Cr(III), Cr(VI) and total chromium in environmental and pharmaceutical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narin, Ibrahim; Kars, Ayse; Soylak, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Due to the toxicity of chromium, species depend on their chemical properties and bioavailabilities, speciation of chromium is very important in environmental samples. A speciation procedure for chromium(III), chromium(VI) and total chromium in environmental samples is presented in this work, prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of chromium. The procedure is based on the adsorption of Cr(III)-diphenylcarbazone complex on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin. After oxidation of Cr(III), the developed solid phase extraction system was applied to determinate the total chromium. Cr(III) was calculated as the difference between the total Cr content and the Cr(VI) content. The analytical conditions for the quantitative recoveries of Cr(VI) on Amberlite XAD-1180 resin were investigated. The effects of some alkaline, earth alkaline, metal ions and also some anions were also examined. Preconcentration factor was found to be 75. The detection limits (LOD) based on three times sigma of the blank (N: 21) for Cr(VI) and total chromium were 7.7 and 8.6 μg/L, respectively. Satisfactory results for the analysis of total chromium in the stream sediment (GBW7310) certified reference material for the validation of the presented method was obtained. The procedure was applied to food, water and pharmaceutical samples successfully

  13. Preliminary thermo-mechanical analysis of the second phase photon shutters for insertion device beamline front ends at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nian, H.L.T.; Sheng, I.C.A.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The photon shutters (PS) on the insertion device front end of the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are designed to fully intercept powerful 7-GeV undulator radiation. Traditional materials (oxygen-free copper and Glidcop) are used in their construction. Initially, the APS proposes to operate the storage ring at 100 mA. In later phases of operation, the APS will operate the storage ring at 300 mA. The heat flux from the undulators is enormous. For example, in the later phase of the project, the first photon shutter (PS1) placed at a distance of 17 m from the Undulator A source will be subjected to 1400 W/mm 2 at normal incidence with a total power of 11.4 kW. The PS uses an enhanced heat transfer mechanism developed at Argonne National Laboratory, which increases the convective heat transfer coefficient to about 3 W/cm 2 · degrees C with single phase water as the coolant. To be able to handle the expected three-fold increase in the intense heat flux, some low-Z materials (such as beryllium or graphite), which can absorb the x-rays through their thickness, are now considered as the facing material on the absorber base plate of the PS. Our analysis of PSI indicates that the face plate made of either graphite or beryllium retains its integrity in most of the cases. The maximum effective stress of the absorber plate (made of annealed OFHC) exceeds the yield strength (50 MPa) except in the case of an absorber with a 10-mm graphite face plate

  14. MO19390 (SAiL): bleeding events in a phase IV study of first-line bevacizumab with chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansin, Eric; Cinieri, Saverio; Garrido, Pilar; Griesinger, Frank; Isla, Dolores; Koehler, Manfred; Kohlhaeufl, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The clinical benefit and safety profile associated with first-line bevacizumab with doublet chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was established in two large phase III studies, E4599 and AVAiL. SAiL, a single-arm phase IV study, was conducted to evaluate bevacizumab with a range of first-line chemotherapy regimens in a routine oncology practice setting. This analysis of the SAiL data was undertaken to specifically evaluate bleeding adverse events (AEs) in this study, and to explore potential associations between bleeding and baseline patient and disease characteristics. In total, 2212 patients were evaluated. Bleeding AEs (any grade) occurred in 38.2% of patients (grade ≥ 3 bleeding AEs: 3.6%). Grade ≥ 3 pulmonary hemorrhage and central nervous system bleeding events were observed in 0.7% and 0.1% of patients, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥ 3 bleeding AEs was comparable across patient subgroups defined by central tumor location, tumor cavitation, histology, concomitant anticoagulation therapy and age. The majority (88.6%) of bleeding events resolved or improved, 10.2% persisted and 1.3% led to death; 10.2% of bleeding events required bevacizumab interruption or discontinuation. This analysis from the SAiL trial reaffirms a comparable incidence of clinically significant bleeding associated with first-line bevacizumab and chemotherapy as previous phase III studies in NSCLC patients despite less stringent first-line selection criteria. Grade ≥ 3 bleeding appears to be comparable when analyzed for patient and tumor characteristics, including tumor cavitation and concomitant anticoagulation therapy. Most bleeding events resolved or improved, and interruption/discontinuation of bevacizumab was infrequent in a standard oncology practice setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phase 2 Study of Combined Sorafenib and Radiation Therapy in Patients With Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shang-Wen, E-mail: sjfchiou@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Li-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chi-Mei Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Yu-Cheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Chia-Chun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Jeng-Fong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: This phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent and sequential sorafenib therapy in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Forty patients with unresectable HCC unfit for transarterial chemoembolization were treated with RT with concurrent and sequential sorafenib. Sorafenib was administered from the commencement of RT at a dose of 400 mg twice daily and continued to clinical or radiologic progression, unacceptable adverse events, or death. All patients had underlying Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. The maximal tumor diameter ranged from 3.0 cm to 15.5 cm. Coexisting portal vein thrombosis was found in 24 patients and was irradiated simultaneously. The cumulative RT dose ranged from 40 Gy to 60 Gy (median, 50 Gy). Image studies were done 1 month after RT and then every 3 months thereafter. Results: Thirty-three (83%) completed the allocated RT. During RT, the incidence of hand-foot skin reactions ≥ grade 2 and diarrhea were 37.5% and 25%, respectively, and 35% of patients had hepatic toxicities grade ≥2. Twenty-two (55.0%) patients achieved complete or partial remission at the initial assessment, and 18 (45%) had stable or progressive disease. The 2-year overall survival and infield progression-free survival (IFPS) were 32% and 39%, respectively. A Cancer of the Liver Italian Program (CLIP) score ≥2 was associated with an inferior outcome in overall survival. Six patients (15%) developed treatment-related hepatic toxicity grade ≥3 during the sequential phase, and 3 of them were fatal. Conclusions: When RT and sorafenib therapy were combined in patients with unresectable HCC, the initial complete or partial response rate was 55% with a 2-year IFPS of 39%. A CLIP score ≥2 was associated with an inferior outcome in overall survival. Hepatic toxicities are a major determinant of the safety; the combination should be used with caution and needs further investigation.

  16. Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Tremelimumab With Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4–blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). Results In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. Conclusion This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23295794

  17. Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Haanen, John B; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-02-10

    In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma.

  18. Schedule-selective biochemical modulation of 5-fluorouracil in advanced colorectal cancer – a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savage Paul

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 5-fluorouracil remains the standard therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic colorectal cancer. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated the biological modulation of 5-fluorouracil by methotrexate and leucovorin. This phase II study was initiated to determine the activity and toxicity of sequential methotrexate – leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Methods Ninety-seven patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were enrolled onto the study. Methotrexate – 30 mg/m2 was administered every 6 hours for 6 doses followed by a 2 hour infusion of LV – 500 mg/m2. Midway through the leucovorin infusion, patients received 5-fluorouracil – 600 mg/m2. This constituted a cycle of therapy and was repeated every 2 weeks until progression. Results The median age was 64 yrs (34–84 and the Eastern Cooperative Group Oncology performance score was 0 in 37%, 1 in 55% and 2 in 8% of patients. Partial and complete responses were seen in 31% of patients with a median duration of response of 6.4 months. The overall median survival was 13.0 months. The estimated 1-year survival was 53.7%. Grade III and IV toxic effects were modest and included mucositis, nausea and vomiting. Conclusions This phase II study supports previously reported data demonstrating the modest clinical benefit of 5-FU modulation utilizing methotrexate and leucovorin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies evaluating 5-fluorouracil modulation with more novel agents (Irinotecan and/or oxaliplatin are in progress and may prove encouraging.

  19. Phase II trial of sorafenib and erlotinib in advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardin, Dana B; Goff, Laura; Li, Chung-I; Shyr, Yu; Winkler, Charles; DeVore, Russell; Schlabach, Larry; Holloway, Melanie; McClanahan, Pam; Meyer, Krista; Grigorieva, Julia; Berlin, Jordan; Chan, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This trial was designed to assess efficacy and safety of erlotinib with sorafenib in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. An exploratory correlative study analyzing pretreatment serum samples using a multivariate protein mass spectrometry-based test (VeriStrat®), previously shown to correlate with outcomes in lung cancer patients treated with erlotinib, was performed. Patients received sorafenib 400 mg daily along with erlotinib 150 mg daily with a primary endpoint of 8-week progression free survival (PFS) rate. Pretreatment serum sample analysis by VeriStrat was done blinded to clinical and outcome data; the endpoints were PFS and overall survival (OS). Difference between groups (by VeriStrat classification) was assessed using log-rank P values; hazard ratios (HR) were obtained from Cox proportional hazards model. Thirty-six patients received study drug and were included in the survival analysis. Eight-week PFS rate of 46% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32–0.67) did not meet the primary endpoint of a rate ≥70%. Thirty-two patients were included in the correlative analysis, and VeriStrat “Good” patients had superior PFS (HR = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.06–0.57; P = 0.001) and OS (HR = 0.31 95% CI: 0.13–0.77, P = 0.008) compared to VeriStrat “Poor” patients. Grade 3 toxicities of this regimen included fever, anemia, diarrhea, dehydration, rash, and altered liver function. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, and this combination will not be further pursued. In this small retrospective analysis, the proteomic classification was significantly associated with clinical outcomes and is being further evaluated in ongoing studies

  20. The scrounge-atron: a phased approach to the advanced hydrotest facility utilizing proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, O.J.; Barnes, P.D. Jr.; Chargin, A.K.; Dekin, W.D.; Hartouni, E.P.; Hockman, J.; Hockman, J.N.; Ladran, A.S.; Libkind, M.A.; Moore, T.L.; Ohnuma, S.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Pico, R.E.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Souza, R.J.; Stoner, J.M.; Wilson, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy has initiated its Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSMP) to provide a single, integrated technical program for maintaining the continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing. Consistent with the SSMP, the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) has been conceived to provide improved radiographic imaging with multiple axes and multiple time frames. The AHF would be used to better understand the evolution of nuclear weapon primary implosion shape under normal and accident scenarios. There are three fundamental technologies currently under consideration for use on the AHF. These include linear induction acceleration, inductive-adder pulsed-power technology (both technologies using high current electron beams to produce an intense X-ray beam) and high-energy proton accelerators to produce a proton beam. The Scrounge-atron (a proton synchrotron) was conceived to be a relatively low cost demonstration of the viability of the third technology using bursts of energetic protons, magnetic lenses, and particle detectors to produce the radiographic image. In order for the Scrounge-atron to provide information useful for the AHF technology decision, the accelerator would have to be built as quickly and as economically as possible. These conditions can be met by scrounging parts from decommissioned accelerators across the country, especially the Main Ring at Fermilab. The Scrounge-atron is designed to meet the baseline parameters for single axis proton radiography: a 20 GeV proton beam of ten pulses, 10 11 protons each, spaced 250 ns apart

  1. Phase Equilibrium and Austenite Decomposition in Advanced High-Strength Medium-Mn Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The work addresses the phase equilibrium analysis and austenite decomposition of two Nb-microalloyed medium-Mn steels containing 3% and 5% Mn. The pseudobinary Fe-C diagrams of the steels were calculated using Thermo-Calc. Thermodynamic calculations of the volume fraction evolution of microstructural constituents vs. temperature were carried out. The study comprised the determination of the time-temperature-transformation (TTT diagrams and continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams of the investigated steels. The diagrams were used to determine continuous and isothermal cooling paths suitable for production of bainite-based steels. It was found that the various Mn content strongly influences the hardenability of the steels and hence the austenite decomposition during cooling. The knowledge of CCT diagrams and the analysis of experimental dilatometric curves enabled to produce bainite-austenite mixtures in the thermomechanical simulator. Light microscopy (LM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to assess the effect of heat treatment on morphological details of produced multiphase microstructures.

  2. Investigation of vertical slug flow with advanced two-phase flow instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, Y.; Ishii, M.; Tsoukalas, L.H.

    2001-01-01

    Extensive experiments of vertical slug flow were carried out with an electromagnetic flowmeter and an impedance void-meter in an air-water two-phase experimental loop. The basic principles of these instruments in vertical slug flow measurements are discussed. Time series of the liquid velocity and the impedance were separated into two parts corresponding to the Taylor bubble and the liquid slug. Characteristics of slug flow, such as the void fractions, probabilities and lengths of the Taylor bubble and liquid slug, slug unit velocity, area-averaged liquid velocity, and liquid film velocity of the Taylor bubble tail, etc., were obtained. For the first time, the area-averaged liquid velocity of slug flow was revealed by the electromagnetic flowmeter. It is realized that the void fraction of the liquid slug is determined by the turbulent intensity due to the relative liquid motion between the Taylor bubble tail region and its wake region. A correlation of the void fraction of the liquid slug is developed based on experimental results obtained from a test section with 50.8 mm i.d. The results of this study suggest a promising improvement in understanding of vertical slug flow

  3. High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, J.A. [Eaton Corp., Willoughby Hills, OH (United States). Mfg. Technologies Center; Malkin, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

  4. ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS(SBCR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.H. Al-Dahhan; L.S. Fan; M.P. Dudukovic

    2002-07-25

    This report summarizes the accomplishment made during the third year of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Air Products and Chemicals. Data processing of the performed Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) experiments in 6 inch column using air-water-glass beads (150 {micro}m) system has been completed. Experimental investigation of time averaged three phases distribution in air-Therminol LT-glass beads (150 {micro}m) system in 6 inch column has been executed. Data processing and analysis of all the performed Computed Tomography (CT) experiments have been completed, using the newly proposed CT/Overall gas holdup methodology. The hydrodynamics of air-Norpar 15-glass beads (150 {micro}m) have been investigated in 2 inch slurry bubble column using Dynamic Gas Disengagement (DGD), Pressure Drop fluctuations, and Fiber Optic Probe. To improve the design and scale-up of bubble column reactors, a correlation for overall gas holdup has been proposed based on Artificial Neural Network and Dimensional Analysis.

  5. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  6. Advances on the time differential three-phase-lag heat conduction model and major open issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Apice, Ciro; Zampoli, Vittorio

    2017-07-01

    The main purpose of this short contribution is to summarize the recent achievements concerning the so-called time differential three-phase-lag heat conduction model, contextually focusing attention on some of the numerous open problems associated with such an attractive theory. After having briefly recalled the origin of the model at issue, the restrictions upon the delay times and the constitutive tensors able to make it thermodynamically consistent are recalled. Under these hypotheses, the investigation of the well-posedness issue has already provided important results in terms of uniqueness and continuous dependence of the solutions (even related to the thermoelastic case), as well as in terms of existence of a domain of influence of the assigned data in connection with the thermoelastic model. Finally, some of the main problems currently object of investigation are recalled, including the very challenging issues about the different possible choices of Taylor series expansion orders for the constitutive equation, the interaction of the model with energy processes that take place on the nanoscale, with multi-porous materials and with biological systems.

  7. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Christopher Sean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 1013 cm-3 can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm-1 with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  8. Phase II trial of cisplatin in advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, J T; Blessing, J A; Homesley, H D; Berek, J S; Creasman, W T

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with advanced or recurrent cancer of the vagina no longer amenable to control with surgery and/or radiotherapy were entered into a phase II study of cisplatin 50 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks. Two were deemed ineligible because of a primary site of origin other than vagina. Two were deemed inevaluable, one because of the lack of measurable disease and the other because she never received drug. The remaining 22 included a variety of histologies (16 squamous cell carcinomas, 2 adenosquamous carcinomas, 1 clear cell carcinoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, and 2 carcinomas not otherwise specified). One complete responder was observed among the 16 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. Adverse effects were tolerable and were essentially those reported in other series. These results suggest that cisplatin has insignificant activity in advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina at least at the dose and schedule tested. No comment can be made regarding the activity of cisplatin in other histologies.

  9. First-in-Human Phase 1 Trial of Agarose Beads Containing Murine RENCA Cells in Advanced Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry H. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Agarose macrobeads containing mouse renal adenocarcinoma cells (RMBs release factors, suppressing the growth of cancer cells and prolonging survival in spontaneous or induced tumor animals, mediated, in part, by increased levels of myocyte-enhancing factor (MEF2D via EGFR-and AKT-signaling pathways. The primary objective of this study was to determine the safety of RMBs in advanced, treatment-resistant metastatic cancers, and then its efficacy (survival, which is the secondary objective. Methods Thirty-one patients underwent up to four intraperitoneal implantations of RMBs (8 or 16 macrobeads/kg via laparoscopy in this single-arm trial (FDA BB-IND 10091; NCT 00283075. Serial physical examinations, laboratory testing, and PET-CT imaging were performed before and three months after each implant. Results RMBs were well tolerated at both dose levels (mean 660.9 per implant. AEs were (Grade 1/2 with no treatment-related SAEs. Conclusion The data support the safety of RMB therapy in advanced-malignancy patients, and the preliminary evidence for their potential efficacy is encouraging. A Phase 2 efficacy trial is ongoing.

  10. Phase II study. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy with nitroglycerin in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Blake, Mónika; Mata-Moya, María Dolores de la; Corona, Francisco; Turcott, Jenny; Orta, David; Alexander-Alatorre, Jorge; Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nitroglycerin, a nitric oxide donor agent, reduces the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and could be a normalizer of the tumor microenvironment. Both factors are associated with chemo-radio-resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the safety profile and efficacy of nitroglycerin administration with chemo-radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: This is a phase II trial of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with cisplatin and vinorelbine plus concurrent nitroglycerin with radiotherapy. A 25-mg NTG patch was administered to the patients for 5 days (1 day before and 4 days after chemotherapy induction and consolidation) and all day during chemo-radiotherapy. VEGF plasmatic level was determined before and after two cycles of chemotherapy. Results: Thirty-five patients were enrolled in this trial. Sixty-three percent of patients achieved an overall response after induction of chemotherapy, and 75% achieved an overall response after chemo-radiotherapy. The median progression-free survival was 13.5 months (95% CI, 8.8–18.2), and the median overall survival was 26.9 months (95% CI, 15.3–38.5). Reduction of VEGF level was associated with better OS. The toxicity profile related to nitroglycerin included headache (20%) and hypotension (2.9%). Conclusions: The addition of nitroglycerin to induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC has an acceptable toxicity profile and supports the possibility to add nitroglycerin to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A randomized trial is warranted to confirm these findings

  11. Prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis in 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in locally advanced breast cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ballvé, A; García García-Esquinas, M; Salsidua-Arroyo, O; Serrano-Palacio, A; García-Sáenz, J A; Ortega Candil, A; Fuentes Ferrer, M E; Rodríguez Rey, C; Román-Santamaría, J M; Moreno, F; Carreras-Delgado, J L

    To determine whether metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) are able to predict recurrence risk in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients. Retrospective study of LABC patients who undertook neoadjuvant, local and adjuvant treatment and follow up. A 18 F-FDG PET/CT study for initial staging was performed analysing in this study different metabolic parameters (MTV, TLG, SUVmax and SUVmed) both in the primary tumour (T) as well as in axillary nodes (N) and whole-body (WB). Forty females were included between January 2010-2011; follow up until January 2015 was completed. The average follow-up was 46 months. Twenty percent presented recurrence: local disease (n=2) and distant metastasis (n=6); 3 patients died (38% of the patients which recurred and 7.5% from the total). SUVmax, MTV and TLG, in T, N and WB, were higher in those patients with recurrence. The MTV and TLG parameters in the tumour (T) were related to the recurrence rate (P=.020 and P=.028, respectively); whereas SUVmax in the lymph nodes (N) was significantly related (P=.008) to the recurrence rate. The best cut-off points to predict recurrence where: MTV T ≥19.3cm 3 , TLG T≥74.4g and SUVmax N≥13.8, being 10-12 times more likely to recidivate when these thresholds where exceeded. Tumour grade was the only clinical-pathological variable which was related to recurrence probability (p=.035). In this study of LABC patients the metabolic parameters which have a better relationship with recurrence rate are: MTV and TLG in the primary tumour, SUVmax in the regional lymph node disease and whole-body PET data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. A single-arm, multicenter, safety-monitoring, phase IV study of icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingsheng; Han, Baohui; Gu, Aiqin; Zhang, Yiping; Jiao, Shun Chang; Wang, Chang-Li; He, Jintao; Jia, Xueke; Zhang, Li; Peng, Jiewen; Wu, Meina; Ying, Kejing; Wang, Junye; Ma, Kewei; Zhang, Shucai; You, Changxuan; Tan, Fenlai; Wang, Yinxiang; Ding, Lieming; Sun, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The phase 3 ICOGEN trial established the non-inferiority of icotinib to gefitinib in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and this led to the approval of icotinib for NSCLC by the China Food and Drug Administration. A phase 4 study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of icotinib in a broad range of patients with advanced NSCLC across China. This study retrospectively analyzed data from unresectable, recurrent, and/or advanced NSCLC patients who received oral icotinib 125 mg three times per day. The primary endpoint was safety. The secondary endpoints included objective response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR), which were investigated overall and in subgroups such as patients with an EGFR mutation and elderly patients. Between August, 2011 and August, 2012, a total of 6087 advanced NSCLC patients were registered in this study, of which 5549 were evaluable for safety and tumor response. The median age was 63 years (range 21-95 years), and 1571 (28.3%) patients were over the age of 70. The majority of patients were non-smokers, and had adenocarcinoma and stage IV disease. The overall incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of any grade was 31.5%. The most common ADRs included rash (17.4%) and diarrhea (8.5%), and three patients experienced interstitial lung disease (ILD). The ORR and DCR were 30.0% and 80.6%, respectively, for the overall population, and 33.4% and 81.2%, 30.3% and 80.3%, and 30.4% and 89.3%, for first-line, second-line, and third-line or multiple line subsets, respectively. In 665 EGFR-mutated patients who were evaluable for tumor response, the ORR and DCR were 49.2% (327/665) and 92.3% (614/665), respectively. The data from over 6000 patients was consistent with the results of the ICOGEN study. Icotinib demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile and efficacy in the routine clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PLANNING PHASE 2 MULTICENTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF NEOADJUVANT CHEMO-RADIOTHERAPY FOLLOWED BY D2 GASTRECTOMY AND ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Skoropad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prognosis for surgical treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer remains disappointing. Neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy is relatively new and the least researched method of treatment, it is attracting more and more attention, mainly abroad in recent years. The aims of neoadjuvant therapy is the earliest start of systemic therapy, damage of the primary tumor and regional metastases, an increase in the percentage of radical operations, improving treatment outcome. Material and methods. The planning study is a multicenter, randomized clinical phase II trial. Patients of the first (experimental group will be treated as the followes: neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (total tumor dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions with the concurrent modified CapOX scheme followed by D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients of the second (control group will be treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy will be carried out under the following schemes (optional for the researchers: CapOX or FOLFOX. Toxicity evaluation of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy will be conducted with NCI CTC Toxicity Scale Version 3.0. The main objectives of the trial are to assess the safety and immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy according to the criteria of the frequency and severity of postoperative complications and mortality, and tumor response. We are planning to include 80 patients with morphologically confirmed gastric cancer сT2–4N1–3, сT3–4N0–3; М0. The proposed trial will be carried out in accordance with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration, it has been approved by local ethic committees of the participated institutions. Results. As a result of this multicenter randomized trial it is planned to show the reproducibility of obtained in MRRC and a number of foreign centers results – that is, the safety and high immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo

  14. Increased levels of proteins of the acute inflammatory phase in the peritoneal fluid of women with advanced stages of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Grzegorz; Barczyński, Bartłomiej; Bednarek, Wiesława; Kwaśniewski, Wojciech; Wertell, Iwona; Derewianka-Polak, Magdalena; Makara-Studzińska, Marta; Kotarski, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Most investigators agree that endometriosis is associated with a state of subclinical, non-infectious peritoneal inflammation. The objective of the study was to assess concentrations of two markers of the acute inflammatory phase proteins, haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin, in peritoneal fluid of endometriotic women. 229 women who underwent diagnostic or therapeutic laparoscopy were included in the study Minimal, mild, moderate and severe endometriosis according to ASRM was confirmed in 119 women (study groups), whereas 110 patients suffered from simple serous or dermoid ovarian cysts (reference groups). Haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin concentrations in the peritoneal fluid samples aspirated during laparoscopy were measured using commercially available radial immunodiffusion kits. The concentration of haptoglobin in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis was significantly higher as compared to patients with serous and dermoid ovarian cysts. Significantly higher haptoglobin level was observed in patients with severe and moderate endometriosis as compared to women from both reference groups. No significant difference in the peritoneal fluid ceruloplasmin levels was found between patients with endometriosis and women from reference groups. However, it was noted that ceruloplasmin levels are higher in the subgroup of patients with severe endometriosis as compared to both reference groups and women with mild disease. Our results support the hypothesis that endometriosis is associated with subclinical inflammation within the peritoneal cavity It may be speculated that pro-inflammatory stimuli strong enough to cause an increase in acute inflammatory phase proteins peritoneal fluid concentrations are observed only in the advanced stages of the disease.

  15. Brain-wave measures of workload in advanced cockpits: The transition of technology from laboratory to cockpit simulator, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.; Munson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The present Phase 2 small business innovation research study was designed to address issues related to scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) indices of mental workload and to transition this technology from the laboratory to cockpit simulator environments for use as a systems engineering tool. The project involved five main tasks: (1) Two laboratory studies confirmed the generality of the ERP indices of workload obtained in the Phase 1 study and revealed two additional ERP components related to workload. (2) A task analysis' of flight scenarios and pilot tasks in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) defined cockpit events (i.e., displays, messages, alarms) that would be expected to elicit ERPs related to workload. (3) Software was developed to support ERP data analysis. An existing ARD-proprietary package of ERP data analysis routines was upgraded, new graphics routines were developed to enhance interactive data analysis, and routines were developed to compare alternative single-trial analysis techniques using simulated ERP data. (4) Working in conjunction with NASA Langley research scientists and simulator engineers, preparations were made for an ACFS validation study of ERP measures of workload. (5) A design specification was developed for a general purpose, computerized, workload assessment system that can function in simulators such as the ACFS.

  16. Development of the advanced phased array UT technique for accurate sizing of cracks in the nozzle welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Jun-ichiro; Kawanami, Seiichi; Ideo, Mitsushi; Matsuura, Takayuki; Chigusa, Naoki; Hirano, Shinro; Sera, Takehiko

    2010-01-01

    Recently, preventive maintenance tasks for welding of safe-end nozzles of reactor vessels and steam generators of PWRs in Japan had been carried out sequentially. Before the maintenance tasks, inspection services were carried out and several crack indications were found by eddy current testing (ECT). These indications were found in the welding which made by 600 series nickel base alloy and evaluated as stress corrosion cracks which were oriented to the axial direction of the nozzle. Then investigations to evaluate the depth of cracks were carried out by ultrasonic testing (UT) from inner surface of the nozzles. However they were difficult to evaluate the depth of cracks due to the high attenuation of the ultrasonic propagation caused by large grain structure of welding. And also it was required high resolution near surface region for accurate sizing. Therefore development of advanced phased array UT techniques specialized for the sizing at this portion was carried out. This paper reports the development status and verification test results. Firstly simulations of the ultrasonic propagation in the welding were carried out to optimize beam profiles of phased array probes. Next prototype probes were manufactured and verification tests were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of depth sizing. It is shown that the developed techniques have high sizing accuracy for artificial stress corrosion cracks in the welding. (author)

  17. Phase I study of TP300 in patients with advanced solid tumors with pharmacokinetic, pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthoney, D Alan; Miwa, Masanori; Twelves, Christopher; Evans, TRJ; Naik, Jay; MacPherson, Iain RJ; Crawford, Donna; Hartley, John M; Hartley, Janet A; Saito, Tomohisa; Abe, Masaichi; Jones, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A Phase I dose escalation first in man study assessed maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and recommended Phase II dose of TP300, a water soluble prodrug of the Topo-1 inhibitor TP3076, and active metabolite, TP3011. Eligible patients with refractory advanced solid tumors, adequate performance status, haematologic, renal, and hepatic function. TP300 was given as a 1-hour i.v. infusion 3-weekly and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of TP300, TP3076 and TP3011 were analysed. Polymorphisms in CYP2D6, AOX1 and UGT1A1 were studied and DNA strand-breaks measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). 32 patients received TP300 at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 mg/m 2 . MTD was 10 mg/m 2 ; DLTs at 12 (2/4 patients) and 10 mg/m 2 (3/12) included thrombocytopenia and febrile neutropenia; diarrhoea was uncommon. Six patients (five had received irinotecan), had stable disease for 1.5-5 months. TP3076 showed dose proportionality in AUC and C max from 1–10 mg/m 2 . Genetic polymorphisms had no apparent influence on exposure. DNA strand-breaks were detected after TP300 infusion. TP300 had predictable hematologic toxicity, and diarrhoea was uncommon. AUC at MTD is substantially greater than for SN38. TP3076 and TP3011 are equi-potent with SN38, suggesting a PK advantage. EU-CTR2006-001345-33

  18. Determination of total selenium and selenium distribution in the milk phases in commercial cow's milk by HG-AAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz-Naveiro, Oscar; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Cocho, Jose A. [University Clinical Hospital, Laboratory of Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fraga, Jose M. [University Clinical Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    A procedure has been developed for determining the selenium in cow's milk using hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) following microwave-assisted acid digestion. The selenium distributions in milk whey, fat and micellar casein phases were studied after separating the different phases by ultracentrifugation and determining the selenium in all of them. The detection limits obtained by HG-AAS for the whole milk, milk whey and micellar casein were 0.074, 0.065 and 0.075 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. The accuracy for the whole milk was checked by using a Certified Reference Material CRM 8435 whole milk powder from NIST, and the analytical recoveries for the milk whey and casein micelles were 100.9 and 96.9%, respectively. A mass balance study of the determination of selenium in the different milk phases was carried out, obtaining values of 95.5-100.8%. The total content of selenium was determined in 37 milk samples from 15 different manufacturers, 19 whole milk samples and 18 skimmed milk samples. The selenium levels found were within the 8.5-21 {mu}g l{sup -1} range. The selenium distributions in the different milk phases were studied in 14 whole milk samples, and the highest selenium levels were found in milk whey (47.2-73.6%), while the lowest level was found for the fat phase (4.8-16.2%). A strong correlation was found between the selenium levels in whole milk and the selenium levels in the milk components. (orig.)

  19. Phase I study of indicine N-oxide in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, T; Sridhar, K S; Ratner, L H; Holland, J F

    1982-07-01

    Indicine N-oxide is a pyrrolizidine alkaloid isolated from Heliotropium indicum, one of the widely used herbs in Ayurvedic medicine. Thirty-seven patients with solid tumors received the drug: 15 men and 22 women (mean age, 53 years). All had had prior chemotherapy, and 25 had had prior radiotherapy. Eighty-four percent had a performance status of 0-3 (Cancer and Leukemia Group B criteria). The drug was given as a short infusion over 15 minutes and repeated with a median interval of 4 weeks. Doses were escalated from 1 to 9 g/m2. A total of 55 courses were evaluable. Dose-limiting toxic effects were leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, and the toxicity was cumulative with repeated doses. Other toxic effects included nausea and vomiting, anemia, and hepatic dysfunction. The hematologic toxicity tended to be more pronounced in patients with hepatic dysfunction, poor marrow reserve, and heavy prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There were no complete or partial responses. One patient with skin melanoma and another with ovarian carcinoma had improvement lasting 2 months. The maximally tolerated dose is 9 g/m2 in our population. A recommended dose for therapeutic study is 7 g/m2. High-risk patients should be started at a dose of 5 g/m2. The treatment may be repeated at 4-week intervals with close monitoring of wbc and platelet counts. Dose reductions may be necessary for repeated courses.

  20. Hot-working behavior of an advanced intermetallic multi-phase γ-TiAl based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaighofer, Emanuel, E-mail: emanuel.schwaighofer@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Roseggerstr. 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Clemens, Helmut [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Roseggerstr. 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Lindemann, Janny [Chair of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Brandenburg University of Technology, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); GfE Fremat GmbH, Lessingstr. 41, D-09599 Freiberg (Germany); Stark, Andreas [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Mayer, Svea [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Roseggerstr. 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2014-09-22

    New high-performance engine concepts for aerospace and automotive application enforce the development of lightweight intermetallic γ-TiAl based alloys with increased high-temperature capability above 750 °C. Besides an increased creep resistance, the alloy system must exhibit sufficient hot-workability. However, the majority of current high-creep resistant γ-TiAl based alloys suffer from poor workability, whereby grain refinement and microstructure control during hot-working are key factors to ensure a final microstructure with sufficient ductility and tolerance against brittle failure below the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. Therefore, a new and advanced β-solidifying γ-TiAl based alloy, a so-called TNM alloy with a composition of Ti–43Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B (at%) and minor additions of C and Si, is investigated by means of uniaxial compressive hot-deformation tests performed with a Gleeble 3500 simulator within a temperature range of 1150–1300 °C and a strain rate regime of 0.005–0.5 s{sup −1} up to a true deformation of 0.9. The occurring mechanisms during hot-working were decoded by ensuing constitutive modeling of the flow curves by a novel phase field region-specific surface fitting approach via a hyperbolic-sine law as well as by evaluation through processing maps combined with microstructural post-analysis to determine a safe hot-working window of the refined TNM alloy. Complementary, in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiments in combination with an adapted quenching and deformation dilatometer were conducted for a deeper insight about the deformation behavior of the alloy, i.e. phase fractions and texture evolution as well as temperature uncertainties arising during isothermal and non-isothermal compression. It was found that the presence of β-phase and the contribution of particle stimulated nucleation of ζ-Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicides and h-type carbides Ti{sub 2}AlC enhance the dynamic recrystallization behavior during

  1. Hot-working behavior of an advanced intermetallic multi-phase γ-TiAl based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, Emanuel; Clemens, Helmut; Lindemann, Janny; Stark, Andreas; Mayer, Svea

    2014-01-01

    New high-performance engine concepts for aerospace and automotive application enforce the development of lightweight intermetallic γ-TiAl based alloys with increased high-temperature capability above 750 °C. Besides an increased creep resistance, the alloy system must exhibit sufficient hot-workability. However, the majority of current high-creep resistant γ-TiAl based alloys suffer from poor workability, whereby grain refinement and microstructure control during hot-working are key factors to ensure a final microstructure with sufficient ductility and tolerance against brittle failure below the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. Therefore, a new and advanced β-solidifying γ-TiAl based alloy, a so-called TNM alloy with a composition of Ti–43Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B (at%) and minor additions of C and Si, is investigated by means of uniaxial compressive hot-deformation tests performed with a Gleeble 3500 simulator within a temperature range of 1150–1300 °C and a strain rate regime of 0.005–0.5 s −1 up to a true deformation of 0.9. The occurring mechanisms during hot-working were decoded by ensuing constitutive modeling of the flow curves by a novel phase field region-specific surface fitting approach via a hyperbolic-sine law as well as by evaluation through processing maps combined with microstructural post-analysis to determine a safe hot-working window of the refined TNM alloy. Complementary, in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiments in combination with an adapted quenching and deformation dilatometer were conducted for a deeper insight about the deformation behavior of the alloy, i.e. phase fractions and texture evolution as well as temperature uncertainties arising during isothermal and non-isothermal compression. It was found that the presence of β-phase and the contribution of particle stimulated nucleation of ζ-Ti 5 Si 3 silicides and h-type carbides Ti 2 AlC enhance the dynamic recrystallization behavior during deformation within

  2. A review of modern advances in analyses and applications of single-phase natural circulation loop in nuclear thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Dipankar N.; Bhattacharyya, Souvik; Das, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Comprehensive review of state-of-the-art on single-phase natural circulation loops. • Detailed discussion on growth in solar thermal system and nuclear thermal hydraulics. • Systematic development in scaling methodologies for fabrication of test facilities. • Importance of numerical modeling schemes for stability assessment using 1-D codes. • Appraisal of current trend of research and possible future directions. - Abstract: A comprehensive review of single-phase natural circulation loop (NCL) is presented here. Relevant literature reported since the later part of 1980s has been meticulously surveyed, with occasional obligatory reference to a few pioneering studies originating prior to that period, summarizing the key observations and the present trend of research. Development in the concept of buoyancy-induced flow is discussed, with introduction to flow initiation in an NCL due to instability. Detailed discussion on modern advancement in important application areas like solar thermal systems and nuclear thermal hydraulics are presented, with separate analysis for various reactor designs working on natural circulation. Identification of scaling criteria for designing lab-scale experimental facilities has gone through a series of modification. A systematic analysis of the same is presented, considering the state-of-the-art knowledge base. Different approaches have been followed for modeling single-phase NCLs, including simplified Lorenz system mostly for toroidal loops, 1-D computational modeling for both steady-state and stability characterization and 3-D commercial system codes to have a better flow visualization. Methodical review of the relevant studies is presented following a systematic approach, to assess the gradual progression in understanding of the practical system. Brief appraisal of current research interest is reported, including the use of nanofluids for fluid property augmentation, marine reactors subjected to rolling waves

  3. A review of modern advances in analyses and applications of single-phase natural circulation loop in nuclear thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Dipankar N., E-mail: dipankar.n.basu@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Bhattacharyya, Souvik; Das, P.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive review of state-of-the-art on single-phase natural circulation loops. • Detailed discussion on growth in solar thermal system and nuclear thermal hydraulics. • Systematic development in scaling methodologies for fabrication of test facilities. • Importance of numerical modeling schemes for stability assessment using 1-D codes. • Appraisal of current trend of research and possible future directions. - Abstract: A comprehensive review of single-phase natural circulation loop (NCL) is presented here. Relevant literature reported since the later part of 1980s has been meticulously surveyed, with occasional obligatory reference to a few pioneering studies originating prior to that period, summarizing the key observations and the present trend of research. Development in the concept of buoyancy-induced flow is discussed, with introduction to flow initiation in an NCL due to instability. Detailed discussion on modern advancement in important application areas like solar thermal systems and nuclear thermal hydraulics are presented, with separate analysis for various reactor designs working on natural circulation. Identification of scaling criteria for designing lab-scale experimental facilities has gone through a series of modification. A systematic analysis of the same is presented, considering the state-of-the-art knowledge base. Different approaches have been followed for modeling single-phase NCLs, including simplified Lorenz system mostly for toroidal loops, 1-D computational modeling for both steady-state and stability characterization and 3-D commercial system codes to have a better flow visualization. Methodical review of the relevant studies is presented following a systematic approach, to assess the gradual progression in understanding of the practical system. Brief appraisal of current research interest is reported, including the use of nanofluids for fluid property augmentation, marine reactors subjected to rolling waves

  4. Advanced process control for solid fuel boilers. Phase 2; Avancerad processtyrning av fastbraensleeldade rostpannor. Etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehleskog, Rickard; Lundborg, Rickard; Schuster, Robert; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    AaF-Energikonsult AB runs within the research programme 'Applied combustion technology' a bigger project under the title 'Possibilities to improved operation of forest-industrial bark boilers by optimised combustion control'. In the project several measures have been identified, that can help to improve the conditions favourable for the combustion and fluid dynamic, for four selected reference grate boilers and grate boilers in general. The boiler at Billerud's paper mill, which is underlying to this project in several ways, is now being rebuilt. During the modifications of the boiler the existing control system will be modified with modern technique to enable operation with low emissions. The new control system consists of several parts, of witch the IR-based ones for fuel input and grate feeding are two totally separated systems. The pressure of the dome, i.e. the effect of the boiler, is the most superior parameter, and is regulated with the combustion air. Amounts of secondary and tertiary air are quoted to the total combustion airflow. The primary oxygen level is primarily regulated with the tertiary air. But if this won't be done without the tertiary air to diverge from de defined working area, the secondary air will assist. The oxygen set point is constantly decreasing until the CO-level exceeds a defined level. Then, the set point will be momentary increased. CFD-calculations have been performed for the modified boiler in Karlsborg for two different loads. The simulations clearly show that the flue gases have a more even retention time in the modified boiler and that the flow pattern is significantly improved. However, concentration gradients of oxygen and temperature gradients still exist. The conclusion is that there is a potential for further improving of the air and flue gas control strategies. The following new control strategies are proposed in the project based on conventional analyse technology; If the furnace

  5. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m 2 twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m 2 /day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of ≥100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  6. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Masafumi, E-mail: masikeda@east.ncc.go.jp [Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Ioka, Tatsuya [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yonemoto, Naohiro [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Translational Medical Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Nagase, Michitaka [Department of Clinical Oncology, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi (Japan); Yamao, Kenji [Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Miyakawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ishii, Hiroshi [Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Division, Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Furuse, Junji [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology School of Medicine, Kyorin University, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Keiko [Kyoto Unit Center, Japan Environment and Children' s Study, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Sato, Tosiya [Department of Biostatistics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Kyoto (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  7. A Phase II Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin and 5- Fluorouracil (TPF) In Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M; Omidvari, S; Mosalaei, A; Ahmadloo, N; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A; Mohammadianpanah, M

    2011-03-01

    The combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (PF) is currently considered a standard and effective regimen for the treatment of advanced head and neck carcinomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) in patients with unresectable head and neck carcinomas. Forty-six patients with previously untreated non-metastatic stage IV head and neck carcinomas were enrolled. All patients received three cycles of induction chemotherapy with docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)), cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) (days 1-2), and 5-FU (500 mg/m(2), days 1-3), repeated every 21 days. Following induction chemotherapy, all patients underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy using weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m(2)) and a median total dose of 70 Gy was delivered. Clinical response rate and toxicity were the primary and secondary end-points of the study. There were 31 men and 15 women. All patients had non-metastatic stage IV (T2-3N2-3 or T4N0-3) of disease. Overall and complete response rates were 74% and 24% respectively. Advanced T4 classification was associated with poorer response rate (p value=0.042). The major (grade 3-4) treatment-related toxicities were myelosuppression (78%), anorexia (13%), diarrhea (7%), emesis (11%) and stomatitis/pharyngitis (24%). In comparison with the data of historical published trials of the PF regimen, the TPF regimen was more effective. However, the TPF regimen appears to be associated with a higher incidence of major toxicities. Therefore, our limited findings support the TPF regimen as an alternative chemotherapeutic regimen for advanced head and neck carcinomas.

  8. Vaccination with melanoma lysate-pulsed dendritic cells, of patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma: report from a phase I study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, S K; Fischer, A; Claesson, M H

    2006-01-01

    Immune therapy have shown new and exciting perspectives for cancer treatment. Aim of our study was to evaluate toxicity and possible adverse effects from vaccination of patients with advanced colorectal cancer with autologous dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with lysate from a newly developed melanoma...... contained 3-5 x 10(6) DCs. Five of the six patients received all five vaccines. The treatment was well tolerated in all patients without any observed vaccine-correlated adverse effects. Treatment with this DC-based cancer vaccine proved safe and non-toxic.......Immune therapy have shown new and exciting perspectives for cancer treatment. Aim of our study was to evaluate toxicity and possible adverse effects from vaccination of patients with advanced colorectal cancer with autologous dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with lysate from a newly developed melanoma...... and selected melanoma cell line enriched in expression of MAGE-A antigens and deficient in expression of melanoma differentiation antigens: tyrosinase, MART-1 and gp100. Vaccinations were administered intradermally on the proximal thigh with a total of five given vaccines at 2 weeks intervals. Each vaccine...

  9. Randomized phase III trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy vs accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Kamnerdsupaphon, Pimkhuan; Pukanhapan, Nantaka; Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Vongtama, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) vs accelerated hyperfractionation with concomitant boost (CCB) as a primary treatment for patients with Stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). A total of 85 non-metastatic advanced SCCHN patients were accrued from January 2003 to December 2007. Of these, 48 and 37 patients received CCRT and CCB, respectively. The patients were randomized to receive either three cycles of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus conventional radiotherapy (CCRT, 66 Gy in 6.5 weeks) or hybrid accelerated radiotherapy (CCB, 70 Gy in 6 weeks). The primary endpoint was determined by locoregional control rate. The secondary endpoints were overall survival and toxicity. With a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 3-102), the 5-year locoregional control rate was 69.6% in the CCRT arm vs 55.0% in the CCB arm (P = 0.184). The 5-year overall survival rate was marginally significantly different (P = 0.05): 76.1% in the CCRT arm vs 63.5% in the CCB arm. Radiotherapy treatment interruptions of more than three days were 60.4% and 40.5% in the CCRT arm and CCB arm, respectively. The median total treatment time was 55.5 days in the CCRT arm and 49 days in the CCB arm. The rate of Grade 3 - 4 acute mucositis was significantly higher in the CCB arm (67.6% vs 41.7%, P = 0.01), but no high grade hematologic toxicities were found in the CCB arm (27.2% vs 0%). CCRT has shown a trend of improving outcome over CCB irradiation in locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  10. Treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer with genetically modified autologous mesenchymal stem cells - TREAT-ME-1 - a phase I, first in human, first in class trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Einem, Jobst C; Peter, Sylvia; Günther, Christine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Grütz, Gerald; Salat, Christoph; Stoetzer, Oliver; Nelson, Peter J; Michl, Marlies; Modest, Dominik P; Holch, Julian W; Angele, Martin; Bruns, Christiane; Niess, Hanno; Heinemann, Volker

    2017-10-06

    This phase I, first in human, first in class clinical study aimed at evaluating the safety, tolerability and efficacy of treatment with genetically modified mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in combination with ganciclovir (GCV). MSC_apceth_101 are genetically modified autologous MSCs used as vehicles for a cell-based gene therapy in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. The study design consisted of a dose-escalation 3 + 3 design. All patients ( n = 6) were treated with up to three applications of MSC_apceth_101, followed by GCV infusions given on three consecutive days starting 48 hours after injection of MSC_apceth_101. Three of six patients received a total dose of 1.5 × 10 6 cells/kg. Two patients received three doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg, while one patient received only two doses of 1 × 10 6 cells/kg due to a SADR. Six patients received MSC_apceth_101. No IMP-related serious adverse events occurred. Adverse-events related to IMP-injection were increased creatinine, cough, fever, and night sweat. TNF, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and sE-Selectin, showed that repeated application is immunologically safe, but induces a switch of the functional properties of monocytes to an inflammatory phenotype. Treatment induced stable disease in 4/6 patients, and progressive disease in 2/6 patients. Treatment with MSC_apceth_101 in combination with GCV demonstrated acceptable safety and tolerability in patients with advanced gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  11. Phase III randomized trial of induction chemotherapy in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ezra E W; Karrison, Theodore G; Kocherginsky, Masha; Mueller, Jeffrey; Egan, Robyn; Huang, Chao H; Brockstein, Bruce E; Agulnik, Mark B; Mittal, Bharat B; Yunus, Furhan; Samant, Sandeep; Raez, Luis E; Mehra, Ranee; Kumar, Priya; Ondrey, Frank; Marchand, Patrice; Braegas, Bettina; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Villaflor, Victoria M; Haraf, Daniel J; Vokes, Everett E

    2014-09-01

    Induction chemotherapy (IC) before radiotherapy lowers distant failure (DF) rates in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this phase III trial was to determine whether IC before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) further improves survival compared with CRT alone in patients with N2 or N3 disease. Treatment-naive patients with nonmetastatic N2 or N3 SCCHN were randomly assigned to CRT alone (CRT arm; docetaxel, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea plus radiotherapy 0.15 Gy twice per day every other week) versus two 21-day cycles of IC (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) on day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) on day 1, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m(2) on days 1 to 5) followed by the same CRT regimen (IC + CRT arm). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included DF-free survival, failure pattern, and recurrence-free survival (RFS). A total of 285 patients were randomly assigned. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities during IC were febrile neutropenia (11%) and mucositis (9%); during CRT (both arms combined), they were mucositis (49%), dermatitis (21%), and leukopenia (18%). Serious adverse events were more common in the IC arm (47% v 28%; P = .002). With a minimum follow-up of 30 months, there were no statistically significant differences in OS (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41), RFS, or DF-free survival. IC did not translate into improved OS compared with CRT alone. However, the study was underpowered because it did not meet the planned accrual target, and OS was higher than predicted in both arms. IC cannot be recommended routinely in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced SCCHN. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Phase III Randomized Trial of Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With N2 or N3 Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Mueller, Jeffrey; Egan, Robyn; Huang, Chao H.; Brockstein, Bruce E.; Agulnik, Mark B.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Yunus, Furhan; Samant, Sandeep; Raez, Luis E.; Mehra, Ranee; Kumar, Priya; Ondrey, Frank; Marchand, Patrice; Braegas, Bettina; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Induction chemotherapy (IC) before radiotherapy lowers distant failure (DF) rates in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this phase III trial was to determine whether IC before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) further improves survival compared with CRT alone in patients with N2 or N3 disease. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with nonmetastatic N2 or N3 SCCHN were randomly assigned to CRT alone (CRT arm; docetaxel, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea plus radiotherapy 0.15 Gy twice per day every other week) versus two 21-day cycles of IC (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 on day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on days 1 to 5) followed by the same CRT regimen (IC + CRT arm). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included DF-free survival, failure pattern, and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results A total of 285 patients were randomly assigned. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities during IC were febrile neutropenia (11%) and mucositis (9%); during CRT (both arms combined), they were mucositis (49%), dermatitis (21%), and leukopenia (18%). Serious adverse events were more common in the IC arm (47% v 28%; P = .002). With a minimum follow-up of 30 months, there were no statistically significant differences in OS (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41), RFS, or DF-free survival. Conclusion IC did not translate into improved OS compared with CRT alone. However, the study was underpowered because it did not meet the planned accrual target, and OS was higher than predicted in both arms. IC cannot be recommended routinely in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced SCCHN. PMID:25049329

  13. Metronomic treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with daily oral vinorelbine – a Phase I trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guetz S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sylvia Guetz,1,* Amanda Tufman,2,* Joachim von Pawel,3 Achim Rittmeyer,4 Astrid Borgmeier,2 Pierre Ferré,5 Birgit Edlich,6 Rudolf Maria Huber2 1Ev. Diakonissenkrankenhaus Leipzig, Leipzig, 2University Hospital Munich and Thoracic Oncology Centre Munich, Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Comprehensive Pneumology Center Munich (DZL CPC-M, Munich, 3Asklepios Fachkliniken Muenchen-Gauting, Gauting, 4Lungenfachklinik Immenhausen, Immenhausen, Germany; 5Pierre Fabre Pharmaceuticals, Oncology Research and Development Center, Toulouse, France; 6Pierre Fabre Pharma GmbH, Freiburg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Micro-abstract: In a Phase I dose-finding study of metronomic daily oral vinorelbine in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, a recommended dose was established for this therapeutic approach. In addition, this trial revealed promising efficacy data and an acceptable tolerability profile. The observed vinorelbine blood concentrations suggest continuous anti-angiogenic coverage. Introduction: We present a Phase I dose-finding study investigating metronomic daily oral vinorelbine (Navelbine® Oral, NVBo in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Patients and methods: Patients with stage III/IV NSCLC received daily NVBo at fixed dose levels of 20–50 mg/d for 21 days of each 4-week cycle. Primary end point was the maximum tolerated dose. Secondary end points included tumor response, time to progression (TTP, overall survival (OS and tolerability. Results: Twenty-seven patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. Most of them were extensively pretreated. Daily NVBo was well tolerated up to 30 mg/d. At 40 mg/d, two of five patients experienced dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs. Three of six patients had DLTs at the 50 mg/d level. The recommended dose was established at 30 mg/d in cycle 1, with escalation to 40 mg/d in cycle 2, if tolerated. Pharmacokinetic analyses showed continuous blood exposure over 21

  14. The facilitating role of chemotherapy in the palliative phase of cancer: qualitative interviews with advanced cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M Buiting

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent to which patients have a directing role in decisions about chemotherapy in the palliative phase of cancer and (want to anticipate on the last stage of life. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study. METHODS: In depth-interviews with 15 patients with advanced colorectal or breast cancer at the medical oncology department in a Dutch teaching hospital; interviews were analysed following the principles of thematic content-analysis. RESULTS: All patients reported to know that the chemotherapy they received was with palliative intent. Most of them did not express the wish for information about (other treatment options and put great trust in their physicians' treatment advice. The more patients were aware of the severity of their disease, the more they seemed to 'live their life' in the present and enjoy things besides having cancer. Such living in the present seemed to be facilitated by the use of chemotherapy. Patients often considered the 'chemotherapy-free period' more stressful than periods when receiving chemotherapy despite their generally improved physical condition. Chemotherapy (regardless of side-effects seemed to shift patients' attention away from the approaching last stage of life. Interestingly, although patients often discussed advance care planning, they were reluctant to bring on end-of-life issues that bothered them at that specific moment. Expressing real interest in people 'as a person' was considered an important element of appropriate care. CONCLUSIONS: Fearing their approaching death, patients deliberately focus on living in the present. Active (chemotherapy treatment facilitates this focus, regardless of the perceived side-effects. However, if anxiety for what lies ahead is the underlying reason for treatment, efforts should be made in assisting patients to find other ways to cope with this fear. Simultaneously, such an approach may reduce the use of burdensome and sometimes costly treatment in the

  15. Treatment of advanced pancreatic carcinoma with 90Y-Clivatuzumab Tetraxetan: a phase I single-dose escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Seza A; Cohen, Steven J; Pennington, Kenneth L; Zuckier, Lionel S; Hauke, Ralph J; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Gold, David V; Sharkey, Robert M; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-06-15

    Humanized antibody hPAM4 specifically binds a mucin glycoprotein expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinomas. This phase I study evaluated a single dose of (90)Y-clivatuzumab tetraxetan ((90)Y-labeled hPAM4) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Twenty-one patients (4 stage III; 17 stage IV) received (111)In-hPAM4 for imaging and serum sampling before (90)Y-hPAM4. Study procedures evaluated adverse events, safety laboratories, computed tomography (CT) scans, biomarkers, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry, and immunogenicity (HAHA). (111)In-hPAM4 showed normal biodistribution with radiation dose estimates to red marrow and solid organs acceptable for radioimmunotherapy and with tumor targeting in 12 patients. One patient withdrew before (90)Y-hPAM4; otherwise, 20 patients received (90)Y doses of 15 (n = 7), 20 (n = 9), and 25 mCi/m(2) (n = 4). Treatment was well tolerated; the only significant drug-related toxicities were (NCI CTC v.3) grade 3 to 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia increasing with (90)Y dose. There were no bleeding events or serious infections, and most cytopenias recovered to grade 1 within 12 weeks. Three patients at 25 mCi/m(2) encountered dose-limiting toxicity with grade 4 cytopenias more than 7 days, establishing 20 mCi/m(2) as the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose. Two patients developed HAHA of uncertain clinical significance. Most patients progressed rapidly and with CA19-9 levels increasing within 1 month of therapy, but 7 remained progression-free by CT for 1.5 to 5.6 months, including 3 achieving transient partial responses (32%-52% tumor diameter shrinkage). (90)Y-Clivatuzumab tetraxetan was well tolerated with manageable hematologic toxicity at the maximal tolerated (90)Y dose, and is a potential new therapeutic for advanced pancreatic cancer. ©2011 AACR.

  16. Phase I and II trial of five-day infused 5-fluorouracil and radiation in advanced cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byfield, J.E.; Sharp, T.R.; Frankel, S.S.; Tang, S.G.; Callipari, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen patients with advanced epithelial cancers of the head and neck region were studied for their tolerance and response to combined cycles of 120-hour infused 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and external-beam radiation therapy. 5-FU infusions were given under conditions where radiosensitization would be expected at the higher infusion doses. Coincident radiation treatments were given as four sequential daily fractions of 250 rad each administered during days 1 through 4 of each five-day infusion cycle. The patients were rested for at least nine days after each cycle or longer until toxicity was resolved. The regimen was then repeated in each patient for a total of five treatment cycles. Thereafter therapy was consolidated, usually by boost radiation without drug. In sequential patient subsets the infusion load was progressively escalated in a phase I format. The complete response rate for stage IV patients was 75% with survival benefit compared to prior results. 5-FU dose-dependent combined modality loco-regional toxicity was demonstrated without significant enhancement of systemic toxicity of any form; 5-FU dose-dependent enhanced responsiveness and survival benefit is also suggested. Further scheduling and response studies of 5-FU under radiosensitizing conditions appear warranted

  17. Combined carboplatin plus ifosfamide and cisplatin in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. A phase I-II study. GOCS (Gynecological Oncology Cooperative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, V; Leone, B; Di Vagno, G; Manzione, L; Palmeri, S; Vallejo, C; Machiavelli, M; Nacci, G; Bilancia, D; Leonardi, V; Catino, A; Gargano, G; Loverro, G; Selvaggi, L; De Lena, M

    1998-02-01

    Because of the relative lack of overlapping toxicity, carboplatin (PPL) and cisplatin (CDDP) can be easily combined for treatment of ovarian cancer to increase total platinum dose intensity. Ifosfamide (IFO), one of the most effective single agents in ovarian cancer, has a low hematological toxicity when administered in continuous infusion. From January 1991 to December 1993, 34 patients with advanced ovarian cancer, previously untreated with chemo- or radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase I-II study with the aim of determining the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of CDDP (on day 8 of a 28-day cycle) in combination with PPL (300 mg/m2 on day 1) and IFO (4,000 mg/m2/24 h by continuous infusion on day 1). The initial dose level of CDDP was 40 mg/m2, which was continuously increased by 10 mg/m2 up to the MTD defined as one dose level below that inducing dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in at least two-thirds of treated patients; no dose escalation was allowed in the same patient. Grade 3-4 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 54 and 49% of patients, respectively. The DLT was reached at 70 mg/m2 and therefore the dose recommended for the phase II study was 60 mg/m2. Complete (CR) plus partial response was observed in 88% of patients with a 21% pathological CR. With a minimum follow-up of 32 months (median 40 months), median progression-free survival and overall survival were 21 and 39 months, respectively. In conclusion, the combination of CDDP, PPL, and IFO provides an effective regimen for ovarian cancer with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  18. Phase I trial of hydroxychloroquine with dose-intense temozolomide in patients with advanced solid tumors and melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwala, Reshma; Leone, Robert; Chang, Yunyoung C; Fecher, Leslie A; Schuchter, Lynn M; Kramer, Amy; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; Rodgers, Glenda; Gallagher, Maryann; Piao, Shengfu; Troxel, Andrea B; Evans, Tracey L; DeMichele, Angela M; Nathanson, Katherine L; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Kaiser, Jonathon; Pontiggia, Laura; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Blocking autophagy with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) augments cell death associated with alkylating chemotherapy in preclinical models. This phase I study evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, preliminary activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of HCQ in combination with dose-intense temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with advanced solid malignancies. Forty patients (73% metastatic melanoma) were treated with oral HCQ 200 to 1200 mg daily with dose-intense oral TMZ 150 mg/m (2) daily for 7/14 d. This combination was well tolerated with no recurrent dose-limiting toxicities observed. An MTD was not reached for HCQ and the recommended phase II dose was HCQ 600 mg twice daily combined with dose-intense TMZ. Common toxicities included grade 2 fatigue (55%), anorexia (28%), nausea (48%), constipation (20%), and diarrhea (20%). Partial responses and stable disease were observed in 3/22 (14%) and 6/22 (27%) patients with metastatic melanoma. In the final dose cohort 2/6 patients with refractory BRAF wild-type melanoma had a near complete response, and prolonged stable disease, respectively. A significant accumulation in autophagic vacuoles (AV) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was observed in response to combined therapy. Population pharmacokinetics (PK) modeling, individual PK simulations, and PK-pharmacodynamics (PD) analysis identified a threshold HCQ peak concentration that predicts therapy-associated AV accumulation. This study indicates that the combination of high-dose HCQ and dose-intense TMZ is safe and tolerable, and is associated with autophagy modulation in patients. Prolonged stable disease and responses suggest antitumor activity in melanoma patients, warranting further studies of this combination, or combinations of more potent autophagy inhibitors and chemotherapy in melanoma.

  19. Combined MTOR and autophagy inhibition: phase I trial of hydroxychloroquine and temsirolimus in patients with advanced solid tumors and melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwala, Reshma; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; Algazy, Kenneth M; Evans, Tracey L; Fecher, Leslie A; Schuchter, Lynn M; Torigian, Drew A; Panosian, Jeffrey T; Troxel, Andrea B; Tan, Kay-See; Heitjan, Daniel F; DeMichele, Angela M; Vaughn, David J; Redlinger, Maryann; Alavi, Abass; Kaiser, Jonathon; Pontiggia, Laura; Davis, Lisa E; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    The combination of temsirolimus (TEM), an MTOR inhibitor, and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an autophagy inhibitor, augments cell death in preclinical models. This phase 1 dose-escalation study evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), safety, preliminary activity, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of HCQ in combination with TEM in cancer patients. In the dose escalation portion, 27 patients with advanced solid malignancies were enrolled, followed by a cohort expansion at the top dose level in 12 patients with metastatic melanoma. The combination of HCQ and TEM was well tolerated, and grade 3 or 4 toxicity was limited to anorexia (7%), fatigue (7%), and nausea (7%). An MTD was not reached for HCQ, and the recommended phase II dose was HCQ 600 mg twice daily in combination with TEM 25 mg weekly. Other common grade 1 or 2 toxicities included fatigue, anorexia, nausea, stomatitis, rash, and weight loss. No responses were observed; however, 14/21 (67%) patients in the dose escalation and 14/19 (74%) patients with melanoma achieved stable disease. The median progression-free survival in 13 melanoma patients treated with HCQ 1200mg/d in combination with TEM was 3.5 mo. Novel 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements predicted clinical outcome and provided further evidence that the addition of HCQ to TEM produced metabolic stress on tumors in patients that experienced clinical benefit. Pharmacodynamic evidence of autophagy inhibition was evident in serial PBMC and tumor biopsies only in patients treated with 1200 mg daily HCQ. This study indicates that TEM and HCQ is safe and tolerable, modulates autophagy in patients, and has significant antitumor activity. Further studies combining MTOR and autophagy inhibitors in cancer patients are warranted.

  20. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of combined treatment with perifosine and radiation in patients with advanced solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, Stefan R.; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Sindermann, Herbert; Engel, Juergen; Dubbelman, Ria; Moppi, Gemi; Hillebrand, Michel J.X.; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Perifosine is an orally applicable, membrane-targeted alkylphosphocholine analogue with antitumour activity and radiosensitising properties in preclinical models. The purpose of this phase I study was to determine the feasibility and tolerability of concurrent daily perifosine and radiation in patients with advanced cancer. Patients and methods: Starting dose of perifosine was 50 mg/day; dose escalation was in steps of 50 mg. Daily administration commenced 2 days before radiotherapy and was continued throughout the radiation treatment. At least three patients were entered at each dose level; at the 150 mg/day level 10 patients were included. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed weekly pre-dosing. Twenty-one patients were entered. Tumour types included NSCLC (n = 17), prostate, oesophageal, colon and bladder cancer. Most patients (16/21) had received prior chemotherapy; none radiotherapy. Median number of daily perifosine administrations was 31 (range 24-53). Mean radiation dose (BED 1 ) was 59.8 Gy (range 50.7-87.5 Gy in 13-28 fractions). Results: Major drug-related toxicities according to CTC criteria were nausea in 57%, fatigue in 48%, vomiting in 38%, diarrhoea in 38% and anorexia in 19%. No bone marrow toxicity was observed. DLT (nausea/vomiting) was encountered in two of five patients at the 200 mg/day dose level. Dose-dependent steady-state plasma levels were reached after 1 week. Major radiotherapy-related acute toxicity consisted of dysphagia in 38% and pneumonitis in 29%. Conclusion: Perifosine can be safely combined with fractionated radiotherapy. A dosage of 150 mg/day, to be started at least 1 week prior to radiotherapy, is recommended for phase II evaluation

  1. Advanced functional materials in solid phase extraction for ICP-MS determination of trace elements and their species - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Man; Huang, Lijin; Zhao, Bingshan; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2017-06-22

    For the determination of trace elements and their species in various real samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), solid phase extraction (SPE) is a commonly used sample pretreatment technique to remove complex matrix, pre-concentrate target analytes and make the samples suitable for subsequent sample introduction and measurements. The sensitivity, selectivity/anti-interference ability, sample throughput and application potential of the methodology of SPE-ICP-MS are greatly dependent on SPE adsorbents. This article presents a general overview of the use of advanced functional materials (AFMs) in SPE for ICP-MS determination of trace elements and their species in the past decade. Herein the AFMs refer to the materials featuring with high adsorption capacity, good selectivity, fast adsorption/desorption dynamics and satisfying special requirements in real sample analysis, including nanometer-sized materials, porous materials, ion imprinting polymers, restricted access materials and magnetic materials. Carbon/silica/metal/metal oxide nanometer-sized adsorbents with high surface area and plenty of adsorption sites exhibit high adsorption capacity, and porous adsorbents would provide more adsorption sites and faster adsorption dynamics. The selectivity of the materials for target elements/species can be improved by using physical/chemical modification, ion imprinting and restricted accessed technique. Magnetic adsorbents in conventional batch operation offer unique magnetic response and high surface area-volume ratio which provide a very easy phase separation, greater extraction capacity and efficiency over conventional adsorbents, and chip-based magnetic SPE provides a versatile platform for special requirement (e.g. cell analysis). The performance of these adsorbents for the determination of trace elements and their species in different matrices by ICP-MS is discussed in detail, along with perspectives and possible challenges in the future

  2. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  3. A total pressure-saturation formulation of two-phase flow incorporating dynamic effects in the capillary-pressure-saturation relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, H K; Celia, M A; Hassanizadeh, S M; Karlsen, K H

    2002-07-01

    New theories suggest that the relationship between capillary pressure and saturation should be enhanced by a dynamic term that is proportional to the time rate of change of saturation. This so-called dynamic capillary pressure formulation is supported by laboratory experiments, and can be included in various forms of the governing equations for two-phase flow in porous media. An extended model of two-phase flow in porous media may be developed based on fractional flow curves and a total pressure - saturation description that includes the dynamic capillary pressure terms. A dimensionless form of the resulting equation set provides an ideal tool to study the relative importance of the dynamic capillary pressure effect. This equation provides a rich set of mathematical research questions, and numerical solutions to the equation provide insights into the behavior of two-phase immiscible flow. For typical two-phase flow systems, dynamic capillary pressure acts to retard infiltration fronts, with responses dependent on system parameters including boundary conditions. Recent theoretical work suggests that the traditional algebraic relationship between capillary pressure and saturation may be inadequate. Instead, a so-called dynamic capillary pressure formulation is needed, where capillary pressure is defined as a thermodynamic variable, and the difference between phase pressures is only equal to the capillary pressure at equilibrium. Under dynamic conditions, the disequilibrium between phase-pressure differences and the capillary pressure is taken to be proportional to the time rate of change of saturation. A recent study by Hassanizadeh et al. presents experimental evidence, culled from the literature, to support this claim. Numerical simulations using dynamic pore-scale network models and upscaling also support the claim. Hassanizadeh et al. also presented numerical solutions for an enhanced version of Richards' equation that included the dynamic terms. A preliminary

  4. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  5. A Phase I-II dose escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and capecitabine every two weeks in advanced cholangiocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik V; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Sorensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (O) and capecitabine (C), and evaluate the safety and efficacy of this regimen in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Methods. In the Phase I part of the study a dose-escalation schedule of FDR G, O and C, administered every two weeks, was performed in patients with solid tumours...... and no other treatments or advanced CC. In the Phase II part response rate, toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival was evaluated in patients with newly diagnosed advanced CC. Results. Thirty-six patients entered the Phase I part and G 1 000 mg/m(2) day 1 and 15, O 60 mg/m(2) day 1...... and 15, and C 1 000 mg/m(2) BID day 1-7 and day 15-21 were established as MTD. In the Phase II part, 41 patients with advanced CC were included. Overall response rate was 34% and 51% had stable disease, resulting in a clinical benefit rate of 85%. Grade III and IV adverse events were rare. Median...

  6. A phase IIb multicentre study comparing the efficacy of trabectedin to doxorubicin in patients with advanced or metastatic untreated soft tissue sarcoma: The TRUSTS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui-Nguyen, B.; Butrynski, J.E.; Penel, N.; Blay, J.Y.; Isambert, N.; Milhem, M.; Kerst, J.M.; Reyners, A.K.; Litiere, S.; Marreaud, S.; Collin, F.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether trabectedin as first-line chemotherapy for advanced/metastatic soft tissue sarcoma prolongs progression-free survival (PFS), compared to doxorubicin and, in the phase IIb part here, to select the most appropriate trabectedin treatment schedule (3-hour or 24-hour

  7. A phase I, dose-escalation study of TB-403, a monoclonal antibody directed against PlGF, in patients with advanced solid tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Nielsen, D L; Sørensen, M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: TB-403 (RO 5323441), a humanised monoclonal antibody, is a novel antiangiogenesis agent directed against placental growth factor. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and antitumour activity of TB-403 were assessed in a phase I, dose-escalation study in patients with advanced solid...

  8. A phase I monotherapy study of RG7212, a first-in-class monoclonal antibody targeting TWEAK signaling in patients with advanced cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik N; Meulendijks, Didier; Siu, Lilian L

    2015-01-01

    activation. A phase I study of RG7212, a humanized anti-TWEAK IgG1κ monoclonal antibody, was conducted in patients with advanced solid tumors expressing Fn14. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Dose escalations, over a 200- to 7,200-mg range, were performed with patients enrolled in weekly (QW), bi-weekly (Q2W), or every...

  9. Phase II study of safety and efficacy of motesanib in patients with progressive or symptomatic, advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlumberger, Martin J; Elisei, Rossella; Bastholt, Lars

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: This phase II study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of motesanib, an investigational, highly selective inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3; platelet-derived growth factor receptor; and Kit in advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). PATIENTS A...

  10. Global distribution of GPS losses of phase lock and total electron content slips during the 2005 May 15 and the 2003 November 20 magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasyukevich, Yuriy; Astafeva, Elvira; Givetev, Ilya; Maksikov, Aleksey

    2015-12-01

    Using data of worldwide network of GPS receivers we investigated losses of GPS phase lock (LoL) during two strong magnetic storms. At fundamental L1 frequency, LoL density is found to increase up to 0.25 % and at L2 frequency the increase is up to 3 %. This is several times as much compared with the background level. During the 2003 November 20 magnetic storm, the number of total electron content (TEC) slips exceeded the background level ~50 times. During superstorms, the most number of GPS LoL is observed at low and high latitudes. At the same time, the area of numerous TEC slips correspond to auroral oval boundaries.

  11. Wave-optical evaluation of interference fringes and wavefront phase in a hard-x-ray beam totally reflected by mirror optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kazuto; Yamamura, Kazuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Sano, Yasuhisa; Saito, Akira; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Souvorov, Alexei; Yabashi, Makina; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mori, Yuzo

    2005-11-10

    The intensity flatness and wavefront shape in a coherent hard-x-ray beam totally reflected by flat mirrors that have surface bumps modeled by Gaussian functions were investigated by use of a wave-optical simulation code. Simulated results revealed the necessity for peak-to-valley height accuracy of better than 1 nm at a lateral resolution near 0.1 mm to remove high-contrast interference fringes and appreciable wavefront phase errors. Three mirrors that had different surface qualities were tested at the 1 km-long beam line at the SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute. Interference fringes faded when the surface figure was corrected below the subnanometer level to a spatial resolution close to 0.1 mm, as indicated by the simulated results.

  12. A first-in-human phase I study of SAR125844, a selective MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumours with MET amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevin, Eric; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Rodon, Jordi; Dotti, Katia; Isambert, Nicolas; Salvagni, Stefania; Moreno, Victor; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hollebecque, Antoine; Azaro, Analia; Hervieu, Alice; Rihawi, Karim; De Marinis, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    Dysregulated MET signalling is implicated in oncogenesis. The safety and preliminary efficacy of a highly selective MET kinase inhibitor (SAR125844) was investigated in patients with advanced solid tumours and MET dysregulation. This was a phase I dose-escalation (3 + 3 design [50-740 mg/m 2 ]) and dose-expansion study. In the dose escalation, patients had high total MET (t-MET) expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) or MET amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. In the dose expansion, patients had MET amplification (including a subset of patients with non-small cell lung cancer [NSCLC]) or phosphorylated-MET (p-MET) expression (IHC). Objectives were determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of once-weekly intravenous SAR125844 based on dose-limiting toxicities; safety and pharmacokinetic profile; preliminary efficacy of SAR125844 MTD in the expansion cohort. In total, 72 patients were enrolled: dose escalation, N = 33; dose expansion, N = 39; 570 mg/m 2 was established as the MTD. Most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were asthenia/fatigue (58.3%), nausea (31.9%), and abdominal pain, constipation, and dyspnea (27.8% for each); 58.3% of patients reported grade 3 AEs (19.4% were treatment related). Of the 29 evaluable patients with MET amplification treated at 570 mg/m 2 , five achieved a partial response, including four of 22 with NSCLC; 17 patients had stable disease. No response was observed in patients with high p-MET solid tumours. There was no correlation between tumour response and t-MET status or MET gene copy number. The MTD of once-weekly SAR125844 was 570 mg/m 2 ; SAR125844 was well tolerated, with significant antitumour activity in patients with MET-amplified NSCLC. NCT01391533. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Performance evaluation of a full-scale advanced phase isolation ditch process by using real-time control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyosoo; Kim, Yejin; Kim, Minsoo; Piao, Wenhua; Kim, Changwon; Gee, Jeasung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes real-time control strategies that can be applied in a full-scale advanced phase isolation ditch (APID) process. Real-time operation mode control (OMC) and aeration section control (ASC) strategies were developed to cope more stably with fluctuations in the influent loading and to increase the nitrification and denitrification reactions within the entire volume. The real-time OMC and ASC strategies were evaluated using mathematical models. When the NH 4 -N in the reactor was maintained at a high level, appropriate control actions, such as continuing the aeration state, stopping the influent inflow and increasing the aeration section, were applied in the APID process. In contrast, when the NO X -N in the reactor was maintained at a high level, the non-aeration state, influent inflow, and decreased aeration section were continued. It was concluded that stable operation in the APID process could be achieved by applying real-time OMC and ASC strategies developed in this study

  14. Performance evaluation of a full-scale advanced phase isolation ditch process by using real-time control strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyosoo; Kim, Yejin; Kim, Minsoo; Piao, Wenhua; Kim, Changwon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Gee, Jeasung [Taiwha Industrial Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    This paper proposes real-time control strategies that can be applied in a full-scale advanced phase isolation ditch (APID) process. Real-time operation mode control (OMC) and aeration section control (ASC) strategies were developed to cope more stably with fluctuations in the influent loading and to increase the nitrification and denitrification reactions within the entire volume. The real-time OMC and ASC strategies were evaluated using mathematical models. When the NH{sub 4}-N in the reactor was maintained at a high level, appropriate control actions, such as continuing the aeration state, stopping the influent inflow and increasing the aeration section, were applied in the APID process. In contrast, when the NO{sub X}-N in the reactor was maintained at a high level, the non-aeration state, influent inflow, and decreased aeration section were continued. It was concluded that stable operation in the APID process could be achieved by applying real-time OMC and ASC strategies developed in this study.

  15. Phase II trial of Uracil/Tegafur plus leucovorin and celecoxib combined with radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morak, Marjolein J.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Eijck, Casper H.J. van; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Gaast, Ate van der; Vervenne, Walter L.; Padmos, Esther E.; Schaake, Eva E.; Busch, Olivier R.C.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the efficacy and toxicity of a short intensive Uracil/Tegafur (UFT) based chemoradiotherapy scheme combined with celecoxib in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Material and methods: The Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam and the Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam enrolled 83 eligible patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in a prospective multicentre phase II study. Median age was 62 years, median tumour size 40 mm and the majority of the patients (85%) had pancreatic head cancers. Treatment consisted of 20 x 2.5 Gy radiotherapy combined with UFT 300 mg/m 2 per day, leucovorin (folinic acid) 30 mg and celecoxib 800 mg for 28 days concomitant with radiotherapy. Four patients were lost to follow-up. Results: Full treatment compliance was achieved in 55% of patients, 80% received at least 3 weeks of treatment. No partial or complete response was observed. Median survival was 10.6 months and median time to progression 6.9 months. Toxicity was substantial with 28% grades III and IV gastro-intestinal toxicity and two early toxic deaths. Conclusions: Based on the lack of response, the substantial toxicity of mainly gastro-intestinal origin and the reported mediocre overall and progression free survival, we cannot advise our short intensive chemoradiotherapy schedule combined with celecoxib as the standard treatment.

  16. Advanced fabrication method for the preparation of MOF thin films: Liquid-phase epitaxy approach meets spin coating method.

    KAUST Repository

    Chernikova, Valeriya

    2016-07-14

    Here we report a new and advanced method for the fabrication of highly oriented/polycrystalline metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films. Building on the attractive features of the liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) approach, a facile spin coating method was implemented to generate MOF thin films in a high-throughput fashion. Advantageously, this approach offers a great prospective to cost-effectively construct thin-films with a significantly shortened preparation time and a lessened chemicals and solvents consumption, as compared to the conventional LPE-process. Certainly, this new spin-coating approach has been implemented successfully to construct various MOF thin films, ranging in thickness from a few micrometers down to the nanometer scale, spanning 2-D and 3-D benchmark MOF materials including Cu2(bdc)2•xH2O, Zn2(bdc)2•xH2O, HKUST-1 and ZIF-8. This method was appraised and proved effective on a variety of substrates comprising functionalized gold, silicon, glass, porous stainless steel and aluminum oxide. The facile, high-throughput and cost-effective nature of this approach, coupled with the successful thin film growth and substrate versatility, represents the next generation of methods for MOF thin film fabrication. Thereby paving the way for these unique MOF materials to address a wide range of challenges in the areas of sensing devices and membrane technology.

  17. Optimization of total vaporization solid-phase microextraction (TV-SPME) for the determination of lipid profiles of Phormia regina, a forensically important blow fly species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, William; Carroll, Clinton; Dixon, Darren; Picard, Christine; Goodpaster, John

    2017-11-01

    A new method has been developed for the determination of fatty acids, sterols, and other lipids which naturally occur within pupae of the blow fly Phormia regina. The method relies upon liquid extraction in non-polar solvent, followed by derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) w/ 1% trimethylchlorsilane (TMCS) carried out inside the sample vial. The analysis is facilitated by total vaporization solid-phase microextraction (TV-SPME), with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) serving as the instrumentation for analysis. The TV-SPME delivery technique is approximately a factor of five more sensitive than traditional liquid injection, which may alleviate the need for rotary evaporation, reconstitution, collection of high performance liquid chromatography fractions, and many of the other pre-concentration steps that are commonplace in the current literature. Furthermore, the ability to derivatize the liquid extract in a single easy step while increasing sensitivity represents an improvement over current derivatization methods. The most common lipids identified in fly pupae were various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids ranging from lauric acid (12:0) to arachinoic acid (20:4), as well as cholesterol. The concentrations of myristic acid (14:0), palmitelaidic acid (16:2), and palmitoleic acid (16:1) were the most reliable indicators of the age of the pupae. Graphical abstract Blow fly pupae were extracted prior to emerging as adults. The extracts were analyzed via total vaporization solid-phase microextraction (TV-SPME), revealing a complex mixture of lipids that could be associated with the age of the insect. This information may assist in determining a post-mortum interval (PMI) in a death investigation.

  18. Phase II trial of weekly 24-hour infusion of gemcitabine in patients with advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delius, Stefan von; Lersch, Christian; Schulte-Frohlinde, Ewert; Mayr, Martina; Schmid, Roland M; Eckel, Florian

    2005-01-01

    Patients with advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinoma face a dismal prognosis, as no effective palliative chemotherapy exists. The antitumor effect of gemcitabine is schedule-dependent rather than dose-dependent. We evaluated the activity of a prolonged infusion of gemcitabine in advanced gallbladder and biliary tract carcinomas. Nineteen consecutive eligible patients were enrolled. All patients were required to have histologically confirmed diagnosis and measurable disease. Gemcitabine was infused over 24 hours at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 on days 1, 8, and 15. Treatment was repeated every 28 days until progression of disease or limiting toxicity. Tumor response was evaluated every second course by computed tomography (CT) scans. Eighteen patients were evaluable for response. A total of 89 cycles of therapy were administered. One partial response was observed (6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0–27%) and ten additional patients had stable disease for at least two months (disease control rate 61%; 95% CI: 36–83%). The therapy was well tolerated, with moderate myelosuppression as the main toxicity. The median time to tumor progression and median overall survival was 3.6 months (95% CI 2.6–4.6 months) and 7.5 months (95% CI 6.5–8.5 months), respectively. Weekly 24-hour gemcitabine at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 is well tolerated. There was a relatively high rate of disease control for a median duration of 5.3 months (range 2.8–18.8 months). However, the objective response rate of this regimen in gallbladder and biliary tract carcinomas was limited

  19. 177 Lu-Dota-octreotate radionuclide therapy of advanced gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: results from a phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Giovanni; Sansovini, Maddalena; Ambrosetti, Alice; Severi, Stefano; Ianniello, Annarita; Matteucci, Federica [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola, FC (Italy); Monti, Manuela; Scarpi, Emanuela [IRST IRCCS, Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Meldola (Italy); Donati, Caterina [IRST IRCCS, Oncology Pharmacy Laboratory, Meldola (Italy); Amadori, Dino [IRST IRCCS, Department of Medical Oncology, Meldola (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    We evaluated the activity and safety profile of {sup 177}Lu-Dotatate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (Lu-PRRT) in patients with advanced, well-differentiated (G1-G2) gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Forty-three patients with radiological tumor progression at baseline and a positive Octreoscan registered completed the treatment with Lu-PRRT, resulting in the cumulative activity of 18.5 or 27.8 GBq in five cycles. Total activity was scheduled on the basis of kidney function or bone marrow reserve. Twenty-five (58 %) patients were treated with a ''standard'' Lu-PRRT full dosage (FD) of 25.7 GBq (range 22.2-27.8), while the remaining 18 patients (42 %) who, at enrolment, showed a higher probability of developing kidney or bone marrow toxicity received a reduced dosage (RD) of 18.4 GBq (range 14.4-20.4). According to SWOG criteria, the overall response was complete response (CR) in (7 %) cases and stable disease (SD) in 33 (77 %), with a disease control rate (DCR) of 84 %. Median response duration was 25 months (range 7-50). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 36 months (95 % CI 24-nr), and median overall survival (OS) has not yet been reached. Remarkably, none of the patients, including those at a higher risk of toxicity, showed side-effects after either dosage of Lu-PRRT. Lu-PRRT was shown to be an effective therapeutic option in our patients with advanced progressive GI-NETs, showing an 84 % DCR (95 % CI 73-95) that lasted for 25 months and a PFS of 36 months. Both activities of 27.8 GBq and 18.5 GBq proved safe and effective in all patients, including those with a higher probability of developing kidney or bone marrow toxicity. (orig.)

  20. Phase III Prospective Randomized Comparison Trial of Depot Octreotide Plus Interferon Alfa-2b Versus Depot Octreotide Plus Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Carcinoid Tumors: SWOG S0518.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, James C; Guthrie, Katherine A; Moran, Cesar; Strosberg, Jonathan R; Kulke, Matthew H; Chan, Jennifer A; LoConte, Noelle; McWilliams, Robert R; Wolin, Edward M; Mattar, Bassam; McDonough, Shannon; Chen, Helen; Blanke, Charles D; Hochster, Howard S

    2017-05-20

    Purpose Treatment options for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) remain limited. This trial assessed the progression-free survival (PFS) of bevacizumab or interferon alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) added to octreotide among patients with advanced NETs. Patients and Methods Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) S0518, a phase III study conducted in a US cooperative group system, enrolled patients with advanced grades 1 and 2 NETs with progressive disease or other poor prognostic features. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with octreotide LAR 20 mg every 21 days with either bevacizumab 15 mg/kg every 21 days or 5 million units of IFN-α-2b three times per week. The primary end point was centrally assessed PFS. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00569127. Results A total of 427 patients was enrolled, of whom 214 were allocated to bevacizumab and 213 to IFN-α-2b. The median PFS by central review was 16.6 months (95% CI, 12.9 to 19.6 months) in the bevacizumab arm and was 15.4 months (95% CI, 9.6 to 18.6 months) in the IFN arm (hazard ratio [HR], 0.93; 95% CI, 0.73 to 1.18; P = .55). By site review, the median PFS times were 15.4 months (95% CI, 12.6 to 17.2 months) for bevacizumab and 10.6 months (95% CI, 8.5 to 14.4 months) for interferon (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.12; P = .33). Time to treatment failure was longer with bevacizumab than with IFN (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.89; P = .003). Confirmed radiologic response rates were 12% (95% CI, 8% to 18%) for bevacizumab and 4% (95% CI, 2% to 8%) for IFN. Common adverse events with bevacizumab and octreotide included hypertension (32%), proteinuria (9%), and fatigue (7%); with IFN and octreotide, they included fatigue (27%), neutropenia (12%), and nausea (6%). Conclusion No significant differences in PFS were observed between the bevacizumab and IFN arms, which suggests that these agents have similar antitumor activity among patients with advanced NETs.

  1. Simultaneous Integrated Boost–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Capecitabine and Mitomycin C for Locally Advanced Anal Carcinoma: A Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deenen, Maarten J. [Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dewit, Luc [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boot, Henk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beijnen, Jos H. [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schellens, Jan H.M. [Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke, E-mail: a.cats@nki.nl [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Newer radiation techniques, and the application of continuous 5-FU exposure during radiation therapy using oral capecitabine may improve the treatment of anal cancer. This phase 1, dose-finding study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost–intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with concomitant capecitabine and mitomycin C in locally advanced anal cancer, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced anal carcinoma were treated with SIB-IMRT in 33 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 33 fractions of 1.5 Gy electively to the bilateral iliac and inguinal lymph node areas. Patients received a sequential radiation boost dose of 3 × 1.8 Gy on macroscopic residual tumor if this was still present in week 5 of treatment. Mitomycin C 10 mg/m{sup 2} (maximum 15 mg) was administered intravenously on day 1, and capecitabine was given orally in a dose-escalated fashion (500-825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d.) on irradiation days, until dose-limiting toxicity emerged in ≥2 of maximally 6 patients. An additional 8 patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: A total of 18 patients were included. The MTD of capecitabine was determined to be 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. The predominant acute grade ≥3 toxicities included radiation dermatitis (50%), fatigue (22%), and pain (6%). Fifteen patients (83% [95%-CI: 66%-101%]) achieved a complete response, and 3 (17%) patients a partial response. With a median follow-up of 28 months, none of the complete responders, and 2 partial responders had relapsed. Conclusions: SIB-IMRT with concomitant single dose mitomycin C and capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. on irradiation days resulted in an acceptable safety profile, and proved to be a tolerable and effective treatment regimen for locally advanced anal cancer.

  2. Simultaneous Integrated Boost–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Capecitabine and Mitomycin C for Locally Advanced Anal Carcinoma: A Phase 1 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Dewit, Luc; Boot, Henk; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Cats, Annemieke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Newer radiation techniques, and the application of continuous 5-FU exposure during radiation therapy using oral capecitabine may improve the treatment of anal cancer. This phase 1, dose-finding study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost–intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with concomitant capecitabine and mitomycin C in locally advanced anal cancer, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced anal carcinoma were treated with SIB-IMRT in 33 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 33 fractions of 1.5 Gy electively to the bilateral iliac and inguinal lymph node areas. Patients received a sequential radiation boost dose of 3 × 1.8 Gy on macroscopic residual tumor if this was still present in week 5 of treatment. Mitomycin C 10 mg/m 2 (maximum 15 mg) was administered intravenously on day 1, and capecitabine was given orally in a dose-escalated fashion (500-825 mg/m 2 b.i.d.) on irradiation days, until dose-limiting toxicity emerged in ≥2 of maximally 6 patients. An additional 8 patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: A total of 18 patients were included. The MTD of capecitabine was determined to be 825 mg/m 2 b.i.d. The predominant acute grade ≥3 toxicities included radiation dermatitis (50%), fatigue (22%), and pain (6%). Fifteen patients (83% [95%-CI: 66%-101%]) achieved a complete response, and 3 (17%) patients a partial response. With a median follow-up of 28 months, none of the complete responders, and 2 partial responders had relapsed. Conclusions: SIB-IMRT with concomitant single dose mitomycin C and capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 b.i.d. on irradiation days resulted in an acceptable safety profile, and proved to be a tolerable and effective treatment regimen for locally advanced anal cancer

  3. A phase III trial of zoladex and flutamide versus orchiectomy in the treatment of patients with advanced carcinoma of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Christensen, M G; Friis, E

    1990-01-01

    In a multicenter Phase III trial 264 patients with advanced prostatic cancer were randomized to either bilateral orchiectomy or treatment with zoladex supplemented by flutamide. Presently, median follow-up time is 30 months. A small difference in objective response was recorded in favor of the co......In a multicenter Phase III trial 264 patients with advanced prostatic cancer were randomized to either bilateral orchiectomy or treatment with zoladex supplemented by flutamide. Presently, median follow-up time is 30 months. A small difference in objective response was recorded in favor...... of the combination therapy, whereas no statistically significant difference was found in subjective response to therapy, time to progression, and overall survival. Adverse effects were more commonly encountered in the pharmacologically treated patients. It is concluded that the combination of zoladex plus flutamide...... is not clinically superior to orchiectomy in the treatment of patients with advanced carcinoma of the prostate....

  4. Phase II trial evaluating the feasibility of interdigitating folfox with chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced and metastatic rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, M; Chander, S; McKendrick, J; MacKay, J R; Steel, M; Hicks, R; Heriot, A; Leong, T; Cooray, P; Jefford, M; Zalcberg, J; Bressel, M; McClure, B; Ngan, S Y

    2014-11-11

    Patients (pts) with metastatic rectal cancer and symptomatic primary, require local and systemic control. Chemotherapy used during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is adequate for radiosensitisation, but suboptimal for systemic control. The aim of this phase II study was to assess tolerability, local/systemic benefits, of a novel regimen delivering interdigitating intensive chemotherapy with radical CRT. Eligible pts had untreated synchronous symptomatic primary/metastatic rectal cancer. A total of 12 weeks of treatment with split-course pelvic CRT (total 50.4 Gy with concurrent oxaliplatin and 5-FU infusion) alternating with FOLFOX chemotherapy. All pts staged with CT, MRI and FDG-PET pre and post treatment. Twenty-six pts were treated. Rectal primary MRI stage: T3 81% and T4 15%. Liver metastases in 81%. Twenty-four pts (92%) completed the 12-week regimen. All patients received planned RT dose, and for both agents over 88% of patients achieved a relative dose intensity of >75%. Grade 3 toxicities: neutropenia 23%, diarrhoea 15%, and radiation skin reaction 12%. Grade 4 toxicity: neutropenia 15%. FDG-PET metabolic response rate for rectal primary 96%, and for metastatic disease 60%. Delivery of interdigitating chemotherapy with radical CRT was feasible to treat both primary and metastatic rectal cancer. High completion and response rates were encouraging.

  5. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Avani S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Raman, Siva P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hacker-Prietz, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  6. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV peak ) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver mean + [2 × Liver sd ]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm 3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy

  7. Optimization of a new mobile phase to know the complex and real polyphenolic composition: towards a total phenolic index using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Rong; Yang, Raymond

    2003-11-07

    An HPLC method is reported for the separation and quantification of five major polyphenolic groups found in fruits and related products: single ring phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acid and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives), flavan-3-ols, flavonols, anthocyanins, and dihydrochalcones. A binary mobile phase consisting of 6% acetic acid in 2 mM sodium acetate aqueous solution (v/v, final pH 2.55) (solvent A) and acetonitrile (solvent B) was used. The use of sodium acetate was new and key to the near baseline separation of 25 phenolics commonly found in fruits. A photodiode array detector was used and data were collected at four wavelengths (280, 320, 360, and 520 nm). This method was sensitive and gave good separation of polyphenolics in apple, cherry, strawberry, blackberry, grape, apple juice, and a processing by-product. The improved separation has led to better understanding of the polyphenolic profiles of these fruits. Individual as well as total phenolic content was obtained, and the latter was close to and correlated well with that obtained by the Folin-Ciocalteu method (FC). The HPLC data can be used as a total phenolic index (TPI) for quantification of fruit phenolics, which is advantageous over the FC because it has more information on individual compounds.

  8. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy With Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DCF-R) in Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial (KDOG 0501-P2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: k.higu@kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Komori, Shouko [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Tanabe, Satoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Katada, Chikatoshi [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Azuma, Mizutomo [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Ishiyama, Hiromichi [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Sasaki, Tohru; Ishido, Kenji [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Katada, Natsuya [Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Koizumi, Wasaburo [Department of Gastroenterology, Kitasato University East Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A previous phase 1 study suggested that definitive chemoradiation therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF-R) is tolerable and active in patients with advanced esophageal cancer (AEC). This phase 2 study was designed to confirm the efficacy and toxicity of DCF-R in AEC. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated thoracic AEC who had T4 tumors or M1 lymph node metastasis (M1 LYM), or both, received intravenous infusions of docetaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5, every 2 weeks, plus concurrent radiation. The total radiation dose was initially 61.2 Gy but was lowered to multiple-field irradiation with 50.4 Gy to decrease esophagitis and late toxicity. Consequently, the number of cycles of DCF administered during radiation therapy was reduced from 4 to 3. The primary endpoint was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate. Results: Characteristics of the 42 subjects were: median age, 62 years; performance status, 0 in 14, 1 in 25, 2 in 3; TNM classification, T4M0 in 20, non-T4M1LYM in 12, T4M1LYM in 10; total scheduled radiation dose: 61.2 Gy in 12, 50.4 Gy in 30. The cCR rate was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.3%-67.5%) overall, 33.3% in the 61.2-Gy group, and 60.0% in the 50.4-Gy group. The median progression-free survival was 11.1 months, and the median survival was 29.0 months with a survival rate of 43.9% at 3 years. Grade 3 or higher major toxicity consisted of leukopenia (71.4%), neutropenia (57.2%), anemia (16.7%), febrile neutropenia (38.1%), anorexia (31.0%), and esophagitis (28.6%). Conclusions: DCF-R frequently caused myelosuppression and esophagitis but was highly active and suggested to be a promising regimen in AEC. On the basis of efficacy and safety, a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy is recommended for further studies of DCF-R.

  9. A prospective phase II trial exploring the association between tumor microenvironment biomarkers and clinical activity of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Omid

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ipilimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has demonstrated an improvement in overall survival in two phase III trials of patients with advanced melanoma. The primary objective of the current trial was to prospectively explore candidate biomarkers from the tumor microenvironment for associations with clinical response to ipilimumab. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, phase II biomarker study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00261365, 82 pretreated or treatment-naïve patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma were induced with 3 or 10 mg/kg ipilimumab every 3 weeks for 4 doses; at Week 24, patients could receive maintenance doses every 12 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated per modified World Health Organization response criteria and safety was assessed continuously. Candidate biomarkers were evaluated in tumor biopsies collected pretreatment and 24 to 72 hours after the second ipilimumab dose. Polymorphisms in immune-related genes were also evaluated. Results Objective response rate, response patterns, and safety were consistent with previous trials of ipilimumab in melanoma. No associations between genetic polymorphisms and clinical activity were observed. Immunohistochemistry and histology on tumor biopsies revealed significant associations between clinical activity and high baseline expression of FoxP3 (p = 0.014 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (p = 0.012, and between clinical activity and increase in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs between baseline and 3 weeks after start of treatment (p = 0.005. Microarray analysis of mRNA from tumor samples taken pretreatment and post-treatment demonstrated significant increases in expression of several immune-related genes, and decreases in expression of genes implicated in cancer and melanoma. Conclusions Baseline expression of immune-related tumor biomarkers and a post-treatment increase in TILs may be positively associated with

  10. Randomized Phase II Trial of Gemcitabine Plus TH-302 Versus Gemcitabine in Patients With Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borad, Mitesh J; Reddy, Shantan G; Bahary, Nathan; Uronis, Hope E; Sigal, Darren; Cohn, Allen L; Schelman, William R; Stephenson, Joe; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Rosen, Peter J; Ulrich, Brian; Dragovich, Tomislav; Del Prete, Salvatore A; Rarick, Mark; Eng, Clarence; Kroll, Stew; Ryan, David P

    2015-05-01

    TH-302 is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that releases the DNA alkylator bromo-isophosphoramide mustard in hypoxic settings. This phase II study (NCT01144455) evaluated gemcitabine plus TH-302 in patients with previously untreated, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m(2)), gemcitabine plus TH-302 240 mg/m(2) (G+T240), or gemcitabine plus TH-302 340 mg/m(2) (G+T340). Randomized crossover after progression on gemcitabine was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), tumor response, CA 19-9 response, and safety. Two hundred fourteen patients (77% with metastatic disease) were enrolled between June 2010 and July 2011. PFS was significantly longer with gemcitabine plus TH-302 (pooled combination arms) compared with gemcitabine alone (median PFS, 5.6 v 3.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.87; P = .005; median PFS for metastatic disease, 5.1 v 3.4 months, respectively). Median PFS times for G+T240 and G+T340 were 5.6 and 6.0 months, respectively. Tumor response was 12%, 17%, and 26% in the gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 arms, respectively (G+T340 v gemcitabine, P = .04). CA 19-9 decrease was greater with G+T340 versus gemcitabine (-5,398 v -549 U/mL, respectively; P = .008). Median OS times for gemcitabine, G+T240, and G+T340 were 6.9, 8.7, and 9.2 months, respectively (P = not significant). The most common adverse events (AEs) were fatigue, nausea, and peripheral edema (frequencies similar across arms). Skin and mucosal toxicities (2% grade 3) and myelosuppression (55% grade 3 or 4) were the most common TH-302-related AEs but were not associated with treatment discontinuation. PFS, tumor response, and CA 19-9 response were significantly improved with G+TH-302. G+T340 is being investigated further in the phase III MAESTRO study (NCT01746979). © 2014 by American Society of

  11. A phase I study of dexosome immunotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valente Nancy

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a continued need to develop more effective cancer immunotherapy strategies. Exosomes, cell-derived lipid vesicles that express high levels of a narrow spectrum of cell proteins represent a novel platform for delivering high levels of antigen in conjunction with costimulatory molecules. We performed this study to test the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous dendritic cell (DC-derived exosomes (DEX loaded with the MAGE tumor antigens in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods This Phase I study enrolled HLA A2+ patients with pre-treated Stage IIIb (N = 4 and IV (N = 9 NSCLC with tumor expression of MAGE-A3 or A4. Patients underwent leukapheresis to generate DC from which DEX were produced and loaded with MAGE-A3, -A4, -A10, and MAGE-3DPO4 peptides. Patients received 4 doses of DEX at weekly intervals. Results Thirteen patients were enrolled and 9 completed therapy. Three formulations of DEX were evaluated; all were well tolerated with only grade 1–2 adverse events related to the use of DEX (injection site reactions (N = 8, flu like illness (N = 1, and peripheral arm pain (N = 1. The time from the first dose of DEX until disease progression was 30 to 429+ days. Three patients had disease progression before the first DEX dose. Survival of patients after the first DEX dose was 52–665+ days. DTH reactivity against MAGE peptides was detected in 3/9 patients. Immune responses were detected in patients as follows: MAGE-specific T cell responses in 1/3, increased NK lytic activity in 2/4. Conclusion Production of the DEX vaccine was feasible and DEX therapy was well tolerated in patients with advanced NSCLC. Some patients experienced long term stability of disease and activation of immune effectors

  12. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Mansky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L. extracts (mistletoe are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC evaluated: (1 safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD, (2 absolute neutrophil count (ANC recovery, (3 formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab, (4 cytokine plasma concentrations, (5 clinical response, and (6 pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistletoe and fixed GEM dose in stage I and increasing doses of GEM with a fixed dose of mistletoe in stage II. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT were grade (G 3 nonhematologic and G4 hematologic events; MTD was reached with 2 DLTs in one dosage level. Response in stage IV ASC was assessed with descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses examined clinical response/survival and ANC recovery. Results. DLTs were G4 neutropenia, G4 thrombocytopenia, G4 acute renal failure, and G3 cellulitis, attributed to mistletoe. GEM 1380 mg/m2 and mistletoe 250 mg combined were the MTD. Of 44 patients, 24 developed nonneutropenic fever and flu-like syndrome. GEM pharmacokinetics were unaffected by mistletoe. All patients developed ML3 IgG antibodies. ANC showed a trend to increase between baseline and cycle 2 in stage I dose escalation. 6% of patients showed partial response, 42% stable disease. Median survival was 200 days. Compliance with mistletoe injections was high. Conclusion. GEM plus mistletoe is well tolerated. No botanical/drug interactions were observed. Clinical response is similar to GEM alone.

  13. SARC009: Phase 2 study of dasatinib in patients with previously treated, high-grade, advanced sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Scott M; Wathen, J Kyle; Lucas, David R; Choy, Edwin; Samuels, Brian L; Staddon, Arthur P; Ganjoo, Kristen N; von Mehren, Margaret; Chow, Warren A; Loeb, David M; Tawbi, Hussein A; Rushing, Daniel A; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Thomas, Dafydd G; Chugh, Rashmi; Reinke, Denise K; Baker, Laurence H

    2016-03-15

    Dasatinib exhibited activity in preclinical models of sarcoma. The Sarcoma Alliance for Research through Collaboration (SARC) conducted a multicenter, phase 2 trial of dasatinib in patients with advanced sarcoma. Patients received dasatinib twice daily. The primary objective was to estimate the clinical benefit rate (CBR) (complete response or partial response within 6 months or stable disease duration of ≥6 months) with a target of ≥25%. Patients were enrolled into 1 of 7 different cohorts and assessed by imaging every 8 weeks using Choi criteria tumor response and a Bayesian hierarchical design. For each subtype, enrollment was stopped after a minimum of 9 patients were treated if there was a sarcoma (UPS) cohorts fully accrued and 6 of 47 and 8 of 42 evaluable patients, respectively, exhibited clinical benefit. The probability that the CBR was ≥25% in the LMS and UPS cohorts was 0.008 and 0.10, respectively. The median progression-free survival ranged from 0.9 months in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma to 2.2 months in patients with LMS. The median overall survival was 8.6 months. The most frequent adverse events were constitutional, gastrointestinal, and respiratory, and 36% of patients required dose reduction for toxicity. Serious adverse events attributed to therapy occurred in 11% of patients. Dasatinib may have activity in patients with UPS but is inactive as a single agent in the other sarcoma subtypes included herein. The Bayesian design allowed for the early termination of accrual in 5 subtypes because of lack of drug activity. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  14. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m 2 orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative ≥T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor ≤5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC

  15. Phase I dose escalation study of KOS-1584, a novel epothilone, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elaine T; Goel, Sanjay; Schaaf, Larry J; Cropp, Gillian F; Hannah, Alison L; Zhou, Yiqing; McCracken, Barbara; Haley, Brandi I; Johnson, Robert G; Mani, Sridhar; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A

    2012-02-01

    First-in-man study of KOS-1584, a second generation epothilone. Patients with advanced solid malignancies received KOS-1584 every 3 weeks until disease progression. Using a modified Fibonacci dose escalation scheme, one patient was enrolled at each dose level until the first instance of grade 2 toxicity. Thereafter, a standard 3 + 3 design was utilized. Sixty-six patients in 14 cohorts were dosed from 0.8 to 48 mg/m(2). Diarrhea, arthralgias, and encephalopathy were dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) at doses ≥36 mg/m(2). At the recommended phase II dose (RP2D), the most common adverse effects were peripheral neuropathy (low grade), fatigue, arthralgias/myalgias, and diarrhea (31, 6%). The incidence of neutropenia was low. The overall clearance, volume of distribution, and half-life of KOS-1584 were 11 ± 6.17 L/h/m(2), 327 ± 161 L/m(2), and 21.9 ± 8.75 h, respectively. The half-life for the seco-metabolite (KOS-1891) was 29.6 ± 13.8 h. KOS-1584 exhibited linear pharmacokinetics. A dose-dependent increase in microtubulin bundle formation was observed at doses ≥27 mg/m(2). Two patients achieved partial responses and 24 patients had stable disease (SD). The RP2D of KOS-1584 is 36 mg/m(2). The lack of severe neurologic toxicity, diarrhea, neutropenia, or hypersensitivity reactions; favorable pharmacokinetic profile; and early evidence of activity support further evaluation.

  16. Phase I biodistribution and pharmacokinetic study of Lewis Y targeting immunoconjugate CMD-193 in patients with advanced epithelial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbertson, R. A.; Lee, F. T.; Hopkins, W.; Smyth, F. E.; Murone, C.; Tebbutt, N. C.; Micallef, N.; MacFarlane, D. J.; Bellen, J.; Sonnichsen, D. S.; Brechbiel, M. W.; Scott, A. M.; Lee, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Background: The Lewis Y (Ley) antigen is a blood-group related antigen expressed in >70% of solid tumours. This study explored the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the immunoconjugate CMD-193 (humanized anti-Ley antibody conjugated with calichaemicin) in patients with advanced Ley expressing epithelial cancers. Methods: There were 2 dose cohorts, (1.0mg/m2 and 2.6mg/m2). Primary objectives were to determine biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of CMD-193. The first cycle was labelled with 111In for biodistribution assessment, and subsequent cycles were administered 3 weekly to a maximum of 6 cycles. Tumour targeting was assessed using SPECT imaging, and pharmacokinetic analysis was based on gamma counting (111In-CMD-193) and ELISA (CMD-193 protein). Results: Nine patients were enrolled, and received 1-6 treatment cycles. Biodistribution imaging demonstrated initial blood pooling, followed by markedly increased hepatic uptake by day 2 (which persisted to day 8), and fast blood clearance. This pattern was seen for all patients, with no significant tumour uptake visualised in any patient. The overall T 1 /2 of 111In-CMD-193 complex formation in blood. One patient had partial metabolic response on 18F-FDG-PET. No radiologic responses were observed. Conclusions: CMD-193 demonstrates rapid blood clearance and increased hepatic uptake compared to prior studies of the original non-conjugated antibody. This trial highlights the importance of biodistribution and pharmacodynamic assessment in early phase studies of new biologics in clinical development.

  17. Activity of megestrol acetate in postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer after nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor failure: a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bines, J; Dienstmann, R; Obadia, R M; Branco, L G P; Quintella, D C; Castro, T M; Camacho, P G; Soares, F A; Costa, M E F

    2014-04-01

    As novel treatments carry substantial price tags and are mostly cost-prohibitive in low- and middle-income countries, there is an urgent need to develop alternatives, such as off-patent drugs. Megestrol acetate (MA) has a longstanding history in the treatment of breast cancer, but recently it is being used less often due to the advent of newer agents. This two-stage phase II trial evaluated the antitumor activity and toxicity of MA in postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive advanced breast cancer who had experienced disease progression on a third-generation nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (NSAI). Eligible patients had metastatic breast cancer treated with a NSAI with at least 6-month progression-free survival (PFS), or relapse after ≥1 year on adjuvant NSAI. Patients received MA at a single daily oral dose of 160 mg. Primary end point was clinical benefit rate (CBR). Forty-eight patients were enrolled. The CBR was 40% [95% confidence interval (CI) 25% to 55%], and the median duration of clinical benefit was 10.0 (95% CI 8.0-14.2) months. The median PFS was 3.9 (95% CI 3.0-4.8) months. The most common grade 3 adverse events were anemia (2%), dyspnea (2%), fatigue (2%), musculoskeletal pain (4%), deep vein thrombosis (10%), and weight gain (2%). This is the first study to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of MA in postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive disease progressing on a NSAI. MA has demonstrated activity and acceptable tolerability in this setting, and therefore remains a reasonable treatment option in a cost-sensitive environment. These results also provide the background for further evaluation of progestins in the treatment of breast cancer. local trial number, related to the approval by the IRB: CEP 108/06.

  18. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval

  19. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  20. High Watts per Kilogram - Advanced Integration and Heat Management solar array technology (HaWK-AIHM ), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Small satellite architectures have become a desirable low cost alternative to larger heritage spacecraft for advanced scientific missions. Unfortunately, the...

  1. Alternative Green Technology for Power Generation Using Waste-Heat Energy And Advanced Thermoelectric Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is interested in advancing green technology research for achieving sustainable and environmentally friendly energy sources for both terrestrial and space...

  2. Alternative Green Technology for Power Generation Using Waste-Heat Energy And Advanced Thermoelectric Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is interested in advancing green technology research for achieving sustainable and environmentally friendly energy sources. Thermo-electric power generation...

  3. [Phase II clinical trial of two different modes of administration of the induction chemotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Ting; Jin, Feng; Wu, Weili; Long, Jinhua; Li, Yuanyuan; Gong, Xiuyun; Luo, Xiuling; Li, Zhuoling; He, Qianyong; Qu, Bo

    2015-09-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects, toxic side effects and influence on the immune function in patients treated with TPF [docetaxel (DOC) + cisplatin (DDP) + 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu)] induction chronochemotherapy and conventional chemotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal (NPC). Seventy patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated in our department at their first visit from April 2013 to December 2013. They were divided randomly into two groups: the chronochemotherapy group (38 patients) and conventional chemotherapy group (32 patients). All of the patients were treated with TPF regimen with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy in a 21-28-days/cycle. The chronochemotherapy group: DOC: 75 mg/m2, i. v. gtt, d1 (03: 30-04: 30); DDP: 75 mg/m2, 10 am-10 pm, c.i.v, d1-d5; 5-Fu: 750 mg·m(-2)·d(-1), 10 pm-10 am, c. i.v., d1-d5, both chemotherapies were administered by intravenous infusion using an automatic electric pump. The conventional chemotherapy group: Both DOC and DDP were administered intravenously at a dose of 75 mg/m2 on d1. 5-Fu was given at a dose of 750 mg/m2 for 24 hours from d1-d5 with continuous infusion in a total of 120 hours. In this procedure, prescribing the conventional intravenous infusion, intensity modulated radiation therapy was used after the induction chemotherapy. The prescribed nasopharyngeal lesion dose (GTVnx) was 69.96 Gy/33 fractions for the T1-T2 nasopharygeal cancer, while 73.92 Gy/33 fractions nasopharynx lesion dose (GTVnx) for the T3-T4 nasopharyngeal cancer. The planning target volume (PTV) of positive lymph node (PTVnd) dose was 69.96 Gy/33 fractions. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy: cisplatin 100 mg/m2, i. v. gtt. d1-d2, and there were two cycles in total and 21 days each cycle. Sixty-six patients were evaluable for the response assessment. There were 36 patients in the chronochemotherapy group and 30 patients in the conventional chemotherapy group. After the induction chemotherapy, no CR case was found in

  4. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved

  5. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esnaola, Nestor F. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O' Brien, Paul [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Camp, E. Ramsay [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Thomas, Melanie B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Cole, David J. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Montero, Alberto J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Orwat, Kelly P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  6. Avelumab, an anti-PD-L1 antibody, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer: a phase 1b JAVELIN Solid Tumor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirix, Luc Y; Takacs, Istvan; Jerusalem, Guy; Nikolinakos, Petros; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Forero-Torres, Andres; Boccia, Ralph; Lippman, Marc E; Somer, Robert; Smakal, Martin; Emens, Leisha A; Hrinczenko, Borys; Edenfield, William; Gurtler, Jayne; von Heydebreck, Anja; Grote, Hans Juergen; Chin, Kevin; Hamilton, Erika P

    2018-02-01

    Agents targeting programmed death receptor 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have shown antitumor activity in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The aim of this study was to assess the activity of avelumab, a PD-L1 inhibitor, in patients with MBC. In a phase 1 trial (JAVELIN Solid Tumor; NCT01772004), patients with MBC refractory to or progressing after standard-of-care therapy received avelumab intravenously 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Tumors were assessed every 6 weeks by RECIST v1.1. Adverse events (AEs) were graded by NCI-CTCAE v4.0. Membrane PD-L1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (Dako PD-L1 IHC 73-10 pharmDx). A total of 168 patients with MBC, including 58 patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), were treated with avelumab for 2-50 weeks and followed for 6-15 months. Patients were heavily pretreated with a median of three prior therapies for metastatic or locally advanced disease. Grade ≥ 3 treatment-related AEs occurred in 13.7% of patients, including two treatment-related deaths. The confirmed objective response rate (ORR) was 3.0% overall (one complete response and four partial responses) and 5.2% in patients with TNBC. A trend toward a higher ORR was seen in patients with PD-L1+ versus PD-L1- tumor-associated immune cells in the overall population (16.7% vs. 1.6%) and in the TNBC subgroup (22.2% vs. 2.6%). Avelumab showed an acceptable safety profile and clinical activity in a subset of patients with MBC. PD-L1 expression in tumor-associated immune cells may be associated with a higher probability of clinical response to avelumab in MBC.

  7. Randomized Phase II trial of paclitaxel plus valproic acid vs paclitaxel alone as second-line therapy for patients with advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushida S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sachio Fushida,1 Masahide Kaji,2 Katsunobu Oyama,1 Yasuo Hirono,3 Hideaki Nezuka,4 Toshiya Takeda,5 Tomoya Tsukada,1 Daisuke Fujimoto,3 Shigekazu Ohyama,6 Takashi Fujimura,7 Tetsuo Ohta1 On behalf of the Digestive Disease Support Organization (DDSO 1Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, 2Department of Surgery, Toyama Prefectural Central Hospital, Toyama, 3First Department of Surgery, Fukui University Hospital, Fukui, 4Department of Surgery, Yatsuo General Hospital, Toyama, 5Department of Surgery, Ishikawa Matto Central Hospital, Hakusan, 6Department of Surgery, Kanazawa Medical Center, Kanazawa, 7Toyama City Hospital, Toyama, Japan Abstract: The standard regimen of second-line chemotherapy for patients with unresectable gastric cancer has not been established. However, weekly paclitaxel (wPTX has become the preferable second-line chemotherapy in Japan. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors have been shown to have antiproliferative activity through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA, also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis, and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel in a mouse xenograft model of gastric cancer. wPTX plus VPA as a second-line chemotherapy is expected to improve survival in gastric cancer patients. A multicenter randomized Phase II study was conducted to compare the effects of wPTX plus VPA and wPTX alone. A total of 66 patients participated in this study. The primary end point of the study was overall survival, and secondary end points were progression-free survival, response rate, and assessment of peripheral neuropathy. Keywords: valproic acid, paclitaxel, second-line therapy, advanced gastric cancer 

  8. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefter, Tracey E., E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [Anschutz Cancer Pavilion, Aurora, CO (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian P. [University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (Canada); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  9. Accelerated radiation therapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx selected according to tumor cell kinetics--a phase II multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognoni, Paolo; Bignardi, Mario; Cazzaniga, L. Franco; Poli, A. Marisa; Richetti, Antonella; Bossi, Alberto; Rampello, Giuseppina; Barbera, Fernando; Soatti, Carlo; Bardelli, Donata; Giordano, Monica; Danova, Marco

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase II multicenter trial testing an accelerated regimen of radiotherapy in locally advanced and inoperable cancers of the head and neck, in patients selected on the basis of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine/DNA flow cytometry-derived tumor potential doubling time (T pot ). Methods and Materials: From September 1992 to September 1993, 23 patients consecutively diagnosed to have locally advanced, inoperable carcinomas of the oral cavity and the oropharynx, with T pot of ≤5 days, received an accelerated radiotherapy regimen (AF) based on a modification of the concomitant boost technique: 2 Gy/fraction once a day, delivered 5 days a week up to 26 Gy, followed by 2 Gy/fraction twice a day, with a 6-h interval, one of the two fractions being delivered as a concomitant boost to reduced fields, up to 66 Gy total dose (off-cord reduction at 46 Gy), shortening the overall treatment time to 4.5 weeks. A contemporary control group of 46 patients with T pot of >5 days or unknown was treated with conventional fractionation (CF): 2 Gy/fraction once a day, 5 days a week, up to 66 Gy in 6.5 weeks, with fields shrinkage after 46 Gy. Results: All patients completed the accelerated regimen according to protocol and in the prescribed overall treatment time. Immediate tolerance was fairly good: 65% of the patients in the AF group experienced Grade 3 mucositis vs. 45% in the CF group (p = n.s.). Symptoms related to mucosal reactions seemed to persist longer in AF than in CF patients. The crude proportion of mild (Grades 1 and 2) late effects on skin (p < 0.01) and salivary glands (p < 0.05) was higher in AF than in CF patients, although these reactions did not exceed the limits of tolerance. Three patients in the AF and 1 in the CF arm experienced a late Grade 4 bone complication. Actuarial estimates of severe (Grades 3 and 4) late complications showed a 2-year hazard of 33.3% in the AF arm and 49.7% in CF (p = NS). The actuarial 2-year local control rate of the AF patients was 49

  10. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefter, Tracey E.; Winter, Kathryn; Kwon, Janice S.; Stuhr, Kelly; Balaraj, Khalid; Yaremko, Brian P.; Small, William; Gaffney, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m 2 ) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade ≥4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade ≥3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6–31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22–80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment–related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  11. Prospective randomized phase II study of FOLFIRI versus FOLFOX7 in advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a Chinese Western Cooperative Gastrointestinal Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu; Wen, Feng; Zhou, Chengya; Qiu, Meng; Liu, Jiyan; Chen, Jing; Yi, Cheng; Li, Zhiping; Luo, Deyun; Xu, Feng; Cai, Xiaohong; Bi, Feng

    2017-11-17

    Until now, no standard chemotherapy has been widely accepted for advanced gastric cancer (GC). The current research aimed to compare folinic acid, fluorouracil with irinotecan (mFOLFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX7) as first-line treatments in patients with locally advanced GC in an open, randomized, phase II study. Previously untreated metastatic or recurrent GC patients with measurable disease received mFOLFIRI (arm A) or mFOLFOX7 (arm B) every 2 weeks. The defined second-line treatment was mFOLFOX7 for arm A and mFOLFIRI for arm B. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS), and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease control rate (DCR) and toxicity. The evaluable population consisted of 128 patients (54 in arm A; 74 in arm B). Median PFS of arm A was 2.9 months (m) (95% confidence interval, CI , 1.9 to 4.1 m) versus 4.1 m (95% CI , 3.2 to 4.8 m) for arm B ( p = 0.109). Median OS was 9.9 months (95% CI , 6.0 to 13.5 m) for arm A versus 12.0 m for arm B (95% CI , 10.3 to 13.7m; p = 0.431). DCRs for arm A and arm B were 59.3% and 66.3%, respectively ( p = 0.850). In subgroup analysis of the patients who completed both treatment lines per protocol, the median first-line PFS was 2.1 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7arm versus 8.0 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI arm ( p = 0.053), and the median second-line PFS values were 1.2 m versus 5.1 m ( p = 0.287). Total PFS and OS were 8.1m and 11.0 m for the mFOLFIRI/mFOLFOX7 group compared with 12.2m and 20.2 m for the mFOLFOX7/mFOLFIRI group ( p = 0.008, p = 0.030). Both regimens were well-tolerated with acceptable and manageable toxicities. Hence, there was no significant difference in the PFS or DCR. However, mFOLFOX7 followed by mFOLFIRI might have a better OS.

  12. Surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric determination of total aflatoxins from wheat samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction using modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafi, Mohammad Hanif; Allahyari, Mehdi; Pourghazi, Kamyar; Amoli-Diva, Mitra; Taherimaslak, Zohreh

    2015-07-01

    The extraction and preconcentration of total aflatoxins (including aflatoxin B1, B2, G1, and G2) using magnetic nanoparticles based solid phase extraction (MSPE) followed by surfactant-enhanced spectrofluorimetric detection was proposed. Ethylene glycol bis-mercaptoacetate modified silica coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles as an efficient antibody-free adsorbent was successfully applied to extract aflatoxins from wheat samples. High surface area and strong magnetization properties of magnetic nanoparticles were utilized to achieve high enrichment factor (97), and satisfactory recoveries (92-105%) using only 100 mg of the adsorbent. Furthermore, the fast separation time (less than 10 min) avoids many time-consuming cartridge loading or column-passing procedures accompany with the conventional SPE. In determination step, signal enhancement was performed by formation of Triton X-100 micelles around the analytes in 15% (v/v) acetonitrile-water which dramatically increase the sensitivity of the method. Main factors affecting the extraction efficiency and signal enhancement of the analytes including pH of sample solution, desorption conditions, extraction time, sample volume, adsorbent amount, surfactant concentration and volume and time of micelle formation were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide linear range of 0.1-50 ng mL-1 with low detection limit of 0.03 ng mL-1 were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction and preconcentration of aflatoxins in three commercially available wheat samples and the results were compared with the official AOAC method.

  13. Phase II study of neoadjuvant treatment with doxorubicin, docetaxel, and capecitabine (ATX) in locally advanced or inflammatory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Gumersindo Pérez; Shahi, Parham Khosravi; Ureña, Miguel Méndez; Pereira, Rosa Quiben; Plaza, María Isabel Palomero; Peron, Yann Izarzugaza; Val, Ricardo González Del; Carrión, Joaquín Belón; Cañón, Esperanza Pérez; Alfonso, Pilar García

    2010-07-01

    Pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative systemic chemotherapy (PSCh) is associated with better outcome in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). PSCh included: doxorubicin (A) 50 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1; docetaxel (T) 30 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1, 8 and 15; and capecitabine (X) 1,500 mg/m(2)/day p.o. on days 1-14, in a 4-week course repeated for up to four cycles (ATX), followed by surgery. The primary end point of this study was to evaluate the pCR rate. Secondary endpoints included clinical response rate, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and the toxicity profile. A total of 60 patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 49 years, and 63.3% of patients were hormone receptor positive. The median number of cycles of PSCh was four (95% CI: 3-4). Five patients (8.3%) achieved pCR in both breast and nodes, and 16.7% reached pCR only in nodes. The clinical response rate was 77% (27% complete response), but only 18% of the patients underwent conservative surgery. With a median follow-up of 20 months, 3-year DFS and OS were 76 and 90%, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity included neutropenia (74%), febrile neutropenia (9%), mucositis (12%), and diarrhea (12%). ATX every 28 days for four cycles is associated with a modest activity (low pCR rate) in the neoadjuvant setting of LABC.

  14. Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of Accelerated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Chris R., E-mail: christopher.kelsey@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Gu, Lin [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Dunphy, Frank R.; Ready, Neal E. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy (RT) given in an accelerated fashion with concurrent chemotherapy using intensity modulated RT. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced lung cancer (non-small cell and small cell) with good performance status and minimal weight loss received concurrent cisplatin and etoposide with RT. Intensity modulated RT with daily image guidance was used to facilitate esophageal avoidance and delivered using 6 fractions per week (twice daily on Fridays with a 6-hour interval). The dose was escalated from 58 Gy to a planned maximum dose of 74 Gy in 4 Gy increments in a standard 3 + 3 trial design. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as acute grade 3-5 nonhematologic toxicity attributed to RT. Results: A total of 24 patients were enrolled, filling all dose cohorts, all completing RT and chemotherapy as prescribed. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 1 patient at 58 Gy (grade 3 esophagitis) and 1 patient at 70 Gy (grade 3 esophageal fistula). Both patients with DLTs had large tumors (12 cm and 10 cm, respectively) adjacent to the esophagus. Three additional patients were enrolled at both dose cohorts without further DLT. In the final 74-Gy cohort, no DLTs were observed (0 of 6). Conclusions: Dose escalation and acceleration to 74 Gy with intensity modulated RT and concurrent chemotherapy was tolerable, with a low rate of grade ≥3 acute esophageal reactions.

  15. Determination of As(III) and total inorganic As in water samples using an on-line solid phase extraction and flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrist, Mirna, E-mail: msigrist@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Albertengo, Antonela; Beldomenico, Horacio [Laboratorio Central, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2654-Piso 6, (3000) Santa Fe (Argentina); Tudino, Mabel [Laboratorio de Analisis de Trazas, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-04-15

    A simple and robust on-line sequential injection system based on solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HGAAS) with a heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) was developed and optimized for the determination of As(III) in groundwater without any kind of sample pretreatment. The method was based on the selective retention of inorganic As(V) that was carried out by passing the filtered original sample through a cartridge containing a chloride-form strong anion exchanger. Thus the most toxic form, inorganic As(III), was determined fast and directly by AsH{sub 3} generation using 3.5 mol L{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution and 0.35% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4} in 0.025% NaOH as the reductant. Since the uptake of As(V) should be interfered by several anions of natural occurrence in waters, the effect of Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -} on retention was evaluated and discussed. The total soluble inorganic arsenic concentration was determined on aliquots of filtered samples acidified with concentrated HCl and pre-reduced with 5% KI-5% C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6} solution. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference between the total soluble inorganic arsenic and As(III) concentrations. Detection limits (LODs) of 0.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1} for As(III) and inorganic total As, respectively, were obtained for a 500 {mu}L sample volume. The obtained limits of detection allowed testing the water quality according to the national and international regulations. The analytical recovery for water samples spiked with As(III) ranged between 98% and 106%. The sampling throughput for As(III) determination was 60 samples h{sup -1}. The device for groundwater sampling was especially designed for the authors. Metallic components were avoided and the contact between the sample and the atmospheric oxygen was carried to a minimum. On-field arsenic species

  16. Determination of As(III) and total inorganic As in water samples using an on-line solid phase extraction and flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigrist, Mirna; Albertengo, Antonela; Beldomenico, Horacio; Tudino, Mabel

    2011-01-01

    A simple and robust on-line sequential injection system based on solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometer (FI-HGAAS) with a heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA) was developed and optimized for the determination of As(III) in groundwater without any kind of sample pretreatment. The method was based on the selective retention of inorganic As(V) that was carried out by passing the filtered original sample through a cartridge containing a chloride-form strong anion exchanger. Thus the most toxic form, inorganic As(III), was determined fast and directly by AsH 3 generation using 3.5 mol L -1 HCl as carrier solution and 0.35% (m/v) NaBH 4 in 0.025% NaOH as the reductant. Since the uptake of As(V) should be interfered by several anions of natural occurrence in waters, the effect of Cl - , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - , HPO 4 2- , HCO 3 - on retention was evaluated and discussed. The total soluble inorganic arsenic concentration was determined on aliquots of filtered samples acidified with concentrated HCl and pre-reduced with 5% KI-5% C 6 H 8 O 6 solution. The concentration of As(V) was calculated by difference between the total soluble inorganic arsenic and As(III) concentrations. Detection limits (LODs) of 0.5 μg L -1 and 0.6 μg L -1 for As(III) and inorganic total As, respectively, were obtained for a 500 μL sample volume. The obtained limits of detection allowed testing the water quality according to the national and international regulations. The analytical recovery for water samples spiked with As(III) ranged between 98% and 106%. The sampling throughput for As(III) determination was 60 samples h -1 . The device for groundwater sampling was especially designed for the authors. Metallic components were avoided and the contact between the sample and the atmospheric oxygen was carried to a minimum. On-field arsenic species separation was performed through the employ of a serial connection of membrane filters and

  17. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in advanced renal cell carcinoma. Results of a phase II-trial of somatostatine analogue therapy in patients with advanced RCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Goerges, R.; Stergar, H.; Bockisch, A.; Gauler, T.; Bauer, S.; Antoch, G.; Schuette, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with respect to potential therapy with somatostatin analogue (SST-A) and to assess the response rate under therapy with SST-A. Patients, methods: 16 patients with documented progression of histologically confirmed advanced RCC were included. Planar whole-body SRS was performed 4, 24 and 48h post i.v. injection of 175-200 MBq 111 In-pentetreoide. 5 and 25 h p.i. SPECT of thorax and abdomen were performed. Documentation of somatostatin receptor expression via SRS in > 50% of known tumour lesions was the criteria for treatment start with SST-A (Sandostatin LAR registered -Depot 30mg i.m. every four weeks). Results: in 9/16 of the patients SRS showed at least one metastasis with moderate (n = 5) or intense (n = 4) tracer uptake. Lesion-based SRS evaluation showed only 12.1% (20/165) of all metastases. Most false-negative lesions were located in the lungs. In too patients, the majority of the known metastases was SRS positive and these patients received SST-A therapy. The first radiographic evaluation after a two-month interval showed progressive disease in both patients. Conclusions: we conclude that SRS is of limited value in staging of advanced RCC. In our patients SST-A did not result in a growth control of RCC. Consequently, the use of SST-A in advanced RCC seems to be no relevant therapeutic option. (orig.)

  18. High-performance liquid chromatography - Ultraviolet method for the determination of total specific migration of nine ultraviolet absorbers in food simulants based on 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidine and organic phase anion exchange solid phase extraction to remove glyceride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianling; Xiao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Tong; Liu, Tingfei; Tao, Huaming; He, Jun

    2016-06-17

    The glyceride in oil food simulant usually causes serious interferences to target analytes and leads to failure of the normal function of the RP-HPLC column. In this work, a convenient HPLC-UV method for the determination of the total specific migration of nine ultraviolet (UV) absorbers in food simulants was developed based on 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine (TMG) and organic phase anion exchange (OPAE) SPE to efficiently remove glyceride in olive oil simulant. In contrast to the normal ion exchange carried out in an aqueous solution or aqueous phase environment, the OPAE SPE was performed in the organic phase environments, and the time-consuming and challenging extraction of the nine UV absorbers from vegetable oil with aqueous solution could be readily omitted. The method was proved to have good linearity (r≥0.99992), precision (intra-day RSD≤3.3%), and accuracy(91.0%≤recoveries≤107%); furthermore, the lower limit of quantifications (0.05-0.2mg/kg) in five types of food simulants(10% ethanol, 3% acetic acid, 20% ethanol, 50% ethanol and olive oil) was observed. The method was found to be well suited for quantitative determination of the total specific migration of the nine UV absorbers both in aqueous and vegetable oil simulant according to Commission Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011. Migration levels of the nine UV absorbers were determined in 31 plastic samples, and UV-24, UV-531, HHBP and UV-326 were frequently detected, especially in olive oil simulant for UV-326 in PE samples. In addition, the OPAE SPE procedure was also been applied to efficiently enrich or purify seven antioxidants in olive oil simulant. Results indicate that this procedure will have more extensive applications in the enriching or purification of the extremely weak acidic compounds with phenol hydroxyl group that are relatively stable in TMG n-hexane solution and that can be barely extracted from vegetable oil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Combining Advanced Turbulent Mixing and Combustion Models with Advanced Multi-Phase CFD Code to Simulate Detonation and Post-Detonation Bio-Agent Mixing and Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Prepared by: School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology 270 Ferst Dr Atlanta, GA 30332...METHOD- OLOGY 7 4.1 Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.1.1 Eulerian Gas Phase...from [3] and our simu- lation : our work is able to capture a non linear behaviour . . . . . . . . . . 59 5.44 Pressure profile from the blast wave

  20. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo, E-mail: gusviani@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Afonso, Sergio Luis [Clinical Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Tavares, Vivian [Head and Neck Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose [Radiation Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine of Marilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  1. Safety profile of avelumab in patients with advanced solid tumors: A pooled analysis of data from the phase 1 JAVELIN solid tumor and phase 2 JAVELIN Merkel 200 clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, K; Infante, JR; Taylor, MH; Patel, MR; Wong, DJ; Iannotti, N; Mehnert, JM; Loos, AH; Koch, H; Speit, I; Gulley, JL

    2018-01-01

    © 2018 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting the programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)/programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) checkpoint may cause adverse events (AEs) that are linked to the mechanism of action of this therapeutic class and unique from those observed with conventional chemotherapy. METHODS: Patients with advanced solid tumors who were enrolled in the phase 1 JAVELIN Solid Tumor (1650 patient...

  2. Tasimelteon for non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder in totally blind people (SET and RESET): two multicentre, randomised, double-masked, placebo-controlled phase 3 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, Steven W; Dressman, Marlene A; Licamele, Louis; Xiao, Changfu; Fisher, Dennis M; Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Hull, Joseph T; Torres, Rosarelis; Lavedan, Christian; Polymeropoulos, Mihael H

    2015-10-31

    Most totally blind people have non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder (non-24), a rare circadian rhythm disorder caused by an inability of light to reset their circadian pacemaker. In two consecutive placebo-controlled trials (SET and RESET), we assessed safety and efficacy (in terms of circadian entrainment and maintenance) of once-daily tasimelteon, a novel dual-melatonin receptor agonist. We undertook the placebo-controlled, randomised, double-masked trials in 27 US and six German clinical research centres and sleep centres. We screened totally blind adults (18-75 years of age), who were eligible for the randomisation phase of SET if they had a non-24-hour circadian period (τ) of 24·25 h or longer (95% CI greater than 24·0 and up to 24·9 h), as calculated from measurements of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythms. For SET, we used block randomisation to assign patients (1:1) to receive tasimelteon (20 mg) or placebo every 24 h at a fixed clock time 1 h before target bedtime for 26 weeks. Patients who entered the open-label group receiving tasimelteon in SET or who did not meet the SET inclusion criteria but did meet the RESET inclusion criteria were screened for RESET. A subset of the patients who entered the open-label group before the RESET study and who had eligible τ values were screened for RESET after completing the open-label treatment. In RESET, we withdrew tasimelteon in a randomised manner (1:1) in patients who responded (ie, entrained) after a tasimelteon run-in period. Entrainment was defined as having τ of 24·1 h or less and a 95% CI that included 24·0 h. In SET, the primary endpoint was the proportion of entrained patients, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. The planned step-down primary endpoint assessed the proportion of patients who had a clinical response (entrainment at month 1 or month 7 plus clinical improvement, measured by the Non-24 Clinical Response Scale). In RESET, the primary endpoint was the proportion of non

  3. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m 2 ), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m 2 ) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC

  4. Next Generation Advanced Binder Chemistries for High Performance, Environmetally DurableThermal Control Material Systems., Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative SBIR Phase I proposal will develop new binder systems through the systematic investigations to tailor required unique performance properties and...

  5. A sensitive method for determining total vanadium in water samples using colorimetric-solid-phase extraction-fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filik, Hayati; Yanaz, Zeynep

    2009-01-01

    A selective colorimetric-solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) method for the determination of total vanadium in water samples was developed. This method introduced a new variation of C-SPE. The colour reaction is based on the reaction of vanadium(V) ternary complex formed with 1-(2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphtol (PAN) in the presence hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). In this technique, the target analytes in samples are extracted onto solid matrix loaded with a colorimetric reagent and then quantified directly on the adsorbent surface by using a miniature fiber optic reflectance spectrometer. The measurements were carried out at a wavelength of 589.4 nm since it yielded the largest divergence different in reflectance spectra before and after reaction with the vanadium. The overall time required for the C-SPE procedure was ∼20 min. The amount of concentrated V is then determined in a few seconds by using miniature reflectance spectrometer. At the optimal conditions, a calibration curve was constructed, revealing a linear range of 0.05-0.52 mg L -1 and a detection limit as low as 0.01 mg L -1 while the RSD lower than 2.8%. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water samples (TMDA) were analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method was applied to the determination of vanadium in tap water, seawater samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-102%.

  6. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A as early-phase and prognostic indicators of acute radiation exposure in nonhuman primate total-body irradiation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossetrova, N.I., E-mail: ossetrova@afrri.usuhs.mil [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bldg. 42, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Sandgren, D.J.; Blakely, W.F. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bldg. 42, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Terrorist radiological attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation. In mass-casualty radiological incidents early medical-management requires triage tools for first-responders to quantitatively identify individuals exposed to life-threatening radiation doses and for early initiation (i.e., within one day after radiation exposure) of cytokine therapy for treatment of bone marrow acute radiation syndrome. Herein, we present results from 30 rhesus macaques total-body irradiated (TBI) to a broad dose range of 1-8.5 Gy with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays (0.55 Gy min{sup -1}) and demonstrate dose- and time-dependent changes in blood of C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CRP and SAA dose-response results are consistent with {approx}1 Gy and {approx}0.2 Gy thresholds for photon-exposure at 24 h after TBI, respectively. Highly significant elevations of CRP and SAA (p = 0.00017 and p = 0.0024, respectively) were found in animal plasma at 6 h after all TBI doses suggesting their potential use as early-phase biodosimeters. Results also show that the dynamics and content of CRP and SAA levels reflect the course and severity of the acute radiation sickness (ARS) and may function as prognostic indicators of ARS outcome. These results demonstrate proof-of-concept that these radiation-responsive proteins show promise as a complementary approach to conventional biodosimetry for early assessment of radiation exposures and may also contribute as diagnostic indices in the medical management of radiation accidents.

  7. A Phase I Study of Triapine® in Combination with Doxorubicin in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelman, William R.; Morgan-Meadows, Sherry; Marnocha, Rebecca; Lee, Fred; Eickhoff, Jens; Huang, Wei; Pomplun, Marcia; Jiang, Zhisheng; Alberti, Dona; Kolesar, Jill M.; Ivy, Percy; Wilding, George; Traynor, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of Triapine® administered in combination with doxorubicin. Study Design Patients were treated with doxorubicin intravenously (IV) on day 1 and Triapine® IV on days 1-4 of a 21-day cycle. The starting dose (level 1) was doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 and Triapine® 25 mg/m2. PK analysis was performed at various time-points before and after treatment. Results Twenty patients received a total of 49 courses of treatment on study. At dose level 2 (doxorubicin 60 mg/m2, Triapine® 45 mg/m2), 2 patients experienced DLTs (febrile neutropenia, grade 4 thrombocytopenia). An additional 3 patients were enrolled at dose level 1 without initial toxicity. Enrollment then resumed at dose level 2a with a decreased dose of doxorubicin (45 mg/m2) with Triapine® 45 mg/m2. The 2 patients enrolled on this level had 2 DLTs (diarrhea, CVA). Enrollment was planned to resume at dose level 1; however, the sixth patient enrolled to this cohort developed grade 5 heart failure (ejection fraction 20%, pretreatment EF 62%) after the second course. Thus, doxorubicin and Triapine® were reduced to 45 mg/m2 and 25 mg/m2, respectively (level 1a), prior to resuming enrollment at dose level 1, the MTD. The main drug-related toxicity was myelosuppression. Non-hematologic toxicities included mild-to-moderate fatigue, grade 3 diarrhea and grade 4 CVA. There was one treatment-related death due to heart failure. While no objective responses were observed, subjective evidence of clinical activity was observed in patients with refractory melanoma and prostate cancer. Conclusions Pretreated patients with advanced malignancies can tolerate the combination of Triapine® and doxorubicin at doses that achieve subjective clinical benefit with the main treatment-related toxicities being myelosuppression and fatigue. The MTD was determined to be doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 on day 1 and Triapine® 25 mg/m2 on

  8. Advanced ovarian cancer: phase III randomized study of sequential cisplatin-topotecan and carboplatin-paclitaxel vs carboplatin-paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, P; Vergote, I; Cervantes, A; Tu, D; Stuart, G; Zola, P; Poveda, A; Provencher, D; Katsaros, D; Ojeda, B; Ghatage, P; Grimshaw, R; Casado, A; Elit, L; Mendiola, C; Sugimoto, A; D'Hondt, V; Oza, A; Germa, J R; Roy, M; Brotto, L; Chen, D; Eisenhauer, E A

    2010-10-20

    Topotecan has single-agent activity in recurrent ovarian cancer. It was evaluated in a novel combination compared with standard frontline therapy. Women aged 75 years or younger with newly diagnosed stage IIB or greater ovarian cancer, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status of 1 or less, were stratified by type of primary surgery and residual disease, treatment center, and age; then randomly assigned to one of the two 21-day intravenous regimens. Patients in arm 1 (n = 409) were administered four cycles of cisplatin 50 mg/m(2) on day 1 and topotecan 0.75 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, then four cycles of paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) over 3 hours on day 1 followed by carboplatin (area under the curve = 5) on day 1. Patients in arm 2 (n = 410) were given paclitaxel plus carboplatin as in arm 1 for eight cycles. We compared progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival, and cancer antigen-125 normalization rates in the two treatment arms. A stratified log-rank test was used to assess the primary endpoint, PFS. All statistical tests were two-sided. A total of 819 patients were randomly assigned. At baseline, the median age of the patients was 57 years (range = 28-78); 81% had received debulking surgery, and of these, 55% had less than 1 cm residual disease; 66% of patients were stage III and 388 (47.4%) patients had measurable disease. After a median follow-up of 43 months, 650 patients had disease progression or died without documented progression and 406 had died. Patients in arm 1 had more hematological toxicity and hospitalizations than patients in arm 2; PFS was 14.6 months in arm 1 vs 16.2 months in arm 2 (hazard ratio = 1.10, 95% confidence interval = 0.94 to 1.28, P = .25). Among patients with elevated baseline cancer antigen-125, fewer in arm 1 than in arm 2 had levels return to normal by 3 months after random assignment (51.6% vs 63.3%, P = .007) Topotecan and cisplatin, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel, were more toxic than carboplatin and

  9. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, Vaneja; Omejc, Mirko; Ocvirk, Janja; Music, Maja; Bracko, Matej; Anderluh, Franc; Oblak, Irena; Edhemovic, Ibrahim; Brecelj, Erik; Kropivnik, Mateja

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day), starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG) were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR). 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male). Twelve patients (19.7%) had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1%) T3N1, 2 patients (3.3%) T2N2, 22 patients (36.1%) T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2%) T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11). Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%), proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5%) and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%). Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%), and 42 patients (70%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR) was recorded in 8 patients (13.3%) and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%). T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower

  10. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  11. Grid-Free LES 3D Vortex Method for the Simulation of Tubulent Flows Over Advanced Lifting Surfaces, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Turbulent flows associated with advanced aerodynamic designs represent a considerable challenge for accurate prediction. For example, the flow past low-speed wings...

  12. Algorithm Design and Validation for Adaptive Nonlinear Control Enhancement (ADVANCE) Technology Development for Resilient Flight Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI proposes to develop and test a framework referred to as the ADVANCE (Algorithm Design and Validation for Adaptive Nonlinear Control Enhancement), within which...

  13. Update of progress for Phase II of B&W`s advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, D.K. [Babcock & Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States); Madden, D.A.; Rodgers, L.W. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Over the past five years, advances in emission control techniques at reduced costs and auxiliary power requirements coupled with significant improvements in steam turbine and cycle design have significantly altered the governing criteria by which advanced technologies have been compared. With these advances, it is clear that pulverized coal technology will continue to be competitive in both cost and performance with other advanced technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) or first generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) technologies for at least the next decade. In the early 1990`s it appeared that if IGCC and PFBC could achieve costs comparable to conventional pulverized coal plants, their significantly reduced NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions would make them more attractive. A comparison of current emission control capabilities shows that all three technologies can already achieve similarly low emissions levels.

  14. ERCC1, toxicity and quality of life in advanced NSCLC patients randomized in a large multicentre phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2010-01-01

    Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, current evidence regarding the impact of ERCC1 on toxicity and quality of life (QOL) is limited.......Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, current evidence regarding the impact of ERCC1 on toxicity and quality of life (QOL) is limited....

  15. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler system. Phase II subsystem test design and plan - an addendum to the Phase II RD & T Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Shortly after the year 2000 it is expected that new generating plants will be needed to meet the growing demand for electricity and to replace the aging plants that are nearing the end of their useful service life. The plants of the future will need to be extremely clean, highly efficient and economical. Continuing concerns over acid rain, air toxics, global climate changes, ozone depletion and solid waste disposal are expected to further then regulations. In the late 1980`s it was commonly believed that coal-fired power plants of the future would incorporate either some form of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) or first generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBS) technologies. However, recent advances In emission control techniques at reduced costs and auxiliary power requirements coupled with significant improvements In steam turbine and cycle design have clearly indicated that pulverized coal technology can continue to be competitive In both cost and performance. In recognition of the competitive potential for advanced pulverized coal-fired systems with other emerging advanced coal-fired technologies, DOE`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) began a research and development initiative In late 1990 named, Combustion 2000, with the intention of preserving and expanding coal as a principal fuel In the Generation of electrical power. The project was designed for two stages of commercialization, the nearer-term Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) program, and for the future, the High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. B&W is participating In the LEBS program.

  16. Waste incineration models for operation optimization. Phase 1: Advanced measurement equipment for improved operation of waste fired plants; Affaldsforbraendingsmodeller til driftsoptimering. Fase 1: Avanceret maeleudstyr til forbedret drift af affaldsfyrede anlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-01

    This report describes results from the PSO projects ELTRA-5294 and ELTRA-5348: Waste incineration models for operation optimization. Phase 1, and Advanced measurement equipment for improved operation of waste fired plants. Phase 1. The two projects form the first step in a project course build on a long-term vision of a fully automatic system using a wide range of advanced measurement data, advanced dynamic models for prediction of operation and advanced regulation methods for optimization of the operation of waste incinerator plants. (BA)

  17. Phase I dose-finding study of sorafenib with FOLFOX4 as first-line treatment in patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yihebali; Yang, Jianliang; Yang, Sheng; Sun, Yongkun; Jia, Bo; Shi, Yuankai

    2015-06-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and efficacy of sorafenib in combination with FOLFOX4 (oxaliplatin/leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil) as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer, we performed a phase I dose-finding study in nine evaluable patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. According to modified Fibonacci method, the design of this study was to guide elevation of the sorafenib dosage to the next level (from 200 mg twice daily to 400 mg twice daily and then, if tolerated, 600 mg twice daily). If the patient achieved complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) after eight cycles of treatment, combination chemotherapy was scheduled to be discontinued and sorafenib monotherapy continued at the original dose until either disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. In sorafenib 200 mg twice daily group, DLT was observed in 1 of 6 patients, and in 400 mg twice daily group, it was observed in 2 of 3 patients. Seven of 9 (77.8%) evaluable patients achieved PR, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11.8 [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.9-14.7] months. Common adverse effects include hand-foot syndrome, leukopenia, neutropenia, anorexia, and nausea. Twice-daily dosing of sorafenib 200 mg in combination with FOLFOX4 was proven effective and safe for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer, and could be an appropriate dosage for subsequent phase II clinical studies.

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision: a Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; van Gijn, W; Muller, E W; Berglund, Å; van den Broek, C B M; Fokstuen, T; Gelderblom, H; Kapiteijn, E; Leer, J W H; Marijnen, C A M; Martijn, H; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, E; Nagtegaal, I D; Påhlman, L; Punt, C J A; Putter, H; Roodvoets, A G H; Rutten, H J T; Steup, W H; Glimelius, B; van de Velde, C J H

    2015-04-01

    The discussion on the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer patients treated according to current guidelines is still ongoing. A multicentre, randomized phase III trial, PROCTOR-SCRIPT, was conducted to compare adjuvant chemotherapy with observation for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision (TME). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial recruited patients from 52 hospitals. Patients with histologically proven stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned (1:1) to observation or adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME. Radiotherapy consisted of 5 × 5 Gy. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of 25 × 1.8-2 Gy combined with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU/LV (PROCTOR) or eight courses capecitabine (SCRIPT). Randomization was based on permuted blocks of six, stratified according to centre, residual tumour, time between last irradiation and surgery, and preoperative treatment. The primary end point was overall survival. Of 470 enrolled patients, 437 were eligible. The trial closed prematurely because of slow patient accrual. Patients were randomly assigned to observation (n = 221) or adjuvant chemotherapy (n = 216). After a median follow-up of 5.0 years, 5-year overall survival was 79.2% in the observation group and 80.4% in the chemotherapy group [hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.39; P = 0.73]. The HR for disease-free survival was 0.80 (95% CI 0.60-1.07; P = 0.13). Five-year cumulative incidence for locoregional recurrences was 7.8% in both groups. Five-year cumulative incidence for distant recurrences was 38.5% and 34.7%, respectively (P = 0.39). The PROCTOR-SCRIPT trial could not demonstrate a significant benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluoropyrimidine monotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy and TME on overall survival, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate. However, this trial did not complete

  19. ModelLab: A Cloud-Based Platform to Support Advanced Geospatial Modeling of Earth Observation Data, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to promote and facilitate broader use of NASA and other Earth observation data sources, the Phase I research focused on development of a cloud-based...

  20. Advanced Data Mining and Deployment for Integrated Vehicle Health Management and the Space Vehicle Lifecycle, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In a successful Phase 1 project for NASA SBIR topic A1.05, "Data Mining for Integrated Vehicle Health Management," Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) demonstrated...

  1. COUPLING STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE SUBSURFACE SIMULATION WITH ADVANCED USER INTERFACE AND PARALLEL VISUALIZATION: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardeman, B.; Swenson, D.; Finsterle, S.; Zhou, Q.

    2008-01-01

    This is a Phase I report on a project to significantly enhance existing subsurface simulation software using leadership-class computing resources, allowing researchers to solve problems with greater speed and accuracy. Subsurface computer simulation is used for monitoring the behavior of contaminants around nuclear waste disposal and storage areas, groundwater flow, environmental remediation, carbon sequestration, methane hydrate production, and geothermal energy reservoir analysis. The Phase I project was a collaborative effort between Thunderhead Engineering (project lead and developers of a commercial pre- and post-processor for the TOUGH2 simulator) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (developers of the TOUGH2 simulator for subsurface flow). The Phase I project successfully identified the technical approaches to be implemented in Phase II.

  2. SiC-SiC and C-SiC Honeycomb for Advanced Flight Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project builds upon the work done in Phase I with the development of a C-SiC CMC honeycomb material that was successfully tested for mechanical...

  3. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

  4. SAFETY AND ACTIVITY OF TEMSIROLIMUS AND BEVACIZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CARCINOMA PREVIOUSLY TREATED WITH TYROSINE KINASE INHIBITORS: A PHASE 2 CONSORTIUM STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, Jaime R.; Qin, Rui; Pitot, Henry; Picus, Joel; Liu, Glenn; Fitch, Tom; Maples, William J.; Flynn, Patrick J.; Fruth, Briant F.; Erlichman, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab or Temsirolimus regimens have clinical activity in the first line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). This phase I/II trial was conducted to determine the safety of combining both agents and its efficacy in RCC patients who progressed on at least one prior anti-VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (RTKI) agent. Methods In the phase I portion, eligible patients were treated with Temsirolimus (25 mg IV weekly) and escalating doses of IV Bevacizumab (level 1=5mg/kg; level 2=10 mg/kg) every other week. The primary endpoint for the phase II portion (RTKI resistant patients) was the 6-month progression free rate. Secondary endpoints were response rate, toxicity evaluation, PFS and OS. Results MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered in 12 phase I patients. Forty evaluable patients were treated with the phase II recommended dose (Temsirolimus 25 mg IV weekly and Bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV every two weeks). The 6-month progression free rate was 40% (16/40 pts). Median PFS was 5.9 (4-7.8) months, and median OS was 20.6 (11.5-23.7) months. Partial response/stable/progressive disease were seen in 23%/63%/14% of patients. Most common grade 3-4 AEs included fatigue (17.8%), hypertriglyceridemia (11.1%), stomatitis (8.9%), proteinuria (8.9%), abdominal pain (6.7%), and anemia (6.7%). Baseline levels of serum sFLT-1 and VEGF-A were inversely correlated with PFS and OS, respectively. Conclusions Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab is a feasible combination in patients with advanced RCC previously exposed to oral anti-VEGF agents. The safety and efficacy results warrant further confirmatory studies in this patient population. PMID:25556030

  5. Korea advanced liquid metal reactor development - Development of measuring techniques of the sodium two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moo Hwan; Cha, Jae Eun [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The technology which models and measures the behavior of bubble in liquid sodium is very important to insure the safety of the liquid metal reactor. In this research, we designed/ manufactured each part and loop of experimental facility for sodium two phase flow, and applied a few possible methods, measured characteristic of two phase flow such as bubbly flow. A air-water loop similar to sodium loop on each measuring condition was designed/manufactured. This air-water loop was utilized to acquire many informations which were necessary in designing the two phase flow of sodium and manufacturing experimental facility. Before the manufacture of a electromagnetic flow meter for sodium, the experiment using each electromagnetic flow mete was developed and the air-water loop was performed to understand flow characteristics. Experiments for observing the signal characteristics of flow were performed by flowing two phase mixture into the electromagnetic flow mete. From these experiments, the electromagnetic flow meter was designed and constructed by virtual electrode, its signal processing circuit and micro electro magnet. It was developed to be applicable to low conductivity fluid very successfully. By this experiment with the electromagnetic flow meter, we observed that the flow signal was very different according to void fraction in two phase flow and that probability density function which was made by statistical signal treatment is also different according to flow patterns. From this result, we confirmed that the electromagnetic flow meter could be used to understand the parameters of two phase flow of sodium. By this study, the experimental facility for two phase flow of sodium was constricted. Also the new electromagnetic flow meter was designed/manufactured, and experimental apparatus for two phase flow of air-water. Finally, this study will be a basic tool for measurement of two phase flow of sodium. As the fundamental technique for the applications of sodium at

  6. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuan-Hong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Jun-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); An, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Luo, Jie-Lin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Mu-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Pei-Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ding, Pei-Rong, E-mail: dingpr@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  7. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrandina, Gabriella, E-mail: gabriella.ferrandina@libero.it [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Antonietta [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Gallotta, Valerio [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Fagotti, Anna [Gynecologic Surgery, University of Perugia, Terni (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Autorino, Rosa [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Valentini, Vincenzo [Division of Radiotherapy, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  8. Atezolizumab in platinum-treated locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma: post-progression outcomes from the phase II IMvigor210 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necchi, A; Joseph, R W; Loriot, Y; Hoffman-Censits, J; Perez-Gracia, J L; Petrylak, D P; Derleth, C L; Tayama, D; Zhu, Q; Ding, B; Kaiser, C; Rosenberg, J E

    2017-12-01

    Conventional criteria for tumor progression may not fully reflect the clinical benefit of immunotherapy or appropriately guide treatment decisions. The phase II IMvigor210 study demonstrated the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab, a programmed death-ligand 1-directed antibody, in patients with platinum-treated locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Patients could continue atezolizumab beyond Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) v1.1 progression at the investigator's discretion: this analysis assessed post-progression outcomes in these patients. Patients were treated with atezolizumab 1200 mg i.v. every 3 weeks until loss of clinical benefit. Efficacy and safety outcomes in patients who experienced RECIST v1.1 progression and did, or did not, continue atezolizumab were analyzed descriptively. In total, 220 patients who experienced progression from the overall cohort (n = 310) were analyzed: 137 continued atezolizumab for ≥ 1 dose after progression, 19 received other systemic therapy, and 64 received no further systemic therapy. Compared with those who discontinued, patients continuing atezolizumab beyond progression were more likely to have had a baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 (43.1% versus 31.3%), less likely to have had baseline liver metastases (27.0% versus 41.0%), and more likely to have had an initial response to atezolizumab (responses in 11.7% versus 1.2%). Five patients (3.6%) continuing atezolizumab after progression had subsequent responses compared with baseline measurements. Median post-progression overall survival was 8.6 months