WorldWideScience

Sample records for total opal burial

  1. OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, David

    1991-01-01

    The kernel of the OPAL (Omni Purpose Apparatus for LEP) collaboration at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider came from the JADE (JApan, Deutschland, England) experiment at the lower energy PETRA electron positron collider at DESY, Hamburg. The name of a semi-precious stone is a reminder of the JADE tradition, while the spelled-out version conveys versatility

  2. OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David

    1991-06-15

    The kernel of the OPAL (Omni Purpose Apparatus for LEP) collaboration at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider came from the JADE (JApan, Deutschland, England) experiment at the lower energy PETRA electron positron collider at DESY, Hamburg. The name of a semi-precious stone is a reminder of the JADE tradition, while the spelled-out version conveys versatility.

  3. The Contribution of Opal-Associated Phosphorus to Bioavailable Phosphorus in Surface and Core Sediments in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanxin; He, Huijun; Yang, Shifeng; Liu, Yanli; Che, Hong; Li, Mujian; Zhang, Jing

    2018-06-01

    To improve the burial flux calculations of bioavailable phosphorus (P) and study opal-associated P (Opal-P) in the East China Sea (ECS), surface and core sediments were collected in the Changjiang Estuary (CE) and the south of the Cheju Island. In this study, sedimentary P was operationally divided into seven different forms using modified sedimentary extraction (SEDEX) technique: LSor-P (exchangeable or loosely sorbed P), Fe-P (easily reducible or reactive ferric Fe-bound P), CFA-P (authigenic carbonate fluorapatite and biogenic apatite and CaCO3-bound P), Detr-P (detrital apatite), Org-P (organic P), Opal-P and Ref-P (refractory P). The data revealed that the concentrations of the seven different P forms rank as Detr-P > CFA-P > Org-P > Ref-P > Opal-P > Fe-P > LSor-P in surface sediments and CFA-P > Detr-P > Org-P > Ref-P > Fe-P > Opal-P > LSor-P in core sediments. The distributions of the total phosphorus (TP), TIP, CFA-P, Detr-P are similar and decrease from the CE to the south of the Cheju Island. Meanwhile, Org-P and Opal-P exhibit different distribution trends; this may be affected by the grain size and TOM. The concentrations of potentially bioavailable P are 9.6-13.0 μmol g-1 and 10.0-13.6 μmol g-1, representing 61%-70% and 41%-64% of the TP in surface and core sediments, respectively. The concentrations of Opal-P are 0.6-2.3 μmol g-1 and 0.6-1.4 μmol g-1 in surface and core sediments, accounting for 5.3%-19.8% and 4.2%-10.6% of bioavailable P, respectively. The total burial fluxes of Opal-P and bioavailable P are 1.4×109 mol yr-1 and 1.1×1010 mol yr-1 in the ECS, respectively. Opal-P represents about 12.7% of potentially bioavailable P, which should be recognized when studying P cycling in marine ecosystems.

  4. Reviews and syntheses: Calculating the global contribution of coralline algae to total carbon burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, L. H.; Kamenos, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The ongoing increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is changing the global marine environment and is causing warming and acidification of the oceans. Reduction of CO2 to a sustainable level is required to avoid further marine change. Many studies investigate the potential of marine carbon sinks (e.g. seagrass) to mitigate anthropogenic emissions, however, information on storage by coralline algae and the beds they create is scant. Calcifying photosynthetic organisms, including coralline algae, can act as a CO2 sink via photosynthesis and CaCO3 dissolution and act as a CO2 source during respiration and CaCO3 production on short-term timescales. Long-term carbon storage potential might come from the accumulation of coralline algae deposits over geological timescales. Here, the carbon storage potential of coralline algae is assessed using meta-analysis of their global organic and inorganic carbon production and the processes involved in this metabolism. Net organic and inorganic production were estimated at 330 g C m-2 yr-1 and 900 g CaCO3 m-2 yr-1 respectively giving global organic/inorganic C production of 0.7/1.8 × 109 t C yr-1. Calcium carbonate production by free-living/crustose coralline algae (CCA) corresponded to a sediment accretion of 70/450 mm kyr-1. Using this potential carbon storage for coralline algae, the global production of free-living algae/CCA was 0.4/1.2 × 109 t C yr-1 suggesting a total potential carbon sink of 1.6 × 109 tonnes per year. Coralline algae therefore have production rates similar to mangroves, salt marshes and seagrasses representing an as yet unquantified but significant carbon store, however, further empirical investigations are needed to determine the dynamics and stability of that store.

  5. Elemental Characteristics of Australian Sedimentary Opals and their Implications for Opal Formation and Gemstone Fingerprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, A.; Landgrebe, T. C.; Rey, P. F.

    2011-12-01

    Opal consists of amorphous SiO2.nH2O comprising a network of silica spheres, which in precious opal are of similar size and form an ordered network allowing light to diffract into an array of colors. Common opal, which is often associated with precious opal, lacks this play of color as it is composed of silica spheres of variable sizes. Australia supplies over 95% of the world's precious opal. The opal is almost exclusively located within Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Great Artesian Basin, which experienced a major phase of uplift in the Late Cretaceous with subsequent erosion removing a package of sedimentary rock up to 3 km in thickness. Intense weathering resulted in extensive silicification at relatively shallow levels within the Tertiary regolith. However, despite a billion dollar industry and a well-constrained geological history of the basin, the formation of sedimentary opal and its uniqueness to the Australian continent are still very poorly understood. In this study we have used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) on precious and common opal from key opal mining areas in order to constrain the possible sources of silica fluids involved in opal genesis and to assess whether any major or trace elements could be used to determine the provenance of opal with respect to a particular mining area. A total of 123 spots, each comprising 59 elements, including rare earth elements were analyzed. Globally, volcanic and sedimentary opals can be distinguished on the basis of Ba and Ca concentrations. Although the opals from the Great Artesian Basin are all sedimentary, some show Ba concentrations consistent with volcanic opals suggesting that silica fluids from which they formed were derived from a volcanic province. The most likely source is the Cretaceous volcanic-plutonic province of central Queensland, which supplied vast amounts of volcanogenic material into the Great Artesian Basin. The weathering of feldspars from the

  6. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  7. DiSC-OPAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Pedersen, Rasmus; Iov, Florin

    2017-01-01

    of such systems. The simulation tool should be able to model Electrical Grid and flexible assets with different time scales and resolution levels fulfilling specific functionalities. In this paper DiSC-OPAL, an OPAL-RT compatible toolbox library for modelling of assets is presented. The library is suitable...

  8. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  9. OPAL detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    Half of the electromagnetic calorimeter of the OPAL detector is seen in this photo. This calorimeter consists of 4720 blocks of lead glass. It was used to detect and measure the energy of photons, electrons and positrons by absorbing them.

  10. OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 14 -1 2 Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses ( OPAL ) OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model...Fulton, Natalie Myers, Scott Tweddale, Dick Gebhart, Ryan Busby, Anne Dain-Owens, and Heidi Howard August 2014 OPAL team measuring above and...online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses ( OPAL ) ERDC/CERL TR-14-12

  11. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  12. Beads from Inhumation Rite Burials of Gnezdovo Burial Mound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrova Olga P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The beads from 33 inhumation burials at Gnezdovo burial mound are examined in the article. The beads (total 367 were crafted from stretched tube (258, stretched stick (3, winding (45, press molding (2 pcs., welding (2 pcs., and mosaic beads (9 pcs.. The burial mound contains virtually no broken beads, including the settlement's most common yellow glass beads. Besides glass beads, cornelian, crystal, amber and faience beads have been registered among the burial mound material, as well as beads crafted with metal. Apart from beads, grave inventories contained a series of pendants with a bead strung on a wire ring. The considered complexes contain five pendants of this type. Besides Gnezdovo, similar pendants have been discovered in Kiev, Timerev, Pskov and Vladimir barrows. A comparison between bead sets from Gnezdovo and Kiev burial mounds allows to conclude that the general composition and occurrence frequency of beads is identical for these burials. At the same time, beads crafted with rock crystal, cornelian and metal are more frequently discovered in Kiev inhumations.

  13. OPAL and More

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G

    2009-01-01

    We shall summarize some of the research activities performed in collaboration with Ben Shen in the OPAL experiment at LEP and in the CMS experiment at the LHC. And we shall recall the LEP legacy to particle physics in general and to the Standard Model in particular. Short recollections are made in other fields in which Ben was interested, in particular in Astroparticle Physics.

  14. OPAL Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/download.shtml ) for installation for Windows, Linux, and Apple OSX ( Macintosh Operating System ) computers. Make sure you choose the...training Uses OSX (Apple Macintosh ) Operating System X PDF Portable Document Format PET Potential Evapotranspiration RFMSS Range Facility...uses some of those extensions. For example, OPAL requires the NetLogo Geographic Information System (GIS) extension, which accom- modates the use of

  15. Model Mineralisasi Pembentukan Opal Banten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chusni Ansori

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v5i3.100Opal is a beautiful precious gemstone that is equal or more valuable than diamond. In Indonesia, precious opal is found at the Lebak Regency, Province of Banten. Banten’s opal widely has been recognized due to its beautiful opalescence. This paper is a review of the last research; preliminary study of Banten’s opal, characteristics of opal-CT and determining of opal type from geochemical data, added by new data to compile concept and to make mineralization model. In order to fulfill these targets, field geology research and analysis of mineralog/gemology, petrography, X-RD, and major and trace element geochemistry have been done. The Banten’s opal is opal-CT showing opalescence (play of colour, weathering, and leaching silica from volcanic glass by dark grey claystone hosted. Mineralization model is divided into three periods; at Early Pliocene volcanic clastic sediments rich in volcanic glass occured as fluvial sediments. Afterwards, at Late Pliocene - Pleistocene folding, weathering and leaching of silica took place. Intensive jointing, faulting, and folding quickened weathering and leaching processes to formed opal at limb of anticline through Holocene. The prospecting area of Banten’s opal is in tuff unit with intercalation of conglomerate or pumiceous breccia, at limb of anticline. The host rock of opal is dark grey claystone which underlies polimict conglomerate/pebbly sandstone sequence with cross stratification, imbricated, and erossional stucture; more than 8 m deep.

  16. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  17. Dismantling OPAL's cylindrical magnet core

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    Lifting a handling device for dismounting the pressure bells, which are inside the cylindrical magnet coil on the central section of OPAL, on the right part of the photo. OPAL was a detector on the LEP accelerator, which ran from 1989 to 2000.

  18. Biocompatibility of crystalline opal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortiz, Marlen; Acosta-Torres, Laura S; Hernández-Padrón, Genoveva; Mendieta, Alicia I; Bernal, Rodolfo; Cruz-Vázquez, Catalina; Castaño, Victor M

    2012-10-22

    Silica nanoparticles are being developed as a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications. For this reason, there are more studies about biocompatibility of silica with amorphous and crystalline structure. Except hydrated silica (opal), despite is presents directly and indirectly in humans. Two sizes of crystalline opal nanoparticles were investigated in this work under criteria of toxicology. In particular, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by opal nanoparticles (80 and 120 nm) were evaluated in cultured mouse cells via a set of bioassays, methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium-bromide (MTT) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). 3T3-NIH cells were incubated for 24 and 72 h in contact with nanocrystalline opal particles, not presented significant statistically difference in the results of cytotoxicity. Genotoxicity tests of crystalline opal nanoparticles were performed by the BrdU assay on the same cultured cells for 24 h incubation. The reduction of BrdU-incorporated cells indicates that nanocrystalline opal exposure did not caused unrepairable damage DNA. There is no relationship between that particles size and MTT reduction, as well as BrdU incorporation, such that the opal particles did not induce cytotoxic effect and genotoxicity in cultured mouse cells.

  19. Optoacoustic characterization of synthetic opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechri, C; Ruello, P; Mounier, D; Breteau, J M; Povey, I; Pemble, M; Romanov, S G; Gusev, V

    2007-01-01

    The development of laser-based ultrafast acoustic techniques allowed the investigation of the vibrations of nanostructures. In this communication, we report the results of the characterization of crystals composed of silica nanospheres (opals) by pump-probe setup. In our study, the excitation and detection of the vibrations of nanospheres by femtosecond laser pulses was facilitated by filling the pores in the opals by GaAs semiconducting material

  20. The OPAL vertex drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.R.; Elcombe, P.A.; Hill, J.C.; Roach, C.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Estabrooks, P.; Hemingway, R.; Karlen, D.; McPherson, A.; Pinfold, J.; Roney, J.M.; Routenburg, P.; Waterhouse, J.; Hargrove, C.K.; Klem, D.; Oakham, F.G.; Carter, A.A.; Jones, R.W.L.; Lasota, M.M.B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Pritchard, T.W.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A high precision vertex drift chamber has been installed in the OPAL experiment at LEP. The design of the chamber and the associated readout electronics is described. The performance of the system has been studied using cosmic ray muons and the results of these studies are presented. A space resolution of 50 μm in the drift direction is obtained using the OPAL central detector gas mixture at 4 bar. (orig.)

  1. Origin of opal-ct in lower eocene tallahatta formation, mississippi, usa and pleistocene barind clay formation in bangladesh: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, S.

    2008-01-01

    Opal-CT mineral in the lower Eocene Tallahatta formation in Mississippi. USA and the Pleistocene Barind clay formation in Bangladesh is of volcanogenic origin. X-ray diffraction patterns of claystones in the former indicated more ordered condition on the older sediments than those of the latter, which may be due to higher burial temperatures and longer time interval for transformation from volcanic ash to opal-CT of the former. Glass shards, present in the latter sediments, were not identified in the former, which may be due to transformation of glass shards of volcanic ash to opal-Cr over the time. (author)

  2. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  3. Superconductivity in Pb inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Lee, Sergey B.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2007-01-01

    Type-II superconducting behavior was observed in highly periodic three-dimensional lead inverse opal prepared by infiltration of melted Pb in blue (D = 160 nm), green (D = 220 nm) and red (D = 300 nm) opals and followed by the extraction of the SiO 2 spheres by chemical etching. The onset of a broad phase transition (ΔT = 0.3 K) was shifted from T c = 7.196 K for bulk Pb to T c = 7.325 K. The upper critical field H c2 (3150 Oe) measured from high-field hysteresis loops exceeds the critical field for bulk lead (803 Oe) fourfold. Two well resolved peaks observed in the hysteresis loops were ascribed to flux penetration into the cylindrical void space that can be found in inverse opal structure and into the periodic structure of Pb nanoparticles. The red inverse opal shows pronounced oscillations of magnetic moment in the mixed state at low temperatures, T 0.9T c has been observed for all of the samples studied. The magnetic field periodicity of resistivity modulation is in good agreement with the lattice parameter of the inverse opal structure. We attribute the failure to observe pronounced modulation in magneto-resistive measurement to difficulties in the precision orientation of the sample along the magnetic field

  4. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  5. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  6. The OPAL phase III microvertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, S.

    1997-01-01

    A description of the OPAL Phase III microvertex detector is given. Special emphasis is put on problems that have been encountered in the installation and operation of the different phases of the OPAL microvertex detector leading to the present Phase III detector and their cures. A short description of the new OPAL radiation monitoring and beam dump system is also given. (orig.)

  7. Array of lead-glass blocks from OPAL

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments at CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) which ran from 1989 - 2000. This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. In total, there were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter, made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP electron positron collisions.

  8. Classification of burial rituals of the cemeteries without burial mounds in regions of the Tsarevskoe ancient settlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedashkovsky Leonard F.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Article is dedicated to analysis of burial rituals of the Golden Horde cemeteries without burial mounds in surroundings of the Tsarevskoe ancient settlement. 51 burials (19.9% of total number in mausoleums or in crypts can be attributed as burials of the Golden Horde aristocracy. In the graves found without burial mounds the most wide-spread were of western, south-western and north-western (which could be considered as azimuth deviation from western orientations (they comprise 94.9% of all burials, which are peculiar to the majority of the urban Muslim population of the Golden Horde. However it must be considered that 56 from these burials (21.9% of total number are burials of necropolis of the population of Old Russian settlement of the Vodyanskoe site. Comparing the aristocratic (in mausoleums and crypts burials without burial mounds in the Lower Volga, it is possible conclude that their percentage was significantly higher in the region of the Tsarevskoe settlement, than in other regions; these data allow to assume here the greatest density of residence of settled elite of the Golden Horde. The smallest share of Muslim burials in coffins in the Lower Volga (44.9% and the maximal one of burials with grave goods (13.6% recorded in the region of the Tsarevskoe site. Burial grounds in the region of the Tsarevskoe ancient settlement were in vicinity of the settlements, that is clearly testified about the degree of territorial closeness of cemeteries of settled population of the Golden Horde with urban and rural settlements of the considered period.

  9. Dating fossil opal phytoliths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentfer, C.; Boyd, B.; Torrence, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Opal phytoliths are microscopic silica bodies formed by the precipitation of hydrated silica dioxide (SiO 2 nH 2 0) in, around and between cell walls. They are relatively resistant to degradation in most environments and thus, can occur in large quantities in palaeosediments. Consequently, they are valuable tools for environmental reconstruction. Furthermore, phytoliths are often the only recoverable organic material in well oxidised sediments, the occluded carbon provides the opportunity for dating sediment whose ages have previously been difficult to determine, and thus, increase the potential for fine resolution determination of environmental change. This poster describes the results of an investigation assessing the viability of AMS radiocarbon dating of fossil phytolith inclusions using samples from Garua Island, West New Britain, PNG. Thirteen phytolith samples, isolated from sediments previously dated using tephrastratigraphy and C14 dating of macroremains of nutshells and wood charcoal, were used in the analysis. As a control measure, thirteen parallel samples of microscopic charcoal were also dated using AMS. The results show that the AMS dates for the microscopic charcoal samples are consistent with ages anticipated from the other dating methods, for all but one sample. However, the dates for eight of the thirteen phytolith samples are considerably younger than expected. This bias could be explained by several factors, including downwashing of phytolith through soils, bioturbation, carbon exchange through the siliceous matrix of the phytolith bodies, and contamination from extraneous sources of modern carbon retained in the samples. Research is currently focusing on the investigation of these issues and selected samples are in the process of being retreated with strong oxidising agents to clear contaminants prior to re-dating. Further to this, a full investigation of one profile with a long sequence is underway. High concentrations of

  10. Shallow land burial handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    The facility development phases (preliminary analysis, site selection, facility design and construction, facility operation, and facility closure/post-closure) are systematically integrated into a logical plan for developing near surface disposal plans. The Shallow Land Burial Handbook provides initial guidance and concepts for understanding the magnitude and the complexity of developing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

  11. Burial No. 67 of the Keliysky Burial Ground (Ingushetia Highlands)

    OpenAIRE

    Narozhny Evgeniy I; Narozhny Vitaliy E.

    2012-01-01

    Martial burial No, 67 from excavations of Keliyskiy burial ground in Ingushetia highlands is introduced into scientific use. The grave goods contained in the burial are quite traditional: a knife, arrowheads, belt buckles dating from the Golden Horde epoch. An iron helmet with a visor is a find standing apart. Helmets of the kind are similar not only to those found in burial sites of Ingushetia, but also to the helmets discovered in the burials of the Golden Horde nomads, which makes it possi...

  12. Detector for magnetic monopoles at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinfold, J.L.; Kinoshita, K.; Lorazo, B.; Regimbald, M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe two indepent methods, employed in the OPAL experiment at LEP, for detection of magnetic monopoles and other highly ionizing particles. The first employs passive track-recording plastic detectors incorporated into the apparatus. The second utilizes thed dE/dX measurement capability of the OPAL JET chamber in association with a dedicated trigger. In addition, energetic particles carrying magnetic charge can be identified by the trajectory in the OPAL magnetic field. (orig.)

  13. Tin dioxide opals and inverted opals: near-ideal microstructures for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.W.J.; Yang, S.M.; Coombs, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Materials Chemistry Research Group; Chabanis, G.; Williams, D.E. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2001-10-02

    Periodic macroporous forms of nc-SnO{sub 2} have been synthesized by two methods, giving opals and inverse opals that can be used as structurally well-defined gas sensors, as demonstrated for CO gas, as well as for toluene and ethanol vapors. The inverse opals, in particular, seem to approximate ''ideal'' behavior. (orig.)

  14. Relationships between palaeogeography and opal occurrence in Australia: A data-mining approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, T. C. W.; Merdith, A.; Dutkiewicz, A.; Müller, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Age-coded multi-layered geological datasets are becoming increasingly prevalent with the surge in open-access geodata, yet there are few methodologies for extracting geological information and knowledge from these data. We present a novel methodology, based on the open-source GPlates software in which age-coded digital palaeogeographic maps are used to “data-mine” spatio-temporal patterns related to the occurrence of Australian opal. Our aim is to test the concept that only a particular sequence of depositional/erosional environments may lead to conditions suitable for the formation of gem quality sedimentary opal. Time-varying geographic environment properties are extracted from a digital palaeogeographic dataset of the eastern Australian Great Artesian Basin (GAB) at 1036 opal localities. We obtain a total of 52 independent ordinal sequences sampling 19 time slices from the Early Cretaceous to the present-day. We find that 95% of the known opal deposits are tied to only 27 sequences all comprising fluvial and shallow marine depositional sequences followed by a prolonged phase of erosion. We then map the total area of the GAB that matches these 27 opal-specific sequences, resulting in an opal-prospective region of only about 10% of the total area of the basin. The key patterns underlying this association involve only a small number of key environmental transitions. We demonstrate that these key associations are generally absent at arbitrary locations in the basin. This new methodology allows for the simplification of a complex time-varying geological dataset into a single map view, enabling straightforward application for opal exploration and for future co-assessment with other datasets/geological criteria. This approach may help unravel the poorly understood opal formation process using an empirical spatio-temporal data-mining methodology and readily available datasets to aid hypothesis testing.

  15. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  16. The OPAL muon barrel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, R.J.; Allison, J.; Ashton, P.; Bahan, G.A.; Baines, J.T.M.; Banks, J.N.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Beeston, C.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clowes, S.G.; Davies, O.W.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Hinde, P.S.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Lafferty, G.D.; Loebinger, F.K.; Macbeth, A.A.; McGowan, R.F.; Moss, M.W.; Murphy, P.G.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Dowd, A.J.P.; Pawley, S.J.; Phillips, P.D.; Richards, G.E.; Skillman, A.; Stephens, K.; Tresillian, N.J.; Wood, N.C.; Wyatt, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The barrel part of the OPAL muon detector consists of 110 drift chambers forming four layers outside the hadron absorber. Each chamber covers an area of 1.2 m by up to 10.4 m and has two cells with wires parallel to the beam and a drift distance of 297 mm. A detailed description of the design, construction, operation and performance of the sub-detector is given. The system has been operating successfully since the start of LEP in 1989. ((orig.))

  17. The Steksovo II burial ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martianov Vladimir N.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the results of many-years’ (1990-2010 excavations on the ancient Mordovian Steksovo II burial ground site. The burial ground had functioned in the 3rd to 13th centuries AD. The investigations revealed hundreds of burials, which enabled the researchers to judge upon the wealth of material items found and the variety of burial rites of the population that had formed the burial ground. The 1st millennium AD is characterized by bi-ritualism, while inhumation is characteristic of the 11-13th-century period; horses’ burials were also discovered. The data of the burial ground make it possible to modify the concept of the stages in ancient Mordovians ethnogenesis. It is generally attributed to the Erzya Mordvins, but in early burials the combination of the Erzya and Moksha ancientries is traced. Complexes of the items of crucial importance for the chronology of the burial are discussed in the article with a representation of statistical data characterizing funeral rites and traditions.

  18. The OPAL vertex detector prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roney, J.M.; Armitage, J.C.; Carnegie, R.K.; Giles, G.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; McPherson, A.C.; Pinfold, J.L.; Waterhouse, J.; Godfrey, L.; Hargrove, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The prototype test results of a high resolution charged particle tracking detector are reported. The detector is designed to measure vertex topologies of particles produced in the e + e - collisions of the OPAL experiment at LEP. The OPAL vertex detector is a 1 m long, 0.46 m diameter cylindrical drift chamber consisting of an axial and stereo layer each of which is divided into 36 jet cells. A prototype chamber containing four axial and two stereo cells was studied using a pion test beam at CERN. The studies examined the prototype under a variety of operating conditions. An r-Φ resolution of 60 μm was obtained when the chamber was operated with argon (50%)-ethane (50%) at 3.75 bar, and when CO 2 (80%)-isobutane (20%) at 2.5 bar was used a 25 μm resolution was achieved. A z measurement using end-to-end time difference has a resolution of 3.5 cm. The details of these prototype studies are discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  19. Opal instability: a relationship between water and microstructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauviré, Boris; Thomas, Paul; Rondeau, Benjamin; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-04-01

    Unlike other gem minerals, opals can suffer a change in their quality with time, resulting in a lack of confidence and hence marketability of this gemstone. The instability has been described and categorized into 2 main types (Aguilar et al., 2004; Aguilar-Reyes et al., 2005; Rondeau et al., 2011): cracking (development of a network of micro-fractures) and whitening (decrease of transparency). Available literature about opal instability, however, is restricted to its description. Although the process involved in the destabilization remains poorly understood, it has been proved, in at least one instance, to be associated with the release of water and a change of its speciation (Pearson, 1985; Paris et al, 2007). We propose 3 models to explain the cracking and/or whitening: (i) drying shrinkage of microstructural units, (ii) differential partial pressure between water enclosed in the opal and atmosphere and (iii) release of water yielding empty pores resulting in a strong light-scattering and hence opacity. In order to ascertain the model, a comprehensive set of opals from various origin and structure have been selected for investigation base on previous heating experiments which identified samples with a high susceptibility to crack or whiten. These samples will be investigated to identify the origins of the destabilization phenomena using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis (gravimetric (TG) and calorimetric (DSC)) and gas adsorption measurements. FTIR will allow the main species of water present in opals (molecular water and hydroxyl groups) and their proportion to be determined while TG will be used to accurately determine the total water content. Gas adsorption and thermoporosity (DSC) will be used to characterize the porosity (surface area, pore size and crystallizable water content). The characterization of water and microstructure for each opal may provide the potential link between the mobility of water in the microstructure and the observed

  20. Silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wenjiang, E-mail: wjli@zju.edu.cn [Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, State Key Laboratory for Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Joint Research Center of Photonics of the Royal Institute of Technology and Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Room 210, East Building 5, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Sun Tan [Center for Optical and Electromagnetic Research, State Key Laboratory for Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Joint Research Center of Photonics of the Royal Institute of Technology and Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, Room 210, East Building 5, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2009-07-15

    The silica artificial opal with a three-dimensional (3D) periodic structure was prepared using highly monodispersed silica microspheres by a force packing method in ITO glass cell. The silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles was fabricated by the electroplating technique. The optical microscope images of the synthetic sample and the corresponding optical properties were measured after each treatment of electroplating-washing-drying circle. The transmission and reflection spectra presented a red shift, showing that the effective refractive index of the complex silver/silica opal increased after each electroplating. Combining the SEM images, it was seen that the silver nanoparticles could be directly deposited on the surface of silica spheres in the opaline structure. The silver/silica complex opal film could provide a simple way to tune the opal properties by controlling silver nanoparticles in the silica opal. The silver/silica opal crystal structures could be used for nano-photonic circuits, white-light LEDs or as photocatalysts.

  1. Silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjiang; Sun Tan

    2009-01-01

    The silica artificial opal with a three-dimensional (3D) periodic structure was prepared using highly monodispersed silica microspheres by a force packing method in ITO glass cell. The silica artificial opal incorporated with silver nanoparticles was fabricated by the electroplating technique. The optical microscope images of the synthetic sample and the corresponding optical properties were measured after each treatment of electroplating-washing-drying circle. The transmission and reflection spectra presented a red shift, showing that the effective refractive index of the complex silver/silica opal increased after each electroplating. Combining the SEM images, it was seen that the silver nanoparticles could be directly deposited on the surface of silica spheres in the opaline structure. The silver/silica complex opal film could provide a simple way to tune the opal properties by controlling silver nanoparticles in the silica opal. The silver/silica opal crystal structures could be used for nano-photonic circuits, white-light LEDs or as photocatalysts.

  2. Millennial-scale variability in Holocene aquatic productivity from Burial Lake, Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenbinder, Matthew S.; Abbott, Mark B.; Stoner, Joseph S.; Ortiz, Joseph D.; Finney, Bruce P.; Dorfman, Jason M.; Stansell, Nathan D.

    2018-05-01

    Holocene records of lacustrine primary production are commonly used to reconstruct past changes in environmental and climatic conditions. While several methods exist to infer paleoproductivity trends, few studies to date have applied multiple geochemical indices in the same core sequence from Arctic lakes to evaluate their fidelity and sensitivity to specific climate variables over long (Holocene length) timescales. In this study, we evaluate sub-century to millennial-scale fluctuations in paleoproductivity over the Holocene using geochemical (biogenic opal and sedimentary chlorin) analyses of sediments from Burial Lake in the western Brooks Range, Alaska. Large fluctuations in opal and related proxies occur at millennial timescales over the last 10,000 years. We interpret the changes in opal to result from variability in diatom productivity, which is indirectly mediated by climate primarily through changes in the duration of the ice-free growing season and the availability of limiting nutrients at this oligotrophic, tundra lake. Comparison of the opal and sedimentary chlorin record, which is correlated with TOC, shows contrasting patterns on both short (century to multi-century) and relatively long (millennial) time scales. The concentration of opal far exceeds that of TOC and variations in sediment dry bulk density, driven by changes in the accumulation of opal, are likely responsible in part for the variations in sedimentary chlorin. Further, C/N ratio values indicate a mixed algal-terrestrial source of sedimentary organic matter. This result highlights the complexity in the climatic interpretation of sedimentary chlorin as an index of whole lake production, because the signal is prone to dilution/concentration from opal and also reflects a combination of aquatic and terrestrial production. Time series analysis of the productivity records indicates the presence of a significant ∼1500-yr oscillation in opal concentration, which has been found in North Atlantic

  3. Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

  4. OPAL experiment at LEP: P. Rapp progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.Y.; Glasser, R.G.; Kellogg, R.; Sechi-Zorn, B.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G.; Steinberg, P.; Zorn, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Excellent progress has been made on all major fronts in this complex collaboration. The magnet construction has begun. The central detector prototypes have been tested and give excellent results. All CERN Review Committee Conditions and milestones are being met in a timely fashion. Financial approval for all major parts of the detector have been obtained from the respective governments and institutions involved, although some financial problems remain when compared to the total requirements of the experiment. Commitments for the physical layout and assembly areas for the various parts of the detector have been obtained and a detailed timetable for construction and assembly have been provided. Some difficulties still remain with respect to the installation time scale. The software problems have been defined and are beginning to yield to the large and steady efforts being made on them. A third US Group, UC Riverside, lead by Prof. Ben Shen has been given conditional acceptance in the OPAL collaboration. In the following is presented (1) a hardware development progress report by Pat Rapp, (2) a detailed overview of the schedule for production and assembly of the OPAL hadron calorimeter, prepared by Gus Zorn, and (3) a status report by C.Y.Chang on Monte Carlo simulation of the BNL test beam hadron calorimeter results (reported last year) for insertion in the overall Hadron Milestone Report being prepared by the OPAL Hadron Calorimeter Group

  5. Photonic crystal waveguides in artificial opals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Kiyan, Roman; Neumeister, Andrei

    2008-01-01

    3D photonic crystals based on Si inverted-opals are numerically explored as hosts for effective air-channel waveguides, which can serve as parts of photonic circuits. Two basic shapes of straight waveguides are considered: cylindrical and a chain of spheres. Modelling shows that transmission...... is heavily dependent on the lattice position of the waveguide and its direction. Our experiments of defect inscription by 2-photon polymerization for the production of straight and bent waveguides in opal templates are reported....

  6. Ion-probe U–Pb dating of authigenic and detrital opal from Neogene-Quaternary alluvium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymark, Leonid; Paces, James B.

    2013-01-01

    planation and burial. Therefore, ages of the authigenic opal from basal alluvium indicate that the last movement on buried faults was older than about 6 Ma.

  7. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  8. Micromolding in inverted polymer opals (MIPO): synthesis of hexagonal mesoporous silica opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Sanming; Coombs, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., Ont. (Canada). Materials Chemistry Research Group

    2000-12-15

    Regular arrays of hexagonal mesoporous silica spheres are crucial for a number of applications, but until now control of the diameter, dispersity, and packing of the spheres has not proved possible. These authors report a new method-micromolding in inverted polymer opals-that allows the synthesis of such hexagonal mesoporous silica opals for the first time. (orig.)

  9. 78 FR 76574 - Burial Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ..., Congress' clear motivation was to make burial benefits ``easier to administer, i.e., through existing VA...'' means any action taken to honor the memory of a deceased individual. 38 CFR 38.600. 3.1701 Deceased...

  10. Quantum Effects in Inverse Opal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiweiss, Michael; Datta, Timir; Lungu, Anca; Yin, Ming; Iqbal, Zafar; Palm, Eric; Brandt, Bruce

    2002-03-01

    Properties of bismuth inverse opals and carbon opal replicas were studied. The bismuth nanostructures were fabricated by pressure infiltration into porous artificial opal, while the carbon opal replicas were created via CVD. These structures form a regular three-dimensional network in which the bismuth and carbon regions percolate in all directions between the close packed spheres of SiO_2. The sizes of the conducting regions are of the order of tens of nanometers. Static susceptibility of the bismuth inverse opal showed clear deHaas-vanAlphen oscillations. Transport measurements, including Hall, were done using standard ac four and six probe techniques in fields up to 17 T* and temperatures between 4.2 and 200 K. Observations of Shubnikov-deHaas oscillations in magnetoresistance, one-dimensional weak localization, quantum Hall and other effects will be discussed. *Performed at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) FSU, Tallahassee, FL. This work was partially supported by grants from DARPA-nanothermoelectrics, NASA-EPSCOR and the USC nanocenter.

  11. Superconductivity in Mesocrystalline Inverse Opal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungu, Anca; Bleiweiss, Michael; Saygi, Salih; Amirzadeh, Jafar; Datta, Timir

    2000-03-01

    Mesocrystalline inverse opal structures were fabricated by the electrodeposition of metallic lead in synthetic opals. In these structures, the superconducting regions percolate in all directions through the voids in the artificial opals and their size is comparable to the coherence length for bulk lead. The inverse lead opals were proven superconducting, with a transition temperature close to that of bulk lead (between 7.2 K and 7.36 K) and broad transition regions. The magnetic behavior of the inverse opals was very different from that of bulk lead. Due to the reduced dimensonality of the superconducting regions, not surprisingly, the magnetic properties of our samples were found to be similar to those of type II superconductors. The critical magnetic field (or the field at which T_copals was proven at least two times larger than that for bulk lead and (dT_c/dH) was observed 2.7 times smaller. We found a reversible ZFC-FC magnetic behavior in the temperature range between T* and T_c. We also performed magnetic relaxation measurements and studied the fluctuation diamagnetism above T_c.

  12. Inverse opal photonic crystal of chalcogenide glass by solution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, Tomas; Orava, Jiri; Sawada, Tsutomu; Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-15

    Chalcogenide opal and inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully fabricated by low-cost and low-temperature solution-based process, which is well developed in polymer films processing. Highly ordered silica colloidal crystal films were successfully infilled with nano-colloidal solution of the high refractive index As(30)S(70) chalcogenide glass by using spin-coating method. The silica/As-S opal film was etched in HF acid to dissolve the silica opal template and fabricate the inverse opal As-S photonic crystal. Both, the infilled silica/As-S opal film (Δn ~ 0.84 near λ=770 nm) and the inverse opal As-S photonic structure (Δn ~ 1.26 near λ=660 nm) had significantly enhanced reflectivity values and wider photonic bandgaps in comparison with the silica opal film template (Δn ~ 0.434 near λ=600 nm). The key aspects of opal film preparation by spin-coating of nano-colloidal chalcogenide glass solution are discussed. The solution fabricated "inorganic polymer" opal and the inverse opal structures exceed photonic properties of silica or any organic polymer opal film. The fabricated photonic structures are proposed for designing novel flexible colloidal crystal laser devices, photonic waveguides and chemical sensors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enzymatic Inverse Opal Hydrogel Particles for Biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Gu, Hongcheng; Chen, Zhuoyue; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Ze; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-04-19

    Enzymatic carriers have a demonstrated value for chemical reactions and industrial applications. Here, we present a novel kind of inverse opal hydrogel particles as the enzymatic carriers. The particles were negatively replicated from spherical colloidal crystal templates by using magnetic nanoparticles tagged acrylamide hydrogel. Thus, they were endowed with the features of monodispersity, small volume, complete penetrating structure, and controllable motion, which are all beneficial for improving the efficiency of biocatalysis. In addition, due to the ordered porous nanostructure, the inverse opal hydrogel particles were imparted with unique photonic band gaps (PBGs) and vivid structural colors for encoding varieties of immobilized enzymes and for constructing a multienzymes biocatalysis system. These features of the inverse opal hydrogel particles indicate that they are ideal enzymatic carriers for biocatalysis.

  14. Update on the opal opacity code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    Persisting discrepancies between theory and observation in a number of astrophysical properties has led to the conjecture that opacity databases may be inaccurate. The OPAL opacity code has been developed to address this question. The physical basis of OPAL removes several of the approximations present in past calculations. For example, it utilizes a much larger and more detailed set of atomic data than was used to construct the los Alamos Astrophysical Library. This data is generated online, in LS or intermediate coupling, from prefitted analytic effective potentials and is of similar quality as single configuration, relativistic, self-consistent-field calculations. The OPAL code has been used to calculate opacities for the solar core and for Cepheid variable stars. In both cases, significant increases in the opacity compared to the Los Alamos Astrophysical Library were found

  15. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  16. Opal shell structures: direct assembly versus inversion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tian-Song; Sharifi, Parvin; Marlow, Frank

    2013-09-16

    Opal shell structures can be fabricated in two ways: By direct assembly from hollow spheres (hs-opal) or by infiltration of precursors into opal templates and inversion. The resulting lattice disturbances were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy, and transmission spectra. The hs-opal system shows much lower disturbances, for example, a lower number of cracks and lattice deformations. The strong suppression of crack formation in one of these inverse opal structures can be considered as promising candidates for the fabrication of more perfect photonic crystals. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Synthetic opal as a template for nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul A.; Heales, Lindsey; Barber, Richard L.; Turney, Terence W.

    2001-04-01

    Synthetic opal has been used as a template for making 3D inverse opals of silica, titania and silicone rubber. The materials are mesoporous with connected pores and channels and have better opalescence than the opal templates they replace. Thin films of synthetic opal have been grown onto glass substrates by spin coating and these have also been used as templates for making thin films of inverse opal and as masks for depositing metal nanodots. This method produced hexagonally patterned 50 nm gold dots on a flat graphite substrate.

  18. Shallow land burial technology: humid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Applying engineered modifications to present shallow land burial (SLB) practices is one method of ensuring safe operation and improving overall disposal-site performance. Two such engineered modifications, trench lining and grouting, are being demonstrated and evaluated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Engineered Test Facility (ETF), using nine 28-m 3 experimental trenches containing compacted low-level waste (LLW). Concurrent to this field demonstration experiment, two finite-element hydrologic models have been developed to model water movement and solute transport at a waste disposal site. This paper covers progress made in these two areas during FY 1984. Though the economic analysis of the two trench treatments favored Hypalon lining (lining costs were 33% lower at this demonstration scale), results of field experiments examining waste hydrologic isolation favored the cement-bentonite grout treatment. Data from water pump-out and water pump-in tests, combined with observed intratrench water-level fluctuations, suggest that the original goal of constructing watertight liners in three experimental trenches was not achieved. In addition, trench-cover subsidence of approx. 2% of the total trench depth has been measured over two of the three lined trenches but has not occurred over any of the three grouted or three control (untreated) trenches. The evaluation of the two trench treatments is continuing. However, results indicate that the cement-bentonite treatment, implemented at a cost of $160/m 3 of grout, provides a degree of waste isolation not afforded by the lined and control trenches and should be considered for use at SLB sites with water-related problems. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  19. Photonic crystals based on opals and inverse opals: synthesis and structural features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimonsky, S O; Abramova, Vera V; Sinitskii, Alexander S; Tretyakov, Yuri D

    2011-01-01

    Methods of synthesis of photonic crystals based on opals and inverse opals are considered. Their structural features are discussed. Data on different types of structural defects and their influence on the optical properties of opaline materials are systematized. The possibilities of investigation of structural defects by optical spectroscopy, electron microscopy, microradian X-ray diffraction, laser diffraction and using an analysis of Kossel ring patterns are described. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  20. Photonic slab heterostructures based on opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Lidon, Elisa; Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Juarez, Beatriz H.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this paper the fabrication of photonic slab heterostructures based on artificial opals is presented. The innovated method combines high-quality thin-films growing of opals and silica infiltration by Chemical Vapor Deposition through a multi-step process. By varying structure parameters, such as lattice constant, sample thickness or refractive index, different heterostructures have been obtained. The optical study of these systems, carried out by reflectance and transmittance measurements, shows that the prepared samples are of high quality further confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The proposed novel method for sample preparation allows a high control of the involved structure parameters, giving the possibility of tunning their photonic behavior. Special attention in the optical response of these materials has been addressed to the study of planar defects embedded in opals, due to their importance in different photonic fields and future technological applications. Reflectance and transmission measurements show a sharp resonance due to localized states associated with the presence of planar defects. A detailed study of the defect mode position and its dependance on defect thickness and on the surrounding photonic crystal is presented as well as evidence showing the scalability of the problem. Finally, it is also concluded that the proposed method is cheap and versatile allowing the preparation of opal-based complex structures.

  1. OPAL jet chamber full-scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-12-01

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL was tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration, and readout are described. Operating experience was gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given.

  2. OPAL: selection and acquisition of LEP data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Du, P.

    1985-01-01

    The OPAL project (Omni Purpose aparatus for LEP) is presented. It will be a frame and an example to explain the main problems and limitations concerning the mode of event selection, acquisition and information transfer to the final registering system. A quick review of the different problems related to data selection and acquisition is made [fr

  3. Opal web services for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingyuan; Williams, Nadya; Clementi, Luca; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W

    2010-07-01

    Biomedical applications have become increasingly complex, and they often require large-scale high-performance computing resources with a large number of processors and memory. The complexity of application deployment and the advances in cluster, grid and cloud computing require new modes of support for biomedical research. Scientific Software as a Service (sSaaS) enables scalable and transparent access to biomedical applications through simple standards-based Web interfaces. Towards this end, we built a production web server (http://ws.nbcr.net) in August 2007 to support the bioinformatics application called MEME. The server has grown since to include docking analysis with AutoDock and AutoDock Vina, electrostatic calculations using PDB2PQR and APBS, and off-target analysis using SMAP. All the applications on the servers are powered by Opal, a toolkit that allows users to wrap scientific applications easily as web services without any modification to the scientific codes, by writing simple XML configuration files. Opal allows both web forms-based access and programmatic access of all our applications. The Opal toolkit currently supports SOAP-based Web service access to a number of popular applications from the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR) and affiliated collaborative and service projects. In addition, Opal's programmatic access capability allows our applications to be accessed through many workflow tools, including Vision, Kepler, Nimrod/K and VisTrails. From mid-August 2007 to the end of 2009, we have successfully executed 239,814 jobs. The number of successfully executed jobs more than doubled from 205 to 411 per day between 2008 and 2009. The Opal-enabled service model is useful for a wide range of applications. It provides for interoperation with other applications with Web Service interfaces, and allows application developers to focus on the scientific tool and workflow development. Web server availability: http://ws.nbcr.net.

  4. Electrochemical properties of opal-V6O13 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernardou, D.; Apostolopoulou, M.; Louloudakis, D.; Spanakis, E.; Katsarakis, N.; Koudoumas, E.; McGrath, J.; Pemble, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Opal-V 6 O 13 composites grown at 95 °C for 50 h. • The deposition period affects the void filling of the opals. • The electrochemical performance is correlated with the oxide’s characteristics. -- Abstract: Vanadium oxides were hydrothermally grown on opal glass substrates at 95 °C. The deposition period was observed to affect the structure of the oxides and the voids filling of the opal surfaces. V 6 O 13 grown on opal for 50 h presented satisfactory electrochemical performance and electrochromic response with a contrast ratio of 2. The specific capacitance of this composite reached a value of 192 F g −1 , which was stable up to 500 continuous charge intercalation/deintercalation scans. The importance of achieving crystalline V 6 O 13 and high opal surface coverage towards the enhancement of the electrochemical properties is presented

  5. Fabrication and optical characterization of gold-infiltrated silica opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenjiang; Sun Gang; Tang Fangqiong; Tam, W.Y.; Li Jensen; Chan, C T; Sheng Ping

    2005-01-01

    We report the fabrication of metal-infiltrated silica opals for optical studies. Highly mono-dispersed silica microspheres are fabricated and assembled by a force packing method to form opals with large domain sizes. The opals are then infiltrated with gold by an electroplating technique. The optical properties of the infiltrated opals in the visible range are studied and model calculations based on a multiple-scattering formalism are used to interpret the experimental results. The calculated position of the directional gap of the silica opal agrees very well with experimental observation. We found that the optical properties of the infiltrated sample can be explained using a model system in which the voids in the silica opal are partially filled with Au and the surface of the slab is covered with a thin layer of Au

  6. Textiles from Scythian burial complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fialko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Northern Black Sea steppes were excavated more than three thousand Scythian burial mounds. In the studied burials were discovered large quantities of artifacts, but leather and textile items are preserved only in a few cases. Some ideas about Scythian costume are found in the works of Greek authors. In this regard, extremely important is the funerary complex dated with the 4th century BC, discovered in barrow Vishnevaja Moghila (Zaporizhia region, Ukraine. In the crypt, which remained undisturbed over time, was found a burial of a Scythian girl. The unique condition of preservation of the textiles and leather findings allowed reconstructing the entire costume of the Scythian. It consisted of six layers of clothing. Various pieces of clothing were made from different materials: white linen cloth, orange satin fabric, reddish-brown fur, black cloth, fur, red skin. This discovery is one of a kind in the Northern Black Sea region, which is currently a reference example of female costume of early nomads of the region.

  7. High energy physics studies with the OPAL detector at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienes, B.; Horvath, D.; Palinkas, J.; Trocsanyi, Z.

    1998-01-01

    The OPAL calorimeter is operated by a collaboration of 34 institutes of 7 countries. The participation of the Hungarian team in the analysis work of two OPAL working groups is presented. So far the result of the group was exclusion of mass ranges for Higgs bosons and thus limiting the parameter space available for the various models. Multijet OPAL events are also analyzed in order to measure the strong coupling and test the symmetry structure of the underlying theory simultaneously. (K.A.)

  8. Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals based on artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kodama, T.; Nishimura, K.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2004-06-01

    We fabricated and experimentally investigated three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D MPCs) based on artificial opals. Opal samples with three-dimensional dielectric lattices were impregnated with different types of magnetic material. Magnetic and structural properties of 3D MPCs were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. We have shown that magnetic materials synthesized in voids of opal lattices and the composites obtained have typical magnetic properties.

  9. Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals based on artificial opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, A.V.; Kodama, T.; Nishimura, K.; Uchida, H.; Inoue, M.

    2004-01-01

    We fabricated and experimentally investigated three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (3D MPCs) based on artificial opals. Opal samples with three-dimensional dielectric lattices were impregnated with different types of magnetic material. Magnetic and structural properties of 3D MPCs were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. We have shown that magnetic materials synthesized in voids of opal lattices and the composites obtained have typical magnetic properties

  10. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, honey, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were evaluated to determine the relationship between trace elements content and opal colour. (author). 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  11. OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-12-01

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. Operating experience has been gathered since summer 1984. The chamber performance in terms of spatial resolution and particle identification capability is given.

  12. OPAL jet chamber full scale prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Hegerath, A; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstreom, R; Heuer, R D; Mazzone, L

    1986-05-22

    The concept of a jet chamber for the central detector of OPAL has been tested with a full scale prototype. The design of this prototype, its mechanical and electrical structure and its support system for high voltage, gas, laser calibration and readout are described. The operating experience gathered since the summer of 1984 and the chamber performance as measured by its spatial resolution and ability to identify particles are also given.

  13. Inverse Opal Scaffolds and Their Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Zhu, Chunlei; Xia, Younan

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional porous scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine by functioning as biomimetic substrates to manipulate cellular behaviors. While many techniques have been developed to fabricate porous scaffolds, most of them rely on stochastic processes that typically result in scaffolds with pores uncontrolled in terms of size, structure, and interconnectivity, greatly limiting their use in tissue regeneration. Inverse opal scaffolds, in contrast, possess uniform pores inheriting from the template comprised of a closely packed lattice of monodispersed microspheres. The key parameters of such scaffolds, including architecture, pore structure, porosity, and interconnectivity, can all be made uniform across the same sample and among different samples. In conjunction with a tight control over pore sizes, inverse opal scaffolds have found widespread use in biomedical applications. In this review, we provide a detailed discussion on this new class of advanced materials. After a brief introduction to their history and fabrication, we highlight the unique advantages of inverse opal scaffolds over their non-uniform counterparts. We then showcase their broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, followed by a summary and perspective on future directions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. About the burial of nuclear power plants, damaged or in the process of decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbrond, J.

    1994-01-01

    Some underground mining methods leave deep empty holes in the earth's surface behind them. In this paper it is described how to use such mining methods for the burial of damaged nuclear power plants and for the decommissioning by burial of nuclear reactors. The design of a new power plant should be integrated with that of an escapeway - an underground arrangement for burial. The described mining methods are block caving for catastrophy burial, and various stoping methods for planned burial and decommissioning. Blind shaft sinking by full face boring machines for burial and decommissioning of the reactor vessel is also described. All the described activities of mining and shaft sinking are well known. The total costs of burial by these methods are estimated using standard mining industry cost data. These include the costs for normal mine ventilation and groundwater control. However, the estimates of the cost and duration do not include the capital and operational costs of the pre- and post burial activities of ventilation and groundwater control related to the radioactivity. (author)

  15. Silicon Isotopes of Marine Pore Water: Tracking the Destiny of Marine Biogenic Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassarino, L.; Hendry, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Silicon isotopes (δ30Si) are a powerful tool for the studying of the past and present silicon cycles, which is closely linked to the carbon cycle. Siliceous phytoplankton, such as diatoms, as one of the major conveyors of carbon to marine sediments. δ30Si from fossil diatoms has been shown to represent past silicic acid (DSi) utilization in the photic zone, since the lighter isotope is preferentially incorporated in their skeleton, the frustule. This assumes that species in the sediments depict past blooms and that frustules are preserved in their initial state during burial. Here we present new silicon isotopes data of sea water and pore water of deep marine sediments from two contrasted environments, the Equatorial Atlantic and West Antarctic Peninsula. δ30Si and DSi concentration, of both sea water and pore water, are negatively correlated. Marine biogenic opal dissolution can be tracked using δ30Si signature of pore water as lighter signals and high DSi concentrations are associated with the biogenic silica. Our data enhances post depositional and diagenesis processes during burial with a clear highlight on the sediment water interface exchanges.

  16. Heavy and Excited Leptons in the OPAL Detector?

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This M.Sc. thesis describes a search for exotic leptons. The search has been performed using data from the OPAL detector at the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN. The total integrated luminosity was 663 pb$^{-1}$ with center of mass energies in the range of 183-209 GeV. The work has been concentrated on the study of production of heavy leptons via the charged current channel and disintegration of the $W$ into two quarks. In particular, single production of heavy leptons in the mass region 100-170 GeV has been extensively studied. No evidence for any new particles has been found. The results translate into upper limits on the mixing between the heavy and the ordinary lepton for different heavy lepton masses. The limits on the mixing angles are generally improved in comparison with the nominal value $\\zeta^2\\sim 0.005$.

  17. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1, followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1 and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC, lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  18. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  19. Software engineering experience from the LEP experiment OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaile, O.

    1990-01-01

    This contribution describes some of the activities within the OPAL collaboration at LEP to apply Software Engineering Techniques for program development and data documentation. It concentrates on two aspects: Structured Analysis Techniques and a data documentation system developed within OPAL. As far as evaluations are given they are the authors view and opinion

  20. Artificial Opals as Nanophotonic Materials for Optical Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Leyrer, R J; Wohlleben, W

    2007-01-01

    We report on advances in the fabrication of thick and homogeneous polymer opals films with bead sizes up to 600 nm; photo-ablation and point and line defect inscription with femtosecond laser pulses; analysis of the influence of imperfections on opal transmission-reflection properties and numerical...

  1. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs

  2. Barium titanate inverted opals-synthesis, characterization, and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soten, I.; Miguez, H.; Yang, S.M.; Petrov, S.; Coombs, N.; Tetreault, N.; Ozin, G.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Matsuura, N.; Ruda, H.E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

    2002-01-01

    The engineering of cubic or tetragonal polymorphs of nanocrystalline barium titanate inverted opals has been achieved by thermally induced transformations. Optical characterization demonstrated photonic crystal behavior of the opals. The tuning of the ferroelectric-paraelectric transition around the Curie temperature is shown in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Trace elements in coloured opals using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McOrist, G D; Smallwood, A [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is a technique particularly suited to analysing opals since it is non-destructive and the silica matrix of opals is not prone to significant activation. It was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 50 samples of orange, yellow, green, blue and pink opals as well as 18 samples of colourless opals taken from a number of recognised fields in Australia, Peru, Mexico and USA. The results were then evaluated to determine if a relationship existed between trace element content and opal colour. The mean concentration of most of the elements found in orange, yellow and colourless opals were similar with few exceptions. This indicated that, for these samples, colour is not related to the trace elements present. However, the trace element profile of the green, pink and blue opals was found to be significantly different with each colour having a much higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with all other opals analysed. 7 refs.

  4. Trace elements in Australian opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Fardy, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 42 samples of black, grey and white opals taken from a number of recognised Australian field. The results were evaluated to determine if a relationship exited between trace element content and opal colour. (author) 12 refs.; 12 figs.; 3 tabs

  5. Modified spontaneous emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Petr; Valenta, Jan; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Mafouana, Rodrigue R.; Linnros, Jan; Elliman, Robert G.

    2007-10-01

    Si nanocrystals (NCs) were embedded in synthetic silica opals by means of Si-ion implantation or opal impregnation with porous-Si suspensions. In both types of sample photoluminescence (PL) is strongly Bragg-reflection attenuated (up to 75%) at the frequency of the opal stop-band in a direction perpendicular to the (1 1 1) face of the perfect hcp opal structure. Time-resolved PL shows a rich distribution of decay rates, which contains both shorter and longer decay components compared with the ordinary stretched exponential decay of Si NCs. This effect reflects changes in the spontaneous emission rate of Si NCs due to variations in the local density of states of real opal containing defects.

  6. Three-dimensional Bragg diffraction in growth-disordered opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A.; Kosobukin, Vladimir A.; Limonov, M. F.; Samusev, K. B.; Usvyat, D. E.

    2003-06-01

    After artificial opals as well as opal-based infilled and inverted composites are considered to be promising representatives of photonic crystal materials. Earlier, photonic stop gaps in opals were studied mainly in transmission or specular reflection geometries corresponding to "one-dimensional" Bragg diffraction. On the contrary, this work was aimed at observing the typical patterns of optical Bragg diffraction in which phenomenon opal crystal structure acts as a three-dimensional diffraction grating. Although our experiments were performed for artificial opals possessing unavoidable imperfections a well-pronounced diffraction peaks were observed characteristic of a crystal structure. Each of the diffraction maxima reveals a photonic stop gap in the specified direction, while the spectral width of the peak is a measure of the photonic stop gap width.

  7. Modified spontaneous emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in artificial opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janda, Petr; Valenta, Jan; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Mafouana, Rodrigue R; Linnros, Jan; Elliman, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    Si nanocrystals (NCs) were embedded in synthetic silica opals by means of Si-ion implantation or opal impregnation with porous-Si suspensions. In both types of sample photoluminescence (PL) is strongly Bragg-reflection attenuated (up to 75%) at the frequency of the opal stop-band in a direction perpendicular to the (1 1 1) face of the perfect hcp opal structure. Time-resolved PL shows a rich distribution of decay rates, which contains both shorter and longer decay components compared with the ordinary stretched exponential decay of Si NCs. This effect reflects changes in the spontaneous emission rate of Si NCs due to variations in the local density of states of real opal containing defects

  8. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  9. Modified spontaneous emission of silicon nanocrystals embedded in artificial opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janda, Petr [Department of Chemical Physics and Optics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Valenta, Jan [Department of Chemical Physics and Optics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Rehspringer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, GMI et GONLO, UMR46 CNRS-ULP-ECPM, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Mafouana, Rodrigue R [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg, GMI et GONLO, UMR46 CNRS-ULP-ECPM, 23, rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Linnros, Jan [Laboratory of Material and Semiconductor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 21 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden); Elliman, Robert G [Electronic Materials Engineering Department, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2007-10-07

    Si nanocrystals (NCs) were embedded in synthetic silica opals by means of Si-ion implantation or opal impregnation with porous-Si suspensions. In both types of sample photoluminescence (PL) is strongly Bragg-reflection attenuated (up to 75%) at the frequency of the opal stop-band in a direction perpendicular to the (1 1 1) face of the perfect hcp opal structure. Time-resolved PL shows a rich distribution of decay rates, which contains both shorter and longer decay components compared with the ordinary stretched exponential decay of Si NCs. This effect reflects changes in the spontaneous emission rate of Si NCs due to variations in the local density of states of real opal containing defects.

  10. Three-dimensional metallic opals fabricated by double templating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Qingfeng; Nukala, Pavan; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Wong, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report a simple and cost-effective double templating method for fabricating large-area three-dimensional metallic photonic crystals of controlled thickness. A self-assembled polystyrene opal was used as the first template to fabricate a silica inverse opal on a gold-coated glass substrate via sol-gel processing. Gold was subsequently infiltrated to the pores of the silica inverse opal using electrochemical deposition. A high-quality three-dimensional gold photonic crystal was obtained after removal of the secondary template (silica inverse opal). The effects of template sphere size and deposition current density on the gold growth rate, and the resulting morphology and growth mechanism of the gold opal, were investigated.

  11. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  12. OPAL - portrait of another LEP experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-11-01

    OPAL's design features a central detector consisting of a slim vertex detector wrapped around the beam pipe and the main jet chamber for recording particle tracks and measuring particle momenta. This will pin down the position, angle and momentum of charged particles using true three-dimensional space coordinates, together with the energy loss (for particle identification). The central detector will be surrounded by a solenoid, of conventional type for initial operations, but the plan is to replace this by a stronger superconducting coil after several years of operation. Outside the magnet will be the calorimetry for measuring the deposition of electromagnetic and hadronic energy, and finally the outer muon chambers.

  13. Measurement of parton shower observables with OPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of QCD coherence is presented based on a sample of about 397,000 e+e- hadronic annihilation events collected at √s = 91 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The study is based on four recently proposed observables that are sensitive to coherence effects in the perturbative regime. The measurement of these observables is presented, along with a comparison with the predictions of different parton shower models. The models include both conventional parton shower models and dipole antenna models. Different ordering variables are used to investigate their influence on the predictions.

  14. Shallow-land-burial handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Davis, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The initial draft of the Shallow-Land Burial Handbook has been prepared and submitted to the DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program for review and comment. The Handbook informs the reader of the current way in which low-level wastes are being handled, outlines the legal and institutional problems that would be involved in developing and licensing such a facility, and describes in some detail the considerations and data needs for siting, designing, operating, and closing such a facility. The initial draft is not a Handbook that provides answers to all questions, nor insures that following the steps detailed in the Handbook guarantees that the facility will be licensed. It does illustrate the types of actions that must be considered and the types of information required to achieve successful operations

  15. The Bahrain Burial Mound Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Steffen; Johansen, Kasper Lambert

    2007-01-01

    the majority of burial mounds have been removed to make way for roads and housing, and in this process about 8000 mounds have been excavated; of these only c. 265 have been published. In 2006 the Bahrain Directorate for Culture & National Heritage and Moesgaard Museum decided on a collaborative project...... process of linking relevant information to the mounds have been initiated in the course of which excavation data of individual monument is being fed into a relational database. Our preliminary study of the digital maps of the mound cemeteries has revealed an abundance of interesting patterns...... that immediately gave rise to puzzling new questions that will direct the future explorations of the project. Of particular interest is a distinctive new type of elite monuments situated to the south of the so-called Royal Mounds in the centre of the island. The newly discovered type of mounds apparently reflect...

  16. Optical properties of opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eradat-Oskouei, Nayer

    2001-10-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) are a class of artificial structures with a periodic dielectric function in one, two, or three dimensions, in which the propagation of electromagnetic waves within a certain frequency band is forbidden. This forbidden frequency band has been dubbed photonic band gap (PBG). The position, width, depth, and shape of the PBG strongly depend on the periodicity, symmetry properties, dielectric constant contrast, and internal lattice structure of the unit cell. There is a common belief that PCs will perform many functions with light that ordinary crystals do with electrons. At the same time, PCs are of great promise to become a laboratory for testing fundamental processes involving interactions of radiation with matter in novel conditions. We have studied the optical properties of opal PCs that are infiltrated with metals, laser dyes, π-conjugated polymers, and J-aggregates. Opals are self-assembled structures of silica (SiO2) spheres mostly packed in a face centered cubic (fcc) lattice. Our research is summarized in the following six chapters. Chapter 1 is a review on the concepts related to PBG and PC, eigenvalue problem of electromagnetism, material systems that exhibit PBG. Chapter 2 covers all the fabrication and measurement techniques including angle resolved reflectivity, transmission, photoluminescence, photo-induced absorption, and coherent backscattering. Chapter 3 focuses on the relationship between a polaritonic gap and a photonic stop-band when they resonantly coexist in the same structure. Infiltration of opal with polarizable molecules combines the polaritonic and Bragg diffractive effects. The experimental results on reflectivity and its dependence on the impinging angle and concentration of the polarizable medium are in agreement with the theoretical calculations. In Chapter 4, the optical studies of three-dimensional metallic mesh composites are reported. Photonic and electronic properties of these PCs strongly depend on their

  17. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki J Hendrick

    Full Text Available The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura, the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus, showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa. With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally

  18. Fabrication and structural studies of opal-III nitride nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. Yu; Golubev, V. G.; Kartenko, N. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Pevtsov, A. B.; Sharenkova, N. V.; Brogueira, P.; Schwarz, R.

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, regular three-dimensional systems of GaN, InN and InGaN nanoclusters have been fabricated for the first time in a void sublattice of artificial opal. The opal consisted of 220 nm diameter close packed amorphous silica spheres and had a regular sublattice of voids accessible to filling by other substances. GaN, InN and InGaN were synthesized directly in the opal voids from precursors such as metal salts and nitrogen hydrides. The composites' structures have been characterized using x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical measurements.

  19. Fast track trigger processor for the OPAL detector at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Ward, D R; Heuer, R D; Jaroslawski, S; Wagner, A

    1986-09-20

    A fast hardware track trigger processor being built for the OPAL experiment is described. The processor will analyse data from the central drift chambers of OPAL to determine whether any tracks come from the interaction region, and thereby eliminate background events. The processor will find tracks over a large angular range, vertical strokecos thetavertical stroke < or approx. 0.95. The design of the processor is described, together with a brief account of its hardware implementation for OPAL. The results of feasibility studies are also presented.

  20. Inverted opal luminescent Ce-doped silica glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scotti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted opal Ce-doped silica glasses (Ce : Si molar ratio 1 ⋅ 10−3 were prepared by a sol-gel method using opals of latex microspheres as templates. The rare earth is homogeneously dispersed in silica host matrix, as evidenced by the absence of segregated CeO2, instead present in monolithic Ce-doped SG with the same cerium content. This suggests that the nanometric dimensions of bridges and junctions of the host matrix in the inverted opal structures favor the RE distribution avoiding the possible segregation of CeO2.

  1. Synthesis of Poly pyrrole Inverse Opal in [bmim] Containing Acetonitrile and the Application of the Inverse Opal in Cell Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Dong, Q.Q.; Sun, L.N.; Deng, W.; Wu, Sh.

    2013-01-01

    Most primary cells use Zn or Li as the anode, a metallic oxide as the cathode, and an acidic or alkaline solution or moist past as the electrolytic solution. In this paper, highly ordered poly pyrrole (PPy) inverse opals have been successfully synthesized in the acetonitrile solution containing [bmim]PF 6 . PPy films were prepared under the same experimental conditions. Cyclic voltammograms of the PPy film and the PPy inverse opal in neutral phosphate buffer solution (PBS) were recorded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the structural surface of the PPy films and the PPy inverse opals. It is found that the PF 6 - anions kept de doping from the PPy films during the potential scanning process, resulting in the electrochemical inactivity. Although PF 6 - anions also kept de doping from the PPy inverse opals, the PO 4 3- anions from PBS could dope into the inverse opal, explaining why the PPy inverse opals kept their electrochemical activity. An environmental friendly cell prototype was constructed, using the PPy inverse opal as the anode. The electrolytes in both the cathodic and anodic half-cells were neutral PBSs. The open-circuit potential of the cell prototype reached 0.487 V and showed a stable output over several hundred hours

  2. Nanoindentation hardness of banded Australian sedimentary opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P S; Smallwood, A S; Ray, A S [Department of Chemistry, Material and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Briscoe, B J; Parsonage, D [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: paul.thomas@uts.edu.au

    2008-04-07

    Nanoindentation hardness data in continuous stiffness mode are reported for banded potch and play of colour opals sourced from Lightning Ridge in New South Wales and Andamooka in South Australia. Despite the significant visible heterogeneities observed and the significant differences in origin and microstructures, as observed by SEM, and subtle differences in the elemental distributions between bands within specimens, little difference was observed in the mechanical properties. Specimens were found to be mechanically homogeneous and values of the hardness and moduli were found to be similar between samples. The creep behaviour of the specimens was also observed to be similar. It was concluded that the similarities in mechanical properties were due to the similarities in the silica morphology of the specimens, formed in similar geological environments, as differences in microstructure and trace element distribution were found not to significantly influence the observed bulk mechanical properties.

  3. Polymer sol-gel composite inverse opal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoran; Blanchard, G J

    2015-03-25

    We report on the formation of composite inverse opal structures where the matrix used to form the inverse opal contains both silica, formed using sol-gel chemistry, and poly(ethylene glycol), PEG. We find that the morphology of the inverse opal structure depends on both the amount of PEG incorporated into the matrix and its molecular weight. The extent of organization in the inverse opal structure, which is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical reflectance data, is mediated by the chemical bonding interactions between the silica and PEG constituents in the hybrid matrix. Both polymer chain terminus Si-O-C bonding and hydrogen bonding between the polymer backbone oxygens and silanol functionalities can contribute, with the polymer mediating the extent to which Si-O-Si bonds can form within the silica regions of the matrix due to hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  4. Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as an Optofluidic Platform for Fast Analysis of Hydrocarbon Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiwei; Mahpeykar, Seyed Milad; Burgess, Ian B; Wang, Xihua

    2018-06-13

    Most of the reported optofluidic devices analyze liquid by measuring its refractive index. Recently, the wettability of liquid on various substrates has also been used as a key sensing parameter in optofluidic sensors. However, the above-mentioned techniques face challenges in the analysis of the relative concentration of components in an alkane hydrocarbon mixture, as both refractive indices and wettabilities of alkane hydrocarbons are very close. Here, we propose to apply volatility of liquid as the key sensing parameter, correlate it to the optical property of liquid inside inverse opal photonic crystals, and construct powerful optofluidic sensors for alkane hydrocarbon identification and analysis. We have demonstrated that via evaporation of hydrocarbons inside the periodic structure of inverse opal photonic crystals and observation of their reflection spectra, an inverse opal film could be used as a fast-response optofluidic sensor to accurately differentiate pure hydrocarbon liquids and relative concentrations of their binary and ternary mixtures in tens of seconds. In these 3D photonic crystals, pure chemicals with different volatilities would have different evaporation rates and can be easily identified via the total drying time. For multicomponent mixtures, the same strategy is applied to determine the relative concentration of each component simply by measuring drying time under different temperatures. Using this optofluidic sensing platform, we have determined the relative concentrations of ternary hydrocarbon mixtures with the difference of only one carbon between alkane hydrocarbons, which is a big step toward detailed hydrocarbon analysis for practical use.

  5. Burial container subsidence load stress calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veith, E.M.

    1995-11-01

    This document captures the supporting analyses conducted to determine if the LLCE (Long-Length Contaminated Equipment) burial containers are structurally adequate under different trench closure scenarios. The LLCE is equipment that was inside tank farm tanks

  6. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-01-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment

  7. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. S. Thompson

    2006-12-28

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities.

  9. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.S.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities

  10. Photonic crystal microprisms obtained by carving artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenollosa, R.; Ibisate, M.; Rubio, S.; López, C.; Meseguer, F.; Sánchez-Dehesa, J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for fabrication of photonic crystal prisms is demonstrated. The procedure is based on micromanipulation techniques, here applied to artificial opals. By means of a microgrinder an opal prism comprising a single crystal (several tens of microns in size) has been carved with three different faces: (111), (110), and (100). The faces were morphologically characterized by scanning electron microscopy and their optical reflectance spectra measured and compared with the theoretical band structure.

  11. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Avoine , Amaury; Ngoc Hong , Phan; Frederich , Hugo; Aregahegn , Kifle; Bénalloul , Paul; Coolen , Laurent; Schwob , Catherine; Thu Nga , Pham; Gallas , Bruno; Maître , Agnès

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflect...

  12. Decommissioning and decontamination (burial ground stabilization) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of retired Hanford facilities and the future use of surrounding landscapes require isolation of contaminated wastes from the biosphere. Burial ground stabilization studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of physical barriers for isolating contaminated wastes in shallow-land burial sites from plants and animals. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of using a layer of loose rock between the waste and the surface soil covering to prevent both plant root and animal penetrations

  13. Effect of annealing on parameters of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajiev, G M; Kurdyukov, D A; Travnikov, V V

    2006-01-01

    We report on the effect of high temperature annealing on the reflection spectra of synthetic opals. The analysis of conditions for simultaneous diffraction on the (111) planes parallel and inclined to the sample surface has shown that both annealed and unannealed opals are compressed along the growth [111] axis and the shape of the SiO 2 balls forming the opals' close packed structure can be described as spheroidal. The structure parameters were evaluated from the analysis of the angular dependences of the peak positions in the Bragg reflection spectra of unfilled and glycerol-filled samples. The major effect of annealing is due to the sintering (interpenetration) of the structural elements of opals. The maximum temperature of 1050 deg. C leads to a 10-fold increase in the degree of spheroid sintering. As a result, the interspheroid spacing decreases by over 10%, while the filling factor increases from 0.75 to 0.96 together with the effective dielectric constant of the opal as a whole (from 1.74 to 2.08). Sintering takes place not only between spheroids, but also inside spheroids between the α-SiO 2 nanoparticles constituting them. This results in a noticeable (by ∼7%) increase in the dielectric constant of opal spheroids

  14. Shallow Land Burial Technology - Humid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.C.; Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The Shallow Land Burial Technology - Humid Project is being conducted for the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program with the objective of identifying and demonstrating improved technology for disposing of low-level solid waste in humid environments. Two improved disposal techniques are currently being evaluated using nine demonstration trenches at the Engineered Test Facility (ETF). The first is use of a cement-bentonite grout applied as a waste backfill material prior to trench closure and covering. The second is complete hydrologic isolation of waste by emplacement in a trench that is lined on all four sides, top and bottom using synthetic impermeable lining material. An economic analysis of the trench grouting and lining demonstration favored the trench lining operation ($1055/demonstration trench) over trench grouting ($1585/demonstration trench), with the cost differential becoming even greater (as much as a factor of 6 in favor of lining for typical ORNL trenches) as trench dimensions increase and trench volumes exceed those of the demonstration trenches. In addition to the evaluation of trench grouting and lining, major effort has centered on characterization of the ETF site. Though only a part of the overall study, characterization is an extremely important component of the site selection process; it is during these activities that potential problems, which may obviate the site from further consideration, are found. Characterization of the ETF has included studies of regional and site-specific geology, the physical and chemical properties of the soils in which the demonstration trenches are located, and hydrology of the small watershed of which the ETF is a part. 12 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  15. Extent of Stream Burial and Relationships to Watershed Area, Topography, and Impervious Surface Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy E. Weitzell

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stream burial—the routing of streams through culverts, pipes, and concrete lined channels, or simply paving them over—is common during urbanization, and disproportionately affects small, headwater streams. Burial undermines the physical and chemical processes governing life in streams, with consequences for water quality and quantity that may amplify from headwaters to downstream receiving waters. Knowledge of the extent of stream burial is critical for understanding cumulative impacts to stream networks, and for future decision-making allowing for urban development while protecting ecosystem function. We predicted stream burial across the urbanizing Potomac River Basin (USA for each 10-m stream segment in the basin from medium-resolution impervious cover data and training observations obtained from high-resolution aerial photography in a GIS. Results were analyzed across a range in spatial aggregation, including counties and independent cities, small watersheds, and regular spatial grids. Stream burial was generally correlated with total impervious surface area (ISA, with areas exhibiting ISA above 30% often subject to elevated ratios of stream burial. Recurring patterns in burial predictions related to catchment area and topographic slope were also detected. We discuss these results in the context of physiographic constraints on stream location and urban development, including implications for environmental management of aquatic resources.

  16. Water-dependent photonic bandgap in silica artificial opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Gómez, Francisco; Blanco, Alvaro; Canalejas-Tejero, Victor; López, Cefe

    2011-07-04

    Some characteristics of silica--based structures-like the photonic properties of artificial opals formed by silica spheres--can be greatly affected by the presence of adsorbed water. The reversible modification of the water content of an opal is investigated here by moderate heating (below 300 °C) and measuring in situ the changes in the photonic bandgap. Due to reversible removal of interstitial water, large blueshifts of 30 nm and a bandgap narrowing of 7% are observed. The latter is particularly surprising, because water desorption increases the refractive index contrast, which should lead instead to bandgap broadening. A quantitative explanation of this experiment is provided using a simple model for water distribution in the opal that assumes a nonclose-packed fcc structure. This model further predicts that, at room temperature, about 50% of the interstitial water forms necks between nearest-neighbor spheres, which are separated by 5% of their diameter. Upon heating, dehydration predominantly occurs at the sphere surfaces (in the opal voids), so that above 65 °C the remaining water resides exclusively in the necks. A near-close-packed fcc arrangement is only achieved above 200 °C. The high sensitivity to water changes exhibited by silica opals, even under gentle heating of few degrees, must be taken into account for practical applications. Remarkably, accurate control of the distance between spheres--from 16 to 1 nm--is obtained with temperature. In this study, novel use of the optical properties of the opal is made to infer quantitative information about water distribution within silica beads and dehydration phenomena from simple reflection spectra. Taking advantage of the well-defined opal morphology, this approach offers a simple tool for the straightforward investigation of generic adsorption-desorption phenomena, which might be extrapolated to many other fields involving capillary condensation. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  17. Shallow land burial of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.G.; Rose, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors discuss low-level, solid radioactive wastes buried in the ground since the startup of nuclear operations by the Manhattan Engineer District in the early 1940's. These operations were originally intended to be temporary so the primary consideration in locating land burial sites was their accessibility from the source of waste production. Early land-burial facilities were located on large reservations owned by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and operated by their prime contractors. Shallow land burial consists of excavating a trench or vault, emplacing the waste, minimizing void space within the disposal unit, and covering the waste with earth to control access to the waste. Problems encountered in the land-burial of radioactive wastes are classified into areas which relate to the environmental characteristics of the sites, waste characteristics, operational practices and control, and predictive capability. The most serious environmentally related problems involve water management. Water provides primary vehicle for both erosional processes, which affect the structural integrity of the waste trenches, and for the migration of radionuclides. Although there is consensus that the current level of off-site movement of radionuclides from operating burial grounds does not constitute an immediate health hazard, there is less certainty with respect to the ability of the facilities to provide long-term containment and isolation

  18. Migration of radionuclides following shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlet, J.; Golchert, N.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study of radionuclide migration was conducted at a facility used from 1944 to 1949 for the shallow land burial of radwaste produced during operations with two reactors and related nuclear research. It is situated in glacial drift 45 m thick. Underlying the drift is a generally level Silurian dolomite bedrock 60 m thick. The thickness of the drift decreases as the surface slopes downhill (north) until the dolomite reaches the surface and forms the bed of a river, 700 m to the north. This study was begun after tritiated water was detected in two picnic wells north of the facility, between the burial plot and the river. Surface and subsurface measurements indicate that tritium is migrating out of the burial site, but no other radionuclides have left the plot. The tritium concentrations decrease with distance from the plot. Tritium was found in the subsoil at all depths sampled, so the ground beneath and immediately around the plot contains tritium down to the dolomite aquifer. Time of travel of water from the burial plot to the nearest well is estimated to be 54 months. This would imply the peak concentration would reach the dolomite in about 35 years. By this time, 86% of the tritium would have disappeared by radioactive decay. The cyclical nature of the tritium content in the two wells implies that tritiated water is carried from the burial site by the spring rains when they recharge the groundwater supply

  19. Commissioning of NAA at the new OPAL reactor in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2007 the new nuclear research reactor, OPAL, was opened at Lucas Heights in Sydney. OPAL is a 20 MW open pool light water reactor with a heavy water reflector vessel and contains a cold neutron source. It is a multi-purpose facility for radioisotope production, irradiation services and neutron beam research. The OPAL design includes purpose-built facilities for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and delayed neutron activation analysis (DNAA). For INAA there is a short residence time facility in a neutron flux of around 2 x 10 13 cm -2 x s -1 and a number of long residence time facilities providing fluxes from 3 x 10 12 to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 x s -1 . The flux at the short residence time DNAA facility is around 6 x 10 12 cm -2 x s -1 . The main focus for INAA at OPAL is the research community, meeting the needs of a wide range of disciplines, including mineral processing, geology, the environment, health and archaeology. Both the relative (comparator) method and the k 0 -method of standardization for INAA are being established in OPAL. A description of progress, plans and capabilities are presented. (author)

  20. Particulate inverse opal carbon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Sang-Ok; Chae, Yu Jin; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2013-01-29

    Inverse opal carbon materials were used as anodes for lithium ion batteries. We applied particulate inverse opal structures and their dispersion in the formation of anode electrodes via solution casting. We prepared aminophenyl-grafted inverse opal carbons (a-IOC), inverse opal carbons with mesopores (mIOC), and bare inverse opal carbons (IOC) and investigated the electrochemical behavior of these samples as anode materials. Surface modification by aminophenyl groups was confirmed by XPS measurements. TEM images showed mesopores, and the specific area of mIOC was compared with that of IOC using BET analysis. A half-cell test was performed to compare a-IOC with IOC and mIOC with IOC. In the case of the a-IOC structure, the cell test revealed no improvement in the reversible specific capacity or the cycle performance. The mIOC cell showed a reversible specific capacity of 432 mAh/g, and the capacity was maintained at 88%-approximately 380 mAh/g-over 20 cycles.

  1. Water budget for SRP burial ground area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, J.E.; Emslie, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide migration from the SRP burial ground for solid low-level waste has been studied extensively. Most of the buried radionuclides are fixed on the soil and show negligible movement. The major exception is tritium, which when leached from the waste by percolating rainfall, forms tritiated water and moves with the groundwater. The presence of tritium has been useful in tracing groundwater flow paths to outcrop. A subsurface tritium plume moving from the southwest corner of the burial ground toward an outcrop near Four Mile Creek has been defined. Groundwater movement is so slow that much of the tritium decays before reaching the outcrop. The burial ground tritium plume defined to date is virtually all in the uppermost sediment layer, the Barnwell Formation. The purpose of the study reported in this memorandum was to investigate the hypothesis that deeper flow paths, capable of carrying substantial amounts of tritium, may exist in the vicinity of the burial ground. As a first step in seeking deeper flow paths, a water budget was constructed for the burial ground site. The water budget, a materials balance used by hydrologists, is expressed in annual area inches of rainfall. Components of the water budget for the burial ground area were analyzed to determine whether significant flow paths may exist below the tan clay. Mean annual precipitation was estimated as 47 inches, with evapotranspiration, run-off, and groundwater recharge estimated as 30, 2, and 15 inches, respectively. These estimates, when combined with groundwater discharge data, suggest that 5 inches of the groundwater recharge flow above the tan clay and that 10 inches flow below the tan clay. Therefore, two-thirds of the groundwater recharge appears to follow flow paths that are deeper than those previously found. 13 references, 10 figures, 5 tables

  2. Opal-based photonic crystal with double photonic bandgap structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, S. G.; Yates, H. M.; Pemble, M. E.; DeLa Rue, R. M.

    2000-09-01

    The interior surfaces of one part of a piece of artificial opal have been coated with GaP so that the remaining part of the opal crystal remains empty, thus forming a photonic heterostructure. Two Bragg resonances have been observed in the optical transmission and reflectance spectra. These two resonances were found to behave differently with changes in the polarization of the incident light and the angle of propagation of the light with respect to the (111) planes of opal. Depolarization of the light was observed to occur most effectively at frequencies within the stop-bands, apparently due to the re-coupling of the propagating electromagnetic wave to a different system of eigenmodes when it crosses the interface separating two parts of the double photonic crystal.

  3. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-09

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Ferroelectric inverse opals with electrically tunable photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bo; Zhou Ji; Li Longtu; Wang Xingjun; Liu Xiaohan; Zi Jian

    2003-01-01

    We present a scheme for tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) by an external electric field in a ferroelectric inverse opal structure. The inverse opals, consisting of ferroelectric (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O 3 (PLZT) ceramics, were synthesized by a sol-gel process. Optical reflection spectra show that the PBG of the PLZT inverse opals shifts continuously with the change in the applied electric field. As the photonic crystals (PCs) consist of the high-refractive-index constituent and possess an 'all-solid' structure, it should supply a more reliable mode to tune the PBG by the electric field for the superprism effect in PCs. It should be of high interest in device applications

  5. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasnetsov, M.V.; Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N.; Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO 2 ) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO 2 globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature

  6. Water-Dependent Photonic Bandgap in Silica Artificial Opals

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego-Gomez, Francisco; Blanco, Alvaro; Canalejas-Tejero, Victor; Lopez, Cefe

    2011-01-01

    Some characteristics of silica-based structuresa-like the photonic properties of artificial opals formed by silica spheresa-can be greatly affected by the presence of adsorbed water. The reversible modification of the water content of an opal is investigated here by moderate heating (below 300 °C) and measuring in situ the changes in the photonic bandgap. Due to reversible removal of interstitial water, large blueshifts of 30 nm and a bandgap narrowing of 7% are observed. The latter is partic...

  7. Are artificial opals non-close-packed fcc structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santamaría, F.; Braun, P. V.

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a simple experimental method to accurately measure the volume fraction of artificial opals. The results are modeled using several methods, and they find that some of the most common yield very inaccurate results. Both finite size and substrate effects play an important role in calculations of the volume fraction. The experimental results show that the interstitial pore volume is 4%-15% larger than expected for close-packed structures. Consequently, calculations performed in previous work relating the amount of material synthesized in the opal interstices with the optical properties may need revision, especially in the case of high refractive index materials.

  8. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Thu Nga, Pham; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2014-03-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter.

  9. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoine, Amaury; Ngoc Hong, Phan; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès; Thu Nga, Pham

    2014-01-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter. (paper)

  10. The optical interface of a photonic crystal: Modeling an opal with a stratified effective index

    OpenAIRE

    Maurin, Isabelle; Moufarej, Elias; Laliotis, Athanasios; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    An artificial opal is a compact arrangement of transparent spheres, and is an archetype of a three-dimensional photonic crystal. Here, we describe the optics of an opal using a flexible model based upon a stratified medium whose (effective) index is governed by the opal density in a small planar slice of the opal. We take into account the effect of the substrate and assume a well- controlled number of layers, as it occurs for an opal fabricated by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The calculation...

  11. Cíge¾ - new field of chloropal and common opal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barok Maroš

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the open pits in surroudings of village Cígeľ in Prievidza district a new occurance of chloropal and common opal was found. The opal postvulkanic mineralization is related to the vulkanic komplex of the mountain range Vtáčnik. The locality is composed of vulcanic rock and their pyroklastic, represented by particularly by andesite and rhyolit brekcia. The quality of the opals is variable. The resouces of the opals were calculated on the order of hundrens ( XOO kg of available materials. Local opals have also another utilization mostly for the individual jewel.

  12. The OPALS Plan for Operations: Use of ISS Trajectory and Attitude Models in the OPALS Pointing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Oaida, Bogdan; Erkmen, Baris

    2013-01-01

    This paper will discuss the OPALS pointing strategy, focusing on incorporation of ISS trajectory and attitude models to build pointing predictions. Methods to extrapolate an ISS prediction based on past data will be discussed and will be compared to periodically published ISS predictions and Two-Line Element (TLE) predictions. The prediction performance will also be measured against GPS states available in telemetry. The performance of the pointing products will be compared to the allocated values in the OPALS pointing budget to assess compliance with requirements.

  13. Munition Burial by Local Scour and Sandwaves: large-scale laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. H.

    2017-12-01

    Our effort has been the direct observation and monitoring of the burial process of munitions induced by the combined action of waves, currents and pure oscillatory flows. The experimental conditions have made it possible to observe the burial process due to both local scour around model munitions as well as the passage of sandwaves. One experimental facility is the Large Oscillating Water Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) constructed with DURIP support. LOWST can reproduce field-like conditions near the sea bed. The second facility is a multipurpose wave-current flume which is 4 feet (1.20 m) deep, 6 feet (1.8 m) wide, and 161 feet (49.2 m) long. More than two hundred experiments were carried out in the wave-current flume. The main task completed within this effort has been the characterization of the burial process induced by local scour as well in the presence of dynamic sandwaves with superimposed ripples. It is found that the burial of a finite-length model munition (cylinder) is determined by local scour around the cylinder and by a more global process associated with the formation and evolution of sandwaves having superimposed ripples on them. Depending on the ratio of the amplitude of these features and the body's diameter (D), a model munition can progressively get partially or totally buried as such bedforms migrate. Analysis of the experimental data indicates that existing semi-empirical formulae for prediction of equilibrium-burial-depth, geometry of the scour hole around a cylinder, and time-scales developed for pipelines are not suitable for the case of a cylinder of finite length. Relative burial depth (Bd / D) is found to be mainly a function of two parameters. One is the Keulegan-Carpenter number, KC, and the Shields parameter, θ. Munition burial under either waves or combined flow, is influenced by two different processes. One is related to the local scour around the object, which takes place within the first few hundred minutes of flow action (i.e. short

  14. Method of determining dispersion dependence of refractive index of nanospheres building opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kępińska, Mirosława; Starczewska, Anna; Duka, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    The method of determining dispersion dependence of refractive index of nanospheres building opals is presented. In this method basing on angular dependences of the spectral positions of Bragg diffraction minima on transmission spectra for opal series of known spheres diameter, the spectrum of effective refractive index for opals and then refractive index for material building opal's spheres is determined. The described procedure is used for determination of neff(λ) for opals and nsph(λ) for material which spheres building investigated opals are made of. The obtained results are compared with literature data of nSiO2(λ) considered in the analysis and interpretation of extremes related to the light diffraction at (hkl) SiO2 opal planes.

  15. Optical effects in artificial opals infiltrated with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoretto, Davide; Morandi, Valentina; Marabelli, Franco; Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2006-04-01

    Polystyrene artificial opals are directly grown with embedded gold nanoparticles (NpAu) in their interstices. Reflectance spectra of samples having different sphere diameters and nanoparticles load clearly show a red shift of the photonic band gap as well as a reduction of its width without showing direct evidence of NpAu absorption. The case of transmission spectra is instead more complicated: here, overlapped to a broad NpAu absorption, a structure having unusual lineshape is detected. The infiltration of opal with NpAu removes the polarization dependence of the photonic band structure observed in bare opals. The lineshape of the absorption spectra suggest a spatial localization of the electromagnetic field in the volume where NpAu are confined thus enhancing its local intensity. This effect seems to be effective to stimulate optical nonlinearities of NpAu. Nanosecond transient absorption measurements on NpAu infiltrated opals indicate that a variation of transmission of about 10% is observed. Since this effect takes place within the pump pulse and since NpAu photoluminescence has been subtracted to the signal, we attribute it to an optical switching process.

  16. Excitations in opal photonic crystals infiltrated with polarizable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eradat, Nayer; Sivachenko, A. Y.; Raikh, Mikhail E.; Vardeny, Z. Valy; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Li, S.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2002-12-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) are a class of artificial structures with a periodic dielectric function. PCs can be a laboratory for testing fundamental processes involving interactions of radiation with matter in novel conditions. We have studied the optical properties of opal PCs that are infiltrated with highly polarizable media such as j-aggregates of cyanine dyes. Opals are self-assembled structures of silica spheres. We report our studies on clarifying the relationship between a polaritonic gap and a photonic stop band (Bragg gap) when they resonantly coexist in the same structure. Infiltration of opal with polarizable molecules combines the polaritonic and Bragg diffractive effects. Both effects exist independently when the Bragg (at ω = ωB) and polaritonic (ω = ωT) resonances are well separated in frequency. A completely different situation occurs when ωT ~ωB. Such a condition was achieved in opals that were infiltrated with J-aggregates of cyanine dyes that have large Rabi frequency. Our measurements show some dramatic changes in the shape of the reflectivity plateaus, which are due to the interplay between the photonic band gap and the polaritonic gap. The experimental results on reflectivity and its dependence on the light propagation angle and concentration of the cyanie dyes are in agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  17. Picture Books about Blacks: An Interview with Opal Moore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCann, Donnarae; Richard, Olga

    1991-01-01

    Presents an interview with Opal Moore, who discusses Black imagery in picture books published in the last four years and the institutions that circulate that imagery. Topics discussed include the issue of race pride; interracial themes; appropriate illustrations; African versus African-American books; and the roles of publishers, books reviewers,…

  18. Fast Formation of Opal-like Columnar Colloidal Crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Beek, D.; Radstake, P.B.; Petukhov, A.V.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate that highly polydisperse colloidal gibbsite platelets easily form an opal-like columnar crystal with striking iridescent Bragg reflections. The formation process can be accelerated by orders of magnitude under a centrifugation force of 900g without arresting the system in a disordered

  19. Licensing of ANSTO'S OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.W.; Ordonez, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents a general description of the ongoing licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) Open Pool Australian Light-water (OPAL) Reactor at their Lucas Heights site. It addresses the following aspects: The Construction Licence - what it is and what impact it had on the construction of the OPAL Reactor, specifically the various Construction Licence Conditions; The interface between ANSTO, INVAP and ARPANSA during the construction of the OPAL Reactor, particularly in relation to ARPANS Regulation 54; Specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process and how they have been resolved; The Operating Licence Application - what it is and how it interfaces with the construction and commissioning of the OPAL Reactor. These aspects are all addressed from the point of view of the licensee ANSTO and the RRR Project. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators. Note that this paper is an update of a presentation given at IGORR10 and follows on from a paper previously presented at PNBC12 in October 2002

  20. Hadronic final state interactions at ALEPH and OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Ghete, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The studies of Fermi-Dirac correlations of $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ and Bose-Einstein correlations and colour reconnection in $\\mathrm{W}$-pairs decays performed by the ALEPH collaboration in $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation at LEP are presented. The OPAL analysis of Bose-Einstein correlations in

  1. Burial diagenesis of deep sea chalk as reflected in Biot's coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul

    2013-01-01

    to limestone as burial increases and porosity decreases. The porosity decrease is accompanied by an increasing velocity to elastic waves, and consequently a decreasing Biot's coefficient, as estimated from velocity and density of core samples. When the effective burial stress is normalized to total horizontal....... In the ooze, we find that the natural compaction causes an increasing stress on grain contact area, indicating that the ooze particles become strongly strained. In the chalk section, contact cement is probably the reason why particles become less strained as porosity declines. In the limestone, stress...... on particles apparently is low and not correlated with porosity, probably because the pore-filling cementation in this interval causes Biot's coefficient to decline as burial increases. Limestone from the water zone of the North sea Chalk Group follows the same stress trend as deep sea limestone. These results...

  2. Inverse opal pH sensors with various protic monomers copolymerized with polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jinsub; Han, Sung Gu; Lee, Wonmok

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We polymerized four different inverse opal pH sensors by using vinyl monomers containing acidic or basic substituents. ► Stepwise swelling response from polyprotic acid sensor was investigated. ► Opposite color changing responses were obtained for acidic and basic sensors. ► Composite pH sensor with wide pH sensing range was fabricated by mixing different monomers. ► Both acid and base sensors show the response time as fast as ∼10 s. - Abstract: pH sensitive inverse opal sensors were synthesized using various vinyl monomers containing acidic or basic substituents. Acrylic acid (AA), vinylphosphonic acid (VPA), vinylimidazole (VI), and dimethylaminoethylmethacrylic acid (DMAEMA) were respectively copolymerized with hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), the building block monomer of the hydrogel via UV-initiated photopolymerization. Opal templating and subsequent template removal enabled the fabrication of four inverse opal (IO) hydrogel colorimetric sensors, which responded to pH in different fashions. pH-dependent swelling of the IO hydrogel induced the red-shift of the diffracted color. The sensors containing AA or VPA, the proton donating monomers showed the color shifts from green to red with pH increase due to the increased concentration of carboxylate anions bound to the hydrogel. Diprotic VPA sensor exhibited two-step increases of diffracted wavelengths at its pK a1 and pK a2 respectively. The sensors containing proton acceptors, VI and DMAEMA showed the pH-dependent color changes in an opposite way to the AA sensor and the VPA sensor since their ionizations take place by lowering pH due to the protonation at the amino groups. The shapes of pH response curves of VI and DMAEMA sensors were similar but pK b s were different from each other. Optical diffraction responses of four sensors were compared with the calculated concentration ratios of the ionized species to the total monomer with pH variation, and a deswelling effect in the

  3. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Old Burial Ground (OBG) source control technology and inventory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.P.; Rehder, T.E.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

    1996-10-02

    This report has been developed to support information needs for wastes buried in the Burial Ground Complex. Information discussed is presented in a total of four individual attachments. The general focus of this report is to collect information on estimated source inventories, leaching studies, source control technologies, and to provide information on modeling parameters and associated data deficiencies.

  4. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Old Burial Ground (OBG) source control technology and inventory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, G.P.; Rehder, T.E.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    This report has been developed to support information needs for wastes buried in the Burial Ground Complex. Information discussed is presented in a total of four individual attachments. The general focus of this report is to collect information on estimated source inventories, leaching studies, source control technologies, and to provide information on modeling parameters and associated data deficiencies

  5. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, M.; Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-01

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities

  6. The disappearance of European smiths' burials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2015), s. 121-143 ISSN 0959-7743 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M300021203 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : elite * burial * forging tools * symbolic * ritual * prehistory * Early Middle Ages * Marxism-Leninism Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  7. Evaluation of burial ground soil covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, J.W.

    1976-11-01

    Solid radioactive waste burial at the Savannah River Plant between 1955 and 1972 filled a 76-acre site. Burial operations then were shifted to an adjacent site, and a program was begun to develop a land cover that would: (1) minimize soil erosion; and (2) protect the buried waste from deep-rooted plants, since radionuclides can be recycled by uptake through root systems. In anticipation of the need for a suitable soil cover, five grass species were planted on 20 plots (4 plots of each species) at the burial ground (Facility 643-G) in 1969. The grass plots were planted for evaluation of viability, root depth, and erosion protection existing under conditions of low fertility and minimum care. In addition, 16 different artificial soil covers were installed on 32 plots (each cover on two plots) to evaluate: (1) resistance of cover to deterioration from weathering; (2) resistance of cover to encroachment by deep-rooted plants; and (3) soil erosion protection provided by the cover. All test plots were observed and photographed in 1970 and in 1974. After both grass and artificial soil covers were tested five years, the following results were observed: Pensacola Bahia grass was the best of the five cover grasses tested; and fifteen of the sixteen artificial covers that were tested controlled vegetation growth and soil erosion. Photographs of the test plots will be retaken at five-year intervals for future documentation

  8. Investigation of optical properties of PMMA opals and inverse opals with YVO4-Eu nano-phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Shashi; Gathania, Arvind K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, opals and inverse opals have attracted the attention of researchers because of their potential applications in photonic devices. The idea of the periodic photonic crystal was proposed by Yablonovitch and John. The photonic crystals are in analogy with crystalline solid: electromagnetic waves propagating in the photonic crystal experienced periodic spatial variation of dielectric constant, as the de Broglie wave propagation in crystalline solids experienced periodic variation of the atomic potential. In the present work we synthesized the PMMA spheres using colloidal crystallization method and PMMA colloidal multilayer crystal were developed on the quartz substrate by self-assembly vertical deposition method. Afterward PMMA microspheres were infiltrated with YVO 4 -Eu nano-phosphors followed by heating at 500 °C and above to form the inverse opals. Transmission spectra for pure PMMA, infiltrated PMMA and inverse opal of PMMA are obtained. The colloidal crystal multilayer shows a stop band at 596nm, which arises from the Bragg reflection of the (111) planes. The central position of this band gap is shifted to 608nm because of the change in the refractive index of the structure after infiltration. As the calcination was carried out at 500 °C and 600 °C, the central position of the band shifted to 483nm and 500nm respectively, because of the change in the effective refractive index of the structure and shrinkage in the direction perpendicular to the film. The resulting structure still exhibits a band gap, as the crystalline ordering is kept after the crystal is inverted. The intensity of inverse opals of PMMA is very small as compared to the bulk powder briefing the application of microstructures for the low voltage light emitting diodes (LEDs). The results show band gap and luminescent characteristics strongly depend upon infiltration. (author)

  9. OPAL extension for permanent-magnet motors; OPAL-Erweiterung fuer Permanentmagnet-Motoren - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R

    2008-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at an extension to the OPAL software that is concerned with the energy-efficient design of pump and fan systems that use induction motors. This software has been extended by a module for permanent magnet motors which directly addresses the question of how much energy and cost can be saved through the use of this type of motors compared to ASM standard motors. However, it is noted that certain parameters of permanent magnet motors necessary to make use of this new design feature must be available, which is currently not the case. In order to make this design application available to a wider group of users, a web-based user interface has been developed. New Web-2.0 features that have been included to provide improved usability are discussed. In addition, it is noted that the software has now been adapted to support German, English and French versions. Also, the EuroDEEM database has been integrated, thus giving access to the performance data of more than 10,000 motors.

  10. Assessing global carbon burial during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2, Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.; Lowery, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Reconstructing the areal extent and total amount of organic carbon burial during ancient events remains elusive even for the best documented oceanic anoxic event (OAE) in Earth history, the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event ( 93.9 Ma), or OAE 2. Reports from 150 OAE 2 localities provide a wide global distribution. However, despite the large number of sections, the majority are found within the proto-Atlantic and Tethyan oceans and interior seaways. Considering these gaps in spatial coverage, the pervasive increase in organic carbon (OC) burial during OAE2 that drove carbon isotope values more positive (average of 4‰) can provide additional insight. These isotope data allow us to estimate the total global burial of OC, even for unstudied portions of the global ocean. Thus, we can solve for any `missing' OC sinks by comparing our estimates from a forward carbon-isotope box model with the known, mapped distribution of OC for OAE 2 sediments. Using the known OC distribution and reasonably extrapolating to the surrounding regions of analogous depositional conditions accounts for only 13% of the total seafloor, mostly in marginal marine settings. This small geographic area accounts for more OC burial than the entire modern ocean, but significantly less than the amount necessary to produce the observed isotope record. Using modern and OAE 2 average OC rates we extrapolate further to appropriate depositional settings in the unknown portions of seafloor, mostly deep abyssal plains. This addition significantly increases the predicted amount buried but still does not account for total burial. Additional sources, including hydrocarbon migration, lacustrine, and coal also cannot account for the missing OC. This difference points to unknown portions of the open ocean with high TOC contents or exceptionally high TOC in productive marginal marine regions, which are underestimated in our extrapolations. This difference might be explained by highly productive margins within the

  11. Investigation of luminescence properties in SiO2: Tb, Yb upconversion inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhengwen; Yan Dong; Song Zhiguo; Zhou Dacheng; Yu Xue; Yang Yong; Yin Zhaoyi; Yan Lei; Wang Rongfei; Wu Hangjun; Qiu Jianbei

    2012-01-01

    The SiO 2 : Tb, Yb inverse opals with photonic band gap at 465 or 543 nm were prepared, and an effect of photonic band gap on upconversion spontaneous emission from Tb 3+ was investigated. The results show that the photonic band gap has a significant influence on the upconversion emission of the SiO 2 : Tb, Yb inverse opals. The upconversion luminescence of the Tb 3+ ions is suppressed in the inverse opal compared with the luminescence of that of the reference sample. - Highlights: ► Upconversion emission from Tb 3+ was observed in the SiO 2 : Tb, Yb inverse opal. ► UC emission of Tb 3+ was modulated by controlling the structure of inverse opal. ► UC emission of Tb 3+ was depressed in the inverse opal.

  12. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between conjugated molecules infiltrated in three-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Lu; Sui, Ning; Wang, Ying-Hui; Qian, Cheng; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from Coumarin 6 (C-6) to Sulforhodamine B (S-B) infiltrated into opal PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) photonic crystals (PCs) has been studied in detail. The intrinsic mesh micro-porous structure of opal PCs could increase the luminescent efficiency through inhibiting the intermolecular interaction. Meanwhile, its structure of periodically varying refractive indices could also modify the FRET through affecting the luminescence characteristics of energy donor or energy acceptor. The results demonstrate that the FRET efficiency between conjugated dyes was easily modified by opal PCs. - Highlights: • We investigate the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two kinds of dyes. • These two kinds of dyes are infiltrated in PMMA opal photonic crystals. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the luminescent characteristics. • The structure of opal PCs could improve the energy transfer characteristics

  13. Formation and dissolution of zeolite during burial diagenesis - Examples from glauconitic sandstones in the Palaeogene Siri Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afsoon Moatari; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan B

    or diagenetic alteration of volcanic glass. Authigenic zeolites are uncommon constituents in most sandstones. However, authigenic zeolites are common in some of the glauconitic sandstones from the Siri Canyon, where it is generally associated with thick coatings of opal/microquartz on the detrital framework...... reflecting dissolution of an early phase with different chemical composition. In many samples, zeolites have been totally dissolved, leaving impression marks in the opal/microquartz coating. The textural relation demonstrates that zeolite was dissolved after microquartz precipitation. In most case...

  14. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L.; Garza, F.J.; Hinojosa, M.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 μm and 0.4 μm) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, ζ, and the correlation length, ξ, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is ζ ∼ 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  15. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L., E-mail: guerreroleo@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Garza, F.J., E-mail: fjgarza@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Hinojosa, M., E-mail: hinojosa@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2010-09-25

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 {mu}m and 0.4 {mu}m) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, {zeta}, and the correlation length, {xi}, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is {zeta} {approx} 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  16. Polarization Change in Face-Centered Cubic Opal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christian; Romanov, Sergei; Küchenmeister, Jens; Peschel, Ulf; Busch, Kurt

    2011-10-01

    Artificial opals are a popular platform for investigating fundamental properties of Photonic Crystals (PhC). In this work, we provide a theoretical analysis of polarization-resolved transmission experiments through thin opal films. Despite the full cubic symmetry of the PhC, this system provides a very efficient mechanism for manipulating the polarization state of light. Based on band structure calculations and Bloch mode analysis, we find that this effect closely resembles classical birefringence. Due to the cubic symmetry, however, a description using tensorial quantities is not possible. This indicates fundamental limitations of effective material models for Photonic Crystals and demonstrates the importance of accurately modelling the microscopic geometry of such systems.

  17. Band structure and optical properties of opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavarini, E.; Andreani, L. C.; Soci, C.; Galli, M.; Marabelli, F.; Comoretto, D.

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical approach for the interpretation of reflectance spectra of opal photonic crystals with fcc structure and (111) surface orientation is presented. It is based on the calculation of photonic bands and density of states corresponding to a specified angle of incidence in air. The results yield a clear distinction between diffraction in the direction of light propagation by (111) family planes (leading to the formation of a stop band) and diffraction in other directions by higher-order planes (corresponding to the excitation of photonic modes in the crystal). Reflectance measurements on artificial opals made of self-assembled polystyrene spheres are analyzed according to the theoretical scheme and give evidence of diffraction by higher-order crystalline planes in the photonic structure.

  18. Fabrication of photonic crystal microprisms based on artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenollosa, Roberto; Ibisate, Marta; Rubio, Silvia; Lopez, Ceferino; Meseguer, Francisco; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose

    2002-04-01

    This paper reports a new method for faceting artificial opals based on micromanipulation techniques. By this means it was possible to fabricate an opal prism in a single domain with different faces: (111), (110) and (100), which were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Optical Reflectance Spectroscopy. Their spectra exhibit different characteristics depending on the orientation of the facet. While (111)-oriented face gives rise to a high Bragg reflection peak at about a/(lambda) equals 0.66 (where a is the lattice parameter), (110) and (100) faces show much less intense peaks corresponding to features in the band structure at a/(lambda) equals 1.12 and a/(lambda) equals 1.07 respectively. Peaks at higher energies have less obvious explanation.

  19. Licensing of the OPAL reactor during construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summerfield, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a description of the licensing activities associated with the construction and commissioning of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation's (ANSTO) OPAL reactor. It addresses the Construction Licence, the interface between ANSTO, INVAP (the contractor with responsibility for design and construction of the facility) and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA, the Australian nuclear regulator) during the construction of OPAL, specific licensing issues that have arisen during the construction and commissioning process, and the Operating Licence Application. Particular emphasis will be given to the way in which the licensing process is integrated into the overall project program and the lessons learnt that may be of benefit to other licensees and regulators

  20. Cell orientation gradients on an inverse opal substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Zou, Xin; Zhao, Ze; Mu, Zhongde; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-05-20

    The generation of cell gradients is critical for understanding many biological systems and realizing the unique functionality of many implanted biomaterials. However, most previous work can only control the gradient of cell density and this has no effect on the gradient of cell orientation, which has an important role in regulating the functions of many connecting tissues. Here, we report on a simple stretched inverse opal substrate for establishing desired cell orientation gradients. It was demonstrated that tendon fibroblasts on the stretched inverse opal gradient showed a corresponding alignment along with the elongation gradient of the substrate. This "random-to-aligned" cell gradient reproduces the insertion part of many connecting tissues, and thus, will have important applications in tissue engineering.

  1. OPAL Forward Calorimeter (half cylinder with lead scintillator)

    CERN Multimedia

    1 half cylinder piece is available for loan. The OPAL forward Detector Calorimeter was made in 4 half cylindrical pieces. Two full cylinders were placed round the LEP beam pipe about 3m downstream of the interaction point. The detector was used primarily to measure the luminosity of LEP (rate of interactions) and also to trigger on 2-photon events. In addition it formed an essential part of the detector coverage which OPAL needed to carry out searches for new particles such as the Higgs boson. The detector is made of scintillators sandwiched between lead sheets. The light from the scintillators passes via bars of wavelength shifter and light guides on its way to be measured by photomultipliers. There is a layer of gas filled tube chambers within the calorimeter. These provide a measure of the position of the particles interacting in the calorimeter.

  2. OPAL Central Detector (Including vertex, jet and Z chambers)

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the different parts of the tracking system. (This piece includes the vertex, jet and Z chambers) In the picture above, the central detector is the piece being removed to the right.

  3. Comparative pulsation calculations with OP and OPAL opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbur, Shashi M.; Simon, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative linear nonadiabatic pulsation calculations are presented using the OPAL and Opacity Project opacities. The two sets of opacities include effects due to intermediate coupling and fine structure as well as new abundances. We used two mass luminosity (M-L) relations, one standard (BIT), and one employing substantial convective core overshoot (COV). The two sets of opacities cannot be differentiated on the basis of the stellar pulsation calculations presented here. The BIT relation can model the beat and bump Cepheids with masses between 4 and 7 solar mass, while if the overshoot relation is used, masses between 2 and 6 solar mass are required. In the RR Lyrae regime, we find the inferred masses of globular cluster RRd stars to be little influenced by the choice of OPAL or OP. Finally, the limited modeling we have done is not able to constrain the Cepheid M-L relation based upon period ratios observed in the beat and bump stars.

  4. Optical analysis of the fine crystalline structure of artificial opal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, G; Dorado, L A; Schinca, D; Depine, R A; Míguez, H

    2009-11-17

    Herein, we present a detailed analysis of the structure of artificial opal films. We demonstrate that, rather than the generally assumed face centered cubic lattice of spheres, opal films are better approximated by rhombohedral assemblies of distorted colloids. Detailed analysis of the optical response in a very wide spectral range (0.4 opal films is provided, as well as of the photonic band structure of the proposed arrangement. The implications of this distortion in the optical response of the lattice are discussed.

  5. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ray diffraction shows that the inverse opal-like structure (OLS) synthesized by the electrochemical method fully duplicates the three-dimensional net of voids of the template artificial opal. The in...

  6. Formation and characterisation of ordered porous vanadium oxide inverse opal materials for Li-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents several routes towards achieving artificial opal templates by colloidal self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres and the use of these template for the fabrication of V2O5 inverse opals as cathode materials for lithium ion battery applications. First, through the manipulation of different experimental factors, several methods of affecting or directing opal growth towards realizing different structures, improving order and/or achieving f...

  7. Physical studies of porphyrin-infiltrated opal crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabataityte, J. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Gostauto 11, LT 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)], E-mail: julija@pfi.lt; Simkiene, I.; Babonas, G.-J.; Reza, A. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Gostauto 11, LT 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Baran, M.; Szymczak, R. [Institute of Physics, PAN, PL 02668, Warsaw (Poland); Vaisnoras, R.; Rasteniene, L. [Vilnius Pedagogical University, LT 08106, Vilnius (Lithuania); Golubev, V.; Kurdyukov, D. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-09-15

    Artificial opals made of silica spheres and infiltrated with aqueous solution of iron porphyrin (FeTPPS) possessing the absorption band in a visible spectral range were studied. The structural, optical and magnetic properties of composite structures were investigated. Bulk samples of opal structure were obtained by sedimentation technique from colloidal solution of SiO{sub 2} spheres of diameter 240 and 245 nm. The structure of the samples was examined by atomic force microscopy. The properties of photonic crystals were demonstrated by optical measurements in transmission and reflection modes. The stop band was observed in the region 510-550 nm. In samples annealed at 900 deg. C the width of the stop band increased to {approx} 70 nm. Aqueous solutions of FeTPPS of concentration {approx} 1.0 mM and various pH-values were used for infiltration. The infiltration has led to a change of photonic characteristics, position of the stop band and dependence on light incidence angle. The absorption bands typical of FeTPPS were observed in the vicinity of the stop band. The photonic properties of infiltrated opal structures were determined to depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, which was used in technological procedure. Magnetic properties of FeTPPS-infiltrated opal samples, which have been studied at 5-300 K in magnetic fields up to 5 T, were discussed. From magnetic measurements it followed that magnetic Fe-Fe interactions have practically vanished in hybrid samples and Fe centers should be treated as isolated ones.

  8. Physical studies of porphyrin-infiltrated opal crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabataityte, J.; Simkiene, I.; Babonas, G.-J.; Reza, A.; Baran, M.; Szymczak, R.; Vaisnoras, R.; Rasteniene, L.; Golubev, V.; Kurdyukov, D.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial opals made of silica spheres and infiltrated with aqueous solution of iron porphyrin (FeTPPS) possessing the absorption band in a visible spectral range were studied. The structural, optical and magnetic properties of composite structures were investigated. Bulk samples of opal structure were obtained by sedimentation technique from colloidal solution of SiO 2 spheres of diameter 240 and 245 nm. The structure of the samples was examined by atomic force microscopy. The properties of photonic crystals were demonstrated by optical measurements in transmission and reflection modes. The stop band was observed in the region 510-550 nm. In samples annealed at 900 deg. C the width of the stop band increased to ∼ 70 nm. Aqueous solutions of FeTPPS of concentration ∼ 1.0 mM and various pH-values were used for infiltration. The infiltration has led to a change of photonic characteristics, position of the stop band and dependence on light incidence angle. The absorption bands typical of FeTPPS were observed in the vicinity of the stop band. The photonic properties of infiltrated opal structures were determined to depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, which was used in technological procedure. Magnetic properties of FeTPPS-infiltrated opal samples, which have been studied at 5-300 K in magnetic fields up to 5 T, were discussed. From magnetic measurements it followed that magnetic Fe-Fe interactions have practically vanished in hybrid samples and Fe centers should be treated as isolated ones

  9. Band structure and optical properties of opal photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Pavarini, E.; Andreani, L. C.; Soci, C.; Galli, M.; Marabelli, F.; Comoretto, D.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical approach for the interpretation of reflectance spectra of opal photonic crystals with fcc structure and (111) surface orientation is presented. It is based on the calculation of photonic bands and density of states corresponding to a specified angle of incidence in air. The results yield a clear distinction between diffraction in the direction of light propagation by (111) family planes (leading to the formation of a stop band) and diffraction in other directions by higher-order...

  10. Track fitting in the opal vertex detector with stereo wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shally, R; Hemingway, R J; McPherson, A C

    1987-10-01

    The geometry of the vertex chamber for the OPAL detector at LEP is reviewed and expressions for the coordinates of the hits are given in terms of the measured drift distance and z-coordinate. The tracks are fitted by a procedure based on the Lagrange multipliers method. The increase in the accuracy of the fit due to the use of the stereo wires is discussed.

  11. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to two jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. Here a Z0 particle is produced in the collision between an electron and positron that then decays into a quark-antiquark pair. The quark pair is seen as a pair of hadron jets in the detector.

  12. OPAL: Decay of Z0 to three jets

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    This track is an example of real data collected from the OPAL detector on the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran between 1989 and 2000. A Z0 particle is produced in the electron-positron collision which decays into a quark and an antiquark, one of which emits a gluon. Both quarks and gluons appear in the detector as jets of hadrons.

  13. Results from γγ collisions in OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patt, Jochen

    1998-01-01

    The production of charged hadrons and jets is measured in collisions of quasi-real photons. The data were taken with the OPAL detector at LEP at e + e - centre-of-mass energies √(s ee )=161 and 172 GeV. The measured cross-sections are compared to perturbative next-to-leading order QCD calculations. The separation of the direct and the resolved component of the photon is demonstrated

  14. Track fitting in the opal vertex detector with stereo wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shally, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; McPherson, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The geometry of the vertex chamber for the OPAL detector at LEP is reviewed and expressions for the coordinates of the hits are given in terms of the measured drift distance and z-coordinate. The tracks are fitted by a procedure based on the Lagrange multipliers method. The increase in the accuracy of the fit due to the use of the stereo wires is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building

  16. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-3 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-3 Solid Waste Burial Ground, also referred to as Burial Ground Number 3 and the Dry Waste Burial Ground Number 3. During its period of operation, the 618-3 site was used to dispose of uranium-contaminated construction debris from the 311 Building and construction/demolition debris from remodeling of the 313, 303-J and 303-K Buildings

  17. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.; Anselm, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground. This burial ground, formerly called Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 1, was the original solid waste disposal site for the 100-F Area. Eight trenches contained miscellaneous solid waste from the 105-F Reactor and one trench contained solid waste from the biology facilities

  18. Thermal properties of carbon inverse opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Lee, Sergey B.; Baughman, Ray H.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of thin-wall glassy carbon and graphitic carbon inverse opals, fabricated by templating of silica opal has been measured in the temperature range 10-400 K using transient pulse method. The heat flow through 100 A-thick layers of graphite sheets tiled on spherical surfaces of empty overlapping spheres arrayed in face-centered-cubic lattices has been analyzed in term of anisotropy factor. Taking into account high anisotropy factor in graphite, γ=342, we found that the thermal conductivity of inverse opal prepared by chemical vapor deposition infiltration is limited by heat flow across the graphitic layers in bottleneck, κ-perpendicular =3.95 W/m K. The electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, κ e(300K) =3.7x10 -3 W/m K is negligible comparing to the measured value, κ (300K) =0.33 W/m K. The obtained phonon mean free path, l=90 nm is comparable with the graphite segments between hexagonal array of interconnections

  19. OPALE una alternativa para el desarrollo de objetos de aprendizajes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunior Portilla-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un análisis de la herramienta OPALE (Open Academic Learning que permite adentrarse en sus potencialidades y ventajas para la producción de contenidos digitales educativos, específicamente de objetos de aprendizajes, tanto por equipos multidisciplinarios como por docentes de cualquier nivel educativo. Desde esta perspectiva, se aborda como OPALE da respuesta al desarrollo de objetos de aprendizaje desde sus dimensiones semántica, sintáctica y práctica como medio de enseñanza aprendizaje. Para ello, se emplearon métodos de investigación del nivel teórico y práctico a través de los cuales se condujo el proceso de obtención de los resultados que se presentan. OPALE se utiliza para la creación de contenidos digitales educativos del portal CubaEduca del Ministerio de Educación y en el desarrollo de objetos de aprendizaje en la Universidad de Ciencias Pedagógicas “José de la Luz y Caballero” de Holguín como parte de las acciones del proyecto de investigación “Desarrollo de Aplicaciones Educativas”.

  20. Trace elements in precious and common opals using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, G.D.; Smallwood, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was used to determine the concentration of trace elements in 44 precious and 52 common opals sampled from a number of recognised fields within Australia. The purpose of this study was to determine if precious and common opals of the same colour and location have the same or a different trace element profile. Similar numbers of black, white and grey samples were studied in each case. In most cases, common opals had a significantly higher concentration of certain trace elements when compared with precious opals. (author)

  1. Shallow land burial - why or why not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.T.; Ledbetter, J.O.; Rohlich, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes a master's thesis on the state-of-the-art for shallow land burial of solid low-level radioactive wastes. The coverage of the thesis, which is condensed for this paper, ranges from site selection to problem case histories. Inherent in such coverage is the assessment of risk, the discussion of operational and management problems and the real significance of off-site migration. This topic is discussed in light of the stands taken that the migration is a serious problem and that it is not. Emphasis is on the engineering parameters of importance in site selection, and what pretreatment, if any, is needed

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  3. Great Moravian burial grounds in Rajhrad and Rajhradice

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrychová, Soňa

    2015-01-01

    The diploma thesis presented deals with an overall assessment of the Great Moravian burial ground in Rajhrad (Brno- venkov), which was excavated in the years 1972 to 1976. The work is based on a catalogue of this burial ground and the neighbouring one in Rajhradice published by Čeněk Staňa. It follows individual aspects of funeral rites at a necropolis and evaluates the inventory of the graves. Based on the findings, the work dates the burial ground, compares with burial ground in Rajhradice ...

  4. Burial stress and elastic strain of carbonate rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Burial stress on a sediment or sedimentary rock is relevant for predicting compaction or failure caused by changes in, e.g., pore pressure in the subsurface. For this purpose, the stress is conventionally expressed in terms of its effect: “the effective stress” defined as the consequent elastic...... strain multiplied by the rock frame modulus. We cannot measure the strain directly in the subsurface, but from the data on bulk density and P‐wave velocity, we can estimate the rock frame modulus and Biot's coefficient and then calculate the “effective vertical stress” as the total vertical stress minus...... the product of pore pressure and Biot's coefficient. We can now calculate the elastic strain by dividing “effective stress” with the rock frame modulus. By this procedure, the degree of elastic deformation at a given time and depth can be directly expressed. This facilitates the discussion of the deformation...

  5. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... children and step-children; an individual's brothers, sisters, parents, adoptive parents, and the spouses... are set aside for the burial arrangements of the eligible child's ineligible parent or parent's spouse... separation; i.e., a circumstance beyond an individual's control which makes conversion/separation impossible...

  6. Burial trench dynamic compaction demonstration at a humid site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    This task has the objective of determining the degree of consolidation which can be achieved by dynamic compaction of a closed burial trench within a cohesive soil formation. A seven-year-old burial trench in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was selected for this demonstration. This 251 m 3 trench contained about 80 Ci of mixed radionuclides, mostly 90 Sr, in 25 m 3 of waste consisting of contaminated equipment, dry solids, and demolition debris. Prior to compaction, a total trench void space of 79 m 3 was measured by pumping the trench full of water with corrections for seepage. Additional pre-compaction characterization included trench cap bulk density (1.68 kg/L), trench cap permeability (3 x 10 -7 m/s), and subsurface waste/backfill hydraulic conductivity (>0.01 m/s). Compaction was achieved by repeatedly dropping a 4-ton steel-reinforced concrete cylinder from heights of 4 to 8 m using the whipline of a 70-ton crane. The average trench ground surface was depressed 0.79 m, with some sections over 2 m, yielding a surveyed volumetric depression which totaled to 64% of the measured trench void space. Trench cap (0 to 60 cm) bulk density and permeability were not affected by compaction indicating that the consolidation was largely subsurface. Neither surface nor airborne radioactive contamination were observed during repeated monitoring during the demonstration. Dynamic compaction was shown to be an excellent and inexpensive (i.e., about $20/m 2 ) method to collapse trench void space, thereby hastening subsidence and stabilizing the land surface. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Synthesis of Polypyrrole Inverse Opal in [bmim]PF6- Containing Acetonitrile and the Application of the Inverse Opal in Cell Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most primary cells use Zn or Li as the anode, a metallic oxide as the cathode, and an acidic or alkaline solution or moist past as the electrolytic solution. In this paper, highly ordered polypyrrole (PPy inverse opals have been successfully synthesized in the acetonitrile solution containing [bmim]PF6. PPy films were prepared under the same experimental conditions. Cyclic voltammograms of the PPy film and the PPy inverse opal in neutral phosphate buffer solution (PBS were recorded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique was used to investigate the structural surface of the PPy films and the PPy inverse opals. It is found that the PF6- anions kept dedoping from the PPy films during the potential scanning process, resulting in the electrochemical inactivity. Although PF6- anions also kept dedoping from the PPy inverse opals, the PO43- anions from PBS could dope into the inverse opal, explaining why the PPy inverse opals kept their electrochemical activity. An environmental friendly cell prototype was constructed, using the PPy inverse opal as the anode. The electrolytes in both the cathodic and anodic half-cells were neutral PBSs. The open-circuit potential of the cell prototype reached 0.487 V and showed a stable output over several hundred hours.

  8. Chronology of 3rd–5th Century Female Graves from Tarasovo Burial Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldina Rimma D.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the concluding part a series of works by the authors on the dating of burials from the unique 1st–5th century Tarasovo burial ground in the Middle Kama region. The first article was dedicated to the chronology of graves dating back to the early Nyrgynda stage (1st–2nd centuries of this monument. The second and third publications feature an analysis of the chronology of 3rd–5th century male burials. The present work describes 160 female burials of 3rd–5th centuries analyzed from the perspective of chronology. Similarly to previous research, the three main methods employed by the authors of this research include those of formal typology, cultural stratigraphy and the nearest neighbour method. A total of 12 chronological groups were singled out as a result: 1st half of 3rd century A.D. (group 1; 2nd half of 3rd century (2; 3rd century (3; 4th century (group 4; 2nd half of 3rd–4th centuries (5а; 3rd–4th centuries (5б; 1st half of 5th century (6; 2nd half of 5th century (7; 5th century (group 8; 2nd half of 4th–5th centuries (9; 4th–5th centuries (10; 2nd half of 3rd–5th centuries

  9. Studies on the beam system for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber with laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maringer, G.

    1988-07-01

    UV laser beams are an important tool for the calibration of the OPAL jet chamber. A beam transport system containing about 350 mirrors in total guides the beams from the laser outside the detector into the chamber. Four of the mirrors are moveable under remote control allowing to guide the beams into each of the 24 sectors and to correct the beam path in case of deviations. A program to control these moveable mirrors has been developed. Drift velocity measurements will be performed by means of double beams which are generated by appropriate beamsplitters. Accurate knowledge of the double beam distances is essential to obtain the desired accuracy of better than 0.1% or 10 μm. Using a CCD device with a pixel size of 23x23 μm 2 the beam distance could be measured with errors below the required limit. (orig.)

  10. Untersuchung der Produktion charmhaltiger Mesonen in der Photon-Photon-Streuung mit dem OPAL-Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, Jochen

    2001-01-01

    Die Produktion von Charm-Quarks in der Photon-Photon-Streuung wird ueber den Nachweis charmhaltiger Mesonen untersucht. Die Arbeit basiert auf den Daten, die mit dem OPAL-Detektor am Elektron-Positron-Speicherring LEP am CERN in Genf in den Jahren von 1989 bis 1998 aufgenommen worden sind. Anhand des Charmonium-Zustandes Chi(c2) wird die Resonanzproduktion von Charm-Quarks untersucht und die Zwei-Photon-Breite des Chi(c2)-Mesons wird gemessen. Geladene D*-Mesonen werden zur Untersuchung der offenen Produktion von Charm-Quarks benutzt. Der Anteil des direkten und des einfach-aufgeloesten Produktionsmechanismus, differentielle D*-Wirkungsquerschnitte, der totale Charm-Wirkungsquerschnitt sowie die Charm-Strukturfunktion des Photons werden bestimmt.

  11. Dialectics of Burial and Teritoriality in Barclays Ayakoroma's A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is conceived to investigate the subjects of death, burial, pride and territorial supremacy in African drama with special focus on A Matter of Honour by Barclays Ayakoroma. The study becomes crucial because the question of burial and struggle over rights of possession of a corpse by two parties has become a ...

  12. Underwater Munitions Expert System to Predict Mobility and Burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-14

    for predicting the location and possible burial of underwater munitions is required to advise site managers as they plan...that region above the given UXO relative density, which is defined as the UXO density divided by the sand grain density, ( nominally 2650 g...0.0 + 2.5*dsed ; % nominal bed roughness if no burial % (Potentially in future version, ripple height

  13. Urban Stream Burial Increases Watershed-Scale Nitrate Export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake J Beaulieu

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that reduces nutrient loading to downstream ecosystems. Here we synthesize studies that investigated the effects of urban stream burial on N-uptake in two metropolitan areas and use simulation modeling to scale our measurements to the broader watershed scale. We report that nitrate travels on average 18 times farther downstream in buried than in open streams before being removed from the water column, indicating that burial substantially reduces N uptake in streams. Simulation modeling suggests that as burial expands throughout a river network, N uptake rates increase in the remaining open reaches which somewhat offsets reduced N uptake in buried reaches. This is particularly true at low levels of stream burial. At higher levels of stream burial, however, open reaches become rare and cumulative N uptake across all open reaches in the watershed rapidly declines. As a result, watershed-scale N export increases slowly at low levels of stream burial, after which increases in export become more pronounced. Stream burial in the lower, more urbanized portions of the watershed had a greater effect on N export than an equivalent amount of stream burial in the upper watershed. We suggest that stream daylighting (i.e., uncovering buried streams can increase watershed-scale N retention.

  14. Customary right to befitting burial: a jurisprudential appraisal of four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These symbols reveal unique rights for the people's entitlement. Among the rights to which an African is entitled is the right to befitting burial/funerals. This right comes with it, certain duties and/or obligations. The aim of this paper is to deconstruct the elements of applicable burial customs with a view to demonstrating their ...

  15. Project TN-030: hydrogeology - ORNL radioactive waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Continuation of an effort started in 1980, the water-level and precipitation data collected during the early years of the project were compiled into a series of five basic data reports. Technical advice on the design of piezometers in Burial Ground 5 was provided, and their construction has been monitored. Field work has continued, principally in Burial Grounds 5 and 6

  16. URBAN STREAM BURIAL INCREASES WATERSHED-SCALE NITRATE EXPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial reduces the capacity of streams to remove nitrate (NO3-) from the water column by in...

  17. Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation

  18. Migration and biological transfer of radionuclides from shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This document is the final report of the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on the Migration and Biological Transfer of Radionuclides from Shallow Land Burial. It contains a description of the objectives of the CRP, its meetings, its achievements and the work of this individual members. Some early experiences in the operation of shallow land repositories have indicated that in the short-term, at least, radioactive wastes can be disposed of safely. However, while these experiences are encouraging, the safety of shallow-land burial for radioactive wastes remains to be demonstrated in the longer term. Some of the industrialized and more developed countries represented have well established disposal programmes for low level wastes (UK, France, USA, Japan, Sweden, Czechoslovakia, Argentina, India) while some of the developing countries represented are still at the preliminary planning stage (Thailand, Iraq). Accordingly, the interests of the participants are concerned with different aspects. Those from countries with existing facilities tend to be more interested in the development and improvement of safety assessment techniques and of a coherent long term disposal philosophy. Participants from countries without disposal facilities tend to be mainly concerned with basic experimental studies aimed at obtaining an understanding of radionuclide behaviour in soils. However, this division was by no means complete and on-going experimental studies were also reported by participants from USA, Canada and France. A total of 11 research agreements and 5 research contracts were allocated, but in addition a number of independent observers attended each of the three Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs). The RCMs were held in Vienna 4-8 November 1985, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, 7-11 September 1987, and Paris, France 17-21 April 1989. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Organic carbon burial in fjords: Terrestrial versus marine inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xingqian; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Savage, Candida; Smith, Richard W.

    2016-10-01

    Fjords have been identified as sites of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial and may play an important role in regulating climate change on glacial-interglacial timescales. Understanding sediment processes and sources of sedimentary OC are necessary to better constrain OC burial in fjords. In this study, we use Fiordland, New Zealand, as a case study and present data on surface sediments, sediment down-cores and terrestrial end-members to examine dynamics of sediments and the sources of OC in fjord sediments. Sediment cores showed evidence of multiple particle sources, frequent bioturbation and mass-wasting events. A multi-proxy approach (stable isotopes, lignin-phenols and fatty acids) allowed for separation of marine, soil and vascular plant OC in surface sediments. The relationship between mass accumulation rate (MAR) and OC contents in fjord surface sediments suggested that mineral dilution is important in controlling OC content on a global scale, but is less important for specific regions (e.g., New Zealand). The inconsistency of OC budgets calculated by using MAR weighted %OC and OC accumulation rates (AR; 6 vs 21-31 Tg OC yr-1) suggested that sediment flux in fjords was likely underestimated. By using end-member models, we propose that 55% to 62% of total OC buried in fjords is terrestrially derived, and accounts for 17 ± 12% of the OCterr buried in all marine sediments. The strong correlation between MAR and OC AR indicated that OC flux will likely decrease in fjords in the future with global warming due to decrease in sediment flux caused by glacier denudation.

  20. Small angle X ray diffraction investigation of twinned opal_like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samusev, A.K.; Sinev, I.S.; Samusev, K.B.; Rybin, M.V.; Mistonov, A.A.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Byelov, D.; Trofimova, E.Y.; Kurdyukov, D.A.; Golubev, V.G.; Limonov, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Small angle X ray diffraction from synthetic opal films has been investigated as a function of the orientation of the sample. All the observed (hkl) diffraction reflections have been interpreted. The reconstruct tion of the reciprocal lattice of the studied opal films has been carried out. The

  1. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad...

  2. Results using the OPAL strategy in Mandarin speaking cochlear implant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandali, Andrew E; Dawson, Pam W; Arora, Komal

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an experimental pitch-coding strategy for improving recognition of Mandarin lexical tone in cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Adult CI recipients were tested on recognition of Mandarin tones in quiet and speech-shaped noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of +10 dB; Mandarin sentence speech-reception threshold (SRT) in speech-shaped noise; and pitch discrimination of synthetic complex-harmonic tones in quiet. Two versions of the experimental strategy were examined: (OPAL) linear (1:1) mapping of fundamental frequency (F0) to the coded modulation rate; and (OPAL+) transposed mapping of high F0s to a lower coded rate. Outcomes were compared to results using the clinical ACE™ strategy. Five Mandarin speaking users of Nucleus® cochlear implants. A small but significant benefit in recognition of lexical tones was observed using OPAL compared to ACE in noise, but not in quiet, and not for OPAL+ compared to ACE or OPAL in quiet or noise. Sentence SRTs were significantly better using OPAL+ and comparable using OPAL to those using ACE. No differences in pitch discrimination thresholds were observed across strategies. OPAL can provide benefits to Mandarin lexical tone recognition in moderately noisy conditions and preserve perception of Mandarin sentences in challenging noise conditions.

  3. Revealing stacking sequences in inverse opals by microradian X-ray diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinitskii, A.; Abramova, V.; Grigorieva, N.; Grigoriev, S.; Snigirev, A.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of the structural analysis of inverse opal photonic crystals by microradian X-ray diffraction. Inverse opals based on different oxide materials (TiO2, SiO2 and Fe2O3) were fabricated by templating polystyrene colloidal crystal films grown by the vertical deposition technique.

  4. Evolution of organic carbon burial in the Global Ocean during the Neogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Although only a small fraction of the organic carbon (OC) that rains from surface waters is eventually buried in the sediments, it is a process that controls the organic sub-cycle of the long-term carbon cycle, and the key for atmospheric O2, CO2 and nutrient cycling. Here we constrain the spatiotemporal variability of OC burial by quantifying the total organic carbon (TOC) mass accumulation rate (MAR) over the Neogene (23.0-2.6 Ma) by compiling the TOC, age model and sediment density data from sites retrieved by the Deep Sea Drilling Program, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. We screened all available sites which yielded 80 sites with adequate data quality, covering all major ocean basins and sedimentary depositional environments. All age models are updated to the GTS 2012 timescale so the TOC MAR records from different sites are comparable. Preliminary results show a clear early Miocene peak of OC burial in many sites related to high sediment flux which might reflect the orogenic uplift and/or glacier erosion. Places that receive high influx of terrigenous inputs become "hotspots" for Neogene burial of OC. At "open ocean" sites, OC burial seems to be more impacted by marine productivity changes, with a pronounced increase during the middle Miocene "Monterey Formation" and late Miocene - early Pliocene "Biogenic Bloom". Upon the completion of the data collection, we will further explore the regional and global OC burial in the context of tectonic uplift, climate change and the evolution of primary producers and consumers during the last 23 million years of Earth history.

  5. Uprooting and burial of invasive alien plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollmann, Johannes Christian; Brink-Jensen, Kasper; Frandsen, Sally I.

    2011-01-01

    (Japanese Rose), an invasive shrub in north-western Europe with negative effects on coastal biodiversity. Two months after uprooting and burial in dunes of north-eastern Denmark, 89% of the 58 shrubs resprouted from roots and rhizomes; on average 41 resprouts per shrub. Resprout density was twice as high...... at former shrub margins compared with the center; resprouts were taller and originated from more superficial soil layers at the margin than in the center. Resprouting was negatively correlated with fragment depth, and no resprouts were observed from greater than 15 cm depth. The number of resprouts...... increased with fragment dry mass (0.5–168.5 g). After 18 months with harrowing the species was still resprouting, flowering, and fruiting, albeit with no difference between shrub margin and center. Resprouts were taller (26 cm) and coverage was higher (0–4%) after two compared with three times harrowing...

  6. Managing soil moisture on waste burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.E.; Ratzlaff, T.D.

    1991-11-01

    Shallow land burial is a common method of disposing of industrial, municipal, and low-level radioactive waste. The exclusion of water from buried wastes is a primary objective in designing and managing waste disposal sites. If wastes are not adequately isolated, water from precipitation may move through the landfill cover and into the wastes. The presence of water in the waste zone may promote the growth of plant roots to that depth and result in the transport of toxic materials to above-ground foliage. Furthermore, percolation of water through the waste zone may transport contaminants into ground water. This report presents results from a field study designed to assess the the potential for using vegetation to deplete soil moisture and prevent water from reaching buried wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Our results show that this approach may provide an economical means of limiting the intrusion of water on waste sites

  7. Development of highly-ordered, ferroelectric inverse opal films using sol gel infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, N.; Yang, S.; Sun, P.; Ruda, H. E.

    2005-07-01

    Highly-ordered, ferroelectric, Pb-doped Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3, inverse opal films were fabricated by spin-coating a sol gel precursor into a polystyrene artificial opal template followed by heat treatment. Thin films of the ferroelectric were independently studied and were shown to exhibit good dielectric properties and high refractive indices. The excellent quality of the final inverse opal film using this spin-coating infiltration method was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images and the good correspondence between optical reflection data and theoretical simulations. Using this method, the structural and material parameters of the final ferroelectric inverse opal film were easily adjusted by template heating and through repeated infiltrations, without changes in the initial template or precursor. Also, crack-free inverse opal thin films were fabricated over areas comparable to that of the initial crack-free polystyrene template (˜100 by 100 μm2).

  8. Measurement and modelization of silica opal reflection properties: Optical determination of the silica index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Nga, Pham Thu; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2012-10-01

    Self-assembled artificial opals (in particular silica opals) constitute a model system to study the optical properties of three-dimensional photonic crystals. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal but is difficult to measure at the submicrometer scale and usually treated as a free parameter. Here, we propose a method to extract the silica index from the opal reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent methods based on infrared measurements. We show that this index gives a correct description of the opal reflection spectra, either by a band structure or by a Bragg approximation. In particular, we are able to provide explanations in quantitative agreement with the measurements for two features : the observation of a second reflection peak in specular direction, and the quasicollapse of the p-polarized main reflection peak at a typical angle of 54∘.

  9. Effect of templates on inverse opals fabricated through annular self-assembly/sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Dengteng; Yang Lili; Fan Zeng; Zhao Jiupeng; Li Yao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Flexible inverse opals could be facilely prepared through annular growth method. → The infiltrated materials are highly densified due to the existence of templates. → The crystalline grains are refined due to the the existence of templates. - Abstract: There is a strong interest in simple preparation of flexible inverse opals for applications. In this article, indium tin oxides (ITO) flexible inverse opals were prepared through annular growth of templates and sol-gel process. It is shown that this method provides a facile route for large scale flexible inverse opals with excellent ordered structures. ITO materials are found much denser in inverse opals, which is due to the increased capillary force during drying process and enhanced shrinkage during annealing process. It is also found that the crystalline grains are refined and the photoluminescence performance is strengthened in low frequency.

  10. Photoluminescence from ZnO-SiO2 opals with different sphere diameters and thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingling; Yan Hongwei; Fu Zhengping; Yang Beifang; Xia Linsheng; Wang Zhen; Zuo Jian; Yu Shijun; Fu Shengquan; Li Fanqing

    2007-01-01

    We systematically investigated the photoluminescence (PL) and transmittance characteristics of ZnO-SiO 2 opals with varied positions of the stop-band and film thicknesses. An improved ultraviolet (UV) luminescence was observed from ZnO-SiO 2 composites over pure ZnO nanocrystals under 325 nm He-Cd laser excitation at room temperature. The UV PL of ZnO nanocrystals in SiO 2 opals with stop-bands center of 410 nm is sensitive to the thickness of opal films, and the UV PL intensity increases with the film thickness increasing. The PL spectra of ZnO nanocrystals in SiO 2 opals with stop-bands center of 570 nm show a suppression of the weak visible band. The experimental results are discussed based on the scattering and/or absorbance in opal crystals

  11. A thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal for monitoring glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liguo; Xie, Zhuoying; Xu, Hua; Xu, Ming; Han, Guozhi; Wang, Cheng; Bai, Xuduo; Gu, ZhongZe

    2012-03-01

    An optical method was developed to monitor the glass transition of the polymer by taking advantage of reflection spectrum change of the thermally tunable inverse opal photonic crystal. The thermally tunable photonic bands of the polymer inverse opal photonic crystal were traceable to the segmental motion of macromolecules, and the segmental motion was temperature dependent. By observing the reflection spectrum change of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal during thermal treatment, the glass transition temperature of polystyrene was gotten. Both changes of the position and intensity of the reflection peak were observed during the glass transition process of the polystyrene inverse opal photonic crystal. The optical change of inverse opal photonic crystal was so large that the glass transition temperature could even be estimated by naked eyes. The glass transition temperature derived from this method was consistent with the values measured by differential scanning calorimeter.

  12. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance.

  13. In-depth study of the pseudogap in artificial opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this work we present optical and structural characterisation of high-quality opal based photonic crystals consisting of polystyrene spheres ordered into a FCC lattice. By means of optical diffraction we orient our samples so that the evolution of its spectral features in reflectivity experiments may be probed along desired directions in reciprocal space. Prior to a comparison with calculated bands, finite size effects in the optical properties of the samples are taken into account. Further, attention is paid to the appearance of spectral features for energies above those where the characteristic Bragg peak is found.

  14. Filtering of elastic waves by opal-based hypersonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasyuk, Alexey S; Scherbakov, Alexey V; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Akimov, Andrey V; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A; Kaplan, Saveliy F; Grudinkin, Sergey A; Nashchekin, Alexey V; Pevtsov, Alexander B; Golubev, Valery G; Berstermann, Thorsten; Brüggemann, Christian; Bombeck, Michael; Bayer, Manfred

    2010-04-14

    We report experiments in which high quality silica opal films are used as three-dimensional hypersonic crystals in the 10 GHz range. Controlled sintering of these structures leads to well-defined elastic bonding between the submicrometer-sized silica spheres, due to which a band structure for elastic waves is formed. The sonic crystal properties are studied by injection of a broadband elastic wave packet with a femtosecond laser. Depending on the elastic bonding strength, the band structure separates long-living surface acoustic waves with frequencies in the complete band gap from bulk waves with band frequencies that propagate into the crystal leading to a fast decay.

  15. Spin alignment in heavy and light flavour systems at OPAL

    CERN Document Server

    Robins, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Spin alignment of inclusive vector mesons and longitudinal polarization of Lambda hyperons have been measured in a sample of 4.3 million hadronic Z/sup 0/ decays from the OPAL detector at LEP. Leading, light vector mesons have been $9 found to populate preferentially the helicity-zero state, a result which has no firm theoretical explanation. The values of off-diagonal elements of the helicity density matrix are in agreement with a theory based on the Standard $9 Model with coherent fragmentation. The longitudinal polarization of the Lambda is well described by a model in which the constituent strange quark carries all of the hyperon spin.

  16. Burial of a Man-At-Arms in Kudash I Burial Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazantseva Olga A.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article features a comprehensive analysis of items discovered in male burial 160 of Kudash I burial ground – a unique source of materials for the research of interactions between the local and foreign population on the Middle Kama region in 3rd – 5th centuries A.D. The monument is located in Bardymsky district of Perm Krai. The complex of metal objects comprises a set of personal protective armament rarely discovered in the Kama region: an open-work helmet, a set of plate armour, a sword, a spear head, a knife and "crooked scythes". The article contains a description of the grave, its structure, morphology and classification of findings, as well as the results of an investigation of the manufacturing technology of the following armament and implements: sword, spear head, knife, and "crooked scythe" conducted using the metallographic method. It also features a graphical reconstruction of the warriors’s protective armament – the helmet. The authors determined counterparts of the grave complex discovered at archaeological sites in the Middle Kama region and the Altai Mountains. The apparel of the man-at-arms represents a unique set of protective and offensive armament. The armour of the deceased is complemented by an open-work ceremonial helmet with an aventail, which suggests that the grave belonged to a military commander. The date of burial was determined on the basis of artefact study results as late 4th – early 5th centuries A.D.

  17. Disruption of the Opal Stop Codon Attenuates Chikungunya Virus-Induced Arthritis and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer E; Long, Kristin M; Whitmore, Alan C; Sanders, Wes; Thurlow, Lance R; Brown, Julia A; Morrison, Clayton R; Vincent, Heather; Peck, Kayla M; Browning, Christian; Moorman, Nathaniel; Lim, Jean K; Heise, Mark T

    2017-11-14

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus responsible for several significant outbreaks of debilitating acute and chronic arthritis and arthralgia over the past decade. These include a recent outbreak in the Caribbean islands and the Americas that caused more than 1 million cases of viral arthralgia. Despite the major impact of CHIKV on global health, viral determinants that promote CHIKV-induced disease are incompletely understood. Most CHIKV strains contain a conserved opal stop codon at the end of the viral nsP3 gene. However, CHIKV strains that encode an arginine codon in place of the opal stop codon have been described, and deep-sequencing analysis of a CHIKV isolate from the Caribbean identified both arginine and opal variants within this strain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the introduction of the arginine mutation in place of the opal termination codon may influence CHIKV virulence. We tested this by introducing the arginine mutation into a well-characterized infectious clone of a CHIKV strain from Sri Lanka and designated this virus Opal524R. This mutation did not impair viral replication kinetics in vitro or in vivo Despite this, the Opal524R virus induced significantly less swelling, inflammation, and damage within the feet and ankles of infected mice. Further, we observed delayed induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as reduced CD4 + T cell and NK cell recruitment compared to those in the parental strain. Therefore, the opal termination codon plays an important role in CHIKV pathogenesis, independently of effects on viral replication. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes significant outbreaks of viral arthralgia. Studies with CHIKV and other alphaviruses demonstrated that the opal termination codon within nsP3 is highly conserved. However, some strains of CHIKV and other alphaviruses contain mutations in the opal termination codon. These mutations alter the virulence

  18. Hydrology of the solid waste burial ground as related to potential migration of radionuclides, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, Jack T.; Robertson, J.B.; Janzer, V.J.; Saindon, L.G.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made (1970-1974) to evaluate the geohydrologic and geochemical controls on subsurface migration of radionuclides from pits and trenches in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) solid waste burial ground and to determine the existence and extent of radionuclide migration from the burial ground. A total of about 1,700 sediment, rock, and water samples were collected from 10 observation wells drilled in and near the burial ground of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS). Within the burial ground area, the subsurface rocks are composed principally of basalt. Wind- and water-deposited sediments occur at the surface and in beds between the thicker basalt zones. Two principal sediment beds occur at about 110 feet and 240 feet below the land surface. The average thickness of the surficial sedimentary layer is about 15 feet while that of the two principal subsurface layers is 13 and 14 feet, respectively. The water table in the aquifer beneath the burial ground is at a depth of about 580 feet. Fission, activation, and transuranic elements were detected in some of the samples from the 110- and 240-foot sedimentary layers. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. First results from the Hubble OPAL Program: Jupiter in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amy A.; Wong, Michael H.; Orton, Glenn S.

    2015-11-01

    The Hubble 2020: Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program is a Director's Discretionary program designed to generate two yearly global maps for each of the outer planets to enable long term studies of atmospheric color, structure and two-dimensional wind fields. This presentation focuses on Jupiter results from the first year of the campaign. Data were acqured January 19, 2015 with the WFC3/UVIS camera and the F275W, F343N, F395N, F467M, F502N, F547M, F631N, F658N, and F889N filters. Global maps were generated and are publicly available through the High Level Science Products archive: https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/opal/Using cross-correlation on the global maps, the zonal wind profile was measured between +/- 50 degrees latitude and is in family with Voyager and Cassini era profiles. There are some variations in mid to high latitude wind jet magnitudes, particularly at +40°and -35° planetographic latitude. The Great Red Spot continues to maintain an intense orange coloration, as it did in 2014. However, the interior shows changed structure, including a reduced core and new filamentary features. Finally, a wave not previously seen in Hubble images was also observed and is interpreted as a baroclinic instability with associated cyclone formation near 16° N latitude. A similar feature was observed faintly in Voyager 2 images, and is consistent with the Hubble feature in location and scale.

  20. General structure and functions of the OPAL optimization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolas, P.; Sustek, J.; Svarny, J.

    2005-01-01

    Presented version of OPAL - the in core fuel management system is under development also for core loading optimization of NPP Temelin (WWER-1000 type reactor). Description of the algorithm of separate modules was presented in several AER papers. The optimization process of NPP Temelin loading patterns comprises problems like preparation input data for NPP SW, loading searching, fixing and splitting of fuel enrichments, BP-assignment, FA rotation and fuel cycle economics. In application for NPP Temelin has been used NPP Temelin code system (spectral code with macrocode). The objective of fuel management is to design a fuel-loading scheme that is capable of producing the required energy at the minimum cost while satisfying the safety constraints. Usually the objectives are: a) To meet the energy production requirements (loaded fuel should have sufficient reactivity that covers reactivity defects associated with startup as well as reactivity loss due to the fuel depletion); b) To satisfy all safety-related limits (loaded fuel should preserve adequate power peaking limits (given namely LOCA), shutdown margins and no positive Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC); c) To minimize the power generation cost ($/kWh(e)). Flow of optimization process OPAL management system is in detail described and application for NPP Temelin cores optimization presented (Authors)

  1. The OPAL Detector (an~Omni~Purpose~Apparatus~for~Lep)

    CERN Multimedia

    Schaile, D A; Watson, N; Craciun, M; Hanson, G; Mcmahon, T J; Stokes, W; Wilson, G W; Carter, J; Plane, D; Scharff-hansen, P; Sahr, O M; Rembser, C; Saeki, T; Nisius, R; Campana, S; Kormos, L L; Marchant, T E; Takeda, H; Kupper, M; Hill, J C; Hajdu, C; Hauschild, M; Charlton, D; Kellogg, R; Kluth, S; Asai, S; Nellen, B; Bright-thomas, P; Polok, J; Guenther, P O; Keeler, R; Schwick, C; Stephens, K; Zankel, K; Watkins, P; Chang, C Y; Roney, M; Fischer, H; Dubbert, J

    2002-01-01

    The OPAL Detector (an Omni Purpose Apparatus for Lep) \\\\ \\\\OPAL, a general purpose detector, was designed to study a wide range of unexplored physics at LEP. \\\\ \\\\At LEP1, one of the central issues is the precise determination of the mass, width and couplings to quarks and leptons of the Z$^{0}$ boson. At LEP2 the mass and couplings of the W$^\\pm$ bosons are determined. Accurate measurements of these quantities might reveal the mechanisms by which symmetries are broken. Many topics relating to heavy flavours are studied, including the properties of tau leptons, and the spectroscopy, lifetimes and mixing of hadrons containing b-quarks. \\\\ \\\\There are very active QCD and Two-Photon groups. Among the topics being studied are the determination of the strong coupling constant, $ \\alpha _{S} $, tests of the group structure of QCD, differences between quark- and gluon-induced jets, many aspects of the fragmentation process measurements of many different final states in photon-photon collision, and measurement of str...

  2. About the problem of self-burial of radioactive wasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosachevskij, L.Ya.; Syui, L.S.

    1999-01-01

    Problem dealing with self-burial of finite thickness spherical container with radioactive waste into the melting rock was approached. The elaborated mathematical model in contrast to the available ones takes account of thermal losses in the hard rock and in the melting behind the container as well as, the back heat release at melting hardening. Calculation conducted for the particular case of self-burial into granite demonstrates that accounting of these factors increases essentially the maximum permissible radius when container remains in the solid state and decreases the rate of its burial [ru

  3. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of rodents at a waste burial site, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, J.R.; Bennett, K.D.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    Small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (Sites 1 and 2) at Area G, TA-54, and a control site outside Area G (Site 3) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and to identify the primary mode of contamination to small mammals, either through surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for americium ( 241 Am), strontium ( 90 Sr), plutonium ( 238 Pu and 239 Pu), total uranium (U), and examined by gamma spectroscopy (including cesium [ 137 Cs]). Significantly higher (parametric t-test at p = 0.05) levels of total U, 241 Am, 238 Pu, and potassium ( 40 K) were detected in pelts as compared to the carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. The results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had significantly higher (alpha = 0.05, P = 0.0095) total U concentrations in carcasses than Sites 2 and 3. Site 2 had significantly higher (alpha = 0.05, P = 0.0195) 239 Pu concentrations in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 3

  4. Development of Chemical Indicators of Groundwater Contamination Near the Carcass Burial Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Choi, J.; Kim, M.; Choi, J.; Lee, M.; Lee, H.; Jeon, S.; Bang, S.; Noh, H.; Yoo, J.; Park, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.

    2011-12-01

    A serious outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) and avian influenza (AI) led to the culling of millions of livestock in South Korea from late 2010 to earlier 2011. Because of the scale of FMD and AI epidemic in Korea and rapid spread of the diseases, mass burial for the disposal of carcass was conducted to halt the outbreak. The improper construction of the burial site or inappropriate management of the carcass burial facility can cause the contamination of groundwater mainly due to the discharges of leachate through the base of disposal pit. The leachate from carcass burial contains by products of carcass decay such as amino acids, nitrate, ammonia and chloride. The presence of these chemical components in groundwater can be used as indicators demonstrating contamination of groundwater with leachate from carcass. The major concern about using these chemical indicators is that other sources including manures, fertilizers and waste waters from human or animal activities already exist in farming area. However, we lack the understanding of how groundwater contamination due to mass burial of carcass can be differentiated from the contamination due to livestock manures which shows similar chemical characteristics. The chemical compositions of the leachate from carcass burial site and the wastewater from livestock manure treatment facilities were compared. The chemical compositions considered include total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), nitrate, organic nitrogen (Organic nitrogen =TN-Ammonium Nitrogen- Nitrate nitrogen), ammonia, chloride, sodium, potassium and amino acids (20 analytes). The ratios of concentrations of the chemical compositions as indicators of contamination were determined to distinguish the sources of contamination in groundwater. Indicators which showed a linear relationship between two factors and revealed a distinct difference between the carcass leachate and livestock manure were chosen. In addition, the background level of the

  5. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project

  6. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  7. High-quality substrate for fluorescence enhancement using agarose-coated silica opal film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Li, Juan; Sun, Liguo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Lv, Linli; Zhao, Xiangwei; Xiao, Pengfeng; Hu, Jing; Lv, Mei; Gu, Zhongze

    2010-08-01

    To improve the sensitivity of fluorescence detection in biochip, a new kind of substrates was developed by agarose coating on silica opal film. In this study, silica opal film was fabricated on glass substrate using the vertical deposition technique. It can provide stronger fluorescence signals and thus improve the detection sensitivity. After coating with agarose, the hybrid film could provide a 3D support for immobilizing sample. Comparing with agarose-coated glass substrate, the agarose-coated opal substrates could selectively enhance particular fluorescence signals with high sensitivity when the stop band of the silica opal film in the agarose-coated opal substrate overlapped the fluorescence emission wavelength. A DNA hybridization experiment demonstrated that fluorescence intensity of special type of agarose-coated opal substrates was about four times that of agarose-coated glass substrate. These results indicate that the optimized agarose-coated opal substrate can be used for improving the sensitivity of fluorescence detection with high quality and selectivity.

  8. Inverse opal carbons for counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Young; Lee, Youngshin; Cho, Chang-Yeol; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the fabrication of inverse opal carbon counter electrodes using a colloidal templating method for DSSCs. Specifically, bare inverse opal carbon, mesopore-incoporated inverse opal carbon, and graphitized inverse opal carbon were synthesized and stably dispersed in ethanol solution for spray coating on a FTO substrate. The thickness of the electrode was controlled by the number of coatings, and the average relative thickness was evaluated by measuring the transmittance spectrum. The effect of the counter electrode thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the DSSCs was investigated and analyzed by interfacial charge transfer resistance (R(CT)) under EIS measurement. The effect of the surface area and conductivity of the inverse opal was also investigated by considering the increase in surface area due to the mesopore in the inverse opal carbon and conductivity by graphitization of the carbon matrix. The results showed that the FF and thereby the efficiency of DSSCs were increased as the electrode thickness increased. Consequently, the larger FF and thereby the greater efficiency of the DSSCs were achieved for mIOC and gIOC compared to IOC, which was attributed to the lower R(CT). Finally, compared to a conventional Pt counter electrode, the inverse opal-based carbon showed a comparable efficiency upon application to DSSCs.

  9. Inverse opal photonic crystals with photonic band gaps in the visible and near-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Brandon C.; Gilleland, Cody L.; Renfro, Tim; Gutierrez, Jose; Parikh, Kunjal; Glosser, R.; Landon, Preston B.

    2005-08-01

    Colloidal silica spheres with 200nm, 250nm, and 290nm diameters were self-assembled with single crystal crystallites 4-5mm wide and 10-15mm long. Larger spheres with diameters between 1000-2300nm were self-assembled with single crystal crystallites up to 1.5mm wide and 2mm long. The silica opals self-assembled vertically along the [100] direction of the face centered cubic lattice resulting in self-templated opals. Inverse opal photonic crystals with a partial band gap possessing a maximum in the near infrared at 3.8μm were constructed from opal templates composed of 2300nm diameter spheres with chalcogenide Ge33As12Se55 (AMTIR-1), a transparent glass in the near infrared with high refractive index. Inverse gold and gold/ polypropylene composite photonic crystals were fabricated from synthetic opal templates composed of 200-290nm silica spheres. The reflectance spectra and electrical conductance of the resulting structures is presented. Gold was infiltrated into opal templates as gold chloride and heat converted to metallic gold. Opals partially infiltrated with gold were co-infiltrated with polypropylene plastic for mechanical support prior to removal of the silica template with hydrofluoric acid.

  10. Potential Benefits of Manmade Opals Demonstrated for First Time (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    NREL experiments show that disordered inverse opals significantly scatter and trap near-infrared light, with possible impact on optoelectronic materials. Inverse opals, familiar in the form of brilliantly colored opal gemstones, are a class of materials that has astounding optical properties. Scientists have been exploring the ability of inverse opals to manipulate light in the hopes of harnessing this capacity for advanced technologies such as displays, detectors, lasers, and photovoltaics. A research group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that man-made inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering, consequently trapping wavelengths in the near-infrared (NIR), which is important to a number of technologies. This discovery is the first experimental evidence to validate a 2005 theoretical model predicting the confinement of light in such structures, and it holds great promise for improving the performance of technologies that rely on careful light control. This breakthrough also makes possible optoelectronic technologies that use a range of low-cost molecular and semiconductor species that otherwise absorb light too weakly to be useful. The disordered inverse opal architecture validates the theoretical model that predicts the diffusion and confinement of light in such structures. Electrochemically deposited CdSe inverse opal films containing significant morphological disorder exhibit substantial light scattering and consequent NIR light trapping. This discovery holds promise for NIR light management in optoelectronic technologies, particularly those involving weakly absorbing molecular and semiconductor photomaterials.

  11. Comparison of the Reactor Core Characteristics of the AHR and the OPAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, C.; Chae, Hee Taek

    2008-09-15

    The AHR (Advanced HANARO research Reactor) was designed using the experiences from the design, operation and utilization of HANARO. Its neutronic performance was compared to that of the OPAL with a 20 MW power which started its operation recently in Australia. As the OPAL does not have any in-core irradiation hole, a modified core model of the AHR, in which an in-core irradiation hole was changed into a fuel channel, was used for the comparison. For a clean, unperturbed core condition with all fresh fuels in the core and no irradiation holes in the reflector region, the maximum thermal neutron flux (E{sub n}<0.625 eV) in the AHR reaches 4.41x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} s and that in the OPAL reaches 3.96x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s in the reflector region. The maximum flux in the AHR is 10.3% higher than that in the OPAL. The thermal flux region above 4.0x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}s is widely distributed in the reflector of the AHR, but is not observed at all in the reflector of the OPAL. The uranium loading of the AHR core is 45.7 kgU, which is 16.3% higher than the 39.3 kgU of OPAL. For a clean core state, the excess reactivity of the AHR is higher than that of the OPAL. The assembly-average discharge burnup in the OPAL is estimated to be 49.1%U-235 whereas that in the AHR is 62.4%U-235. The difference for the discharge burnup is significant. For the conditions with the same cycle length of 30 days, the number of fuel assemblies consumed in the AHR is only 3/4 that of the OPAL.

  12. Comparison of the Reactor Core Characteristics of the AHR and the OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Chul Gyo; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, C.; Chae, Hee Taek

    2008-09-01

    The AHR (Advanced HANARO research Reactor) was designed using the experiences from the design, operation and utilization of HANARO. Its neutronic performance was compared to that of the OPAL with a 20 MW power which started its operation recently in Australia. As the OPAL does not have any in-core irradiation hole, a modified core model of the AHR, in which an in-core irradiation hole was changed into a fuel channel, was used for the comparison. For a clean, unperturbed core condition with all fresh fuels in the core and no irradiation holes in the reflector region, the maximum thermal neutron flux (E n 14 n/cm 2 s and that in the OPAL reaches 3.96x10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector region. The maximum flux in the AHR is 10.3% higher than that in the OPAL. The thermal flux region above 4.0x10 14 n/cm 2 s is widely distributed in the reflector of the AHR, but is not observed at all in the reflector of the OPAL. The uranium loading of the AHR core is 45.7 kgU, which is 16.3% higher than the 39.3 kgU of OPAL. For a clean core state, the excess reactivity of the AHR is higher than that of the OPAL. The assembly-average discharge burnup in the OPAL is estimated to be 49.1%U-235 whereas that in the AHR is 62.4%U-235. The difference for the discharge burnup is significant. For the conditions with the same cycle length of 30 days, the number of fuel assemblies consumed in the AHR is only 3/4 that of the OPAL

  13. Modeling of Sediment Mechanics for Mine Burial Prediction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brandes, Horst

    2004-01-01

    Numerical model development and testing were carried out for the purpose of assessing the influence of seafloor liquefaction on the burial of mines in shallow water due to cyclic loading by surface water waves...

  14. Waste migration studies at the Savannah River Plant burial ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.; Oblath, S.B.; Hawkins, R.H.; Grant, M.W.; Hoeffner, S.L.; King, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The low-level radioactive waste burial ground at the Savannah River Plant is a typical shallow-land-burial disposal site in a humid region. Studies of waste migration at this site provide generic data for designing other disposal facilities. A program of field, laboratory, and modeling studies for the SRP burial ground has been conducted for several years. Recent results of lysimeter tests, soil-water chemistry studies, and transport modeling are reported. The lysimeter experiments include ongoing tests with 40 lysimeters containing a variety of defense wastes, and recently concluded lysimeter tests with tritium and plutonium waste forms. The tritium lysimeter operated 12 years. In chemistry studies, measurements of soil-water distribution coefficients (K/sub d/) were concluded. Current emphasis is on identification of trace organic compounds in groundwater from the burial site. Development of the dose-to-man model was completed, and the computer code is available for routine use. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Laser generation in opal-like single-crystal and heterostructure photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchyanov, A. S.; Plekhanov, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    This study describes the laser generation of a 6Zh rhodamine in artificial opals representing single-crystal and heterostructure films. The spectral and angular properties of emission and the threshold characteristics of generation are investigated. In the case where the 6Zh rhodamine was in a bulk opal, the so-called random laser generation was observed. In contrast to this, the laser generation caused by a distributed feedback inside the structure of the photonic bandgap was observed in photonic-crystal opal films.

  16. Facile route to magnetophotonic crystals by infiltration of 3D inverse opals with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, J.M.; Taboada, E.; Hrabovsky, D.; Lopez-Garcia, M.; Herranz, G.; Roig, A.; Blanco, A.; Lopez, C.; Fontcuberta, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report here on the fabrication and characterization of magnetophotonic crystals obtained by infiltrating magnetic nanoparticles (maghemite) into silica-based inverse opals. Good quality opals, with adjustable photonic and magnetic characteristics have been obtained by this method. Magnetic and magneto-optic measurements, performed by using SQUID magnetometry and Kerr and Faraday effects, have been used to monitor the magnetic filling of the opals. It is observed that the Kerr rotation is not proportional to the overall magnetization of the magnetophotonic crystal. Possible scenarios for this unexpected result are discussed.

  17. A fast track trigger processor for the OPAL detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, A.A.; Jaroslawski, S.; Wagner, A.

    1986-01-01

    A fast hardware track trigger processor being built for the OPAL experiment is described. The processor will analyse data from the central drift chambers of OPAL to determine whether any tracks come from the interaction region, and thereby eliminate background events. The processor will find tracks over a large angular range, vertical strokecos thetavertical stroke < or approx. 0.95. The design of the processor is described, together with a brief account of its hardware implementation for OPAL. The results of feasibility studies are also presented. (orig.)

  18. Tritium in the burial ground of the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyder, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    This memorandum reviews the available information on tritium-contaminated material discarded to burial grounds. Tritium was the first isotope studied because it represents the most immediate concern with regard to release to the environment. Substantial amounts of tritium are known to be present in the ground water underneath the area, and outcropping of this ground water in springs and seeps has been observed. The response to this release of tritium from the burial ground is a current concern. The amount of tritium emplaced in the burial ground facilities is very uncertain, however, some general conclusions can be made. In particular, most of the tritium buried is associated with spent equipment and other waste, rather than spent melts. Correspondingly, most of the tritium in the ground water seems to be associated with burials of this type, rather than the spent melts. Maps are presented showing the location of burials of tritiated waste by type, and the location of the largest individual burials according to COBRA records

  19. Problems of solidificated radioactive wastes burial into deep geological structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedrovskij, O.L.; Leonov, E.A.; Romadin, N.M.; Shishcits, I.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    Perspectives are noted of the radioactive wastes burial into deep geopogical structures. For these purposes it has been proposed to investigate severap types of rocks, which do not have intensive gas-generation when beeng heated; salt deposits and clays. Basing on the results of calculations it has been shown that the dimentions of zones of substantial deformations in the case of the high-level radioactive wastes burial to not exceed several hundreds of meters. Conclusion is made that in the case of choosing the proper geotogicat structure for burial and ir the case of inclusion in the structure of the burial site a zone of sanitary alienation, it is possible to isolate wastes safely for all the period of preservation. Preliminary demands have been formulated to geological structures and underground burial sites. As main tasks for optimizatiop of burial sited are considered: determination of necessary types, number and reliability of barriers which ensure isolation of wastes; to make prognoses of the stressed and deformed state of a geological massif on the influence of thermal field; investigation in changes of chemical and physical properties of rocks under heat, radiative and chemical influence; estimation of possible diffusion of radioactivity in a mountin massif; development of a rational mining-thechnological schemes of the burual of wastes of different types. A row of tasks in the farmeworks of this probtem are sotved successfutty. Some resutts are given of the theoretical investigations in determination of zones of distructions of rocks because of heat-load [ru

  20. Packaging design criteria modified fuel spacer burial box. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, P.F.

    1994-01-01

    Various Hanford facilities must transfer large radioactively contaminated items to burial/storage. Presently, there are eighteen Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (FSBBs) available on the Hanford Site for transport of such items. Previously, the FSBBS were transported from a rail car to the burial trench via a drag-off operation. To allow for the lifting of the boxes into the burial trench, it will be necessary to improve the packagings lifting attachments and provide structural reinforcement. Additional safety improvements to the packaging system will be provided by the addition of a positive closure system and package ventilation. FSBBs that are modified in such a manner are referred to as Modified Fuel Spacer Burial Boxes (MFSBs). The criteria provided by this PDC will be used to demonstrate that the transfer of the MFSB will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by a package meeting offsite transportation requirements. This fulfills the onsite transportation safety requirements implemented in WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. A Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) will be prepared to evaluate the safety of the transfer operation. Approval of the SARP is required to authorize transfer. Criteria are also established to ensure burial requirements are met

  1. Safety analysis of the Chernobyl accident origin decontamination waste burials in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skurat, V.V.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, N.K.; Gvozdev, A.A.; Serebryanyj, G.Z.; Golikova, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    Potential dangerous of the decontamination waste burials was estimated by means of the generalized multicompartmental model. Characteristics of 24 the most large and unfavorable decontamination waste burials are shown and an estimate of their safety is given. The burial effect zones were determined (100-300 m). A reliability of the forecasting estimate of potential dangerous radioactive contamination of ground waters near the burials was checked on example of the Dudichi decontamination waste burial

  2. Analysis of artificial opals by scanning near field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, J.; Lozano, G.; Lamela, J.; Lifante, G.; Dorado, L. A.; Depine, R. A.; Jaque, F.; Míguez, H.

    2011-04-01

    Herein we present a detailed analysis of the optical response of artificial opal films realized employing a near-field scanning optical microscope in collection and transmission modes. Near-field patterns measured at the rear surface when a plane wave impinges on the front face are presented with the finding that optical intensity maps present a clear correlation with the periodic arrangement of the outer surface. Calculations based on the vector Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method reproduce the different profiles experimentally observed as well as the response to the polarization of the incident field. These observations constitute the first experimental confirmation of the collective lattice resonances that give rise to the optical response of these three dimensional periodic structures in the high-energy range.

  3. Magneto Transport of CVD Carbon in Artificial Opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yin, Ming; Arammash, Fauzi; Datta, Timir

    2014-03-01

    Magneto-transport of carbon inverse opal structures were investigated in the 2.5 to 300 K temperatures and magnetic fields in the 0-10T regime. Qualitatively, our observations lie between those reported by previous researchers. Over this temperature range, transport (in zero magnetic field) is non-metallic; the resistance decreased with rising temperature however the temperature dependent behavior is not activated, as observed with variable range hopping. In three-dimensions, such behavior can also be the result of weak localization and electron-electron interactions; in particular the change in conductivity is a polynomial in fractional powers of absolute temperature. At sub-helium temperature regimes the relative magneto resistance is measured to be ~ 0.1 percent per Tesla. Results of data analysis for several different scenarios will be reported. DOD award #60177-RT-H from the ARO.

  4. Microwave properties of Ni-based ferromagnetic inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, M.; Stashkevich, A. A.; Roussigné, Y.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Menzel, D.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Lukashin, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.; Samarin, S. N.

    2012-11-01

    Investigations of microwave properties of Ni-based inverse ferromagnetic opal-like film with the [111] axis of the fcc structure along the normal direction to the film have been carried out in the 2-18 GHz frequency band. We observed multiple spin wave resonances for the magnetic field applied perpendicular to the film, i.e., along the [111] axis of this artificial crystal. For the field applied in the film plane, a broad band of microwave absorption is observed, which does not contain a fine structure. The field ranges of the responses observed are quite different for these two magnetization directions. This suggests a collective magnetic ground state or shape anisotropy and collective microwave dynamics for this foam-like material. This result is in agreement with SQUID measurements of hysteresis loops for the material. Two different models for this collective behavior are suggested that satisfactorily explain the major experimental results.

  5. Hardware Testing for the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Hardware for several subsystems of the proposed Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS), including the gimbal and avionics, was tested. Microswitches installed on the gimbal were evaluated to verify that their point of actuation would remain within the acceptable range even if the switches themselves move slightly during launch. An inspection of the power board was conducted to ensure that all power and ground signals were isolated, that polarized components were correctly oriented, and that all components were intact and securely soldered. Initial testing on the power board revealed several minor problems, but once they were fixed the power board was shown to function correctly. All tests and inspections were documented for future use in verifying launch requirements.

  6. Analysis of trace elements in opal using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichs, Ruth, E-mail: ruth.hinrichs@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is particularly important for the analysis of trace elements of precious samples, being one of the few methods to determine elements with ppm concentration that does not affect sample integrity. A PIXE methodology for trace element analysis in opal was developed. To avoid detector count saturation due to the high number of Si-Kα X-rays generated in the sample, several filters were employed to optimize the reduction of the Si-Kα signal, while maintaining acceptable intensities of the other relevant X-ray lines. Two proton beam energies were tested, to establish the signal to noise ratio in different X-ray energies. Spectra were fitted with the software GUPIX, using a matrix composition determined with electron beam excited energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Above the energy of the silicon X-ray, several trace elements were quantified.

  7. Biobarriers used in shallow-burial ground stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.

    1979-03-01

    These data show that cobblestone can be effective as a barrier to burrowing animals and insects, but not totally effective as a barrier to plant roots. Because of variable weather patterns at Hanford, five to six year studies are recommended for further evaluation of the effectiveness of different materials as biobarriers to radioactive substances. The following criteria must be met to present plant roots from entering buried waste and transporting radioactive or other elements to the soil surface where they can enter the food web: (1) the burial zone beneath the cover should be kept dry; (2) enough soil or other water-retaining substance should be placed in the cover to hold annual precipitation; (3) plants or other substances should be placed in the cover to remove soil moisture from site each year via evaporation and plant transpiration; and (4) different additions to the cover should be designed and placed over the buried waste to prevent burrowing animals from causing channelization of water through the cover to the lower levels. Stone size appeared to affect the plants' rate of root growth since root growth slowed in the air spaces between stones. Root toxin was 100% effective as a means of keeping roots out of the buried waste; this method could be used as a barrier modification where no plant cover is needed. 9 figures, 2 tables

  8. Commissioning of the Opal reactor cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiering, R.; Lu, W.; Ullah, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At OPAL, Australia's first cold neutron facility will form an essential part of the reactor's research programs. Fast neutrons, born in the core of a reactor, interact with a cryogenic material, in this case liquid deuterium, to give them very low energies ( 1 0 m eV). A cold neutron flux of 1.4 1 0 E 1 4 n /cm 2/ s is expected, with a peak in the energy spectrum at 4.2m eV. The cold neutron source reached cryogenic conditions for the first time in late 2005. The cold neutron source operates with a sub-cooled liquid Deuterium moderator at 24 K. The moderator chamber, which contains the deuterium, has been constructed from AlMg 5. The thermosiphon and moderator chamber are cooled by helium gas, in a natural convection thermosiphon loop. The helium refrigeration system utilises the Brayton cycle, and is fully insulated within a high vacuum environment. Despite the proximity of the cold neutron source to the reactor core, it has been considered as effectively separate to the reactor system, due to the design of its special vacuum containment vessel. As OPAL is a multipurpose research reactor, used for beam research as well as radiopharmaceutical production and industrial irradiations, the cold neutron source has been designed with a stand-by mode, to maximise production. The stand-by mode is a warm operating mode using only gaseous deuterium at ambient temperatures (∼ 3 00 K ), allowing for continued reactor operations whilst parts of the cold source are unavailable or in maintenance. This is the first time such a stand-by feature has been incorporated into a cold source facility

  9. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Fabrication and structure of an opal-gallium nitride nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, V. Yu; Dunin-Borkovski, R. E.; Golubev, V. G.; Hutchison, J. L.; Kartenko, N. F.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Pevtsov, A. B.; Sharenkova, N. V.; Sloan, J.; Sorokin, L. M.

    2001-02-01

    A three-dimensional gallium nitride lattice has been synthesized within the void sublattice of an artificial opal. The composite structure has been characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Modulating light propagation in ZnO-Cu₂O-inverse opal solar cells for enhanced photocurrents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantara, Natalia; Pham, Thi Thu Trang; Boix, Pablo P; Mathews, Nripan

    2015-09-07

    The advantages of employing an interconnected periodic ZnO morphology, i.e. an inverse opal structure, in electrodeposited ZnO/Cu2O devices are presented. The solar cells are fabricated using low cost solution based methods such as spin coating and electrodeposition. The impact of inverse opal geometry, mainly the diameter and thickness, is scrutinized. By employing 3 layers of an inverse opal structure with a 300 nm pore diameter, higher short circuit photocurrents (∼84% improvement) are observed; however the open circuit voltages decrease with increasing interfacial area. Optical simulation using a finite difference time domain method shows that the inverse opal structure modulates light propagation within the devices such that more photons are absorbed close to the ZnO/Cu2O junction. This increases the collection probability resulting in improved short circuit currents.

  11. The effects of lithium hydroxide solution on alkali silica reaction gels created with opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Lyndon D.; Beaudoin, James J.; Grattan-Bellew, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of Nevada opal with calcium hydroxide, potassium hydroxide and lithium hydroxide solutions was investigated. In addition, opal was exposed to a combined solution of these three hydroxides. The progress of the three reactions was followed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 29 Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD results indicated the presence of a low-angle peak exclusive to the lithium-based reactions. The NMR results suggested a change in the silicate structure in the presence of lithium. These techniques indicated that the reaction of the alkali with the opal starting material is inhibited and perhaps stopped in the presence of lithium hydroxide. SEM revealed that the morphology of the reaction products on the surface of the reacted opal grains is markedly different invariably. It was concluded that evidence to support the theory of a protective layer exists and that the nature of the layer varies with ion type

  12. Ordered macroporous platinum electrode and enhanced mass transfer in fuel cells using inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Park, Hee-Young; Kim, Minhyoung; Lim, Ju Wan; Chung, Dong Young; Lee, Myeong Jae; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opal structures are attractive materials for various applications in electrochemical devices because of the benefits derived from their periodic structures: relatively large surface areas, large voidage, low tortuosity and interconnected macropores. However, a direct application of an inverse opal structure in membrane electrode assemblies has been considered impractical because of the limitations in fabrication routes including an unsuitable substrate. Here we report the demonstration of a single cell that maintains an inverse opal structure entirely within a membrane electrode assembly. Compared with the conventional catalyst slurry, an ink-based assembly, this modified assembly has a robust and integrated configuration of catalyst layers; therefore, the loss of catalyst particles can be minimized. Furthermore, the inverse-opal-structure electrode maintains an effective porosity, an enhanced performance, as well as an improved mass transfer and more effective water management, owing to its morphological advantages.

  13. EPR spectra of synthetic, and natural Australian opals - A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, D.R.; Troup, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The EPR spectra of some synthetic opals, and of some Australian natural opals of various provenance, have been obtained, with the use of a Varian E-12 EPR spectrometer operating at ∼9.2 Ghz. The synthetic opals, from Swiss Gilson showed here a broad ESR signal in the g =2 region, with little identifiable structure . The natural Australian opals from Coober Pedy, Lightning Ridge, and Mintabie all showed the clear presence of Fe 3+ , Mn 2+ and a free radical like signal, suspected to be localised on an Al atom. Examples of the various spectra will be presented. It is not yet certain how the spectra correlate with provenance, but the synthetic spectra are quite different from the natural ones

  14. Luminescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots infiltrated into an opal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzintsev, A. N.; Emelchenko, G. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Yakimov, E. E.; Barthou, C.; Maitre, A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the photonic band gap in the photonic crystal, the synthesized SiO 2 opal with embedded CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, on its luminescence in the visible spectral region is studied. It is shown that the position of the photonic band gap in the luminescence and reflectance spectra for the infiltrated opal depends on the diameter of the constituent nanospheres and on the angle of recording the signal. The optimal conditions for embedding the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots from the solution into the opal matrix are determined. It is found that, for the opal-CdSe/ZnS nanocomposites, the emission intensity decreases and the luminescence decay time increases in the spatial directions, in which the spectral positions of the photonic band gap and the luminescence peak of the quantum dots coincide.

  15. Organic Light Emitting Diodes with Opal Photonic Crystal Layer and Carbon Nanotube Anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle Robles, Raquel; Del Rocio Nava, Maria; Williams, Christopher; Zhang, Mei; Fang, Shaoli; Lee, Sergey; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2007-03-01

    We report electroluminescence intensity and spectral changes in light emission from organic light emitting diode (OLEDs) structures, which have thin transparent films of opal photonic crystal (PC). The anode in such PC-OLED is laminated on opal layer from free standing optically transparent multiwall carbon nanotubes (T-CNT) sheets made by dry spinning from CVD grown forests. Silica and polystyrene opal films were grown on glass substrates by vertical sedimentation in colloids in thermal baths and the particle size of opal spheres ranges from 300 nm to 450 nm. The use of T-CNTs, (coated by PEDOT-PSS to avoid shorting) as hole injector, allows to eliminate the use of vacuum deposition of metals and permits to achieve tunneling hole injection regime from CNT tips into Alq^3 emission layer

  16. Organic carbon burial in a mangrove forest, margin and intertidal mud flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Christian J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Naidu, A. Sathy; Sanders, Luciana M.; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.

    2010-12-01

    The flux of total organic carbon (TOC) to depositional facies (intertidal mud flat, margin and forest) was quantified for a tropical mangrove forest in Brazil. Results indicate that these mangrove margins and intertidal mudflats are sites of large TOC accumulation, almost four times greater than the global averages for mangrove forests. The TOC burial rates were determined from organic carbon content in sediment cores which were dated using 210Pb. Burial rates were calculated to be 1129, 949, and 353 (g m -2 yr -1), for the mud flat, margin and forest, respectively. Sediment accumulation rates (SAR) were estimated to be 7.3, 5.0 and 2.8 mm yr -1. Sediment characterization (δ 13C, δ 15N, TOC/TN and mud fraction) indicated a representative mangrove system with a record of consistent organic matter flux of up to 100 years. Because of substantial burial of organic carbon in mangrove ecosystems, their role in the global carbon budget must be considered. More importantly, as climate change influences temperature and sea level, mangrove ecosystems will respond to specific climatic conditions.

  17. Identification of electrons from semileptonic b quark decays. Determination of Γsub(banti b)/Γhad at the Z0 resonance with the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollnik, A.

    1992-05-01

    A procedure for the identification of electrons in multihadronic Z 0 decays with the OPAL Detector has been developed. With this method electrons with high momentum and high transverse momentum to the closest jet can be identified in the barrel region (vertical stroke cos vertical stroke 4 GeV/c and p t > 0.8 GeV/c. In a total of 136000 multihadronic Z 0 decays recorded with the OPAL detector in 1990 about 1300 electrons were registered. Using the semileptonic branching ratio Br(b → e) as determined by CLEO at the Υ (4S) resonance, we obtain a value of Γsub(banti b) = 394 ± 13 (stat.) ± 32 (sys.) MeV. The precise knowlegde of the momenta of charged paticles is an important input to most of the OPAL physics analysis. To guarantee a good momentum resolution over a long period of time, calibration and monitoring of the tracking chambers an efficient optical system with two UV-Lasers was installed. In each half of the 24 sectors two parallel beams with a relative distance of 10 mm are provided. The system for the active control of the beam positions and also the method for recording calibration events during regular ε + ε - data taking are described. (orig.) [de

  18. Fluxes and burial of particulate organic carbon along the Adriatic mud-wedge (Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Giani, M.; Ravaioli, M.; Miserocchi, S.

    2012-04-01

    Clinoform-shaped deposits are ubiquitous sedimentological bodies of modern continental margins, including both carbonate and silicoclastic platforms. They formed after the attainment of the modern sea level high-stand (mid-late Holocene) when river outlets and shoreline migrated landward. As clinoform-shape deposits are essential building blocks of the infill of sedimentary basins, they are sites of intense organic carbon (OC) deposition and account for a significant fraction of OC burial in the ocean during interglacial periods. In this study, we focused on sigmoid clinoforms that are generally associated with low-energy environments. In particular, we characterized the modern accumulation and burial of OC along the late-Holocene sigmoid in the Western Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea). This sedimentary body consists of a mud wedge recognizable on seismic profiles as a progradational unit lying on top the maximum flooding surface that marks the time of maximum landward shift of the shoreline attained around 5.5 kyr cal BP. In the last two decades, several projects have investigated sediment dynamics and organic geochemistry along the Adriatic mud wedge (e.g., PRISMA, EURODELTA, EuroSTRATAFORM, PASTA, CIPE, VECTOR). All these studies increased our understanding of strata formation and organic matter cycling in this epicontinental margin. The overarching goal of this study was to combine the results gained during these projects with newly acquired data to assess fluxes to seabed and burial efficiency of organic carbon along the uppermost strata of the Adriatic mud-wedge. Our study benefited of an extensive number of radionuclide-based (Pb-210, and Cs-137) sediment accumulation rates and numerous biogeochemical data of surface sediments and sediment cores (organic carbon, total nitrogen, radiocarbon measurements, carbon stable isotopes, and biomarkers). In addition, because the accumulation of river-borne sediment may or may not be linked to a specific source, another

  19. Preliminary hydrogeologic investigation of the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site, Fleming County, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehner, Harold H.

    1979-01-01

    Burial trenches at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site , Fleming County, Ky., cover an area of about 0.03 square mile, and are located on a plateau, about 300 to 400 feet above surrounding valleys. Although surface-water characteristics are known, little information is available regarding the ground-water hydrology of the Maxey Flats area. If transport of radionuclides from the burial site were to occur, water would probably be the principal mechanism of transport by natural means. Most base flow in streams around the burial site is from valley alluvium, and from the mantle of regolith, colluvium, and soil partially covering adjacent hills. Very little base flow is due to ground-water flow from bedrock. Most water in springs is from the mantle, rather than from bedrock. Rock units underlying the Maxey Flats area are, in descending order, the Nancy and Farmers Members of the Borden Formation, Sunbury, Bedford, and Ohio Shales, and upper part of the Crab Orchard Formation. These units are mostly shales, except for the Farmers Member, which is mostly sandstone. Total thickness of the rocks is about 320 feet. All radioactive wastes are buried in the Nancy Member. Most ground-water movement in bedrock probably occurs in fractures. The ground-water system at Maxey Flats is probably unconfined, and recharge occurs by (a) infiltration of rainfall into the mantle, and (b) vertical, unsaturated flow from the saturated regolith on hilltops to saturated zones in the Farmers Member and Ohio Shale. Data are insufficient to determine if saturated zones exist in other rock units. The upper part of the Crab Orchard Formation is probably a hydrologic boundary, with little ground-water flow through the formation. (USGS)

  20. Hierarchical opal grating films prepared by slide coating of colloidal dispersions in binary liquid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmok; Kim, Seulgi; Kim, Seulki; Kim, Jin-Ho; Lee, Hyunjung

    2015-02-15

    There are active researches on well ordered opal films due to their possible applications to various photonic devices. A recently developed slide coating method is capable of rapid fabrication of large area opal films from aqueous colloidal dispersion. In the current study, the slide coating of polystyrene colloidal dispersions in water/i-propanol (IPA) binary media is investigated. Under high IPA content in a dispersing medium, resulting opal film showed a deterioration of long range order, as well as a decreased film thickness due to dilution effect. From the binary liquid, the dried opal films exhibited the unprecedented topological groove patterns with varying periodic distances as a function of alcohol contents in the media. The groove patterns were consisted of the hierarchical structures of the terraced opal layers with periodic thickness variations. The origin of the groove patterns was attributed to a shear-induced periodic instability of colloidal concentration within a thin channel during the coating process which was directly converted to a groove patterns in a resulting opal film due to rapid evaporation of liquid. The groove periods of opal films were in the range of 50-500 μm, and the thickness differences between peak and valley of the groove were significantly large enough to be optically distinguishable, such that the coated films can be utilized as the optical grating film to disperse infra-red light. Utilizing a lowered hydrophilicity of water/IPA dispersant, an opal film could be successfully coated on a flexible Mylar film without significant dewetting problem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Manipulation of inverted and direct opals by a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, S; Milani, M; Tatti, F; Savoia, C

    2008-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling techniques are presented aiming at the manipulation of both tin dioxide (SnO 2 ) inverted opals and polystyrene (PS) direct opals. Different SnO 2 opals are considered in order to estimate the regularity of their bulk after the production. A SnO 2 mesoporous monolith is FIB micromachined to make it suitable for optical applications. PS direct opals are structured by FIB milling at different scales. Ordered arrays of PS opals are modified by selectively removing a single sphere. In performing this task, we discuss the effects on the FIB milling due to the gas-assisted enhanced etching and to the binding of the nearest neighbours. Techniques to achieve imaging of PS opals in absence of a conductive coating are also brought up. Furthermore, isolated PS spheres are drilled with or without enhanced etching in order to produce controlled defects on them. The FIB-assisted manipulations we show may find potential applications in the field of photonic crystals, (bio)sensors and lithography assisted by colloidal masks.

  2. Egg Component-Composited Inverse Opal Particles for Synergistic Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiao; Shao, Changmin; Bian, Feika; Yu, Yunru; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2018-05-23

    Microparticles have a demonstrated value in drug delivery systems. The attempts to develop this technology focus on the generation of functional microparticles by using innovative but accessible materials. Here, we present egg component-composited microparticles with a hybrid inverse opal structure for synergistic drug delivery. The egg component inverse opal particles were produced by using egg yolk to negatively replicate colloid crystal bead templates. Because of their huge specific surface areas, abundant nanopores, and complex nanochannels of the inverse opal structure, the resultant egg yolk particles could be loaded with different kinds of drugs, such as hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT), by simply immersing them into the corresponding drug solutions. Attractively, additional drugs, such as the hydrophilic doxorubicin (DOX), could also be encapsulated into the particles through the secondary filling of the drug-doped egg white hydrogel into the egg yolk inverse opal scaffolds, which realized the synergistic drug delivery for the particles. It was demonstrated that the egg-derived inverse opal particles were with large quantity and lasting releasing for the CPT and DOX codelivery, and thus could significantly reduce cell viability, and enhance therapeutic efficacy in treating cancer cells. These features of the egg component-composited inverse opal microparticles indicated that they are ideal microcarriers for drug delivery.

  3. Capabilities of laser ablation mass spectrometry in the differentiation of natural and artificial opal gemstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Eric; Aubriet, Frédéric; Finqueneisel, Gisèle; Muller, Jean-François

    2003-12-01

    The potentialities of laser ablation coupled to ion cyclotron resonance Fourier transform mass spectrometry are evaluated to distinguish natural and artificial opals. The detection of specific species in both ion detection modes leads us to obtain relevant criteria of differentiation. In positive ions, species including hafnium and large amounts of zirconium atoms are found to be specific for artificial opal. In contrast, aluminum, titanium, iron, and rubidium are systematically detected in the study of natural opals. Moreover, some ions allow us to distinguish between natural opal from Australia and from Mexico. Australian gemstone includes specifically strontium, cesium, and barium. Moreover, it is also found that the yield of (H2O)0-1(SiO2)nX- (X- = O-, OH-, KO-, NaO-, SiO2-, AlO1-2-, FeO2-, ZrO2-, and ZrO3-) and (Al2O3)(SiO2)nAlO2- ions depends on the composition of the sample when opals are laser ablated. Ions, which include zirconium oxide species, are characteristics of artificial gem. In contrast, natural opals lead us, after laser ablation, to the production of ions including H2O, Al2O3 motifs and AlO-, KO-, NaO-, and FeO2- species.

  4. Effects of urban stream burial on nitrogen uptake and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanization has resulted in extensive burial and channelization of headwater streams, yet little is known about impacts on stream ecosystem functions critical for reducing downstream nitrogen pollution. To characterize the biogeochemical impact of stream burial, we measured NO3- uptake, using 15N-NO3- isotope tracer releases, and whole stream metabolism, during four seasons in three paired buried and open streams reaches within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long-term Ecological Research Network. Stream burial increased NO3- uptake lengths, by a factor of 7.5 (p < 0.01) and decreased nitrate uptake velocity and areal nitrate uptake rate by factors of 8.2 (p = 0.01) and 9.6 (p < 0.001), respectively. Stream burial decreased gross primary productivity by a factor of 9.2 (p < 0.05) and decreased ecosystem respiration by a factor of 4.2 (p = 0.06). From statistical analysis of Excitation Emissions Matrices (EEMs), buried streams were also found to have significantly less labile dissolved organic matter. Furthermore, buried streams had significantly lower transient storage and water temperatures. Overall, differences in NO3- uptake and metabolism were primarily explained by decreased transient storage and light availability in buried streams. We estimate that stream burial increases daily watershed nitrate export by as much as 500% due to decreased in-stream retention and may considerably decrease carbon export via decreased primary production. These results

  5. Burial history of two potential clay host formations in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, J.; Wouters, L.; Van Marcke, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    When dealing with long term stability of repository host rocks, it is important to consider and learn from all past geological events since the deposition of the formations. The burial history of the Boom Clay and Ypresian Clays, both considered as potential host rocks in Belgium, illustrates that the North Belgian region was tectonically relatively stable since deposition. In Northern Belgium, where both formations are located at a few hundreds meters of depth, tectonic movements were relatively small and no significant uplifts took place. The burial history of the Boom Clay in Mol, where the HADES underground research facility is located illustrates this. On the poster, the burial history for both formations is presented at two locations each: one location in the outcrop region and one research site location, where the formation is currently buried under a few 100 metres of sediment. (authors)

  6. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhuang

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  7. Organic Carbon Burial in Brazilian Mangrove Sediments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C.; Smoak, J. M.; Sanders, L.; Patchineelam, S.

    2010-12-01

    This study reviews the organic carbon (OC) burial rates in mangrove forests, margins and mud flats in geographically distinct areas of the Brazilian coastline. We exam the burial rates, taking into account the geomorphology of each region. Our initial results indicate that the Northeastern region of Brazil is sequestering significantly more OC than in the Southeastern areas, being that the mass sediment accumulation rates remained consistent within the forests as opposed to large variations found in the mudflats. The other pertinent factor was OC content, which differed substantially in respect to region. Given that the mangrove forests of the Southeastern regions of Brazil may be more susceptible to a rising sea level, as these areas are constricted by vast mountain ranges, this work attempts to put in perspective the possible impacts of climate change on mangrove ecosystems and OC burial along the Brazilian coastal ocean. We also compare our result to global averages.

  8. The Semiotics of Pemature Burial: Feminism in a Postfeminist Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hawkesworth

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will explore how the death of feminism is represented in order to plumb the larger meanings embedded in proclamations of feminism’s symbolic death. I will begin by investigating two mechanisms by which feminism’s death has been produced to unearth the tacit values of feminism’s morticians. I will then consider competing accounts of the “signs of death” in order to explore how particular assumptions about the ontology of feminism are tied to specific forms of metaphorical death. Given the particular kind of distortion involved in the premature burial of a thriving global feminism, the final section of the article situates contemporary feminism’s death knell in the context of a gendered history of live burial practices. By excavating and interpreting such archaic practices, I will link the rhetorical burial of contemporary feminism to an ongoing effort to undermine feminist struggles for social justice.

  9. 618-11 Burial Ground USRADS radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendling, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from February 4 through February 10, 1993 over the 618-11 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 618-11 Burial Ground radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the area. The radiological survey of the 618-11 Burial Ground, along with the background study, were conducted by Site Investigative Surveys Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology was based on utilization of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches and at three (3) feet from the surface soil

  10. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  11. Soil Burial of Polylactic Acid/Paddy Straw Powder Biocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorulnajwa Diyana Yaacob

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the biodegradability of polylactic acid (PLA/paddy straw powder (PSP biocomposites. Environmental degradation was evaluated by composting the biocomposite samples into the soil. Different techniques, including mechanical tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, were used to obtain a view of the degradation that occurred during the soil burial of the biocomposites. Results of the mechanical tests showed that an increasing content of PSP in the biocomposites decreased the tensile strength and elongation at break (EB, while it increased the modulus of elasticity after six months of exposure. Scanning electron microscopy on the surface after soil burial showed that the filler was poorly wetted by the matrix. This explains the reduction in tensile strength and the elongation at break after soil burial. Differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that the crystallinity of the biocomposites increased with longer composting periods.

  12. Forensic Geopedology and Micropedology: New Indications and Lookouts from Pigs Experimental Burials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Stephania Irmgard Elena; Trombino, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The role played by soil scientists in the modern forensic science is very real and important, above all in the crime scenes when buried remains, both strongly decomposed or skeletal, are found. Thanks to a PhD project on Forensic Geopedology, an interdisciplinary team of the Universities of Milano and Milano Bicocca, has been working for the last four years on several sets of experimental burials of pigs and piglets, in different soil types and for different times of burial, in order to get new evidences on environmental responses to the burial, including geopedological and micropedological aspects. The present work constitutes a conclusive synthesis of results emerged from comparative soil characterizations, listed as follow: - Grainsize analyses; - Determination of pH in H2O and KCl; - Total Nitrogen and Organic Carbon analyses: - Quantification of Available Phosphorous; - Determination of Cation Exchange Capacity and Base Saturation; - Analyses of Volatile Fatty Acids; - Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analyses; - Petrographic Optical Microscope analyses (including thin sections descriptions). It is proposed a diachronic picture of the project where it is possible to follow the variability of significance of the different kinds of analyses carried out. The achieved results, especially when cross-checked, are very stimulating as regards the setting of analytical protocols for: - The determination of time since burial (TSB); - The discrimination between primary and secondary burials; - The identification of corpses concealments. All the analyses and different approaches discussed and addressed in this work require extreme care when applied to real forensic scenarios; however, the protocols tested can be a piece of a large and articulated puzzle that depicts the major forensic case studies in which Geopedology can be of help in solving problems or in answering some peculiar questions. It is important to understand that a science so

  13. Free span burial inspection pig. Phase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This report deals with design and construction of a pipeline pig for on-line internal inspection of offshore trenched gas pipelines for pipeline burial, free spans, exposures and loss of concrete weight coating. The measuring principle uses detection of the natural gamma radiation emitted by sea bed formations and the concrete coating of the pipe to map pipeline condition. The gamma ray flux penetrating to the internal side of the pipeline is an effect of the outside conditions. The measuring principle was confirmed in a occasionally present in the gas, blurred seriously sensor signals of the previous instrumentation. The continued project activities have been divided in two phases. Phase A comprised design and construction of a detector system, which could identify and quantify radioactive components from decay of radon-222. During Phase A a new gamma detector was tested in full scale exposed to radon-222. New data analysis procedures for the correction for the influence of radon-222 inside the pipeline, where developed and its utility successfully demonstrated. During Phase B the new detector was mounted in a pipeline pig constructed for inspection of 30-inch gas pipelines. Working conditions were demonstrated in three runs through the southern route of the DONG owned 30-inch gas pipelines crossing the Danish strait named the Great Belt. The FSB-technology found 88% of the free spans identified with the latest acoustic survey. The FSB-technology found in addition 22 free spans that were termed ''invisible'', because they were not identified by the most recent acoustic survey. It is believed that ''invisible free spans'' are either real free spans or locations, where the pipeline has no or very little support from deposits in the pipeline trench. The FSB-survey confirmed all exposed sections longer than 20 metres found by the acoustic survey in the first 21 kilometre of the pipeline. However, the FSB-survey underestimated

  14. Estimated erosion rate at the SRP burial ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.H.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1978-04-01

    The rate of soil erosion at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) burial ground can be calculated by means of the universal soil loss equation. Erosion rates estimated by the equation are more suitable for long-term prediction than those which could be measured with a reasonable effort in field studies. The predicted erosion rate at the SRP burial ground ranges from 0.0007 cm/year under stable forest cover to 0.38 cm/year if farmed with cultivated crops. These values correspond to 170,000 and 320 years, respectively, to expose waste buried 4 ft deep

  15. Taenia sp. in human burial from Kan River, East Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepchenko, Sergey Mikhailovich; Ivanov, Sergey Nikolaevich; Vybornov, Anton Vasilevich; Alekseevich, Tsybankov Alexander; Sergeyevich, Slavinsky Vyacheslav; Lysenko, Danil Nikolaevich; Matveev, Vyacheslav Evgenievich

    2017-05-01

    We present an arhaeoparasitological analysis of a unique burial from the Neftprovod II burial ground in East Siberia, which dated from the Bronze Age. Analysis of a sediment sample from the sacral region of the pelvis revealed the presence of Taenia sp. eggs. Because uncooked animal tissue is the primary source of Taenia, this indicated that the individual was likely consuming raw or undercooked meat of roe deer, red deer, or elk infected with Taenia. This finding represents the oldest case of a human infected with Taenia sp. from Eastern Siberia and Russia.

  16. Alternatives to the burial of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The approach for management of LLRW in different countries has evolved differently due to many factors such as culture and public sentiment, systems of government, public policy, and geography. There are also various methods to disposition LLRW including but not limited to: - Long term statutes and unconditional or conditional release of material, - Direct Burial, - Treatment (Processing) → Burial, - Treatment → Unconditional Release, - Recycle for Unconditional Release or Reuse Within Any Industry, - Controlled Recycle within Nuclear Industry. (author)

  17. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Uraniferous, fluorescent opal, which occurs in tuffaceous sedimentary rocks at Virgin Valley, Nevada, records the temperature and composition of uranium-rich solutions as well as the time of uranium-silica coprecipitation. Results are integrated with previous geologic and geochronologic data for the area to produce a model for uranium mobility that may be used to explore for uranium deposits in similar geologic settings. Uraniferous opal occurs as replacements of diatomite, or silicic air-fall ash layers in tuffaceous lakebeds of the Virgin Valley Formation (Miocene) of Merriam (1907). Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and highangle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal. ?? 1982.

  18. TL and OSL dosimetric properties of Opal gemstone for gamma radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, Patrícia L.; Gronchi, Claudia C.; Oliveira, Raquel A.P.; Khoury, Helen J.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the response of the natural material Opal was studied in relation to its thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), after exposure to the gamma radiation of a "6"0Co source. The structure of the powdered Opal was verified using the X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The material, in its stone form, was turned into powder and mixed to Teflon (also in powder) in three different concentrations, and then pellets were manufactured. The aim of this work was to evaluate the response of these pellets in high-doses of gamma radiation beams, and to observe their possible application as dosimeters, using the TL and OSL techniques. The dosimetric properties of the samples were analyzed by means of different tests, as: TL emission curves and OSL signal decay curves, reproducibility of TL and OSL response, minimum detectable dose, TL and OSL dose–response curves (5 Gy–10 kGy), and fading. The results obtained in this work, for the TL and OSL phenomena, demonstrated that the pellets of Opal + Teflon present an adequate performance e possibility of use as dosimeters in beams of high-dose gamma radiation. - Highlights: • The XRD, SEM and EDX techniques were used to investigate powdered Opal. • Pellets of three different concentrations of Opal and Teflon were studied. • The dosimetric properties of the Opal + Teflon pellets were verified. • TL and OSL techniques were used to analyze the characteristics of the pellets. • Pellets of concentration of 2:1 (Opal:Teflon) presented the most adequate results.

  19. Optical chracterization and lasing in three-dimensional opal-structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki eNishijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The lasing properties of dye-permeated opal pyramidal structures are compared with the lasing properties of opal films. The opal-structures studied were made by sedimentation of micro-spheres and by sol-gel inversion of the direct-opals. Forced-sedimentation by centrifugation inside wet-etched pyramidal pits on silicon surfaces was used to improve the structural quality of the direct-opal structures. Single crystalline pyramids with the base length of ∼ 100 µm were formed by centrifuged sedimentation. The lasing of dyes in the well-ordered crystalline and poly-crystalline structures showed a distinct multi-modal spectrum. Gain via a distributed feedback was responsible for the lasing since the photonic band gap was negligible in a low refractive index contrast medium; the indices of silica and ethylene glycol are 1.46 and 1.42, respectively. A disordered lasing spectrum was observed from opal films with structural defects and multi-domain regions. The three dimensional structural quality of the structures was assessed by in situ optical diffraction and confocal fluorescence. A correlation between the lasing spectrum and the three-dimensional structural quality was established. Lasing threshold of a sulforhodamine dye in a silica opal was controlled via Förster mechanism by addition of a donor rhodamine 6G dye. The lasing spectrum had a well-ordered modal structure which was spectrally stable at different excitation powers. The sharp lasing threshold characterized by a spontaneous emission coupling ratio β ' 10−2 was obtained.

  20. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  1. Concentration of carbonate admixture from opalized tuff into one separate fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogoevski, Slobodan; Boshkovski, Boshko

    2016-01-01

    White opalized tuff (from the Strmosh locality, Probishtip), as a raw silicate amorphous material, contains some quantity of admixtures. The total quantity of admixtures amounts is about 8% mass. Mine powdery ingredients are homogeneously distributed into the basic silicate mass.Carbonate material is a significant part of present admixtures, and it is possible to be separated with controlled milling. Milling parameters (type and time of milling) enables to concentrate the present CaCO 3 in granulometric fraction<0.032 μm, after 30 min. milling. Reliable evidence about afore mentioned separation is shown with simultaneous view of the results of silicate chemical analysis, DT/TG analysis (750 - 850 °C), and sieve-analysis.From the X-ray analysis it is evident that the present carbonate material exists in crypto crystal to amorphous state. The space where CaCO 3 is hidden, presents the place between basic silicate particles inside the groups, generally with dimensions about 40 to 60 μm. The concentration of CaCO 3 appears when this particle group goes to the process of disintegration. (author)

  2. Search for Invisibly Decaying Higgs Bosons with Large Decay Width Using the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostu, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Bailari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batly, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; shen, B.C.; sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a topological search for an invisibly decaying Higgs boson,H, produced via the Bjorken process (e+e- -> HZ). The analysis is based on data recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 629pb-1. In the analysis only hadronic decays of the Z boson are considered. A scan over Higgs boson masses from 1 to 120 GeV and decay widths from 1 to 3000 GeV revealed no indication for a signal in the data. From a likelihood ratio of expected signal and Standard Model background we determine upper limits on cross-section times branching ratio to an invisible final state. For moderate Higgs boson decay widths, these range from about 0.07pb Mh = 60GeV) to 0.57pb (Mh = 114GeV). For decay widths above 200GeV the upper limits are of the order of 0.15pb. The results can be interpreted in general scenarios predicting a large invisible decay width of the Higgs boson. As an example we interpret the results in the so-called...

  3. China action of "Cleanup Plan for Polychlorinated Biphenyls Burial Sites": emissions during excavation and thermal desorption of a capacitor-burial site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Zhou, Lingli; Xue, Nandong; Li, Fasheng; Wu, Guanglong; Ding, Qiong; Yan, Yunzhong; Liu, Bo

    2013-10-01

    Scarce data are available so far on emissions in a given scenario for excavation and thermal desorption, a common practice, of soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). As part of China action of "Cleanup Plan for PCBs Burial Sites", this study roughly estimated PCBs emissions in the scenario for a capacitor-burial site. The concentrations of total PCBs (22 congeners) in soils were in the range of 2.1-16,000μg/g with a mean of 2300μg/g, among the same order of magnitude as the highest values obtained in various PCBs-contaminated sites. Only six congeners belonging to Di-, Tri-, and Tetra-CBs were observed above limits of detection in air samples in the scenario, partially which can be estimated by the USEPA air emission model. Comparing concentrations and composition profiles of PCBs in the soil and air samples further indicated a leaked source of commercial PCBs formulations of trichlorobiphenyl (China PCB no. 1). The measures taken if any to mitigate the volatilization and movement of PCBs and to minimize worker exposure were discussed for improvements of the excavation practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. OPAL reactor calculations using the Monte Carlo code serpent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraro, Diego; Villarino, Eduardo [Nuclear Engineering Dept., INVAP S.E., Rio Negro (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    In the present work the Monte Carlo cell code developed by VTT Serpent v1.1.14 is used to model the MTR fuel assemblies (FA) and control rods (CR) from OPAL (Open Pool Australian Light-water) reactor in order to obtain few-group constants with burnup dependence to be used in the already developed reactor core models. These core calculations are performed using CITVAP 3-D diffusion code, which is well-known reactor code based on CITATION. Subsequently the results are compared with those obtained by the deterministic calculation line used by INVAP, which uses the Collision Probability Condor cell-code to obtain few-group constants. Finally the results are compared with the experimental data obtained from the reactor information for several operation cycles. As a result several evaluations are performed, including a code to code cell comparison at cell and core level and calculation-experiment comparison at core level in order to evaluate the Serpent code actual capabilities. (author)

  5. Selectively Patterning Polymer Opal Films via Microimprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Zhao, Qibin; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-11-01

    Large-scale structural color flexible coatings have been hard to create, and patterning color on them is key to many applications, including large-area strain sensors, wall-size displays, security devices, and smart fabrics. To achieve controlled tuning, a micro-imprinting technique is applied here to pattern both the surface morphology and the structural color of the polymer opal films (POFs). These POFs are made of 3D ordered arrays of hard spherical particles embedded inside soft shells. The soft outer shells cause the POFs to deform upon imprinting with a pre-patterned stamp, driving a flow of the soft polymer and a rearrangement of the hard spheres within the films. As a result, a patterned surface morphology is generated within the POFs and the structural colors are selectively modified within different regions. These changes are dependent on the pressure, temperature, and duration of imprinting, as well as the feature sizes in the stamps. Moreover, the pattern geometry and structural colors can then be further tuned by stretching. Micropattern color generation upon imprinting depends on control of colloidal transport in a polymer matrix under shear flow and brings many potential properties including stretchability and tunability, as well as being of fundamental interest.

  6. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L., E-mail: l.davies@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Howard, C. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Hobbs, S.J. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Jones, D.T. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Power, S.A. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rose, N. [Department of Geography, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ryder, C.; Seed, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stevens, G. [Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); White, P.C.L. [Environment Department, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: > Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. > Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. > New insights into urban pollution. > A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  7. Open Air Laboratories (OPAL): A community-driven research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.; Bell, J.N.B.; Bone, J.; Head, M.; Hill, L.; Howard, C.; Hobbs, S.J.; Jones, D.T.; Power, S.A.; Rose, N.; Ryder, C.; Seed, L.; Stevens, G.; Toumi, R.; Voulvoulis, N.; White, P.C.L.

    2011-01-01

    OPAL is an English national programme that takes scientists into the community to investigate environmental issues. Biological monitoring plays a pivotal role covering topics of: i) soil and earthworms; ii) air, lichens and tar spot on sycamore; iii) water and aquatic invertebrates; iv) biodiversity and hedgerows; v) climate, clouds and thermal comfort. Each survey has been developed by an inter-disciplinary team and tested by voluntary, statutory and community sectors. Data are submitted via the web and instantly mapped. Preliminary results are presented, together with a discussion on data quality and uncertainty. Communities also investigate local pollution issues, ranging from nitrogen deposition on heathlands to traffic emissions on roadside vegetation. Over 200,000 people have participated so far, including over 1000 schools and 1000 voluntary groups. Benefits include a substantial, growing database on biodiversity and habitat condition, much from previously unsampled sites particularly in urban areas, and a more engaged public. - Highlights: → Environmental research conducted jointly by the public and scientists. → Over 200,000 people involved, 8000 sites surveyed, uncertainty minimised. → New insights into urban pollution. → A more engaged and informed society. - Research is enriched where the public and scientists work together.

  8. Rapid Software Development for Experiment Control at OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathaway, P.V.; Lam, Tony; Franceschini, Ferdi; Hauser, Nick; Rayner, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Full text: ANSTO is undertaking the parallel development of instrument control and graphical experiment interface software for seven neutron beam instruments at OPAL. Each instrument poses several challenges for a common system solution, including custom detector interfaces, a range of motion and beamline optics schema, and a spectrum of online data reduction requirements. To provide a superior system with the least development effort, the computing team have adopted proven, configurable, server-based control software (SICS)1., a highly Integrated Scientific Experimental Environment (GumTree)2. and industry-standard database management systems. The resulting graphical interfaces allow operation in a familiar experiment domain, with monitoring of data and parameters independent of control system specifics. GumTree presents the experimenter with a consistent interface for experiment management, instrument control and data reduction tasks. The facility instrument scientists can easily reconfigure instruments and add ancillaries. The user community can expect a reduced learning curve for performing each experiment. GumTree can be installed anywhere for pre-experiment familiarisation, postprocessing of acquired data sets, and integration with third party analysis tools. Instrument scientists are seeing faster software development iterations and have a solid basis to prepare for the next suite of instruments. 1. SICS from PSI (lns00.psi.ch). 2. GumTree (gumtree.sourceforge.net), new site: http://gumtree.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

  9. Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    regular review and comparison. The annual reports discussed here are the primary sources for these reviews. The pathways of interest are air and groundwater for both operational and post-closure conditions at the LLBG, with groundwater considered to be the most significant long-term exposure pathway. Constituents that contributed at least 0.1% of the total relative hazard were selected as target analytes for monitoring. These are technetium-99, uranium, and iodine-129. Because of its environmental unavailability, carbon 14 was removed from the list of constituents. Given the potential uncertainties in inventories at the 200 Area LLBG and the usefulness of tritium as a contaminant indicator, tritium will be monitored as a constituent of concern at all burial grounds. Preexisting contamination plumes in groundwater beneath low-level waste management areas are attributed to other past-practice liquid waste disposal sites. Groundwater and air will be sampled and analyzed for radiogenic components. Subsidence monitoring will also be performed on a regular basis. The existing near-facility and surveillance air monitoring programs are sufficient to satisfy the performance assessment monitoring. Groundwater monitoring will utilize the existing network of wells at the LLBG, and co-sampling with RCRA groundwater monitoring, to be sampled semiannually. Installation of additional wells is currently underway to replace wells that have gone dry

  10. Study of prompt photon and neutral pion production in photon-photon scattering with the OPAL experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lillich, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    For the first time at LEP the production of prompt photons is studied in the collisions of quasi-real photons using the OPAL data taken at e+e- centre-of mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The total inclusive production cross-section for isolated prompt photons in the kinematic range of transverse momentum > 3.0 GeV and the absolut value of pseudorapidity <1 is determined to be (0.32 +- 0.04 (stat) +- 0.04 (sys)) pb. Differential cross-sections are compared to the predictions of a next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculation. In the second part of this thesis inclusive differential neutral pion cross-sections in photon photon collisons are measured. This measurement is an important test of QCD. In addition this process is the main background for prompt photons.

  11. Functional Polymer Opals and Porous Materials by Shear-Induced Assembly of Tailor-Made Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallei, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Photonic band-gap materials attract enormous attention as potential candidates for a steadily increasing variety of applications. Based on the preparation of easily scalable monodisperse colloids, such optically attractive photonic materials can be prepared by an inexpensive and convenient bottom-up process. Artificial polymer opals can be prepared by shear-induced assembly of core/shell particles, yielding reversibly stretch-tunable materials with intriguing structural colors. This feature article highlights recent developments of core/shell particle design and shear-induced opal formation with focus on the combination of hard and soft materials as well as crosslinking strategies. Structure formation of opal materials relies on both the tailored core/shell architecture and the parameters for polymer processing. The emphasis of this feature article is on elucidating the particle design and incorporation of addressable moieties, i.e., stimuli-responsive polymers as well as elaborated crosslinking strategies for the preparation of smart (inverse) opal films, inorganic/organic opals, and ceramic precursors by shear-induced ordering. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection.

  13. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and high-angle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal. (Auth.)

  14. Practitioner insights on obesity prevention: the voice of South Australian OPAL workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge based on science has been central to implementing community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions. The art of practitioner wisdom is equally critical to ensure locally relevant responses. In South Australia (SA), the OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle) program has been implemented to reduce childhood obesity across 20 communities reaching nearly one quarter of the state's population. Staff from across the State come together at regular intervals to share practice challenges and insights and refine the model of practice. Over a 3-year period 12 reflective practice workshops were held with OPAL staff (n = 46). OPAL staff were guided by an external facilitator using inquiring questions to reflect on their health promotion practice within local government. Three themes were identified as central within the reflections. The first theme is shared clarity through the OPAL obesity prevention model highlighting the importance of working to a clearly articulated, holistic obesity prevention model. The second theme is practitioner skill and sensitivity required to implement the model and deal with the 'politics' of obesity prevention. The final theme is the power of relationships as intrinsic to effective community based health promotion. Insights into the daily practices and reflections from obesity prevention practitioners are shared to shed light on the skills required to contribute to individual and social change. OPAL staff co-authored this paper. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Uraniferous opal, Virgin Valley, Nevada: conditions of formation and implications for uranium exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, R A [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)

    1981-01-01

    Fission-track radiography shows uranium to be homogeneously dispersed throughout the opal structure, suggesting coprecipitation of dissolved uranium and silica gel. Fluid inclusions preserved within opal replacements of diatomite have homogenization temperatures in the epithermal range and are of low salinity. Four samples of opal from one locality all have U-Pb apparent ages which suggest uraniferous opal precipitation in late Pliocene time. These ages correspond to a period of local, normal faulting, and high-angle faults may have served as vertical conduits for transport of deep, thermalized ground water to shallower levels. Lateral migration of rising solutions occurred at intersections of faults with permeable strata. Silica and some uranium were dissolved from silica-rich host strata of 5-20 ppm original uranium content and reprecipitated as the solutions cooled. The model predicts that in similar geologic settings, ore-grade concentrations of uranium will occur in permeable strata that intersect high-angle faults and that contain uranium source rocks as well as efficient reductant traps for uranium. In the absence of sufficient quantities of reductant materials, uranium will be flushed from the system or will accumulate in low-grade disseminated hosts such as uraniferous opal.

  16. Mesolithic burial place in La Martina Cave (Dinant, Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewez, M.; Gilot, E.; Groessens-Van-Dyck, M.C.; Cordy, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The ''La Martina'' cave is located near Dinant (Belgium). Although the sediments had been shoveled out in the mid XIXth century, a calcic breccia has provided prehistoric bones. We can distinguish a Pleistocene fauna with cave bear, one Mesolithic burial place with two cromagnoid skeletons, from the 6th millennium BC, and some Holocene faunal remains. (authors). 7 refs

  17. Waste analysis plan for the low-level burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, B.M.

    1996-01-01

    This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Low-Level Burial Grounds that are located in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit

  18. Quantification and presence of human ancient DNA in burial place ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantification and presence of human ancient DNA in burial place remains of Turkey using real time polymerase chain reaction. ... A published real-time PCR assay, which allows for the combined analysis of nuclear or ancient DNA and mitochondrial DNA, was modified. This approach can be used for recovering DNA from ...

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulloway, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car

  20. Waste analysis plan for the low-level burial grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, C.R.

    1996-09-19

    This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) which are located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

  1. Quantification and presence of human ancient DNA in burial place ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... burial place remains of Turkey using real time ... DNA was isolaled from fossil bone tissue remains with Bio Robot EZ1 and ... the increase in the amount of DNA as it is amplified. The ... species or human blood in this work.

  2. Environmental analysis burial of offsite low-level waste at SRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poe, W.L.; Moyer, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    The environmental effects of receipt and burial of low-level naval waste generated at Department of Energy Laboratories are assessed in this environmental analysis. Through 1979, this low-level DOE waste was sent to the NRC-licensed burial ground operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., at Barnwell, South Carolina. DOE announced on October 26, 1979, that DOE-generated low-level waste would no longer be buried at commercial waste burial sites. SRP was selected to receive the naval waste described in this analysis. Receipt and burial of these wastes will have a negligible effect on SRP's environment and increase only slightly the environmental effects of the SRP operations discussed in the EIS on SRP waste management operations. The environmental effects of burial of this waste at Chem-Nuclear Burial Ground or at the SRP Burial Ground are described in this environmental analysis to permit assessment of incremental effects caused by the decision to bury this naval waste in the SRP Burial Ground rather than in the Barnwell Burial Ground. The radiological effects from burial of this waste in either the SRP or Chem-Nuclear Burial Ground are very small when compared to those from natural background radiation or to the annual population dose commitment from operation of SRP. The environmental effects of burial at SRP to dose commitments normally received by the population surrounding SRP are compared

  3. Funeral dress and textiles in 17th and 19th century burials in Ostrobothnia, Finland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipkin, S.; Vajanto, K.; Kallio-Seppä, T.; Kuokkanen, T.; Niinimäki, S.; Väre, T.; van Bommel, M.; Grömer, K.; Pritchard, F.

    2015-01-01

    The 17th-19th-century burial materials from northern Ostrobothnia are studied in order to consider the value, origin and meaning of textiles especially in child burials. The focus is on the preservation, quality and dyes of burial textiles unearthed at the yard of Oulu Cathedral as well as the

  4. Sarmatian Burials Near the Astanino Village in the Eastern Crimea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropotov Viktor Valeryevich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article contains the materials of two Sarmatian burials that had been studied in 1966-1967 years by the Kerch expedition of Institute of Archeology of Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (the chief of expedition – A.M. Leskov in the Astanino village in the Eastern Crimea. These burials had been made on small depth in embankments of barrows of the bronze epoch, therefore it is not possible to track contours of funeral constructions. The dead were laid on their backs, heads turned to the North and the North-West. The utensils buried in the same tombs included two ceramic gray-clay pelikes, two gray-clay bowls, a red-gloss vessel, a red-clay pottery, a set of glass and cornelian beads, and the Egyptian faience beads. These things allow to exactly date the investigated complexes within the second half of the 1st century BC – the beginnings of the 1st century AD. The main distinctive characteristics of Early-Sarmatian burials of Northern Pontic region consist in the use of already existing barrows for burial places, orientations of the dead in the Northern sector, the insignificant depth of burials. Therefore published monuments should be also referred to them. A small number of such complexes with their distribution on the quite big territory between the Don and Dnepr rivers testify to the low density of the nomadic population at that time. The antique sources of the end of the 2nd – 1st centuries BC mention the presence of Roxolani in the given region. The described complexes supplement our poor knowledge of Sarmatian antiquities of the Eastern Crimea and specify the direct contacts of nomads of Northern Pontic region to the antique centers, in immediate proximity from which they had been located.

  5. Evaluation of the ORNL area for future waste burial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Byerly, D.W.; Gonzales, S.

    1983-10-01

    Additional waste-burial facilities will be needed at ORNL within this decade. In order to find environmentally acceptable sites, the ORNL area must be systematically evaluated. This document represents the first step in that selection process. Geologic and hydrologic data from the literature and minor field investigations are used to identify more favorable sites for Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7. Also underway at this time is a companion study to locate a Central Waste Storage Area which could be used in the future to accommodate wastes generated by the X-10, Y-12, and K-25 facilities. From the several watershed options available, the Whiteoak Creek drainage basin is selected as the most promising hydrologic regime. This area contains all past and present waste-disposal facilities and is thus already well monitored. The seven bedrock units within the ORNL area are evaluated as potential burial media. Shales of the Conasauga Group, which are currently used for waste burial in the Whiteoak Creek drainage basin, and the Knox Group are considered the leading candidates. Although the residuum derived from and overlying the Knox dolomite has many favorable characteristics and may be regarded as having a high potential for burial of low-level wastes, at the present it is unproven. Therefore, the Conasauga shales are considered a preferable option for SWSA 7 within the ORNL area. Since the Conasauga interval is currently used for waste burial, it is better understood. One tract in Melton Valley that is underlain by Conasauga shales is nominated for detailed site-characterization studies, and several other tracts are recommended for future exploratory drilling. Exploration is also suggested for a tract in the upper Whiteoak Creek basin where Knox residuum is the shallow subsurface material

  6. Infiltrating a thin or single-layer opal with an atomic vapour: Sub-Doppler signals and crystal optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moufarej, Elias; Maurin, Isabelle; Zabkov, Ilya; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ballin, Philippe; Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Artificial thin glass opals can be infiltrated with a resonant alkali-metal vapour, providing novel types of hybrid systems. The reflection at the interface between the substrate and the opal yields a resonant signal, which exhibits sub-Doppler structures in linear spectroscopy for a range of oblique incidences. This result is suspected to originate in an effect of the three-dimensional confinement of the vapour in the opal interstices. It is here extended to a situation where the opal is limited to a few- or even a single-layer opal film, which is a kind of bidimensional grating. We have developed a flexible one-dimensional layered optical model, well suited for a Langmuir-Blodgett opal. Once extended to the case of a resonant infiltration, the model reproduces quick variations of the lineshape with incidence angle or polarization. Alternately, for an opal limited to a single layer of identical spheres, a three-dimensional numerical calculation was developed. It predicts crystalline anisotropy, which is demonstrated through diffraction on an empty opal made of a single layer of polystyrene spheres.

  7. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as

  8. Solvothermal synthesis of 3D photonic crystals based on ZnS/opal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Xin [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Cao Jieming [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)]. E-mail: jmcao@nuaa.edu.cn; Ji Hongmei [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Fang Baoqing [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Feng Jie [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Pan Lijia [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhang Fang [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Haiyan [Nanomaterials Research Institute, College of Material Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2005-01-15

    We made photonic crystals composed of artificial opals infiltrated with ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals by using self-assembly and solvothermal methods. SEM images show that the silica spheres exhibit a well-ordered arrangement and the ZnS nanocrystals infiltrate within the opal templates by heterogeneous nucleation and growth processing, and the as-synthesized ZnS nanocrystals reveal a cubic phase from X-ray diffraction pattern. Furthermore, the optical properties of the infiltrated opals with different ZnS filling ratio are also studied by transmission spectroscopy, respectively. It is proposed that the position of the stop band can be easily designed by controlling the infiltration ratio of ZnS. These results demonstrate an easy-to-handle and efficient route to obtain high performance photonic crystal structures.

  9. Solvothermal synthesis of 3D photonic crystals based on ZnS/opal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Xin; Cao Jieming; Ji Hongmei; Fang Baoqing; Feng Jie; Pan Lijia; Zhang Fang; Wang, Haiyan

    2005-01-01

    We made photonic crystals composed of artificial opals infiltrated with ZnS semiconductor nanocrystals by using self-assembly and solvothermal methods. SEM images show that the silica spheres exhibit a well-ordered arrangement and the ZnS nanocrystals infiltrate within the opal templates by heterogeneous nucleation and growth processing, and the as-synthesized ZnS nanocrystals reveal a cubic phase from X-ray diffraction pattern. Furthermore, the optical properties of the infiltrated opals with different ZnS filling ratio are also studied by transmission spectroscopy, respectively. It is proposed that the position of the stop band can be easily designed by controlling the infiltration ratio of ZnS. These results demonstrate an easy-to-handle and efficient route to obtain high performance photonic crystal structures

  10. Three-dimensional artificial spin ice in nanostructured Co on an inverse opal-like lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistonov, A. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Chumakova, A. V.; Eckerlebe, H.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Menzel, D.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of the magnetic structure for an inverse opal-like structure under an applied magnetic field is studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The samples were produced by filling the voids of an artificial opal film with Co. It is shown that the local configuration of magnetization is inhomogeneous over the basic element of the inverse opal-like lattice structure (IOLS) but follows its periodicity. Applying the “ice-rule” concept to the structure, we describe the local magnetization of this ferromagnetic three-dimensional lattice. We have developed a model of the remagnetization process predicting the occurrence of an unusual perpendicular component of the magnetization in the IOLS which is defined only by the direction and strength of the applied magnetic field.

  11. Transmission spectra changes produced by decreasing compactness of opal-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andueza, A.; Echeverría, R.; Morales, P.; Sevilla, J.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial opal-like structures based on spheres and colloidal particles have been fabricated in a controlled way, presenting optical band-gap properties in the optical frequency range. Nonclose packed artificial opals have also been fabricated and studied recently. In order to gain a better understanding of these phenomena, we have studied macroscopic models of nonclose packed fcc lattices using glass spheres (ɛ =7) of 8 mm diameter, and measuring in the microwave region (from 10 to 30 GHz). The results have shown a Bragg resonance tunable with filling factor of the opal, and a strong rejected band similar, also present in close packed samples, much less affected by compactness. The relation of this high order band with spheres single layer behavior is also discussed.

  12. Secondary Emission From Synthetic Opal Infiltrated by Colloidal Gold and Glycine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovbeshko, G.I.; Fesenko, O.M.; Boyko, V.V.; Romanyuk, V.R.; Gorelik, V.S.; Moiseyenko, V.N.; Sobolev, V.B.; Shvalagin, V.V.

    2012-01-01

    A comparison of the secondary emission (photoluminescence) and Bragg reflection spectra of photonic crystals (PC), namely, synthetic opals, opals infiltrated by colloidal gold, glycine, and a complex of colloidal gold with glycine is performed. The infiltration of colloidal gold and a complex of colloidal gold with glycine into the pores of PC causes a short-wavelength shift (about 5-15 nm) of the Bragg reflection and increases the intensity of this band by 1.5-3 times. In photoluminescence, the infiltration of PC by colloidal gold and colloidal gold with glycine suppresses the PC emission band near 375-450 nm and enhances the shoulder of the stop-zone band of PC in the region of 470-510 nm. The shape of the observed PC emission band connected with defects in synthetic opal is determined by the type of infiltrates and the excitation wavelength. Possible mechanisms of the effects are discussed.

  13. Resonant infiltration of an opal: Reflection line shape and contribution from in-depth regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, Isabelle; Bloch, Daniel

    2015-06-21

    We analyze the resonant variation of the optical reflection on an infiltrated artificial opal made of transparent nanospheres. The resonant infiltration is considered as a perturbation in the frame of a previously described one-dimensional model based upon a stratified effective index. We show that for a thin slice of resonant medium, the resonant response oscillates with the position of this slice. We derive that for adequate conditions of incidence angle, this spatially oscillating behavior matches the geometrical periodicity of the opal and hence the related density of resonant infiltration. Close to these matching conditions, the resonant response of the global infiltration varies sharply in amplitude and shape with the incidence angle and polarization. The corresponding resonant reflection originates from a rather deep infiltration, up to several wavelengths or layers of spheres. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the present predictions and our previous observations on an opal infiltrated with a resonant vapor.

  14. Angle dependence in slow photon photocatalysis using TiO2 inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Mariano; Zvitco, Gonzalo; Grela, María Alejandra; Mendive, Cecilia B.

    2018-03-01

    The slow photon effect was studied by means of the photocatalytic degradation of stearic acid over TiO2 inverse opals. The comparison of the degradation rates over inverse opals with those obtained over disordered structures at different irradiation angles showed that the irradiation at the blue edge of the stopband leads to the activation of the effect, evidenced by an improvement factor of 1.8 ± 0.6 in the reaction rate for irradiation at 40°. The rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method was employed to confirm the source of the enhancement; simulated spectra showed an enhancement in the absorption of the TiO2 matrix that composes the inverse opal at a 40° irradiation angle, owing to an appropriate position of the stopband in relation to the absorption onset of TiO2.

  15. Opals: Mission System Operations Architecture for an Optical Communications Demonstration on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, Matthew J.; Sindiy, Oleg V.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Fregoso, Santos; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.; Kokorowski, Michael; Wilkerson, Marcus W.; Konyha, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    In April of 2014, the Optical PAyload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) Flight System (FS) launched to the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate space-to-ground optical communications. During a planned 90-day baseline mission, the OPALS FS will downlink high quality, short duration videos to the Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) ground station in Wrightwood, California. Interfaces to the ISS payload operations infrastructure have been established to facilitate activity planning, hazardous laser operations, commanding, and telemetry transmission. In addition, internal processes, such as pointing prediction and data processing, satisfy the technical requirements of the mission. The OPALS operations team participates in Operational Readiness Tests (ORTs) with external partners to exercise coordination processes and train for the overall mission. The ORTs have provided valuable insight into operational considerations for the instrument on the ISS.

  16. Effects of heat treatment temperature on morphology and properties of opal crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Tao; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Peng Tongjiang; Chen Jiming; Tang Yongjian

    2008-01-01

    The monodispersed SiO 2 microspheres were synthesized by reactant mixed equally. The colloid crystal templates were assemblied by vertical sedimentation method in ethanol at certain temperatures, and the effects of the heat treatment temperature on the morphology and the properties of opal colloid crystals were investigated. SEM, TCr-DSC results indicate SiO 2 colloid templates should be heat treated at 700-800 degree C, enhancing the conglutination and mechanistic intensity of opal templates. UV-Vis analysis result indicates that the heat treatment process can remove the photonic band gap location of the opal colloid crystals, and with the heat treatment temperature increasing gradually, blue shift occurs and the gap narrows. (authors)

  17. Color Tunable and Upconversion Luminescence in Yb-Tm Co-Doped Yttrium Phosphate Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siqin; Qiu, Jianbei; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Dacheng; Yang, Zhengwen

    2016-04-01

    For this paper, YPO4: Tm, Yb inverse opals with the photonic band gaps at 475 nm and 655 nm were prepared by polystyrene colloidal crystal templates. We investigated the influence of photonic band gaps on the Tm-Yb upconversion emission which was in the YPO4: Tm Yb inverse opal photonic crystals. Comparing with the reference sample, significant suppression of both the blue and red upconversion luminescence of Tm3+ ions were observed in the inverse opals. The color purity of the blue emission was improved in the inverse opal by the suppression of red upconversion emission. Additionally, mechanism of upconversion emission in the inverse opal was discussed. We believe that the present work will be valuable for not only the foundational study of upconversion emission modification but also the development of new optical devices in upconversion lighting and display.

  18. Optimizing sol-gel infiltration for the fabrication of high-quality titania inverse opal and its photocatalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weijie; Zou Bo; Zhao Jing; Cui Haining

    2010-01-01

    This article reports an optimized sol-gel opal infiltration technique for the fabrication of high-quality titania inverse opal. Different from previous reports, the presently proposed method is facile, efficient and suitable for other inorganic oxide. We have compared two different infiltration strategies and their influences on the structure, photonic properties and photocatalytic activity. The obtained titania inverse opal displays excellent photonic properties with photonic band gap at 320 nm and better photocatalytic effect, which is attributed to its high-quality inverse opal nanostructure. Reproducibility tests prove that the photocatalytic activity of the resultant titania inverse opal remains intact even after five repeated photocatalytic reactions under the same procedure and experimental conditions.

  19. Red photoluminescent property and modification of WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal for blue light converted LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jiufeng; Yang, Zhengwen; Huang, Anjun; Chai, Zhuangzhuang; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2018-01-01

    Blue light converted light-emitting diodes is of great significance as a candidate for next generation lighting. In this work, the WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal photonic crystals were prepared and their luminescence properties were studied. The results demonstrated that the main excitation peak of WO3:Eu3+ inverse opals were located at 465 nm. The red luminescence peak at the 613 nm was observed in the WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal upon 465 nm excitation, exhibiting better red color purity. The influence of photonic band gap on the photoluminescence of WO3:Eu3+ inverse opal was obtained. When the red luminescence peak is in the regions of the photonic band gap and the edge of the band-gap, the red luminescence suppression and enhancement was observed respectively. The WO3:Eu3+ inverse opals may be a promising candidate for the blue light converted LEDs.

  20. Utilizing stretch-tunable thermochromic elastomeric opal films as novel reversible switchable photonic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Christian G; Lederle, Christina; Zentel, Kristina; Stühn, Bernd; Gallei, Markus

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the preparation of highly thermoresponsive and fully reversible stretch-tunable elastomeric opal films featuring switchable structural colors is reported. Novel particle architectures based on poly(diethylene glycol methylether methacrylate-co-ethyl acrylate) (PDEGMEMA-co-PEA) as shell polymer are synthesized via seeded and stepwise emulsion polymerization protocols. The use of DEGMEMA as comonomer and herein established synthetic strategies leads to monodisperse soft shell particles, which can be directly processed to opal films by using the feasible melt-shear organization technique. Subsequent UV crosslinking strategies open access to mechanically stable and homogeneous elastomeric opal films. The structural colors of the opal films feature mechano- and thermoresponsiveness, which is found to be fully reversible. Optical characterization shows that the combination of both stimuli provokes a photonic bandgap shift of more than 50 nm from 560 nm in the stretched state to 611 nm in the fully swollen state. In addition, versatile colorful patterns onto the colloidal crystal structure are produced by spatial UV-induced crosslinking by using a photomask. This facile approach enables the generation of spatially cross-linked switchable opal films with fascinating optical properties. Herein described strategies for the preparation of PDEGMEMA-containing colloidal architectures, application of the melt-shear ordering technique, and patterned crosslinking of the final opal films open access to novel stimuli-responsive colloidal crystal films, which are expected to be promising materials in the field of security and sensing applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Burial fluxes and source apportionment of carbon in culture areas of Sanggou Bay over the past 200 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sai; HUANG Jiansheng; YANG Qian; YANG Shu; YANG Guipeng; SUN Yao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the burial fluxes and source appointment of different forms of carbon in core sediments collected from culture areas in the Sanggou Bay, and preliminarily analyzed the reasons for the greater proportion of inorganic carbon burial fluxes (BFTIC). The average content of total carbon (TC) in the Sanggou Bay was 2.14%. Total organic carbon (TOC) accounted for a small proportion in TC, more than 65% of which derived from terrigenous organic carbon (Ct), and while the proportion of marine-derived organic carbon (Ca) increased significantly since the beginning of large-scale aquaculture. Total inorganic carbon (TIC) accounted for 60%–75%of TC, an average of which was 60%, with a maximum up to 90% during flourishing periods (1880–1948) of small natural shellfish derived from seashells inorganic carbon (Shell-IC). The TC burial fluxes ranged from 31 g/(m2·a) to 895 g/(m2·a) with an average of 227 g/(m2·a), which was dominated by TIC (about 70%). Shell-IC was the main source of TIC and even TC. As the main food of natural shellfish, biogenic silica (BSi) negatively correlated with BFTIC through affecting shellfish breeding. BFTIC of Sta. S1, influenced greatly by the Yellow Sea Coastal Current, had a certain response to Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in some specific periods.

  2. Growth and optical studies of opal films as three-dimensional photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comoretto, D.; Grassi, R.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L.C

    2003-01-15

    Three-dimensional artificial opals showing photonic crystals properties are grown by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of opal surfaces show domains with regular triangular and squared packing of the spheres separated by cracks whose relative fraction depends on the sample quality. The energy position of an optical pseudo gap in transmittance spectra is observed by varying the angle of incidence and is accounted for by theoretical calculations of the photonic band structure based on a plane-wave expansion method.

  3. Chemically Patterned Inverse Opal Created by a Selective Photolysis Modification Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Gao, Ning; Gu, Chen; Li, Jian; Wang, Hui; Lan, Yue; Yin, Xianpeng; Li, Guangtao

    2015-09-02

    Anisotropic photonic crystal materials have long been pursued for their broad applications. A novel method for creating chemically patterned inverse opals is proposed here. The patterning technique is based on selective photolysis of a photolabile polymer together with postmodification on released amine groups. The patterning method allows regioselective modification within an inverse opal structure, taking advantage of selective chemical reaction. Moreover, combined with the unique signal self-reporting feature of the photonic crystal, the fabricated structure is capable of various applications, including gradient photonic bandgap and dynamic chemical patterns. The proposed method provides the ability to extend the structural and chemical complexity of the photonic crystal, as well as its potential applications.

  4. New high-gain thin-gap detector for the OPAL hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dado, S; Goldberg, J; Lupu, N; Mincer, A I; Alexander, G; Bella, G; Gnat, Y; Grunhaus, J; Levy, A; Cohen, J

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin-gap multiwire gas detector operating in a high-gain mode was developed for use in the OPAL pole-tip calorimeter. The detector thickness is only 6.6 mm and its area is 0.61 m/sup 2/. The induced pad readout provides high output pulses that require no amplification. The setup for the detector mass production and quality-control test is described. Results from a test beam setup that simulates the OPAL pole-tip calorimeter are presented and compared with computer simulations.

  5. New high gain thin gap detector for the OPAL hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dado, S; Goldberg, J; Lupu, N; Mincer, A I; Alexander, G; Bella, G; Gnat, Y; Grunhaus, J; Levy, A; Cohen, J

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin gap multiwire gas detector operating in a high gain mode has been developed for use in the OPAL pole tip calorimeter. The detector thickness is only 6.6 mm and its area is 0.61 m/sup 2/. The induced pad readout provides high output pulses which require no amplification. The set-up for the detector mass production and quality control test is described. Results from a test beam set-up that simulates the OPAL pole tip calorimeter are presented and compared with computer simulations.

  6. Growth and optical studies of opal films as three-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comoretto, D.; Grassi, R.; Marabelli, F.; Andreani, L.C.

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional artificial opals showing photonic crystals properties are grown by self-assembly of polystyrene nanospheres. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of opal surfaces show domains with regular triangular and squared packing of the spheres separated by cracks whose relative fraction depends on the sample quality. The energy position of an optical pseudo gap in transmittance spectra is observed by varying the angle of incidence and is accounted for by theoretical calculations of the photonic band structure based on a plane-wave expansion method

  7. Optical Properties of Metal-Dielectric Structures Based on Photon-Crystal Opal Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanin, A. I.; Lukin, A. E.; Romanov, S. G.; Solovyev, V. G.; Khanin, S. D.; Yanikov, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    Optical properties of novel metal-dielectric nanocomposite materials based on opal matrices have been investigated. The position of optical resonances of nanocomposites, obtained by embedding of silver into the opal matrix by the electrothermodiffusion method, is explained by the Bragg diffraction, and an asymmetric form of resonance curves is attributed to the Fano resonance. An anomalous transmission and absorption of light by hybrid plasmon-photonic layered heterostructures, which is apparently associated with excitation of surface plasmon-polaritons, propagating along "metal-dielectric" interfaces, was revealed.

  8. U-Th Burial Dates on Ostrich Eggshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. D.; Fylstra, N. D.; Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining precise and accurate dates at archaeological sites beyond the range of radiocarbon dating is challenging but essential for understanding human origins. Eggshells of ratites (large flightless birds including ostrich, emu and others) are common in many archaeological sequences in Africa, Australia and elsewhere. Ancient eggshells are geochemically suitable for the U-Th technique (1), which has about ten times the range of radiocarbon dating (>500 rather than 50 ka), making eggshells attractive dating targets. Moreover, C and N isotopic studies of eggshell provide insights into paleovegetation and paleoprecipitation central to assessing past human-environment interactions (2,3). But until now, U-Th dates on ratite eggshell have not accounted for the secondary origin of essentially all of their U. We report a novel approach to U-Th dating of eggshell that explicitly accounts for secondary U uptake that begins with burial. Using ostrich eggshell (OES) from Pleistocene-Holocene east African sites, we have measured U and 232Th concentration profiles across OES by laser ablation ICP-MS. U commonly peaks at 10s to 100s of ppb and varies 10-fold or more across the ~2 mm thickness of OES, with gradients modulated by the layered structure of the eggshell. Common Th is high near the shell surfaces, but low in the middle "pallisade" layer of OES, making it optimal for U-Th dating. We determine U-Th ages along the U concentration gradient by solution ICP-MS analyses of two or more fractions of the pallisade layer. We then estimate OES burial dates using a simple model for diffusive uptake of uranium. Comparing such "U-Th burial dates" with radiocarbon dates for OES calcite from the same shells, we find good agreement in 7 out of 9 cases, consistent with rapid burial and confirming the accuracy of the approach. The remaining 2 eggshells have anomalous patterns of apparent ages that reveal they are unsuitable for U-Th dating, thereby providing reliability criteria innate

  9. Late Sarmatian Elite Military Burial From the Southern Urals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krivosheev Mikhail Vasilyevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the burial of a warrior of Late Sarmatian time from the Southern Urals. The complex from mound no. 4 of the burial mound Taksai I is distinguished by large size of barrow and grave. The reconstructed height of the mound was less than 2 meters. The depth of the burial pit was more than 3 meters. For Late Sarmatian culture such dimensions of sepulchral structures are unique. Under the mound the ritual platform from mainland soil was discovered. The found inventory of a warrior-rider included: horse bridle, a set of bladed weapons consisting of a long sword, dagger and knife, as well as a small bronze cauldron. Analysis of inventory allows us to date this burial to the second half of the 3rd century A.D. This burial belongs to an elite funerary complexes of Late Sarmatian culture and is a burial of professional warriors. This social stratum was formed in Late Sarmatian society at the end of the 2nd - first half of the 3rd century A.D. Most of these graves are dating back to the first half of the 3rd century A.D and were found in the Low Don and in the Volga region. The situation in these regions changed in that period due to the invasion of the tribes of the North-Caucasian origin. Their occurrence is associated with the destruction of the Tanais in the Lower Don region and the spread of graves in the T-shaped catacombs in the steppe monuments. The tradition of burying warriors-horsemen of high social status almost disappears in the Volga-Don steppes after the middle of 3rd century A.D. In the Southern Urals where these processes had an indirect influence, the existence of traditional hierarchies of Late Sarmatian society could continue until the end of the 3rd century A.D. Among the parts of a horse bridle the researchers discovered bronze B-shape buckle. These buckles are widely distributed in the 4th-5th centuries A.D. in the basin of the Kama river and the Danube river. The found buckle is the earliest currently known

  10. Shallow ground burial of low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, A.; Cooper, M.B.; Hargrave, N.J.; Munslow-Davies, L.

    1989-01-01

    Acceptance criteria for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes are presented for adoption throughout Australia, a continent in which there are readily available areas in arid, sparsely inhabited places, likely to be suitable as sites for shallow ground burial. Drawing upon overseas practices and experiences, criteria have been developed for low-level waste disposal and are intended to be applicable and relevant to the Australian situation. Concentration levels have been derived for a shallow ground burial facility assuming a realistic institutional control period of 200 years. A comparison is made between this period and institutional control for 100 years and 300 years. Longer institutional control periods enable the acceptance of higher concentrations of radionuclides of intermediate half-lives. Scenarios, which have been considered, include current Australian pastoral practices and traditional Aboriginal occupancy. The derived radionuclide concentration levels for the disposal of low level wastes are not dissimilar to those developed in other countries. 17 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  11. Preliminary report on a glass burial experiment in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Zhu, B.F.; Robinson, R.S.; Wicks, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results of a two-year burial experiment in granite are discussed. Three compositions of simulated alkali borosilicate waste glasses were placed in boreholes approximately 350 meters deep. The glass sample configurations include mini-cans (stainless steel rings into which glass has been cast) and pineapple slices (thin sections from cylindrical blocks). Assemblies of these glass samples were prepared by stacking them together with granite, compacted bentonite and metal rings to provide several types of interfaces that are expected to occur in the repository. The assemblies were maintained at either ambient mine temperature (8 to 10 0 C) or 90 0 C. The glasses were analyzed before burial and after one month storage at 90 0 C. The most extensive surface degradation occurred on the glasses interfaced with bentonite. In general, very little attack was observed on glass surfaces in contact with the other materials. The limited field and laboratory data are compared

  12. Application of Natural Radioisotopes as Tracers of Particulate Organic Carbon Transport, Export and Burial Processes in Chukchi Sea, Arctic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Yu; Jianhua, He [Key Lab of Global Change and Marine-Atmosphere Chemistry, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China)

    2013-07-15

    To evaluate the efficiency of the biological pump and carbon sequestration content on the Arctic shelf, estimations of POC export fluxes derived from 234Th/238U disequilibrium and organic carbon burial rate from 210Pbex chronology in sediment core were made during the 3rd Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE-3), Jul 12-Sep 22, 2008. Great deficits of {sup 234}Th to {sup 238}U were observed widely over the Chukchi shelf, with an average {sup 234}Th/{sup 238}U of 0.64{+-}0.28, resulting from intense particle scavenging. The average POC export fluxes in the entire study area, shelf and slope area were 24.9 {+-} 23.3, 29.5 {+-} 23.0 and 2.1 {+-} 0.5 mmol C/m{sup 2}d, respectively, i.e. 21% of the primary production on average was exported to the benthos. An organic carbon burial rate of 517 mmol C/m{sup 2}a were estimated, accounting for 6% of the average primary production. The efficient biological pump led to 11.6{+-}9.0 T g C exported to benthos and 3.4 T g C buried permanently in the sediment per year, accounting for 0.3% of total POC export amount and 2.1% of total organic carbon burial amount of the global ocean. (author)

  13. Touchstones from early medieval burials in Tuna in Alsike, Sweden

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, February (2014), s. 422-429 ISSN 0305-4403 Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M300021203 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Early Middle Ages * Viking Age * elite * boat burial * touchstone * precious metal * zinc * nickel Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 2.196, year: 2014

  14. Discovery of a predynastic elephant burial at Hierakonpolis, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Adams

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the ancient Egyptians buried such animals as dogs, baboons and cattle, sometimes in human tombs and sometimes in separate graves of their own. Now excavation in a cemetery associated with the large settlement of Hierakonpolis has led to the unexpected discovery of a 5700-year-old elephant burial. Here the Research Curator of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology at UCL describes the discovery and discusses its significance.

  15. Solid Waste Burial Grounds/Central Waste Complex hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for Solid Waste Burial Grounds/Central Waste Complex on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is documented

  16. Development of waste unit for use in shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodersen, K.

    1986-01-01

    A hexagonal waste unit has been developed for use in shallow land burial of low- and medium-level radioactive waste. The waste units used as overpack on empty standard 210 1 drums have been tested for tightness and mechanical resistance. Experimental burial of 21 empty full-size units has demonstrated the emplacement of the containers and the sealing of the crevises between them with molten bitumen. The development of the experimental burial with time is being followed. Three different conceptual designs for advanced burial systems using the hexagonal standard units are described. The outer barrier is a thick concrete structure covered by 2, 10 or 20 m soil, respectively. The waste units were cast from a normal high-quality concrete as well as from Densit, a new, very strong and impermeable type of concrete prepared by the combined use of silica-fume (microsilica) and a superplastizicer as additives. The migration of Cl - , Cs + and tritiated water was found to be much slower in Densit than in normal concrete. In combination with leaching measurements for Cs + from the same materials the results are used to present some theoretical considerations concerning transport through solution-filled pore systems as dependent on pore-size distribution, tortuosity, etc. A method based on neutron-activated cement cast in form of thin plates has been developed and used to study the dissolution chemistry of concrete. A preliminary model is presented. Indications for precipitation mechanisms were obtained. Densit was demonstrated to ensure a high degree of corrosion protection for steel reinforcement. The reason is mainly the high electrical resistivity combined with low diffusive transport in the material. The pozzolanic reaction results in somewhat lower pH in the pore water than in normal concrete, but the effect is not so pronounced that the passivation of steel reinforcement is endangered

  17. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution.Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  18. Discovery of a predynastic elephant burial at Hierakonpolis, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Adams

    1998-01-01

    It has long been known that the ancient Egyptians buried such animals as dogs, baboons and cattle, sometimes in human tombs and sometimes in separate graves of their own. Now excavation in a cemetery associated with the large settlement of Hierakonpolis has led to the unexpected discovery of a 5700-year-old elephant burial. Here the Research Curator of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology at UCL describes the discovery and discusses its significance.

  19. Decommissioning of commercial shallow-land burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.S.; Holter, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Estimated costs and safety considerations for decommissioning LLW burial grounds have been evaluated. Calculations are based on a generic burial ground assumed to be located at a western and an eastern site. Decommissioning modes include: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care of the site; and (2) waste relocation. Site stabilization is estimated to cost from $0.4 million to $7.5 million, depending on the site and the stabilization option chosen. Long-term care is estimated to cost about $100,000 annually, with somewhat higher costs during early years because of increased site maintenance and environmental monitoring requirements. Long-term care is required until the site is released for unrestricted public use. Occupational and public safety impacts of site stabilization and long-term care are estimated to be small. Relocation of all the waste from a reference burial ground is estimated to cost more than $1.4 billion and to require more than 20 years for completion. Over 90% of the cost is associated with packaging, transportation, and offsite disposal of the exhumed waste. Waste relocation results in significant radiation exposure to decommissioning workers

  20. Examination of representative drum from 618-9 Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1992-10-01

    The work described in this report was conducted in pursuance of Task E of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Solid Waste Technology Support Program for Westinghouse Hanford Company. Task E calls for a determination of the corrosion rate of low-carbon steels under typical Hanford Site conditions. To meet this objective, Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined one intact drum that was judged to be representative of the largely intact drums excavated at the 618-9 Burial Ground located west of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. Six samples were examined to characterize the drum, its composition, and its corrosion and corrosion products. The drum, which was found empty, was constructed of low-carbon steel. Its surface appeared relatively sound. The drum metal varied in thickness, but the minimum thickness in the samples was near 0.020 in. The corrosion corresponds to approximately 25 to 35 mils of metal loss, roughly a 1 mil/yr corrosion rate. Corrosion products were goethite and maghymite, expected products of iron buried in soil. Apparently, the drum leaked some time ago, but the cause of the leakage is unknown because records of the drums and their burial are limited. The drum was empty when found, and it is possible that it could have failed by pitting rather than by general corrosion. A pitting rate of about 3.5 mils/yr would have caused loss of drum integrity in the time since burial

  1. Ornamental Stones and Gemstones: The limits of heritage stone designation: The case for and against Australian Precious Opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry

    2015-04-01

    When the international designation of natural stone types was first mooted in 2007, stones that were utilised in building and construction were the primary focus of attention. However following public discussion it soon became apparent that sculptural stones, stone used for utilitarian purposes such as millstones, as well as archaeological materials including stones used by early man could all be positively assessed as a potential Global Heritage Stone Resource (GHSR). Over the past 2 years it has been realised there is also a range of ornamental and semi-precious stones that may also be considered in the same international context. Examples in this respect include Imperial Porphyry sourced from Egypt that was much prized in the ancient world and "Derbyshire Blue John" a variety of fluorspar from central England that was used for vases, chalices, urns, candle sticks, jars, bowls door, jewellery and fire-place surrounds, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is at this point that rock materials, sometimes used as gemstones, impinge on the domain of typical heritage stones. In Australia, the gemstone most identifiable with the country is precious opal formed by sedimentary processes in the Great Artesian Basin. In this paper the question is asked whether "Australian Precious Opal" could be or should be considered as a heritage stone of international significance. Immediately Australian Precious Opal satisfies several GHSR criteria including historic use for more than 50 years and wide-ranging utilisation for prestige jewellery around the world. It is also recognised as a cultural icon including association with national identity in Australia as it is legally defined as Australia's "National Gemstone" as well as being the "Gemstone Emblem" for the State of South Australia. Opal continues to be mined. Designation of Australian Precious Opal as a Global Heritage Stone Resource would likely involve formal international recognition of Australian opal in the

  2. Ni-NiO core-shell inverse opal electrodes for supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Kang, Soon Hyung; Zhu, Kai; Kim, Jin Young; Neale, Nathan R; Frank, Arthur J

    2011-05-14

    A general template-assisted electrochemical approach was used to synthesize three-dimensional ordered Ni core-NiO shell inverse opals (IOs) as electrodes for supercapacitors. The Ni-NiO IO electrodes displayed pseudo-capacitor behavior, good rate capability and cycling performance. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  3. The design of the cold neutron source of the OPAL reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechiman, L.M.; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the conceptual design process of the first cold neutron source developed by INVAP for the nuclear research reactor OPAL. The analysis begins from the requirements given by the client and continues with the chosen solutions. Furthermore, we studied how impact in the design the fully illuminated constraint with the finite remote source model. (author) [es

  4. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Themagnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle

  5. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Napolskii, K.S.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Eliseev, A.A.; Bouwman, W.G.; Byelov, D.V.; Petukhov, A.V.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle

  6. Interaction of the Bragg gap with polaritonic gap in opal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayer, Eradat; Sivachenko, Andrey Yu; Li, Sergey; Raikh, Mikhail E.; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2001-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) are a class of artificial structures with a periodic dielectric function. PCs can be a laboratory for testing fundamental processes involving interactions of radiation with matter in novel conditions. We have studied the optical properties of opal PCs that are infiltrated with highly polarizable media such as j-aggregates of cyanine dyes. Opals are self- assembled structures of silica (SiO_2) spheres. We report our studies on clarifying the relationship between a polaritonic gap and a photonic stop band (Bragg gap) when they resonantly coexist in the same structure. Infiltration of opal with polarizable molecules combines the polaritonic and Bragg diffractive effects. Both effects exist independently when the Bragg (at ω=ω_B) and polaritonic (at ω=ω_T) resonances are well separated in frequency. A completely different situation occurs when ωT =ω_B. Such a condition was achieved in opals that were infiltrated with J-aggregates of cyanine dyes that have large Rabi frequency. Our measurements show some dramatic changes in the shape of the reflectivity plateaus, which are due to the interplay between the photonic band gap and the polaritonic gap. The experimental results on reflectivity and its dependence on the light propagation angle and concentration of the cyanie dyes are in agreement with the theoretical calculations. (The work was supported in part by Army Research office DAAD19-00-1-0406.)

  7. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic opal/Fe3O4 colloidal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Carmona, A. J.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Hernández-Cristobal, Orlando; Sánchez-Mora, E.; Toledo-Solano, M.

    2017-03-01

    We report an experimental study of colloidal crystals based on SiO2 artificial opals, infiltrated with 1.34(M1), 2.03(M2) and 24.4(M3) wt% Fe3O4 nanoparticles, using the co-assembly method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) were used to study the structural, magnetic and optical properties of the samples. At 300 K all the samples exhibit superparamagnetic behavior due to the magnetic coupling of Fe3O4 nanoparticles infiltrated into opal. However, for higher concentration of nanoparticles this strong coupling distorts the opal network. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and Kubelka-Munk theory were applied to determine that the energy band gap of the opal-magnetite composites can be adjusted by varying the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. This values are between the energy band gap of SiO2 and Fe3O4.

  8. Radiation monitoring and beam dump system of the OPAL silicon microvertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Braibant, S

    1997-01-01

    The OPAL microvertex silicon detector radiation monitoring and beam dump system is described. This system was designed and implemented in order to measure the radiation dose received at every beam crossing and to induce a fast beam dump if the radiation dose exceeds a given threshold.

  9. Vegetation response to large scale disturbance in a southern Appalachian forest: Hurricane Opal and salvage logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Elliott; Stephanie L. Hitchcock; Lisa Krueger

    2002-01-01

    Disturbance such as catastrophic windthrow can play a major role in the structure and composition of southern Appalachian forests. We report effects of Hurricane Opal followed by salvage logging on vegetation dynamics (regeneration, composition, and diversity) the first three years after disturbance at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western North Carolina. The...

  10. Preparation and Optical Properties of Spherical Inverse Opals by Liquid Phase Deposition Using Spherical Colloidal Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoi, Y; Tominaga, T

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) inverse opals in spherical shape were prepared by liquid phase deposition (LPD) using spherical colloidal crystals as templates. Spherical colloidal crystals were produced by ink-jet drying technique. Aqueous emulsion droplets that contain polystyrene latex particles were ejected into air and dried. Closely packed colloidal crystals with spherical shape were obtained. The obtained spherical colloidal crystals were used as templates for the LPD. The templates were dispersed in the deposition solution of the LPD, i.e. a mixed solution of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid and reacted for 4 h at 30 °C. After the LPD process, the interstitial spaces of the spherical colloidal crystals were completely filled with titanium oxide. Subsequent heat treatment resulted in removal of templates and spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals. The spherical shape of the template was retained. SEM observations indicated that the periodic ordered voids were surrounded by titanium dioxide. The optical reflectance spectra indicated that the optical properties of the spherical titanium dioxide inverse opals were due to Bragg diffractions from the ordered structure. Filling in the voids of the inverse opals with different solvents caused remarkable changes in the reflectance peak.

  11. Green Color Purification in Tb(3+) Ions through Silica Inverse Opal Heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Vishnu Prasad; Sivakumar, Sri; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-06-10

    The ordered SiO2:Tb(3+) inverse opal heterostructure films are fabricated through polystyrene spheres hetero-opal template using the convective self-assembly method to examine their potential for color purification. Their optical properties and photoluminescence have been investigated and compared with individual single inverse opals and reference (SiO2:Tb(3+) powder). The heterostructures are shown to possess two broad photonic stop bands separated by an effective pass band, causing suppression of blue, orange, and red emission bands corresponding to (5)D4 → (7)F(j); j = 6, 4, 3 transitions, respectively and an enhancement of green emission (i.e., (5)D4 → (7)F5). Although the suppression of various emission occurs because of its overlap with the photonic band gaps (PSBs), the enhancement of green radiation is observed because of its location matching with the pass band region. The Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates of the emission spectrum of the heterostructure based on polystyrene sphere of 390 and 500 nm diameter are x = 0.2936, y = 0.6512 and lie closest to those of standard green color (wavelength 545 nm). In addition, a significant increase observed in luminescence lifetime for (5)D4 level of terbium in inverse opal heterostructures vis-à-vis reference (SiO2:Tb(3+) powder) is attributed to the change in the effective refractive index.

  12. Dominant ultraviolet-blue photoluminescence of ZnO embedded into synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrarov, S.M.; Yuldashev, Sh.U.; Kim, T.W.; Lee, S.B.; Kwon, H.Y.; Kang, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) embedded into the voids of synthetic opal were studied. ZnO was infiltrated into opal from aqueous solution with zinc nitrate precursor followed by thermal annealing. The PL spectra of the ZnO powder exhibit very high and broad emission peaks in the green region due to crystal defects, such as oxygen vacancies and zinc ion interstitials. In contrast to the PL spectra of ZnO powder, nanocrystals of ZnO embedded into the voids of FCC packed opal matrix exhibit dominant ultraviolet (UV)-blue and rapidly decreasing green PL emissions with decreasing temperature. The temperature-dependent PL characteristics show that the green band suppression in the ZnO nanocrystals is due to the influence of photonic crystal. The infiltration of nanoparticles into synthetic opal may be used for the fabrication of polycrystalline ZnO with dominant UV-blue PL. These results indicate that the luminescent materials embedded into photonic crystal may be promising for the fabrication of the RGB pixels in full-color displays

  13. Two-dimensional inverse opal hydrogel for pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Meng, Zihui; Qi, Fenglian; Xue, Min; Wang, Fengyan; Chen, Wei; Yan, Zequn

    2014-12-07

    A novel hydrogel film with a highly ordered macropore monolayer on its surface was prepared by templated photo-polymerization of hydrogel monomers on a two-dimensional (2D) polystyrene colloidal array. The 2D inverse opal hydrogel has prominent advantages over traditional three-dimensional (3D) inverse opal hydrogels. First, the formation of the 2D array template through a self-assembly method is considerably faster and simpler. Second, the stable ordering structure of the 2D array template makes it easier to introduce the polymerization solution into the template. Third, a simple measurement, a Debye diffraction ring, is utilized to characterize the neighboring pore spacing of the 2D inverse opal hydrogel. Acrylic acid was copolymerized into the hydrogel; thus, the hydrogel responded to pH through volume change, which resulted from the formation of the Donnan potential. The 2D inverse opal hydrogel showed that the neighboring pore spacing increased by about 150 nm and diffracted color red-shifted from blue to red as the pH increased from pH 2 to 7. In addition, the pH response kinetics and ionic strength effect of this 2D mesoporous polymer film were also investigated.

  14. Ultrafast optical switching of three-dimensional Si inverse opal photonic band gap crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euser, T.G.; Wei, Hong; Kalkman, Jeroen; Jun, Yoonho; Polman, Albert; Norris, David J.; Vos, Willem L.

    2007-01-01

    We present ultrafast optical switching experiments on three-dimensional photonic band gap crystals. Switching the Si inverse opal is achieved by optically exciting free carriers by a two-photon process. We probe reflectivity in the frequency range of second order Bragg diffraction where the photonic

  15. Report on waste burial charges: Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plant, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised annually, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC, and contains values for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analysis, or may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Carbon source/sink function of a subtropical, eutrophic lake determined from an overall mass balance and a gas exchange and carbon burial balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Xing Yangping; Xie Ping; Ni Leyi; Rong Kewen

    2008-01-01

    Although studies on carbon burial in lake sediments have shown that lakes are disproportionately important carbon sinks, many studies on gaseous carbon exchange across the water-air interface have demonstrated that lakes are supersaturated with CO 2 and CH 4 causing a net release of CO 2 and CH 4 to the atmosphere. In order to more accurately estimate the net carbon source/sink function of lake ecosystems, a more comprehensive carbon budget is needed, especially for gaseous carbon exchange across the water-air interface. Using two methods, overall mass balance and gas exchange and carbon burial balance, we assessed the carbon source/sink function of Lake Donghu, a subtropical, eutrophic lake, from April 2003 to March 2004. With the overall mass balance calculations, total carbon input was 14 905 t, total carbon output was 4950 t, and net carbon budget was +9955 t, suggesting that Lake Donghu was a great carbon sink. For the gas exchange and carbon burial balance, gaseous carbon (CO 2 and CH 4 ) emission across the water-air interface totaled 752 t while carbon burial in the lake sediment was 9477 t. The ratio of carbon emission into the atmosphere to carbon burial into the sediment was only 0.08. This low ratio indicates that Lake Donghu is a great carbon sink. Results showed good agreement between the two methods with both showing Lake Donghu to be a great carbon sink. This results from the high primary production of Lake Donghu, substantive allochthonous carbon inputs and intensive anthropogenic activity. Gaseous carbon emission accounted for about 15% of the total carbon output, indicating that the total output would be underestimated without including gaseous carbon exchange. - Due to high primary production, substantive allochthonous carbon inputs and intensive anthropogenic acitivity, subtropical, eutrophic Lake Donghu is a great carbon sink

  17. Report on waste burial charges. Escalation of decommissioning waste disposal costs at low-level waste burial facilities, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    One of the requirements placed upon nuclear power reactor licensees by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is for the licensees to periodically adjust the estimate of the cost of decommissioning their plants, in dollars of the current year, as part of the process to provide reasonable assurance that adequate funds for decommissioning will be available when needed. This report, which is scheduled to be revised periodically, contains the development of a formula for escalating decommissioning cost estimates that is acceptable to the NRC. The sources of information to be used in the escalation formula are identified, and the values developed for the escalation of radioactive waste burial costs, by site and by year, are given. The licensees may use the formula, the coefficients, and the burial escalation factors from this report in their escalation analyses, or they may use an escalation rate at least equal to the escalation approach presented herein. This fourth revision of NUREG-1307 contains revised spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference PWR and the reference BWR and the ratios of disposal costs at the Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina sites for the years 1986, 1988, 1991 and 1993, superseding the values given in the May 1993 issue of this report. Burial cost surcharges mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) have been incorporated into the revised ratio tables for those years. In addition, spreadsheet results for the disposal costs for the reference reactors and ratios of disposal costs at the two remaining burial sites in Washington and South Carolina for the year 1994 are provided. These latter results do not include any LLRWPAA surcharges, since those provisions of the Act expired at the end of 1992. An example calculation for escalated disposal cost is presented, demonstrating the use of the data contained in this report

  18. Magnetophotonic crystals based on yttrium-iron-garnet infiltrated opals: Magnetization-induced second-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murzina, T. V.; Kim, E. M.; Kapra, R. V.; Moshnina, I. V.; Aktsipetrov, O. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Kaplan, S. F.; Golubev, V. G.; Bader, M. A.; Marowsky, G.

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs) based on artificial opals infiltrated by yttrium iron garnet (YIG) are fabricated and their structural, optical, and nonlinear optical properties are studied. The formation of the crystalline YIG inside the opal matrix is checked by x-ray analysis. Two templates are used for the infiltration by YIG: bare opals and those covered by a thin platinum film. Optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique is used to study the magnetization-induced nonlinear-optical properties of the composed MPCs. A high nonlinear magneto-optical Kerr effect in the SHG intensity is observed at the edge of the photonic band gap of the MPCs.

  19. OPAL: prediction of MoRF regions in intrinsically disordered protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ronesh; Raicar, Gaurav; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Patil, Ashwini; Sharma, Alok

    2018-06-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins lack stable 3-dimensional structure and play a crucial role in performing various biological functions. Key to their biological function are the molecular recognition features (MoRFs) located within long disordered regions. Computationally identifying these MoRFs from disordered protein sequences is a challenging task. In this study, we present a new MoRF predictor, OPAL, to identify MoRFs in disordered protein sequences. OPAL utilizes two independent sources of information computed using different component predictors. The scores are processed and combined using common averaging method. The first score is computed using a component MoRF predictor which utilizes composition and sequence similarity of MoRF and non-MoRF regions to detect MoRFs. The second score is calculated using half-sphere exposure (HSE), solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and backbone angle information of the disordered protein sequence, using information from the amino acid properties of flanks surrounding the MoRFs to distinguish MoRF and non-MoRF residues. OPAL is evaluated using test sets that were previously used to evaluate MoRF predictors, MoRFpred, MoRFchibi and MoRFchibi-web. The results demonstrate that OPAL outperforms all the available MoRF predictors and is the most accurate predictor available for MoRF prediction. It is available at http://www.alok-ai-lab.com/tools/opal/. ashwini@hgc.jp or alok.sharma@griffith.edu.au. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Mathematical model quantifies multiple daylight exposure and burial events for rock surfaces using luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiesleben, Trine; Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank; Al Khasawneh, Sahar; Hvidt, Søren; Jakobsen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of rock surfaces has increased significantly over the last few years, as the potential of the method has been explored. It has been realized that luminescence-depth profiles show qualitative evidence for multiple daylight exposure and burial events. To quantify both burial and exposure events a new mathematical model is developed by expanding the existing models of evolution of luminescence–depth profiles, to include repeated sequential events of burial and exposure to daylight. This new model is applied to an infrared stimulated luminescence-depth profile from a feldspar-rich granite cobble from an archaeological site near Aarhus, Denmark. This profile shows qualitative evidence for multiple daylight exposure and burial events; these are quantified using the model developed here. By determining the burial ages from the surface layer of the cobble and by fitting the new model to the luminescence profile, it is concluded that the cobble was well bleached before burial. This indicates that the OSL burial age is likely to be reliable. In addition, a recent known exposure event provides an approximate calibration for older daylight exposure events. This study confirms the suggestion that rock surfaces contain a record of exposure and burial history, and that these events can be quantified. The burial age of rock surfaces can thus be dated with confidence, based on a knowledge of their pre-burial light exposure; it may also be possible to determine the length of a fossil exposure, using a known natural light exposure as calibration. - Highlights: • Evidence for multiple exposure and burial events in the history of a single cobble. • OSL rock surface dating model improved to include multiple burial/exposure cycles. • Application of the new model quantifies burial and exposure events.

  1. Mathematical model quantifies multiple daylight exposure and burial events for rock surfaces using luminescence dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Trine Holm; Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of rock surfaces has increased significantly over the last few years, as the potential of the method has been explored. It has been realized that luminescence-depth profiles show qualitative evidence for multiple daylight exposure...... and burial events. To quantify both burial and exposure events a new mathematical model is developed by expanding the existing models of evolution of luminescenceedepth profiles, to include repeated sequential events of burial and exposure to daylight. This new model is applied to an infrared stimulated...... events. This study confirms the suggestion that rock surfaces contain a record of exposure and burial history, and that these events can be quantified. The burial age of rock surfaces can thus be dated with confidence, based on a knowledge of their pre-burial light exposure; it may also be possible...

  2. Studies of Pre-Mongol Bulgar Burials in the Territory of the Astrakhan Oblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutukov Dmitriy V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The funeral ceremonial features traced in three Bulgar burials, which have been discovered during archaeological excavations on the burial grounds named "Shchuchii", "Posol’skii" and "Kovyl’nyi" (Astrakhan oblast, are discussed in the article. The burials are dated, respectively, to the early 10th century, the early 9th century, and the late 8th – early 9th centuries. The funeral gifts include mainly ceramic vessels. The "Posol’skii" burial site also yielded jewelry and weapon fragments (bow plates. In two burials ("Posol’skii" and "Kovyl’nyi", sheep bones were recorded. The burials apparently reflect the process of the Bulgars settling in the southern direction to the Lower Volga river area, up to its deltaic part

  3. Could a secular increase in organic burial explain the rise of oxygen? Insights from a geological carbon cycle model constrained by the carbon isotope record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krissansen-Totton, J.; Kipp, M.; Catling, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    The stable isotopes of carbon in marine sedimentary rock provide a window into the evolution of the Earth system. Conventionally, a relatively constant carbon isotope ratio in marine sedimentary rocks has been interpreted as implying constant organic carbon burial relative to total carbon burial. Because organic carbon burial corresponds to net oxygen production from photosynthesis, it follows that secular changes in the oxygen source flux cannot explain the dramatic rise of oxygen over Earth history. Instead, secular declines in oxygen sink fluxes are often invoked as causes for the rise of oxygen. However, constant fractional organic burial is difficult to reconcile with tentative evidence for low phosphate concentrations in the Archean ocean, which would imply lower marine productivity and—all else being equal—less organic carbon burial than today. The conventional interpretation of the carbon isotope record rests on the untested assumption that the isotopic ratio of carbon inputs into the ocean reflect mantle isotopic values throughout Earth history. In practice, differing rates of carbonate and organic weathering will allow for changes in isotopic inputs, as suggested by [1] and [2]. However, these inputs can not vary freely because large changes in isotopic inputs would induce secular trends in carbon reservoirs, which are not observed in the isotope record. We apply a geological carbon cycle model to all Earth history, tracking carbon isotopes in crustal, mantle, and ocean reservoirs. Our model is constrained by the carbon isotope record such that we can determine the extent to which large changes in organic burial are permitted. We find both constant organic burial and 3-5 fold increases in organic burial since 4.0 Ga can be reconciled with the carbon isotope record. Changes in the oxygen source flux thus need to be reconsidered as a possible contributor to Earth's oxygenation. [1] L. A. Derry, Organic carbon cycling and the lithosphere, in Treatise on

  4. Regional variations in the fluxes of foraminifera carbonate, coccolithophorid carbonate and biogenic opal in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Gaye, B.

    Mass fluxes of diatom opal, planktonic foraminifera carbonate and coccolithophorid carbonate were measured with time-series sediment traps at six sites in the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and Equatorial Indian Ocean (EIOT). The above fluxes were...

  5. Optimal enhancement in conversion efficiency of crystalline Si solar cells using inverse opal photonic crystals as back reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouachi, A; M’nif, A; Hamzaoui, A H; Chtourou, R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of using inverse opal photonic crystals as back reflectors on the power conversion efficiency of c-Si solar cells is investigated. The reflection spectra of inverse opal photonic crystals with different diameters of air spheres are simulated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The reflection peaks are correlated with photonic band gaps present in the photonic band gap diagram. Significant improvement in the optical absorption of the crystalline silicon layer is recorded when inverse opal photonic crystals are considered. Physical mechanisms which may contribute to the enhancement of the light absorption are underlined. With higher short-circuit current enhancement possible, and with no corresponding degradation in open-circuit voltage V oc or the fill factor, the power conversion efficiency is increased significantly when inverse opal photonic crystals are used as back reflectors with optimized diameter of air spheres. (paper)

  6. Spontaneous emission of semiconductor quantum dots in inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Yang, Yingshu; Wang, Yinghui; Gao, Jiechao; Sui, Ning; Chi, Xiaochun; Zou, Lu; Zhang, Han-Zhuang

    2016-02-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) infiltrated into inverse opal SiO2 photonic crystals (PCs) are systemically studied. The special porous structure of inverse opal PCs enhanced the thermal exchange rate between the CdSe QDs and their surrounding environment. Finally, inverse opal SiO2 PCs suppressed the nonlinear PL enhancement of CdSe QDs in PCs excited by a continuum laser and effectively modulated the PL characteristics of CdSe QDs in PCs at high temperatures in comparison with that of CdSe QDs out of PCs. The final results are of benefit in further understanding the role of inverse opal PCs on the PL characteristics of QDs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Low temperature catalytic combustion of propane over Pt-based catalyst with inverse opal microstructure in microchannel reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, G.; Zapf, R.; Kolb, G.A.; Men, Y.; Hessel, V.; Löwe, H.; Ye, J.; Zentel, R.

    2007-01-01

    novel Pt-based catalyst with highly regular, periodic inverse opal microstructure was fabricated in a microchannel reactor, and catalytic testing revealed excellent conversion and stable activity for propane combustion at low temperatures

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-1, 105-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capron, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance criteria for the 118-B-1, 105-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-B Reactor and P-10 Tritium Separation Project and also received waste from the 105-N Reactor. The burial ground received reactor hardware, process piping and tubing, fuel spacers, glassware, electrical components, tritium process wastes, soft wastes and other miscellaneous debris

  9. Biomass burial and storage to reduce atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, N.

    2012-04-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a theoretical carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC/y, but probably 1-3 GtC/y can be realized in practice. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other environmental concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from forest industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be 14/tCO2 (50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The low cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is possible because the technique uses the natural process of photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe, and can be stopped at any time, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  10. Burial history influence on the generation of some Italian oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattavelli, L.; Novelli, L. (AGIP SPA, San Donato Milanese (Italy))

    1990-05-01

    Many Italian oils were sourced by Triassic source rock; evidence of this exists in the Po Plain. In the Adriatic Sea, and offshore southern Sicily. Bulk and geochemical characteristics of these oils are quite dissimilar: heavy oils as well as gasolines were discovered. Such differences are partly attributable to the organic matter type and to environmental conditions, but the role of the source rock's burial histories is fundamental in determining oil characteristics. The different burial histories in these two areas definitely account for these differences. In the Po Plain, the Raethian Argilliti di Riva di Solto Formation, source rock of condensates of the Malossa area, started to generate very early as a consequence of the noticeable Rhaetian-Liassic subsidence. The generation of oil continued for a long geological time, but probably hydrocarbons were lost for the lack of traps. Only condensates, generated by the further Pliocene-Quaternary burial, were accumulated in the Neogene traps. In the western part of the Po Plain, Gaggiano and Villafortuna oils (34 and 40{degree} API), sourced by the Ladinian Meride Formation, were generated only during the sizeable Neogene-Quaternary subsidence. The high heating rate in this case probably enhanced expulsion efficiency, allowing secondary migration toward shallower depths and, consequently, preventing hydrocarbons from secondary cracking. Offshore in southern Sicily (Gela field), the recent subsidence (Pliocene-Pleistocene) is responsible for Triassic source rock maturation. In this case the shallower depth reached by the source rock and, consequently, the lower temperatures at which maturity occurred are partly responsible for the generation of heavy oils, even if other factors such as early expulsion due to tectonics and organic matter type probably play a more important role.

  11. Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.B.; Jacobs, D.G.; Lee, D.W.

    1986-02-01

    The performance objectives included in regulations for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (10 CFR 61 for commercial waste and DOE Order 5820.2 for defense waste) are generic principles that generate technical requirements which must be factored into each phase of the development and operation of a shallow land burial facility. These phases include a determination of the quantity and characteristics of the waste, selection of a site and appropriate facility design, use of sound operating practices, and closure of the facility. The collective experience concerning shallow land burial operations has shown that achievement of the performance objectives (specifically, waste isolation and radionuclide containment) requires a systems approach, factoring into consideration the interrelationships of the phases of facility development and operation and their overall impact on performance. This report presents the technical requirements and procedures for the development and operation of a shallow land burial facility for low-level radioactive waste. The systems approach is embodied in the presentation. The report is not intended to be an instruction manual; rather, emphasis is placed on understanding the technical requirements and knowing what information and analysis are needed for making informed choices to meet them. A framework is developed for using the desired site characteristics to locate potentially suitable sites. The scope of efforts necessary for characterizing a site is then described and the range of techniques available for site characterization is identified. Given the natural features of a site, design options for achieving the performance objectives are discussed, as are the operating practices, which must be compatible with the design. Site closure is presented as functioning to preserve the containment and isolation provided at earlier stages of the development and operation of the facility

  12. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during

  13. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents information derived form the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the main text. This Volume contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text

  14. Disposal of radioactive waste in land burial facilities at Studsvik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, G.; Haegg, C.; Bergman, C.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents the formal background for the handling of the Studsvik application for permission to build a plant for deposition of radioactive waste in land burial facilities. The SSI (National Swedish Institute of Radiation Protection) basis for assessment is reported and relevant factors are presented. The radiation doses calculated by the SSI do not exceed a few microsievert per annum in spite of very pessimistic assumptions. The report constitutes assessment material for the standpoint to be taken by the board of SSI. (L.F.)

  15. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a function of the number of layers in the Ni inverse opal-like structure. The average lateral size of mesoscopic domains is found to be independent of the number of layers. 3D reconstruction of the reciprocal space for the inverse opal crystals with different thickness provided an indirect study of original opal templates in a depth-resolved way. The microstructure and thermal response of the framework of the porous inverse opal crystal was examined using wide-angle powder x-ray diffraction. This artificial porous structure is built from nickel crystallites possessing stacking faults and dislocations peculiar for the nickel thin films.

  16. Waste migration in shallow burial sites under unsaturated flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eicholz, G.G.; Whang, J.

    1987-01-01

    Unsaturated conditions prevail in many shallow-land burial sites, both in arid and humid regions. Unless a burial site is allowed to flood and possibly overflow, a realistic assessment of any migration scenario must take into account the conditions of unsaturated flow. These are more difficult to observe and to model, but introduce significant changes into projected rates of waste leaching and waste migration. Column tests have been performed using soils from the Southeastern coastal plain to observe the effects of varying degrees of ''unsaturation'' on the movement of radioactive tracers. The moisture content in the columns was controlled by maintaining various levels of hydrostatic suction on soil columns whose hydrodynamic characteristics had been determined carefully. Tracer tests, employing Cs-137, I-131 and Ba-133 were used to determine migration profiles and to follow their movement down the column for different suction values. A calculational model has been developed for unsaturated flow and seems to match the observations fairly well. It is evident that a full description of migration processes must take into account the reduced migration rates under unsaturated conditions and the hysteresis effects associated with wetting-drying cycles

  17. Chalk porosity and sonic velocity versus burial depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Gommesen, Lars; Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Seventy chalk samples from four formations in the overpressured Danish central North Sea have been analyzed to investigate how correlations of porosity and sonic velocity with burial depth are affected by varying mineralogy, fluid pressure, and early introduction of petroleum. The results show th...... for fluid pressure because the cementing ions originate from stylolites, which are mechanically similar to fractures. We find that cementation occurs over a relatively short depth interval.......Seventy chalk samples from four formations in the overpressured Danish central North Sea have been analyzed to investigate how correlations of porosity and sonic velocity with burial depth are affected by varying mineralogy, fluid pressure, and early introduction of petroleum. The results show...... that porosity and sonic velocity follow the most consistent depth trends when fluid pressure and pore-volume compressibility are considered. Quartz content up to 10% has no marked effect, but more than 5% clay causes lower porosity and velocity. The mineralogical effect differs between P-wave and shear velocity...

  18. The Application of GPR in Florida for Detecting Forensic Burials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Koppenjan; J. J. Schultz; S. Ono; H. Lee

    2003-01-01

    A study was performed at the University of Florida to measure ground penetrating radar(GPR) performance for detecting forensic burials. In controlled scenarios, 24 burials were constructed with pig cadavers. Two soils were utilized to represent two of the most common soil orders in Florida: an Entisol and an Ultisol. Graves were monitored on a monthly basis for time periods up to 21 months with grid data acquired with pulsed and swept-frequency GPR systems incorporating several different frequency antennas. A small subset of the graves was excavated to assess decomposition and relate to the GPR images during the test. The grave anomalies in the GPR depth profiles became less distinctive over time due to body decomposition and settling of the disturbed soil (backfill) as it compacted. Soil type was a major factor. Grave anomalies became more difficult to recognize over time for deep targets that were within clay. Forensic targets that were in sandy soil were recognized for the duration of this study. Time elapsed imagery will be presented to elucidate the changes, or lack thereof, of grave anomalies over the duration of this study. Further analysis was performed using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) reconstruction of images in 2-D and 3-D.

  19. Genetic research at a fivefold children's burial from medieval Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Melisch, Claudia; Powers, Natasha; Geppert, Maria; Zander, Judith; Purps, Josephine; Spors, Birgit; Nagy, Marion

    2015-03-01

    Berlin originated from the two twin cities Berlin and Cölln, which both were founded at the beginning of the 13th century. However the real date of their foundation as well as the origin of the first settlers is still unknown. On the Berlin site the historic city center is still visible in the Nikolaiviertel, but the medieval origin of Cölln disappeared almost completely. In 2007 a large scale excavation, which comprised an area of about 1700m(2) of the historical center of the St. Peters church, recovers the remains of Cölln's first citizens and span a period of 500 years of medieval population. Here we present the first genetic analysis of a fivefold children's burial from excavations in Berlin. The genetic data unveiled next to ancestry and eye color data also the kinship and the gender of the five individuals. Together with the archeological context the new gained information help to shed more light on the possible reasons for this burial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Burial increases seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) subspecies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayratne, Upekala C.; Pyke, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Seed longevity and persistence in soil seed banks may be especially important for population persistence in ecosystems where opportunities for seedling establishment and disturbance are unpredictable. The fire regime, an important driver of population dynamics in sagebrush steppe ecosystems, has been altered by exotic annual grass invasion. Soil seed banks may play an active role in postfire recovery of the foundation shrub Artemisia tridentata, yet conditions under which seeds persist are largely unknown. Methods: We investigated seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata subspecies in situ by retrieving seed bags that were placed at varying depths over a 2 yr period. We also sampled naturally dispersed seeds in litter and soil immediately after seed dispersal and before flowering in subsequent seasons to estimate seed persistence. Key results: After 24 mo, seeds buried at least 3 cm below the soil surface retained 30–40% viability whereas viability of seeds on the surface and under litter declined to 0 and Artemisia tridentata has the potential to form a short-term soil seed bank that persists longer than has been commonly assumed, and that burial is necessary for seed longevity. Use of seeding techniques that promote burial of some seeds to aid in formation of a soil seed bank may increase restoration potential.

  1. Rock stresses associated with burial of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voight, B.

    1977-01-01

    Rock stress changes related to long-term deep storage of nuclear waste involve thermoelastic and pore fluid pressure changes associated with excavation and heating. Computer models are being examined to assess the question of thermally-induced fracturing in storage rock surrounding radioactive waste containers. Stresses are evaluated in three dimensions, employing elastic-plastic finite element codes. Potential failure conditions are expressed in terms of ''effective stresses,'' and force and thermal fields are incremented to produce an appropriate load path. In general, heating in vicinity of waste containers produces a zone of high compression bonded by a zone of circumferential and axial tension. (At this conference an analogous case of thermal stresses was documented and illustrated for larger-scale temperature domains associated with geothermal areas in Iceland.) Fractures are possible in radial directions as well as perpendicular to the axis of the cylindrical heat source. In addition, the mechanical effect of a vapor pulse will be explored by a two-phase numerical fluid transport model used in conjunction with mechanical finite element models. This portion of the work, being conducted jointly with C. R. Faust and J. W. Mercer of the US Geological Survey, should provide a preliminary appreciation of the possible effect of phase changes on fracturing of burial sites. Preliminary work suggests the possibility of establishing design criteria (e.g., design burial depth, depth of canister below storage vault) in order to minimize problems of potential rock fracture

  2. Comparative Study of Christian and Pagan Burial Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Bazaraitė

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws a chronological timeline comparing burial customs and construction traditions in the cradle of Christian religion, and pagan traditions on the Eastern coast of the Baltic Sea, precisely Lithuania, since the early ages of Christianity (1c. A.D. until nowadays. This paper searches for reasons that could have effected cultural transformations, a shifting relation between inhumation and incineration in European culture. In the Ancient Roman culture, people used to cremate their dead before Christianity set in. Baltic pagans at the time were burying their dead in stone circles, and started incineration only during the Middle Ages. Then Christianity was a powerful institution indoctrinating European daily culture. Meanwhile, in the territory of Lithuania pagan culture was erased only in the 15th century, i.e. about 600 years ago, leaving evident vestiges on traditions and customs of nowadays. These revelations of pagan culture are usually mistaken as Christian or Catholic. The paper focuses on architectural and urban aspects of burial architecture, taking into account social and historical conditions.

  3. Ancient Item Spoilage Ritual Used in Nomadic Burial Rite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisenov Arman Z.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the findings of items in ancient burials which were intentionally spoiled prior to deposition in graves. This tradition was widely spread both in terms of chronology and geography, and therefore cannot be attributed to any individual cultures or regions. The authors present new information on the ritual obtained during an investigation of Borsyk burial mound of the Middle Sarmatian period located in West Kazakhstan. The central grave of barrow 6 contained a heavily damaged bronze cauldron. The grave was looted in antiquity. Individual scattered bones of a human skeleton and minor gold foil adornments from the ceremonial dress of a nobleman were discovered in the grave. The authors suggest that the cauldron was intentionally deformed by the participants of an ancient mortuary and memorial ritual. According to the principal hypothesis concerning the essence of this ritual, spoilage of the items was related to the idea of assign the items with “different” and “transcendent” properties, which resulted from the necessity of burying the owner. Cauldrons played an important role in the life of steppe leaders. The authors assume a sacral nature of the use of cauldrons in the culture of steppe peoples associated with feasts, battles, and sacred hunting. Perhaps, there was a tradition of burying cauldrons together with their owners after spoiling the items in view of the concept of the other world and the role of a heroic leader therein.

  4. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents information derived from the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. This volume contains the main text. Volume 2 contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text. This report documents information collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Presented in this report are the preliminary interpretations of the hydrogeologic environment of six low-level burial grounds, which comprise four waste management areas (WMAs) located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. This information and its accompanying interpretations were derived from sampling and testing activities associated with the construction of 35 ground-water monitoring wells as well as a multitude of previously existing boreholes. The new monitoring wells were installed as part of a ground-water monitoring program initiated in 1986. This ground-water monitoring program is based on requirements for interim status facilities in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (1976)

  5. Low-Level Burial Grounds Dangerous Waste Permit Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The single dangerous waste permit identification number issued to the Hanford Site by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology is US Environmental Protection Agency/State Identification Number WA 7890008967. This identification number encompasses a number of waste management units within the Hanford Site. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Low-Level Burial Grounds, the waste management unit addressed by this permit application. The Low-Level Burial Grounds Dangerous Waste Permit Application consists of both a Part A and a Part B Permit Application. The original Part A, submitted in November 1985, identified landfills, retrievable storage units, and reserved areas. An explanation of subsequent Part A revisions is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Part B consists of 15 chapters addressing the organization and content of the Part B checklist prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology

  6. Localization and Related Phenomena in Multiply Connected Nanostructured Inverse Opal Bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiweiss, Michael; Saygi, Salih; Amirzadeh, Jafar; Datta, Timir; Lungu, Anca; Yin, Ming; Palm, Eric; Brandt, Bruce; Iqbal, Zafar

    2001-03-01

    The nanostructures were fabricated by pressure infiltration of bismuth into porous artificial opal and were characterized using SEM, EDX and XRD. These structures form a regular three-dimensional network in which the bismuth regions percolate in all directions between the close packed spheres of SiO_2. The sizes of the conducting regions are of the order of tens of nanometers. The static magnetic properties of both bismuth inverse opal and bulk bismuth were studied using a SQUID magnetometer. Transport measurements, including Hall, were done using standard ac four and six probe techniques in fields up to 17 T* and temperatures between 4.2 and 150 K. The results of these measurements, including the observation of localization phenomena, will be discussed. Comparisons will be made with published results on bismuth nanowires. *Performed at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) FSU, Tallahassee, FL. Partially supported by a grant from NASA.

  7. Angular shaping of fluorescence from synthetic opal-based photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, Vitalii; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Dolgov, Leonid; Kiisk, Valter; Sildos, Ilmo; Loot, Ardi; Gorelik, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Spectral, angular, and temporal distributions of fluorescence as well as specular reflection were investigated for silica-based artificial opals. Periodic arrangement of nanosized silica globules in the opal causes a specific dip in the defect-related fluorescence spectra and a peak in the reflectance spectrum. The spectral position of the dip coincides with the photonic stop band. The latter is dependent on the size of silica globules and the angle of observation. The spectral shape and intensity of defect-related fluorescence can be controlled by variation of detection angle. Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip. Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed. Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

  8. Particle identification with the OPAL jet chamber in the region of the relativistic rise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuker, H; Fischer, H M; Hauschild, M; Hartmann, H; Wuensch, B; Boerner, H; Burckhart, H J; Dittmar, M; Hammarstroem, R; Heuer, R D

    1987-10-15

    An important goal of the OPAL jet chamber is particle identification at high momenta by exploiting the relativistic rise of the energy loss. Extensive tests have been performed with the full scale prototype of the OPAL jet chamber to measure the energy loss in an argon-methane-isobutane mixture as function of momentum and particle species. The measurements were done under various operating conditions in order to optimise the operationg point, to investigate sources of systematic errors, to monitor the stability of the energy loss measurement and to develop calibration procedures. The particle separation capability in the region of relativistic rise has been studied at gas pressures of 3 and 4 bar. The adopted operation point represents a reasonable compromise between the requirements for particle identification and tracking accuracy.

  9. Transition of lasing modes in polymeric opal photonic crystal resonating cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lan-Ting; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Jin, Feng; Dong, Xian-Zi; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-06-10

    We demonstrate the transition of lasing modes in the resonating cavity constructed by polystyrene opal photonic crystals and 7 wt. % tert-butyl Rhodamine B doped polymer film. Both single mode and multiple mode lasing emission are observed from the resonating cavity. The lasing threshold is determined to be 0.81  μJ/pulse for single mode lasing emission and 2.25  μJ/pulse for multiple mode lasing emission. The single mode lasing emission is attributed to photonic lasing resulting from the photonic bandgap effect of the opal photonic crystals, while the multiple mode lasing emission is assigned to random lasing due to the defects in the photonic crystals. The result would benefit the development of low threshold polymeric solid state photonic crystal lasers.

  10. Protein-based inverse opals: A novel support for enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjun; Sun, Wenya; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Lihui; Zhou, Liya; Gao, Jing; He, Ying; Ma, Li; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, protein-based inverse opals were prepared for the first time by using the colloidal crystal templating method. The preparation process involved three steps including filling the templates with protein molecules, crosslinking, and template removal. The obtained inverse opals were used to immobilize Penicillin G acylase (PGA) because of its intrinsic biocompatible property. The immobilization process was optimized and the properties of the immobilized PGA (PGA@IO) were investigated. PGA@IO exhibited improved thermal and pH stability compared with its free counterpart. After reusing nine times, it retained 70% of the initial activity. Besides, the PGA@IO retained high activity during the hydrolysis reactions in continuous catalysis in packed-bed reactor (PBR) after 15 days. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanowires of silicon carbide and 3D SiC/C nanocomposites with inverse opal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelchenko, G.A.; Zhokhov, A.A.; Masalov, V.M.; Kudrenko, E.A.; Tereshenko, A.N.; Steinman, E.A.; Khodos, I.I.; Zinenko, V.I.; Agafonov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis, morphology, structural and optical characteristics of SiC NWs and SiC/C nanocomposites with an inverse opal lattice have been investigated. The samples were prepared by carbothermal reduction of silica (SiC NWs) and by thermo-chemical treatment of opal matrices (SiC/C) filled with carbon compounds which was followed by silicon dioxide dissolution. It was shown that the nucleation of SiC NWs occurs at the surface of carbon fibers felt. It was observed three preferred growth direction of the NWs: [111], [110] and [112]. HRTEM studies revealed the mechanism of the wires growth direction change. SiC/C- HRTEM revealed in the structure of the composites, except for silicon carbide, graphite and amorphous carbon, spherical carbon particles containing concentric graphite shells (onion-like particles).

  12. Temporal variability of carbon and nutrient burial, sediment accretion, and mass accumulation over the past century in a carbonate platform mangrove forest of the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J.; Sanders, Christian J.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this research was to measure temporal variability in accretion and mass sedimentation rates (including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorous (TP)) from the past century in a mangrove forest on the Shark River in Everglades National Park, USA. The 210Pb Constant Rate of Supply model was applied to six soil cores to calculate annual rates over the most recent 10, 50, and 100 year time spans. Our results show that rates integrated over longer timeframes are lower than those for shorter, recent periods of observation. Additionally, the substantial spatial variability between cores over the 10 year period is diminished over the 100 year record, raising two important implications. First, a multiple-decade assessment of soil accretion and OC burial provides a more conservative estimate and is likely to be most relevant for forecasting these rates relative to long-term processes of sea level rise and climate change mitigation. Second, a small number of sampling locations are better able to account for spatial variability over the longer periods than for the shorter periods. The site average 100 year OC burial rate, 123 ± 19 (standard deviation) g m-2 yr-1, is low compared with global mangrove values. High TN and TP burial rates in recent decades may lead to increased soil carbon remineralization, contributing to the low carbon burial rates. Finally, the strong correlation between OC burial and accretion across this site signals the substantial contribution of OC to soil building in addition to the ecosystem service of CO2 sequestration.

  13. Development studies for the OPAL end cap electromagnetic calorimeter using vacuum photo triode instrumented leadglass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffreys, P.W.; Arnison, G.T.J.; Akrawy, M.

    1989-07-01

    A description is given of the OPAL end cap electromagnetic calorimeters which consist of leadglass instrumented with vacuum photo triodes. Test results are presented showing linearity, energy and position resolution measured in an electron beam whilst the calorimeter is subject to magnetic fields up to 1.0T. The response to hadrons is also discussed. Finally, radiation damage and recovery of the leadglass is reported. (author)

  14. Magnetic topology of Co-based inverse opal-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Eliseev, A. A.; Bouwman, W.; Byelov, D. V.; Petukhov, A. V.; Chernyshov, D. Yu.; Eckerlebe, H.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetic and structural properties of a cobalt inverse opal-like crystal have been studied by a combination of complementary techniques ranging from polarized neutron scattering and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry to x-ray diffraction. Microradian small-angle x-ray diffraction shows that the inverse opal-like structure (OLS) synthesized by the electrochemical method fully duplicates the three-dimensional net of voids of the template artificial opal. The inverse OLS has a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure with a lattice constant of 640±10 nm and with a clear tendency to a random hexagonal close-packed structure along the [111] axes. Wide-angle x-ray powder diffraction shows that the atomic cobalt structure is described by coexistence of 95% hexagonal close-packed and 5% fcc phases. The SQUID measurements demonstrate that the inverse OLS film possesses easy-plane magnetization geometry with a coercive field of 14.0 ± 0.5 mT at room temperature. The detailed picture of the transformation of the magnetic structure under an in-plane applied field was detected with the help of small-angle diffraction of polarized neutrons. In the demagnetized state the magnetic system consists of randomly oriented magnetic domains. A complex magnetic structure appears upon application of the magnetic field, with nonhomogeneous distribution of magnetization density within the unit element of the OLS. This distribution is determined by the combined effect of the easy-plane geometry of the film and the crystallographic geometry of the opal-like structure with respect to the applied field direction.

  15. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm; Butler, Simon; Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids

  16. The rheology and processing of “edge sheared” colloidal polymer opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Hon Sum; Mackley, Malcolm, E-mail: mrm5@cam.ac.uk; Butler, Simon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Baumberg, Jeremy; Snoswell, David; Finlayson, Chris; Zhao, Qibin [Cavendish Laboratory, NanoPhotonics Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    This paper is concerned with the rheology and processing of solvent-free core shell “polymer opals” that consist of a soft outer shell grafted to hard colloidal polymer core particles. Strong iridescent colors can be produced by shearing the material in a certain way that causes the initially disordered spheres to rearrange into ordered crystalline structures and produce colors by diffraction and interference of multiple light scattering, similar to gemstone opals. The basic linear viscoelastic rheology of a polymer opal sample was determined as a function of temperature, and the material was found to be highly viscoelastic at all tested temperatures. A Cambridge multipass rheometer was specifically modified in order to make controlled mechanical measurements of initially disordered polymer opal tapes that were sandwiched between protective polyethylene terephthalate sheets. Axial extension, simple shear, and a novel “edge shearing” geometry were all evaluated, and multiple successive experiments of the edge shearing test were carried out at different temperatures. The optical development of colloidal ordering, measured as optical opalescence, was quantified by spectroscopy using visible backscattered light. The development of opalescence was found to be sensitive to the geometry of deformation and a number of process variables suggesting a complex interaction of parameters that caused the opalescence. In order to identify aspects of the deformation mechanism of the edge shearing experiment, a separate series of in situ optical experiments were carried out and this helped indicate the extent of simple shear generated with each edge shear deformation. The results show that strong ordering can be induced by successive edge shearing deformation. The results are relevant to polymer opal rheology, processing, and mechanisms relating to ordering within complex viscoelastic fluids.

  17. A study of charm production in beauty decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Using an inclusive method, BR(b -> D\\bar{D}X) has been measured in hadronic Z^0 decays with the OPAL detector at LEP. The impact parameter significance of tracks opposite tagged b-jets is used to differentiate b -> D\\bar{D}X decays from other decays. Using this result, the average number of charm and anti-charm quarks produced per beauty quark decay, n_c, is determined.

  18. Conversion of the luminescence of laser dyes in opal matrices to stimulated emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, O K; Basiev, T T; Orlovskii, Yu V; Osiko, V V; Samoilovich, M I

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence and laser characteristics of a synthetic opal matrix filled with organic dyes are studied upon excitation by nanosecond laser pulses. The appearance of stimulated emission in a partially ordered scattering medium is investigated. It is shown that if the luminescence spectrum of a dye (oxazine-17) is located far outside the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, stimulated emission along a preferential direction in the (111) plane is observed when pumping exceeds a threshold even without an external optical cavity. The stimulated emission spectrum is considerably narrower than the luminescence spectrum and consists of several narrow lines located within the dye luminescence band. If the luminescence spectrum of a dye (rhodamine 6G) overlaps with the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, a different picture is observed. The loss of radiation in the matrix leads to the red shift of the luminescence spectrum, while the stimulated emission as in the case of oxazine-17 lies is observed within the luminescence band. (active media, lasers, and amplifiers)

  19. Stretched inverse opal colloid crystal substrates-induced orientation of fibroblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y C; Tang, Z M; Feng, Z Q; Xie, Z Y; Gu, Z Z, E-mail: gu@seu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-06-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in studying the interaction between mammalian cells and nanometer-sized structures. However, the effect of nanostructures on cell behavior, such as cell morphology and alignment, is still largely unknown. Inverse opal colloid crystal substrates, which can be stretched to produce nano-scale pore structures of different degrees of orientation, serve as a convenient model system to study the effect of nanotopography on cell morphology and cell alignment. In this work, we fabricated inverse opal colloidal crystal films that were either unstretched or stretched to three, four or six times their original length, producing pore structures of increasing degree of orientation. Human dermal fibroblast-fetal (HDF-f) cells were seeded and cultured on these four types of substrates. The results from fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that cells showed the highest degree of alignment when cultured on inverse opal colloid crystal films that were stretched the most (six times original length). The results also demonstrated that the orientation of nanostructures could affect both the morphology and growth direction of fibroblasts. The ability to control the direction of cell growth through the engineering of nanostructures could have important applications in tissue engineering, especially for tissues with anisotropic structures, such as cardiac muscle, blood vessel, tendon and ligament.

  20. Manipulating emission of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals embedded in synthetic opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benalloul, Paul; Vion, Celine; Barthou, Charles; Schwob, Catherine; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; MaItre, Agnes; Gruzintsev, Alex; Emelchenko, Gennadi; Masalov, Wladimir; Nga, Pham Thu

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are the object of great interest due to the possibility, for appropriate PCs, to modify and control light propagation and even to influence the emission properties of an emitter, such as its emission diagram and its life time. One of the most common approaches to prepare 3D PCs takes advantage of the spontaneous self-organisation of spherical colloidal particles. Various self-assembly techniques such as sedimentation, convective or Langmuir-Blodgett ones have been studied as they provide a low cost and relatively easy protocol to obtain artificial opals. SiO 2 opals exhibit a pseudo-band gap. Nevertheless the coupling of II-VI nanocrystal emitters in such PCs allows one to recognize and study some basic problems. Large opals have been prepared by the sedimentation method and the size of the balls has been adjusted so that the pseudo-band gap of those PCs lies in the same region as the emission band of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals. Diagrams of radiation and the modification of the spontaneous life time of the embedded nanocrystals will be presented and discussed. Introducing well-defined defects in PCs which are necessary to guide the photons through the crystal remains a hard technological challenge. Several top-down methods have been investigated. We will present different bottom-up routes proposed by different groups to engineer planar defects into colloidal PCs.

  1. Stretched inverse opal colloid crystal substrates-induced orientation of fibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y C; Tang, Z M; Feng, Z Q; Xie, Z Y; Gu, Z Z

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in studying the interaction between mammalian cells and nanometer-sized structures. However, the effect of nanostructures on cell behavior, such as cell morphology and alignment, is still largely unknown. Inverse opal colloid crystal substrates, which can be stretched to produce nano-scale pore structures of different degrees of orientation, serve as a convenient model system to study the effect of nanotopography on cell morphology and cell alignment. In this work, we fabricated inverse opal colloidal crystal films that were either unstretched or stretched to three, four or six times their original length, producing pore structures of increasing degree of orientation. Human dermal fibroblast-fetal (HDF-f) cells were seeded and cultured on these four types of substrates. The results from fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that cells showed the highest degree of alignment when cultured on inverse opal colloid crystal films that were stretched the most (six times original length). The results also demonstrated that the orientation of nanostructures could affect both the morphology and growth direction of fibroblasts. The ability to control the direction of cell growth through the engineering of nanostructures could have important applications in tissue engineering, especially for tissues with anisotropic structures, such as cardiac muscle, blood vessel, tendon and ligament.

  2. Inverse gold photonic crystals and conjugated polymer coated opals for functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, P.B.; Gutierrez, Jose; Ferraris, John P.; Martinez, I.L.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Wu, Y.-C.; Lee, Sergey; Parikh, Kunjal; Gillespie, Jessica; Ussery, Geoffrey; Karimi, Behzad; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar; Glosser, R

    2003-10-01

    Inverse gold photonic crystals templated from synthetic opals with a face centered cubic (FCC) crystal lattice were constructed by heat converting gold chloride to metallic gold. Tetrahedral formations constructed of alternating large and small octahedrons oriented in the zinc sulfide structure were created by controlling the infiltration of gold chloride. Silica spheres were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) and 5 nm colloidal gold. Ordinary yeast cells were coated with polyanilinesulfonic acid, polypyrrole and 5 nm colloidal gold. Spheres coated with MEH-PPV were dispersed in H{sub 2}O and coated with polyelectrolytes which recharged and sterically stabilized the colloidal surfaces. The recharged spheres self-assembled by sedimentation with a FCC crystalline lattice possessing 500 {mu}m wide and 1 mm long crystallites. Silica spheres with diameters as large as 1500 {mu}m were self-assembled along the [1 0 0] direction of the FCC crystal lattice. Opals infiltrated with gold and opals constructed from polymer coated spheres were co-infiltrated with polypropylene yielding inverse polypropylene composite photonic crystals.

  3. Determination of the real structure of artificial and natural opals on the basis of three-dimensional reconstructions of reciprocal space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Gorozhankin, D. F.; Napolskii, K. S.; Petukhov, A. V.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Byelov, D. V.; Bouwman, W. G.; Kvashnina, K. O.; Chernyshov, D. Yu.; Bosak, A. A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2009-10-01

    The distribution of the scattering intensity in the reciprocal space for natural and artificial opals has been reconstructed from a set of small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns. The resulting three-dimensional intensity maps are used to analyze the defect structure of opals. The structure of artificial opals can be satisfactorily described in the Wilson probability model with the prevalence of layers in the fcc environment. The diffraction patterns observed for a natural opal confirm the presence of sufficiently long unequally occupied fcc domains.

  4. Preparation and photonic bandgap properties of Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 inverse opal photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhengwen; Zhou Ji; Huang Xueguang; Xie Qin; Fu Ming; Li Bo; Li Longtu

    2009-01-01

    The Na 1/2 Bi 1/2 TiO 3 (NBT) inverse opal photonic crystals were prepared by the self-assembly technique in combination with a sol-gel method. In the preparation process, NBT precursors were filled into the interstices of the opal template assembled by monodispersive polystyrene microspheres. The polystyrene template was then removed by calcination at 800 deg. C for 5 h, meanwhile, a perovskite NBT inverse opal photonic crystal was formed. An optical micrograph shows that the NBT inverse opals reflect green-yellow light strongly. Moreover, a photonic band gap was observed by reflective spectra of NBT sample

  5. 618-10 Burial Ground Trench Remediation and 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground Nonintrusive Characterization of Vertical Pipe Units Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, J. W.

    2012-06-28

    A “lessons learned” is a noteworthy practice or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or an adverse work practice/experience that is captured and shared to avoid reoccurrence. This document provides the lessons learned identified by the 618-10 Burial Ground trench remediation and the 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground nonintrusive characterization of the vertical pipe units (VPUs).

  6. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  7. About One of Burials of Novotitorovka Culture From the Territory of Kuban

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya A. Balabanova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the burial complex and the skull of the Novotitorovka culture from burial no. 35 of the Ovalny burial mound, Kalininsky district of the Krasnodar region. The burial itself was non-inventory, but it was synchronous with burial no. 26. Both burials were excavated from the level of the ancient surface and covered by the same barrow. The bones from the studied burial belonged to a young man, who died at the age of 20-25. His craniological type is characterized by meso-dolichocrania, ellipsoidal vertical norm, the average width of forehead, wide and low face, orthognathy-like in a vertical plane and slightly profiled at the level of low eye sockets. The face is also characterized by narrow and sharply protruding nasal bones. The article also deals with the possible relationship between the tribes of the Novotitorovka culture and the Azov-Black Sea sites of Catacomb culture. This conclusion is based on the results of intergroup comparison by the method of canonical analysis. The studied skull of the Novotitorovka culture has a morphological complex that characterizes the groups of burials of the Catacomb culture localized on the terraces of the Ingul river and on the terraces of the Don river left bank. This conclusion calls into question the archaeologists’ hypothesis on the connection of the the Novotitorovka culture with the tribes of the Novosvobodnenskaya culture and the Maykop culture.

  8. Introduction: Life Space and Burial Space in the Post-Apartheid City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Landscapes of the dead are always, simultaneously, landscapes of the living. It is this coterminousness of life and death that gives the burial site its salience and emotional power. Different societies, at different times, renegotiate the relationship between what anthropologists call 'life space\\' and 'burial space\\', depending on ...

  9. Hiding from swans: optimal burial depth of sago pondweed tubers foraged by Bewick's swans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaría, L.; Rodriguez-Girones, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    1 We used a combination of laboratory and field experiments to test the hypothesis that the burial depth of Potamogeton pectinatus tubers will vary with local sediment type and swan predation pressure. 2 In the field, mortality due to predation by swans decreased linearly with burial depth (from 100

  10. Technical data summary: Plan for closure of the 643-G burial ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    This report involves the actions of closing the 643-G burial ground which involves waste removal, stabilization, and capping. Remedial action involves the removing of the transuranic waste and closing of the grid wells. The closure cap for the burial site will consist of native soil, clay, and gravel. This will assure long-term physical and chemical stability. (MB)

  11. The study of secondary burial in Mycenaean mortuary traditions: a new approach to the evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Olivia A.

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines the methodological and interpretative frameworks proposed as the most holistic and inclusive manner for studying Mycenaean burial data. It provides a deeper exploration of mortuary themes, such as secondary burial, and argues that human remains should be studied in correlation

  12. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, M.J.; Capron, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes

  13. Application of biological barriers in maintaining the integrity of radioactivity in shallow burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.

    1979-05-01

    Stabilization of a shallow burial site requires some means of keeping buried radioactive wastes in place and preventing the movement of radioactive elements into the biosphere by various vectors present in the soil covering the burial site. By placing a barrier between the surface of the soil and the buried wastes, it would be possible to isolate the wastes from the biosphere and eliminate the movement of radioactive elements into the environment. An effective biobarrier would make it possible to grow plants over the buried wastes regardless of rooting habits; the plants would stabilize the surface soil, prevent wind erosion, and transpire soil water back into the air, thus preventing it from percolating downward through the buried wastes. This report summarizes the finding of a study undertaken to determine the effectiveness of natural cobblestones as a long-term biobarrier. In the initial field study, we investigated whether a thick layer of cobblestones would prevent plant roots and burrowing animals from reaching contaminated materials and transferring radionuclides to the soil surface. In a subsequent greenhouse study, three modifications of the cobblestone barrier were tested, including the addition of another layer of stones, one of asphalt, and one of a root toxin. These data show that cobblestone can be effective as a barrier to burrowing animals and insects, but not totally effective as a barrier to plant roots. Because of variable weather patterns at Hanford, five to six year studies are recommended for further studies on the effectiveness of different materials as biobarriers to radioactive substances. Stone size appeared to affect the plants' rate of root growth since root growth slowed in the air spaces between stones. Root toxin was 100% effective as a means of keeping roots out of the buried waste; this method could be used as a barrier modification where no plant cover is needed

  14. Assessment of change in shallow land burial limits for defense transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.J.; Smith, C.F.; Spaeth, M.E.; Ciminesi, F.J.; Dickman, P.T.; O'Neal, D.A.

    1983-03-01

    There is an emerging consensus within the waste management technical community that the current concentration limit of 10 nCi/g for shallow land burial (SLB) of transuranic (TRU) waste is excessively restrictive. A concentration limit for SLB in the range of 100 to 1000 nCi/g is reasonable and justifiable based upon these reasons: Resultant increase in collective radiation dose (total population dose) would be very small, and the net detriment to public health would be negligible. Increasing the limit is cost-effective and could save hundreds of millions of dollars for the national economy over time. The hazard resulting from the increased SLB limit for TRU would be significantly less than that due to many naturally occurring mineral deposits and/or human activities. Expenditures directed toward health and safety conform to the economic law of diminishing returns: as the absolute expenditure increases, the marginal return decreases. Excessive restriction of the TRU concentration limit for SLB needlessly diverts limited resources (time, talent, and money) from other areas of health and safety where they might be more beneficially applied. Despite considerable effort, this study did not find any compelling technical argument to maintain the limit for TRU in SLB at 10 nCi/g. Subsequent to the initial preparation of this document, the US Department of Energy issued DOE Order 5820 which raises the administrative disposal limit for transuranic wastes from 10 nCi/g to 100 nCi/g. In addition, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has subsequently proposed and adopted a revised version of regulation 10 CFR 61 in which the disposal limit for shallow land burial of Category C (intruder protected) waste is set at 100 nCi/g

  15. Necropolis on Bor lake: New reports on Bronze age burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapuran Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the social and anthropological aspects of burial rituals during the Middle Bronze Age in Timočka Krajina. Decades of systematic research of necropolises and reconnaissance in the basin of the Crni Timok proved an increase in number of sites around ore - rich areas of the east Kučaj mountains as well as around Romuliana site and the fertile valleys of Džanovo polje (Map. 1. The quantitative increase in settlements was reflected by the emergence of large necropolises, only three of which have been systematically explored; those in Trnjani, Magura and Bor Lake (Fig. 1; Plan 1. Analysis of geographical features of many settlements and their position in relation to natural resources helped define two communities, one of which carried out mining and metallurgical activities, while the other group engaged in the production of food. Both groups lived in the immediate vicinity and mutual dependence, functioning within a developed market for copper production. During the exploration of the necropolis near Bor Lake in 1997, the remains of burnt skeletons were collected from burial structures 2/97 and 13/97 (Fig. 2; Plans 2 and 3. Anthropological analysis of the cremated remains of the deceased showed that high temperatures were used during the cremation process, which we assume could have only been achieved in metallurgical furnaces. This is confirmed by the fact that the skeletal fragments contain traces of melted metal, as well as finds of bronze slag inside urns and grave structures in the necropolis in Trnjani (Figs. 3 and 4; Tables 1-4. Burial ritual of this kind was not proved by systematic archaeological research of necropolises in the basin of Crni Timok, although anthropological data collected from necropolises linked to metallurgical settlements may indicate some guidelines in the ritual cremation of prominent members of these communities. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177020: Arheologija Srbije

  16. Improvement in operating incident experience at the Savannah River Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornman, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory are stored at the Savannah River burial ground. These wastes have accumulated from >20 years of reprocessing nuclear fuels and materials for defense programs at the Savannah River Plant. Burial in earthen trenches and aboveground storage for transuranic materials are the principal modes of storage. The infrequent operating incidents that have occurred during the 20-year period have been analyzed. The incidents can be categorized as those causing airborne contamination, waterborne contamination, or vegetation contamination through penetration of plant roots into contaminated soil. Contamination was generally confined to the immediate area of the burial ground. Several incidents occurred because of unintentional burial or exhumation of material. The frequency of operating incidents decreased with operating experience of the burial ground, averaging only about two incidents per year during the last six years of operation

  17. A multi-physics analysis for the actuation of the SSS in opal reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferraro Diego

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available OPAL is a 20 MWth multi-purpose open-pool type Research Reactor located at Lucas Heights, Australia. It was designed, built and commissioned by INVAP between 2000 and 2006 and it has been operated by the Australia Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO showing a very good overall performance. On November 2016, OPAL reached 10 years of continuous operation, becoming one of the most reliable and available in its kind worldwide, with an unbeaten record of being fully operational 307 days a year. One of the enhanced safety features present in this state-of-art reactor is the availability of an independent, diverse and redundant Second Shutdown System (SSS, which consists in the drainage of the heavy water reflector contained in the Reflector Vessel. As far as high quality experimental data is available from reactor commissioning and operation stages and even from early component design validation stages, several models both regarding neutronic and thermo-hydraulic approaches have been developed during recent years using advanced calculations tools and the novel capabilities to couple them. These advanced models were developed in order to assess the capability of such codes to simulate and predict complex behaviours and develop highly detail analysis. In this framework, INVAP developed a three-dimensional CFD model that represents the detailed hydraulic behaviour of the Second Shutdown System for an actuation scenario, where the heavy water drainage 3D temporal profiles inside the Reflector Vessel can be obtained. This model was validated, comparing the computational results with experimental measurements performed in a real-size physical model built by INVAP during early OPAL design engineering stages. Furthermore, detailed 3D Serpent Monte Carlo models are also available, which have been already validated with experimental data from reactor commissioning and operating cycles. In the present work the neutronic and thermohydraulic

  18. A multi-physics analysis for the actuation of the SSS in opal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Diego; Alberto, Patricio; Villarino, Eduardo; Doval, Alicia

    2018-05-01

    OPAL is a 20 MWth multi-purpose open-pool type Research Reactor located at Lucas Heights, Australia. It was designed, built and commissioned by INVAP between 2000 and 2006 and it has been operated by the Australia Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO) showing a very good overall performance. On November 2016, OPAL reached 10 years of continuous operation, becoming one of the most reliable and available in its kind worldwide, with an unbeaten record of being fully operational 307 days a year. One of the enhanced safety features present in this state-of-art reactor is the availability of an independent, diverse and redundant Second Shutdown System (SSS), which consists in the drainage of the heavy water reflector contained in the Reflector Vessel. As far as high quality experimental data is available from reactor commissioning and operation stages and even from early component design validation stages, several models both regarding neutronic and thermo-hydraulic approaches have been developed during recent years using advanced calculations tools and the novel capabilities to couple them. These advanced models were developed in order to assess the capability of such codes to simulate and predict complex behaviours and develop highly detail analysis. In this framework, INVAP developed a three-dimensional CFD model that represents the detailed hydraulic behaviour of the Second Shutdown System for an actuation scenario, where the heavy water drainage 3D temporal profiles inside the Reflector Vessel can be obtained. This model was validated, comparing the computational results with experimental measurements performed in a real-size physical model built by INVAP during early OPAL design engineering stages. Furthermore, detailed 3D Serpent Monte Carlo models are also available, which have been already validated with experimental data from reactor commissioning and operating cycles. In the present work the neutronic and thermohydraulic models, available for

  19. Mine burial in the seabed of high-turbidity area—Findings of a first experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeye, Matthias; Fettweis, Michael; Legrand, Sebastien; Dupont, Yves; Van Lancker, Vera

    2012-07-01

    The seabed of the North Sea is covered with ammunition dating back from World Wars I and II. With increasing human interference (e.g. fisheries, aggregate extraction, harbor related activities), it forms a threat to the safety at sea. In this study, test mines were deployed on a sandy seabed for 3 months to investigate mine burial processes as a function of hydrodynamic and meteorological conditions. The mine experiment was conducted in a shallow (9 m), macrotidal environment characterized by highly turbid waters (yearly and depth-averaged suspended particulate matter concentration of 100 mg l-1). Results showed some variability of the overall mine burial, which corresponded with scouring processes induced by a (sub-) tidal forcing mechanism. The main burial events however were linked to storm-related scouring processes, and subsequent mine roll into the resulting pit. Two storms affecting the mines during the 3-month experiment resulted in enduring increases in burial volume to 60% and 80%, respectively. More cyclic and ephemeral burial and exposure events appear to be linked to the local hydrodynamic regime. During slack tides, suspended sediment settles on the seabed, increasing the burial volume. In between slack tides, sediment is resuspended, decreasing the burial volume. The temporal pattern of this never reported burial mechanism, as measured optically, mimics the cyclicity of the suspended sediment concentration as recorded by ultrasonic signals at a nearby benthic observatory. Given the similarity in response signals at the two sites, we hypothesize that the formation of high-concentrated mud suspensions (HCMS) is a mechanism causing short-term burial and exposure of mines. This short-term burial and exposure increase the chance that mines are 'missed' during tracking surveys. Test mines contribute to our understanding of the settling and erosion of HCMS, and thus shed a light on generic sedimentary processes.

  20. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Cottrell

    Full Text Available Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables.Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1% concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01 than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01 compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C. Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1 with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species' resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis.Lack of consideration for the role of organic matter and

  1. Radionuclide distributions and migration mechanisms at shallow land burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.; Toste, A.P.; Thomas, C.W.; Rickard, W.H.; Nielson, H.L.; Campbell, R.M.; McShane, M.C.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Robertson, D.E.

    1991-02-01

    During the past several years, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted research at the Maxey Flats Disposal Site (MFDS) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This work has identified the spectrum of radionuclides present in the waste trenches, determined the processes that were occurring relative to degradation of radioactive material within the burial trenches, determined the chemical and physical characteristics of the trench leachates and the chemical forms of the leached radionuclides, determined the mobility of these radionuclides, investigated the subsurface and surface transport processes, determined the biological uptake by the native vegetation, developed strategies for environmental monitoring, and investigated other factors that influence the long-term fate of the radionuclide inventory at the disposal site. This report is a final summary of the research conducted by PNL and presents the results and discussions relative to the above investigative areas. 45 refs., 31 figs., 17 tabs

  2. Subsidence and settlement and their effect on shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bentonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on our current field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems in general and on biobarriers in particular

  3. Onset of scour below pipelines and self-burial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Truelsen, Christoffer; Sichmann, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on the onset of scour below and self-burial of pipelines in currents/waves. Pressure was measured on the surface of a slightly buried pipe at two points, one at the upstream side and the other at the downstream side of the pipe, both...... in the sand bed. The latter enabled the pressure gradient (which drives a seepage flow underneath the pipe) to be calculated. The results indicated that the excessive seepage flow and the resulting piping are the major factor to cause the onset of scour below the pipeline. The onset of scour occurred always...... locally (but not along the length of the pipeline as a two-dimensional process). The critical condition corresponding to the onset of scour was determined both in the case of currents and in the case of waves. Once the scour breaks out, it will propagate along the length of the pipeline, scour holes being...

  4. Alternatives To The Burial Of Low-Level Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The approach for management of LLRW in different countries has evolved differently due to many factors such as culture and public sentiment, systems of government, public policy, and geography. There are also various methods to disposition LLRW including but not limited to: - Long term statutes and unconditional or conditional release of material; - Direct Burial; - Treatment (Processing); - Burial; - Treatment; - Unconditional Release; - Recycle for Unconditional Release or Reuse Within Any Industry; - Controlled Recycle within Nuclear Industry. This paper examines the options of controlled recycle of material within the nuclear industry and cites several successful examples. Controlled recycling of LLRW materials within the nuclear industry has been demonstrated to be practical and economical. The reuse of materials within the nuclear industry properly addressed stakeholder concerns for material being used for what they believe to be improper purposes. There are a number of environmental benefits including: - Preservation of resources; - Energy Conservation (in cases where less energy is required to recycle/reuse as compared to mainstream new fuel storages. - Preservation of burial space at disposal sites. In many cases recycling is cost beneficial as compared to other options to disposition the LLRW. In some cases burial costs are comparatively higher. To further the advancement of controlled recycle countries must continue to embrace the concept and create large enough feedstocks of like type material to achieve economies of scale. Additionally, a mechanism to uniformly track material to show where material has been moved and ultimately dispositioned would also contribute to enhancing the endorsement of controlled recycling. There is a large amount of LLRW material that could potentially be recycled. To date, 100 mines, 90 commercial power reactors, over 250 research reactors and a number of fuel cycle facilities, have been retired from operation. Some of these

  5. High integrity container evaluation for solid waste disposal burial containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, W.S.

    1996-01-01

    In order to provide radioactive waste disposal practices with the greatest measure of public protection, Solid Waste Disposal (SWD) adopted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirement to stabilize high specific activity radioactive waste prior to disposal. Under NRC guidelines, stability may be provided by several mechanisms, one of which is by placing the waste in a high integrity container (HIC). During the implementation process, SWD found that commercially-available HICs could not accommodate the varied nature of weapons complex waste, and in response developed a number of disposal containers to function as HICs. This document summarizes the evaluation of various containers that can be used for the disposal of Category 3 waste in the Low Level Burial Grounds. These containers include the VECTRA reinforced concrete HIC, reinforced concrete culvert, and the reinforced concrete vault. This evaluation provides justification for the use of these containers and identifies the conditions for use of each

  6. Subsidence and settlement and their effect on shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeele, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    Subsidence and settlement are phenomena that are much more destructive than generally thought. In shallow land burials they may lead to cracking of the overburden and eventual exposure and escape of waste material. The primary causes are consolidation and cave-ins. Laboratory studies performed at Los Alamos permit us to predict settlement caused by consolidation or natural compaction of the crushed tuff overburden. Examples of expected settlement and subsidence are calculated based on the known geotechnical characteristics of crushed tuff. The same thing is done for bentonite/tuff mixes because some field experiments were performed using this additive (bentonite) to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the crushed tuff. Remedial actions, i.e., means to limit the amount of settlement, are discussed. Finally, we briefly comment on our current field experiment, which studies the influence of subsidence on layered systems, in general, and on biobarriers, in particular. 16 references, 7 figures, 5 tables

  7. Determination of post-burial interval using entomology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajinder; Sharma, Sahil; Sharma, Arun

    2016-08-01

    Insects and other arthropods are used in different matters pertinent to the criminal justice system as they play very important role in the decomposition of cadavers. They are used as evidence in a criminal investigation to determine post mortem interval (PMI). Various researches and review articles are available on forensic entomology to determine PMI in the terrestrial environment but very less work has been reported in context to buried bodies. Burring the carcass, is one of the methods used by criminals to conceal the crime. So, to drive the attention of researchers toward this growing field and to help various investigating agencies, the present paper reviews the studies done on determination of post-burial interval (PBI), its importance and future prospective. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  8. Alternative techniques for low-level waste shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.B.; Mezga, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Experience to date relative to the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) indicates that the physical stability of the disposal unit and the hydrologic isolation of the waste are the two most important factors in assuring disposal site performance. Disposal unit stability can be ensured by providing stable waste packages and waste forms, compacting backfill material, and filling the void spaces between the packages. Hydrologic isolation can be achieved though a combination of proper site selection, subsurface drainage controls, internal trench drainage systems, and immobilization of the waste. A generalized design of a LLW disposal site that would provide the desired long-term isolation of the waste is discussed. While this design will be more costly than current practices, it will provide additional confidence in predicted and reliability and actual site performance

  9. Migration of tritium from a nuclear waste burial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.H.

    1975-09-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) has routinely and continuously monitored the local environment (land, water, air, flora, and fauna) since 1951. As part of this intensive program, a three-part study was made to assess the tritium migration from an onsite burial ground for solid nuclear wastes and the resulting dose-to-man. A major source of tritium is buried, massive, Li-Al residues (referred to as melts) from the thermal extraction step in the SRP tritium production process. A melt with its extraction crucible and lid were immersed in water to measure the amounts of tritium released as HTO and HT to the water and to air. The result was a rapid release of 23 curies, of which approximately 99 percent was HTO that remained in the immersion water, and 1 percent was HT that passed into the air. (auth)

  10. Low-level burial grounds dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This document is submitted to request an exemption for Trench 94 from dangerous waste landfill liner and leachate collection and removal system (hereinafter referred to as liner/leachate system) requirements. This exemption request is based on an evaluation which demonstrates that burial in Trench 94 of cathodically protected submarine reactor compartments (SRC), which contain lead and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) as hazardous constituents, is as effective as disposal in a landfill having a liner/leachate system. This demonstration also considers the effectiveness of burial in Trench 94 in terms of preventing long-term migration of contaminants to groundwater or surface water. Modeling results indicate that release of contaminants to the groundwater or surface water will not occur until after long periods of time and that even after reaching the groundwater, contaminants will not be in excess of current regulatory limits, such as drinking water standards. Chapter 1.0 provides introductory information concerning this request, including the scope of the exemption request and relevant background information. The five subsequent chapters provide information needed to support the exemption request. Chapter 2.0 discusses the regulatory basis for the exemption request and presents performance objectives related to regulatory requirements. Chapter 3.0 provides a description of the site and its operation. Chapter 4.0 describes the wastes subject to this exemption request Chapter 5.0 discusses the performance of the disposal site with respect to performance objectives. Finally, Chapter 6.0 presents the actual request for exemption from requirements for a liner/leachate system. 30 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs

  11. High-level waste glass field burial tests at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnyk, T.W.; Walton, F.B.; Johnson, H.L.

    1983-06-01

    In 1960 June, 25 nepheline syenite-based glass hemispheres containing the fission products 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 144 Ce and 106 Ru were buried below the water table in fluvial sand at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Soil and groundwater concentrations of 90 Sr and 137 Cs have been determined since then and the data have been interpreted using kinetically limited migration models to deduce the leaching history of the glass for these burial conditions. The leaching history derived from the field data is compared to laboratory leaching of samples from a glass hemisphere retrieved in 1978, and also to pre-burial laboratory leaching of identical hemispheres. The time dependence of the leach rates observed for the buried specimens suggests that leaching is being inhibited by the formation of a protective surface layer, although no direct observation of this layer has been made. Using an average leach rate of 5.6 x 10 -14 kg/(m 2 .s) derived from the field data for the period 1966 to 1977, it is estimated that it would require approximately 20 million years to dissolve the glass hemispheres. The effect of the kinetic limitations of the fission-product/fluvial-sand interactions is discussed with respect to the migration of 90 Sr and 137 Cs over a 20-a time scale. It is concluded that kinetically limited sorption by oxyhydroxides rather than equilibrium ion exchange controls the long-term migration of 90 Cr; the action of the oxyhydroxides immobilizes the 90 Sr on the longer time scale. Cesium is initially rapidly bound to the micaceous fraction of the sand. On a longer time scale, slow remobilization of 137 Cs in particulate form is observed and is believed to be related to bacterial action

  12. Rapid precipitation of silica (opal-A) disguises evidence of biogenicity in high-temperature geothermal deposits: Case study from Dagunguo hot spring, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Jones, Brian

    2012-06-01

    Dagunguo Spring, located in the Tengchong geothermal area in the western part of Yunnan Province, China, is a very active spring with water temperatures of 78 to 97 °C and pH of 7.7 to 8.8. The vent pool, 5.6 m in diameter and up to 1.5 m deep, is lined with opal-A that was precipitated from the near-boiling spring waters. A glass suspended in the pool was coated with opal-A in two months and two PVC pipes that drained water from the pool in late 2010 became lined with opal-A precipitates in less than three months. The opal-A accumulated at rates of 0.5 to 0.75 mm/month in the spring pool and 2.5 to 3.5 mm/month in the PVC pipes. The opal-A precipitates, irrespective of where they developed, are formed primarily of silicified microbes and opal-A spheres along with minor amounts of native sulfur, detrital quartz, and clay (mainly kaolinite). The fabrics in these opal-A deposits were dictated largely by the growth patterns of the filamentous and rod-shaped microbes that dominate this low-diversity biota and the amount of opal-A that was precipitated around them. Many of the microbes were preserved as rapid opal-A was precipitated on and around them before the cells decayed. With continued precipitation, however, the microbes became quickly engulfed in the opal-A precipitates and morphological evidence of their presence was lost. In essence, the process that controls their preservation ultimately disguised them to the point where cannot be seen. Critically, this loss of morphological identity takes places even before opal-A starts its diagenetic transformation towards quartz.

  13. Opal-A in glassy pumice, acid alteration, and the 1817 phreatomagmatic eruption at Kawah Ijen (Java), Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; van Hinsberg, Vincent; Berlo, Kim; Liesegang, Moritz; Iacovino, Kayla D.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Wright, Heather M.

    2018-01-01

    At Kawah Ijen (Indonesia), vigorous SO2 and HCl degassing sustains a hyperacid lake (pH ~0) and intensely alters the subsurface, producing widespread residual silica and advanced argillic alteration products. In 1817, a VEI 2 phreatomagmatic eruption evacuated the lake, depositing a widespread layer of muddy ash fall, and sending lahars down river drainages. We discovered multiple types of opaline silica in juvenile low-silica dacite pumice and in particles within co-erupted laharic sediments. Most spectacular are opal-replaced phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene adjacent to pristine matrix glass and melt inclusions. Opal-bearing pumice has been found at numerous sites, including where post-eruption infiltration of acid water is unlikely. Through detailed analyses of an initial sampling of 1817 eruption products, we find evidence for multiple origins of opaline materials in pumice and laharic sediments. Evidently, magma encountered acid-altered materials in the subsurface and triggered phreatomagmatic eruptions. Syn-eruptive incorporation of opal-alunite clasts, layered opal, and fragment-filled vesicles of opal and glass, all suggest magma-rock interactions in concert with vesiculation, followed by cooling within minutes. Our experiments at magmatic temperature confirm that the opaline materials would show noticeable degradation in time periods longer than a few tens of minutes. Some glassy laharic sedimentary grains are more andesitic than the main pumice type and may represent older volcanic materials that were altered beneath the lake bottom and were forcefully ejected during the 1817 eruption. A post-eruptive origin remains likely for most of the opal-replaced phenocrysts in pumice. Experiments at 25°C and 100°C reveal that when fresh pumice is bathed in Kawah Ijen hyperacid fluid for 6 weeks, plagioclase is replaced without altering either matrix glass or melt inclusions. Moreover, lack of evidence for high-temperature annealing of the opal suggests

  14. Opal-A in Glassy Pumice, Acid Alteration, and the 1817 Phreatomagmatic Eruption at Kawah Ijen (Java), Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; van Hinsberg, Vincent; Berlo, Kim; Liesegang, Moritz; Iacovino, Kayla; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Wright, Heather M.

    2018-02-01

    At Kawah Ijen (Indonesia), vigorous SO2 and HCl degassing sustains a hyperacid lake (pH 0) and intensely alters the subsurface, producing widespread residual silica and advanced argillic alteration products. In 1817, a VEI 2 phreatomagmatic eruption evacuated the lake, depositing a widespread layer of muddy ash fall, and sending lahars down river drainages. We discovered multiple types of opaline silica in juvenile low-silica dacite pumice and in particles within co-erupted laharic sediments. Most spectacular are opal-replaced phenocrysts of plagioclase and pyroxene adjacent to pristine matrix glass and melt inclusions. Opal-bearing pumice has been found at numerous sites, including where post-eruption infiltration of acid water is unlikely. Through detailed analyses of an initial sampling of 1817 eruption products, we find evidence for multiple origins of opaline materials in pumice and laharic sediments. Evidently, magma encountered acid-altered materials in the subsurface and triggered phreatomagmatic eruptions. Syn-eruptive incorporation of opal-alunite clasts, layered opal, and fragment-filled vesicles of opal and glass, all suggest magma-rock interactions in concert with vesiculation, followed by cooling within minutes. Our experiments at magmatic temperature confirm that the opaline materials would show noticeable degradation in time periods longer than a few tens of minutes. Some glassy laharic sedimentary grains are more andesitic than the main pumice type and may represent older volcanic materials that were altered beneath the lake bottom and were forcefully ejected during the 1817 eruption. A post-eruptive origin remains likely for most of the opal-replaced phenocrysts in pumice. Experiments at 25°C and 100°C reveal that when fresh pumice is bathed in Kawah Ijen hyperacid fluid for six weeks, plagioclase is replaced without altering either matrix glass or melt inclusions. Moreover, lack of evidence for high-temperature annealing of the opal suggests

  15. Uranium speciation in the environment: study of opals from Nopal I (Mexico) and mill tailings from Gunnar (Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othmane, G.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the processes of uranium migration and sequestration is an important issue for the prediction of radionuclide retardation in the vicinity of uranium mine tailings sites or for the safety assessment of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories. Uranium speciation, controlled by biotic and abiotic factors, represents a key parameter for the control of uranium transfer in the environment. This study firstly deals with uranium speciation in opals from the Nopal I uranium deposit (Mexico). Microscopic observations of opals at the nano-scale revealed the occurrence of vorlanite, cubic CaUO 4 . This was the first time this rare calcium uranate has been found displaying a cubic morphology, in agreement with its crystal structure. Nopal I opals have been further investigated through time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The opals spectra and their comparison with those of experimentally produced standards indicate occurrence of mono- or polymeric uranyl complexes (associated or not with calcium or phosphate) sorbed onto internal surface of opal around pH 7-8. Finally, the speciation of uranium was studied in mill tailings from Gunnar (Canada). In the first tailings site, uranium primarily occurs as monomeric, inner-sphere uranyl complexes sharing edges with Fe(O,OH) 6 octahedral sites of iron-oxy-hydroxides and chlorite. Our results suggested that U(VI) co-precipitates with iron (oxy-hydr)oxides predominate in the second tailings sites. Therefore uranium mobility in Gunnar is governed by sorption/desorption and dissolution/(co)precipitation processes. (author)

  16. Software Application Profile: Opal and Mica: open-source software solutions for epidemiological data management, harmonization and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Dany; Marcon, Yannick; Fortier, Isabel; Burton, Paul; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Improving the dissemination of information on existing epidemiological studies and facilitating the interoperability of study databases are essential to maximizing the use of resources and accelerating improvements in health. To address this, Maelstrom Research proposes Opal and Mica, two inter-operable open-source software packages providing out-of-the-box solutions for epidemiological data management, harmonization and dissemination. Opal and Mica are two standalone but inter-operable web applications written in Java, JavaScript and PHP. They provide web services and modern user interfaces to access them. Opal allows users to import, manage, annotate and harmonize study data. Mica is used to build searchable web portals disseminating study and variable metadata. When used conjointly, Mica users can securely query and retrieve summary statistics on geographically dispersed Opal servers in real-time. Integration with the DataSHIELD approach allows conducting more complex federated analyses involving statistical models. Opal and Mica are open-source and freely available at [www.obiba.org] under a General Public License (GPL) version 3, and the metadata models and taxonomies that accompany them are available under a Creative Commons licence. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  17. Determination of the real structure of artificial and natural opals on the basis of three-dimensional reconstructions of reciprocal space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliseev, A.A.; Gorozhankin, D.F.; Napolskii, K.S.; Petukhov, A.V.; Sapoletova, N.A.; Vasilieva, A.V.; Grigoryeva, N.A.; Mistonov, A.A.; Belov, D.V.; Bouwman, W.G.; Kvashnina, K.; Chernyshov, D.Y.; Bosak, A.A.; Grigoriev, S.V.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of the scattering intensity in the reciprocal space for natural and artificial opals has been reconstructed from a set of small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns. The resulting three-dimensional intensity maps are used to analyze the defect structure of opals. The structure of

  18. Formation of Burial Mounds of the Sarmatian Time in the Basin of the Esaulovsky Aksai River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Korobkova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the features of the formation of the burial mounds in the basin of the Esaulovsky Aksai river in the Sarmatian period. Most of the burial mounds of the region begin to form in the Bronze Age and continue to function throughout the early, middle and early late-Sarmatian periods. Most of the burial mounds were located on the watersheds and above-flood terraces of different levels. All of them are characterized by same principles of planning, barrows in them are stretched in a chain in the natural form of the terrace on which the burial mound was built. The territories developed already in the Bronze Age were chosen for creating mounds in the early Sarmatian period. The main part of them is concentrated on a small section landplot of the middle course of the Esaulovsky Aksai river. During the Middle Sarmatian period, the main part of barrows were also located in the middle course of the Esaulovsky Aksai, but represented 2 plots. One of these plots continues to use large burial mounds of the previous period, and the other one undergoes the creation of small barrow groups consisting usually of two-three barrows containing the richest burials of the region with the “classical” set of Middle Sarmatian features. In the late Sarmatian period, as well as in the previous stages of the Sarmatian culture, the burial mounds of the middle course of the Esaulovsky Aksai continue to be used, which cease to function no later than at the first half of the 3rd century AD. But the territory of actively used burial mounds changes, and the main complexes of that time concentrate in the upper reaches, where new burial mounds are created and continue to function until the end of the Sarmatian era.

  19. Resurrection imageries: A study of the motives for extravagant burial rituals in ancient Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jock M. Agai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Unlike in the New Testament whereby faith in Christ can resurrect the dead, the ancient Egyptians believed that the bereaved created the resurrection of their deceased through burial rituals and by encouraging the living to serve their kings. They thought that faith alone in god or the gods was not enough to resurrect the dead, thus they seemingly superimposed resurrection alongside burials. Using the various forms of Egyptian burial rituals and evaluated from the perspective of the Christian concept of resurrection, this researcher attempts to search for the motives behind specific Egyptian burial rituals. The researcher proposes that the activities of the bereaved or of the living over the dead were paramount in resurrecting the dead in ancient Egypt. The purpose of this research is, firstly, to explain how the Egyptian burial rituals influenced their thoughts on resurrection and, secondly, to show that the Egyptian god(s might have depended on the living to raise the dead.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The ancient Egyptians lived their lives mainly to satisfy the interests of the dead, hence their extensive burial rituals. Whilst they believed in the power of the gods to raise the dead, there seemed to be another motive behind their burial practices which suggested that the living may have had more power to raise the dead. The power was realised in the activities of the living in the form of burials, tomb designs, mummification, food offering, and in remembering the dead. This research explains that these burial activities were relevant in resurrecting the dead without which the gods alone were not able to do that.

  20. Ancient tombs in China and shallow ground burial of solid low-intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yawen; Gu Cunli

    1987-01-01

    Having reviewed the experiences with ancient tombs in China, particularly the experiences with tomb siting, configuration of tombs, backfilling materials, civil engineering techniques, sealing techniques, drainage system, antiseptic techniques, a comparison between the ancient tombs and the shallow ground burial of solid radioactive wastes is made. The authors believe that the brilliant achievements of ancient tombs in China in keeping ancient corpses and funeral objects are a historical evidence for safety of shallow ground burial of radioactive wastes, and that the main experiences with the ancient tombs may be useful to shallow ground burial of solid radioactive wastes

  1. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

  2. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Main Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E. S.; Holter, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains background information and study results in summary form.

  3. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Main Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E. S.; Holter, G. M.

    1980-06-01

    Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains background information and study results in summary form.

  4. Calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Pedogenic or hypogene?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Harmon, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this paper is to consider all of the geological and geochemical data available for the calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain and to ascertain whether this data favors a pedogenic or hyogene origin for these deposits. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site. It is also the purpose of this paper to serve as a foundation for a lengthy feature article to be submitted for publication in 1994. In addition, a stand has been taken by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences against the upwelling-water model (a vote of 17 to 0 against), and this same panel report has concluded that open-quotes there is no compelling evidence for the repetitive flooding of the environment by expulsion of groundwaterclose quotes and that open-quotes instead, the evidence strongly supports the idea that the near-surface mineral deposits resulted from percolating rainwater, which carried soil minerals down into rock fracturesclose quotes. Based on such information the Department of Energy has stated that it open-quotes finds no basis to continue to study the origin of these specific depositsclose quotes. This study, based upon many different independent lines of evidence, reaches the opposite conclusion and instead favors a hypogene spring-travertine origin for the controversial calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. This study recognizes a pedogenic carbonate component at Yucca Mountain, but argues that this component is distinct from, and sometimes intermixed with, the calcite/opal deposits

  5. Thermoresponsive Polymers and Inverse Opal Hydrogels for the Detection of Diols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Jean-Philippe; Wischerhoff, Erik; Bernin, Robert; Hettrich, Cornelia; Koetz, Joachim; Sütterlin, Martin; Tiersch, Brigitte; Laschewsky, André

    2016-05-03

    Responsive inverse opal hydrogels functionalized by boroxole moieties were synthesized and explored as sensor platforms for various low molar mass as well as polymeric diols and polyols, including saccharides, glycopolymers and catechols, by exploiting the diol induced modulation of their structural color. The underlying thermoresponsive water-soluble copolymers and hydrogels exhibit a coil-to-globule or volume phase transition, respectively, of the LCST-type. They were prepared from oligoethylene oxide methacrylate (macro)monomers and functionalized via copolymerization to bear benzoboroxole moieties. The resulting copolymers represent weak polyacids, which can bind specifically to diols within an appropriate pH window. Due to the resulting modulation of the overall hydrophilicity of the systems and the consequent shift of their phase transition temperature, the usefulness of such systems for indicating the presence of catechols, saccharides, and glycopolymers was studied, exploiting the diol/polyol induced shifts of the soluble polymers' cloud point, or the induced changes of the hydrogels' swelling. In particular, the increased acidity of benzoboroxoles compared to standard phenylboronic acids allowed performing the studies in PBS buffer (phosphate buffered saline) at the physiologically relevant pH of 7.4. The inverse opals constructed of these thermo- and analyte-responsive hydrogels enabled following the binding of specific diols by the induced shift of the optical stop band. Their highly porous structure enabled the facile and specific optical detection of not only low molar mass but also of high molar mass diol/polyol analytes such as glycopolymers. Accordingly, such thermoresponsive inverse opal systems functionalized with recognition units represent attractive and promising platforms for the facile sensing of even rather big analytes by simple optical means, or even by the bare eye.

  6. The laser system for calibration and monotoring of the Opal jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biebel, O.; Boden, B.; Bug, S.; Eyring, A.; Fischer, H.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gross, S.; Knop, G.; Levegruen, S.; Maringer, G.; Mauer, E.; Maur, U.; Nellen, B.; Neumann, H.; Rollnik, A.; Schreiber, S.; Simon, A.; Thiebes, J.; Wolf, B.; Wuensch, B.; Boerner, H.; Breuker, H.; Hagemann, J.; Hauschild, M.; Heuer, R.D.; Karner, K.; Linser, G.; Runolfsson, O.; Seidl, W.; Voillat, D.; Wicht, P.; Schmitt, H. von der; Wagner, A.

    1992-01-01

    In this report we describe the construction and performance of the laser system which was used in Summer 1989 for the initial calibration of the OPAL jet chamber after installation on the LEP beam axis and which has served as a monitoring tool since then. Two Nd:YAG lasers are used to generate 48 high precision double beams which enter the chamber at fixed positions. The main features of the roughly 450 optical components are described and the beam alignment procedures are explained. Results are given for jet chamber calibration constants such as drift velocity, Lorentz angle, and residual sagittas. (orig.)

  7. The Knight shift in liquid gallium confined within porous glasses and opals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnaya, E V; Michel, D; Tien, C; Kumzerov, Yu A; Yaskov, D

    2003-01-01

    71 Ga nuclear magnetic resonance studies were carried out for liquid gallium embedded into porous glasses with different pore sizes and into artificial opals within the temperature range from about 320 K to complete confined gallium freezing. A general decrease in the Knight shift compared to the bulk melt depending on pore sizes was observed in contrast to theoretical predictions. Correlations between alterations in the Knight shift and pore sizes were established for particular pore geometry. It was also observed that confined geometry affects the temperature dependence of the Knight shift in liquid gallium

  8. Tuning optical properties of opal photonic crystals by structural defects engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stasio, F.; Cucini, M.; Berti, L.; Comoretto, D.; Abbotto, A.; Bellotto, L.; Manfredi, N.; Marinzi, C.

    2009-06-01

    We report on the preparation and optical characterization of three dimensional colloidal photonic crystal (PhC) containing an engineered planar defect embedding photoactive push-pull dyes. Free standing polystyrene films having thickness between 0.6 and 3 mm doped with different dipolar chromophores were prepared. These films were sandwiched between two artificial opals creating a PhC structure with planar defect. The system was characterized by reflectance at normal incidence angle (R), variable angle transmittance (T) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) Evidence of defect states were observed in T and R spectra which allow the light to propagate for selected frequencies within the pseudogap (stop band).

  9. Interpretation of small-angle diffraction experiments on opal-like photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, F.; Muldarisnur, M.; Sharifi, P.; Zabel, H.

    2011-08-01

    Comprehensive structural information on artificial opals involving the deviations from the strongly dominating face-centered cubic structure is still missing. Recent structure investigations with neutrons and synchrotron sources have shown a high degree of order but also a number of unexpected scattering features. Here, we point out that the exclusion of the allowed 002-type diffraction peaks by a small atomic form factor is not obvious and that surface scattering has to be included as a possible source for the diffraction peaks. Our neutron diffraction data indicate that surface scattering is the main reason for the smallest-angle peaks in the diffraction patterns.

  10. Application of the GEANT3 geometry package to the description of the OPAL detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, J; Brun, R; Bruyant, F; Zanarini, P; Bullock, F W; Hobson, P R; Chang, C Y; Dumont, J J; Hemingway, R J; McPherson, A C

    1987-10-01

    We present the general features of the GEANT3 package for coding the geometrical structure of a large and complex detector in the computer programs used for their design and analysis. This package has been developed in the context of Monte Carlo studies of detector performance but should be well matched to the problem of analysis. As a specific example, we illustrate the description of the OPAL detector for the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN and show the results of a sample study using this description.

  11. Fabrication and Photo-Detecting Performance of 2D ZnO Inverse Opal Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D ZnO inverse opal (IO films were fabricated by co-assembly of sacrificed polystyrene (PS microspheres and citric acid/zinc acetate (CA/ZA aqueous solution at an oil–water interface followed by calcination. Their morphologies could be controlled by the surface property of polymer templates and CA/ZA molar ratio. Moreover, photo-detecting devices based on such films were constructed, which showed high photocurrent (up to 4.6 μA, excellent spectral selectivity, and reversible response to optical switch.

  12. Quality control in public participation assessments of water quality: the OPAL Water Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, N L; Turner, S D; Goldsmith, B; Gosling, L; Davidson, T A

    2016-07-22

    Public participation in scientific data collection is a rapidly expanding field. In water quality surveys, the involvement of the public, usually as trained volunteers, generally includes the identification of aquatic invertebrates to a broad taxonomic level. However, quality assurance is often not addressed and remains a key concern for the acceptance of publicly-generated water quality data. The Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) Water Survey, launched in May 2010, aimed to encourage interest and participation in water science by developing a 'low-barrier-to-entry' water quality survey. During 2010, over 3000 participant-selected lakes and ponds were surveyed making this the largest public participation lake and pond survey undertaken to date in the UK. But the OPAL approach of using untrained volunteers and largely anonymous data submission exacerbates quality control concerns. A number of approaches were used in order to address data quality issues including: sensitivity analysis to determine differences due to operator, sampling effort and duration; direct comparisons of identification between participants and experienced scientists; the use of a self-assessment identification quiz; the use of multiple participant surveys to assess data variability at single sites over short periods of time; comparison of survey techniques with other measurement variables and with other metrics generally considered more accurate. These quality control approaches were then used to screen the OPAL Water Survey data to generate a more robust dataset. The OPAL Water Survey results provide a regional and national assessment of water quality as well as a first national picture of water clarity (as suspended solids concentrations). Less than 10 % of lakes and ponds surveyed were 'poor' quality while 26.8 % were in the highest water quality band. It is likely that there will always be a question mark over untrained volunteer generated data simply because quality assurance is uncertain

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson with the OPAL Detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarises the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV performed by the OPAL Collaboration at LEP. The consistency of the data with the background hypothesis and various Higgs boson mass hypotheses is examined. No indication of a signal is found in the data and a lower bound of 112.7GeV/C^2 is obtained on the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% CL.

  14. An application of the GEANT3 geometry package to the description of the OPAL detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.; Bullock, F.W.; Hobson, P.R.; Lorazo, B.; Mallet, J.; Patrick, G.; Possoz, A.; Rossi, A.; Bologna Univ.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    We present the general features of the GEANT3 package for coding the geometrical structure of a large and complex detector in the computer programs used for their design and analysis. This package has been developed in the context of Monte Carlo studies of detector performance but should be well matched to the problem of analysis. As a specific example, we illustrate the description of the OPAL detector for the Large Electron Positron collider at CERN and show the results of a sample study using this description. (orig.)

  15. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m 3 ) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time

  16. Effects of sand burial on the survival and growth of two shrubs dominant in different habitats of northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hao; Zhao, Ha-Lin; Zhao, Xue-Yong; Zuo, Xiao-An; Wang, Shao-Kun; Chen, Min

    2017-04-01

    Plants that grow in dune ecosystems always suffer from sand burial. Shrubs play implications on the healthy functioning of dune ecosystems due to control blowing sand. However, the survival and growth responses of shrubs to sand burial remain poorly understood. The survival rate and seedling height of two shrubs (Artemisia halodendron and Lespedeza davurica) along with the soil properties under different burial depths were examined in order to reveal the causing ecophysiological attributes of sand burial on shrubs in the desertified region. It was found that A. halodendron can survive a burial depth of 6 cm greater than its seedling height, which is a dominant shrub in mobile dunes with intense burial, whereas a burial depth equivalent to three fourths of its seedling height is detrimental to L. davurica, which is dominant in fixed dunes with less burial. The reasons for the shrub death under sand burial were associated with the physical barrier to vertical growth and the reduction in photosynthetic area. In conclusion, A. halodendron can facilitate the stabilization of mobile dunes because of their high tolerance to the frequent and intensive sand burial, while L. davurica can be beneficial for the recovery process because of their higher survival rates under shallow burial following restoration of mobile dunes.

  17. Fabrication of Au- and Ag–SiO{sub 2} inverse opals having both localized surface plasmon resonance and Bragg diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erola, Markus O.A.; Philip, Anish; Ahmed, Tanzir; Suvanto, Sari; Pakkanen, Tuula T., E-mail: Tuula.Pakkanen@uef.fi

    2015-10-15

    The inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} containing metal nanoparticles can have both the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanoparticles and the Bragg diffraction of inverse opal crystals of SiO{sub 2}, which are very useful properties for applications, such as tunable photonic structures, catalysts and sensors. However, effective processes for fabrication of these films from colloidal particles have rarely been reported. In our study, two methods for preparation of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} with three different crystal sizes and containing gold or silver nanoparticles (NPs) via self-assembly using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces are reported. The Bragg diffraction of inverse opal films of SiO{sub 2} in the presence and absence of the template was measured and predicted on the basis of with UV–vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The preparation methods used provided good-quality inverse opal SiO{sub 2} films containing highly dispersed, plasmonic AuNPs or AgNPs and having both Bragg diffractions and LSPRs. - Graphical abstract: For syntheses of SiO{sub 2} inverse opals containing Au/Ag nanoparticles two approaches and three template sizes were employed. Self-assembly of template molecules and metal nanoparticles occurred using electrostatic interactions and capillary forces. Both the Bragg diffraction of the photonic crystal and the localized surface plasmon resonance of Au/Ag nanoparticles were detected. - Highlights: • Fabrication methods of silica inverse opals containing metal nanoparticles studied. • Three template sizes used to produce SiO{sub 2} inverse opals with Au/Ag nanoparticles. • PS templates with Au nanoparticles adsorbed used in formation of inverse opals. • Ag particles infiltrated in inverse opals with capillary and electrostatic forces. • Bragg diffractions of IOs and surface plasmon resonances of nanoparticles observed.

  18. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    OpenAIRE

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale face-centered-cubic (fcc) ordering of spherical voids in the inverse opal-like structure with unit cell dimension of 750±10nm. The diffuse scattering data were used to map defects in the fcc structure as a f...

  19. Suppression of the green photoluminescence band in ZnO embedded into porous opal by spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrarov, S.M.; Yuldashev, Sh.U.; Lee, S.B.; Kang, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and transmittance characteristics of the zinc oxide embedded into voids of FCC sub-micron packed silicon dioxide spheres by using technologically simple and inexpensive spray pyrolysis are reported. The uniform formation of ZnO nanocrystalline particles inside of the porous opal takes place after deposition in aqueous solution with zinc nitrite hexahydride precursor followed by thermal annealing. The decrease of green PL is observed due to the inhibition of spontaneous emission through oxygen vacancies in ZnO. The strong red shift of the transmittance characteristics signifies the essential filling of voids in the opal matrix

  20. Mineralogical, chemical and K-Ar isotopic changes in Kreyenhagen Shale whole rocks and <2 µm clay fractions during natural burial and hydrous-pyrolysis experimental maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, Norbert; Lewan, Michael D.; Dolan, Michael P.; Chaudhuri, Sambhudas; Curtis, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive maturation of the Eocene Kreyenhagen Shale from the San Joaquin Basin of California was studied by combining mineralogical and chemical analyses with K–Ar dating of whole rocks and sequence, indicating that there is no detectable variation in the crystallo-chemical organization of the K-bearing alumino-silicates with depth. No supply of K from outside of the rock volumes occurred, which indicates a closed-system behavior for it. Conversely, the content of the total organic carbon (TOC) content decreases significantly with burial, based on the progressive increasing Al/TOC ratio of the whole rocks. The initial varied mineralogy and chemistry of the rocks and their <2 μm fractions resulting from differences in detrital sources and depositional settings give scattered results that homogenize progressively during burial due to increased authigenesis, and concomitant increased alteration of the detrital material.

  1. Estimation of the release and migration of nickel through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.

    1994-05-01

    An assessment was performed to evaluate release and transport of nickel from large metal components containing nickel-bearing alloys at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground. The potential for nickel within the components to enter groundwater under the burial site was investigated by examining available data on the site's geology, geochemistry, and geohydrology to develop a conceptual model for release and transport of nickel from the components. In addition, laboratory studies were performed to provide information needed for the model, but which was not available from existing databases. Estimates of future concentrations of nickel radioisotopes ( 59 Ni and 63 Ni) and total elemental nickel in the unconfined aquifer and in the Columbia River were developed based on this information

  2. Community-based obesity prevention in Australia: Background, methods and recruitment outcomes for the evaluation of the effectiveness of OPAL (Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Leslie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle (OPAL intervention program targets families and communities to improve children’s eating and physical activity patterns. We outline the quantitative evaluation design and recruitment results for baseline data collection. Methods: A longitudinal quasi-experimental design, with baseline data collection and five-year follow-up. Participants targeted are children, parents, and school principals/directors from primary, secondary/R-12 schools, pre-schools, childcare and out-of-school-hours-care (OSHC centers in 20 selected communities across South Australia (SA, and one in the Northern Territory (NT. A total of 277 (262 SA, 15 NT schools participated; 4860 9-11 year olds and 1164 12-16 year olds completed a questionnaire. Anthropometric measures were taken from 5531 students; 6552 parents, 276 pre/school/childcare directors, 139 OSHC directors and 237 principals completed questionnaires. Data include measurements of child participants’ weight/height/waist circumference; paper-based/online surveys of informants in early childhood, primary/secondary school and community settings; and secondary growth check data for 4-5 year old children. Serial cross-sectional analyses will compare intervention to matched comparison communities. Results: Overall school response rate was 50%. Student response rates were 20-22% and 11-13% (questionnaires and measurements respectively; 14-21% of parents, 49-55% of directors, and 26-44% of principals completed and returned questionnaires. Changes to child weight status; eating practices; sleep, physical activity/sedentary behaviors; physical environments; community capacity; and economic evaluation (Quality Adjusted Life year gain will examine program effectiveness. Conclusions: As the most significant program of its kind in Australia, OPAL will contribute to obesity prevention efforts on an international scale.

  3. Dating floodplain sediments using tree-ring response to burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J.M.; Vincent, K.R.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Floodplain sediments can be dated precisely based on the change in anatomy of tree rings upon burial. When a stem of tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima) or sandbar willow (Salix exigua) is buried, subsequent annual rings in the buried section resemble the rings of roots: rings become narrower, vessels within the rings become larger, and transitions between rings become less distinct. We combined observations of these changes with tree-ring counts to determine the year of deposition of sedimentary beds exposed in a 150-m-long trench across the floodplain of the Rio Puerco, a rapidly filling arroyo in New Mexico. This method reliably dated most beds thicker than about 30 cm to within a year of deposition. Floodplain aggradation rates varied dramatically through time and space. Sediment deposition was mostly limited to brief overbank flows occurring every few years. The most rapid deposition occurred on channel-margin levees, which migrated laterally during channel narrowing. At the decadal timescale, the cross-section-average sediment deposition rate was steady, but there was a shift in the spatial pattern of deposition in the 1980s. From 1936 to 1986, sediment deposition occurred by channel narrowing, with little change in elevation of the thalweg. After 1986 sediment deposition occurred by vertical aggradation. From 1936 to 2000 about 27 per cent of the arroyo cross-section filled with sediment. The rate of filling from 1962 to 2000 was 0·8 vertical m/decade or 85 m2/decade.

  4. Numerical modelling of GPR electromagnetic fields for locating burial sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carcione José M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-penetrating radar (GPR is commonly used for locating burial sites. In this article, we acquired radargrams at a site where a domestic pig cadaver was buried. The measurements were conducted with the ProEx System GPR manufactured by the Swedish company Mala Geoscience with an antenna of 500MHz. The event corresponding to the pig can be clearly seen in the measurements. In order to improve the interpretation, the electromagnetic field is compared to numerical simulations computed with the pseudo-spectral Fourier method. A geological model has been defined on the basis of assumed electromagnetic properties (permittivity, conductivity and magnetic permeability. The results, when compared with the GPR measurements, show a dissimilar amplitude behaviour, with a stronger reflection event from the bottom of the pit. We have therefore performed another simulation by decreasing the electrical conductivity of the body very close to that of air. The comparison improved, showing more reflections, which could be an indication that the body contains air or has been degraded to a certain extent that the electrical resistivity has greatly increased.

  5. Low-level waste shallow burial assessment code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Little, C.A.; Emerson, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Exposures from Shallow Trench Operationns) is a computer code developed under United States Environmental Protection Agency funding to evaluate possible health effects from radionuclide releases from shallow, radioctive-waste disposal trenches and from areas contaminated with operational spillage. The model is intended to predict radionuclide transport and the ensuing exposure and health impact to a stable, local population for a 1000-year period following closure of the burial grounds. Several classes of submodels are used in PRESTO to represent scheduled events, unit system responses, and risk evaluation processes. The code is modular to permit future expansion and refinement. Near-surface transport mechanisms considered in the PRESTO code are cap failure, cap erosion, farming or reclamation practices, human intrusion, chemical exchange within an active surface soil layer, contamination from trench overflow, and dilution by surface streams. Subsurface processes include infiltration and drainage into the trench, the ensuing solubilization of radionuclides, and chemical exchange between trench water and buried solids. Mechanisms leading to contaminated outflow include trench overflow and downwad vertical percolation. If the latter outflow reaches an aquifer, radiological exposure from irrigation or domestic consumption is considered. Airborne exposure terms are evaluated using the Gaussian plume atmospheric transport formulation as implemented by Fields and Miller

  6. Design for the second phase Rokkasho LLW burial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, Tadamasa

    1997-01-01

    Rokkasho Low Level radioactive Waste management center of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (hereafter called JNFL) has been operating for five years and about 90,000 (200 liter) drums have already been buried. Currently, JNFL is planning the 2nd phase of the burial program. The basic design of the new facility has been completed and applied for license additionally. Wastes buried in the 2nd phase facility are mainly dry active wastes from nuclear power plants. Inflammable wastes except for plastics are incinerated before they are disposed, because organic materials can generate gas and their degraded materials affect the distribution coefficients of the radionuclides. Most of the aluminum wastes which can generate hydrogen gas by corrosion are also removed from the waste. The 2nd phase facility accepts metal, plastics and non-flammable wastes. These are solidified with mortar in the 200 liter drums at the power plants. The radioactive inventory of the 2nd phase facility is considered to be as much as that of the 1st phase facility. (author)

  7. Books, Baths, and Burials: Notes on Certain Nineteenth Century Adoptive Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Early legislation relating to street lighting, baths and washhouses, burial of the dead, public libraries and public improvements in England and Wales, reflected Parliament's suspicion of local democracy and distrust of local authorities. (9 references) (Author)

  8. Low-level burial grounds dangerous waste permit application design documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    This document serves a supplement to the already existing ''Low-Level Burial Ground Dangerous Waste Permit Application Design Documents.'' This paper contains information regarding drawings, construction specifications, and liner/leachate compatibility test plans

  9. Phosphorus recycling and burial in Baltic Sea sediments with contrasting redox conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mort, Haydon P; Slomp, Caroline P; Gustafson, Bo G

    2010-01-01

    . Most burial of P takes place as organic P. We find no evidence for significant authigenic Ca–P formation or biogenic Ca–P burial. The lack of major inorganic P burial sinks makes the Baltic Sea very sensitive to the feedback loop between increased hypoxia, enhanced regeneration of P and increased......In this study, redox-dependent phosphorus (P) recycling and burial at 6 sites in the Baltic Sea is investigated using a combination of porewater and sediment analyses and sediment age dating (210Pb and 137Cs). We focus on sites in the Kattegat, Danish Straits and Baltic Proper where present...... be accounted for in budgets and models for the Baltic Sea....

  10. LASL experimental engineered waste burial facility: design considerations and preliminary plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The LASL Experimental Engineered Waste Burial Facility is a part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program on Shallow-Land Burial Technology. It is a test facility where basic information can be obtained on the processes that occur in shallow-land burial operations and where new concepts for shallow-land burial can be tested on an accelerated basis on an appropriate scale. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the factors considered in the design of the facility and to present a preliminary description of the experiments that are initially planned. This will be done by discussing waste management philosophies, the purposes of the facility in the context of the waste management philosophy for the facility, and the design considerations, and by describing the experiments initially planned for inclusion in the facility, and the facility site

  11. Exploring sustainable burial practices in South Africa: Potential challenges and opportunities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Leuta, T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available . In addition to the various faiths/religions, many cultures believe that burial is the most respectful and dignified way to treat the body, and for loved ones to find comfort in having a specific gravesite to visit. The primary drawback to conventional... across a range of cultures and religions. 3. The way forward This paper aimed to enhance an understanding of the challenges faced by South African municipalities concerning inadequate land for cemetery development. Burial forms part of important...

  12. PROBLEMS OF THE BURIAL REGISTERS IN TURKEY: A QUALITATIVE STUDY ON MATERNAL MORTALITY

    OpenAIRE

    ERGÖÇMEN, Banu Akadlı; YÜKSEL, İlknur

    2006-01-01

    In this article deficiencies of the burial registers in Turkey are discussed with specificemphasis on maternal mortality. The analysis is based on the qualitative data of “Turkey NationalMaternal Mortality Study, 2005”. This article aims to understand the reasons behind thedeficiencies in reporting and registering of the maternal deaths through interviews conducted withthe officers in charge of the burial registers in urban and rural settlements as well as the personsresponsible in recording ...

  13. Recycling and shallow land burial as goals for fusion reactor materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponti, C.

    1988-01-01

    The acceptability of each natural element as a constituent for fusion reactor materials has been determined for the purpose of limiting long-lived radioactivity, so that the material could be recycled or disposed of by near-surface burial. The results show that there is little incentive for optimizing the composition of steels for recycling. The development of a steel with an optimized composition that would allow reaching shallow land burial conditions even for the first wall is more interesting and feasible

  14. Cover integrity in shallow land burial of low-level wastes: hydrology and erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, L.J.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of a state-of-the-art technology for simulating hydrologic processes and erosion affecting cover integrity at shallow land waste burial sites are described. A nonpoint source pollution model developed for agricultural systems has been adapted for application to waste burial sites in semiarid and arid regions. Applications include designs for field experiments, evaluation of slope length and steepness, evaluation of various soil types, and evaluation of vegetative cover influencing erosion rates and the water balance within the soil profile

  15. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, Alison; Saratsopoulos, John; Deura, Michael; Kenny, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  16. Angle-resolved reflection spectroscopy of high-quality PMMA opal crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, Ivan V.; Tambasov, Igor A.; Ivanenko, Alexander A.; Zyryanov, Victor Ya.

    2018-02-01

    PMMA opal crystal was prepared by a simple hybrid method, which includes sedimentation, meniscus formation and evaporation. We investigated three surfaces of this crystal by angle-resolved reflective light spectroscopy and SEM study. The angle-resolved reflective measurements were carried out in the 400-1100 nm range. We have determined the high-quality ordered surface of the crystal region. Narrow particle size distribution of the surface has been revealed. The average particle diameter obtained with SEM was nearly 361 nm. The most interesting result was that reflectivity of the surface turned out up to 98% at normal light incidence. Using a fit of dependences of the maximum reflectivity wavelength from an angle based on the Bragg-Snell law, the wavelength of maximum 0° reflectivity, the particle diameter and the fill factor have been determined. For the best surface maximum reflectivity wavelength of a 0° angle was estimated to be 869 nm. The particle diameter and fill factor were calculated as 372 nm and 0.8715, respectively. The diameter obtained by fitting is in excellent agreement with the particle diameter obtained with SEM. The reflectivity maximum is assumed to increase significantly when increasing the fill factor. We believe that using our simple approach to manufacture PMMA opal crystals will significantly increase the fabrication of high-quality photonic crystal templates and thin films.

  17. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-07

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  18. Opal-like Multicolor Appearance of Self-Assembled Photonic Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Zohar A; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Schmidt, Matthias; Gilead, Sharon; Guterman, Tom; Sadhanala, Aditya; Ahmad, Shahab; Levin, Aviad; Walther, Paul; Kaminski, Clemens F; Fändrich, Marcus; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Shimon, Linda J W; Gazit, Ehud

    2018-06-20

    Molecular self-assembly of short peptide building blocks leads to the formation of various material architectures that may possess unique physical properties. Recent studies had confirmed the key role of biaromaticity in peptide self-assembly, with the diphenylalanine (FF) structural family as an archetypal model. Another significant direction in the molecular engineering of peptide building blocks is the use of fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) modification, which promotes the assembly process and may result in nanostructures with distinctive features and macroscopic hydrogel with supramolecular features and nanoscale order. Here, we explored the self-assembly of the protected, noncoded fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-β,β-diphenyl-Ala-OH (Fmoc-Dip) amino acid. This process results in the formation of elongated needle-like crystals with notable aromatic continuity. By altering the assembly conditions, arrays of spherical particles were formed that exhibit strong light scattering. These arrays display vivid coloration, strongly resembling the appearance of opal gemstones. However, unlike the Rayleigh scattering effect produced by the arrangement of opal, the described optical phenomenon is attributed to Mie scattering. Moreover, by controlling the solution evaporation rate, i.e., the assembly kinetics, we were able to manipulate the resulting coloration. This work demonstrates a bottom-up approach, utilizing self-assembly of a protected amino acid minimal building block, to create arrays of organic, light-scattering colorful surfaces.

  19. Colorimetric Humidity Sensor Using Inverse Opal Photonic Gel in Hydrophilic Ionic Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seulki; Han, Sung Gu; Koh, Young Gook; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2018-04-27

    We demonstrate a fast response colorimetric humidity sensor using a crosslinked poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) in the form of inverse opal photonic gel (IOPG) soaked in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM⁺][BF₄ − ]), a non-volatile hydrophilic room temperature ionic liquid (IL). An evaporative colloidal assembly enabled the fabrication of highly crystalline opal template, and a subsequent photopolymerization of PHEMA followed by solvent-etching and final soaking in IL produced a humidity-responsive IOPG showing highly reflective structural color by Bragg diffraction. Three IOPG sensors with different crosslinking density were fabricated on a single chip, where a lightly crosslinked IOPG exhibited the color change response over entire visible spectrum with respect to the humidity changes from 0 to 80% RH. As the water content increased in IL, thermodynamic interactions between PHEMA and [BMIM⁺][BF₄ − ] became more favorable, to show a red-shifted structural color owing to a longitudinal swelling of IOPG. Highly porous IO structure enabled fast humidity-sensing kinetics with the response times of ~1 min for both swelling and deswelling. Temperature-dependent swelling of PHEMA in [BMIM⁺][BF₄ − ] revealed that the current system follows an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) behavior with the diffraction wavelength change as small as 1% at the temperature changes from 10 °C to 30 °C.

  20. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  1. Construction of the neutron beam facility at Australia's OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Shane J.

    2006-01-01

    Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed principally for neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for 18 neutron beam instruments, located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The neutron beam facility features a 20 l liquid deuterium cold neutron source and cold and thermal supermirror neutron guides. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, when criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. This paper will outline the key features of the OPAL reactor, and will describe the neutron beam facility in particular. The status of the construction and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed

  2. Real-Time-Simulation of IEEE-5-Bus Network on OPAL-RT-OP4510 Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atul Bhandakkar, Anjali; Mathew, Lini, Dr.

    2018-03-01

    The Real-Time Simulator tools have high computing technologies, improved performance. They are widely used for design and improvement of electrical systems. The advancement of the software tools like MATLAB/SIMULINK with its Real-Time Workshop (RTW) and Real-Time Windows Target (RTWT), real-time simulators are used extensively in many engineering fields, such as industry, education, and research institutions. OPAL-RT-OP4510 is a Real-Time Simulator which is used in both industry and academia. In this paper, the real-time simulation of IEEE-5-Bus network is carried out by means of OPAL-RT-OP4510 with CRO and other hardware. The performance of the network is observed with the introduction of fault at various locations. The waveforms of voltage, current, active and reactive power are observed in the MATLAB simulation environment and on the CRO. Also, Load Flow Analysis (LFA) of IEEE-5-Bus network is computed using MATLAB/Simulink power-gui load flow tool.

  3. Construction of the Neutron Beam Facility at Australia's OPAL Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Australia's new research reactor, OPAL, has been designed for high quality neutron beam science and radioisotope production. It has a capacity for eighteen neutron beam instruments to be located at the reactor face and in a neutron guide hall. The new neutron beam facility features a 20 litre liquid deuterium cold neutron source and supermirror neutron reflecting guides for intense cold and thermal neutron beams. Nine neutron beam instruments are under development, of which seven are scheduled for completion in early 2007. The project is approaching the hot-commissioning stage, where criticality will be demonstrated. Installation of the neutron beam transport system and neutron beam instruments in the neutron guide hall and at the reactor face is underway, and the path to completion of this project is relatively clear. The lecture will outline Australia's aspirations for neutron science at the OPAL reactor, and describe the neutron beam facility under construction. The status of this project and a forecast of the program to completion, including commissioning and commencement of routine operation in 2007 will also be discussed. This project is the culmination of almost a decade of effort. We now eagerly anticipate catapulting Australia's neutron beam science capability to meet the best in the world today. (author)

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  5. Mirrors in the Burial Rites of Saryarka Population in the Golden Horde Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasenova Bakhyt M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyze the mirrors which were originally discovered in ancient Turkic burials, but became widely spread as late as in the Golden Horde period, which was largely accounted for by the intensification of contacts due to the establishment of the Mongol Empire. High-quality Chinese mirrors and their local imitations have been discovered across the entire vast territory in which the steppe peoples established new state formations. The authors support the opinion advanced by many researchers, according to which the mirrors represent ritual items. There is evidence of the fact that in the ancient Turkic period mirrors were characteristic of female burials. This information is partially confirmed for the developed medieval period as well, for paleoanthropological characteristics are not always available. The authors provide information on the conditions in which mirrors have been discovered in the burials of the historical period in question. The article features the first description of individual mirrors discovered in the burials of the steppe area of Kazakhstan. Of considerable interest is the discovery of one of the mirrors underneath a grave in a female burial conducted in accordance with the Muslim funerary rite. The authors attempt to identify the role of individual items in the burial rite of the medieval period, in this case mirrors, as a marker of gender identity.

  6. Establishment of the Neutron Beam Research Facility at the OPAL Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.J.; Robinson, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Australia's first research reactor, HIFAR, reached criticality in January 1958. At that time Australia's main agenda was establishment of a nuclear power program. HIFAR operated for nearly 50 years, providing a firm foundation for the establishment of Australia's second generation research Reactor OPAL, which reached criticality in August 006. In HIFAR's early years a neutron beam facility was established for materials characterization, partly in aid of the nuclear energy agenda and partly in response to interest from Australia's scientific community. By the time Australia's nuclear energy program ceased (in the 1970s), radioisotope production and research had also been established at Lucas Heights. Also, by this time the neutron beam facility for scientific research had evolved into a major utilization programme, warranting establishment of an independent body to facilitate scientific access (the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering). In HIFAR's lifetime, ANSTO established a radiopharmaceuticals service for the Australian medical community and NDT silicon production was also established and grew to maturity. So when time came to determine the strategy for nuclear research in Australia into the 21st century, it was clear that the replacement for HIFAR should be multipurpose, with major emphases on scientific applications of neutron beams and medical isotope production. With this strategy in mind, ANSTO set about to design and build OPAL with a world-class neutron beam facility, capable of supporting a large and diverse scientific research community. The establishment of the neutron beam facility became the mission of the Bragg Institute management team. This journey began in 1997 with establishment of a working budget, and reached its first major objective when OPAL reached 20 MW thermal power nearly one decade later (in 2006). The first neutron beam instruments began operation soon after (in 2007), and quickly proved themselves to be

  7. Molybdenum speciation and burial pathway in weakly sulfidic environments: Insights from XAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meghan; Chappaz, Anthony; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-06-01

    Sedimentary molybdenum (Mo) accumulation is a robust proxy for sulfidic conditions in both modern and ancient aquatic systems and has been used to infer changing marine redox chemistry throughout Earth's history. Accurate interpretation of any proxy requires a comprehensive understanding of its biogeochemical cycling, but knowledge gaps remain concerning the geochemical mechanism(s) leading to Mo burial in anoxic sediments. Better characterization of Mo speciation should provide mechanistic insight into sedimentary Mo accumulation, and therefore in this study we investigate Mo speciation from both modern (Castle Lake, USA) and ancient (Doushantuo Formation, China) environments using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. By utilizing a series of laboratory-synthesized oxythiomolybdate complexes-many containing organic ligands-we expand the number of available standards to encompass a greater range of known Mo chemistry and test the linkage between Mo and total organic carbon (TOC). In weakly euxinic systems ([H2S(aq)] < 11 μM), or where sulfide is restricted to pore waters, natural samples are best represented by a linear combination of MoO3, MoOxS4-x2- (intermediate thiomolybdates), and [MoOx(cat)4-x]2- (cat = catechol, x = 2 or 3). These results suggest a revised model for how Mo accumulates in weakly sulfidic sediments, including a previously unrecognized role for organic matter in early sequestration of Mo and a de-emphasized importance for MoS42- (tetrathiomolybdate).

  8. Molybdenum speciation and burial pathway in weakly sulfidic environments: Insights from XAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Meghan; Chappaz, Anthony; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-06-01

    Sedimentary molybdenum (Mo) accumulation is a robust proxy for sulfidic conditions in both modern and ancient aquatic systems and has been used to infer changing marine redox chemistry throughout Earth’s history. Accurate interpretation of any proxy requires a comprehensive understanding of its biogeochemical cycling, but knowledge gaps remain concerning the geochemical mechanism(s) leading to Mo burial in anoxic sediments. Better characterization of Mo speciation should provide mechanistic insight into sedimentary Mo accumulation, and therefore in this study we investigate Mo speciation from both modern (Castle Lake, USA) and ancient (Doushantuo Formation, China) environments using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. By utilizing a series of laboratory-synthesized oxythiomolybdate complexes—many containing organic ligands—we expand the number of available standards to encompass a greater range of known Mo chemistry and test the linkage between Mo and total organic carbon (TOC). In weakly euxinic systems ([H2S(aq)] < 11 µM), or where sulfide is restricted to pore waters, natural samples are best represented by a linear combination of MoO3, MoOxS4-x2- (intermediate thiomolybdates), and [MoOx(cat)4-x]2- (cat = catechol, x = 2 or 3). These results suggest a revised model for how Mo accumulates in weakly sulfidic sediments, including a previously unrecognized role for organic matter in early sequestration of Mo and a de-emphasized importance for MoS42- (tetrathiomolybdate).

  9. Evaluation of a gamma monitor for survey of waste for shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, J.E.

    1978-12-01

    During an 8-month evaluation of the Gamma Waste Monitor, 54 reactor-area scrap casks and 8 shipments from the separations areas containing fission product activities were measured. It was concluded that a more accurate and detailed record of radionuclide burials can be obtained by using this monitor than by present methods of estimation. The monitor will significantly improve records and will provide a more reliable data base for evaluating long-term effects on the environment. Although the monitor can directly detect only gamma-emitting radionuclides, a method is proposed in this report for estimating the total radionuclide distribution by association with radionuclides that are detected. The monitor cannot assay transuranic waste and tritium. In many cases where the radionuclide emits two gamma rays of different energy, corrections for attenuation at other photon energies can be empirically derived from the spectrum. Complete details are included in the Appendix for operating the facility. Experimental data gathered during the evaluation period are contained in the body of this report

  10. Collapse and erosion at the low-level radioactive-waste burial site near Sheffield, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.R.; McGovern, L.L.

    1986-01-01

    Collapse and erosion are the dominant landform-modification processes at the Sheffield, Illinois, low-level radioactive-waste burial site. Records on collapse have been collected by the site contractor since 1978 and include data of inspection, location, and cavity dimensions. Fluvial sediment yield was measured by the US Geological Survey beginning in July 1982 from three gaged areas which drained two-thirds of the 20-acre site, and from a gaged 3.5-acre area in undisturbed terrain 0.3 mile south of the site. A total of 302 collapse cavities were recorded from October 1978 through September 1985. Based on the weight of earth material equivalent to cavity volume, an annual average of 6 tons of sediment per acre of site area has moved downward due to collapse. Sixty-two percent of the collapses occurred in swales between waste-disposal trenches or near trench boundaries, while the remainder occurred in earth material covers over trench interiors. Two-thirds of the collapses occurred during the months of February, March, and April. On-site fluvial sediment yield averaged 2 tons per acre per year from July 1982 through July 1984. Although this yield was approximately 200 times that from the undisturbed area, it is about one-half the annual sediment yield expected from a 20-acre row-crop agricultural basin on an 8% slope near Sheffield

  11. The Role of Reactive Iron in Organic Carbon Burial of the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, T. S.; Shields, M. R.; Gelinas, Y.; Allison, M. A.; Twilley, R.

    2016-02-01

    Deltaic systems are responsible for 41% of the total organic carbon buried on continental shelves (Smith et al., 2015). Furthermore, 21.5 ± 8.6% of the organic carbon in marine sediments is reported to be associated to reactive iron phases (Lalonde et al., 2012). Here, we examine the role of reactive iron in preserving organic carbon across a chronosequence in deltaic soils/sediments of the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. This prograding delta is part of the youngest subdelta of the Mississippi River Delta and serves as a model for deltas in an active progradational stage. We report the proportion, δ13C, lignin phenol content, and fatty acid content of organic carbon associated to iron in three unique environments along the delta topset. We found that over 15 % of the organic carbon in the top 0.5 meters was associated to reactive iron phases at our sampling locations. However, this amount varied between the mudflat, meadow, and canopy dominated sites. Moreover, the type of binding shifts from 1:1 sorption in the sediment dominated (mudflat) region to chelation/co-precipitation in the more soil-dominated regions. Acidic lignin phenols are preferentially sorbed in the mudflat region, which likely occurs pre-depositionally. These results add to our knowledge of the carbon burial processes in young deltas and present new questions about the selective preservation of organic compounds in deltaic sediments.

  12. Enhanced photochemical catalysis of TiO2 inverse opals by modification with ZnO or Fe2O3 using ALD and the hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiatong; Sun, Cuifeng; Fu, Ming; Long, Jie; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng

    2018-02-01

    The development of porous materials exhibiting photon regulation abilities for improved photoelectrochemical catalysis performance is always one of the important goals of solar energy harvesting. In this study, methods to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 inverse opals were discussed. TiO2 inverse opals were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using colloidal crystal templates. In addition, TiO2 inverse opal heterostructures were fabricated using colloidal heterocrystals by repeated vertical deposition using different colloidal spheres. The hydrothermal method and ALD were used to prepare ZnO- or Fe2O3-modified TiO2 inverse opals on the internal surfaces of the TiO2 porous structures. Although the photonic reflection band was not significantly varied by oxide modification, the presence of Fe2O3 in the TiO2 inverse opals enhanced their visible absorption. The conformally modified oxides on the TiO2 inverse opals could also form energy barriers and avoid the recombination of electrons and holes. The fabrication of the TiO2 photonic crystal heterostructures and modification with ZnO or Fe2O3 can enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 inverse opals.

  13. OPAL shield design performance assessment. Comparison of measured dose rates against the corresponding design calculated values. A designer perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brizuela, Martin; Albornoz, Felipe [INVAP SE, Av. Cmte. Piedrabuena, Bariloche (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    A comparison of OPAL shielding calculations against measurements carried out during Commissioning, is presented for relevant structures such as the reactor block, primary shutters, neutron guide bunker, etc. All the results obtained agree very well with the measured values and contribute to establish the confidence on the calculation tools (MCNP4, DORT, etc.) and methodology used for shielding design. (author)

  14. Periodic order and defects in Ni-based inverse opal-like crystals on the mesoscopic and atomic scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chumakova, A. V.; Valkovskiy, G. A.; Mistonov, A. A.; Dyadkin, V. A.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Sapoletova, N. A.; Napolskii, K. S.; Eliseev, A. A.; Petukhov, Andrei V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of inverse opal crystals based on nickel was probed on the mesoscopic and atomic levels by a set of complementary techniques such as scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron microradian and wide-angle diffraction. The microradian diffraction revealed the mesoscopic-scale

  15. Infrared to visible upconversion luminescence in Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped CeO2 inverse opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhengwen; Wu, Hangjun; Liao, Jiayan; Li, Wucai; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Rongfei; Qiu, Jianbei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • UC emission of Er 3+ was modified by introducing the structure of inverse opal. • Color tuning of CeO 2 :Yb, Er inverse opal was realized by inhibition of UC emission. • Two-photon excitation processes were observed in CeO 2 :Yb, Er inverse opal. -- Abstract: Infrared to visible upconversion luminescence has been investigated in Er 3+ /Yb 3+ co-doped CeO 2 inverse opal. Under the excitation of 980 nm diode lasers, visible emissions centered at 525, 547, 561, 660 and 680 nm are observed, which are assigned to the Er 3+ transitions of 2 H 11/2 → 4 I 15/2 (525 nm), 4 S 3/2 → 4 I 15/2 (547, 561 nm), 4 F 9/2 → 4 I 15/2 (660 and 680 nm), respectively. The effect of photonic band gap on the upconversion luminescence intensity was also obtained. Additionally, the upconversion luminescence mechanism was studied. The dependence of Er 3+ upconversion emission intensity on pump power reveals that it is a two-photon excitation process

  16. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Iversen, M.H.; Koski, Marja

    2008-01-01

    sp., T. weissflogii, and E. huxleyi, respectively. The average carbon-specific respiration rate was 0.15 d(-1) independent on diet (range: 0.08-0.21 d(-1)). Because of ballasting of opal and calcite, sinking velocities were significantly higher for pellets produced on T. weissflogii (322 +/- 169 m d...

  17. 3D WO3 /BiVO4 /Cobalt Phosphate Composites Inverse Opal Photoanode for Efficient Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhou, Weiwei; Yang, Yaping; Cheng, Chuanwei

    2017-04-01

    A novel 3D WO 3 /BiVO 4 /cobalt phosphate composite inverse opal is designed for photoeletrochemical (PEC) water splitting, yielding a significantly improved PEC performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Multifunctional Inverse Opal-Like TiO2 Electron Transport Layer for Efficient Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Shuang; Zheng, Yi Chu; Chen, Ying; Hou, Yu; Yang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-09-01

    A novel multifunctional inverse opal-like TiO 2 electron transport layer (IOT-ETL) is designed to replace the traditional compact layer and mesoporous scaffold layer in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Improved light harvesting efficiency and charge transporting performance in IOT-ETL based PSCs yield high power conversion efficiency of 13.11%.

  19. Optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties of opal matrices with intersphere nanocavities filled with crystalline multiferroic, piezoelectric, and segnetoelectric materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samoilovich, M.I.; Rinkevich, A.B.; Bovtun, Viktor; Belyanin, A.F.; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.; Klescheva, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 11 (2013), s. 2132-2147 ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : composites * opal matrices * optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2013

  20. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Moehl, Thomas; Harms, Hauke; Chavhan, Sudam; Tena-Zaera, Ramon; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Graetzel, Michael; Tetreault, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive