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Sample records for total headspace flammability

  1. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report

  2. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

  3. Tank 24-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented and interpreted to help resolve the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. Concern that the headspace of tank 241-C-103 may contain a flammable mixture of organic vapors and an aerosol of combustible organic liquid droplets arises from the presence of a layer of organic liquid in the tank. This organic liquid is believed to have originated in the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process, having been stored initially in tank 241-C-102 and apparently transferred to tank 241-C-103 in 1975 (Carothers 1988). Analyses of samples of the organic liquid collected in 1991 and 1993 indicate that the primary constituents are tributyl phosphate (TBP) and several semivolatile hydrocarbons (Prentice 1991, Pool and Bean 1994). This is consistent with the premise that the organic waste came from the PUREX process, because the PUREX process used a solution of TBP in a diluent composed of the n-C 11 H 24 to n-C 15 H 32 normal paraffinic hydrocarbons (NPH)

  4. TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected calibrating

  5. Quantitative analysis of total starch content in wheat flour by reaction headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Gong, Yi-Xian; Yu, Kong-Xian

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposed a new reaction headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method for efficiently quantifying the total starch content in wheat flours. A certain weight of wheat flour was oxidized by potassium dichromate in an acidic condition in a sealed headspace vial. The results show that the starch in wheat flour can be completely transferred to carbon dioxide at the given conditions (at 100 °C for 40 min) and the total starch content in wheat flour sample can be indirectly quantified by detecting the CO 2 formed from the oxidation reaction. The data showed that the relative standard deviation of the reaction HS-GC method in the precision test was less than 3.06%, and the relative differences between the new method and the reference method (titration method) were no more than 8.90%. The new reaction HS-GC method is automated, accurate, and can be a reliable tool for determining the total starch content in wheat flours in both laboratory and industrial applications. Graphical abstract The total starch content in wheat flour can be indirectly quantified by the GC detection of the CO 2 formed from the oxidation reaction between wheat flour and potassium dichromate in an acidic condition.

  6. Assessment of gas flammability in transuranic waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Loehr, C.A.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package [Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) SARP] set limits for gas generation rates, wattage limits, and flammable volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in transuranic (TRU) waste containers that would be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Based on existing headspace gas data for drums stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), over 30 percent of the contact-handled TRU waste drums contain flammable VOC concentrations greater than the limit. Additional requirements may be imposed for emplacement of waste in the WIPP facility. The conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the facility required that flame tests be performed if significant levels of flammable VOCs were present in TRU waste containers. This paper describes an approach for investigating the potential flammability of TRU waste drums, which would increase the allowable concentrations of flammable VOCS. A flammability assessment methodology is presented that will allow more drums to be shipped to WIPP without treatment or repackaging and reduce the need for flame testing on drums. The approach includes experimental work to determine mixture lower explosive limits (MLEL) for the types of gas mixtures observed in TRU waste, a model for predicting the MLEL for mixtures of VOCS, hydrogen, and methane, and revised screening limits for total flammable VOCs concentrations and concentrations of hydrogen and methane using existing drum headspace gas data and the model predictions

  7. Methodology for flammable gas evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    There are 177 radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste generates flammable gases. The waste releases gas continuously, but in some tanks the waste has shown a tendency to trap these flammable gases. When enough gas is trapped in a tank`s waste matrix, it may be released in a way that renders part or all of the tank atmosphere flammable for a period of time. Tanks must be evaluated against previously defined criteria to determine whether they can present a flammable gas hazard. This document presents the methodology for evaluating tanks in two areas of concern in the tank headspace:steady-state flammable-gas concentration resulting from continuous release, and concentration resulting from an episodic gas release.

  8. Flammable refrigerants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerwen, R.J.M. van; Verwoerd, M.; Oostendorp, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are promising alternatives for CFC, HCFC and HFC refrigerants. Due to their flammable nature, safety aspects have to be considered carefully. The world-wide situation concerning acceptability and practical application of flammable refrigerants is becoming more and more complex and

  9. Tank 241-U-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results from samples collected on July 16, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C.; Mitroshkov, A.V.; Edwards, J.A.; Julya, J.L.; Thornton, B.M.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents the results from analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-U-104 (Tank U-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Tank headspace samples collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Vapor concentrations from sorbent trap samples are based on measured sample volumes provided by WHC. No analytes were determined to be above the immediate notification limits specified by the sampling and analysis plan. None of the flammable constituents were present at concentrations above the analytical instrument detection limits. Total headspace flammability was estimated to be <0.108% of the lower flammability limit. Average measured concentrations of targeted gases, inorganic vapors, and selected organic vapors are provided in a table. A summary of experimental methods, including sampling methodology, analytical procedures, and quality assurance and control methods are presented in Section 2.0. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results are provided in Section 3.0

  10. Calculation note: project W-320 primary ventilation air flow requirements for mitigation of steady state flammable gas concentrations in the headspaces of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    This calculation note analyzes headspace concentrations of hydrogen dependent upon assumed ventilation flow rates provided for tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The analyses are based on measured or estimated steady state hydrogen release rates. Tank 241-C-106 is analyzed prior to sluicing; tank 241-AY-102 is analyzed both prior to and after completion of sluicing. Specific analyses, using both best estimated and bounding hydrogen generation rates, include the minimum primary ventilation flow rates required in the tanks to ensure that the steady state hydrogen concentration in the respective tank headspace does not exceed 25% and 100% of the LFL. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of time as well as the time required to reach 25% and 100% of LFL upon complete loss of active ventilation, starting from the steady state hydrogen concentration based on a 200 CFM minimum flow rate in tank 241-C-106 and a 100 CFM minimum flow rate in tank241-AY-102. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of thee following partial loss of active ventilation (i.e., step changes to l60, l20, 80, and 40 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-C-106, staffing from a 200 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 200 CFM flow rate. The headspace hydrogen concentration as a function of the following partial loss of active ventilation i.e., step changes to 80, 60, 40, and 20 CFM ventilation flow rates) in tank 241-AY-102, starting from a 100 CFM flow rate and the corresponding steady state hydrogen concentration based on the 100 CFM flow rate

  11. Overview of the Flammability of Gases Generated in Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Huckaby, James L.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Johnson, Gerald D.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents an overview of what is known about the flammability of the gases generated and retained in Hanford waste tanks in terms of the gas composition, flammability and detonability limits of the gas constituents, and availability of ignition sources. The intrinsic flammability (or non-flammability) of waste gas mixtures is one major determinant of whether a flammable region develops in the tank headspace; other factors are the rate, surface area, and volume of the release and the tank ventilation rate, which are not covered in this report

  12. FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2003-11-10

    This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.

  13. Overview of the Flammability of Gases Generated in Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Huckaby, J.L.; Bryan, S.A.; Johnson, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents an overview of what is known about the flammability of the gases generated and retained in Hanford waste tanks in terms of the gas composition, the flammability and detonability limits of the gas constituents, and the availability of ignition sources. The intrinsic flammability (or nonflammability) of waste gas mixtures is one major determinant of whether a flammable region develops in the tank headspace; other factors are the rate, surface area, volume of the release, and the tank ventilation rate, which are not covered in this report

  14. Organic analysis of the headspace in Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    Before radioactive mixed waste in Hanford waste tanks can be isolated and permanently stored, several safety issues need to be addressed. The headspace vapors in Hanford Tank 103-C raise two issues: (1) the potential flammability of the vapor and aerosol, and (2) the potential worker health and safety hazards associated with the toxicity of the constituents. As a result, the authors have implemented organic analysis methods to characterize the headspace vapors in Hanford waste tanks. To address the flammability issue, they have used OSHA versatile sampling (OVS) tubes as the sampling method followed by solvent extraction and GC/MS analysis. For analyzing volatile organics and organic air toxins, they have implemented SUMMA trademark canisters as the collection device followed by cryogenic trapping and GC/MS analysis. Strategies for modifying existing NIOSH and EPA methods to make them applicable to vapors in Hanford waste tanks are discussed. Identification and quantification results of volatile and semivolatile organics are presented

  15. Headspace analysis of foams and fixatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Kyle [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Truong, Thanh-Tam [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Magwood, Leroy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, Brent [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nicholson, James [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-27

    In the process of decontaminating and decommissioning (D&D) older nuclear facilities, special precautions must be taken with removable or airborne contamination. One possible strategy utilizes foams and fixatives to affix these loose contaminants. Many foams and fixatives are already commercially available, either generically or sold specifically for D&D. However, due to a lack of revelant testing in a radioactive environment, additional verification is needed to confirm that these products not only affix contamination to their surfaces, but also will function in a D&D environment. Several significant safety factors, including flammability and worker safety, can be analyzed through the process of headspace analysis, a technique that analyzes the off gas formed before or during the curing process of the foam/fixative, usually using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This process focuses on the volatile components of a chemical, which move freely between the solid/liquid form within the sample and the gaseous form in the area above the sample (the headspace). Between possibly hot conditions in a D&D situation and heat created in a foaming reaction, the volatility of many chemicals can change, and thus different gasses can be released at different times throughout the reaction. This project focused on analysis of volatile chemicals involved in the process of using foams and fixatives to identify any potential hazardous or flammable compounds.

  16. Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a reference document describing the current knowledge of flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases. The report incorporates these analyses into two models for calculating headspace flammability, one based on instantaneous equilibrium between dissolved gases and the headspace and one incorporating limited release rates based on mass-transfer considerations. Finally, it demonstrates the use of both models to estimate headspace flammable gas concentrations and minimum ventilation rates required to maintain concentrations below 25% of the LFL

  17. Flammability Indices for Refrigerants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Osami

    This paper introduces a new index to classify flammable refrigerants. A question on flammability indices that ASHRAE employs arose from combustion test results of R152a and ammonia. Conventional methods of not only ASHRAE but also ISO and Japanese High-pressure gas safety law to classify the flammability of refrigerants are evaluated to show why these methods conflict with the test results. The key finding of this paper is that the ratio of stoichiometric concentration to LFL concentration (R factor) represents the test results most precisely. In addition, it has excellent correlation with other flammability parameters such as flame speed and pressure rise coefficient. Classification according to this index gives reasonable flammability order of substances including ammonia, R152a and carbon monoxide. Theoretical background why this index gives good correlation is also discussed as well as the insufficient part of this method.

  18. Flammability characteristics of LPG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardillo, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The use of LPG is continuous increase not only in the domestic field but also in the field of the transports. Consequently, there is a renewed interest for its flammability characteristics in order to decide the necessary conditions of safety. The main components of LPG are hydrocarbons containing three or four carbon atoms. The normal components of LPG are propane and butane; small concentrations of other hydrocarbons (isobutene, propylene, butane, ethane, pentane) may also be present. Different mixtures of LGP have different and physical characteristics with a different behavior during the use. Also flammability characteristics can be different according to the composition. In this paper at firsts the flammability characteristics of the main components of LGP, taken singularly, are examinated; subsequently some examples of calculation of the flammability limits of different mixture are reported [it

  19. Flammable gas safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Steele, R.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic constituents in Hanford waste tanks, with particular emphasis on those tanks that have been assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY, obtained during the window E core sampling, have been analyzed for organic constituents. Four of the samples were from the upper region, or convective layer, of the tank and two were from the lower, nonconvective layer. The samples were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitroso-iminodiacetic acid (NIDA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid (CA), succinic acid (SA), and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (ED3A). The chelator of highest concentration was EDTA in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography (LC) was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids (LMWA) including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids. Oxalate constituted approximately 40% of the TOC in the nonconvective layer samples. Oxalate was found to be approximately 3 to 4 times higher in concentration in the nonconvective layer than in the convective layer. During FY 1993, LC methods for analyzing LWMA, and two chelators N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid and EDTA, were transferred to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and the 222-S laboratory

  20. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    This report assesses the steady state flammability level under off normal ventilation conditions in the tank headspace for 28 double-shell tanks (DST) and 149 single shell-tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. Flammability was calculated using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule, and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. This revision updates the hydrogen generation rate input data for al1 177 tanks using waste composition information from the Best Basis Inventory Detail Report (data effective as of August 4,2008). Assuming only barometric breathing, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 13 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-102) and 36 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203). Assuming zero ventilation, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 12 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-102) and 34 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203).

  1. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    This report assesses the steady state flammability level under off normal ventilation conditions in the tank headspace for 28 double-shell tanks (DST) and 149 single shell-tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. Flammability was calculated using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule, and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. This revision updates the hydrogen generation rate input data for all 177 tanks using waste composition information from the Best Basis Inventory Detail Report (data effective as of August 4,2008). Assuming only barometric breathing, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 11 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-10l) and 36 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203). Assuming zero ventilation, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 10 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-101) and 34 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203).

  2. Self-Flammability of Gases Generated by Hanford Tank Waste and the Potential of Nitrogen Inerting to Eliminate Flammability Safety Concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Through radiolytic and thermolytic reactions, Hanford tank wastes generate and retain a variety of gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, methane (and other hydrocarbons), ammonia, and nitrogen. This gas generation can be expected to continue during processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The generation rates in the WTP will change from those for the in-situ tank waste because of different process temperatures, different dose rates produced by in-process changes in the proportions of solid and liquid, and dilution of the waste liquid. The flammability of the generated gas that is continuously released, and of any retained gas that might be released into a vessel headspace in quantity due to a spontaneous release, depends on the concentrations not only of the fuel gases—primarily hydrogen (H2), methane, other hydrocarbons, and ammonia—but of the oxidizer nitrous oxide (N2O). As a result of high concentrations of N2O, some gas mixtures are “self-flammable” (i.e., ignition can occur when no air is present because N2O provides the only oxidizer needed). Self-flammability could potentially reduce the effectiveness of using a nitrogen (N2) purge in the headspace as a flammability control, if its effects are not accounted for. A given amount of inertant gas (N2) can accommodate only a certain amount of a generated self-flammable gas before the mixture with inertant gas becomes flammable.

  3. Interstage Flammability Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeffrey K.; Eppard, William M.

    2011-01-01

    The Interstage of the Ares I launch platform houses several key components which are on standby during First Stage operation: the Reaction Control System (ReCS), the Upper Stage (US) Thrust Vector Control (TVC) and the J-2X with the Main Propulsion System (MPS) propellant feed system. Therefore potentially dangerous leaks of propellants could develop. The Interstage leaks analysis addresses the concerns of localized mixing of hydrogen and oxygen gases to produce deflagration zones in the Interstage of the Ares I launch vehicle during First Stage operation. This report details the approach taken to accomplish the analysis. Specified leakage profiles and actual flammability results are not presented due to proprietary and security restrictions. The interior volume formed by the Interstage walls, bounding interfaces with the Upper and First Stages, and surrounding the J2-X engine was modeled using Loci-CHEM to assess the potential for flammable gas mixtures to develop during First Stage operations. The transient analysis included a derived flammability indicator based on mixture ratios to maintain achievable simulation times. Validation of results was based on a comparison to Interstage pressure profiles outlined in prior NASA studies. The approach proved useful in the bounding of flammability risk in supporting program hazard reviews.

  4. Flammable gas project topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-29

    The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

  5. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-02-18

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for double shell tank (DST) and single shell tank (SST) representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant SSCs and/or TSRS were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  6. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-03-03

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for DST and SST representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant structures, systems and components (SSCs) and/or technical safety requirements (TSRs) were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support WP-13033, Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  7. Flammable Gas Safety Self-Study 52827

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-03-17

    This course, Flammable Gas Safety Self-Study (COURSE 52827), presents an overview of the hazards and controls associated with commonly used, compressed flammable gases at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  8. Results of vapor space monitoring of flammable gas Watch List tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization Systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, release rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed

  9. Results of Vapor Space Monitoring of Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCAIN, D.J.

    2000-09-27

    This report documents the measurement of headspace gas concentrations and monitoring results from the Hanford tanks that have continuous flammable gas monitoring. The systems used to monitor the tanks are Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems. Further characterization of the tank off-gases was done with Gas Characterization systems and vapor grab samples. The background concentrations of all tanks are below the action level of 6250 ppm. Other information which can be derived from the measurements (such as generation rate, released rate, and ventilation rate) is also discussed.

  10. Headspace Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-25

    explosive ammonium nitrate produces ammonia and nitric acid in the gaseous headspace above bulk solids, but the concentrations of the products have been...and NO2-, a product of nitrate fragmentation (Figure 7). Brief spikes in the background and dips in oxalic acid signal were observed at the time of...either filtered air or experimental nitric acid vapor sources so that analyte signal could be measured directly opposite background. With oxalic

  11. Flammable gas program topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1996-01-01

    The major emphasis of this report is to describe what has been learned about the generation, retention, and release of flammable gas mixtures in high-level waste tanks. A brief overview of efforts to characterize the gas composition will be provided. The report also discusses what needs to be learned about the phenomena, how the Unreviewed Safety Question will be closed, and the approach for removing tanks from the Watch List

  12. FLAMMABILITY OF HERBICIDE-TREATED GUAVA FOLIAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guava leaves treated with herbicide were found to be less flammable than untreated green leaves or dead leaves . Differences in flammability were...determined by small-scale laboratory fires, differential thermal analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The herbicide-treated leaves had a higher ash

  13. 16 CFR 1611.4 - Flammability test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM The Standard § 1611.4 Flammability test. (a) Apparatus and materials. The.... The center section of the rack contains an open U-shaped area in which burning of the specimen takes... fan is turned off during the test. (4) Timing mechanism. The burning rate shall be determined by a...

  14. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only

  15. Remote flammable gas detection/measuring device.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kononov, VA

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available This research report presents the results of an evaluation of the existing open path remote flammable gas detection/monitoring technology and provides recommendations on possible limited implementation of this technology and future development...

  16. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU TA

    2009-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  17. 16 CFR 1500.44 - Method for determining extremely flammable and flammable solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method for determining extremely flammable and flammable solids. 1500.44 Section 1500.44 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND...

  18. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; hide

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  19. headspace - Australia's innovation in youth mental health: who are the clients and why are they presenting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickwood, Debra J; Telford, Nic R; Parker, Alexandra G; Tanti, Chris J; McGorry, Patrick D

    2014-02-03

    To provide the first national profile of the characteristics of young people (aged 12-25 years) accessing headspace centre services - the Australian Government's innovation in youth mental health service delivery - and investigate whether headspace is providing early service access for adolescents and young adults with emerging mental health problems. Census of all young people accessing a headspace centre across the national network of 55 centres comprising a total of 21 274 headspace clients between 1 January and 30 June 2013. Reason for presentation, Kessler Psychological Distress Scale, stage of illness, diagnosis, functioning. Young people were most likely to present with mood and anxiety symptoms and disorders, self-reporting their reason for attendance as problems with how they felt. Client demographic characteristics tended to reflect population-level distributions, although clients from regional areas and of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background were particularly well represented, whereas those who were born outside Australia were underrepresented. headspace centres are providing a point of service access for young Australians with high levels of psychological distress and need for care in the early stages of the development of mental disorder.

  20. Method of burning flammable radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahata, Taneaki.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To completely oxidize flammable radioactive wastes such as organic compounds, ion exchange materials or oils. Method: Contaminated flammable radioactive wastes are heated and pyrolytically decomposed in the range 400 0 to 500 0 C in the presence of oxygen under lower pressure than atmospheric pressure. Volatile organic substance, hydrogen and soot subsequently produced are passed over oxidation catalyst. The catalysts such as copper oxide, iron oxide, cobalt oxide, nickel oxide, chromium oxide are heated in the range 600 0 to 700 0 C to produce stable oxides. (J.P.N.)

  1. 16 CFR 423.9 - Conflict with flammability standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conflict with flammability standards. 423.9... TEXTILE WEARING APPAREL AND CERTAIN PIECE GOODS AS AMENDED § 423.9 Conflict with flammability standards. If there is a conflict between this regulation and any regulations issued under the Flammable Fabrics...

  2. 16 CFR 1500.133 - Extremely flammable contact adhesives; labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extremely flammable contact adhesives... REGULATIONS § 1500.133 Extremely flammable contact adhesives; labeling. (a) Extremely flammable contact adhesives, also known as contact bonding cements, when distributed in containers intended or suitable for...

  3. An Approach to the Flammability Testing of Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation reviews: (1) Current approach to evaluation of spacecraft materials flammability (2) The need for and the approach to alternative routes (3) Examples of applications of the approach recommended a) Crew Module splash down b) Crew Module depressurization c) Applicability of NASA's flammability test data to other sample configurations d) Applicability of NASA's ground flammability test data to spacecraft environments

  4. 46 CFR 154.1350 - Flammable gas detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable gas detection system. 154.1350 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1350 Flammable gas detection system. (a) The vessel must have a fixed flammable gas detection system that has sampling points in: (1) Each cargo pump room; (2) Each cargo...

  5. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T.A.

    2007-01-01

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  6. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...

  7. Review on flammability of biofibres and biocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mngomezulu, ME

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The subject on flammability properties of natural fibre-reinforced biopolymer composites has not been broadly researched. This is not only evidenced by the minimal use of biopolymer composites and/or blends in different engineering areas where fire...

  8. Engineering task plan for flammable gas atmosphere mobile color video camera systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlman, E.H.

    1995-01-01

    This Engineering Task Plan (ETP) describes the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of the mobile video camera systems. The color video camera systems will be used to observe and record the activities within the vapor space of a tank on a limited exposure basis. The units will be fully mobile and designed for operation in the single-shell flammable gas producing tanks. The objective of this tank is to provide two mobile camera systems for use in flammable gas producing single-shell tanks (SSTs) for the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program. The camera systems will provide observation, video recording, and monitoring of the activities that occur in the vapor space of applied tanks. The camera systems will be designed to be totally mobile, capable of deployment up to 6.1 meters into a 4 inch (minimum) riser

  9. Flammable gas data evaluation. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.D.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E.

    1996-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Numerous safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate, retain, and periodically release flammable gases. This report documents some of the activities of the Flammable Gas Project Data Evaluation Task conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal year 1996. Described in this report are: (1) the results of examining the in-tank temperature measurements for insights into gas release behavior; (2) the preliminary results of examining the tank waste level measurements for insights into gas release behavior; and (3) an explanation for the observed hysteresis in the level/pressure measurements, a phenomenon observed earlier this year when high-frequency tank waste level measurements came on-line

  10. The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZACH, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data

  11. The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZACH, J.J.

    2000-10-30

    The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

  12. Method for Predicting Hypergolic Mixture Flammability Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    of all these phases. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, rocket propulsion, combustion chemistry , energetic ionic liquids, flammability limits, fuel/oxidizer...Chemical Engineering Lab(UCP) This report is in support of the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) Demonstration Program, which...formation at 298.15 K have been proposed by Osmont and co-workers [Osmont, 2007 and Osmont et al., 2007] by using quantum chemistry computations at

  13. BFR Electrolyte Additive Safety and Flammability Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allcorn, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-13

    Lithium-ion battery safety is a critical issue in the adoption of the chemistry to larger scale applications such as transportation and stationary storage. One of the critical components impacting the safety of lithium-ion batteries is their use of highly flammable organic electrolytes. In this work, brominated flame retardants (BFR’s) – an existing class of flame retardant materials – are incorporated as additives to lithium-ion battery electrolytes with the intention to reduce the electrolyte flammability and thereby improve safety. There are a few critical needs for a successful electrolyte additive: solubility in the electrolyte, electrochemical stability over the range of battery operation, and minimal detrimental effects on battery performance. Those detrimental effects can take the form of electrolyte specific impacts, such as a reduction in conductivity, or electrode impacts, such as SEI-layer modification or chemical instability to the active material. In addition to these needs, the electrolyte additive also needs to achieve its intended purpose, which in this case is to reduce the flammability of the electrolyte. For the work conducted as part of this SPP agreement three separate BFR materials were provided by Albemarle to be tested by Sandia as additives in a traditional lithium-ion battery electrolyte. The provided BFR materials were tribromo-neopentyl alcohol, tetrabromo bisphenol A, and tribromoethylene. These materials were incorporated as separate 4 wt.% additives into a traditional lithium-ion battery electrolyte and compared to said traditional electrolyte, designated Gen2.

  14. Operation of the multigap resistive plate chamber using a gas mixture free of flammable components

    CERN Document Server

    Akindinov, A; Antonioli, P; Arcelli, S; Basile, M; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; De Caro, A; De Pasquale, S; Di Bartolomeo, A; Fusco-Girard, M; Golovine, V; Guida, M; Hatzifotiadou, D; Kaidalov, A B; Kim, D H; Kim, D W; Kisselev, S M; Laurenti, G; Lee, K; Lee, S C; Lioublev, E; Luvisetto, M L; Margotti, A; Martemyanov, A N; Nania, R; Noferini, F; Otiougova, P; Pesci, A; Pinazza, O; Polozov, P A; Scapparone, E; Scioli, G; Sellitto, S B; Semeria, F; Smirnitsky, A V; Tchoumakov, M M; Usenko, E; Valenti, G; Voloshin, K G; Williams, M C S; Zagreev, B V; Zampolli, C; Zichichi, A

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the operation of the multigap resistive plate chamber (MRPC) for the ALICE-TOF system with a gas mixture free of flammable components. Two different gas mixtures, with and without iso-C//4H//1//0 have been used to measure the performance of the MRPC. The efficiency, time resolution, total charge, and the fast to total charge ratio have been found to be comparable.

  15. GNS Castor V/21 Headspace Gas Sampling 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Prior to performing an internal visual inspection, samples of the headspace gas of the GNS Castor V/21 cask were taken on June 12, 2014. These samples were taken in support of the CREIPI/Japanese nuclear industry effort to validate fuel integrity without visual inspection by measuring the 85Kr content of the cask headspace

  16. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  17. Headspace techniques in foods, fragrances and flavors: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouseff, R; Cadwallader, K

    2001-01-01

    Headspace techniques have traditionally involved the collection of volatiles in the vapor state under either dynamic or static conditions as a means of determining concentrations in the product of interest. A brief overview of contemporary headspace applications and recent innovations are presented from the literature and Chapters in this book. New approaches used to concentrate volatiles under static conditions such as solid phase micro extraction, SPME, are examined. Advances in purge and trap applications and automation are also presented. Innovative methods of evaluating headspace volatiles using solid state sensor arrays (electronic noses) or mass spectrometers without prior separation are referenced. Numerous food and beverage headspace techniques are also reviewed. Advantages, limitations and alternatives to headspace analysis are presented.

  18. Flammability tests for regulation of building and construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Sumathipala

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of building materials and products for flammability is critical to ensure the safety of occupants in buildings and other structures. The involvement of exposed building materials and products in fires resulting in the loss of human life often spurs an increase in regulation and new test methods to address the problem. Flammability tests range from those...

  19. Flammability of litter from southeastern trees: a preliminary assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Morgan Varner; Jeffrey M. Kane; Erin M. Banwell; Jesse K. Kreye

    2015-01-01

    The southeastern United States possesses a great diversity of woody species and an equally impressive history of wildland fires. Species are known to vary in their flammability, but little is known about southeastern species. We used published data and our own collections to perform standard litter flammability tests on a diverse suite of 25 native overstory trees from...

  20. Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-05-23

    This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List.

  1. Strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    This document provides a strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. It defines the key elements required for the following: Closing the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ); Providing the administrative basis for resolving the safety issue; Defining the data needed to support these activities; and Providing the technical and administrative path for removing tanks from the Watch List

  2. Determination of ketone bodies in blood by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Karen Marie Dollerup; Linnet, Kristian; Rasmussen, Brian Schou

    2010-01-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for determination of ketone bodies (ß-hydroxybutyrate, acetone, and acetoacetate) in blood is presented. The method is based on enzymatic oxidation of D-ß-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate, followed by decarboxylation to acetone, which...... was quantified by the use of headspace GC-MS using acetone-(13)C(3) as an internal standard. The developed method was found to have intra- and total interday relative standard deviations

  3. Factors controlling headspace pressure in a manual manometric BMP method can be used to produce a methane output comparable to AMPTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himanshu, H; Voelklein, M A; Murphy, J D; Grant, J; O'Kiely, P

    2017-08-01

    The manual manometric biochemical methane potential (mBMP) test uses the increase in pressure to calculate the gas produced. This gas production may be affected by the headspace volume in the incubation bottle and by the overhead pressure measurement and release (OHPMR) frequency. The biogas and methane yields of cellulose, barley, silage and slurry were compared with three incubation bottle headspace volumes (50, 90 and 180ml; constant 70ml total medium) and four OHPMR frequencies (daily, each third day, weekly and solely at the end of experiment). The methane yields of barley, silage and slurry were compared with those from an automated volumetric method (AMPTS). Headspace volume and OHPMR frequency effects on biogas yield were mediated mainly through headspace pressure, with the latter having a negative effect on the biogas yield measured and relatively little effect on methane yield. Two mBMP treatments produced methane yields equivalent to AMPTS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A study on flammability limits of fuel mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki; Sekiya, Akira

    2008-07-15

    Flammability limit measurements were made for various binary and ternary mixtures prepared from nine different compounds. The compounds treated are methane, propane, ethylene, propylene, methyl ether, methyl formate, 1,1-difluoroethane, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. The observed values of lower flammability limits of mixtures were found to be in good agreement to the calculated values by Le Chatelier's formula. As for the upper limits, however, some are close to the calculated values but some are not. It has been found that the deviations of the observed values of upper flammability limits from the calculated ones are mostly to lower concentrations. Modification of Le Chatelier's formula was made to better fit to the observed values of upper flammability limits. This procedure reduced the average difference between the observed and calculated values of upper flammability limits to one-third of the initial value.

  5. Determination of sulfur dioxide in wine using headspace gas chromatography and electron capture detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberl, A; Coelhan, M

    2013-01-01

    Sulfites are routinely added as preservatives and antioxidants in wine production. By law, the total sulfur dioxide content in wine is restricted and therefore must be monitored. Currently, the method of choice for determining the total content of sulfur dioxide in wine is the optimised Monier-Williams method, which is time consuming and laborious. The headspace gas chromatographic method described in this study offers a fast and reliable alternative method for the detection and quantification of the sulfur dioxide content in wine. The analysis was performed using an automatic headspace injection sampler, coupled with a gas chromatograph and an electron capture detector. The method is based on the formation of gaseous sulfur dioxide subsequent to acidification and heating of the sample. In addition to free sulfur dioxide, reversibly bound sulfur dioxide in carbonyl compounds, such as acetaldehyde, was also measured with this method. A total of 20 wine samples produced using diverse grape varieties and vintages of varied provenance were analysed using the new method. For reference and comparison purposes, 10 of the results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those acquired by the optimised Monier-Williams method. Overall, the results from the headspace analysis showed good correlation (R = 0.9985) when compared with the conventional method. This new method requires minimal sample preparation and is simple to perform, and the analysis can also be completed within a short period of time.

  6. 75 FR 49379 - Correction to Internal Citation of “Extremely Flammable Solid” and “Flammable Solid”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1500 Correction to Internal Citation of ``Extremely... to correct internal citations to the definitions of ``extremely flammable solid'' and ``flammable... citation for part 1500 continues to read as follows: Authority: 15 U.S.C. 1261-1277. 0 2. In Sec. 1500.83...

  7. 16 CFR 1500.45 - Method for determining extremely flammable and flammable contents of self-pressurized containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method for determining extremely flammable and flammable contents of self-pressurized containers. 1500.45 Section 1500.45 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND...

  8. Dynamic headspace-gas-chromatography-olfactometry analysis of different anatomical parts of lovage (Levisticum officinale Koch.) at eight growing stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bylaite, E.; Roozen, J.P.; Legger, A.; Venskutonis, R.P.; Posthumus, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Volatiles of five different parts of lovage (leaves, stems, flowers, seeds, and roots) were isolated by dynamic headspace (DHS) method and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-olfactometry (GC-O) techniques. In total, 98 compounds were identified in the samples, of which 41 are reported as lovage volatiles for

  9. Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

    1998-09-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations.

  10. Investigation of flammable gas and thermal safety issues for retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caley, S.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Cuta, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Panisko, F.E.

    1998-09-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to identify and resolve some of the flammable gas and thermal safety issues potentially associated with the retrieval of waste from Tank 241-AN-105 (AN-105), which is the first double-shell tank scheduled for waste retrieval at Hanford. The planned retrieval scenario includes the following steps in AN-105: (1) degas the tank using two submerged mixing pumps, (2) turn off the mixer pump(s) and allow any suspended solids to settle, (3) decant the supernatant to the intermediate feed staging tank(s) (IFSTs) (AP-102 and/or AP-104) using water/caustic dilution at the transfer pump inlet, (4) add the remaining dilution water/caustic to the slurry remaining in AN-105, (5) mix the tank with the mixer pump(s) until the soluble solids dissolve, (6) turn off the mixer pump(s) and let the insoluble solids settle, and (7) decant the new supernatant to the IFST(s), leaving the insoluble solids behind. Three waste retrieval safety issues are addressed in this report. They are (1) the controlled degassing of AN-105 to ensure that the headspace remains <25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), (2) an assessment of how dissolved gas (mainly ammonia) released during the transfer of the supernatant in AN-105 to the IFSTs and the water/caustic dilution of the remaining slurry in AN-105 will affect the flammability in these tanks; and (3) an assessment of the maximum waste temperatures that might occur in AN-105 during retrieval operations

  11. Gas flow headspace liquid phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Qiu, Jinxue; Ren, Chunyan; Piao, Xiangfan; Li, Xifeng; Wu, Xue; Li, Donghao

    2009-11-06

    There is a trend towards the use of enrichment techniques such as microextraction in the analysis of trace chemicals. Based on the theory of ideal gases, theory of gas chromatography and the original headspace liquid phase microextraction (HS-LPME) technique, a simple gas flow headspace liquid phase microextraction (GF-HS-LPME) technique has been developed, where the extracting gas phase volume is increased using a gas flow. The system is an open system, where an inert gas containing the target compounds flows continuously through a special gas outlet channel (D=1.8mm), and the target compounds are trapped on a solvent microdrop (2.4 microL) hanging on the microsyringe tip, as a result, a high enrichment factor is obtained. The parameters affecting the enrichment factor, such as the gas flow rate, the position of the microdrop, the diameter of the gas outlet channel, the temperatures of the extracting solvent and of the sample, and the extraction time, were systematically optimized for four types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The results were compared with results obtained from HS-LPME. Under the optimized conditions (where the extraction time and the volume of the extracting sample vial were fixed at 20min and 10mL, respectively), detection limits (S/N=3) were approximately a factor of 4 lower than those for the original HS-LPME technique. The method was validated by comparison of the GF-HS-LPME and HS-LPME techniques using data for PAHs from environmental sediment samples.

  12. Flammability of Gas-Filled Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushkov Valentin Anatol'evich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The regularities of flame propagation on the horizontal surface of gas-filled polymers are considered depending on the concentration of oxygen in the oxidizer flow. The values of the coefficients in the expression describing relationship between the rate of flame propagation on the surface of foams and oxygen concentration are obtained. It was shown that with the mass content of reactive organophosphorus compounds reaching 4.0...5.9%, non-smoldering resole foam plastics with high performance characteristics are obtained. It was found that in order to obtain moderately combustible polyurethane foams based on oxyethylated phosphorus-containing polyols, the phosphorus concentration should not exceed 3 % of mass. To obtain flame-retardant urea-formaldehyde foam cellular plastics, the concentration of phosphorus should not exceed 0.3 % of mass. Physical-mechanical properties and flammability indices of developed gas-filled polymers based on reactive oligomers are presented.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of kerosene flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochet, I. [Orleans Univ., ENSIB, Lab. Energetique Explosions Structures, 18 - Bourges (France); Pascaud, J.M.; Gillard, P. [Orleans Univ., IUTde Bourges, Lab. Energetique Explosions Structures, 18 - Bourges (France)

    2002-08-01

    In an attempt to contribute to aircraft safety, it is fundamental to define the explosions conditions of kerosene vapor in an aircraft tank. Flammability properties of kerosene F-34 and F-35 have been determined experimentally. The flash point and the vapor pressure have been measured by means of an appropriate apparatus. A first analysis of the composition by GC-MS analysis shows four essential compounds: decane, dodecane, 1,2,4 trimethylbenzene and butyl-cyclohexane. The evolution of maximum pressure is compared with the theoretical values obtained with a simple model based on the theory of molecule collisions. A simple modelling has been developed as part of a novel study on ignition and combustion of classical propulsive powders and transposed to liquid kerosene droplets in order to predict the main characteristics of these explosions in a closed vessel. (authors)

  14. Flammability of polypropylene/organoclay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Tatianny Soares; Barbosa, Renata; Carvalho, Laura Hecker de; Canedo, Eduardo Luis

    2014-01-01

    The flammabilities of nanocomposites made with three polypropylene grades (homo and copolymers) with 5 wt % of organoclay (Cloisite 20A), 5 or 15 wt % of maleated polypropylene as compatibilizer, and 0, 0.5 or 1 wt % of cis-13-docosenamide (Erucamide) as co-intercalant, were studied using the horizontal burning test UL94HB. Masterbatches prepared in an internal mixer were diluted in the polypropylene matrix using a corotating twin-screw extruder, with different screw configurations and operating at 240 or 480 rpm. Results indicate that the high burning rate of the composites was not affected by the processing conditions. For all formulations was observed a significant reduction in smoke release, lack of dripping and the formation of a char surface layer, that protected the core of the samples. (author)

  15. Field portable low temperature porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption headspace sampling and analysis part I: Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    Building on the successful application in the laboratory of PLOT-cryoadsorption as a means of collecting vapor (or headspace) samples for chromatographic analysis, in this paper a field portable apparatus is introduced. This device fits inside of a briefcase (aluminum tool carrier), and can be easily transported by vehicle or by air. The portable apparatus functions entirely on compressed air, making it suitable for use in locations lacking electrical power, and for use in flammable and explosive environments. The apparatus consists of four aspects: a field capable PLOT-capillary platform, the supporting equipment platform, the service interface between the PLOT-capillary and the supporting equipment, and the necessary peripherals. Vapor sampling can be done with either a hand piece (containing the PLOT capillary) or with a custom fabricated standoff module. Both the hand piece and the standoff module can be heated and cooled to facilitate vapor collection and subsequent vapor sample removal. The service interface between the support platform and the sampling units makes use of a unique counter current approach that minimizes loss of cooling and heating due to heat transfer with the surroundings (recuperative thermostatting). Several types of PLOT-capillary elements and sampling probes are described in this report. Applications to a variety of samples relevant to forensic and environmental analysis are discussed in a companion paper. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Headspace gas chromatographic method for the measurement of difluoroethane in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, L A; Broussard, A; Pittman, T; Lafferty, D; Presley, L

    2001-01-01

    To develop a gas chromatographic assay for the analysis of difluoroethane, a volatile substance, in blood and to determine assay characteristics including linearity, limit of quantitation, precision, and specificity. Referral toxicology laboratory Difluoroethane, a colorless, odorless, highly flammable gas used as a refrigerant blend component and aerosol propellant, may be abused via inhalation. A headspace gas chromatographic procedure for the identification and quantitation of difluoroethane in blood is presented. A methanolic stock standard prepared from pure gaseous difluoroethane was used to prepare whole blood calibrators. Quantitation of difluoroethane was performed using a six-point calibration curve and an internal standard of 1-propanol. The assay is linear from 0 to 115 mg/L including a low calibrator at 4 mg/L, the limit of quantitation. Within-run coefficients of variation at mean concentrations of 13.8 mg/L and 38.5 mg/L were 5.8% and 6.8% respectively. Between-run coefficients of variation at mean concentrations of 15.9 mg/L and 45.7 mg/L were 13.4% and 9.8% respectively. Several volatile substances were tested as potential interfering compounds with propane having a retention time identical to that of difluoroethane. This method requires minimal sample preparation, is rapid and reproducible, can be modified for the quantitation of other volatiles, and could be automated using an automatic sampler/injector system.

  17. Genetic component of flammability variation in a Mediterranean shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, B; Castellanos, M C; Pausas, J G

    2014-03-01

    Recurrent fires impose a strong selection pressure in many ecosystems worldwide. In such ecosystems, plant flammability is of paramount importance because it enhances population persistence, particularly in non-resprouting species. Indeed, there is evidence of phenotypic divergence of flammability under different fire regimes. Our general hypothesis is that flammability-enhancing traits are adaptive; here, we test whether they have a genetic component. To test this hypothesis, we used the postfire obligate seeder Ulex parviflorus from sites historically exposed to different fire recurrence. We associated molecular variation in potentially adaptive loci detected with a genomic scan (using AFLP markers) with individual phenotypic variability in flammability across fire regimes. We found that at least 42% of the phenotypic variation in flammability was explained by the genetic divergence in a subset of AFLP loci. In spite of generalized gene flow, the genetic variability was structured by differences in fire recurrence. Our results provide the first field evidence supporting that traits enhancing plant flammability have a genetic component and thus can be responding to natural selection driven by fire. These results highlight the importance of flammability as an adaptive trait in fire-prone ecosystems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Flammability Assessment Methodology Program Phase I: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A. Loehr; S. M. Djordjevic; K. J. Liekhus; M. J. Connolly

    1997-09-01

    The Flammability Assessment Methodology Program (FAMP) was established to investigate the flammability of gas mixtures found in transuranic (TRU) waste containers. The FAMP results provide a basis for increasing the permissible concentrations of flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in TRU waste containers. The FAMP results will be used to modify the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (TRUPACT-II SARP) upon acceptance of the methodology by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Implementation of the methodology would substantially increase the number of drums that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) without repackaging or treatment. Central to the program was experimental testing and modeling to predict the gas mixture lower explosive limit (MLEL) of gases observed in TRU waste containers. The experimental data supported selection of an MLEL model that was used in constructing screening limits for flammable VOC and flammable gas concentrations. The MLEL values predicted by the model for individual drums will be utilized to assess flammability for drums that do not meet the screening criteria. Finally, the predicted MLEL values will be used to derive acceptable gas generation rates, decay heat limits, and aspiration time requirements for drums that do not pass the screening limits. The results of the program demonstrate that an increased number of waste containers can be shipped to WIPP within the flammability safety envelope established in the TRUPACT-II SARP.

  19. Test plan for headspace gas concentration measurement and headspace ventilation rate measurement for DCRTs 241-A-244, 241-BX-244, 241-S-244, 241-TX-244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    This test plan provides the directions to characterize the headspace gas concentrations and the headspace ventilation rate for double contained receiver tanks 241-A-244, 241-BX-244, 241-S-244, and 241-TX-244

  20. 14 CFR Appendix M to Part 25 - Fuel Tank System Flammability Reduction Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Flammability Reduction... 25—Fuel Tank System Flammability Reduction Means M25.1Fuel tank flammability exposure requirements. (a) The Fleet Average Flammability Exposure of each fuel tank, as determined in accordance with...

  1. 46 CFR 182.480 - Flammable vapor detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 100 GROSS TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.480 Flammable vapor... permit calibration in a vapor free atmosphere. (g) Electrical connections, wiring, and components for a...

  2. 46 CFR 105.10-15 - Flammable liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FISHING VESSELS DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Definition of Terms Used in This Part § 105.10-15 Flammable... vapor pressure of 14 pounds or more. 1 American Society of Testing Materials Standard D 323...

  3. DOE/DOE Tight Oil Flammability & Transportation Spill Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, David L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This presentation describes crude oils, their phase behavior, the SPR vapor pressure program, and presents data comparisons from various analytical techniques. The overall objective is to describe physical properties of crude oil relevant to flammability and transport safety

  4. Chemical Safety Alert: Lightning Hazard to Facilities Handling Flammable Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raises awareness about lightning strikes, which cause more death/injury and damage than all other environmental elements combined, so industry can take proper precautions to protect equipment and storage or process vessels containing flammable materials.

  5. 16 CFR 1611.3 - Flammability-general requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM The Standard § 1611.3 Flammability—general requirement. The rate of burning shall not exceed 1.2 in./sec as judged by the average of five determinations...

  6. Electrical safety in flammable gas/vapor laden atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Korver, WOE

    1992-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive coverage of electrical system installation within areas where flammable gases and liquids are handled and processed. The accurate hazard evaluation of flammability risks associated with chemical and petrochemical locations is critical in determining the point at which the costs of electrical equipment and installation are balanced with explosion safety requirements. The book offers the most current code requirements along with tables and illustrations as analytic tools. Environmental characteristics are covered in Section 1 along with recommended electrical ins

  7. DWPF Melter Off-Gas Flammability Assessment for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-07-11

    The slurry feed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter contains several organic carbon species that decompose in the cold cap and produce flammable gases that could accumulate in the off-gas system and create potential flammability hazard. To mitigate such a hazard, DWPF has implemented a strategy to impose the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) limits on all key operating variables affecting off-gas flammability and operate the melter within those limits using both hardwired/software interlocks and administrative controls. The operating variables that are currently being controlled include; (1) total organic carbon (TOC), (2) air purges for combustion and dilution, (3) melter vapor space temperature, and (4) feed rate. The safety basis limits for these operating variables are determined using two computer models, 4-stage cold cap and Melter Off-Gas (MOG) dynamics models, under the baseline upset scenario - a surge in off-gas flow due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melter.

  8. Effects of gas composition in headspace and bicarbonate concentrations in media on gas and methane production, degradability, and rumen fermentation using in vitro gas production techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amlan Kumar; Yu, Zhongtang

    2013-07-01

    Headspace gas composition and bicarbonate concentrations in media can affect methane production and other characteristics of rumen fermentation in in vitro gas production systems, but these 2 important factors have not been evaluated systematically. In this study, these 2 factors were investigated with respect to gas and methane production, in vitro digestibility of feed substrate, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile using in vitro gas production techniques. Three headspace gas compositions (N2+ CO2+ H2 in the ratio of 90:5:5, CO2, and N2) with 2 substrate types (alfalfa hay only, and alfalfa hay and a concentrate mixture in a 50:50 ratio) in a 3×2 factorial design (experiment 1) and 3 headspace compositions (N2, N2 + CO2 in a 50:50 ratio, and CO2) with 3 bicarbonate concentrations (80, 100, and 120 mM) in a 3×3 factorial design (experiment 2) were evaluated. In experiment 1, total gas production (TGP) and net gas production (NGP) was the lowest for CO2, followed by N2, and then the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas after fermentation was greater for CO2 than for N2 and the gas mixture, whereas total methane production (TMP) and net methane production (NMP) were the greatest for CO2, followed by the gas mixture, and then N2. Headspace composition did not affect in vitro digestibility or the VFA profile, except molar percentages of propionate, which were greater for CO2 and N2 than for the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas, TGP, and NGP were affected by the interaction of headspace gas composition and substrate type. In experiment 2, increasing concentrations of CO2 in the headspace decreased TGP and NGP quadratically, but increased the concentrations of methane, NMP, and in vitro fiber digestibility linearly, and TMP quadratically. Fiber digestibility, TGP, and NGP increased linearly with increasing bicarbonate concentrations in the medium. Concentrations of methane and NMP were unaffected by bicarbonate concentration, but

  9. On the temperature dependence of flammability limits of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki

    2011-03-15

    Flammability limits of several combustible gases were measured at temperatures from 5 to 100 °C in a 12-l spherical flask basically following ASHRAE method. The measurements were done for methane, propane, isobutane, ethylene, propylene, dimethyl ether, methyl formate, 1,1-difluoroethane, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. As the temperature rises, the lower flammability limits are gradually shifted down and the upper limits are shifted up. Both the limits shift almost linearly to temperature within the range examined. The linear temperature dependence of the lower flammability limits is explained well using a limiting flame temperature concept at the lower concentration limit (LFL)--'White's rule'. The geometric mean of the flammability limits has been found to be relatively constant for many compounds over the temperature range studied (5-100 °C). Based on this fact, the temperature dependence of the upper flammability limit (UFL) can be predicted reasonably using the temperature coefficient calculated for the LFL. However, some compounds such as ethylene and dimethyl ether, in particular, have a more complex temperature dependence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement

  11. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  12. Headspace Analysis of Volatile Compounds Coupled to Chemometrics in Leaves from the Magnoliaceae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Farag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Headspace volatile analysis has been used for volatiles profiling in leaves of 4 Magnolia species with a total of 75 compounds were identified. Monterpene hydrocarbons dominated the volatile blend of M. calophylla (86%, M. acuminata (78%, M. virginiana (70% and M. grandiflora (47% with b -pinene and b -ocimene occurring in the largest amounts, whereas sesquiterpenes were the most abundant compounds in M. grandiflora (39%. High levels of oxygenated compounds were only found in M. virginiana volatile blend (11.4% with 2-phenylethyl alcohol as major component. Hierarchical cluster analysis performed on volatiles content revealed the close relationship between M. acuminata and M. calophylla.

  13. Flammability of kerosene in civil and military aviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sochet, I.; Gillard, P. [Universite d' Orleans, Lab. Energetique Explosions Structures, Bourges cedex, 18 (France)

    2002-09-01

    The investigation of the ignition conditions of kerosene vapors in the air contained in an aircraft fuel tank contributes to the definition of onboard safety requirements. Civil and military kerosene are characterized by specification. The specification of civil aviation kerosene is based upon usage requirements and property limits, while military kerosene is primarily controlled by specific chemical composition. Characterization of the flammability properties is a first step for the establishment of aircraft safety conditions. Flash point, vapor pressure, gas chromatography analysis, and flammability properties of the kerosene used by the French Military aviation (F-34 and F-35 kerosene) are compared with the flammability properties of civil kerosene. The empirical law established by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in 1998, expressing the ignition energy in terms of fuel, temperature, flash point and altitude is modified and expressed in terms of fuel temperature, flash point and pressure. (Author)

  14. Flammability on textile of flight crew professional clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santos, M. C.; Oliveira, M. S.; Giacomin, A. M.; Laktim, M. C.; Baruque-Ramos, J.

    2017-10-01

    The issue about flammability of textile materials employed in passenger cabins of commercial aircrafts is an important part of safety routines planning. Once an in-flight emergency initiated with fire or smoke aboard, time becomes critical and the entire crew must be involved in the solution. It is part of the crew functions, notably the attendants, the in-flight firefighting. This study compares the values of textile material of flight attendant working cloths and galley curtain fabric with regard to flammability and Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI). Values to the professional clothing material indicate that they are flammable and the curtains, self-extinguishing. Thus, despite of the occurrences of fire outbreaks in aircrafts are unexceptional, the use of other materials and technologies for uniforms, such as alternative textile fibers and flame retardant finishes should be considered as well as the establishment of performance limits regarding flame and fire exposing.

  15. A summary description of the flammable gas tank safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    Radioactive liquid waste may produce hydrogen as result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. If the waste contains organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia may be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site in Washington State, are on a Flammable Gas Watch List. Some contain waste that produces and retains gases until large quantities of gas are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks nearly-filled to capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture could result. The most notable example of a Hanford waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Upon occasion waste stored in this tank has released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several, other Hanford waste tanks exhibit similar behavior although to a lesser magnitude. Because this behavior was hot adequately-addressed in safety analysis reports for the Hanford Tank Farms, an unreviewed safety question was declared, and in 1990 the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program was established to address this problem. The purposes of the program are a follows: (1) Provide safety documents to fill gaps in the safety analysis reports, and (2) Resolve the safety issue by acquiring knowledge about gas retention and release from radioactive liquid waste and developing mitigation technology. This document provides the general logic and work activities required to resolve the unreviewed safety question and the safety issue of flammable gas mixtures in radioactive liquid waste storage tanks

  16. Progress toward mitigation of flammable gas Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Hanson, C.E.; Kirch, N.W.

    1994-01-01

    The mixing pump installed in Hanford Site tank 241-SY-101 has been shown to be effective in releasing flammable gases in a controlled manner. This controlled release of gas prevents the accumulation and episodic release above flammable limits. More work needs to be done to optimize the pumping operation, and to evaluate the long-term effects of mixing so as to assure that no undesirable changes have occurred to the waste. Other alternative mitigation concepts are still being evaluated as a backup to mixing

  17. Textiles: Some technocal information and data III: Low flammable and other high performance fibres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hunter, L

    1978-07-01

    Full Text Available What it meant by the flammability of a texttile material? What exactly are the meaning of such term as "non-burning", "fire resistant", "self-extinquishing","non-combustible","flameproof",etc? Unfortunately the flammability properties to which...

  18. A highly conductive, non-flammable polymer–nanoparticle hybrid electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Agrawal, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-01-01

    liquid media as the electrolyte solvent. Remarkably, we also find that even in highly flammable liquid media, the bidisperse nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes can be formulated to exhibit low or no flammability without compromising their favorable room

  19. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Definitions). A non-flammable ullage is one where the fuel-air vapor is too lean or too rich to burn or is... Office for approval the fuel tank flammability analysis, including the airplane-specific parameters...

  20. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-S-101: Results from samples collected on 06/06/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-101. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed

  1. Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denise Baclawski

    2010-03-08

    The University of Nevada, Reno Fire Science Academy (FSA) applied for grant funding to develop and deliver programs for municipal, rural, and volunteer firefighters. The FSA specializes in preparing responders for a variety of emergency events, including flammable liquid fires resulting from accidents, intentional acts, or natural disasters. Live fire training on full scale burnable props is the hallmark of FSA training, allowing responders to practice critical skills in a realistic, yet safe environment. Unfortunately, flammable liquid live fire training is often not accessible to municipal, rural, or volunteer firefighters due to limited department training budgets, even though most department personnel will be exposed to flammable liquid fire incidents during the course of their careers. In response to this training need, the FSA developed a course during the first year of the grant (Year One), Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community: Flammable-Liquid Fire Fighting Techniques for Municipal and Rural Firefighters. During the three years of the grant, a total of 2,029 emergency responders received this training. In Year Three, two new courses, a train-the-trainer for Responding to Terrorist Incidents in Your Community and Management of Large-Scale Disasters for Public Officials were developed and pilot tested during the Real-World Disaster Management Conference held at the FSA in June of 2007. Two research projects were conducted during Years Two and Three. The first, conducted over a two year period, evaluated student surveys regarding the value of the flammable liquids training received. The second was a needs assessment conducted for rural Nevada. Both projects provided important feedback and a basis for curricula development and improvements.

  2. Quality control of raw cows' milk by headspace analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, K.A.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether headspace analysis of volatile components can be used for monitoring the quality of raw cows¿ milk. The detection of different quality defects caused by cows¿ feed, microbiological and chemical contamination, as well as enzymatic deterioration was studied. Fresh raw

  3. Development of headspace solid-phase microextraction method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method was developed as a preliminary investigation using univariate approach for the analysis of 14 multiclass pesticide residues in fruits and vegetable samples. The gas chromatography mass spectrometry parameters (desorption temperature and time, column flow ...

  4. 10 CFR 36.69 - Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. 36.69... IRRADIATORS Operation of Irradiators § 36.69 Irradiation of explosive or flammable materials. (a) Irradiation... cause radiation overexposures of personnel. (b) Irradiation of more than small quantities of flammable...

  5. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. (a...

  6. Evaluation of Flammable Gas Monitoring and Ventilation System Alternatives for Double-Contained Receiver Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    This study identifies possible flammable gas monitoring and ventilation system alternatives to ensure adequate removal of flammable gases from the Double-Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) primary tanks during temporary storage of small amounts of waste. The study evaluates and compares these alternatives to support closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ TF-96-04330)

  7. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the entire...

  8. Volatile profile of the headspace fraction of "assa-peixe" (Vernonia sp. honeys Perfil dos compostos voláteis presentes na fração "headspace" de méis de assa-peixe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carvalho Ribeiro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatile compounds were isolated from the headspace fraction of "assa-peixe" honeys by adsorptive column chromatography, eluted with acetone and analysed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Volatile compounds were separated using a polar phase column. Low- and medium-boiling point volatile compounds predominated in the headspace. A large proportion of 3-penten-2-one (80.5 ± 13.9 µg.kg-1 and benzaldehyde (25.9 ± 4.2 µg.kg-1 was found in the headspace fraction, while 2-penten-1-ol, 3-hexenyl butanoate, octadecane and hexanoic acid (Os compostos voláteis da fração "Headspace" de méis de assa-peixe foram adsorvidos pela técnica de cromatografia de adsorção, eluídos com acetona e analisados através da CG/DIC e CG/EM usando coluna polar de sílica fundida. Os compostos voláteis de baixo e médio ponto de ebulição predominaram na fração "headspace". Foi achada uma grande proporção de 3-penten-2-ona (80,5 ± 13,9 µg.kg-1 e benzaldeído (25,9 ± 4,2 µg.kg-1, enquanto o 2-penten-1-ol, o hexanoato de 3-hexenila, o octadecano e o ácido hexanóico (<0,01 µg.kg-1 foram compostos minoritários. Um total de doze compostos voláteis foi identificado, sendo cinco descritos pela primeira vez no mel de assa-peixe. Destes cinco, a 3-penten-2-ona, o dodecano, o tridecano e o benzaldeído foram definitivamente identificados na fração "headspace" dos méis de assa-peixe brasileiro.

  9. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Waste Transfer Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems (i.e., waste transfer piping and waste transfer-associated structures) made at control decision meetings on November 30, 1999a and April 19, 2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996). Following the Contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval. The control decision meeting on November 30, 1999 to address flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems followed the control decision process and the criteria for control decisions described in Section 3.3.1.5 of the FSAR. The control decision meeting agenda, attendance list, and introductory and background presentations are included in Attachments 1 through 4. The control decision discussions on existing and other possible controls for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems and the basis for selecting or not selecting specific controls are summarized in this report

  10. Controlling the ignition and flammability of magnesium for aerospace applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The perceived easy ignition and flammability of magnesium alloys create a detrimental safety feature that overshadows their high strength-to-weight ratio and hinders the aerospace application opportunities. To overcome the existing barriers a progress in understanding and controlling the reactivity of magnesium at high temperatures is required. This report describes fundamentals of magnesium ignition and flammability along with laboratory testing procedures and correlations with full scale fire scenarios, related in particular to the aircraft cabin. The influence of alloying elements on high temperature reactivity of magnesium and global efforts to develop ignition resistant and non-flammable magnesium alloys are reviewed. Although ignition and flammability represent quite different quantities, both are controlled by an oxidation resistance of the alloy and its capability to form a dense and protective surface oxide after exposures to an open flame or other heat source. Since surface oxide, composed of pure MgO, does not offer a sufficient protection, the research strategy is focused on modification of its chemistry and microstructure by micro-alloying the substrate with rare earths and other elements having high affinity to oxygen

  11. 30 CFR 77.1103 - Flammable liquids; storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... storage tanks shall be mounted securely on firm foundations. Outlet piping shall be provided with flexible connections or other special fittings to prevent adverse effects from tank settling. (c) Fuel lines shall be... hazards. (d) Areas surrounding flammable-liquid storage tanks and electric substations and transformers...

  12. Project W-030 flammable gas verification monitoring test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARKER, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the verification monitoring campaign used to document the ability of the new ventilation system to mitigate flammable gas accumulation under steady state tank conditions. This document reports the results of the monitoring campaign. The ventilation system configuration, process data, and data analysis are presented

  13. Rapid identification of pork for halal authentication using the electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjuliana, M; Che Man, Y B; Mat Hashim, D; Mohamed, A K S

    2011-08-01

    The volatile compounds of pork, other meats and meat products were studied using an electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer (GCMS-HS) for halal verification. The zNose™ was successfully employed for identification and differentiation of pork and pork sausages from beef, mutton and chicken meats and sausages which were achieved using a visual odor pattern called VaporPrint™, derived from the frequency of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector of the electronic nose. GCMS-HS was employed to separate and analyze the headspace gasses from samples into peaks corresponding to individual compounds for the purpose of identification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for data interpretation. Analysis by PCA was able to cluster and discriminate pork from other types of meats and sausages. It was shown that PCA could provide a good separation of the samples with 67% of the total variance accounted by PC1. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-B-107: Results from samples collected on 7/23/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-107 (Tank B-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwestern National Laboratory (PNNL). A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the same table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  15. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-S-106: Results from samples collected on 06/13/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-106 (Tank S-106) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the same table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  16. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-201: Results from samples collected on 06/19/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-201 (Tank C-201) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary, of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  17. Integration of the Uncertainties of Anion and TOC Measurements into the Flammability Control Strategy for Sludge Batch 8 at the DWPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T. B.

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of a flammability control strategy for DWPF's melter operation during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). SRNL's support has been in response to technical task requests that have been made by SRR's Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) organization. The flammability control strategy relies on measurements that are performed on Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples by the DWPF Laboratory. Measurements of nitrate, oxalate, formate, and total organic carbon (TOC) standards generated by the DWPF Laboratory are presented in this report, and an evaluation of the uncertainties of these measurements is provided. The impact of the uncertainties of these measurements on DWPF's strategy for controlling melter flammability also is evaluated. The strategy includes monitoring each SME batch for its nitrate content and its TOC content relative to the nitrate content and relative to the antifoam additions made during the preparation of the SME batch. A linearized approach for monitoring the relationship between TOC and nitrate is developed, equations are provided that integrate the measurement uncertainties into the flammability control strategy, and sample calculations for these equations are shown to illustrate the impact of the uncertainties on the flammability control strategy

  18. Efficient quantification of water content in edible oils by headspace gas chromatography with vapour phase calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Gong, Yi-Xian; Yu, Kong-Xian

    2018-06-01

    An automated and accurate headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) technique was investigated for rapidly quantifying water content in edible oils. In this method, multiple headspace extraction (MHE) procedures were used to analyse the integrated water content from the edible oil sample. A simple vapour phase calibration technique with an external vapour standard was used to calibrate both the water content in the gas phase and the total weight of water in edible oil sample. After that the water in edible oils can be quantified. The data showed that the relative standard deviation of the present HS-GC method in the precision test was less than 1.13%, the relative differences between the new method and a reference method (i.e. the oven-drying method) were no more than 1.62%. The present HS-GC method is automated, accurate, efficient, and can be a reliable tool for quantifying water content in edible oil related products and research. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Bioactive Compounds from Aromatic Plants by Means of Dynamic Headspace Extraction and Multiple Headspace Extraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omar, Jone; Olivares, Maitane; Alonso, Ibone; Vallejo, Asier; Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-01-01

    Seven monoterpenes in 4 aromatic plants (sage, cardamom, lavender, and rosemary) were quantified in liquid extracts and directly in solid samples by means of dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS) and multiple headspace extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

  20. [Determination of flavor compounds in foxtail millet wine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingke; Zhang, Aixia; Li, Shaohui; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yuzong; Xing, Guosheng

    2017-11-08

    To comprehensively understand flavor compounds and aroma characteristics of foxtail millet wine, extraction conditions were optimized with 85 μm polyacrylate (PA), 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), 75 μm carboxen (CAR)/PDMS and 50/30 μm divinylbenzene (DVB)/CAR/PDMS fibers. The flavor compounds in foxtail millet wine were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and the odor characteristics and intensity were analyzed by odor active values (OAVs). The samples of 8 mL were placed in headspace vials with 1.5 g NaCl, then the headspace vials were heated at 60℃ for 40 min. Using HS-SPME with different fibers, a total of 55 flavor compounds were identified from the samples, including alcohols, esters, benzene derivatives, hydrocarbons, acids, aldehydes, ketones, terpenes, phenols and heterocycle compounds. The main flavor compounds were alcohols compounds. According to their OAVs, phenylethyl alcohol, styrene, 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, benzaldehyde, benzeneacetaldehyde and 2-methoxy-phenol were established to be odor-active compounds. Phenylethyl alcohol and benzeneacetaldehyde were the most prominent odor-active compounds. PA and PDMS fibers had good extraction effect for polar and nonpolar compounds, respectively. CAR/PDMS and DVB/CAR/PDMS provided a similar compounds profile for moderate polar compounds. This research comprehensively determined flavor compounds of foxtail millet wine, and provided theoretical basis for product development and quality control.

  1. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP

  2. Characterization strategy for the flammable gas safety issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Roberts, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    The characterization strategy for resolving the flammable gas safety issue for Hanford waste tanks is based on a structured logic diagram (SLD) that displays the outcomes necessary to reach the desired goal of making flammable gas risk acceptable. The diagram provides a structured path that can identify all information inputs, data as well as models, needed to achieve the goal. Tracing the path from need to outcome provides an immediate and clear justification and defense of a specific need. The diagram itself is a open-quote picture of a risk calculation close-quote and forms the basis for a quantitative model of risk. The SLID, with the risk calculation, identifies options for characterization, mitigation, and controls that have the maximum effect in reducing risk. It provides quantitative input to risk-based decision making so that options are chosen for maximum impact at least cost

  3. A flammability and combustion model for integrated accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plys, M.G.; Astleford, R.D.; Epstein, M.

    1988-01-01

    A model for flammability characteristics and combustion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures is presented for application to severe accident analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR's). Flammability of general mixtures for thermodynamic conditions anticipated during a severe accident is quantified with a new correlation technique applied to data for several fuel and inertant mixtures and using accepted methods for combining these data. Combustion behavior is quantified by a mechanistic model consisting of a continuity and momentum balance for the burned gases, and considering an uncertainty parameter to match the idealized process to experiment. Benchmarks against experiment demonstrate the validity of this approach for a single recommended value of the flame flux multiplier parameter. The models presented here are equally applicable to analysis of current LWR's. 21 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Redirecting fire-prone Mediterranean ecosystems toward more resilient and less flammable communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M; Baeza, M Jaime; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Vallejo, V Ramón

    2018-06-01

    The extensive abandonment of agricultural lands in the Mediterranean basin has led to large landscapes being dominated by early-successional species, characterized by high flammability and an increasing fire risk. This fact promotes fire occurrence and places ecosystems in a state of arrested succession. In this work, we assessed the effectiveness of several restoration actions in redirecting these ecosystems toward more resilient communities dominated by resprouting species. These actions included the mechanical clearing of early-successional species, the plantation of resprouting species, and the combination of both treatments. For 13 years, we assessed shifts in the successional trajectory and ecosystem flammability by changes in: species composition, species richness, ecosystem evenness, the natural colonization of resprouting species, total biomass and proportion of dead biomass. We observed that the plantation and clearing combination was a suitable strategy to promote resilience. Species richness increased as well as the presence of the resprouting species introduced by planting. The natural colonization of the resprouting species was also enhanced. These changes in the successional trajectory were accompanied by a possible reduction of fire risk by reducing dead fuel proportion. These findings are relevant for the management of Mediterranean basin areas, but also suggest new tools for redirecting systems in fire-prone areas worldwide. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fires in the Cenozoic: a late flowering of flammable ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern flammable ecosystems include tropical and subtropical savannas, steppe grasslands, boreal forests, and temperate sclerophyll shrublands. Despite the apparent fiery nature of much contemporary vegetation, terrestrial fossil evidence would suggest we live in a time of low fire activity relative to the deep past. The inertinite content of coal, fossil charcoal, is strikingly low from the Eocene to the Pleistocene and no charcoalified mesofossils have been reported for the Cenozoic. Marine...

  6. Fires in the Cenozoic: a late flowering of flammable ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William John Bond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern flammable ecosystems include tropical and subtropical savannas, steppe grasslands, boreal forests and temperate sclerophyll shrublands. Despite the apparent fiery nature of much contemporary vegetation, terrestrial fossil evidence would suggest we live in a time of low fire activity relative to the deep past. The inertinite content of coal, fossil charcoal, is strikingly low from the Eocene to the Pleistocene and no charcoalified mesofossils have been reported for the Cenozoic. Marine cores have been analysed for charcoal in the North Pacific, the north and south Atlantic off Africa, and the south China sea. These tell a different story with the oldest records indicating low levels of fire activity from the Eocene but a surge of fire from the late Miocene (~7 Ma. Phylogenetic studies of woody plants adapted to frequent savanna fires show them beginning to appear from the Late Miocene with peak origins in the late Pliocene in both South American and African lineages. Phylogenetic studies indicate ancient origins (60 Ma+ for clades characteristic of flammable sclerophyll vegetation from Australia and the Cape region of South Africa. However, as for savannas, there was a surge of speciation from the Late Miocene associated with the retreat of closed fire-intolerant forests. The wide geographic spread of increased fire activity in the last few million years suggests a global cause. However none of the potential global factors (oxygen, rainfall seasonality, CO2 , novel flammable growth forms provides an adequate explanation as yet. The global patterns and processes of fire and flammable vegetation in the Cenozoic, especially since the Late Miocene, deserve much more attention to better understand fire in the earth system.

  7. Fires in the Cenozoic: a late flowering of flammable ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, William J

    2014-01-01

    Modern flammable ecosystems include tropical and subtropical savannas, steppe grasslands, boreal forests, and temperate sclerophyll shrublands. Despite the apparent fiery nature of much contemporary vegetation, terrestrial fossil evidence would suggest we live in a time of low fire activity relative to the deep past. The inertinite content of coal, fossil charcoal, is strikingly low from the Eocene to the Pleistocene and no charcoalified mesofossils have been reported for the Cenozoic. Marine cores have been analyzed for charcoal in the North Pacific, the north and south Atlantic off Africa, and the south China sea. These tell a different story with the oldest records indicating low levels of fire activity from the Eocene but a surge of fire from the late Miocene (~7 Ma). Phylogenetic studies of woody plants adapted to frequent savanna fires show them beginning to appear from the Late Miocene with peak origins in the late Pliocene in both South American and African lineages. Phylogenetic studies indicate ancient origins (60 Ma+) for clades characteristic of flammable sclerophyll vegetation from Australia and the Cape region of South Africa. However, as for savannas, there was a surge of speciation from the Late Miocene associated with the retreat of closed fire-intolerant forests. The wide geographic spread of increased fire activity in the last few million years suggests a global cause. However, none of the potential global factors (oxygen, rainfall seasonality, CO2, novel flammable growth forms) provides an adequate explanation as yet. The global patterns and processes of fire and flammable vegetation in the Cenozoic, especially since the Late Miocene, deserve much more attention to better understand fire in the earth system.

  8. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Dahl, M.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1999-01-01

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples

  9. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  10. Predicting the flammable region reach of propane vapor clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Vílchez Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Villafañe, Diana; Casal Fàbrega, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    Liquified gas fuels are widely used around the world, and the growth of LNG and LPG consumption continues to increase. However, using these fuels can lead to accidents if they are released to the environment. Consequently, the challenge to control and predict such hazards has become an objective in emergency planning and risk analysis. In a previous article the “Dispersion Safety Factor” (DSF) was proposed, defined as the ratio between the distance at which the lower flammability limit concen...

  11. Hazard assessments of double-shell flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, G.L.; Stepnewski, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of hazard assessments performed on the double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks. This report focuses on hazards associated with the double-shell watch list tanks (101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN). While a similar assessment has already been performed for tank 103-SY, it is also included here to incorporate a more representative slurry gas mixture and provide a consistent basis for comparing results for all the flammable gas tanks. This report is intended to provide an in-depth assessment by considering the details of the gas release event and slurry gas mixing as the gas is released from the waste. The consequences of postulated gas ignition are evaluated using a plume burn model and updated ignition frequency predictions. Tank pressurization which results from a gas burn, along with the structural response, is also considered. The report is intended to support the safety basis for work activities in flammable gas tanks by showing margins to safety limits that are available in the design and procedures

  12. Rapid determination of methanol in black liquors by full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Zhan, Huaiyu; Fu, Shiyu; Liu, Mengru; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2007-12-14

    This paper reported a full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (GC) technique for determination of methanol content in black liquors (pulping spent liquor). In this method, a very small volume (10-20 microL) of liquor sample is introduced into a headspace sample vial (20 mL) and heated up to a temperature of 105 degrees C. A near-complete mass transfer of methanol from the liquid phase to vapor phase (headspace), i.e., a full evaporation, can be achieved within 3 min. The methanol in the headspace of the vial is then measured by GC. The present method is simple, rapid and accurate.

  13. A Simple Technique to Estimate the Flammability Index of Moroccan Forest Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M'Hamed Hachmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A formula to estimate forest fuel flammability index (FI is proposed, integrating three species flammability parameters: time to ignition, time of combustion, and flame height. Thirty-one (31 Moroccan tree and shrub species were tested within a wide range of fuel moisture contents. Six species flammability classes were identified. An ANOVA of the FI-values was performed and analyzed using four different sample sizes of 12, 24, 36, and 50 flammability tests. Fuel humidity content is inversely correlated to the FI-value, and the linear model appears to be the most adequate equation that may predict the hypothetical threshold-point of humidity of extinction. Most of the Moroccan forest fuels studied are classified as moderately flammable to flammable species based on their average humidity content, calculated for the summer period from July to September.

  14. Olive Oil Headspace Characterization by a Gas Sensor Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santonico, Marco; Capuano, Rosamaria; Catini, Alexandro; Dini, Francesca; Martinelli, Eugenio; Gianni, Giacomo; Migliorini, Marzia; Paolesse, Roberto; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Di Natale, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    Olive oil quality is strictly correlated to the volatile compounds profile. Both quality and defects can be connected to the presence of specific volatile compounds in the oil headspace. In this paper, olive oil samples have been artificially modified by adding a number of compounds known to be typical of the more frequent defects: fusty, musty, muddy and rancid. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of the electronic nose to the compounds characterizing the defects and then the capability of the instrument to identify the defects in real samples.

  15. Dynamic collection and analysis of volatile organic compounds from the headspace of cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranska, A; Smolinska, A; Boots, A W; Dallinga, J W; van Schooten, F J

    2015-10-15

    interactions. Measurements were performed with gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Multivariate data analysis allowed detection of significant altered compounds in the compared groups. We found a significant change (p  ⩽  0.001) of the composition of VOCs due to the stressing of the Caco-2 cells by H2O2. A total of ten VOCs showed either increased or decreased abundance in the headspace of the cell cultures due to the presence of the H2O2 stressor.

  16. A risk-based approach to flammable gas detector spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defriend, Stephen; Dejmek, Mark; Porter, Leisa; Deshotels, Bob; Natvig, Bernt

    2008-11-15

    Flammable gas detectors allow an operating company to address leaks before they become serious, by automatically alarming and by initiating isolation and safe venting. Without effective gas detection, there is very limited defense against a flammable gas leak developing into a fire or explosion that could cause loss of life or escalate to cascading failures of nearby vessels, piping, and equipment. While it is commonly recognized that some gas detectors are needed in a process plant containing flammable gas or volatile liquids, there is usually a question of how many are needed. The areas that need protection can be determined by dispersion modeling from potential leak sites. Within the areas that must be protected, the spacing of detectors (or alternatively, number of detectors) should be based on risk. Detector design can be characterized by spacing criteria, which is convenient for design - or alternatively by number of detectors, which is convenient for cost reporting. The factors that influence the risk are site-specific, including process conditions, chemical composition, number of potential leak sites, piping design standards, arrangement of plant equipment and structures, design of isolation and depressurization systems, and frequency of detector testing. Site-specific factors such as those just mentioned affect the size of flammable gas cloud that must be detected (within a specified probability) by the gas detection system. A probability of detection must be specified that gives a design with a tolerable risk of fires and explosions. To determine the optimum spacing of detectors, it is important to consider the probability that a detector will fail at some time and be inoperative until replaced or repaired. A cost-effective approach is based on the combined risk from a representative selection of leakage scenarios, rather than a worst-case evaluation. This means that probability and severity of leak consequences must be evaluated together. In marine and

  17. Effects of headspace fraction and aqueous alkalinity on subcritical hydrothermal gasification of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Ryan; Yin, Sudong; Tan, Zhongchao [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Centre for Environmental Engineering Research and Education, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W. Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-15

    In order to better understand the pathways of hydrothermal gasification of cellulose, the effect of headspace fraction and alkalinity on the hydrothermal gasification of cellulose has been studied at 315 C in the presence of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as catalyst. It was found that regardless of alkalinity the headspace fraction had a large impact on gasification yield, with larger headspace fractions resulting in considerably more gas product. Without the addition of sodium carbonate, the effect of headspace fraction became more pronounced, with gas increasing by approximately a factor of forty from the lowest to highest headspace fraction. On the other hand, for the same residence time the addition of sodium carbonate co-catalyst dampened the magnitude of the effect, to a factor of 2.5 and 1.5, for 50 and 100 mM sodium carbonate solutions, respectively. These results indicated that the headspace fraction affected the phase behaviour, and that this altered the pathway of the cellulose decomposition. While furfural alcohol was the major product obtained with a 49% headspace fraction, it was effectively suppressed by using 78% or greater headspace fractions. Based on the effects of phase behaviour and previous literature, the reduced effect occurring upon the addition of sodium carbonate may relate to catalysis of the Lobry de-bruyn Van Eckenstein transform to produce lactic acid rather than intermediates proceeding through glycolaldehyde. (author)

  18. Bepaling van tetrachloor- en trichloorethyleen in olijfolie met behulp van headspace - gaschromatografie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, A.H.; Mazijk, van R.J.; Tuinstra, L.G.M.Th.

    1990-01-01

    De resultaten van de EEG headspace methode wijzen uit dat de herhaalbaarheid en nauwkeurigheid voldoende zijn om tetrachloor- en trichloorethyleen in olijfolie te bepalen tot een niveau van 0,01 mg/kg op produkt. De headspace techniek is door de eenvoudige procedure zeer geschikt voor routine

  19. Simplex Optimization of Headspace-Enrichment Conditions of Residual Petroleum Distillates Used by Arsonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Molly M.; Erickson, Angela E.; Smith, Eugene T.

    2005-01-01

    A forensic project is described that is suitable for an undergraduate instrumental methods lab. Accelerants commonly used by arsonists are analyzed by static headspace enrichment followed by gas chromatography. The conditions used for headspace enrichment (e.g., time and temperature) are known to influence the distribution of hydrocarbons…

  20. Low-Flammability PTFE for High-Oxygen Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walle, E.; Fallon, B.; Sheppard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Modified forming process removes volatile combustible materials. Flammability of cable-wrapping tape reduced by altering tape-manufacturing process. In new manufacturing process, tape formed by proprietary process of screw extrusion, followed by washing in solvent and drying. Tape then wrapped as before. Spectrogram taken after extrusion, washing, and drying shows lower hydrocarbon content. PTFE formed by new process suited to oxygen-rich environments. Safe in liquid oxygen of Space Shuttle tank and in medical uses; thin-wall shrinkable tubing in hospital test equipment, surgical instruments, and implants.

  1. The Efficiency of Non-Flammable Functional Underwear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glombikova Viera

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the efficiency of non-flammable functional underwear used as a secondary heat barrier in extreme conditions. Five groups of knitted fabrics were analysed for flame resistance and selected physiological properties (water vapour permeability, air permeability, thermal resistance and liquid moisture transport by moisture management transport. The results indicated similar levels of flame resistance for the materials tested but show important differences in terms of physiological characteristics, namely liquid moisture transport, which influences the safety and comfort of protective clothing.

  2. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  3. Strategy for resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the general strategy for resolution of the flammable gas safety issue; it is not a detailed description of program activities. budgets and schedules. Details of the program activities have been issued (Johnson and Sherwood, 1994) and the information pertaining to budgets is provided in the FY 1995-1997 Multi-Year Work Plan for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) (Program Element 1.1.1.2.02.). The key element in this strategy is to provide an understanding of the behavior of each of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks. While a review of historical information does provide some insight, it is necessary to gather current information about the gases, behavior and nature of the waste,. and about the control systems that maintain and monitor the waste. Analysis of this information will enable TWRS to determine the best approach to place any tank in a safe condition, if it is found to be in an unsafe state

  4. Influence of Knits Structure on Flammability and Comfortability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikučionienė D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the influence of the knit structure, i.e. the loop length and the number of yarns in a loop, on flammability and comfortability are presented in this paper. The investigations were carried out using single jersey knits from Delta TA 18 tex × 2 yarns with five variants of a loop length. Single yarn as well as folded yarn from two single yarns was used in the investigations. Comparison of the results of single-layer knits flammability and air permeability with those of multilayer packet was made. The results obtained show that an increase in the loop length of the knit increases their permeability to air and decreases the burning time as well as increase in the number of layers decreases the air permeability and increases the burning time. Moreover, the similar burning time with significantly different permeability to air can be achieved changing the basic knitting parameters, i.e. the loop length and/or the yarn linear density.

  5. Analysis of the volatiles in the headspace above the plasmodium and sporangia of the slime mould (Physarum polycephalum) by SPME-GCMS

    OpenAIRE

    Kateb, Huda al; Costello, Ben de Lacy

    2013-01-01

    Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled with Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to extract and analyse the volatiles in the headspace above the plasmodial and sporulating stages of the slime mould Physarum Polycephalum. In total 115 compounds were identified from across a broad range of chemical classes. Although more (87) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified when using a higher incubation temperature of 75oC, a large number of compounds (79) were still ide...

  6. 46 CFR 111.105-32 - Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk liquefied flammable gas and ammonia carriers. 111... gas and ammonia carriers. (a) Each vessel that carries bulk liquefied flammable gases or ammonia as a.... (2) The term “gas-dangerous” does not include the weather deck of an ammonia carrier. (c) Each...

  7. Safe Handling and Use of Flammable and Combustible Materials. Module SH-30. Safety and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on safe handling and use of flammable and combustible materials is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module introduces the student to the hazards of flammable and combustible materials and the measures necessary to control those hazards. Following the introduction, 14 objectives (each keyed to a page…

  8. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank... Tank Flammability § 26.33 Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability. (a) Applicability. This... part 25 of this chapter. (2) Exception. This paragraph (b) does not apply to— (i) Fuel tanks for which...

  9. 14 CFR 26.39 - Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank... Tank Flammability § 26.39 Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability. (a) Applicability: This... Series 767 Series (b) Any fuel tank meeting all of the criteria stated in paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(2) and...

  10. Outlier treatment for improving parameter estimation of group contribution based models for upper flammability limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Flammability data is needed to assess the risk of fire and explosions. This study presents a new group contribution (GC) model to predict the upper flammability limit UFL oforganic chemicals. Furthermore, it provides a systematic method for outlier treatment inorder to improve the parameter...

  11. The ring of fire: the relative importance of fuel packing versus intrinsic leaf flammability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootemaat, S.; Wright, I.J.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Viegas, D.X.

    2014-01-01

    Two different experimental set-ups were used to disentangle the relative importance of intrinsic leaf traits versus fuel packing for the flammability in fuel beds. Dried leaves from 25 Australian perennial species were burnt in fuel bed rings under controlled conditions. The flammability parameters

  12. Flammable gas project expert elicitation results for Hanford Site double-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the second phase of parameter quantification by the flammable gas expert panel. This second phase is focused on the analysis of flammable gas accidents in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks. The first phase of parameter quantification, performed in 1997 was focused on the analysis of Hanford single-shell tanks

  13. Analysis of hydrogen and methane in seawater by "Headspace" method: Determination at trace level with an automatic headspace sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donval, J P; Guyader, V

    2017-01-01

    "Headspace" technique is one of the methods for the onboard measurement of hydrogen (H 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ) in deep seawater. Based on the principle of an automatic headspace commercial sampler, a specific device has been developed to automatically inject gas samples from 300ml syringes (gas phase in equilibrium with seawater). As valves, micro pump, oven and detector are independent, a gas chromatograph is not necessary allowing a reduction of the weight and dimensions of the analytical system. The different steps from seawater sampling to gas injection are described. Accuracy of the method is checked by a comparison with the "purge and trap" technique. The detection limit is estimated to 0.3nM for hydrogen and 0.1nM for methane which is close to the background value in deep seawater. It is also shown that this system can be used to analyze other gases such as Nitrogen (N 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and light hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods development for measuring and classifying flammability/combustibility of refrigerants. Interim report, task 2 - test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, E.W.; Tapscott, R.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Regulations on alternative refrigerants and concerns for the environment are forcing the refrigeration industry to consider the use of potentially flammable fluids to replace CFC fluids currently in use. The objectives of this program are to establish the conditions under which refrigerants and refrigerant blends exhibit flammability and to develop appropriate methods to measure flammability.

  15. 16 CFR 1145.3 - Extremely flammable contact adhesives; risk of burns from explosive vapor ignition and flashback...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extremely flammable contact adhesives; risk... TO OTHER ACTS UNDER THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT § 1145.3 Extremely flammable contact adhesives... associated with certain extremely flammable contact adhesives under the Consumer Product Safety Act rather...

  16. Headspace profiling of cocaine samples for intelligence purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujourdy, Laurence; Besacier, Fabrice

    2008-08-06

    A method for determination of residual solvents in illicit hydrochloride cocaine samples using static headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) associated with a storage computerized procedure is described for the profiling and comparison of seizures. The system involves a gas chromatographic separation of 18 occluded solvents followed by fully automatic data analysis and transfer to a PHP/MySQL database. First, a fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the main effects of some critical method parameters (salt choice, vial agitation intensity, oven temperature, pressurization and loop equilibration) on the results with a minimum of experiments. The method was then validated for tactical intelligence purposes (batch comparison) via several studies: selection of solvents and mathematical comparison tool, reproducibility and "cutting" influence studies. The decision threshold to determine the similarity of two samples was set and false positives and negatives evaluated. Finally, application of the method to distinguish geographical origins is discussed.

  17. Determination of microstickies in recycled whitewater by headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, X-S; Samp, J C; Yang, Q F; Song, H N; Zhang, D C; Zhu, J Y

    2006-03-03

    This study proposed a novel headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method for determination of adhesive contaminants (microstickies) in recycled whitewater, a fiber containing process stream, in the paper mill. It is based on the adsorption behavior of toluene (as a tracer) on the hydrophobic surface of microstickies, which affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibration partitioning of toluene. It was found that the equilibrium concentration of toluene in the vapor phase is inversely proportional to the apparent effective surface area of microstickies that remain in the corresponding solution. Thus, the amount of microsticky materials in the recycled whitewater can be quantified by HS-GC via indirect measurement of the toluene content in the vapor phase of the sample without any pretreatment. The presented method is simple, rapid and automated.

  18. Tank vapor characterization project - headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-107: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 3/26/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-C-107 (Tank C-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H 2 O) and ammonia (NH 3 ), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA trademark canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC

  19. Tank vapor characterization project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-BY-108: Second comparison study results from samples collected on 3/28/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-BY-108 (Tank BY-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report is the second in a series comparing vapor sampling of the tank headspace using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) and In Situ Vapor Sampling (ISVS) system without high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) prefiltration. The results include air concentrations of water (H 2 O) and ammonia (NH 3 ), permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds (TO-12), and individual organic analytes collected in SUMMA trademark canisters and on triple sorbent traps (TSTs). Samples were collected by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volume measurements provided by WHC

  20. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-S-107: Results from samples collected on 06/18/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-107 (Tank S-107) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National. Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, on sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  1. Thermoplastic Polyurethane Elastomer Nanocomposites: Morphology, Thermophysical, and Flammability Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai K. Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel materials based on nanotechnology creating nontraditional ablators are rapidly changing the technology base for thermal protection systems. Formulations with the addition of nanoclays and carbon nanofibers in a neat thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer (TPU were melt-compounded using twin-screw extrusion. The TPU nanocomposites (TPUNs are proposed to replace Kevlar-filled ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer rubber, the current state-of-the-art solid rocket motor internal insulation. Scanning electron microscopy analysis was conducted to study the char characteristics of the TPUNs at elevated temperatures. Specimens were examined to analyze the morphological microstructure during the pyrolysis reaction and in fully charred states. Thermophysical properties of density, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity of the different TPUN compositions were determined. To identify dual usage of these novel materials, cone calorimetry was employed to study the flammability properties of these TPUNs.

  2. Biogas utilization as flammable for internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, H.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the energetic potential stored in form of generated biogas of organic industrial wastes treatment is analyzed. Biogas utilization as flammable at internal combustion engine coupled to electrical energy generating is studied in the Wastewater Treatment Plant of Bucaramanga city (Colombia). This Plant was designed for 160.000 habitants treatment capacity, 1300 m3/h wealth, 170 BDO/m3 residues concentration and 87% process efficiency. The plant generate 2.000 m3/d of biogas. In laboratory trials was worked with biogas originating from Treatment Plant, both without purifying and purified, and the obtained results were compared with both yields determined with 86-octanes gasoline and natural gas. The analysis of pollutant by-products generated in combustion process as leak gases, present corrosive compounds and not desirable. elements in biogas composition are included

  3. Flammable gas tank waste level reconciliation tank 241-SX-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddie, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Fluor Daniel Northwest was authorized to address flammable gas issues by reconciling the unexplained surface level increases in Tank 241-SX-105 (SX-105, typical). The trapped gas evaluation document states that Tank SX-105 exceeds the 25% of the lower flammable limit criterion, based on a surface level rise evaluation. The Waste Storage Tank Status and Leak Detection Criteria document, commonly referred to as the Welty Report is the basis for this letter report. The Welty Report is also a part of the trapped gas evaluation document criteria. The Welty Report contains various tank information, including: physical information, status, levels, and dry wells. The unexplained waste level rises were attributed to the production and retention of gas in the column of waste corresponding to the unaccounted for surface level rise. From 1973 through 1980, the Welty Report tracked Tank SX-105 transfers and reported a net cumulative change of 20.75 in. This surface level increase is from an unknown source or is unaccounted for. Duke Engineering and Services Hanford and Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation are interested in determining the validity of unexplained surface level changes reported in the Welty Report based upon other corroborative sources of data. The purpose of this letter report is to assemble detailed surface level and waste addition data from daily tank records, logbooks, and other corroborative data that indicate surface levels, and to reconcile the cumulative unaccounted for surface level changes as shown in the Welty Report from 1973 through 1980. Tank SX-105 initially received waste from REDOX starting the second quarter of 1955. After June 1975, the tank primarily received processed waste (slurry) from the 242-S Evaporator/Crystallizer and transferred supernate waste to Tanks S-102 and SX-102. The Welty Report shows a cumulative change of 20.75 in. from June 1973 through December 1980

  4. Flammable gas tank waste level reconcilliation tank 241-SX-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddie, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Fluoro Dynel Northwest (FDNW) was authorized to address flammable gas issues by reconciling the unexplained surface level increases in Tank 24 1-S-1 1 1 (S-I 1 1, typical). The trapped gas evaluation document (ref 1) states that Tank SX-102 exceeds the 25% of the lower flammable limit (FL) criterion (ref 2), based on a surface level rise evaluation. The Waste Storage Tank Status and Leak Detection Criteria document, commonly referred to as the ''Wallet Report'' is the basis for this letter report (ref 3). The Wallet Report is also a part of the trapped gas evaluation document criteria. The Wallet Report contains various tank information, including: physical information, status, levels, and dry wells, see Appendix A. The unexplained waste level rises were attributed to the production and retention of gas in the column of waste corresponding to the unacquainted for surface level rise. From 1973 through 1980, the Wallet Report tracked Tank S- 102 transfers and reported a net cumulative change of 19.95 in. This surface level increase is from an unknown source or is unacquainted for. Duke Engineering and Services Hanford (DASH) and Leached Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) are interested in determining the validity of the unexplained surface level changes reported in the 0611e Wallet Report based upon other corroborative sources of data. The purpose of this letter report is to assemble detailed surface level and waste addition data from daily tank records, logbooks, and other corroborative data that indicate surface levels, and to reconcile the cumulative unacquainted for surface level changes as shown in the Wallet Report from 1973 through 1980

  5. Seasonal and local differences in leaf litter flammability of six Mediterranean tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauf, Zorica; Fangmeier, Andreas; Rosavec, Roman; Španjol, Željko

    2015-03-01

    One of the suggested management options for reducing fire danger is the selection of less flammable plant species. Nevertheless, vegetation flammability is both complex and dynamic, making identification of such species challenging. While large efforts have been made to connect plant traits to fire behavior, seasonal changes and within species variability of traits are often neglected. Currently, even the most sophisticated fire danger systems presume that intrinsic characteristics of leaf litter stay unchanged, and plant species flammability lists are often transferred from one area to another. In order to assess if these practices can be improved, we performed a study examining the relationship between morphological characteristics and flammability parameters of leaf litter, thereby taking into account seasonal and local variability. Litter from six Mediterranean tree species was sampled throughout the fire season from three different locations along a climate gradient. Samples were subjected to flammability testing involving an epiradiator operated at 400 °C surface temperature with 3 g sample weight. Specific leaf area, fuel moisture content, average area, and average mass of a single particle had significant influences on flammability parameters. Effects of sampling time and location were significant as well. Due to the standardized testing conditions, these effects could be attributed to changes in intrinsic characteristics of the material. As the aforementioned effects were inconsistent and species specific, these results may potentially limit the generalization of species flammability rankings. Further research is necessary in order to evaluate the importance of our findings for fire danger modeling.

  6. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  7. Extended Le Chatelier's formula for carbon dioxide dilution effect on flammability limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki

    2006-11-02

    Carbon dioxide dilution effect on the flammability limits was measured for various flammable gases. The obtained values were analyzed using the extended Le Chatelier's formula developed in a previous study. As a result, it has been found that the flammability limits of methane, propane, propylene, methyl formate, and 1,1-difluoroethane are adequately explained by the extended Le Chatelier's formula using a common set of parameter values. Ethylene, dimethyl ether, and ammonia behave differently from these compounds. The present result is very consistent with what was obtained in the case of nitrogen dilution.

  8. Operational experience in mitigating flammable gas releases from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Kirch, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and methane are periodically released from Hanford Site waste tank 241-SY-101 at concentrations above the flammable limit. A large mixer pump installed in the tank in 1993 has effectively mitigated this problem by continuously releasing small amounts of the flammable gases at the rate they are generated. Tank 241-SY-101 is also equipped with multiple high-sensitivity gas monitoring systems and level detection systems to measure the quantity of gas that is retained in and released from the waste

  9. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-U-109: Results from samples collected on 8/10/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.; Pool, K.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-109 (Tank U-109) At the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. This tank is on the Hydrogen Waste List. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases and total non-methane hydrocarbons is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples is also listed in the table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text

  10. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste Tank 241-BX-110: Results from samples collected on 04/30/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-BX-110 (Tank BX-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in a table. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in the table. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  11. Automated headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction to analyse the volatile fraction of food matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicchi, Carlo; Cordero, Chiara; Liberto, Erica; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Sgorbini, Barbara

    2004-01-23

    High concentration capacity headspace techniques (headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE)) are a bridge between static and dynamic headspace, since they give high concentration factors as does dynamic headspace (D-HS), and are as easy to apply and as reproducible as static headspace (S-HS). In 2000, Chromtech (Idstein, Germany) introduced an inside-needle technique for vapour and liquid sampling, solid-phase dynamic extraction (SPDE), also known as "the magic needle". In SPDE, analytes are concentrated on a 50 microm film of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and activated carbon (10%) coated onto the inside wall of the stainless steel needle (5 cm) of a 2.5 ml gas tight syringe. When SPDE is used for headspace sampling (HS-SPDE), a fixed volume of the headspace of the sample under investigation is sucked up an appropriate number of times with the gas tight syringe and an analyte amount suitable for a reliable GC or GC-MS analysis accumulates in the polymer coating the needle wall. This article describes the preliminary results of both a study on the optimisation of sampling parameters conditioning HS-SPDE recovery, through the analysis of a standard mixture of highly volatile compounds (beta-pinene, isoamyl acetate and linalool) and of the HS-SPDE-GC-MS analyses of aromatic plants and food matrices. This study shows that HS-SPDE is a successful technique for HS-sampling with high concentration capability, good repeatability and intermediate precision, also when it is compared to HS-SPME.

  12. Polyaniline-nylon-6 electrospun nanofibers for headspace adsorptive microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Habib; Aghakhani, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Polyaniline–polyamide nanofiber mat was fabricated by electrospinning technology. ► Electrospun nanofiber was used for extraction of chlorobenzenes from aquatic media. ► A method based on headspace adsorptive microextraction and GC–MS was developed. - Abstract: A headspace adsorptive microextraction technique was developed using a novel polyaniline-nylon-6 (PANI-N6) nanofiber sheet, fabricated by electrospinning. The homogeneity and the porosity of the prepared PANI-N6 sheet were studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanofibers diameters were found to be around 200 nm. The novel nanofiber sheet was examined as an extracting medium to isolate some selected chlorobenzenes (CBs), as model compounds, from aquatic media. The extracted analytes were desorbed using μL-amounts of solvent and eventually an aliquot of extractant was injected into gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Various parameters affecting the extraction and desorption processes were optimized. The developed method proved to be convenient and offers sufficient sensitivity and a good reproducibility. Limits of detection achieved for CBs with the developed analytical procedure ranged from 19 to 33 ng L −1 , while limits of quantification were from 50 to 60 ng L −1 . The relative standard deviations (RSD) at a concentration level of 0.1 ng mL −1 and 1 ng mL −1 were in the range of 8–14% and 5–11% (n = 3), respectively. The calibration curves of analytes were investigated in the range of 50–1000 ng L −1 and R 2 between 0.9739 and 0.9932 were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction of selected CBs from tap and river water samples. The relative recovery (RR) percentage obtained for the spiked real water samples at 0.1 ng mL −1 and 1 ng mL −1 level were 93–103% and 95–104%, respectively. The whole procedure showed to be conveniently applicable and quite easy to handle.

  13. Polyaniline-nylon-6 electrospun nanofibers for headspace adsorptive microextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu [Environmental and Bio-Analytical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghakhani, Ali [Environmental and Bio-Analytical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyaniline-polyamide nanofiber mat was fabricated by electrospinning technology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrospun nanofiber was used for extraction of chlorobenzenes from aquatic media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method based on headspace adsorptive microextraction and GC-MS was developed. - Abstract: A headspace adsorptive microextraction technique was developed using a novel polyaniline-nylon-6 (PANI-N6) nanofiber sheet, fabricated by electrospinning. The homogeneity and the porosity of the prepared PANI-N6 sheet were studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanofibers diameters were found to be around 200 nm. The novel nanofiber sheet was examined as an extracting medium to isolate some selected chlorobenzenes (CBs), as model compounds, from aquatic media. The extracted analytes were desorbed using {mu}L-amounts of solvent and eventually an aliquot of extractant was injected into gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Various parameters affecting the extraction and desorption processes were optimized. The developed method proved to be convenient and offers sufficient sensitivity and a good reproducibility. Limits of detection achieved for CBs with the developed analytical procedure ranged from 19 to 33 ng L{sup -1}, while limits of quantification were from 50 to 60 ng L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviations (RSD) at a concentration level of 0.1 ng mL{sup -1} and 1 ng mL{sup -1} were in the range of 8-14% and 5-11% (n = 3), respectively. The calibration curves of analytes were investigated in the range of 50-1000 ng L{sup -1} and R{sup 2} between 0.9739 and 0.9932 were obtained. The developed method was successfully applied to the extraction of selected CBs from tap and river water samples. The relative recovery (RR) percentage obtained for the spiked real water samples at 0.1 ng mL{sup -1} and 1 ng mL{sup -1} level were 93-103% and 95-104%, respectively. The whole procedure showed

  14. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties of Chemicals using Group-Contribution Property Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    Process safety studies and assessments rely on accurate property data. Flammability data like the lower and upper flammability limit (LFL and UFL) play an important role in quantifying the risk of fire and explosion. If experimental values are not available for the safety analysis due to cost...... or time constraints, property prediction models like group contribution (GC) models can estimate flammability data. The estimation needs to be accurate, reliable and as less time consuming as possible. However, GC property prediction methods frequently lack rigorous uncertainty analysis. Hence....... In this study, the MG-GC-factors are estimated using a systematic data and model evaluation methodology in the following way: 1) Data. Experimental flammability data is used from AIChE DIPPR 801 Database. 2) Initialization and sequential parameter estimation. An approximation using linear algebra provides...

  15. Non-Flammable Crew Clothing Utilizing Phosphorus-Based Fire Retardant Polymers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For maintaining U.S. leadership role in space exploration, there is an urgent need to develop non-flammable shirts, shorts, sweaters, and jackets without...

  16. LBA-ECO LC-02 Forest Flammability Data, Catuaba Experimental Farm, Acre, Brazil: 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides the results of controlled burns conducted to assess the flammability of mature forests on the Catuaba Experimental Farm of the Federal...

  17. LBA-ECO LC-02 Forest Flammability Data, Catuaba Experimental Farm, Acre, Brazil: 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides the results of controlled burns conducted to assess the flammability of mature forests on the Catuaba Experimental Farm of the...

  18. Clothing Flammability and Burn Injuries: Public Opinion Concerning an Overlooked, Preventable Public Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Spivak, Steven M; Pollack, Keshia M; Gielen, Andrea C; Salomon, Michele; Damant, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe knowledge of clothing flammability risk, public support for clothing flammability warning labels, and stronger regulation to reduce the risk. As part of a national survey of homeowners about residential sprinkler systems, the authors included questions about clothing flammability. The authors used an online web panel to sample homeowners and descriptive methods to analyze the resulting data. The sample included 2333 homeowners. Knowledge of clothing flammability and government oversight of clothing flammability risk was low. Homeowners were evenly split about the effectiveness of current standards; however, when presented with clothing-related burn injury and death data, a majority (53%) supported stricter standards. Most homeowners (64%) supported warning labels and indicated that such labels would either have no effect on their purchasing decisions (64%) or be an incentive (24%) to purchase an item. Owners of sprinkler-equipped homes were more likely to support these interventions than owners of homes without sprinkler systems. Public knowledge about clothing flammability risks is low. Most homeowners supported clothing labels to inform consumers of this risk and increased government intervention to reduce the risk.

  19. TRU waste transportation -- The flammable gas generation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed a flammable gas (i.e., hydrogen) concentration limit of 5% by volume on transuranic (TRU) waste containers to be shipped using the TRUPACT-II transporter. This concentration is the lower explosive limit (LEL) in air. This was done to minimize the potential for loss of containment during a hypothetical 60 day period. The amount of transuranic radionuclide that is permissible for shipment in TRU waste containers has been tabulated in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP, 1) to conservatively prevent accumulation of hydrogen above this 5% limit. Based on the SARP limitations, approximately 35% of the TRU waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab (INEEL), Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) cannot be shipped in the TRUPACT-II. An even larger percentage of the TRU waste drums at the Savannah River Site (SRS) cannot be shipped because of the much higher wattage loadings of TRU waste drums in that site's inventory. This paper presents an overview of an integrated, experimental program that has been initiated to increase the shippable portion of the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste inventory. In addition, the authors will estimate the anticipated expansion of the shippable portion of the inventory and associated cost savings. Such projection should provide the TRU waste generating sites a basis for developing their TRU waste workoff strategies within their Ten Year Plan budget horizons

  20. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  1. Flammable gas safety program. Analytical methods development: FY 1993 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Steele, R.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic constituents in Hanford waste tanks, with particular emphasis on those tanks that have been assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY, obtained during the window E core sampling, have been analyzed for organic constituents. Four of the samples were from the upper region, or convective layer, of the tank and two were from the lower, nonconvective layer. The samples were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitroso-iminodiacetic acid (NIDA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid (CA), succinic acid (SA), and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (ED3A). The chelator of highest concentration was EDTA in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography (LC) was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids (LMWA) including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids. Oxalate constituted approximately 40% of the TOC in the nonconvective layer samples. Oxalate was found to be approximately 3 to 4 times higher in concentration in the nonconvective layer than in the convective layer. During FY 1993, LC methods for analyzing LWMA, and two chelators N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid and EDTA, were transferred to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory and the 222-S laboratory.

  2. A novel intumescent flame retardant-functionalized graphene: Nanocomposite synthesis, characterization, and flammability properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Guobo; Chen, Suqing; Tang, Shouwan; Gao, Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    An intumescent flame retardant, poly(piperazine spirocyclic pentaerythritol bisphosphonate) (PPSPB), has been covalently grafted onto the surfaces of graphene oxide (GO) to obtain GO–PPSPB and according nanocomposites were prepared via solvent blending. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the chemically reduced GO–PPSPB (CRG–PPSPB) can achieve better dispersion in the ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) matrix and exfoliated EVA/CRG–PPSPB nanocomposites are formed. The results from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and cone calorimeter tests indicate that CRG–PPSPB improve thermal stability and reduce obviously the flammability (including peak heat release rate (PHRR), total heat release (THR), average mass loss rate (AMLR), etc.) of EVA. Compared with pure EVA resin, the PHRR of the EVA/CRG–PPSPB nanocomposites filled with 1 wt% CRG–PPSPB is reduced by about 56%. The SEM images show that a compact, dense and uniform intumescent char is formed for EVA/CRG–PPSPB nanocomposites after combustion. The functionalization of graphene by intumescent flame retardant PPSPB can improve both the dispersion of graphene sheets in the polymer matrix and flame retardancy of the nanocomposites. -- Highlights: ► Graphene oxide were modified with intumescent flame retardant PPSPB. ► EVA/CRG–PPSPB nanocomposites were prepared via solvent blending. ► CRG–PPSPB improved the flame retardancy of EVA nanocomposites.

  3. A short review of headspace extraction and ultrasonic solvent extraction for honey volatiles fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Marijanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey volatiles exhibit a potential role in distinguishing honeys as a function of botanical origin, but heating of honey generates artefacts such as compounds of Strecker degradation and Maillard reaction products. This short review is focused on the most recently applied methods for honey volatiles fingerprinting (without generation of thermal artefacts: headspace extraction (dynamic headspace extraction (DHE, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE. These methods display a varying degree of selectivity and effectiveness depending upon the compounds involved and the extraction conditions. Recent developments of these methods are discussed, with application examples drawn from the literature as well from our own research. Flavour qualities of the honey are very much dependent on the volatile and semivolatile organic compounds present in both the sample matrix and the headspace aroma. Therefore the use of one single technique is not adequate for reliable honey volatiles profiling, but combined use of headspace extraction and ultrasonic solvent extraction could be a useful tool for the characterization of the honey and identification of its botanical source through typical volatile marker compounds.

  4. Analysis of flammability limits for the liquefaction process of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.Y.; Wang, L.; Ju, Y.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A novel liquefaction and distillation process is designed for oxygen bearing coal-bed methane. → Oxygen contained in coal-bed methane is removed in distillation process. → Flammability limits are analyzed for the whole operation process. → We find explosion hazard may exist in distillation tower. → Effective measures are proposed to ensure the operation safety in distillation tower. - Abstract: A novel liquefaction and distillation process has been proposed and designed for the typical oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane (CBM), in which the impurities of the oxygen and nitrogen components are removed in the distillation column. The flammability limit theory combining with HYSYS simulation results are employed to analyze and calculate the flammability limits and the results indicate that no flammability hazard exists in the stages of compression, liquefaction and throttling. However, flammability hazard exists at the top the distillation column because the methane mole fraction decreases to the value below the upper flammability limit (UFL). The safety measures of initially removing oxygen content from the feed gas combining with the control of the bottom flowrate (flowrate of the liquid product at column bottom) are proposed to ensure the operation safety of the liquefaction process. The results reveal that the operation safety of the whole process can be guaranteed, together with high methane recovery rate and high purity of the liquid product. The applicability of the liquefaction process has also been analyzed in this paper. The simulation results can offer references for the separation of oxygen from CBM, the analysis of flammability limits and the safety measures for the whole process.

  5. Modelling leaf, plant and stand flammability for ecological and operational decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Numerous factors have been found to affect the flammability of individual leaves and plant parts; however the way in which these factors relate to whole plant flammability, fire behaviour and the overall risk imposed by fire is not straightforward. Similarly, although the structure of plant communities is known to affect the flammability of the stand, a quantified, broadly applicable link has proven difficult to establish and validate. These knowledge gaps have presented major obstacles to the integration into fire behaviour science of research into factors affecting plant flammability, physiology, species succession and structural change, so that the management of ecosystems for fire risk is largely uninformed by these fields. The Forest Flammability Model (Zylstra, 2011) is a process-driven, complex systems model developed specifically to address this disconnect. Flame dimensions and position are calculated as properties emerging from the capacity for convective heat to propagate flame between horizontally and vertically separated leaves, branches, plants and plant strata, and this capacity is determined dynamically from the ignitability, combustibility and sustainability of those objects, their spatial arrangement and a vector-based model of the plume temperature from each burning fuel. All flammability properties as well as the physics of flame dimensions, angle and temperature distributions and the vertical structure of wind within the plant array use published sub-models which can be replaced as further work is developed. This modular structure provides a platform for the immediate application of new work on any aspect of leaf flammability or fire physics. Initial validation of the model examined its qualitative predictions for trends in forest flammability as a function of time since fire. The positive feedback predicted for the subalpine forest examined constituted a 'risky prediction' by running counter to the expectations of the existing approach, however

  6. Headspace liquid-phase microextraction of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine by an aqueous drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yi; Vargas, Angelica; Kang, Youn-Jung

    2007-01-01

    This study developed a headspace liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method by using a single aqueous drop in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection for the determination of methamphetamine (MAP) and amphetamine (AP) in urine samples. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from sample matrix into the headspace first, and then protonated and dissolved in an aqueous H 3 PO 4 drop hanging in the headspace by a HPLC syringe. After extraction, this drop was directly injected into HPLC. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the investigated concentration range of 1.0-1500 μg L -1 , repeatability of the extraction (R.S.D. -1 for both analytes). Enrichment factors of about 400-fold and 220-fold were achieved for MAP and AP, respectively, at optimum conditions. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples

  7. Position paper on flammability concerns associated with TRU waste destined for WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in southeastern New Mexico,is an underground repository, designed for the safe geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes generated from defense-related activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The WIPP storage rooms are mined in a bedded salt (halite) formation, and are located 2150 feet below the surface. After the disposal of waste in the storage rooms, closure of the repository is expected to occur by creep (plastic flow) of the salt formation, with the waste being permanently isolated from the surrounding environment. This paper has evaluated the issue of flammability concerns associated with TRU waste to be shipped to WIPP, including a review of possible scenarios that can potentially contribute to the flammability. The paper discusses existing regulations that address potential flammability concerns, presents an analysis of previous flammability-related incidents at DOE sites with respect to the current regulations, and finally, examines the degree of assurance these regulations provide in safeguarding against flammability concerns during transportation and waste handling. 50 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs

  8. The effect of hydrogen enrichment towards the flammability limits of natural gas in conventional combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izirwan Izhab; Nur Syuhada Mohd Shokri; Nurul Saadah Sulaiman; Mohd Zulkifli Mohamad Noor; Siti Zubaidah Sulaiman; Rosmawati Naim; Norida Ridzuan, Mohd Masri Razak; Abdul Halim Abdul Razik; Zulkafli Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The use of hydrogenated fuels shows a considerable promise for the applications in gas turbines and internal combustion engines. The aims of this study are to determine the flammability limits of natural gas/ air mixtures and to investigate the effect of hydrogen enrichment on the flammability limits of natural gas/ air mixtures up to 60 vol % of hydrogen/fuel volume ratio at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The experiments were performed in a 20 L closed explosion vessel where the mixtures were ignited by using a spark permanent wire that was placed at the centre of the vessel. The pressure-time variations during explosions of natural gas/ air mixtures in an explosion vessel were recorded. Moreover, the explosion pressure data is used to determine the flammability limits that flame propagation is considered to occur if explosion pressure is greater than 0.1 bar. Therefore, in this study, the results show that the range of flammability limits are from 6 vol % to 15 vol % and by the addition of hydrogen in natural gas proved to extend the initial lower flammability limit of 6 vol % to 2 vol % of methane. (author)

  9. Headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) for the determination of volatile and semivolatile pollutants in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llompart, Maria [Departamento de Quimica Analitica Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Li, Ken; Fingas, Merv [Emergencies Science Division, Environment Canada, Environmental Technology Centre, 3439 River Road, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1999-02-08

    We have investigated the use of headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) as a sample concentration and preparation technique for the analysis of volatile and semivolatile pollutants in soil samples. Soil samples were suspended in solvent and the SPME fibre suspended in the headspace above the slurry. Finally, the fibre was desorbed in the Gas Chromatograph (GC) injection port and the analysis of the samples was carried out. Since the transfer of contaminants from the soil to the SPME fibre involves four separate phases (soil-solvent-headspace and fibre coating), parameters affecting the distribution of the analytes were investigated. Using a well-aged artificially spiked garden soil, different solvents (both organic and aqueous) were used to enhance the release of the contaminants from the solid matrix to the headspace. It was found that simple addition of water is adequate for the purpose of analysing the target volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in soil. The addition of 1 ml of water to 1 g of soil yielded maximum response. Without water addition, the target VOCs were almost not released from the matrix and a poor response was observed. The effect of headspace volume on response as well as the addition of salt were also investigated. Comparison studies between conventional static headspace (HS) at high temperature (95C) and the new technology HSSPME at room temperature (=20C) were performed. The results obtained with both techniques were in good agreement. HSSPME precision and linearity were found to be better than automated headspace method and HSSPME also produced a significant enhancement in response. The detection and quantification limits for the target VOCs in soils were in the sub-ng g{sup -1} level. Finally, we tried to extend the applicability of the method to the analysis of semivolatiles. For these studies, two natural soils contaminated with diesel fuel and wood preservative, as well as a standard urban dust contaminated with polyaromatic

  10. Species mixture effects on flammability across plant phylogeny: the importance of litter particle size and the special role for non-Pinus Pinaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Cornwell, William K; van Pomeren, Marinda; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2016-11-01

    Fire affects and is affected by plants. Vegetation varies in flammability, that is, its general ability to burn, at different levels of ecological organization. To scale from individual plant traits to community flammability states, understanding trait effects on species flammability variation and their interaction is important. Plant traits are the cumulative result of evolution and they show, to differing extents, phylogenetic conservatism. We asked whether phylogenetic distance between species predicts species mixture effects on litterbed flammability. We conducted controlled laboratory burns for 34 phylogenetically wide-ranging species and 34 random two-species mixtures from them. Generally, phylogenetic distance did not predict species mixture effects on flammability. Across the plant phylogeny, most species were flammable except those in the non- Pinus Pinaceae, which shed small needles producing dense, poorly ventilated litterbeds above the packing threshold and therefore nonflammable. Consistently, either positive or negative dominance effects on flammability of certain flammable or those non-flammable species were found in mixtures involving the non- Pinus Pinaceae. We demonstrate litter particle size is key to explaining species nonadditivity in fuelbed flammability. The potential of certain species to influence fire disproportionately to their abundance might increase the positive feedback effects of plant flammability on community flammability state if flammable species are favored by fire.

  11. Safety basis for selected activities in single-shell tanks with flammable gas concerns. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    This is full revision to Revision 0 of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of analyses done to support activities performed for single-shell tanks. These activities are encompassed by the flammable gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). The basic controls required to perform these activities involve the identification, elimination and/or control of ignition sources and monitoring for flammable gases. Controls are implemented through the Interim Safety Basis (ISB), IOSRs, and OSDs. Since this report only provides a historical compendium of issues and activities, it is not to be used as a basis to perform USQ screenings and evaluations. Furthermore, these analyses and others in process will be used as the basis for developing the Flammable Gas Topical Report for the ISB Upgrade

  12. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Several Hanford waste tanks have been observed to exhibit periodic releases of significant quantities of flammable gases. Because potential safety issues have been identified with this type of waste behavior, applicable tanks were equipped with instrumentation offering the capability to continuously monitor gases released from them. This document was written to cover three primary areas: (1) describe the current technical basis for requiring flammable gas monitoring, (2) update the technical basis to include knowledge gained from monitoring the tanks over the last three years, (3) provide the criteria for removal of Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System(s) (SHMS) from a waste tank or termination of other flammable gas monitoring activities in the Hanford Tank farms

  13. A preliminary study on the thermal conductivity and flammability of WPC based on some tropical woods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, L.H.L.; Chua, P.H.; Lee, E.E.N.

    1985-01-01

    Selected local woods and their wood-polymer combinations or composites (WPC) were tested for their thermal conductivity and their fire resistance. WPC were prepared by polymerizing monomers 'in situ' in oven dried woods by gamma radiation. The monomers included acrylonitrile (AN), 60% styrene-40% acrylonitrile (STAN), methyl methacrylate (MMA), 95% methyl methacrylate-5% dioxane (MD), and vinylidene chloride (VDC). A reduction in thermal conductivity was exhibited by all the composites prepared. W-PAN showed the greatest reduction in thermal conductivity and W-PSTAN in general showed the least. An explanation is suggested for this behaviour. The polymers PMMA and PMD were found to enhance flammability of the woods while PVDC, PAN, and PSTAN imparted fire resistance to the woods. Of the six local woods studied, Ramin-and-Keruing-polymer composites showed the highest flammable tendencies obtained. The correlation of thermal conductivity to flammability is discussed. (author)

  14. Flow Effects on the Flammability Diagrams of Solid Fuels: Microgravity Influence on Ignition Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, J. L.; Walther, D. C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Steinhaus, T.; Torero, J. L.; Quintere, J. G.; Ross, H. D.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of an accidental fire in space-based facilities is a primary concern of space exploration programs. Spacecraft environments generally present low velocity air currents produced by ventilation and heating systems (of the order of 0.1 m/s), and fluctuating oxygen concentrations around that of air due to CO2 removal systems. Recent experiments of flame spread in microgravity show the spread rate to be faster and the limiting oxygen concentration lower than in normal-gravity. To date, there is not a material flammability-testing protocol that specifically addresses issues related to microgravity conditions. The present project (FIST) aims to establish a testing methodology that is suitable for the specific conditions of reduced gravity. The concepts underlying the operation of the LIFT apparatus, ASTM-E 1321-93, have been used to develop the Forced-flow Ignition and flame-Spread Test (FIST). As in the LIFT, the FIST is used to obtain the flammability diagrams of the material, i.e., graphs of ignition delay time and flame spread rate as a function of the externally applied radiant flux, but under forced flow rather than natural convection conditions, and for different oxygen concentrations. Although the flammability diagrams are similar, the flammability properties obtained with the FIST are found to depend on the flow characteristics. A research program is currently underway with the purpose of implementing the FIST as a protocol to characterize the flammability performance of solid materials to be used in microgravity facilities. To this point, tests have been performed with the FIST apparatus in both normal-gravity and microgravity conditions to determine the effects of oxidizer flow characteristics on the flammability diagrams of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) fuel samples. The experiments are conducted at reduced gravity in a KC- 135 aircraft following a parabolic flight trajectory that provides up to 25 seconds of low gravity. The objective of the

  15. Multivariate optimization of headspace trap for furan and furfural simultaneous determination in sponge cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Vázquez, Mayela; Blumenthal, David; Camel, Valérie; Rega, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Furan, a possibly carcinogenic compound to humans, and furfural, a naturally occurring volatile contributing to aroma, can be both found in thermally treated foods. These process-induced compounds, formed by close reaction pathways, play an important role as markers of food safety and quality. A method capable of simultaneously quantifying both molecules is thus highly relevant for developing mitigation strategies and preserving the sensory properties of food at the same time. We have developed a unique reliable and sensitive headspace trap (HS trap) extraction method coupled to GC-MS for the simultaneous quantification of furan and furfural in a solid processed food (sponge cake). HS Trap extraction has been optimized using an optimal design of experiments (O-DOE) approach, considering four instrumental and two sample preparation variables, as well as a blocking factor identified during preliminary assays. Multicriteria and multiple response optimization was performed based on a desirability function, yielding the following conditions: thermostatting temperature, 65°C; thermostatting time, 15min; number of pressurization cycles, 4; dry purge time, 0.9min; water / sample amount ratio (dry basis), 16; and total amount (water + sample amount, dry basis), 10g. The performances of the optimized method were also assessed: repeatability (RSD: ≤3.3% for furan and ≤2.6% for furfural), intermediate precision (RSD: 4.0% for furan and 4.3% for furfural), linearity (R 2 : 0.9957 for furan and 0.9996 for furfural), LOD (0.50ng furan g sample dry basis -1 and 10.2ng furfural g sample dry basis -1 ), LOQ (0.99ng furan g sample dry basis -1 and 41.1ng furfural g sample dry basis -1 ). Matrix effect was observed mainly for furan. Finally, the optimized method was applied to other sponge cakes with different matrix characteristics and levels of analytes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. 16 CFR 1500.46 - Method for determining flashpoint of extremely flammable contents of self-pressurized containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... extremely flammable contents of self-pressurized containers. 1500.46 Section 1500.46 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND... extremely flammable contents of self-pressurized containers. Use the apparatus described in § 1500.43a. Use...

  17. Flight attraction of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae to cotton headspace and synthetic volatile blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eBorrero-Echeverry

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The insect olfactory system discriminates odor signals of different biological relevance, which drive innate behavior. Identification of stimuli that trigger upwind flight attraction towards host plants is a current challenge, and is essential in developing new, sustainable plant protection methods, and for furthering our understanding of plant-insect interactions. Using behavioral, analytical and electrophysiological studies, we here show that both females and males of the Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, use blends of volatile compounds to locate their host plant, cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (Malvales, Malvaceae. Female S. littoralis were engaged in upwind orientation flight in a wind tunnel when headspace collected from cotton plants was delivered through a piezoelectric sprayer. Although males took off towards cotton headspace significantly fewer males than females flew upwind towards the sprayed headspace. Subsequent assays with antennally active synthetic compounds revealed that a blend of nonanal, (Z-3 hexenyl acetate, (E-β-ocimene, and (R-(+-limonene was as attractive as cotton headspace to females and more attractive to males. DMNT and (R-(--linalool, both known plant defense compounds may have reduced the flight attraction of both females and males; more moths were attracted to blends without these two compounds. Our findings provide a platform for further investigations on host plant signals mediating innate behavior, and for the development of novel insect plant protection strategies against S. littoralis.

  18. Optimizing headspace sampling temperature and time for analysis of volatile oxidation products in fish oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørbæk, Karen; Jensen, Benny

    1997-01-01

    Headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC), based on adsorption to Tenax GR(R), thermal desorption and GC, has been used for analysis of volatiles in fish oil. To optimize sam sampling conditions, the effect of heating the fish oil at various temperatures and times was evaluated from anisidine values (AV...

  19. Analysis of Cyanide in Blood by Headspace-Isotope-Dilution-GC-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbger, Lise Lotte; Petersen, Henning Willads; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2008-01-01

    An uncomplicated, rapid, automated procedure for the analysis of low cyanide concentrations in whole blood is reported. The analysis was performed by headspace gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in the (1H12C14N) and m/z 29 (1H13C15N). Carryover from cyanide adsorption onto the surface...

  20. Determination of carboxyl groups in wood fibers by headspace gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    X.-S. Chai; Q.X. Hou; J.Y. Zhu; S.-L. Chen; S.F. Wang; L. Lucia

    2003-01-01

    The phase reaction conversion (PRC) headspace gas chromatographic (HSGC) technique was employed to develop a method for the determination of the content of carboxyl groups in wood fibers. Acid treatment of the wood fibers using hydrochloric was applied to convert carboxyl groups to carboxyl acids. Bicarbonate solution is then used to react with carboxyl acids on the...

  1. Tank 241-B-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  2. Tank 241-BX-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  3. Measurement of water absorption capacity in wheat flour by a headspace gas chromatographic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Yu, Kong-Xian; Gong, Yi-Xian

    2018-04-17

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a new method for quantitatively analyzing water absorption capacity in wheat flour by a headspace gas chromatographic technique. This headspace gas chromatographic technique was based on measuring the water vapor released from a series of wheat flour samples with different contents of water addition. According to the different trends between the vapor and wheat flour phase before and after the water absorption capacity in wheat flour, a turning point (corresponding to water absorption capacity in wheat flour) can be obtained by fitting the data of the water gas chromatography peak area from different wheat flour samples. The data showed that the phase equilibrium in the vial can be achieved in 25 min at desired temperature (35°C). The relative standard deviation of the reaction headspace gas chromatographic technique in water absorption capacity determination was within 3.48%, the relative differences has been determined by comparing the water absorption capacity obtained from this new analytical technique with the data from the reference technique (i.e., the filtration method), which are less than 8.92%. The new headspace gas chromatographic method is automated, accurate and be a reliable tool for quantifying water absorption capacity in wheat flour in both laboratory research and mill applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Isolation and quantification of volatiles in fish by dynamic headspace sampling and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Haahr, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Benny

    1999-01-01

    A dynamic headspace sampling method for isolation of volatiles in fish has been developed. The sample preparation involved freezing of fish tissue in liquid nitrogen, pulverizing the tissue, and sampling of volatiles from an aqueous slurry of the fish powder. Similar volatile patterns were...

  5. Tank 241-U-203 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  6. Tank 241-C-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  7. Tank 241-S-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  8. Tank 241-U-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  9. Tank 241-SX-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  10. Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  11. Tank 241-C-102 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  12. Tank 241-BY-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  13. Tank 241-T-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in January 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  14. Tank 241-SX-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  15. Tank 241-TY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  16. Tank 241-C-110 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  17. Tank 241-C-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  18. Tank 241-C-107 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  19. Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  20. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor's controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first

  1. Headspace volume and percentage of carbon monoxide affects carboxymyoglobin layer development of modified atmosphere packaged beef steaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Christopher R; Hunt, Melvin C

    2010-01-01

    Carboxymyoglobin (COMb) development of beef Longissimus lumborum as related to molecular CO availability and package headspace volume was evaluated. Steaks from six pairs of USDA Select strip loins were packaged in modified atmosphere packages with 0.2%, 0.4%, or 0.8% CO and 30% CO(2) and balanced with N(2) to obtain meat-to-gas ratios of 0.4, 0.7, and 1.1, and CO molar concentrations of 0.07, 0.10, and 0.20 mMol. Steak redness (CIE a*), COMb layer thickness, percentage of CO in the headspace, visual display color, and bloom intensity scores were evaluated 4 and 7 d after packaging. Greater concentration of CO in a smaller headspace resulted in a thicker COMb layer compared with lesser concentration of CO in a larger headspace, regardless of moles CO available. The combined effects of concentration of CO and headspace volume had a greater impact on COMb development than millimoles of CO in the package headspace. Package headspace can be reduced and the concentration of CO can be increased without detriment to fresh beef color or consumer safety.

  2. Non-Toxic, Non-Flammable, -80 C Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a non-toxic, non-flammable, -80 C phase change material (PCM) to be used in NASA's ICEPAC capsules for biological sample preservation in flight to and from Earth orbit. A temperature of about -68 C or lower is a critical temperature for maintaining stable cell, tissue, and cell fragment storage.

  3. Flammable gas safety program. Analytical methods development: FY 1994 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.; Grant, K.; Hoopes, V.; Lerner, B.; Lucke, R.; Mong, G.; Rau, J.; Wahl, K.; Steele, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the status of developing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with particular focus on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods that have been developed are illustrated by their application to samples obtained from Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY)

  4. 16 CFR 1500.43a - Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials. 1500.43a Section 1500.43a Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... shall intersect the plane of the underside of the cover. The cover is also provided with an orifice...

  5. Effect of melamine phosphate on the thermal stability and flammability of bio-based polyurethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushin, Vladimir; Sevastyanova, Irina; Vilsone, Dzintra; Avots, Andris

    2016-01-01

    The effect of melamine phosphate (MP) on the thermal stability of bio-based polyurethane and the flammability parameters of wood samples with polyurethane coatings was studied. Thermogravimetric analysis and cone calorimeter test at a heat flux of 35 kW/m 2 were used for this purpose. The main characteristics of the thermal stability and flammability of the coating with addition of MP were compared with the characteristics of analogous coatings with addition of ammonium polyphosphate (APP), as well as APP in combination with melamine. It was found that the use of MP as an intumescent additive allows a considerable decrease of most of the flammability parameters of the polyurethane based on tall oil fatty acids, like APP. To reach the maximum effect, it is enough to load in the polyurethane 20% of MP. In contrast to APP, MP reduces also the smoke release of the samples. Using MP in combination with APP at definite weight ratios, it is possible to essentially reduce the flammability parameters of polyurethane coatings, such as PHRR, THR and MARHE. (paper)

  6. Fleet Composition of Rail Tank Cars That Transport Flammable Liquids: 2013-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Section 7308 of the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act; P. L. 114-94; December 4, 2015) requires the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to assemble and collect data on rail tank cars transporting Class 3 flammable liquids (box...

  7. Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

    1998-06-01

    Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a technical basis or reference document for flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases

  8. 29 CFR 1910.107 - Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... drying apparatus and electrical connections and wiring thereto shall not be located within spray... apparatus, the drying apparatus, and the ventilating system of the spray enclosure shall be equipped with... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials...

  9. System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldo, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks

  10. Flammable gas issues in double-contained receiver tanks. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Stewart, C.W.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.; Shepard, C.L.

    1998-06-01

    Four double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) at Hanford will be used to store salt-well pumped liquids from tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. This document was created to serve as a technical basis or reference document for flammable gas issues in DCRTs. The document identifies, describes, evaluates, and attempts to quantify potential gas carryover and release mechanisms. It estimates several key parameters needed for these calculations, such as initial aqueous concentrations and ventilation rate, and evaluates the uncertainty in those estimates. It justifies the use of the Schumpe model for estimating vapor-liquid equilibrium constants. It identifies several potential waste compatibility issues (such as mixing and pH or temperature changes) that could lead to gas release and provides a basis for calculating their effects. It evaluates the potential for gas retention in precipitated solids within a DCRT and whether retention could lead to a buoyant displacement instability (rollover) event. It discusses rates of radiolytic, thermal, and corrosive hydrogen generation within the DCRT. It also describes in detail the accepted method of calculating the lower flammability limit (LFL) for mixtures of flammable gases.

  11. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  12. Analysis of flammability in the attached buildings to containment under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, J.C. de la, E-mail: juan-carlos.de-la-rosa-blul@ec.europa.eu [European Commission Joint Research Centre (Netherlands); Fornós, Joan, E-mail: jfornosh@anacnv.com [Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellós (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Analysis of flammability conditions in buildings outside containment. • Stepwise approach easily applicable for any kind of containment and attached buildings layout. • Detailed application for real plant conditions has been included. - Abstract: Right after the events unfolded in Fukushima Daiichi, the European Union countries agreed in subjecting Nuclear Power Plants to Stress Tests as developed by WENRA and ENSREG organizations. One of the results as implemented in many European countries derived from such tests consisted of mandatory technical instructions issued by nuclear regulatory bodies on the analysis of potential risk of flammable gases in attached buildings to containment. The current study addresses the key aspects of the analysis of flammable gases leaking to auxiliary buildings attached to Westinghouse large-dry PWR containment for the specific situation where mitigating systems to prevent flammable gases to grow up inside containment are available, and containment integrity is preserved – hence avoiding isolation system failure. It also provides a full practical exercise where lessons learned derived from the current study – hence limited to the imposed boundary conditions – are applied. The leakage of gas from the containment to the support buildings is based on separate calculations using the EPRI-owned Modular Accident Analysis Program, MAAP4.07. The FATE™ code (facility Flow, Aerosol, Thermal, and Explosion) was used to model the transport and distribution of leaked flammable gas (H{sub 2} and CO) in the penetration buildings. FATE models the significant mixing (dilution) which occurs as the released buoyant gas rises and entrains air. Also, FATE accounts for the condensation of steam on room surfaces, an effect which acts to concentrate flammable gas. The results of the analysis show that during a severe accident, flammable conditions are unlikely to occur in compartmentalized buildings such as the one used in the

  13. Analysis of flammability in the attached buildings to containment under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, J.C. de la; Fornós, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of flammability conditions in buildings outside containment. • Stepwise approach easily applicable for any kind of containment and attached buildings layout. • Detailed application for real plant conditions has been included. - Abstract: Right after the events unfolded in Fukushima Daiichi, the European Union countries agreed in subjecting Nuclear Power Plants to Stress Tests as developed by WENRA and ENSREG organizations. One of the results as implemented in many European countries derived from such tests consisted of mandatory technical instructions issued by nuclear regulatory bodies on the analysis of potential risk of flammable gases in attached buildings to containment. The current study addresses the key aspects of the analysis of flammable gases leaking to auxiliary buildings attached to Westinghouse large-dry PWR containment for the specific situation where mitigating systems to prevent flammable gases to grow up inside containment are available, and containment integrity is preserved – hence avoiding isolation system failure. It also provides a full practical exercise where lessons learned derived from the current study – hence limited to the imposed boundary conditions – are applied. The leakage of gas from the containment to the support buildings is based on separate calculations using the EPRI-owned Modular Accident Analysis Program, MAAP4.07. The FATE™ code (facility Flow, Aerosol, Thermal, and Explosion) was used to model the transport and distribution of leaked flammable gas (H_2 and CO) in the penetration buildings. FATE models the significant mixing (dilution) which occurs as the released buoyant gas rises and entrains air. Also, FATE accounts for the condensation of steam on room surfaces, an effect which acts to concentrate flammable gas. The results of the analysis show that during a severe accident, flammable conditions are unlikely to occur in compartmentalized buildings such as the one used in the

  14. An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    High-level waste (HLW) produces flammable gases as a result of radiolysis and thermal decomposition of organics. Under certain conditions, these gases can accumulate within the waste for extended periods and then be released quickly into the dome space of the storage tank. As part of the effort to reduce the safety concerns associated with flammable gas in HLW tanks at Hanford, a flammable gas watch list (FGWL) has been established. Inclusion on the FGWL is based on criteria intended to measure the risk associated with the presence of flammable gas. It is important that all high-risk tanks be identified with high confidence so that they may be controlled. Conversely, to minimize operational complexity, the number of tanks on the watchlist should be reduced as near to the true number of flammable risk tanks as the current state of knowledge will support. This report presents an alternative to existing approaches for FGWL screening based on the theory of approximate reasoning (AR) (Zadeh 1976). The AR-based model emulates the inference process used by an expert when asked to make an evaluation. The FGWL model described here was exercised by performing two evaluations. (1) A complete tank evaluation where the entire algorithm is used. This was done for two tanks, U-106 and AW-104. U-106 is a single shell tank with large sludge and saltcake layers. AW-104 is a double shell tank with over one million gallons of supernate. Both of these tanks had failed the screening performed by Hodgson et al. (2) Partial evaluations using a submodule for the predictor likelihood for all of the tanks on the FGWL that had been flagged previously by Whitney (1995)

  15. Summary of tank information relating salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caley, S.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Active use of these SSTs was phased out completely by November 1980, and the first step toward final disposal of the waste in the SSTs is interim stabilization, which involves removing essentially all of the drainable liquid from the tank. Stabilization can be achieved administratively, by jet pumping to remove drainable interstitial liquid, or by supernatant pumping. To date, 116 tanks have been declared interim stabilized; 44 SSTs have had drainable liquid removed by salt well jet pumping. Of the 149 SSTs, 19 are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because the waste in these tanks is known or suspected, in all but one case, to generate and retain mixtures of flammable gases, including; hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Salt well pumping to remove the drainable interstitial liquid from these SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. The scope of this work is to collect and summarize information, primarily tank data and observations, that relate salt well pumping to flammable gas safety issues. While the waste within FGWL SSTs is suspected offering flammable gases, the effect of salt well pumping on the waste behavior is not well understood. This study is being conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the Flammable Gas Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Understanding the historical tank behavior during and following salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues

  16. Time since discharge of 9mm cartridges by headspace analysis, part 1: Comprehensive optimisation and validation of a headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallidabino, M; Romolo, F S; Weyermann, C

    2017-03-01

    Estimating the time since discharge of spent cartridges can be a valuable tool in the forensic investigation of firearm-related crimes. To reach this aim, it was previously proposed that the decrease of volatile organic compounds released during discharge is monitored over time using non-destructive headspace extraction techniques. While promising results were obtained for large-calibre cartridges (e.g., shotgun shells), handgun calibres yielded unsatisfying results. In addition to the natural complexity of the specimen itself, these can also be attributed to some selective choices in the methods development. Thus, the present series of paper aimed to more systematically evaluate the potential of headspace analysis to estimate the time since discharge of cartridges through the use of more comprehensive analytical and interpretative techniques. Specifically, in this first part, a method based on headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) was comprehensively optimised and validated, as the latter recently proved to be a more efficient alternative than previous approaches. For this purpose, 29 volatile organic compounds were preliminary selected on the basis of previous works. A multivariate statistical approach based on design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimise variables potentially involved in interaction effects. Introduction of deuterated analogues in sampling vials was also investigated as strategy to account for analytical variations. Analysis was carried out by selected ion mode, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed good chromatographic resolution as well as detection limits and peak area repeatability. Application to 9mm spent cartridges confirmed that the use of co-extracted internal standards allowed for improved reproducibility of the measured signals. The validated method will be applied in the second part of this work to estimate the time since discharge of 9mm spent cartridges using multivariate models. Copyright

  17. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-TY-102: Results from samples collected on 04/12/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-TY-102 (Tank TY-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to'characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes, and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  18. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Tank 241-B-105: Results from samples collected on 07/30/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-B-105 (Tank B-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  19. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-103: Results from samples collected on 06/12/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-S-103 (Tank S-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  20. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-204: Results from samples collected on 07/02/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-C-204 (Tank C-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the inorganic analytes, permanent gases, and total non-methane organic compounds is listed in Table S.1. The three highest concentration analytes detected in SUMMA trademark canister and triple sorbent trap samples are also listed in Table S.1. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the appendices

  1. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions by headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongping; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Hong; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili

    2016-07-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with cryotrap gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. The highly volatile organic compounds were separated successfully with high sensitivity by the employment of a cryotrap device, with the construction of a cold column head by freezing a segment of metal capillary with liquid nitrogen. A total of 76 volatile organic compounds were identified in 50 pleural effusion samples (20 malignant effusions and 30 benign effusions). Among them, 34 more volatile organic compounds were detected with the retention time less than 8 min, by comparing with the normal headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry method. Furthermore, 24 volatile organic compounds with high occurrence frequency in pleural effusion samples, 18 of which with the retention time less than 8 min, were selected for the comparative analysis. The results of average peak area comparison and box-plot analysis showed that except for cyclohexanone, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and tetramethylbenzene, which have been reported as potential cancer biomarkers, cyclohexanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-heptane, ethylbenzene, and xylene also had differential expression between malignant and benign effusions. Therefore, the proposed approach was valuable for the comprehensive characterization of volatile organic compounds in pleural effusions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Performance evaluation of a thermal desorption/gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method for the characterization of waste tank headspace samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) method was validated for the determination of volatile organic compounds collected on carbonaceous triple sorbent traps and applied to characterize samples of headspace gases collected from underground nuclear waste storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site, in Richland, WA. Method validation used vapor-phase standards generated from 25 target analytes, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, alkylated aromatics, and alkyl nitriles. The target analytes represent a group of compounds identified in one of the most problematic tanks. TD/GC/MS was carried out with modified injectors. Performance was characterized based on desorption efficiency, reproducibility, stability, and linearity of the calibration, method detection limits, preanalytical holding time, and quality control limits for surrogate standard recoveries. Desorption efficiencies were all greater than 82%, and the majority of the analytes (23 out of 25) had reproducibility values less than 24% near the method detection levels. The method was applied to the analysis of a total of 305 samples collected from the headspaces of 48 underground waste storge tanks. Quality control procedures were implemented to monitor sampling and TD/GC/MS method. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-U-112: Results from samples collected on 7/09/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Silvers, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-112 at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company

  4. Maximum total organic carbon limits at different DWPF melter feed maters (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The document presents information on the maximum total organic carbon (TOC) limits that are allowable in the DWPF melter feed without forming a potentially flammable vapor in the off-gas system were determined at feed rates varying from 0.7 to 1.5 GPM. At the maximum TOC levels predicted, the peak concentration of combustible gases in the quenched off-gas will not exceed 60 percent of the lower flammable limit during a 3X off-gas surge, provided that the indicated melter vapor space temperature and the total air supply to the melter are maintained. All the necessary calculations for this study were made using the 4-stage cold cap model and the melter off-gas dynamics model. A high-degree of conservatism was included in the calculational bases and assumptions. As a result, the proposed correlations are believed to by conservative enough to be used for the melter off-gas flammability control purposes

  5. Spreaders, igniters, and burning shrubs: plant flammability explains novel fire dynamics in grass-invaded deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Ramirez, Andres; Veldman, Joseph W; Holzapfel, Claus; Moloney, Kirk A

    2016-10-01

    Novel fire regimes are an important cause and consequence of global environmental change that involve interactions among biotic, climatic, and human components of ecosystems. Plant flammability is key to these interactions, yet few studies directly measure flammability or consider how multiple species with different flammabilities interact to produce novel fire regimes. Deserts of the southwestern United States are an ideal system for exploring how novel fire regimes can emerge when fire-promoting species invade ecosystems comprised of species that did not evolve with fire. In these deserts, exotic annual grasses provide fuel continuity across landscapes that did not historically burn. These fires often ignite a keystone desert shrub, the fire-intolerant creosote bush, Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville. Ignition of Larrea is likely catalyzed by fuels produced by native plants that grow beneath the shrubs. We hypothesize that invasive and native species exhibit distinct flammability characteristics that in combination determine spatial patterns of fire spread and intensity. We measured flammability metrics of Larrea, two invasive grasses, Schismus arabicus and Bromus madritensis, and two native plants, the sub-shrub Ambrosia dumosa and the annual herb Amsinckia menziesii. Results of laboratory experiments show that the grasses carry fire quickly (1.32 cm/s), but burn for short duration (0.5 min) at low temperatures. In contrast, native plants spread fire slowly (0.12 cm/s), but burn up to eight times longer (4 min) and produced hotter fires. Additional experiments on the ignition requirements of Larrea suggest that native plants burn with sufficient temperature and duration to ignite dead Larrea branches (time to ignition, 2 min; temperature at ignition 692°C). Once burning, these dead branches ignite living branches in the upper portions of the shrub. Our study provides support for a conceptual model in which exotic grasses are "spreaders" of fire and native

  6. Dynamic Headspace Sampling as an Initial Step for Sample Preparation in Chromatographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnowski, Wojciech; Majchrzak, Tomasz; Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    This work represents a brief summary of the use of dynamic headspace (DHS) as a technique for sample preparation in chromatographic analysis. Despite numerous developments in the area of analyte isolation and enrichment, DHS remains one of the fundamental methods used with GC. In our opinion, interest in this technique will not diminish significantly because it conforms to stipulations of green analytical chemistry. Moreover, DHS fulfills the need for methods that facilitate detection and determination of analytes present at ultratrace levels in complex matrixes. The main focus of this work was placed on the theoretical fundamentals of this method. Also described herein were DHS development, the advantages and disadvantages of this technique compared with other headspace sampling techniques, and selected examples of its applications in food and environmental analyses.

  7. Organic analysis of the headspace of Hanford waste Tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, S.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Lucke, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; Edwards, J.A.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Organic species from the headspace of one Hanford radioactive waste tank are described. Samples were collected either using a sorbent trap or a SUMMA TM canister and were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The headspace contained several organic components, including alkanes, alkanes, ketones, aldehydes, organic nitriles, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Sorbent trap samples were designed to collect only normal paraffin hydrocarbons (NPHs). A comparison of NPH data from sorbent traps and SUMMA TM cans revealed results of 693 and 1320 mg/m 3 , NPH respectively. Significant differences were observed in NPH values when samples were collected at different times, or at different locations in the tank. These data suggest either the time of collection, or the position of the sampling device are important variables in the analysis of organic species from Hanford tanks. (author). 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Simultaneous Determination of Alkoxyalcohols in Wet Wipes Using Static Headspace Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Jin; Pyo, Hee Soo; Chung, Bong Chul; Lee, Jeon Gae [KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hai Dong [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Alkoxyalcohols are used as solvents or preservatives in various consumer products such as wet wipes. The metabolites of alkoxyalcohols are known to be chronically toxic and carcinogenic to animals. Thus, an analytical method is needed to monitor alkoxyalcohols in wet wipes. The aim of this study was to develop a simultaneous analytical method for 14 alkoxyalcohols using headspace gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to analyze the wet wipes. This method was developed by comparing with various headspace extraction parameters. The linear calibration curves were obtained for the method (r2 > 0.995). The limit of detection of alkoxyalcohols ranged from 2 to 200 ng mL-1. The precision of the determinative method was less than 18.20% coefficient of variation both intra and inter days. The accuracy of the method ranged from 82.86% to 119.83%. (2-Methoxymethylethoxy)propanol, 2-phenoxyethanol, and 1-phenoxy-2-propanol were mainly detected in wet wipes.

  9. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor sample results - August 1993 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Tank 241-C-111 is on the ferrocyanide Watch List. Gas and vapor samples were collected to assure safe conditions before planned intrusive work was performed. Sample analyses showed that hydrogen is about ten times higher in the tank headspace than in ambient air. Nitrous oxide is about sixty times higher than ambient levels. The hydrogen cyanide concentration was below 0.04 ppbv, and the average NO x concentration was 8.6 ppmv

  10. Gram-negative and -positive bacteria differentiation in blood culture samples by headspace volatile compound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Michael E; Janitza, Silke; Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Graßmann-Lichtenauer, Carola; Praun, Siegfried; Denzer, Wolfgang; Schelling, Gustav; Schubert, Sören

    2016-12-01

    Identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures still relies on standard techniques such as Gram staining followed by culturing with definite microorganism identification. Alternatively, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or the analysis of headspace volatile compound (VC) composition produced by cultures can help to differentiate between microorganisms under experimental conditions. This study assessed the efficacy of volatile compound based microorganism differentiation into Gram-negatives and -positives in unselected positive blood culture samples from patients. Headspace gas samples of positive blood culture samples were transferred to sterilized, sealed, and evacuated 20 ml glass vials and stored at -30 °C until batch analysis. Headspace gas VC content analysis was carried out via an auto sampler connected to an ion-molecule reaction mass spectrometer (IMR-MS). Measurements covered a mass range from 16 to 135 u including CO2, H2, N2, and O2. Prediction rules for microorganism identification based on VC composition were derived using a training data set and evaluated using a validation data set within a random split validation procedure. One-hundred-fifty-two aerobic samples growing 27 Gram-negatives, 106 Gram-positives, and 19 fungi and 130 anaerobic samples growing 37 Gram-negatives, 91 Gram-positives, and two fungi were analysed. In anaerobic samples, ten discriminators were identified by the random forest method allowing for bacteria differentiation into Gram-negative and -positive (error rate: 16.7 % in validation data set). For aerobic samples the error rate was not better than random. In anaerobic blood culture samples of patients IMR-MS based headspace VC composition analysis facilitates bacteria differentiation into Gram-negative and -positive.

  11. Headspace gas and vapor characterization summary for the 43 vapor program suspect tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    During the time period between February 1994 and September 1995, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) sampled the waste tank headspace of 43 single-shell tanks for a variety of gaseous and/or volatile and semi-volatile compounds. This report summarizes the results of analyses of those sampling activities with respect to both the Priority 1 Safety Issues and relative to the detection in the headspace of significant concentrations of target analytes relating to worker breathing space consideration as recommended by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Toxicology Review Panel. The information contained in the data tables was abstracted from the vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization reports. Selected results are tabulated and summarized. Sampling equipment and methods, as well as sample analyses, are briefly described. Vapor sampling of passively ventilated single-shell tanks (tanks C-105, C-106, and SX-106 were sampled and are actively ventilated) has served to highlight or confirm tank headspace conditions associated with both priority 1 safety issues and supports source term analysis associated with protecting worker health and safety from noxious vapors

  12. Headspace liquid-phase microextraction of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine by an aqueous drop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Yi [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)]. E-mail: yhe@jjay.cuny.edu; Vargas, Angelica [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States); Kang, Youn-Jung [Department of Sciences, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W 59th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)

    2007-04-25

    This study developed a headspace liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method by using a single aqueous drop in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection for the determination of methamphetamine (MAP) and amphetamine (AP) in urine samples. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from sample matrix into the headspace first, and then protonated and dissolved in an aqueous H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} drop hanging in the headspace by a HPLC syringe. After extraction, this drop was directly injected into HPLC. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the investigated concentration range of 1.0-1500 {mu}g L{sup -1}, repeatability of the extraction (R.S.D. < 5%, n = 6), and low detection limits (0.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} for both analytes). Enrichment factors of about 400-fold and 220-fold were achieved for MAP and AP, respectively, at optimum conditions. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples.

  13. Headspace mass spectrometry methodology: application to oil spill identification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Pavon, J.L.; Garcia Pinto, C.; Moreno Cordero, B. [Universidad de Salamanca, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Salamanca (Spain); Guerrero Pena, A. [Universidad de Salamanca, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Salamanca (Spain); Laboratorio de Suelos, Plantas y Aguas, Campus Tabasco, Colegio de Postgraduados, Cardenas, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2008-05-15

    In the present work we report the results obtained with a methodology based on direct coupling of a headspace generator to a mass spectrometer for the identification of different types of petroleum crudes in polluted soils. With no prior treatment, the samples are subjected to the headspace generation process and the volatiles generated are introduced directly into the mass spectrometer, thereby obtaining a fingerprint of volatiles in the sample analysed. The mass spectrum corresponding to the mass/charge ratios (m/z) contains the information related to the composition of the headspace and is used as the analytical signal for the characterization of the samples. The signals obtained for the different samples were treated by chemometric techniques to obtain the desired information. The main advantage of the proposed methodology is that no prior chromatographic separation and no sample manipulation are required. The method is rapid, simple and, in view of the results, highly promising for the implementation of a new approach for oil spill identification in soils. (orig.)

  14. Determination of methanol in pulp washing filtrates by desiccated full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-Chao; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2012-01-27

    This paper reports on a desiccated full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (FE HS-GC) technique for determination of the methanol content in dilute mill effluents. Anhydrous K(2)CO(3) was selected as the preferred salt for eliminating the water in the sample in the headspace sample vial. The results showed that the addition of 12 g K(2)CO(3) made it possible to introduce a larger sample size (up to 1 mL) into the FE HS-GC measurement, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the technique. At the given equilibration temperature (105°C), a near-complete mass transfer of methanol from the liquid phase to vapor phase (headspace) was achieved within 10 min. Replicate samples showed that the relative standard deviation of the method was less than 1.5%. Further, the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.12 μg and the recovery ranged from 95 to 104%. The present method greatly improves the methanol detection sensitivity in the FE HS-GC method and has the added advantage of being simple, rapid and accurate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative analysis of perfumes in talcum powder by using headspace sorptive extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Khim Hui; Heng, Audrey; Osborne, Murray

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of perfume dosage in talcum powder has been a challenge due to interference of the matrix and has so far not been widely reported. In this study, headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) was validated as a solventless sample preparation method for the extraction and enrichment of perfume raw materials from talcum powder. Sample enrichment is performed on a thick film of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) coated onto a magnetic stir bar incorporated in a glass jacket. Sampling is done by placing the PDMS stir bar in the headspace vial by using a holder. The stir bar is then thermally desorbed online with capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The HSSE method is based on the same principles as headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME). Nevertheless, a relatively larger amount of extracting phase is coated on the stir bar as compared to SPME. Sample amount and extraction time were optimized in this study. The method has shown good repeatability (with relative standard deviation no higher than 12.5%) and excellent linearity with correlation coefficients above 0.99 for all analytes. The method was also successfully applied in the quantitative analysis of talcum powder spiked with perfume at different dosages. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [Determination of olive oil content in olive blend oil by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wanfeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Fengyan; Yang, Zhao

    2017-07-08

    A method for the determination of the content of olive oil in olive blend oil by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SH-GC/MS) was established. The amount of the sample, the heating temperature, the heating time, the amount of injection, the injection mode and the chromatographic column were optimized. The characteristic compounds of olive oil were found by chemometric method. A sample of 1.0 g was placed in a 20 mL headspace flask, and heated at 180℃ for 2700 s. Then, 1.0 mL headspace gas was taken into the instrument. An HP-88 chromatographic column was used for the separation and the analysis was performed by GC/MS. The results showed that the linear range was 0-100%(olive oil content). The linear correlation coefficient ( r 2 ) was more than 0.995, and the limits of detection were 1.26%-2.13%. The deviations of olive oil contents in the olive blend oil were from -0.65% to 1.02%, with the relative deviations from -1.3% to 6.8% and the relative standard deviations from 1.18% to 4.26% ( n =6). The method is simple, rapid, environment friendly, sensitive and accurate. It is suitable for the determination of the content of olive oil in olive blend oil.

  17. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust

  18. Cycling performance of lithium polymer cells assembled by in situ polymerization of a non-flammable ionic liquid monomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon-Sung; Kim, Dong-Won

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Gel polymer electrolytes were synthesized by in situ polymerization of ionic liquid in the lithium polymer cells. • Flammability of the electrolyte was significantly reduced by polymerizing electrolyte containing a non-flammable ionic liquid monomer. • The cells assembled with polymeric ionic liquid-based electrolytes exhibited reversible cycling behavior with good capacity retention. -- Abstract: Lithium polymer cells composed of a lithium negative electrode and a LiCoO 2 positive electrode were assembled with a gel polymer electrolyte obtained by in situ polymerization of an electrolyte solution containing an ionic liquid monomer with vinyl groups. The polymerization of the electrolyte solution containing the non-flammable ionic liquid monomer resulted in a significant reduction of the flammability of the gel polymer electrolytes. The lithium polymer cell assembled with the stable gel polymer electrolyte delivered a discharge capacity of 134.3 mAh g −1 at ambient temperature and exhibited good capacity retention

  19. Flammable Gas Refined Safety Analysis Tool Software Verification and Validation Report for Resolve Version 2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document all software verification and validation activities, results, and findings related to the development of Resolve Version 2.5 for the analysis of flammable gas accidents in Hanford Site waste tanks

  20. Ammonia, total reduced sulfides, and greenhouse gases of pine chip and corn stover bedding packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedding materials may affect air quality in livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to compare headspace concentrations of ammonia (NH3), total reduced sulfides (TRS), carbon dioxide (CO2),methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) when pine wood chips and corn stover were mixed in various...

  1. Flammability and thermal properties studies of nonwoven flax reinforced acrylic based polyester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasyid, M. F. Ahmad; Salim, M. S.; Akil, H. M.; Ishak, Z. A. Mohd.

    2017-12-01

    In the pursuit of green and more sustainable product, natural fibre reinforced composites originating from renewable resources has gained interest in recent years. These natural fibres exhibit good mechanical properties, low production costs, and good environmental properties. However, one of the disadvantages of natural fibre reinforced composites is their high flammability that limits their application in many fields. Within this research, the effect of sodium silicate on the flammability and thermal properties of flax reinforced acrylic based polyester composites has been investigated. Sodium silicate is applied as binder and flame retardant system in impregnation process of the natural flax fiber mats. The addition of sodium silicate significantly improved the flame retardant efficiency but reduced the degree of crosslinking of the composites.

  2. Development of Large-Format Lithium-Ion Cells with Silicon Anode and Low Flammable Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, James J.; Hernandez-Lugo, D. M.; Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Miller, T. B.; Lvovich, V. F.; Lytle, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing safe, high energy and high capacity lithium-ion cell designs and batteries for future missions under NASAs Advanced Space Power System (ASPS) project. Advanced cell components, such as high specific capacity silicon anodes and low-flammable electrolytes have been developed for improving the cell specific energy and enhancing safety. To advance the technology readiness level, we have developed large-format flight-type hermetically sealed battery cells by incorporating high capacity silicon anodes, commercially available lithium nickel, cobalt, aluminum oxide (NCA) cathodes, and low-flammable electrolytes. In this report, we will present the performance results of these various battery cells. In addition, we will also discuss the post-test cell analysis results as well.

  3. Influence of natural or organophilic bentonite for flammable of the poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyder, Eduardo T.; Kloss, Juliana R.; Morita, Reinaldo Y.; Barbosa, Ronilson V.

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture polymeric applied in electrical sector in general use additives which act as flame retardants, for example, some borates, phosphates, and halogenated hydroxides. An alternative material for this purpose frequently reported in the literature because the flame resistance or flame retardancy is organoclay. Thus, the objective of this study is to evaluate the flammability of mixtures of EVA/natural bentonite and EVA/organoclay containing modifier as a species free of quaternary ammonium ions. The natural bentonite and organoclay were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and materials were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the flammability test. Regarding the combustion rate values, there was a reduction of flame propagation in EVA/natural bentonite (3.0%), showing that in this case the clay without modifier acted as a physical barrier and promoted retardant action of flame. (author)

  4. A Review of the Flammability Factors of Kenaf and Allied Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibre is a well-known reinforcement fibre in polymer-matrix Composites (PMC lately. Natural fibre has fast growing and abundance properties which make it available at very low cost. For kenaf fibre there is long lists of research projects which have been done regarding its behaviour, and properties and modification made to it. In this paper, fire flammability is the main concern for natural fibre reinforced polymer (NFRP composites especially kenaf fibre. To estimate its flammability, a wide range of factors can be considered such as fibre content, type of matrices, pH conditions, treatment, and fire retardant (FR filler’s type. The most important criteria are the ignition time, rate of propagation, and fire behavior. thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, different scanning calorimetric (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA are the three most famous methods used to investigate the fire behaviour of composites.

  5. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-06-28

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) made at control decision meetings on November 16, 17, and 18, 1999, on April 19,2000, and on May 10,2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996) for DCRTs. Following the contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval.

  6. Reference Material Kydex(registered trademark)-100 Test Data Message for Flammability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Carl D.; Richardson, Erin; Davis, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) database contains, as an engineering resource, a large amount of material test data carefully obtained and recorded over a number of years. Flammability test data obtained using Test 1 of NASA-STD-6001 is a significant component of this database. NASA-STD-6001 recommends that Kydex 100 be used as a reference material for testing certification and for comparison between test facilities in the round-robin certification testing that occurs every 2 years. As a result of these regular activities, a large volume of test data is recorded within the MAPTIS database. The activity described in this technical report was undertaken to mine the database, recover flammability (Test 1) Kydex 100 data, and review the lessons learned from analysis of these data.

  7. Assessing and ranking the flammability of some ornamental plant species to select firewise plants for landscaping in WUI (SE France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganteaume, A.; Jappiot, M.; Lampin, C.

    2012-04-01

    The increasing urbanization of Wildland-Urban Interfaces (WUI) as well as the high fire occurrence in these areas requires the assessment and the ranking of the flammability of the ornamental vegetation surrounding houses especially that planted in hedges. Thus, the flammability of seven species, among those most frequently planted in hedges in Provence (South-Eastern France), were studied at particle level and at dead surface fuel level (litters) under laboratory conditions. The flammability parameters (ignition frequency, time-to-ignition, flaming duration) of the very fine particles (live leaves and particles fire bench. Burning experiments using the epiradiator showed that live leaves of Phyllostachys sp., Photinia frasei and Prunus laurocerasus had the shortest time-to-ignition and the highest ignition frequency and flaming duration whereas Pittosporum tobira and Nerium oleander were the longest to ignite with a low frequency. Phyllostachys sp. and Nerium oleander litters were the shortest to ignite while Prunus laurocerasus litter had the lowest bulk density and long time-to-ignition, but high flame propagation. Photinia fraseri litter ignited frequently and had a high flame spread while Pittosporum tobira litter ignited the least frequently and for the shortest duration. Cupressus sempervirens litter had the highest bulk density and the longest flaming duration but the lowest flame propagation. Pyracantha coccinea litter was the longest to ignite and flame propagation was low but lasted a long time. Hierarchical cluster analysis performed on the flammability parameters of live leaves and of litters ranked the seven species in four distinct clusters from the most flammable (Prunus laurocerasus and Pyracantha coccinea) to the least flammable (Pittosporum tobira and Nerium oleander); the other species displaying two groups of intermediate flammabilities (Phyllostachys sp.- Photinia fraseri and Cupressus sempervirens ). The species with highly flammable

  8. Effect of Environmental Variables on the Flammability of Fire Resistant Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, Andres Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the effects of external radiation, ambient pressure and microgravity on the flammability limits of fire-resistant (FR) materials. Future space missions may require spacecraft cabin environments different than those used in the International Space Station, 21%O2, 101.3kPa. Environmental variables include flow velocity, oxygen concentration, ambient pressure, micro or partial-gravity, orientation, presence of an external radiant flux, etc. Fire-resistant materials are use...

  9. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-04-17

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop {number_sign}2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages.

  10. Results of gas monitoring of double-shell flammable gas watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, N.E.

    1995-01-01

    Tanks 103-SY; 101-AW; 103-, 104-, and 105-AN are on the Flammable Gas Watch List. Recently, standard hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) cabinets have been installed in the vent header of each of these tanks. Grab samples have been taken once per week, and a gas chromatograph was installed on tank 104-AN as a field test. The data that have been collected since gas monitoring began on these tanks are summarized in this document

  11. Potential Flammable Gas Explosion in the TRU Vent and Purge Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the failure of the Vent and Purge (V and P) Machine due to potential explosion in the Transuranic (TRU) drum during its venting and/or subsequent explosion in the V and P machine from the flammable gases (e.g., hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds [VOCs]) vented into the V and P machine from the TRU drum. The analysis considers: (a) increase in the pressure in the V and P cabinet from the original deflagration in the TRU drum including lid ejection, (b) pressure wave impact from TRU drum failure, and (c) secondary burns or deflagrations resulting from excess, unburned gases in the cabinet area. A variety of cases were considered that maximized the pressure produced in the V and P cabinet. Also, cases were analyzed that maximized the shock wave pressure in the cabinet from TRU drum failure. The calculations were performed for various initial drum pressures (e.g., 1.5 and 6 psig) for 55 gallon TRU drum. The calculated peak cabinet pressures ranged from 16 psig to 50 psig for various flammable gas compositions. The blast on top of cabinet and in outlet duct ranged from 50 psig to 63 psig and 12 psig to 16 psig, respectively, for various flammable gas compositions. The failure pressures of the cabinet and the ducts calculated by structural analysis were higher than the pressure calculated from potential flammable gas deflagrations, thus, assuring that V and P cabinet would not fail during this event. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 68 calculations showed that for a failure pressure of 20 psig, the available vent area in the V and P cabinet is 1.7 to 2.6 times the required vent area depending on whether hydrogen or VOCs burn in the V and P cabinet. This analysis methodology could be used to design the process equipment needed for venting TRU waste containers at other sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex

  12. The effect of the environment conditions on the prediction of flammable cloud dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Schleder, Adriana; Martins, Marcelo; Pastor Ferrer, Elsa; Planas Cuchi, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    In order to quantify the damage caused by undesired events involving leakages of flammable materials, specific models are used to analyze the spills or jets of gas and liquid, gas dispersion, explosions and fires. The main step of this analysis is to estimate the concentration, in space and time, of the vapor cloud of hazardous substances released into the atmosphere; the purpose is to determine the area where a fire or explosion might occur and the quantity of flam...

  13. The effect of the computational grid size on the prediction of a flammable cloud dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Schleder, Adriana; Martins, Marcelon; Pastor Ferrer, Elsa; Planas Cuchi, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The consequence analysis is used to define the extent and nature of effects caused by undesired events being of great help when quantifying the damage caused by such events. For the case of leaking of flammable and/or toxic materials, effects are analyzed for explosions, fires and toxicity. Specific models are used to analyze the spills or jets of gas or liquids, gas dispersions, explosions and fires. The central step in the analysis of consequences in such cases is to de...

  14. Flammable gas double shell tank expert elicitation presentations (Part A and Part B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document is a compilation of presentation packages and white papers for the Flammable Gas Double Shell Tank Expert Elicitation Workshop number-sign 2. For each presentation given by the different authors, a separate section was developed. The purpose for issuing these workshop presentation packages and white papers as a supporting document is to provide traceability and a Quality Assurance record for future reference to these packages

  15. Flammability limits: A review with emphasis on ethanol for aeronautical applications and description of the experimental procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronado, Christian J.R.; Carvalho, João A.; Andrade, José C.; Cortez, Ely V.; Carvalho, Felipe S.; Santos, José C.; Mendiburu, Andrés Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Develops a comprehensive literature review on ethanol flammability limits. ► Difference in standard procedures lead to different experimental values of the flammability limits. ► Methodology for experiments to find the FL's of ethanol for aeronautical applications. - Abstract: The lower and upper flammability limits of a fuel are key tools for predicting fire, assessing the possibility of explosion, and designing protection systems. Knowledge about the risks involved with the explosion of both gaseous and vaporized liquid fuel mixtures with air is very important to guarantee safety in industrial, domestic, and aeronautical applications. Currently, most countries use various standard experimental tests, which lead to different experimental values for these limits. A comprehensive literature review of the flammability limits of combustible mixtures is developed here in order to organize the theoretical and practical knowledge of the subject. The main focus of this paper is the review of the flammability data of ethanol–air mixtures available in the literature. In addition, the description of methodology for experiments to find the upper and lower limits of flammability of ethanol for aeronautical applications is discussed. A heated spherical 20 L vessel was used. The mixtures were ignited with electrode rods placed in the center of the vessel, and the spark gap was 6.4 mm. LFL and the UFL were determined for ethanol (hydrated ethanol 96% °INPM) as functions of temperature for atmospheric pressure to compare results with data published in the scientific literature.

  16. Flammability of self-extinguishing kenaf/ABS nanoclays composite for aircraft secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, S.; Majid, D. L.; Mohd Tawil, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the flammability properties of kenaf fiber reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) with nanoclays composites. Natural fiber is one of the potential materials to be used with thermoplastic as a composite due to its attractive properties such as lightweight and strong. In this paper, flammability properties of this material are evaluated through Underwriters Laboratory 94 Horizontal Burning (UL94 HB), which has been conducted for both controlled and uncontrolled conditions, smoke density and limiting oxygen index tests (LOI). These flammability tests are in compliance with the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) requirement. The results from UL94 HB and smoke density tests show that the presence of nanoclays with effective composition of kenaf fiber reinforced ABS has enhanced the burning characteristics of the material by hindering propagation of flame spread over the surface of the material through char formation. Consequently, this decreases the burning rate and produces low amount of smoke during burning. On contrary, through LOI test, this material requires less oxygen to burn when exposed to fire, which hinders the enhancement of burning characteristics. This is due to burning mechanism exhibited by nanoclays that catalyzes barrier formation and flame propagation rate over the surface of the biocomposite material. Overall, these experimental results suggest that this biocomposite material is capable of self-extinguishing and possesses effective fire extinction. The observed novel synergism from the result obtained is promising to be implemented in secondary structures of aircraft with significant benefits such as cost-effective, lightweight and biodegradable self-extinguishing biocomposite.

  17. A refined safety analysis approach for closure of the Hanford Site flammable gas unreviewed safety question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Following a 1990 investigation into flammable gas generation, retention, and release mechanisms within the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks, personnel concluded that the existing Authorization Basis documentation did not adequately evaluate flammable gas hazards. This declaration was based primarily on the fact that personnel did not adequately consider hydrogen and nitrous oxide evolution within the material in certain waste tanks and subsequent hypothetical ignition in the development of safety documentation for the waste tanks. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters subsequently declared an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). Although work scope has been focused on closure of the USQ since 1990, the DOE has yet to close the USQ because of considerable uncertainty regarding essential technical parameters and associated risk. The DOE recently approved a Basis for Interim Operation to revise the Authorization Basis for managing the tank farms, however, the USQ remains open. The two fundamental requirements for closure of the flammable gas USQ are as follows: development of a defensible technical basis for existing controls; development of a process to assess the adequacy of controls as the waste tank mission progresses

  18. Condensation heat transfer coefficients of flammable refrigerants on various enhanced tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ki Jung; Jung, Dong Soo

    2005-01-01

    In this study, external condensation Heat Transfer Coefficients (HTCs) of six flammable refrigerants of propylene (R1270), propane (R290), isobutane (R600a), butane (R600), dimethylether (RE170), and HFC32 were measured at the vapor temperature of 39 .deg. C on a 1023 fpm low fin and turbo-C tubes. All data were taken under the heat flux of 32∼116 and 42∼142 kW/m 2 for the low fin and turbo-C tubes respectively. Flammable refrigerants' data obtained on enhanced tubes showed a typical trend that external condensation HTCs decrease with increasing wall subcooling. HFC32 and DME showed up to 30% higher HTCs than those of HCFC22 due to their excellent thermophysical properties. Propylene, propane, isobutane, and butane showed similar or lower HTCs than those of HCFC22. Beatty and Katz' correlation predicted the HTCs of the flammable refrigerants obtained on a low fin tube within a mean deviation of 7.3%. Turbo-C tube showed the best performance due to its 3 dimensional surface geometry for fast removal of condensate

  19. Equipment design guidance document for flammable gas waste storage tank new equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, D.B.

    1996-01-01

    This document is intended to be used as guidance for design engineers who are involved in design of new equipment slated for use in Flammable Gas Waste Storage Tanks. The purpose of this document is to provide design guidance for all new equipment intended for application into those Hanford storage tanks in which flammable gas controls are required to be addressed as part of the equipment design. These design criteria are to be used as guidance. The design of each specific piece of new equipment shall be required, as a minimum to be reviewed by qualified Unreviewed Safety Question evaluators as an integral part of the final design approval. Further Safety Assessment may be also needed. This guidance is intended to be used in conjunction with the Operating Specifications Documents (OSDs) established for defining work controls in the waste storage tanks. The criteria set forth should be reviewed for applicability if the equipment will be required to operate in locations containing unacceptable concentrations of flammable gas

  20. Analysis of Volatile Components of Adenosma indianum (Lour. Merr. by Steam Distillation and Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Adenosma indianum (Lour. Merr. plays an important role in its antibacterial and antiphlogistic activities. In this work, the volatile components were extracted by steam distillation (SD and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. A total of 49 volatile components were identified by GC-MS, and the major volatile components were α-limonene (20.59–35.07%, fenchone (15.79–31.81%, α-caryophyllene (6.98–10.32%, β-caryophyllene (6.98–10.19%, and piperitenone oxide (1.96–11.63%. The comparison of the volatile components from A. indianum (Lour. Merr. grown in two regions of China was reported. Also, the comparison of the volatile components by SD and HS-SPME was discussed. The results showed that the major volatile components of A. indianum (Lour. Merr. from two regions of China were similar but varied with different extraction methods. These results were indicative of the suitability of HS-SPME method for simple, rapid, and solvent-free analysis of the volatile components of the medicinal plants.

  1. Microwave-assisted headspace single-drop microextration of chlorobenzenes from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Lorena [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Domini, Claudia E. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Grane, Nuria [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Psillakis, Elefteria [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, GR-73100 Chania, Crete (Greece); Canals, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: a.canals@ua.es

    2007-05-29

    A one-step and in-situ sample preparation method used for quantifying chlorobenzene compounds in water samples has been developed, coupling microwave and headspace single-drop microextraction (MW-HS-SDME). The chlorobenzenes in water samples were extracted directly onto an ionic liquid single-drop in headspace mode under the aid of microwave radiation. For optimization, a Plackett-Burman screening design was initially used, followed by a mixed-level factorial design. The factors considered were: drop volume, aqueous sample volume, stirring speed, ionic strength, extraction time, ionic liquid type, microwave power and length of the Y-shaped glass-tube. The optimum experimental conditions found from this statistical evaluation were: a 5 {mu}L microdrop of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate exposed for 20 min to the headspace of a 30 mL aqueous sample, irradiated by microwaves at 200 W and placed in a 50 mL spherical flask connected to a 25 cm Y-shaped glass-tube. Under the optimised experimental conditions, the response of a high performance liquid chromatographic system was found to be linear over the range studied and with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9995 and 0.9999. The method showed a good level of repeatability, with relative standard deviations varying between 2.3 and 8.3% (n = 5). Detection limits were found in the low {mu}g L{sup -1} range varying between 0.016 and 0.039 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Overall, the performance of the proposed method demonstrated the favourable effect of microwave sample irradiation upon HS-SDME. Finally, recovery studies from different types of environmental water samples revealed that matrix had little effect upon extraction.

  2. Microwave-assisted headspace single-drop microextration of chlorobenzenes from water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Lorena; Domini, Claudia E.; Grane, Nuria; Psillakis, Elefteria; Canals, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    A one-step and in-situ sample preparation method used for quantifying chlorobenzene compounds in water samples has been developed, coupling microwave and headspace single-drop microextraction (MW-HS-SDME). The chlorobenzenes in water samples were extracted directly onto an ionic liquid single-drop in headspace mode under the aid of microwave radiation. For optimization, a Plackett-Burman screening design was initially used, followed by a mixed-level factorial design. The factors considered were: drop volume, aqueous sample volume, stirring speed, ionic strength, extraction time, ionic liquid type, microwave power and length of the Y-shaped glass-tube. The optimum experimental conditions found from this statistical evaluation were: a 5 μL microdrop of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate exposed for 20 min to the headspace of a 30 mL aqueous sample, irradiated by microwaves at 200 W and placed in a 50 mL spherical flask connected to a 25 cm Y-shaped glass-tube. Under the optimised experimental conditions, the response of a high performance liquid chromatographic system was found to be linear over the range studied and with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9995 and 0.9999. The method showed a good level of repeatability, with relative standard deviations varying between 2.3 and 8.3% (n = 5). Detection limits were found in the low μg L -1 range varying between 0.016 and 0.039 μg L -1 . Overall, the performance of the proposed method demonstrated the favourable effect of microwave sample irradiation upon HS-SDME. Finally, recovery studies from different types of environmental water samples revealed that matrix had little effect upon extraction

  3. Magnetic headspace adsorptive extraction of chlorobenzenes prior to thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Lorena; Ahmadi, Mazaher; Fernández, Elena; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Canals, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new, user-friendly, cost-effective and portable headspace solid-phase extraction technique based on graphene oxide decorated with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles as sorbent, located on one end of a small neodymium magnet. Hence, the new headspace solid-phase extraction technique has been called Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction (Mag-HSAE). In order to assess Mag-HSAE technique applicability to model analytes, some chlorobenzenes were extracted from water samples prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. A multivariate approach was employed to optimize the experimental parameters affecting Mag-HSAE. The method was evaluated under optimized extraction conditions (i.e., sample volume, 20 mL; extraction time, 30 min; sorbent amount, 10 mg; stirring speed, 1500 rpm, and ionic strength, non-significant), obtaining a linear response from 0.5 to 100 ng L −1 for 1,3-DCB, 1,4-DCB, 1,2-DCB, 1,3,5-TCB, 1,2,4-TCB and 1,2,3-TCB; from 0.5 to 75 ng L −1 for 1,2,4,5-TeCB, and PeCB; and from 1 to 75 ng L −1 for 1,2,3,4-TeCB. The repeatability of the proposed method was evaluated at 10 ng L −1 and 50 ng L −1 spiking levels, and coefficients of variation ranged between 1.5 and 9.5% (n = 5). Limits of detection values were found between 93 and 301 pg L −1 . Finally, tap, mineral and effluent water were selected as real water samples to assess method applicability. Relative recoveries varied between 86 and 110% showing negligible matrix effects. - Highlights: • A new extraction technique named Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction is presented. • Graphene oxide/iron oxide composite deposited on a neodymiun magnet as sorbent. • Sorbent of low cost, rapid and simple synthesis, easy manipulation and portability options. • Fast and efficient extraction and sensitive determination of chlorobenzenes in water samples.

  4. Analysis of pollutants in air and water using gas chromatography and headspace gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The combination 'personal sampling' with headspace gas chromatography to determine traces of formaldehyde, phenol and benzene in air is investigated in this work, with the aim of developing maximum workplace concentration values (MWL values). Further possible applications of gas chromatography in trace analysis in the environmentally protected area. The analysis of chromium in waste waters (Cr III as acetyl acetonate complex) is investigated as further possible application, whereby optimum conditions are obtained. A modified flame ionization detector was used to increase the detection sensitivity.

  5. Determination of binding-dioxygen in dioxygen complexes by headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Feng, Shun; Li, Ya-ni; Wu, Meiying; Wang, Jide

    2008-06-06

    Dioxygen complexes play important roles in organisms' bodies, so the determination of binding-dioxygen has practical significance. A simple and robust method based on headspace gas chromatography was proposed to determine the binding-dioxygen in dioxygen complexes. By measuring the content change of nitrogen gas in a vial, the amount of oxygen released from dixoygen complexes can be determined. The method was validated using potassium chlorate as model sample, and the results exhibited good recoveries (90-99%) with the relative standard deviation less than 8%. It was also used to analyze dioxygen complex of cobalt bis(salicylaldehyde) ethylenediimine and polyamine cobalt complexes prepared by solid-phase reaction.

  6. Analysis of Furaneol in tomato using dynamic headspace sampling with sodium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, R G; Takeoka, G R; Naim, M; Rabinowitch, H; Nam, Y

    2001-09-01

    High-flow dynamic headspace sampling with excess anhydrous sodium sulfate was found to be an effective method of isolating Furaneol from fresh tomatoes. Quantitative analysis was carried out by gas chromatography using maltol as internal standard. Furaneol was found in the highest concentrations (660-1100 ppb) in the summer crop of home-grown tomatoes and in some of the greenhouse hydroponically grown tomatoes, which are ripened on the plant before being transported to the supermarkets. Furaneol was found in the lowest concentrations (38-180 ppb) in the common ethylene-ripened, field-grown, supermarket tomatoes.

  7. Magnetic headspace adsorptive extraction of chlorobenzenes prior to thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Lorena, E-mail: lorena.vidal@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences and University Institute of Materials, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain); Ahmadi, Mazaher [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fernández, Elena [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences and University Institute of Materials, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain); Madrakian, Tayyebeh [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Canals, Antonio, E-mail: a.canals@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences and University Institute of Materials, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2017-06-08

    This study presents a new, user-friendly, cost-effective and portable headspace solid-phase extraction technique based on graphene oxide decorated with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles as sorbent, located on one end of a small neodymium magnet. Hence, the new headspace solid-phase extraction technique has been called Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction (Mag-HSAE). In order to assess Mag-HSAE technique applicability to model analytes, some chlorobenzenes were extracted from water samples prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. A multivariate approach was employed to optimize the experimental parameters affecting Mag-HSAE. The method was evaluated under optimized extraction conditions (i.e., sample volume, 20 mL; extraction time, 30 min; sorbent amount, 10 mg; stirring speed, 1500 rpm, and ionic strength, non-significant), obtaining a linear response from 0.5 to 100 ng L{sup −1} for 1,3-DCB, 1,4-DCB, 1,2-DCB, 1,3,5-TCB, 1,2,4-TCB and 1,2,3-TCB; from 0.5 to 75 ng L{sup −1} for 1,2,4,5-TeCB, and PeCB; and from 1 to 75 ng L{sup −1} for 1,2,3,4-TeCB. The repeatability of the proposed method was evaluated at 10 ng L{sup −1} and 50 ng L{sup −1} spiking levels, and coefficients of variation ranged between 1.5 and 9.5% (n = 5). Limits of detection values were found between 93 and 301 pg L{sup −1}. Finally, tap, mineral and effluent water were selected as real water samples to assess method applicability. Relative recoveries varied between 86 and 110% showing negligible matrix effects. - Highlights: • A new extraction technique named Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction is presented. • Graphene oxide/iron oxide composite deposited on a neodymiun magnet as sorbent. • Sorbent of low cost, rapid and simple synthesis, easy manipulation and portability options. • Fast and efficient extraction and sensitive determination of chlorobenzenes in water samples.

  8. Headspace analysis gas-phase infrared spectroscopy: a study of xanthate decomposition on mineral surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, Andrew J.; Brienne, Stephane H. R.; Markwell, Ross D.; Butler, Ian S.; Finch, James A.

    1997-03-01

    The O-ethyldithiocarbonate (ethyl xanthate, CH 3CH 2OCS -2) anion is a widely used reagent in mineral processing for the separation of sulphide minerals by froth flotation. Ethyl xanthate interacts with mineral powders to produce a hydrophobic layer on the mineral surface. A novel infrared technique, headspace analysis gas-phase infrared spectroscopy (HAGIS) has been used to study the in situ thermal decomposition products of ethyl xanthate on mineral surfaces. These products include CS 2, COS, CO 2, CH 4, SO 2, and higher molecular weight alkyl-containing species. Decomposition pathways have been proposed with some information determined from 2H- and 13C-isotope labelling experiments.

  9. A volatile tracer-assisted headspace analytical technique for determining the swelling capacity of superabsorbent polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Jiang, Ran; Chai, Xin-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports on a new method for the determination of swelling capacity of superabsorbent polymers by a volatile tracer-assisted headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC). Toluene was used as a tracer and added to the solution for polymers swelling test. Based on the differences of the tracer partitioned between the vapor and hydrogel phase before and after the polymer's swelling capacity, a transition point (corresponding to the material swelling capacity) can be observed when plotting the GC signal of toluene vs. the ratio of solution added to polymers. The present method has good precision (RSDpolymers at the elevated temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of quantitative uncertainty in the safety analysis of flammable gas accidents in Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Following a 1990 investigation into flammable gas generation, retention, and release mechanisms within the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks, personnel concluded that the existing Authorization Basis documentation did not adequately evaluate flammable gas hazards. The US Department of Energy Headquarters subsequently declared the flammable gas hazard as an unresolved safety issue. Although work scope has been focused on resolution of the issue, it has yet to be resolved due to considerable uncertainty regarding essential technical parameters and associated risk. Resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue will include the identification of a set of controls for the Authorization Basis for the tanks which will require a safety analysis of flammable gas accidents. A traditional nuclear facility safety analysis is based primarily on the analysis of a set of bounding accidents to represent the risks of the possible accidents and hazardous conditions at a facility. While this approach may provide some indication of the bounding consequences of accidents for facilities, it does not provide a satisfactory basis for identification of facility risk or safety controls when there is considerable uncertainty associated with accident phenomena and/or data as is the case with potential flammable gas accidents at the Hanford Site. This is due to the difficulties in identifying the bounding case and reaching consensus among safety analysts, facility operations and engineering, and the regulator on the implications of the safety analysis results. In addition, the bounding cases are frequently based on simplifying assumptions that make the analysis results insensitive to variations among facilities or the impact of alternative safety control strategies. The existing safety analysis of flammable gas accidents for the Tank Waste Remediation system (TWRS) at the Hanford Site has these difficulties. However, Hanford Site personnel are developing a refined safety analysis approach

  11. Determination of 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol in polyamideamine epichlorohydrin resin solution by reaction-based headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Wan, Xiao-Fang; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Chen, Run-Quan

    2018-04-01

    We report on a headspace gas chromatographic method for determining the content of 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol in polyamideamine epichlorohydrin resin solution. It was based on quantitatively converting 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol to formaldehyde by periodate oxidation in a closed headspace sample vial at a room temperature for 10 min, and then to methanol by borohydride reduction at 90°C for 40 min followed by the headspace gas chromatographic measurement. The results showed that the present method has an excellent measurement precision (relative standard deviation < 2.60%) and accuracy (recoveries from 96.4-102%) in 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol analysis. The limit of quantitation was 0.031 mg/mL. It is simple and suitable for determining the 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol content in polyamideamine epichlorohydrin resin solution. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  13. Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks

  14. Comparison and evaluation of methods for the determination of flammability limits, applied to methane/hydrogen/air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoor, F. van den; Hermanns, R.T.E.; Oijen, J.A. van; Verplaetsen, F.; Goey, L.P.H. de

    2008-01-01

    Different methods, both experimental and numerical, to determine the flammability limits are compared and evaluated, exemplified by a determination of the flammability limits of methane/hydrogen/air mixtures for hydrogen fuel molar fractions of 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6, at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. Two different experimental methods are used. The first method uses a glass tube with visual observation of the flame, whereas the second method uses a closed spherical vessel with a pressure rise criterion to determine whether flame propagation has occurred. In addition to these experiments, the flammability limits are determined numerically. Unsteady planar and spherically expanding flames are calculated with a one-dimensional flame code with the inclusion of radiation heat loss in the optically thin limit. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of the planar flame calculations shows large differences, especially for lean mixtures. These differences increase with increasing hydrogen content in the fuel. Better agreement with the experimental results is found for the spherically expanding flame calculations. A limiting burning velocity of 5 cm/s is found to predict the upper flammability limit determined with the tube method very well, whereas the limiting flame temperature approach was found to give poorer agreement. Further analysis indicates that the neglect of flame front instabilities is the probable cause of the large differences between experimental and numerical results at the lower flammability limit

  15. Group-Contribution based Property Estimation and Uncertainty analysis for Flammability-related Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Marcarie, Camille; Abildskov, Jens

    2016-01-01

    regression and outlier treatment have been applied to achieve high accuracy. Furthermore, linear error propagation based on covariance matrix of estimated parameters was performed. Therefore, every estimated property value of the flammability-related properties is reported together with its corresponding 95......%-confidence interval of the prediction. Compared to existing models the developed ones have a higher accuracy, are simple to apply and provide uncertainty information on the calculated prediction. The average relative error and correlation coefficient are 11.5% and 0.99 for LFL, 15.9% and 0.91 for UFL, 2...

  16. Resolve. Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    RESOLVE. Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations

  17. Modelling of hot surface ignition within gas turbines subject to flammable gas in the intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lea Duedahl; Nielsen, Kenny Krogh; Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Controlling risks associated with fires and explosions from leaks of flammable fluids at oil and gas facilities is paramount to ensuring safe operations. The gas turbine is a significant potential source of ignition; however, the residual risk is still not adequately understood. A model has been...... but decreases with increase in initial mixture temperature and pressure. The model shows a great potential in reliable prediction of the risk of hot surface ignition within gas turbines in the oil and gas industry. In the future, a dedicated experimental study will be performed not only to improve...

  18. ASTM Committee G-4 metals flammability test program - Data and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Homa, John M.; Williams, Ralph E.; Benz, Frank J.

    1988-01-01

    Results of metals flammability tests performed on twenty-six metals in the NASA/White Sands Test Facility are discussed together with the test systems. The promoted combustion and ignition characteristics of these metals are described, and the metals are ranked according to their suitability for use in oxygen systems. In general, alloys with high copper and nickel contents and low iron content were found to rank higher than those that had high iron content, while alloys that had high aluminum content were ranked the lowest.

  19. Laminar burning velocities of near-flammability-limit H{sub 2}-air-steam mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loesel Sitar, J V; Chan, C K; Torchia, F; Guerrero, A

    1996-12-31

    Laminar burning velocities of lean H{sub 2}-air-steam mixtures near the flammability limit were measured by using the pressure-time history of an expanding flame kernel. Although flames in these mixtures are inherently unstable, this difficulty was avoided by using the early pressure rise of the burn. A comparison of results from that method with burning velocities determined from schlieren photographs of the expanding flame kernel gave good agreement. Despite the difficulties, it is believed that the pressure trace method gives results that are useful in modelling reactor accident scenarios. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Laminar burning velocities of near-flammability-limit H2-air-steam mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesel Sitar, J.V.; Chan, C.K.; Torchia, F.; Guerrero, A.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar burning velocities of lean H 2 -air-steam mixtures near the flammability limit were measured by using the pressure-time history of an expanding flame kernel. Although flames in these mixtures are inherently unstable, this difficulty was avoided by using the early pressure rise of the burn. A comparison of results from that method with burning velocities determined from schlieren photographs of the expanding flame kernel gave good agreement. Despite the difficulties, it is believed that the pressure trace method gives results that are useful in modelling reactor accident scenarios. 8 refs., 4 figs

  1. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Korolchenko Dmitriy; Voevoda Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL) surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam...

  2. Uncertainty of Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC Results as Related to Instrumental Conditions: Optimization and Robustness of BAC Analysis Headspace Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleigh A. Boswell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of blood alcohol concentration is a routine analysis performed in many forensic laboratories. This analysis commonly utilizes static headspace sampling, followed by gas chromatography combined with flame ionization detection (GC-FID. Studies have shown several “optimal” methods for instrumental operating conditions, which are intended to yield accurate and precise data. Given that different instruments, sampling methods, application specific columns and parameters are often utilized, it is much less common to find information on the robustness of these reported conditions. A major problem can arise when these “optimal” conditions may not also be robust, thus producing data with higher than desired uncertainty or potentially inaccurate results. The goal of this research was to incorporate the principles of quality by design (QBD in the adjustment and determination of BAC (blood alcohol concentration instrumental headspace parameters, thereby ensuring that minor instrumental variations, which occur as a matter of normal work, do not appreciably affect the final results of this analysis. This study discusses both the QBD principles as well as the results of the experiments, which allow for determination of more favorable instrumental headspace conditions. Additionally, method detection limits will also be reported in order to determine a reporting threshold and the degree of uncertainty at the common threshold value of 0.08 g/dL. Furthermore, the comparison of two internal standards, n-propanol and t-butanol, will be investigated. The study showed that an altered parameter of 85 °C headspace oven temperature and 15 psi headspace vial pressurization produces the lowest percent relative standard deviation of 1.3% when t-butanol is implemented as an internal standard, at least for one very common platform. The study also showed that an altered parameter of 100 °C headspace oven temperature and 15-psi headspace vial pressurization

  3. Zero-Headspace Coal-Core Gas Desorption Canister, Revised Desorption Data Analysis Spreadsheets and a Dry Canister Heating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Charles E.; Dallegge, Todd A.

    2005-01-01

    Coal desorption techniques typically use the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) canister-desorption method as described by Diamond and Levine (1981), Close and Erwin (1989), Ryan and Dawson (1993), McLennan and others (1994), Mavor and Nelson (1997) and Diamond and Schatzel (1998). However, the coal desorption canister designs historically used with this method have an inherent flaw that allows a significant gas-filled headspace bubble to remain in the canister that later has to be compensated for by correcting the measured desorbed gas volume with a mathematical headspace volume correction (McLennan and others, 1994; Mavor and Nelson, 1997).

  4. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford waste tank 241-U-108: Results from samples collected on 8/29/95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Olsten, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-108 (Tank U-108) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in the report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC

  5. Determination of Porosity in Shale by Double Headspace Extraction GC Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Li, Teng-Fei; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Xiao, Xian-Ming; Barnes, Donald

    2015-11-03

    This paper reports on a novel method for the rapid determination of the shale porosity by double headspace extraction gas chromatography (DHE-GC). Ground core samples of shale were placed into headspace vials and DHE-GC measurements of released methane gas were performed at a given time interval. A linear correlation between shale porosity and the ratio of consecutive GC signals was established both theoretically and experimentally by comparing with the results from the standard helium pycnometry method. The results showed that (a) the porosity of ground core samples of shale can be measured within 30 min; (b) the new method is not significantly affected by particle size of the sample; (c) the uncertainties of measured porosities of nine shale samples by the present method range from 0.31 to 0.46 p.u.; and (d) the results obtained by the DHE-GC method are in a good agreement with those from the standard helium pycnometry method. In short, the new DHE-GC method is simple, rapid, and accurate, making it a valuable tool for shale gas-related research and applications.

  6. Vented spikes improve delivery from intravenous bags with no air headspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galush, William J; Horst, Travis A

    2015-07-01

    Flexible plastic bags are the container of choice for most intravenous (i.v.) infusions. Under certain circumstances, however, the air-liquid interface present in these i.v. bags can lead to physical instability of protein biopharmaceuticals, resulting in product aggregation. In principle, the air headspace present in the bags can be removed to increase drug stability, but experiments described here show that this can result in incomplete draining of solution from the bag using gravity delivery, or generation of negative pressure in the bag when an infusion pump is used. It is expected that these issues could lead to incomplete delivery of medication to patients or pump-related problems, respectively. However, here it is shown that contrary to the standard pharmacy practice of using nonvented spikes with i.v. bags, the use of vented spikes with i.v. bags that lack air headspace allows complete delivery of the dose solution without impacting the physical stability of a protein-based drug. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Grains colonised by moulds: fungal identification and headspace analysis of produced volatile metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paola Tampieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to verify if the headspace analysis of fungal volatile compounds produced by some species of Fusarium can be used as a marker of mould presence on maize. Eight samples of maize (four yellow maize from North Italy and four white maize from Hungary, naturally contaminated by Fusarium and positive for the presence of fumonisins, were analyzed to detect moisture content, Aw, volatile metabolites and an enumeration of viable moulds was performed by means of a colony count technique. Headspace samples were analysed using a gas-chromatograph equipped with a capillary column TR-WAX to detect volatile metabolites of moulds. Furthermore macro and microscopic examination of the colonies was performed in order to distinguish, according to their morphology, the genera of the prevalent present moulds. Prevalent mould of eight samples was Fusarium, but other fungi, like Aspergillus, Penicillum and Mucoraceae, were observed. The metabolites produced by F.graminearum and F. moniliforme were Isobutyl-acetate, 3-Methyl-1-butanol and, only at 8 days, 3-Octanone. The incubation time can affect off flavour production in consequence of the presence of other moulds. Further studies on maize samples under different conditions are needed in order to establish the presence of moulds using the count technique and through the identification of volatile compounds.

  8. Analysis of residual toluene in food packaging via headspace extraction method using gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ying Chin; Mohd Marsin Sanagi

    2008-01-01

    Polymeric materials are used in many food contact applications as packaging material. The presence of residual toluene in this food packaging material can migrate into food and thus affect the quality of food. In this study, a manual headspace analysis was successfully designed and developed. The determination of residual toluene was carried out with standard addition method and multiple headspace extraction, MHE) method using gas chromatography-flame ionization detector, GC-FID). Identification of toluene was performed by comparison of its retention time with standard toluene and GC-MS. It was found that the suitable heating temperature was 180 degree Celsius with an optimum heating time of 10 minutes. The study also found that the concentration of residual toluene in multicolored sample was higher compared to mono colored sample whereas residual toluene in sample analyzed using standard addition method was higher compared to MHE method. However, comparison with the results obtained from De Paris laboratory, France found that MHE method gave higher accuracy for sample with low analyte concentration. On the other hand, lower accuracy was obtained for sample with high concentration of residual toluene due to systematic errors. Comparison between determination methods showed that MHE method is more precise compared to standard addition method. (author)

  9. Headspace single-drop microextraction coupled to microvolume UV-vis spectrophotometry for iodine determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Headspace single-drop microextraction has been combined with microvolume UV-vis spectrophotometry for iodine determination. Matrix separation and preconcentration of iodide following in situ volatile iodine generation and extraction into a microdrop of N,N'-dimethylformamide is performed. An exhaustive characterization of the microextraction system and the experimental variables affecting iodine generation from iodide was carried out. The procedure employed consisted of exposing 2.5 μL of N,N'-dimethylformamide to the headspace of a 10 mL acidic (H 2 SO 4 2 mol L -1 ) aqueous solution containing 1.7 mol L -1 Na 2 SO 4 for 7 min. Addition of 1 mL of H 2 O 2 1 mol L -1 for in situ iodine generation was performed. The limit of detection was determined as 0.69 μg L -1 . The repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation, was 4.7% (n = 6). The calibration working range was from 5 to 200 μg L -1 (r 2 = 0.9991). The large preconcentration factor obtained, ca. 623 in only 7 min, compensate for the 10-fold loss in sensitivity caused by the decreased optical path, which results in improved detection limits as compared to spectrophotometric measurements carried out with conventional sample cells. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iodine in water, pharmaceutical and food samples

  10. Australian young people's awareness of headspace, beyondblue and other mental health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Anthony F

    2009-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to assess young people's awareness of mental health organizations supporting their age group. Of particular interest was awareness of headspace, which was created in 2006 to provide youth-oriented mental health services, and of beyondblue, which aims to raise community awareness of depression, anxiety and related disorders. Method: A telephone survey was carried out on a national sample of young people who were part of a 2-year follow-up study of youth mental health literacy. Data were analysed for those aged 13-25 years. Results: Awareness was highest for beyondblue and telephone helplines; headspace had established some awareness, particularly in areas where its services operate. However, awareness was unrelated to the participant's psychological symptoms in the past year. Conclusions: If youth-oriented services are to be successful, young people need to know about them. Awareness campaigns need to be targeted at the sub-group who have greatest need for these services, namely those with mental health problems.

  11. Volatile Hydrocarbon Analysis in Blood by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction: The Interpretation of VHC Patterns in Fire-Related Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian; Hara, Kenji; Ikematsu, Natsuki; Takayama, Mio; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Matsusue, Aya; Kubo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-05-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) technique was used to quantitate the concentration of volatile hydrocarbons from the blood of cadavers by cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. A total of 24 compounds including aromatic and aliphatic volatile hydrocarbons were analyzed by this method. The analytes in the headspace of 0.1 g of blood mixed with 1.0 mL of distilled water plus 1 µL of an internal standard solution were adsorbed onto a 100-µm polydimethylsiloxane fiber at 0°C for 15 min, and measured using a GC-MS full scan method. The limit of quantitation for the analytes ranged from 6.8 to 10 ng per 1 g of blood. This method was applied to actual autopsy cases to quantitate the level of volatile hydrocarbons (VHCs) in the blood of cadavers who died in fire-related incidents. The patterns of the VHCs revealed the presence or absence of accelerants. Petroleum-based fuels such as gasoline and kerosene were differentiated. The detection of C8-C13 aliphatic hydrocarbons indicated the presence of kerosene; the detection of C3 alkylbenzenes in the absence of C8-C13 aliphatic hydrocarbons was indicative of gasoline; and elevated levels of styrene or benzene in the absence of C3/C4 alkylbenzenes and aliphatic hydrocarbons indicated a normal construction fire. This sensitive HS-SPME method could help aid the investigation of fire-related deaths by providing a simple pattern to use for the interpretation of VHCs in human blood. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Methods of Off-Gas Flammability Control for DWPF Melter Off-Gas System at Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A.S.; Iverson, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Several key operating variables affecting off-gas flammability in a slurry-fed radioactive waste glass melter are discussed, and the methods used to prevent potential off-gas flammability are presented. Two models have played a central role in developing such methods. The first model attempts to describe the chemical events occurring during the calcining and melting steps using a multistage thermodynamic equilibrium approach, and it calculates the compositions of glass and calcine gases. Volatile feed components and calcine gases are fed to the second model which then predicts the process dynamics of the entire melter off-gas system including off-gas flammability under both steady state and various transient operating conditions. Results of recent simulation runs are also compared with available data

  13. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  14. Tests of Flammability of Cotton Fabrics and Expected Skin Burns in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jane M.; Torvi, David A.; Gabriel, Kamiel S.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    During a shuttle launch and other portions of space flight, astronauts wear specialized flame resistant clothing. However during most of their missions on board the Space Shuttle or International Space Station, astronauts wear ordinary clothing, such as cotton shirts and pants. As the behaviour of flames is considerably different in microgravity than under earth s gravity, fabrics are expected to burn in a different fashion in microgravity than when tested on earth. There is interest in determining how this change in burning behaviour may affect times to second and third degree burn of human skin, and how the results of standard fabric flammability tests conducted under earth s gravity correlate with the expected fire behaviour of textiles in microgravity. A new experimental apparatus was developed to fit into the Spacecraft Fire Safety Facility (SFSF), which is used on NASA s KC-135 low gravity aircraft. The new apparatus was designed to be similar to the apparatus used in standard vertical flammability tests of fabrics. However, rather than using a laboratory burner, the apparatus uses a hot wire system to ignite 200 mm high by 80 mm wide fabric specimens. Fabric temperatures are measured using thermocouples and/or an infrared imaging system, while flame spread rates are measured using real time observations or video. Heat flux gauges are placed between 7 and 13 mm away from the fabric specimen, so that heat fluxes from the burning fabric to the skin can be estimated, along with predicted times required to produce skin burns.

  15. An approximate-reasoning-based method for screening high-level waste tanks for flammable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at Hanford have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop an improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. AR models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. The authors performed a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening. They found that the effort to implement such a model was acceptable and that computational requirements were reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts

  16. Operability test report for core sample truck number one flammable gas modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report primarily consists of the original test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to Core Sample Truck No. One. Included are exceptions, resolutions, comments, and test results. This report consists of the original, completed, test procedure used for the Operability Testing of the flammable gas modifications to the Push Mode Core Sample Truck No. 1. Prior to the Acceptance/Operability test the truck No. 1 operations procedure (TO-080-503) was revised to be more consistent with the other core sample truck procedures and to include operational steps/instructions for the SR weather cover pressurization system. A draft copy of the operations procedure was used to perform the Operability Test Procedure (OTP). A Document Acceptance Review Form is included with this report (last page) indicating the draft status of the operations procedure during the OTP. During the OTP 11 test exceptions were encountered. Of these exceptions four were determined to affect Acceptance Criteria as listed in the OTP, Section 4.7 ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

  17. An approximate reasoning-based method for screening high-level-waste tanks for flammable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at the Hanford site have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop and improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. Approximate-reasoning models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. In a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening, the effort to implement such a model was found to be acceptable, and computational requirements were found to be reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts

  18. An Approximate Reasoning-Based Method for Screening High-Level-Waste Tanks for Flammable Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhawer, Stephen W.; Bott, Terry F.; Smith, Ronald E.

    2000-01-01

    The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at the Hanford site have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop an improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. Approximate-reasoning models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. In a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening, the effort to implement such a model was found to be acceptable, and computational requirements were found to be reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts

  19. Effect of Meltable Triazine-DOPO Additive on Rheological, Mechanical, and Flammability Properties of PA6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Butnaru

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Through a straightforward approach, a new meltable, halogen-free, nitrogen-phosphorus-based flame retardant (FR, 6-(2-(4,6-diamino-1,3,5-triazin-2-ylethyl dibenzo[c,e][1,2]oxaphosphinine 6-oxide (DTE-DOPO was synthesized and incorporated in polyamide 6 (PA6. It was proved that a very low phosphorus content of 1.46 wt% for DTE-DOPO additive improved the flame retardancy of PA6, leading to a non-flammable material. The performance of the new additive was compared to that of the commercially-available Exolit® OP 1230. The PA6 formulations were evaluated by measuring the rheological, mechanical, and flammability behavior. Using compounding by melt extrusion, 17 wt% additives was introduced into PA6 matrix and the corresponding formulations were characterized. The results evidenced a higher homogeneity of DTE-DOPO with PA6, a high thermal stability with a catalyzing decomposition effect on PA6 caused by the presence of the new developed FR, enhanced elasticity for the PA6/DTE-DOPO formulation and a V0 rating for both formulations. Thermal and fire analysis indicated a primary gas-phase activity, combined with a complete suppression of the self-sustained burning for the PA6/DTE-DOPO formulation.

  20. Estimation of the lower flammability limit of organic compounds as a function of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J R; Rowley, R L; Wilding, W V

    2011-02-15

    A new method of estimating the lower flammability limit (LFL) of general organic compounds is presented. The LFL is predicted at 298 K for gases and the lower temperature limit for solids and liquids from structural contributions and the ideal gas heat of formation of the fuel. The average absolute deviation from more than 500 experimental data points is 10.7%. In a previous study, the widely used modified Burgess-Wheeler law was shown to underestimate the effect of temperature on the lower flammability limit when determined in a large-diameter vessel. An improved version of the modified Burgess-Wheeler law is presented that represents the temperature dependence of LFL data determined in large-diameter vessels more accurately. When the LFL is estimated at increased temperatures using a combination of this model and the proposed structural-contribution method, an average absolute deviation of 3.3% is returned when compared with 65 data points for 17 organic compounds determined in an ASHRAE-style apparatus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. An approximate reasoning-based method for screening high-level-waste tanks for flammable gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Smith, R.E.

    2000-06-01

    The in situ retention of flammable gas produced by radiolysis and thermal decomposition in high-level waste can pose a safety problem if the gases are released episodically into the dome space of a storage tank. Screening efforts at the Hanford site have been directed at identifying tanks in which this situation could exist. Problems encountered in screening motivated an effort to develop and improved screening methodology. Approximate reasoning (AR) is a formalism designed to emulate the kinds of complex judgments made by subject matter experts. It uses inductive logic structures to build a sequence of forward-chaining inferences about a subject. Approximate-reasoning models incorporate natural language expressions known as linguistic variables to represent evidence. The use of fuzzy sets to represent these variables mathematically makes it practical to evaluate quantitative and qualitative information consistently. In a pilot study to investigate the utility of AR for flammable gas screening, the effort to implement such a model was found to be acceptable, and computational requirements were found to be reasonable. The preliminary results showed that important judgments about the validity of observational data and the predictive power of models could be made. These results give new insights into the problems observed in previous screening efforts.

  2. Design review report for rotary mode core sample truck (RMCST) modifications for flammable gas tanks, preliminary design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the completion of a preliminary design review for the Rotary Mode Core Sample Truck (RMCST) modifications for flammable gas tanks. The RMCST modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to validate basic design assumptions and concepts to support a path forward leading to a final design. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that the design was acceptable and efforts should continue toward a final design review

  3. Using a rainforest-flame forest mosaic to test the hypothesis that leaf and litter fuel flammability is under natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Peter J; Prior, Lynda D; French, Ben J; Vincent, Ben; Knox, Kirsten J E; Bowman, David M J S

    2014-12-01

    We used a mosaic of infrequently burnt temperate rainforest and adjacent, frequently burnt eucalypt forests in temperate eastern Australia to test whether: (1) there were differences in flammability of fresh and dried foliage amongst congeners from contrasting habitats, (2) habitat flammability was related to regeneration strategy, (3) litter fuels were more flammable in frequently burnt forests, (4) the severity of a recent fire influenced the flammability of litter (as this would suggest fire feedbacks), and (5) microclimate contributed to differences in fire hazard amongst habitats. Leaf-level comparisons were made among 11 congeneric pairs from rainforest and eucalypt forests. Leaf-level ignitability, combustibility and sustainability were not consistently higher for taxa from frequently burnt eucalypt forests, nor were they higher for species with fire-driven recruitment. The bulk density of litter-bed fuels strongly influenced flammability, but eucalypt forest litter was not less dense than rainforest litter. Ignitability, combustibility and flame sustainability of community surface fuels (litter) were compared using fuel arrays with standardized fuel mass and moisture content. Forests previously burned at high fire severity did not have consistently higher litter flammability than those burned at lower severity or long unburned. Thus, contrary to the Mutch hypothesis, there was no evidence of higher flammability of litter fuels or leaves from frequently burnt eucalypt forests compared with infrequently burnt rainforests. We suggest the manifest pyrogenicity of eucalypt forests is not due to natural selection for more flammable foliage, but better explained by differences in crown openness and associated microclimatic differences.

  4. Total algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tel, G.

    We define the notion of total algorithms for networks of processes. A total algorithm enforces that a "decision" is taken by a subset of the processes, and that participation of all processes is required to reach this decision. Total algorithms are an important building block in the design of

  5. Bromination of Aromatic Compounds by Residual Bromide in Sodium Chloride Matrix Modifier Salt During Heated Headspace GC/MS Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analytical artifacts attributed to the bromination of toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes were found during the heated headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of aqueous samples. The aqueous samples were produced from Fenton-like chemical oxidation rea...

  6. Tank 241-TY-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994 and April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  7. Application of head-space solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of volatile metabolites emitted by Penicillium species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Torben; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Montanarella, Luca

    1996-01-01

    Head-space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) has been used to collect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fungi of the genus Penicillium. Gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was employed for the analysis of the profiles of volatile metabolites characteristic...

  8. Comparative analysis of the vapor headspace of military-grade TNT versus NESTT TNT under dynamic and static conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Cindy C.; Gibb, Julie; Wasserzug, Louis S.

    1998-09-01

    The Institute for Biological Detection Systems (IBDS) has developed a quantitative vapor delivery system that can aid in characterizing dog's sensitivity and ability to recognize odor signatures for explosives and contraband substances. Determining of the dog's odor signature for detection of explosives is important because it may aid in eliminating the risk of handling explosives and reducing cross-contamination. Progress is being made in the development of training aids that represent the headspace of the explosives. NESTTTM TNT materials have been proposed as an approach to developing training aid simulates. In order for such aids to be effective they must mimic the headspace of the target material. This study evaluates the NESTTTM TNT product with regard to this criterion. NESTTTM TNT vapor was generated by the IBDS vapor delivery system, which incorporates a vapor generation cell that enables the user to control the conditions under which a substance is tested. The NESTTTM TNT vapor was compared to the headspace of military-grade TNT. The findings identify and quantify major vapor constituents of military-grade TNT and NESTTTM TNT. A comparative analysis evaluated the degree to which the NESTTTM TNT mimics the headspace of an actual TNT sample.

  9. Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in September 1994 and December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  10. Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in July 1993 and August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  11. Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994 and October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  12. Tank 241-BY-104 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in April 1994 and June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  13. Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and July 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  14. Tank 241-C-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in June 1994 and August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  15. Tank 241-BY-103 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  16. Tank 241-C-109 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  17. Tank 241-C-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1993 and September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  18. Tank 241-BY-108 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in March 1994 and October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  19. Tank 241-BY-110 Headspace Gas and Vapor Characterization Results for Samples Collected in November 1994. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  20. Tank 241-C-105 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in February 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  1. Tank 241-BY-111 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in May 1994 and November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  2. Tank 241-TY-101 headspace gas and vapor characterization results for samples collected in August 1994 and April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  3. A Method for Assessing Material Flammability for Micro-Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, T.; Olenick, S. M.; Sifuentes, A.; Long, R. T.; Torero, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    On a spacecraft, one of the greatest fears during a mission is the outbreak of a fire. Since spacecraft are enclosed spaces and depend highly on technical electronics, a small fire could cause a large amount of damage. NASA uses upward flame spread as a "worst case scenario" evaluation for materials and the Heat and Visible Smoke Release Rates Test to assess the damage potential of a fire. Details of these tests and the protocols followed are provided by the "Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion" document. As pointed by Ohlemiller and Villa, the upward flame spread test does not address the effect of external radiation on ignition and spread. External radiation, as that coming from an overheated electrical component, is a plausible fire scenario in a space facility and could result in a reversal of the flammability rankings derived from the upward flame spread test. The "Upward Flame Propagation Test" has been the subject of strong criticism in the last few years. In many cases, theoretical exercises and experimental results have demonstrated the possibility of a reversal in the material flammability rankings from normal to micro-gravity. Furthermore, the need to incorporate information on the effects of external radiation and opposed flame spread when ranking materials based on their potential to burn in micro-gravity has been emphasized. Experiments conducted in a 2.2 second drop tower with an ethane burner in an air cross flow have emphasized that burning at the trailing edge is deterred in micro-gravity due to the decreased oxygen transport. For very low air flow velocities (U0.01 m/s). Only for U>0.l m/s extinction is observed at the leading edge (blow-off). Three dimensional numerical calculations performed for thin cellulose centrally ignited with an axisymmetric source have shown that under the presence of a forced flow slower than 0.035 m/s flames spreads

  4. Headspace screening: A novel approach for fast quality assessment of the essential oil from culinary sage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovikj, Ivana; Stefkov, Gjoshe; Acevska, Jelena; Karapandzova, Marija; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Kulevanova, Svetlana

    2016-07-01

    Quality assessment of essential oil (EO) from culinary sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is limited by the long pharmacopoeial procedure. The aim of this study was to employ headspace (HS) sampling in the quality assessment of sage EO. Different populations (30) of culinary sage were assessed using GC/FID/MS analysis of the hydrodistilled EO (pharmacopoeial method) and HS sampling directly from leaves. Compound profiles from both procedures were evaluated according to ISO 9909 and GDC standards for sage EO quality, revealing compliance for only 10 populations. Factors to convert HS values, for the target ISO and GDC components, into theoretical EO values were calculated. Statistical analysis revealed a significant relationship between HS and EO values for seven target components. Consequently, HS sampling could be used as a complementary extraction technique for rapid screening in quality assessment of sage EOs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. (Vapour + liquid) equilibria of ternary systems with ionic liquids using headspace gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtarani, Babak; Gmehling, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data for the ternary systems (hexane + benzene), (hexane + cyclohexane), (benzene + cyclohexane), and (ethanol + water) with an ionic liquid as entrainer for extractive distillation were measured by headspace gas chromatography. As ionic liquids, 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide [HMIM][BTI], 1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide [OMIM][BTI], 1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium trifluoro-methanesulfonate [OMIM][OTF], and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium trifluoro-methanesulfonate [BMIM][OTF] were used. The experimental data show that the ionic liquids investigated have a great influence on the separation factors of the systems (hexane + benzene), (hexane + cyclohexane), and (benzene + cyclohexane). The experimental data were compared with the predicted results using mod. UNIFAC (Do). The predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Headspace Solid Phase Micro Extraction Gas Chromatographic Determination of Fenthion in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriaki Machera

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective analytical procedure was developed for the determination of fenthion residues in human serum samples. The sample treatment was performed using the headspace solid-phase micro extraction with polyacrylate fiber, which has the advantage to require low amount of serum (1 mL without tedious pre-treatment. The quantification of fenthion was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the recoveries ranged from 79 to 104% at two spiking levels for 6 replicates. Detection and quantification limits were calculated as 1.51 and 4.54 ng/mL of serum respectively. Two fenthion metabolites − fenoxon and fenthion–sulfoxide − were also identified.

  7. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness.

  8. (Vapour + liquid) equilibria of ternary systems with ionic liquids using headspace gas chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtarani, Babak [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center of Iran, P.O. Box 14335-186, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gmehling, Juergen, E-mail: gmehling@tech.chem.uni-oldenburg.d [Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg, Technische Chemie, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) data for the ternary systems (hexane + benzene), (hexane + cyclohexane), (benzene + cyclohexane), and (ethanol + water) with an ionic liquid as entrainer for extractive distillation were measured by headspace gas chromatography. As ionic liquids, 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide [HMIM][BTI], 1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide [OMIM][BTI], 1-octyl-3-methyl-imidazolium trifluoro-methanesulfonate [OMIM][OTF], and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium trifluoro-methanesulfonate [BMIM][OTF] were used. The experimental data show that the ionic liquids investigated have a great influence on the separation factors of the systems (hexane + benzene), (hexane + cyclohexane), and (benzene + cyclohexane). The experimental data were compared with the predicted results using mod. UNIFAC (Do). The predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Headspace solid-phase microextraction procedures for gas chromatographic analysis of biological fluids and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, G A; Walker, V

    2000-12-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a new solventless sample preparation technique that is finding wide usage. This review provides updated information on headspace SPME with gas chromatographic separation for the extraction and measurement of volatile and semivolatile analytes in biological fluids and materials. Firstly the background to the technique is given in terms of apparatus, fibres used, extraction conditions and derivatisation procedures. Then the different matrices, urine, blood, faeces, breast milk, hair, breath and saliva are considered separately. For each, methods appropriate for the analysis of drugs and metabolites, solvents and chemicals, anaesthetics, pesticides, organometallics and endogenous compounds are reviewed and the main experimental conditions outlined with specific examples. Then finally, the future potential of SPME for the analysis of biological samples in terms of the development of new devices and fibre chemistries and its coupling with high-performance liquid chromatography is discussed.

  10. Analysis of Volatile Compounds from Solanumbetaceum Cav. Fruits from Panama by Head-Space Micro Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando A. Durant

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of the volatile compounds of two varieties of Solanum betaceum Cav. by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry ( GC-MS i s presented. The HS-SPME method for extraction of the volatiles compounds was optimized by using a 2 3 central composite design. Maximum extraction of volatile compounds was achieved by using a divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber, extraction temperature 76° C, incubation time 44 min, and extraction time of 46 min. The main types of compounds detected in both varieties are terpenoids, followed by aromatics, esters, and aldehydes. Golden-yellow cultivars contained higher levels of esters and terpenes, while the reddish-purple variety contained a significant amount of aromatic compounds. The data structure of the chemical information obtained as well as the relationship between variables was evaluated by means of principal component analysis and cluster analysis.

  11. 16 CFR 1500.43 - Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials by Tagliabue open-cup apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... flammable materials by Tagliabue open-cup apparatus. 1500.43 Section 1500.43 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... horizontal plane above the liquid may be used, as follows: (1) Guide wire, 3/32-inch in diameter and 31/2... the thermometer, and in a plane 1/8-inch above the upper edge of the cup. The taper should be kept in...

  12. 75 FR 5578 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request-Flammability Standards for Clothing Textiles and Vinyl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... Standards for Clothing Textiles and Vinyl Plastic Film AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), the Consumer... Commission's flammability standards for clothing textiles and vinyl plastic film. DATES: Written comments on...

  13. Report on the handling of safety information concerning flammable gases and ferrocyanide at the Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses concerns safety issues, and management at Hanford Tank Farm. Concerns center on the issue of flammable gas generation which could ignite, and on possible exothermic reactions of ferrocyanide compounds which were added to single shell tanks in the 1950's. It is believed that information concerning these issues has been mis-handled and the problems poorly managed

  14. 14 CFR 25.1182 - Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine pod attaching structures containing flammable fluid...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nacelle areas behind firewalls, and engine...: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 25.1182 Nacelle areas behind firewalls... immediately behind the firewall, and each portion of any engine pod attaching structure containing flammable...

  15. Report on the handling of safety information concerning flammable gases and ferrocyanide at the Hanford waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses concerns safety issues, and management at Hanford Tank Farm. Concerns center on the issue of flammable gas generation which could ignite, and on possible exothermic reactions of ferrocyanide compounds which were added to single shell tanks in the 1950's. It is believed that information concerning these issues has been mis-handled and the problems poorly managed. (CBS)

  16. Mass loss and flammability of insulation materials used in sandwich panels during the pre-flashover phase of fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giunta d'Albani, A.W.; de Kluiver, L.L.; de Korte, A.C.J.; van Herpen, R.; Weewer, R.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, buildings contain more and more synthetic insulation materials in order to meet the increasing energy-performance demands. These synthetic insulation materials have a different response to fire. In this study, the mass loss and flammability limits of different sandwich panels and their

  17. Multiple headspace-solid-phase microextraction: An application to quantification of mushroom volatiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Rosaria; Tedone, Laura; De Grazia, Selenia [Dipartimento Farmaco-chimico, University of Messina, viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina (Italy); Dugo, Paola [Dipartimento Farmaco-chimico, University of Messina, viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina (Italy); Centro Integrato di Ricerca (C.I.R.), Università Campus-Biomedico, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Roma (Italy); Mondello, Luigi, E-mail: lmondello@unime.it [Dipartimento Farmaco-chimico, University of Messina, viale Annunziata, 98168 Messina (Italy); Centro Integrato di Ricerca (C.I.R.), Università Campus-Biomedico, Via Álvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Roma (Italy)

    2013-04-03

    Highlights: ► Multiple headspace extraction-solid phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) has been applied to the analysis of Agaricus bisporus. ► Mushroom flavor is characterized by the presence of compounds with a 8-carbon atoms skeleton. ► Formation of 8-carbon compounds involves a unique fungal biochemical pathway. ► The MHS-SPME allowed to determine quantitatively 5 target analytes of A. bisporus for the first time. -- Abstract: Multiple headspace-solid phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and flame ionization detection (GC–FID) was applied to the identification and quantification of volatiles released by the mushroom Agaricus bisporus, also known as champignon. MHS-SPME allows to perform quantitative analysis of volatiles from solid matrices, free of matrix interferences. Samples analyzed were fresh mushrooms (chopped and homogenized) and mushroom-containing food dressings. 1-Octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, 3-octanone, 1-octen-3-one and benzaldehyde were common constituents of the samples analyzed. Method performance has been tested through the evaluation of limit of detection (LoD, range 0.033–0.078 ng), limit of quantification (LoQ, range 0.111–0.259 ng) and analyte recovery (92.3–108.5%). The results obtained showed quantitative differences among the samples, which can be attributed to critical factors, such as the degree of cell damage upon sample preparation, that are here discussed. Considerations on the mushrooms biochemistry and on the basic principles of MHS analysis are also presented.

  18. Measurement of activity coefficients of mixtures by head-space gas chromatography: general procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Patricia; Wouters, Christine; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Sandler, Stanley I

    2013-08-09

    Head-space gas chromatography (HS-GC) is an applicable method to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements and determine activity coefficients. However, the reproducibility of the data may be conditioned by the experimental procedure concerning to the automated pressure-balanced system. The study developed in this work shows that a minimum volume of liquid in the vial is necessary to ensure the reliability of the activity coefficients since it may become a parameter that influences the magnitude of the peak areas: the helium introduced during the pressurization step may produce significant variations of the results when too small volume of liquid is selected. The minimum volume required should thus be evaluated prior to obtain experimentally the concentration in the vapor phase and the activity coefficients. In this work, the mixture acetonitrile-toluene is taken as example, requiring a sample volume of more than 5mL (about more than 25% of the vial volume). The vapor-liquid equilibrium and activity coefficients of mixtures at different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 molar fraction) and four temperatures (35, 45, 55 and 70°C) have been determined. Relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 5% have been obtained, indicating the good reproducibility of the method when a sample volume larger than 5mL is used. Finally, a general procedure to measure activity coefficients by means of pressure-balanced head-space gas chromatography is proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic comparison of static and dynamic headspace sampling techniques for gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Andreas; Jochmann, Maik A; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-09-01

    Six automated, headspace-based sample preparation techniques were used to extract volatile analytes from water with the goal of establishing a systematic comparison between commonly available instrumental alternatives. To that end, these six techniques were used in conjunction with the same gas chromatography instrument for analysis of a common set of volatile organic carbon (VOC) analytes. The methods were thereby divided into three classes: static sampling (by syringe or loop), static enrichment (SPME and PAL SPME Arrow), and dynamic enrichment (ITEX and trap sampling). For PAL SPME Arrow, different sorption phase materials were also included in the evaluation. To enable an effective comparison, method detection limits (MDLs), relative standard deviations (RSDs), and extraction yields were determined and are discussed for all techniques. While static sampling techniques exhibited sufficient extraction yields (approx. 10-20 %) to be reliably used down to approx. 100 ng L(-1), enrichment techniques displayed extraction yields of up to 80 %, resulting in MDLs down to the picogram per liter range. RSDs for all techniques were below 27 %. The choice on one of the different instrumental modes of operation (aforementioned classes) was thereby the most influential parameter in terms of extraction yields and MDLs. Individual methods inside each class showed smaller deviations, and the least influences were observed when evaluating different sorption phase materials for the individual enrichment techniques. The option of selecting specialized sorption phase materials may, however, be more important when analyzing analytes with different properties such as high polarity or the capability of specific molecular interactions. Graphical Abstract PAL SPME Arrow during the extraction of volatile analytes from the headspace of an aqueous sample.

  20. Multiple headspace-solid-phase microextraction: An application to quantification of mushroom volatiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Rosaria; Tedone, Laura; De Grazia, Selenia; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Multiple headspace extraction-solid phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) has been applied to the analysis of Agaricus bisporus. ► Mushroom flavor is characterized by the presence of compounds with a 8-carbon atoms skeleton. ► Formation of 8-carbon compounds involves a unique fungal biochemical pathway. ► The MHS-SPME allowed to determine quantitatively 5 target analytes of A. bisporus for the first time. -- Abstract: Multiple headspace-solid phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and flame ionization detection (GC–FID) was applied to the identification and quantification of volatiles released by the mushroom Agaricus bisporus, also known as champignon. MHS-SPME allows to perform quantitative analysis of volatiles from solid matrices, free of matrix interferences. Samples analyzed were fresh mushrooms (chopped and homogenized) and mushroom-containing food dressings. 1-Octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, 3-octanone, 1-octen-3-one and benzaldehyde were common constituents of the samples analyzed. Method performance has been tested through the evaluation of limit of detection (LoD, range 0.033–0.078 ng), limit of quantification (LoQ, range 0.111–0.259 ng) and analyte recovery (92.3–108.5%). The results obtained showed quantitative differences among the samples, which can be attributed to critical factors, such as the degree of cell damage upon sample preparation, that are here discussed. Considerations on the mushrooms biochemistry and on the basic principles of MHS analysis are also presented

  1. Determination of dissolved methane in natural waters using headspace analysis with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Hannah M.; Shiller, Alan M., E-mail: alan.shiller@usm.edu

    2015-01-26

    Highlights: • A method for determining low nanomolar dissolved CH{sub 4} was developed. • The methane detection utilizes cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). • Use of CRDS requires less time, materials and labor than typical of GC analysis. • Relative standard deviations of ∼4% were achieved at low nM CH{sub 4}. • Applications to seawater and river water are presented. - Abstract: Methane (CH{sub 4}) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) but is vastly understudied in comparison to carbon dioxide. Sources and sinks to the atmosphere vary considerably in estimation, including sources such as fresh and marine water systems. A new method to determine dissolved methane concentrations in discrete water samples has been evaluated. By analyzing an equilibrated headspace using laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), low nanomolar dissolved methane concentrations can be determined with high reproducibility (i.e., 0.13 nM detection limit and typical 4% RSD). While CRDS instruments cost roughly twice that of gas chromatographs (GC) usually used for methane determination, the process presented herein is substantially simpler, faster, and requires fewer materials than GC methods. Typically, 70-mL water samples are equilibrated with an equivalent amount of zero air in plastic syringes. The equilibrated headspace is transferred to a clean, dry syringe and then drawn into a Picarro G2301 CRDS analyzer via the instrument’s pump. We demonstrate that this instrument holds a linear calibration into the sub-ppmv methane concentration range and holds a stable calibration for at least two years. Application of the method to shipboard dissolved methane determination in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as river water is shown. Concentrations spanning nearly six orders of magnitude have been determined with this method.

  2. Totally James

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with James Howe, author of "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe". In this interview, Howe discusses tolerance, diversity and the parallels between his own life and his literature. Howe's four books in addition to "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe" and his list of recommended books with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  3. Experimental Studies on the Flammability and Fire Hazards of Photovoltaic Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Yun; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Li-Zhong; Zhang, Tao-Lin

    2015-07-09

    Many of the photovoltaic (PV) systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltages, with potential to cause or promote fires. However, research about photovoltaic fires is insufficient. This paper focuses on the flammability and fire hazards of photovoltaic modules. Bench-scale experiments based on polycrystalline silicon PV modules have been conducted using a cone calorimeter. Several parameters including ignition time ( t ig ), mass loss, heat release rate (HRR), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO₂) concentration, were investigated. The fire behaviours, fire hazards and toxicity of gases released by PV modules are assessed based on experimental results. The results show that PV modules under tests are inflammable with the critical heat flux of 26 kW/m². This work will lead to better understanding on photovoltaic fires and how to help authorities determine the appropriate fire safety provisions for controlling photovoltaic fires.

  4. Flammability of polypropylene/organoclay nanocomposites; Inflamabilidade de nanocompositos de polipropileno/argila organofilica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Tatianny Soares; Barbosa, Renata [Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina (Brazil); Carvalho, Laura Hecker de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Canedo, Eduardo Luis [Instituto de Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    The flammabilities of nanocomposites made with three polypropylene grades (homo and copolymers) with 5 wt % of organoclay (Cloisite 20A), 5 or 15 wt % of maleated polypropylene as compatibilizer, and 0, 0.5 or 1 wt % of cis-13-docosenamide (Erucamide) as co-intercalant, were studied using the horizontal burning test UL94HB. Masterbatches prepared in an internal mixer were diluted in the polypropylene matrix using a corotating twin-screw extruder, with different screw configurations and operating at 240 or 480 rpm. Results indicate that the high burning rate of the composites was not affected by the processing conditions. For all formulations was observed a significant reduction in smoke release, lack of dripping and the formation of a char surface layer, that protected the core of the samples. (author)

  5. Experimental Studies on the Flammability and Fire Hazards of Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yun Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the photovoltaic (PV systems on buildings are of sufficiently high voltages, with potential to cause or promote fires. However, research about photovoltaic fires is insufficient. This paper focuses on the flammability and fire hazards of photovoltaic modules. Bench-scale experiments based on polycrystalline silicon PV modules have been conducted using a cone calorimeter. Several parameters including ignition time (tig, mass loss, heat release rate (HRR, carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration, were investigated. The fire behaviours, fire hazards and toxicity of gases released by PV modules are assessed based on experimental results. The results show that PV modules under tests are inflammable with the critical heat flux of 26 kW/m2. This work will lead to better understanding on photovoltaic fires and how to help authorities determine the appropriate fire safety provisions for controlling photovoltaic fires.

  6. Influence of dispersion degree of water drops on efficiency of extinguishing of flammable liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korolchenko Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the size of water drops, process of fire extinguishing is focused either in a zone of combustion or on a burning liquid surface. This article considers two alternate solutions of a heat balance equation. The first solution allows us to trace decrease of temperature of a flammable liquid (FL surface to a temperature lower than fuel flash point at which combustion is stopped. And the second solution allows us to analyze decrease of burnout rate to a negligible value at which steam-air mixture becomes nonflammable. As a result of solve of a heat balance equation it was made the following conclusion: water drops which size is equal to 100 μm will completely evaporate in a zone of combustion with extent of 1 m if the flying speed of drops is even 16 mps (acc. to Stokes v = 3 mps; whereas drops of larger size will evaporate only partially.

  7. Data Observations on Double Shell Tank (DST) Flammable Gas Watch List Tank Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-09-28

    This report provides the data from the retained gas sampler, void fraction instrument, ball rheometer, standard hydrogen monitoring system, and other tank data pertinent to gas retention and release behavior in the waste stored in double-shelled Flammable Gas Watch List tanks at Hanford. These include tanks 241-AN-103,241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, 241-AW-101, 241-SY-101, and 241-SY-103. The tanks and the waste they contain are described in terms of fill history and chemistry. The results of mixer pump operation and recent waste transfers and back-dilution in SY-101 are also described. In-situ measurement and monitoring systems are described and the data are summarized under the categories of thermal behavior, waste configuration and properties, gas generation and composition, gas retention and historical gas release behavior.

  8. A highly conductive, non-flammable polymer–nanoparticle hybrid electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Agrawal, Akanksha

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. We report on the physical properties of lithium-ion conducting nanoparticle-polymer hybrid electrolytes created by dispersing bidisperse mixtures of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized silica nanoparticles in an aprotic liquid host. At high particle contents, we find that the ionic conductivity is a non-monotonic function of the fraction of larger particles xL in the mixtures, and that for the nearly symmetric case xL ≈ 0.5 (i.e. equal volume fraction of small and large particles), the room temperature ionic conductivity is nearly ten-times larger than in similar nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes comprised of the pure small (xL ≈ 0) or large (xL ≈ 1) particle components. Complementary trends are seen in the activation energy for ion migration and effective tortuosity of the electrolytes, which both exhibit minima near xL ≈ 0.5. Characterization of the electrolytes by dynamic rheology reveals that the maximum conductivity coincides with a distinct transition in soft glassy properties from a jammed to partially jammed and back to jammed state, as the fraction of large particles is increased from 0 to 1. This finding implies that the conductivity enhancement arises from purely entropic loss of correlation between nanoparticle centers arising from particle size dispersity. As a consequence of these physics, it is now possible to create hybrid electrolytes with MPa elastic moduli and mS cm-1 ionic conductivity levels at room temperature using common aprotic liquid media as the electrolyte solvent. Remarkably, we also find that even in highly flammable liquid media, the bidisperse nanoparticle hybrid electrolytes can be formulated to exhibit low or no flammability without compromising their favorable room temperature ionic conductivity and mechanical properties.

  9. Tank vapor characterization project - Tank 241-U-112 headspace gas and vapor characterization: Results for homogeneity samples collected on December 6, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklarew, D.S.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; Hayes, J.C. [and others

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-U-112 (Tank U-112) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Samples were collected to determine the homogeneity of selected inorganic and organic headspace constitutents. Two risers (Riser 3 and Riser 6) were sampled at three different elevations (Bottom, Middle, and Top) within the tank. Tank headspace samples were collected by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation (SESC) and were analyzed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine headspace concentrations of selected non-radioactive analytes. Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNNL. Ammonia was determined to be above the immediate notification limit specified by the sampling and analysis plan.

  10. Analysis of the Volatile Profile of Core Chinese Mango Germplasm by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Ma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite abundant published research on the volatile characterization of mango germplasm, the aroma differentiation of Chinese cultivars remains unclear. Using headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS, the composition and relative content of volatiles in 37 cultivars representing the diversity of Chinese mango germplasm were investigated. Results indicated that there are distinct differences in the components and content of volatile compounds among and within cultivars. In total, 114 volatile compounds, including 23 monoterpenes, 16 sesquiterpenes, 29 non-terpene hydrocarbons, 25 esters, 11 aldehydes, five alcohols and five ketones, were identified. The total volatile content among cultivars ranged from 211 to 26,022 μg/kg fresh weight (FW, with 123-fold variation. Terpene compounds were the basic background volatiles, and 34 cultivars exhibited abundant monoterpenes. On the basis of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA and principal component analysis (PCA, terpinolene and α-pinene were important components constituting the aroma of Chinese mango cultivars. Most obviously, a number of mango cultivars with high content of various aroma components were observed, and they can serve as potential germplasms for both breeding and direct use.

  11. Analysis of volatile headspace gases sampled by cryogenic traps from Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank 242-C-112 March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, S.A.

    1993-10-01

    Results are given from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses of the headspace samples obtained by using cryogenic traps from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Tank 112-C during the month of March, 1992. Samples were analyzed as received with no sample preparation. Analyses included direct GC/MS for volatile/semivolatile components, and direct GC/MS for ammonia. Purge and trap GC/MS analysis was not done. In addition, aliquots were sent to Karl Pool, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, for hydrogen cyanide analysis by ion chromatography, the results are reported here. All concentrations are reported for the methanol extract solutions. To calculate concentrations in the headspace, the cryo-sampling air volume and the methanol rinse volume must be obtained from cryo-sampling personnel at WHC. Triplicate analyses were done on all samples, and average concentrations and standard deviations are reported. One significant result was that no ammonia was detected

  12. Effect of headspace CO2 concentration on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in MAP, irradiated fresh pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, A.D.; Smith, J.P.; Dodds, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of five initial levels of CO2 (15, 30, 45, 60, and 75%) and three irradiation doses (0, 0.5, and 1.0 kGy) on toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in inoculated fresh pork were studied using factorial design experiments. Headspace CO2 levels increased in all samples during storage at 15 degrees C. In most treatments, spoilage preceded toxigenesis. Toxin production occurred faster in samples initially packaged with 15 to 30% of CO2 while higher levels of CO2 (45-75%) delayed toxin production. Low-dose irradiation delayed toxin production at all levels of CO2 in the package headspace. Contrary to expectations, including a CO2 absorbent in the package enhanced toxin production by C. botulinum. This was attributed to production of H2 by the CO2 absorbent, possibly resulting in a decrease in the oxido-reduction potential of the meat

  13. Evaluation of peroxidative stress of cancer cells in vitro by real-time quantification of volatile aldehydes in culture headspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestivska, Violetta; Rutter, Abigail V; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2017-08-30

    Peroxidation of lipids in cellular membranes results in the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including saturated aldehydes. The real-time quantification of trace VOCs produced by cancer cells during peroxidative stress presents a new challenge to non-invasive clinical diagnostics, which as described here, we have met with some success. A combination of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS), a technique that allows rapid, reliable quantification of VOCs in humid air and liquid headspace, and electrochemistry to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro has been used. Thus, VOCs present in the headspace of CALU-1 cancer cell line cultures exposed to ROS have been monitored and quantified in real time using SIFT-MS. The CALU-1 lung cancer cells were cultured in 3D collagen to mimic in vivo tissue. Real-time SIFT-MS analyses focused on the volatile aldehydes: propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, heptanal and malondialdehyde (propanedial), that are expected to be products of cellular membrane peroxidation. All six aldehydes were identified in the culture headspace, each reaching peak concentrations during the time of exposure to ROS and eventually reducing as the reactants were depleted in the culture. Pentanal and hexanal were the most abundant, reaching concentrations of a few hundred parts-per-billion by volume, ppbv, in the culture headspace. The results of these experiments demonstrate that peroxidation of cancer cells in vitro can be monitored and evaluated by direct real-time analysis of the volatile aldehydes produced. The combination of adopted methodology potentially has value for the study of other types of VOCs that may be produced by cellular damage. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A novel headspace gas chromatographic method for in situ monitoring of monomer conversion during polymerization in an emulsion environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhong, Jin-Feng; Hu, Hui-Chao

    2012-05-18

    This paper describes a novel multiple-headspace extraction/gas chromatographic (MHE-GC) technique for monitoring monomer conversion during a polymerization reaction in a water-based emulsion environment. The polymerization reaction of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in an aqueous emulsion is used as an example. The reaction was performed in a closed headspace sample vial (as a mini-reactor), with pentane as a tracer. In situ monitoring of the vapor concentration of the tracer, employing a multiple headspace extraction (sampling) scheme, coupled to a GC, makes it possible to quantitatively follow the conversion of MMA during the early stages of polymerization. Data on the integrated amount of the tracer vapor released from the monomer droplet phase during the polymerization is described by a mathematic equation from which the monomer conversion can be calculated. The present method is simple, automated and economical, and provides an efficient tool in the investigation of the reaction kinetics and effects of the reaction conditions on the early stage of polymerization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Method detection limit determination and application of a convenient headspace analysis method for methyl tert-butyl ether in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Dennis T; Rochette, Elizabeth A; Ramsey, Philip J

    2002-11-15

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a common groundwater contaminant, introduced to the environment by leaking petroleum storage tanks, urban runoff, and motorized watercraft. In this study. a simplified (static) headspace analysis method was adapted for determination of MTBE in water samples and soil water extracts. The MDL of the headspace method was calculated to be 2.0 microg L(-1) by the EPA single-concentration design method(1) and 1.2 microg L(-1) by a calibration method developed by Hubaux and Vos (Hubaux, A.; Vos, G. Anal. Chem. 1970,42, 849-855). The MDL calculated with the Hubaux and Vos method was favored because it considers both a true positive and a false positive. The static headspace method was applied to analysis of a tap water sample and a monitoring well sample from a gasoline service station, a river sample, and aqueous extracts from soil excavated during removal of a leaking underground storage tank (LUST). The water samples examined in this study had MTTBE concentrations ranging from 6 to 19 microg L(-1). Aqueous extracts of a soil sample taken from the LUST site had 8 microg L(-1) MTBE.

  16. Full evaporation headspace gas chromatography for sensitive determination of high boiling point volatile organic compounds in low boiling matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mana Kialengila, Didi; Wolfs, Kris; Bugalama, John; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2013-11-08

    Determination of volatile organic components (VOC's) is often done by static headspace gas chromatography as this technique is very robust and combines easy sample preparation with good selectivity and low detection limits. This technique is used nowadays in different applications which have in common that they have a dirty matrix which would be problematic in direct injection approaches. Headspace by nature favors the most volatile compounds, avoiding the less volatile to reach the injector and column. As a consequence, determination of a high boiling solvent in a lower boiling matrix becomes challenging. Determination of VOCs like: xylenes, cumene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), benzyl alcohol (BA) and anisole in water or water soluble products are an interesting example of the arising problems. In this work, a headspace variant called full evaporation technique is worked out and validated for the mentioned solvents. Detection limits below 0.1 μg/vial are reached with RSD values below 10%. Mean recovery values ranged from 92.5 to 110%. The optimized method was applied to determine residual DMSO in a water based cell culture and DMSO and DMA in tetracycline hydrochloride (a water soluble sample). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An Exploratory Study on a High-Energy Flux (HEF) Calorimeter to Characterize Flammability of Advanced Engineered Polymers: Phase 1 - Ignition and Mass Loss Rate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tewarson, A

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a newly designed high-energy flux (HEF) calorimeter for the flammability evaluation of high fire resistant plastics exposed to high heat flux typical of combat field scenarios and large-scale fires...

  18. Flammability of radiation cross-linked low density polyethylene as an insulating material for wire and cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basfar, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    Various formulations of low-density polyethylene blended with ethylene vinyl acetate were prepared to improve the flame retardancy for wire and cable applications. The prepared formulations were cross-linked by γ-rays to 50, 100, 150 and 200 kGy in the presence of trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA). The effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties of these formulations were investigated. In addition, the influence of various combinations of aluminum trihydroxide and zinc borate as flame retardant fillers on the flammability was explored. Limiting oxygen index (LOI) and average extent of burning were used to characterize the flammability of investigated formulations. An improved flame retardancy of low density polyethylene was achieved by various combinations of flame ratardant fillers and cross-linking by gamma radiation

  19. Effect of swelling behavior of organoclays in styrene on flammability of polystyrene nanocomposites obtained through in situ incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timochenco, Licinia; Sayer, Claudia; Machado, Ricardo A.F.; Araujo, Pedro H.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the effect of the interaction between organoclays and styrene on the flammability of polystyrene/clay nanocomposites obtained through in-situ incorporation was investigated. The reactions were carried out in bulk polymerization. The interaction between organoclays and styrene was inferred by swelling of the organoclay in styrene. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The heat release rate was obtained by Cone Calorimeter and the nanocomposites were tested through UL94 horizontal burn test. Thermogravimetric analysis were also performed. Results showed that intercalated and partially exfoliated nanocomposites were obtained depending on the swelling behavior of the organoclay in styrene. It was also observed an increase of the higher decomposition temperature and an accentuated decrease on the peak of heat release of the nanocomposites when comparing to the virgin polymer. No remarkable effect between the swelling behavior of the organoclay in styrene and the flammability properties was observed. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the Thermophysical Properties of Poly(MethylMethacrylate): A Reference Material for the Development of a flammability Test for Micro-Gravity Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Steinhaus, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    A study has been conducted using PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) as a reference material in the development process of the Forced Flow and flame Spread Test (FIST). This test attempts to establish different criteria for material flammability for micro-gravity environments. The FIST consists of two tests, ignition and flame spread tests, that provide a series of material “fire” properties that jointly provide important information on the flammability of a material. This work de...

  1. The utilisation of two detectors for the determination of water in honey using headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Lillian A; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-08-15

    A headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) method was developed for the determination of water content in honey. This method was shown to work with five different honey varieties which had a range of water from 14-16%. It also utilised two different detectors, the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and the barrier discharge ionisation detector (BID). This method needs no heating pretreatment step as in the current leading method, (i.e. the measurement of refractive index). The solvent-free procedure negates the possibility of solvent-compound interactions as well as solubility limitations, as is common with Karl Fischer titrations. It was also apparent that the classic loss on drying method consistently and substantially produced results that were lower than the correct values. This approach is shown to be rapid, with an analysis time of 4 min when using the TCD detector and under 3 min when utilising the BID detector. HSGC is feasible for the determination of water due to the new PEG-linked geminal dicationic ionic-liquid-coated GC capillary column. In addition it provides accurate and precise determinations of the water content in honey. When using the sensitive BID detector, other trace volatile compounds are observed as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction in Pesticide Residues Analysis:1. Optimisation of Extraction Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of headspace solid phase microextraction (HS/SPME was successfully used in a simultaneous multicomponent analysis of hexachlorobenzene (HCB, tefluthrin, heptachlor, aldrin, chlorpyrifos, fenthion and bifenthrin in aqueous medium. Measurementswere performed using a nonpolar polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS fiber. Detection and quantification were done by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS.Optimal conditions for HS/SPME were determined both by performing extraction at different temperatures and examining extraction time profiles at constant temperature. Optimal extraction temperature for each pesticide studied was determined as follows: 60°C for HCB and for heptachlor, 80°C for aldrin and for chlorpyrifos, fenthion and tefluthrin, and temperature exceeding 80°C for bifenthrin. For the pesticide mixture studied, 60°C was identified as the optimum extraction temperature.Based on the time profiles obtained, it was confirmed that satisfactory extraction sensitivity can be obtained even for extraction times shorter than the time required to reach a sorption equilibrium. This conclusion was confirmed by linear concentration profiles obtained for the following ranges: 0.05-10 ng/ml (HCB, 0.05-25 ng/ml (tefluthrin, 0.05-40 ng/ml (heptachlor, 0.05-40 ng/ml (aldrin, 0.05-25 ng/ml (chlorpyrifos, 0.05-25 ng/ml (fenthionand 0.05-25 ng/ml (bifenthrin.Relative standard deviation (RSD values for triplicate measurements did not exceed 15%.

  3. Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction in Pesticide Residues Analysis: 2. Apple Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Milinović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Headspace solid phase microextraction method (HS/SPME, optimised previously for pesticide water solutions, was applied to trace residues of the pesticides chlorpyrifos, fenthion and bifenthrin in apple samples. One-hour extraction procedure was performed at 60oC extraction temperature. Nonpolar polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS fiber was used. Detection and quantification were carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. A non-pesticide treated apple sample was fortified with the pesticides over a 0.025-1.25 mg/kg concentration range in order to determine analytical parameters of the method applied. Linearity with regression coefficient (R values higher than 0.99 were obtained over the whole concentration range investigated for chlorpyrifos and fenthion, while linear dependence was observed in the 0.1-1.25 mg/kg range for bifenthrin. Relative recovery values for samples fortified at different levels were in the 56.68-82.91% range. Limit of detection (LOD values were determined as follows: 0.014 mg/kg for chlorpyrifos, 0.021 mg/kg for fenthion and 0.053 mg/kg for bifenthrin. Relative standard deviation (RSD values obtained for multiple analysis of the sample fortified at 0.6 mg/kg level were not higher than 20%.

  4. Application of headspace for research volatile organic compounds emitted from building materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kultys Beata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Headspace technique and gas chromatography method with mas detector has been used for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOC emitted from various building and finishing materials, such as sealing foams, mounting strips, paints, varnishes, floor coverings. The tests were carried out for different temperatures (in the temperature range of 60 to 180 °C and the time of heated vials with tested materials inside. These tests were conducted to verify the possibility of use this method of determination the VOC emission. Interpretation of chromatograms and mass spectra allowed to identify the type of compounds emitted from the tested materials and the optimum time and temperature for each type of material was determined. The increase in heating temperature of the samples resulted in increase the type and number of identified compounds: for four materials the increase was in the whole temperature range, for others it was from 90 °C. On the other hand, emission from mineral wool was low in whole temperature range. 30-minutes heating of the samples was sufficient to identify emitted compounds for most of tested materials. Applying a longer time, i.e. 24 hours, significantly increased the sensitivity of the method.

  5. Ethanol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame-ionization and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin

    2011-09-01

    Ethanol is the most frequently identified compound in forensic toxicology. Although confirmation involving mass spectrometry is desirable, relatively few methods have been published to date. A novel technique utilizing a Dean's Switch to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame-ionization (FID) and mass spectrometric (MS) detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation is presented. Using 100 μL of sample, the limits of detection and quantitation were 0.005 and 0.010 g/dL, respectively. The zero-order linear range (r(2) > 0.990) was determined to span the concentrations of 0.010 to 1.000 g/dL. The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 3.1%. Quantitative accuracy was within ±8%, ±6%, ±3%, and ±1.5% at concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.080, and 0.300 g/dL, respectively. In addition, 1,1-difluoroethane was validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validated FID-MS method provides a procedure for the quantitation of ethyl alcohol in blood by FID with simultaneous confirmation by MS and can also be utilized as an identification method for inhalants such as 1,1-difluoroethane.

  6. [Simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus by headspace gas chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shuyao; Wu, Dike; Sun, Jinhong; Ye, Ruhan; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2014-05-01

    A headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven residual solvents (petroleum ether (60-90 degrees C), acetone, ethyl acetate, methanol, methylene chloride, ethanol and butyl acetate) in bovis calculus artifactus. The DB-WAX capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) were used for the separation and detection of the residual solvents, and the internal standard method was used for the quantification. The chromatographic conditions, such as equilibrium temperature and equilibrium time, were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, all of the seven residual solvents showed good linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (not less than 0.999 3) in the prescribed concentration range. At three spiked levels, the recoveries for the seven residual solvents were 94.7%-105.2% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 3.5%. The limits of detection (LODs) of the method were 0.43-5.23 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 1.25-16.67 mg/L. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and accurate, and is suitable for the simultaneous determination of the seven residual solvents in bovis calculus artifactus.

  7. Multiple headspace-solid-phase microextraction: an application to quantification of mushroom volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rosaria; Tedone, Laura; De Grazia, Selenia; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-04-03

    Multiple headspace-solid phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and flame ionization detection (GC-FID) was applied to the identification and quantification of volatiles released by the mushroom Agaricus bisporus, also known as champignon. MHS-SPME allows to perform quantitative analysis of volatiles from solid matrices, free of matrix interferences. Samples analyzed were fresh mushrooms (chopped and homogenized) and mushroom-containing food dressings. 1-Octen-3-ol, 3-octanol, 3-octanone, 1-octen-3-one and benzaldehyde were common constituents of the samples analyzed. Method performance has been tested through the evaluation of limit of detection (LoD, range 0.033-0.078 ng), limit of quantification (LoQ, range 0.111-0.259 ng) and analyte recovery (92.3-108.5%). The results obtained showed quantitative differences among the samples, which can be attributed to critical factors, such as the degree of cell damage upon sample preparation, that are here discussed. Considerations on the mushrooms biochemistry and on the basic principles of MHS analysis are also presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  9. An Earth-Based Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus to Assess Material Flammability for Microgravity & Extraterrestrial Fire-Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, S. L.; Beeson, H.; Haas, J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the performance goals for NASA's enterprise of Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) is to develop methods, data bases, and validating tests for material flammability characterization, hazard reduction, and fire detection/suppression strategies for spacecraft and extraterrestrial habitats. This work addresses these needs by applying the fundamental knowledge gained from low stretch experiments to the development of a normal gravity low stretch material flammability test method. The concept of the apparatus being developed uses the low stretch geometry to simulate the conditions of the extraterrestrial environment through proper scaling of the sample dimensions to reduce the buoyant stretch in normal gravity. The apparatus uses controlled forced-air flow to augment the low stretch to levels which simulate Lunar or Martian gravity levels. In addition, the effect of imposed radiant heat flux on material flammability can be studied with the cone heater. After breadboard testing, the apparatus will be integrated into NASA's White Sands Test Facility's Atmosphere-Controlled Cone Calorimeter for evaluation as a new materials screening test method.

  10. Development of a cost efficient methodology to perform allocation of flammable and toxic gas detectors applying CFD tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, Rafael Brod; Rocha, Gean Felipe Almeida [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nalvarte, Gladys Augusta Zevallos [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Novik (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    This paper is aimed to present a computational procedure for flammable and toxic gas detector allocation and quantification developed by DNV. The proposed methodology applies Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as operational and safety characteristics of the analyzed region to assess the optimal number of toxic and flammable gas detectors and their optimal location. A probabilistic approach is also used when applying the DNV software ThorEXPRESSLite, following NORSOK Z013 Annex G and presented in HUSER et al. 2000 and HUSER et al. 2001, when the flammable gas detectors are assessed. A DNV developed program, DetLoc, is used to run in an iterative way the procedure described above leading to an automatic calculation of the gas detectors location and number. The main advantage of the methodology presented above is the independence of human interaction in the gas detector allocation leading to a more precise and free of human judgment allocation. Thus, a reproducible allocation is generated when comparing several different analyses and a global criteria appliance is guaranteed through different regions in the same project. A case study is presented applying the proposed methodology. (author)

  11. 32-Week Holding-Time Study of SUMMA Polished Canisters and Triple Sorbent Traps Used To Sample Organic Constituents in Radioactive Waste Tank Vapor Headspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John C.; Huckaby, James L.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Julya, Janet L.; Hayes, James C.; Edwards, Jeffrey A.; Sasaki, Leela M.

    1997-01-01

    Two sampling methods[SUMMA polished canisters and triple sorbent traps (TSTs)] were compared for long-term storage of trace organic vapor samples collected from the headspaces of high-level radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. Because safety, quality assurance, radiological controls, the long-term stability of the sampling media during storage needed to be addressed. Samples were analyzed with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) using cryogenic reconcentration or thermal desorption sample introduction techniques. SUMMA canister samples were also analyzed for total non-methane organic compounds (TNMOC) by GC/flame ionization detector (FID) using EPA Compendium Method TO-12 . To verify the long-term stability of the sampling media, multiple samples were collected in parallel from a typical passively ventilated radioactive waste tank known to contain moderately high concentrations of both polar and nonpolar organic compounds. Analyses for organic analytes and TNMOC were conducted at increasing intervals over a 32-week period to determine whether any systematic degradation of sample integrity occurred. Analytes collected in the SUMMA polished canisters generally showed good stability over the full 32 weeks with recoveries at the 80% level or better for all compounds studied. The TST data showed some loss (50-80% recovery) for a few high-volatility compounds even in the refrigerated samples; losses for unrefrigerated samples were far more pronounced with recoveries as low as 20% observed in a few cases

  12. Development of a headspace trap HRGC/MS method for the assessment of the relevance of certain aroma compounds on the sensorial characteristics of commercial apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikfardjam, Martin Pour; Maier, Daniel

    2011-06-15

    A reliable and simple method was developed for the completely automatised analysis of apple juice aroma compounds. In total 26 flavour compounds could be measured by headspace trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). We used the method to analyse 85 commercially available apple juices, of which 67 apple juices were not from concentrate. Our results show that apple juices not from concentrate are mainly characterised by flavour compounds responsible for fruity, ripe, and sweet aroma impressions, such as 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, ethylbutyrate, and ethyl-2-methylbutyrate. On the contrary, apple juices made from concentrate were dominated by acetaldehyde, E-2-hexenal, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl acetate, and hexanal, which are mainly responsible for sensory impressions, such as 'green, fresh, estery'. According to our data, neither of the single compounds nor indexes calculated thereof as suggested by some authors could be used for the reliable assessment of apple juice quality. Thus, these results suggest that sensory evaluation remains the ultimate mean to reliably assess apple juice quality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in different colour carrot (Daucus carota L. cultivars using static headspace/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Güler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs as well as sugar and acid contents affect carrot flavour. This study compared VOCs in 11 carrot cultivars. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using static headspace technique was applied to analyse the VOCs. The number of VOCs per sample ranged from 17 to 31. The primarily VOCs identified in raw carrots with the exception of “Yellow Stone” were terpenes, ranging from 65 to 95%. The monoterpenes with values ranging from 31 to 89% were higher than those (from 2 to 15% of sesquiterpenes. Monoterpene α-terpinolene (with ranging from 23 to 63% and (--α-pinene (26%, and alcohol ethanol (35% was the main VOC in extracts from the nine carrot cultivars, “Purple” and “Yellow Stone”, respectively. As a result, among 16 identified monoterpenes, 7 monoterpenes (--α-pinene, (--β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, γ-terpinene, α-terpinolene and p-cymene constituted more than 60% of total VOCs identified in carrots including “Atomic Red”, “Nantes”, “Cosmic Purple”, “Red Samurai”, “Eregli Black”, “White Satin”, “Parmex” and “Baby Carrot”. Thus, these cultivars may advise to carrot breeders due to the beneficial effects of terpenes, especially monoterpenes on health.

  14. Characterization of the Key Aroma Compounds in Proso Millet Wine Using Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingke Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The volatile compounds in proso millet wine were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (85 μm polyacrylate (PA, 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 75 μm Carboxen (CAR/PDMS, and 50/30 μm divinylbenzene (DVB/CAR/PDMS fibers, and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; the odor characteristics and intensities were analyzed by the odor activity value (OAV. Different sample preparation factors were used to optimize this method: sample amount, extraction time, extraction temperature, and content of NaCl. A total of 64 volatile compounds were identified from the wine sample, including 14 esters, seven alcohols, five aldehydes, five ketones, 12 benzene derivatives, 12 hydrocarbons, two terpenes, three phenols, two acids, and two heterocycles. Ethyl benzeneacetate, phenylethyl alcohol, and benzaldehyde were the main volatile compounds found in the samples. According to their OAVs, 14 volatile compounds were determined to be odor-active compounds (OAV > 1, and benzaldehyde, benzeneacetaldehyde, 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, and biphenyl were the prominent odor-active compounds (OAV > 50, having a high OAV. Principal component analysis (PCA showed the difference of distribution of the 64 volatile compounds and 14 odor-active compounds with four solid-phase microextraction (SPME fibers.

  15. A comparative study of three tissue-cultured Dendrobium species and their wild correspondences by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Dong; You, Tao; Li, Jun; Bai, Li-Tao; Hao, Jing-Wen; Xu, Xiao-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Plant tissue culture technique is widely used in the conservation and utilization of rare and endangered medicinal plants and it is crucial for tissue culture stocks to obtain the ability to produce similar bioactive components as their wild correspondences. In this paper, a headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method combined with chemometric methods was applied to analyze and evaluate the volatile compounds in tissue-cultured and wild Dendrobium huoshanense Cheng and Tang, Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo and Dendrobium moniliforme (Linn.) Sw. In total, 63 volatile compounds were separated, with 53 being identified from the three Dendrobium spp. Different provenances of Dendrobiums had characteristic chemicals and showed remarkable quantity discrepancy of common compositions. The similarity evaluation disclosed that the accumulation of volatile compounds in Dendrobium samples might be affected by their provenance. Principal component analysis showed that the first three components explained 85.9% of data variance, demonstrating a good discrimination between samples. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, combined with chemometrics, might be an effective strategy for identifying the species and their provenance, especially in the assessment of tissue-cultured Dendrobium quality for use in raw herbal medicines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A pilot study combining a GC-sensor device with a statistical model for the identification of bladder cancer from urine headspace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzeela Khalid

    Full Text Available There is a need to reduce the number of cystoscopies on patients with haematuria. Presently there are no reliable biomarkers to screen for bladder cancer. In this paper, we evaluate a new simple in-house fabricated, GC-sensor device in the diagnosis of bladder cancer based on volatiles. Sensor outputs from 98 urine samples were used to build and test diagnostic models. Samples were taken from 24 patients with transitional (urothelial cell carcinoma (age 27-91 years, median 71 years and 74 controls presenting with urological symptoms, but without a urological malignancy (age 29-86 years, median 64 years; results were analysed using two statistical approaches to assess the robustness of the methodology. A two-group linear discriminant analysis method using a total of 9 time points (which equates to 9 biomarkers correctly assigned 24/24 (100% of cancer cases and 70/74 (94.6% controls. Under leave-one-out cross-validation 23/24 (95.8% of cancer cases were correctly predicted with 69/74 (93.2% of controls. For partial least squares discriminant analysis, the correct leave-one-out cross-validation prediction values were 95.8% (cancer cases and 94.6% (controls. These data are an improvement on those reported by other groups studying headspace gases and also superior to current clinical techniques. This new device shows potential for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, but the data must be reproduced in a larger study.

  17. Effect of Spacecraft Environmental Variables on the Flammability of Fire Resistant Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, A. F.; Fernandez-Pello, C.; Takahashi, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Urban, D. L.; Ruff, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fire resistant fabrics are used for firefighter, racecar drivers as well as astronaut suits. However, their fire resistant characteristics depend on the environment conditions and require study. Particularly important is the response of these fabrics to elevated oxygen concentration environments and radiant heat from a source such as an adjacent fire. In this work, experiments using two fire resistant fabrics were conducted to study the effect of oxygen concentration, external radiant flux and oxidizer flow velocity in concurrent flame spread. Results show that for a given fabric the minimum oxygen concentration for flame spread depends strongly on the magnitude of the external radiant flux. At increased oxygen concentrations the external radiant flux required for flame spread decreases. Oxidizer flow velocity influences the external radiant flux only when the convective heat flux from the flame has similar values to the external radiant flux. The results of this work provide further understanding of the flammability characteristics of fire resistant fabrics in environments similar to those of future spacecrafts.

  18. THERMAL DECOMPOSITION AND FLAMMABILITY OF ACRYLONITRILE-BUTADIENE-STYRENE/MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-fang Tong; Hai-yun Ma; Zheng-ping Fang

    2008-01-01

    Thermal and flammability properties of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene copolymer (ABS) with the addition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were studied. ABS/MWNTs composites were prepared via melt blending with the MWNTs content varied from 0.2% to 4.0% by mass. Thermogravimetry results showed that the addition of MWNTs accelerated the degradation of ABS during the whole process under air atmosphere, and both onset and maximum degradation temperature were lower than those of pure ABS. The destabilization effect of MWNTs on the thermal stability of the composites became unobvious under nitrogen, and the addition of MWNTs could improve the maximum degradation temperature. The heat release rate and time of ignition (tign) for the composites reduced greatly with the addition of MWNTs especially when the concentration of nanotubes was higher than 1.0%. The accumulation of carbon nanotubes with a network structure was observed and the char layer became thicker with increasing nanotubes concentration. Results from Raman spectra showed a higher degree of graphitization for the residues of ABS/MWNTs composites.

  19. Evaluation of the generation and release of flammable gases in tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babad, H.; Johnson, G.D.; Lechelt, J.A.; Reynolds, D.A. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Meisel, D.; Jonah, C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Ashby, E.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double shell, high-level waste tank located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank contains about 1 million gallons of waste that was concentrated at the 242-S Evaporator. Shortly after the waste was put in the tank, the waste began to expand because the generation of gases. In 1990 this tank was declared to have an unreviewed safety question because of the periodic release of hydrogen and nitrous oxide. A safety program was established to conduct a characterization of the waste and vented gases and to determine an effective means to prevent the accumulation of flammable gases in the tank dome space and ventilation system. Results of the expanded characterization conducted in fiscal year 1991 are presented. The use of gas chromatographs, mass spectrometers, and hydrogen-specific monitors provided a greater understanding of the vented gases. Additional instrumentation placed in the tank also helped to provide more detailed information on tank temperatures, gas pressure, and gas flow rates. An extensive laboratory study involving the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Georgia Institute of Technology was initiated for the purpose of determining the mechanisms responsible for the generation of various gases. These studies evaluate both radiolytic and thermochemical processes. Results of the first series of experiments are described.

  20. Independent design review report for truck number 1 modifications for flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.W.

    1997-01-01

    The East and West Tank Farm Standing Order 97-01 requires that the PMST be modified to include purging of the enclosed space underneath the shielded receiver weather cover per National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 496, Purged and Pressurized Enclosures for Electrical Equipment. The Standing Order also requires that the PMST be modified by replacing the existing electrical remote latch (RLU) unit with a mechanical remote latch unit. As the mechanical remote latch unit was exactly like the RLU installed on the Rotary Mode Core Sampler Trucks (RMCST) and the design for the RMCST went through formal design review, replacing the RLU was done utilizing informal design verification and was completed per work package ES-97-0028. As the weather cover purge was similar to the design for the RMCSTS, this design was reviewed using the independent review method with multiple independent reviewers. A function design criteria (WHC-SD-WM-FDC-048, Functional Design Criteria for Core Sampling in Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks) provided the criteria for the modifications. The review consisted of distributing the design review package to the reviewers and collecting and dispositioning the RCR comments. The review package included the ECNs for review, the Design Compliance Matrix, copies of all drawings affected, and copies of outstanding ECNs against these drawings. A final meeting was held to ensure that all reviewers were aware of the changes to ECNs from incorporation of RCR comments

  1. The deforestation story: testing for anthropogenic origins of Africa's flammable grassy biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, William; Zaloumis, Nicholas P

    2016-06-05

    Africa has the most extensive C4 grassy biomes of any continent. They are highly flammable accounting for greater than 70% of the world's burnt area. Much of Africa's savannas and grasslands occur in climates warm enough and wet enough to support closed forests. The combination of open grassy systems and the frequent fires they support have long been interpreted as anthropogenic artefacts caused by humans igniting frequent fires. True grasslands, it was believed, would be restricted to climates too dry or too cold to support closed woody vegetation. The idea that higher-rainfall savannas are anthropogenic and that fires are of human origin has led to initiatives to 'reforest' Africa's open grassy systems paid for by carbon credits under the assumption that the net effect of converting these system to forests would sequester carbon, reduce greenhouse gases and mitigate global warming. This paper reviews evidence for the antiquity of African grassy ecosystems and for the fires that they sustain. Africa's grassy biomes and the fires that maintain them are ancient and there is no support for the idea that humans caused large-scale deforestation. Indicators of old-growth grasslands are described. These can help distinguish secondary grasslands suitable for reforestation from ancient grasslands that should not be afforested.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Experimental study of hydrogen combustion in a flammable atmosphere in presence of water drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheikhravat, Homan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is part of safety studies on Pressurized Water Reactors for nuclear power plants. Scenarios including a release of hydrogen predict to trigger spraying in order to reduce the pressure and collect the aerosols towards the bottom. However spraying involves lowering the temperature and, consequently, the content of water vapor initially sufficient to render the atmosphere inert. The purpose of this thesis is to study the de-inerting conditions of premixed hydrogen / air / water vapor in presence of fogs and then to analyze the interaction between the water spray and the flame which can initially be laminar or turbulent. For this purpose two facilities have been designed: a spherical one of 56 L with central ignition that can be heated to 200 C and a large one optimised for flame acceleration (ENACCEF). With these tools have been determined the flammability limits of H 2 /air/water vapor as a function of pressure and temperature, the behavior of flames close to the limits, the effect of sprinkling on de-inerting and finally the interaction between the flame front and the droplets considering different mean droplets sizes. The influence of a hydrogen concentration gradient on the acceleration criterion and the role of sprinkling on the propagation of a turbulent flame have also been studied. It appears that the spray can cause not only de-inerting but also be ineffective in extinguishing the flame and, in some cases, can even increase the turbulence rate and consequently the flame acceleration process. (author)

  3. Rapid determination of the volatile components in tobacco by ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanqin; Chu, Guohai; Zhou, Guojun; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Kailong; Pan, Yuanjiang; Song, Zhiyu; Li, Zuguang; Xia, Qian; Lu, Xinbo; Xiao, Weiqiang

    2016-03-01

    An ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction was first employed to determine the volatile components in tobacco samples. The method combined the advantages of ultrasound, microwave, and headspace solid-phase microextraction. The extraction, separation, and enrichment were performed in a single step, which could greatly simplify the operation and reduce the whole pretreatment time. In the developed method, several experimental parameters, such as fiber type, ultrasound power, and irradiation time, were optimized to improve sampling efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, there were 37, 36, 34, and 36 components identified in tobacco from Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, and Zimbabwe, respectively, including esters, heterocycles, alkanes, ketones, terpenoids, acids, phenols, and alcohols. The compound types were roughly the same while the contents were varied from different origins due to the disparity of their growing conditions, such as soil, water, and climate. In addition, the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction method was compared with the microwave-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and headspace solid-phase microextraction methods. More types of volatile components were obtained by using the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction method, moreover, the contents were high. The results indicated that the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction technique was a simple, time-saving and highly efficient approach, which was especially suitable for analysis of the volatile components in tobacco. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Novel synthesis of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles modified with organic phosphate and their effect on the flammability of acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, Nour F., E-mail: drnour2005@yahoo.com [Fire Protection Laboratory, Chemistry Division, National Institute of Standards, 136, Giza 12211 (Egypt); Goda, Emad S.; Nour, M.A. [Fire Protection Laboratory, Chemistry Division, National Institute of Standards, 136, Giza 12211 (Egypt); Sabaa, M.W. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, NahdetMisr Street, Giza 12613 (Egypt); Hassan, M.A., E-mail: Mohamed_a_hassan@hotmail.com [Fire Protection Laboratory, Chemistry Division, National Institute of Standards, 136, Giza 12211 (Egypt)

    2015-11-15

    New and facile method for the synthesis and modification of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles has been developed. The organic phosphate was used to facilitate the synthesis and wrapping of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles with organic phosphate shell. The size of the nanoparticles wrapped with phosphate has an average diameter range from 46 to 125 nm. The preparation method has governed the nanoparticles diameter based on reaction time. Thermal stability and morphological properties of the new nanoparticles coated phosphates were investigated. The developed magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles-organic phosphate achieved a very good compatibility when dispersed in acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene polymer (ABS) produced dispersed nanocomposites. The flammability and thermal properties of the new polymer nanocomposites were studied. The rate of burning of the nanocomposites was reduced to 9.8 mm/min compared to 15, 21.9 and 42.5 mm/min for polymer-conventional magnesium hydroxide composite, polymer-conventional magnesium hydroxide-organic phosphate composite and virgin polymer, respectively. The peak heat release rate (PHRR) and total heat release (THR) of the new nanocomposites were recorded as 243.4 kW/m{sup 2} and 19.2 MJ/m{sup 2}, respectively, achieved 71% reduction for PHRR and 55% for THR. The synergism between magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles and organic phosphates shell was also studied. The developed nanoparticles suppressed the emission of toxic gases. The different materials were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy. The flammability properties were evaluated using UL94 horizontal method and cone calorimeter. The dispersion of magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles-organic phosphate in ABS was studied using scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • Novel and facile nanoparticles synthesis and modification have developed. • Magnesium hydroxide nanoparticles size has

  5. Total Thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Moris E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Total thyroidectomy is a surgery that removes all the thyroid tissue from the patient. The suspect of cancer in a thyroid nodule is the most frequent indication and it is presume when previous fine needle puncture is positive or a goiter has significant volume increase or symptomes. Less frequent indications are hyperthyroidism when it is refractory to treatment with Iodine 131 or it is contraindicated, and in cases of symptomatic thyroiditis. The thyroid gland has an important anatomic relation whith the inferior laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands, for this reason it is imperative to perform extremely meticulous dissection to recognize each one of these elements and ensure their preservation. It is also essential to maintain strict hemostasis, in order to avoid any postoperative bleeding that could lead to a suffocating neck hematoma, feared complication that represents a surgical emergency and endangers the patient’s life.It is essential to run a formal technique, without skipping steps, and maintain prudence and patience that should rule any surgical act.

  6. Análise de pesticidas organoclorados em água usando a microextração em fase sólida por headspace com cromatografia gasosa e espectrometria de massas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crislaine Batista Prates

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method based on headspace - solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography - mass spectrometry was validated for the quantitative determination of 18 organochlorine pesticides in water. For the extraction conditioning some parameters as the best type of coating fiber, time and temperature of extraction, pH and ionic strength were evaluated. The method HS-SPME/GC-MS/MS showed linear coefficient above 0.9948. The repeatability of the measurements were lower than 7.6%. Relative recoveries were between 88 and 110%. Limits of detection from 0.5 x 10-3 to 1.0 mg L-1 were obtained. A total of 31 samples were analyzed and 16 presented from 1 to 5 pesticides.

  7. An interior needle electropolymerized pyrrole-based coating for headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Av., P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu; Babanezhad, Esmaeil; Khalilian, Faezeh [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Av., P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-02-23

    A headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction (HS-SPDE) technique was developed by the use of polypyrrole (PPy) sorbent, electropolymerized inside the surface of a needle, as a possible alternative to solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Thermal desorption was subsequently, employed to transfer the extracted analytes into the injection port of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The PPy sorbent including polypyrrole-dodecyl sulfate (PPy-DS) was deposited on the interior surface of a stainless steel needle from the corresponding aqueous electrolyte by applying a constant deposition potential. The homogeneity and the porous surface structure of the coating were examined using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The developed method was applied to the trace level extraction of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from aqueous sample. In order to enhance the extraction efficiency and increase the partition coefficient of analytes, the stainless steel needle was cooled at 5 deg. C, while the sample solution was kept at 80 deg. C. Optimization of influential experimental conditions including the voltage of power supply, the time of PPy electrodeposition, the extraction temperature, the ionic strength and the extraction time were also investigated. The detection limits of the method under optimized conditions were in the range of 0.002-0.01 ng mL{sup -1}. The relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) at a concentration level of 0.1 ng mL{sup -1} were obtained between 7.54 and 11.4% (n = 6). The calibration curves of PAHs showed linearity in the range of 0.01-10 ng mL{sup -1}. The proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction of some selected PAHs from real-life water samples and the relative recoveries were higher than 90% for all the analytes.

  8. The potential of head-space gas chromatography for VLE measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis, Patricia; Wouters, Christine; Sweygers, Nick; Creemers, Claude; Van der Bruggen, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► HS-GC is a potential technique to obtain VLE data in a high throughput scenario. ► We applied HS-GC and evaluate the main issues to consider. ► Four azeotropic mixtures of industrial interest are studied. ► The thermodynamic analysis of VLE shows the strong non-ideality of the mixtures. - Abstract: Head-space gas chromatography (HS-GC) is thought to allow the performance of (vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) measurements in a fast and automated way. However, two decades after the first applications of HS-GC for this purpose, the potential of this technique is not fully developed yet. Measurements of isothermal VLE and activity coefficients of mixtures can be obtained in a high throughput scenario. However, several considerations have to be taken into account before starting the analysis, such as the equilibration time or the minimum sample volume and the GC response factors. These aspects can strongly influence on the validity of the results and should therefore be determined for each mixture. In this paper, four azeotropic mixtures of interest in the pharmaceutical and chemical industry, i.e., (ethylacetate + water), which forms a heterogeneous azeotrope, (ethylacetate + isooctane), (acetonitrile + toluene) and the ternary mixture (acetonitrile + toluene + tetrahydrofuran), are considered to show the potential of HS-GC for VLE measurements. The thermodynamic analysis of VLE data leads to activity coefficients for the mixtures at (35, 50, and 70) °C. In addition, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic models and data from the literature, when available.

  9. Quantitative analysis of aldehydes in canned vegetables using static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María; Gallego, Mercedes; Silva, Manuel

    2017-11-17

    Volatile aldehydes appear in canned vegetables as constituents and some of them can also be present as disinfection by-products (DBPs) because of the contact between vegetables and treated water. This paper describes two static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS) methods to determine 15 aldehydes in both the solid and the liquid phases of canned vegetables. The treatment for both phases of samples was carried out simultaneously into an SHS unit, including the leaching of the aldehydes (from the vegetable), their derivatization and volatilization of the oximes formed. Detection limits were obtained within the range of 15-400μg/kg and 3-40μg/L for aldehydes in the solid and the liquid phases of the food, respectively. The relative standard deviation was lower than 7% -for the whole array of the target analytes-, the trueness evaluated by recovery experiments provided %recoveries between 89 and 99% and short- and long-term stability studies indicated there was no significant variation in relative peak areas of all aldehydes in both phases of canned vegetables after their storing at 4°C for two weeks. The study of the origin of the 15 aldehydes detected between both phases of canned vegetables showed that: i) the presence of 13 aldehydes -at average concentrations of 2.2-39μg/kg and 0.25-71μg/L for the solid and the liquid phases, respectively- is because they are natural constituents of vegetables; and ii) the presence of glyoxal and methylglyoxal -which are mainly found in the liquid phase (average values, 1.4-4.1μg/L)- is ascribed to the use of treated water, thereby being DBPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution to internal pressure and flammable gas concentration in RAM [radioactive material] transport packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrant, M.M.; Brown, N.

    1989-01-01

    Various facilities in the US generate wastes contaminated with transuranic (TRU) isotopes (such as plutonium and americium) that decay primarily by emission of alpha particles. The waste materials consist of a wide variety of commercially available plastics, paper, cloth, and rubber; concreted or sludge wastes containing water; and metals, glass, and other solid inorganic materials. TRU wastes that have surface dose rates of 200 mrem/hr or less are typically packaged in plastic bags placed inside metal drums or boxes that are vented through high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. These wastes are to be transported from waste generation or storage sites to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the TRUPACT-II, a Type B package. Radiolysis of organic wastes or packaging materials, or wastes containing water generates gas which may be flammable or simply contribute to the internal pressure of the radioactive material (RAM) transport package. This paper discusses the factors that affect the amount and composition of this gas, and summarizes maximum radiolytic G values (number of molecules produced per 100 eV absorbed energy) found in the technical literature for many common materials. These G values can be used to determine the combination of payload materials and decay heats that are safe for transport. G values are established for categories of materials, based on chemical functional groups. It is also shown using transient diffusion and quasi-equilibrium statistical mechanics methods that hydrogen, if generated, will not stratify at the top of the transport package void space. 9 refs., 1 tab

  11. Permeability and flammability study of composite sandwich structures for cryogenic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubacz, Monika

    Fiber reinforced plastics offer advantageous specific strength and stiffness compared to metals and has been identified as candidates for the reusable space transportation systems primary structures including cryogenic tanks. A number of carbon and aramid fiber reinforced plastics have been considered for the liquid hydrogen tanks. Materials selection is based upon mechanical properties and containment performance (long and short term) and upon manufacturing considerations. The liquid hydrogen tank carries shear, torque, end load, and bending moment due to gusts, maneuver, take-off, landing, lift, drag, and fuel sloshing. The tank is pressurized to about 1.5 atmosphere (14.6psi or 0.1 MPa) differential pressure and on ascent maintains the liquid hydrogen at a temperature of 20K. The objective of the research effort into lay the foundation for developing the technology required for reliable prediction of the effects of various design, manufacturing, and service parameters on the susceptibility of composite tanks to develop excessive permeability to cryogenic fuels. Efforts will be expended on developing the materials and structural concepts for the cryogenic tanks that can meet the functional requirements. This will include consideration for double wall composite sandwich structures, with inner wall to meet the cryogenic requirements. The structure will incorporate nanoparticles for properties modifications and developing barriers. The main effort will be extended to tank wall's internal skin design. The main requirements for internal composite stack are: (1) introduction of barrier film (e.g. honeycomb material paper sheet) to reduce the wall permeability to hydrogen, (2) introduction of nanoparticles into laminate resin to prevent micro-cracking or crack propagation. There is a need to characterize and analyze composite sandwich structural damage due to burning and explosion. Better understanding of the flammability and blast resistance of the composite structures

  12. From Fireproof Desert to Flammable Grassland: Buffelgrass Invasion in the Sonoran Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Only a few decades ago, the Sonoran Desert of northwestern Mexico and southern Arizona was considered mostly fireproof, a case of not enough fine fuel to connect the dominant shrubs and cacti. This has changed with invasions by non-native, winter annual and summer-flower perennial grasses that are rapidly transforming fireproof desert into flammable grassland. Of particular concern is buffelgrass, Pennisetum ciliare, a fire-prone and invasive African perennial grass that has already converted millions of hectares across Sonora since the mid-1960s and has made quick headway in southern and central Arizona beginning in the 1980s. Near Tucson and Phoenix, AZ, buffelgrass invasion is proceeding exponentially, with population expansion (and the costs of mitigation) more than doubling every year. As this conversion progresses, there will be increased fire risks, lost tourist revenue, diminished property values, insurmountable setbacks to conservation efforts, and the threat of large ignition fronts in desert valleys routinely spreading into the mountains. Although somewhat belated, an integrated, multi-jurisdictional effort is being organized to reduce ecological and economic impacts. My presentation will summarize the history and context of buffelgrass introduction and invasion, the disconnect in attitudes and policies across state and international boundaries, ongoing management efforts, the role of science and responsibilities of scientists, accelerated spread with changing climate, and impacts to regional ecosystems and economies. This narrative may serve as a template for other semi-arid lands where buffelgrass and similar grasses have become invasive, including Australia, South America, and many islands in the Pacific Ocean (including Hawaii), Indian Ocean, and Caribbean Sea.

  13. A high-throughput headspace gas chromatographic technique for the determination of nitrite content in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Peng, Rong; Jiang, Ran; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2018-02-23

    This paper reports on a high-throughput headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of nitrite content in water sample, based on GC measurement of cyclohexene produced from the reaction between nitrite and cyclamate in a closed vial. The method has a relative standard deviation of water samples. In short, the present HS-GC method is simple, accurate, and sensitive, and it is very suitable to be used in the batch sample testing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of styrene migration from food-contact polymers into margarine, using azeotropic distillation and headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, S L; Breder, C V; Fazio, T

    1983-09-01

    Migration studies were conducted to determine the quantity of styrene that migrates from polymers into fatty foods, specifically margarine. Azeotropic distillation was used to isolate styrene from the margarine. Headspace gas chromatography with a Chromosorb 104 column and a flame ionization detector was used for quantitation. The quantitation limit for the method was about 25 ppb (wt/wt) styrene in margarine. On the average, greater than 90% of the styrene was recovered. Several commercial margarines were examined. The method and results of the migration studies are presented. There was no detectable migration of styrene into margarine.

  15. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds and headspace aroma compounds after treatment of red wines with chitosans with different structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe-Ribeiro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds and headspace aroma abundance of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with a commercial crustacean chitin (CHTN, two commercial crustacean chitosans (CHTB, CHTD, one fungal chitosan (CHTF, one additional chitin (CHTNA and one additional chitosan (CHTC produced by alkaline deacetylation of CHTN and CHTB, respectively. Chitin and chitosans presented different structural features, namely deacetylation degree (DD, average molecular weight (MW, sugar and mineral composition (“Reducing the negative sensory impact of volatile phenols in red wine with different chitosan: effect of structure on efficiency” (Filipe-Ribeiro et al., 2018 [1]. Statistical data is also shown, which correlates the changes in headspace aroma abundance of red wines with the chitosans structural features at 10 g/h L application dose. Keywords: Red wine, 4-Ethylphenol, 4-Ethylguaiacol, Chitosan, Chitin, Chromatic characteristics, Phenolic compounds, Headspace aroma abundance

  16. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-112: Results from samples collected on July 11, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage Tank 241-S-112 (Tank S-112) at the Hanford. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5044. Samples were collected by WHC on July 11, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  17. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank SX-102: Results from samples collected on July 19, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-102 (Tank SX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed under the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5046. Samples were collected by WHC on July 19, 1995, using the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  18. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-T-110: Results from samples collected on August 31, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-T-110 (Tank T-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5056. Samples were collected by WHC on August 31, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  19. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-TX-111: Results from samples collected on October 12, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-TX-111 (Tank TX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5069. Samples were collected by WHC on October 12, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  20. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-103: Results from samples collected on June 21, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-AX-103 (Tank AX-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5029. Samples were collected by WHC on June 21, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  1. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-101: Results from samples collected on June 15, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-AX-101 (Tank AX-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) under the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5028. Samples were collected by WHC on June 15, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  2. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-109: Results from samples collected on August 1, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-109 (Tank SX-109) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5048. Samples were collected by WHC on August 1, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  3. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-104: Results from samples collected on July 25, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-104 (Tank SX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5049. Samples were collected by WHC on July 25, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  4. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-105: Results from samples collected on July 26, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-105 (Tank SX-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5047. Samples were collected by WHC on July 26, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  5. Variation in Scent Compounds of Oil-Bearing Rose (Rosa damascena Mill. Produced by Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction, Hydrodistillation and Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Erbaş

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, rose oil and rose water were hydro-distilled from the fresh oil-bearing rose flowers (Rosa damascena Mill. using Clevenger-type apparatus. Rose concretes were extracted from the fresh rose flowers by using non-polar solvents, e.g. diethyl ether, petroleum ether, cyclo-hexane, chloroform and n-hexane, and subsequently by evaporation of the solvents under vacuum. Absolutes were produced from the concretes with ethyl alcohol extraction at -20°C, leaving behind the wax and other paraffinic substances. Scent compounds of all these products detected by gas chromatography (GC-FID/GC-MS were compared with the natural scent compounds of fresh rose flower detected by using headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME with carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS fiber. A total of 46 compounds analysis were identified by HS-SPME-GC-MS in the fresh flower, and a total of 15 compounds were identified by GC-MS in the hydrodistilled rose oil. While main compounds in rose oil were geraniol (35.4%, citronellol (31.6%, and nerol (15.3%, major compound in fresh rose flower, rose water and residue water was phenylethyl alcohol (43.2, 35.6 and 98.2%, respectively. While the highest concrete yield (0.7% was obtained from diethyl ether extraction, the highest absolute yield (70.9% was obtained from the n-hexane concrete. The diethyl ether concrete gave the highest productivity of absolute, as 249.7 kg of fresh rose flowers was needed to produce 1 kg of absolute.

  6. A study of the dynamic flammability of radiation cross-linked flame-retardant HDPE/EPDM/silicon-elastomer compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Shaojin E-mail: jiashaojin2@yahoo.com.cn; Zhang Zhicheng E-mail: zczhang@ustc.edu.cn; Du Zhiwen; Teng Renrui; Wang Zhengzhou

    2003-04-01

    A dynamic flammability study of flame-retardant compound consisting of HDPE, EPDM and silicon elastomer blended with additives, as wire and cable insulation was made before and after irradiation. The data of RHR, EHC, SEC and the concentration of CO and CO{sub 2} from cone colorimeter shown in the burning process were accessed. By blending silicon elastomer, CO release rate was reduced and the thermal endurance was improved. Oxygen index, mechanical property, morphology of the char formed in dynamical flame and thermal stability were also investigated.

  7. A study of the dynamic flammability of radiation cross-linked flame-retardant HDPE/EPDM/silicon-elastomer compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Shaojin; Zhang Zhicheng; Du Zhiwen; Teng Renrui; Wang Zhengzhou

    2003-01-01

    A dynamic flammability study of flame-retardant compound consisting of HDPE, EPDM and silicon elastomer blended with additives, as wire and cable insulation was made before and after irradiation. The data of RHR, EHC, SEC and the concentration of CO and CO 2 from cone colorimeter shown in the burning process were accessed. By blending silicon elastomer, CO release rate was reduced and the thermal endurance was improved. Oxygen index, mechanical property, morphology of the char formed in dynamical flame and thermal stability were also investigated

  8. Estimation of lower flammability limits of C-H compounds in air at atmospheric pressure, evaluation of temperature dependence and diluent effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiburu, Andrés Z; de Carvalho, João A; Coronado, Christian R

    2015-03-21

    Estimation of the lower flammability limits of C-H compounds at 25 °C and 1 atm; at moderate temperatures and in presence of diluent was the objective of this study. A set of 120 C-H compounds was divided into a correlation set and a prediction set of 60 compounds each. The absolute average relative error for the total set was 7.89%; for the correlation set, it was 6.09%; and for the prediction set it was 9.68%. However, it was shown that by considering different sources of experimental data the values were reduced to 6.5% for the prediction set and to 6.29% for the total set. The method showed consistency with Le Chatelier's law for binary mixtures of C-H compounds. When tested for a temperature range from 5 °C to 100 °C, the absolute average relative errors were 2.41% for methane; 4.78% for propane; 0.29% for iso-butane and 3.86% for propylene. When nitrogen was added, the absolute average relative errors were 2.48% for methane; 5.13% for propane; 0.11% for iso-butane and 0.15% for propylene. When carbon dioxide was added, the absolute relative errors were 1.80% for methane; 5.38% for propane; 0.86% for iso-butane and 1.06% for propylene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of the content of alkyl ketene dimer in its latex by an ionic-liquid assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Wan, Xiao-Fang; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Chen, Run-Quan; Chen, Chun-Xia

    2017-12-29

    This paper reports on an ionic-liquid assisted headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) for the determination of the content of alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) in its latex samples, in which the GC system was equipped with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The method was based on the AKD hydrolysis conducted in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (ionic-liquid) added medium at 100°C for 10min in a closed headspace sample vial, and the measured CO 2 (the resulting product of the hydrolysis) by HS-GC. The results showed that the present method has a good measurement precision (RSD <2.3%) and accuracy (recoveries from 96 - 105%), and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) is 0.9%. The present method is very suitable to be used for the routine check of AKD content in its latex sample in mill applications. The study also showed that the content of AKD in the tested commercial latex samples were in the range of 3.5-12%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME method for the chromatographic determination of alkylpyrazines in cocoa samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pini Gláucia F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME procedure for isolation and determination of alkylpyrazines in cocoa liquor, using Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection (GC-FID for the separation and detection of the analytes, is presented here. The HS-SPME operational conditions were optimized using extractions of samples spiked with known amounts of alkylpyrazines typically found on cocoa products. The maximum extraction efficiency was obtained using SPME fibers coated with 65 µm Carbowax/divinylbenzene. Additionally, the best results were achieved with extraction temperature of 60 ºC, 15 min of sample/headspace equilibration time and 45 min extraction time. It was also observed that suspending the samples in saturated aqueous NaCl solution during extractions resulted in a significant increment on the peak areas. This procedure was found to be effective to determine the so-called pyrazinic ratios (quotient between peak areas of alkylpyrazines, which are useful as quality parameters for cocoa liquor.

  11. Multiple responses optimization in the development of a headspace gas chromatography method for the determination of residual solvents in pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M. Teglia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient generic static headspace gas chromatography (HSGC method was developed, optimized and validated for the routine determination of several residual solvents (RS in drug substance, using a strategy with two sets of calibration. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO was selected as the sample diluent and internal standards were used to minimize signal variations due to the preparative step. A gas chromatograph from Agilent Model 6890 equipped with flame ionization detector (FID and a DB-624 (30 m×0.53 mm i.d., 3.00 µm film thickness column was used. The inlet split ratio was 5:1. The influencing factors in the chromatographic separation of the analytes were determined through a fractional factorial experimental design. Significant variables: the initial temperature (IT, the final temperature (FT of the oven and the carrier gas flow rate (F were optimized using a central composite design. Response transformation and desirability function were applied to find out the optimal combination of the chromatographic variables to achieve an adequate resolution of the analytes and short analysis time. These conditions were 30 °C for IT, 158 °C for FT and 1.90 mL/min for F. The method was proven to be accurate, linear in a wide range and very sensitive for the analyzed solvents through a comprehensive validation according to the ICH guidelines. Keywords: Headspace gas chromatography, Residual solvents, Pharmaceuticals, Surface response methodology, Desirability function

  12. Análise qualitativa de compostos voláteis do headspace de carne cozida de ovinos e caprinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossiê Zamperetti Donadel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar qualitativamente os compostos voláteis (CV do headspace de diferentes músculos de carne cozida de ovinos e caprinos da região do Alto Camaquã, Rio Grande do Sul - Brasil. Os CV do headspace dos músculos cozidos, L. dorsi e V. lateralis de cinco ovinos machos (idade de 6 meses e cinco cabritos machos castrados (idade de 8-9 meses foram analisados pela técnica de microextração em fase sólida (HS-SPME e cromatógrafo a gás acoplado a espectrômetro de massas (GC/MS. Foram encontrados 73 compostos voláteis, dentre eles aldeídos, cetonas e compostos sulfurados, característicos de carne processada termicamente. A partir da fração volátil, foi possível encontrar marcadores que discriminassem as espécies animais estudadas, caracterizando os caprinos por apresentarem, entre outros compostos, terpenos (β-pineno, α-gurjuneno, α-muuroleno, ausentes em ovinos. Alguns compostos discriminaram V. lateralis e L. dorsi de ovinos, como álcool isopropílico, α-pineno, o-xileno, porém não foi possível obter uma diferenciação entre os músculos de caprinos.

  13. [Analysis of the components of floral scent in Glochidion puberum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with dynamic headspace adsorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Daihong; Zhang, Zhenguo; Chen, Guoping; Li, Houhun; Shi, Fuchen

    2015-03-01

    The floral scent plays the important key role in maintaining the obligate pollination mutualism between Glochidion plants and Epicephala moths. In the study, the dynamic headspace adsorption technique was employed to collect the floral scent emitted by Glochidion puberum, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the detection and identification of volatile chemical components in headspace samples of flowers from G. puberum. The peak area normalization was used to determine the relative contents of each odour component. The results showed that 45 compounds mainly consisting of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were isolated from the floral scent produced by G. puberum. Especially, both linalool (38.06%) and β-elemene (23.84%) were considered as the major scent components of G. puberum. It was speculated that linalool and β-elemene may be the two potential compounds attracting female Epicephala moths. The study provided the basic data for further electroantennographic detection and bioassays to identify the compounds having the actual physiological activity to female Epicephala moths.

  14. Headspace concentrations of explosive vapors in containers designed for canine testing and training: theory, experiment, and canine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotspeich, Erica; Kitts, Kelley; Goodpaster, John

    2012-07-10

    It is a common misconception that the amount of explosive is the chief contributor to the quantity of vapor that is available to trained canines. In fact, this quantity (known as odor availability) depends not only on the amount of explosive material, but also the container volume, explosive vapor pressure and temperature. In order to better understand odor availability, headspace experiments were conducted and the results were compared to theory. The vapor-phase concentrations of three liquid explosives (nitromethane, nitroethane and nitropropane) were predicted using the Ideal Gas Law for containers of various volumes that are in use for canine testing. These predictions were verified through experiments that varied the amount of sample, the container size, and the temperature. These results demonstrated that the amount of sample that is needed to saturate different sized containers is small, predictable and agrees well with theory. In general, and as expected, once the headspace of a container is saturated, any subsequent increase in sample volume will not result in the release of more vapors. The ability of canines to recognize and alert to differing amounts of nitromethane has also been studied. In particular, it was found that the response of trained canines is independent of the amount of nitromethane present, provided it is a sufficient quantity to saturate the container in which it is held. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of volatile organic compounds in eucalyptus fast pyrolysis bio-oil by full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski Lima, Nathalya; Romualdo Lopes, André; Gimenes Guerrero, Palimecio; Itsuo Yamamoto, Carlos; Augusto Hansel, Fabricio

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports a full evaporation (FE) headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method for the determination of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in bio-oil (i.e. methanol, ethanol, acetone, acetic acid and furfural). The method uses a 4μL sample of bio-oil in a headspace vial (ca. 20mL). Complete evaporation of the compounds was achieved after seven minutes at 90°C. The method showed good precision and accuracy for methanol, ethanol, acetone and acetic acid. The recovery of furfural was low (74.3%). The results showed that the protocol can be applied for the determination of methanol, ethanol, acetone and acetic acid in bio-oil. Detection limits ranged from 0.13 to 0.16μg. Acetic acid was the dominant analyte in the heavy bio-oil and light bio-oil analysis (113. 3 and 85.1µgmg -1 , respectively), followed by methanol, ethanol, and acetone. The polymerisation of furfural was suspected as the cause of its poor quantification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A rapid method for simultaneously determining ethanol and methanol content in wines by full evaporation headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Lin, Neng-Biao; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Zhong-Li; Barnes, Donald G

    2015-09-15

    This work reports on a full evaporation headspace gas chromatographic (FE HS-GC) method for simultaneously determining the ethanol (EtOH) and methanol (MeOH) content in wines. A small sample (10μL) was placed in a headspace sample vial, and a near-complete mass transfer of ethanol and methanol from the liquid sample to the vapor phase was obtained within three minutes at a temperature of 105°C, which allowed the measurement of the EtOH and MeOH content in the sample by GC. The results showed excellent precision and accuracy, as shown by the reproducibilities of 1.02% and 2.11% for EtOH and MeOH, respectively, and recoveries that ranged from 96.1% to 104% for both alcohols. The method is efficient, accurate and suitable for the determination of EtOH and MeOH in wine production and quality control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Flammability of Cellulose-Based Fibers and the Effect of Structure of Phosphorus Compounds on Their Flame Retardancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifah A. Salmeia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose fibers are promoted for use in various textile applications due their sustainable nature. Cellulose-based fibers vary considerably in their mechanical and flammability properties depending on their chemical composition. The chemical composition of a cellulose-based fiber is further dependent on their source (i.e., seed, leaf, cane, fruit, wood, bast, and grass. Being organic in nature, cellulose fibers, and their products thereof, pose considerable fire risk. In this work we have compared the flammability properties of cellulose fibers obtained from two different sources (i.e., cotton and peat. Compared to cotton cellulose textiles, peat-based cellulose textiles burn longer with a prominent afterglow which can be attributed to the presence of lignin in its structure. A series of phosphoramidates were synthesized and applied on both cellulose textiles. From thermogravimetric and pyrolysis combustion flow analysis of the treated cellulose, we were able to relate the flame retardant efficacy of the synthesized phosphorus compounds to their chemical structure. The phosphoramidates with methyl phosphoester groups exhibited higher condensed phase flame retardant effects on both types of cellulose textiles investigated in this study. In addition, the bis-phosphoramidates exhibited higher flame retardant efficacy compared to the mono-phosphoramidates.

  18. Altered community flammability in Florida's Apalachicola ravines and implications for the persistence of the endangered conifer Torreya taxifolia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Mola

    Full Text Available Plant species and communities often reflect historic fire regimes via ecological and evolutionary responses to recurrent fires. Plant communities of the southeastern USA experience a wide array of fire regimes, perhaps nowhere more marked than the juxtaposition of fire-prone uplands and adjacent mesic ravines along Florida's Apalachicola River. The ravines contain many endemic and disjunct species, most notably the endangered endemic conifer Torreya taxifolia. A rapid decline in T. taxifolia over the past 60 years has been associated with widespread replacement by other tree species. To understand the changes accompanying the shift in ravine composition, we compared leaf litter flammability of nine historic and contemporary species. We measured maximum flame height, flame duration, smoldering duration, mass loss, absorptive capacity, and drying rate. Ordination and perMANOVA suggest the nine species segregated into three distinct groups: the fire-impeding T. taxifolia and Taxus floridana; an intermediate group of three deciduous angiosperms; and a mixed cluster of four flammable species. Results suggest T. taxifolia and T. floridana were fire-impeding species in these communities, while contemporary dominants burn similarly to the upslope pyric species. The increasing presence of fire-facilitating species may portend a shifting fire regime that further imperils T. taxifolia and other rare species in the formerly fire-safe ravines.

  19. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  20. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  1. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

  2. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Evaluation of the synergistic interaction between Decarbomobiphenyl Oxide and alumina on the flammability and thermal behavior of unsaturated polyester resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Owias, A.; Al-Haizan, A.; Khattab, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    The bromine performance of decarbomobiphenyl oxide (DBBO) as a flame retardant for unsaturated polyester resin (UP) had been investigated in its own and in the presence of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) using UL-94V and Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI). Thermal behaviors of the resulted systems were evaluated using thermal analysis technique. DBBO showed a satisfactory fire retardant performance for UP, particularly when used at a loading higher than 30 wt%. In contrast aluminum oxide has no significant effect on the reduction of the flammability. Treatment of UP with mixtures containing different portioned of DBBO and alumina showed that, the best performance of these mixtures as a flame retardant occurred when the mixture is rich in DBBO. The maximum synergism between the two additives has been observed to occur at a weight ratio of DBBO to Al2O3 of 5:6. A possible explanation for the observed synergism between the two additives was given. The synergism was partly attributed to the formation of aluminum halide species which enhance the rate of halogen released from the halogenated compound and consequently reduce the flammability of the resin. (author)

  4. A salting out system for improving the efficiency of the headspace solid-phase microextraction of short and medium chain free fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Dennis; Pacetti, Deborah; Gabbianelli, Rosita; Gabrielli, Serena; Ballini, Roberto

    2015-08-28

    Given the importance of short and medium chain free fatty acids (FFAs) in several fields, this study sought to improve the extraction efficiency of the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of FFAs by evaluating salting out agents that appear promising for this application. The salts ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) and sodium dihydrogen phosphate (NaH2PO4) were tried on their own and in combination (3.7/1), in four different total amounts, as salting out agents in the headspace-SPME-gas chromatographic (HS-SPME-GC) analysis of the FFAs from acetic acid (C2) to decanoic acid (C10). Their performance in a model system of an aqueous standard mixture of FFAs at a pH of 3.5 was compared to that of the more commonly used sodium chloride (NaCl) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). All of the salts and salt systems evaluated, in proper amount, gave improved results compared to NaCl (saturated), which instead gave interesting results only for the least volatile FFAs C8 and C10. For C2-C6, the salt system that gave the best results compared to NaCl was (NH4)2SO4/NaH2PO4, in the highest of the four amounts evaluated, with factor increases between 1.2 and 4.1-fold, and NaH2PO4, between 1.0 and 4.3-fold. The SPME extraction efficiency given by the mixture (NH4)2SO4/NaH2PO4 was also assessed on biological and food samples, confirming that overall it performed better than NaCl. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Forensic medical evaluation of a burn injury from combustion of flammable fluids on the human body based on morphological changes in internal organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushkadamov, Z K

    2009-01-01

    The author describes morphological features of splanchnic organs in the patients that suffered an injury from combustion of flammable fluids at the body surface. The burn injury is a specific form of trauma originating from a combination of several injurious factors including thermoinhalation and intoxication with combustion products in the absence of oxygen in the centre of the hot spot. A rather specific combination of morphological changes in internal organs along with results of laboratory studies provides the most reliable criterion for forensic medical diagnosis of burn injuries from combustion of flammable fluids on the human body.

  6. The selection of skin care products for use in hyperbaric chamber may depend on flammability acceptability indices score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Darlene E; Newton, Barry E; Fore, Jane; Chiffoleau, Gwenael

    2008-02-01

    Current protocols call for stopping adjunctive skin care treatments during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) because the hyperbaric environment is considered unsafe for skin care products. The elevated oxygen fraction and the increased pressure in the hyperbaric chamber dramatically increase the flammability potential of materials, leading to the need for rigorous standards to prevent flame ignition. A scientific method of evaluating the flammability risks associated with skin care products would be helpful. Several skin care products were tested, using established industrial techniques for determining flammability potential with some modification. The information obtained from these tests can help clinicians make more rational decisions about which topical products can be used safely on patients undergoing HBOT. Wendell Hull & Associates conducted independent studies, comparing the oxygen compatibility for leading skin care products. Oxygen compatibility was determined using autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), oxygen index (OI), and heat of combustion (HoC) testing. AIT, a relative indication of a material's propensity for ignition, is the minimum temperature needed to cause a sample to self-ignite at a given pressure and oxygen concentration. OI, a relative indication of a material's flammability, is the minimum oxygen percentage that, when mixed with nitrogen, will sustain burning. HoC is the absolute value of a material's energy release when burning, if ignition occurs. Products with a high AIT, a high OI, and a low HoC are more compatible in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere (OEA). An acceptability index (AI) based on these 3 factors was calculated for the products, so the testers could rank overall material compatibility in OEAs (Lapin A. Oxygen Compatibility of Materials. International Institute of Refrigeration Commission Meeting; Brighton, England; 1973). Test results for the skin products varied widely. The AIT, OI, HoC, and AI were determined for each

  7. Quantification of liquid products from the electroreduction of CO2 and CO using static headspace-gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Abghoui, Younes; Jovanov, Zarko P.

    2017-01-01

    Static headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) useful for ex-situ liquid product analysis. Could complement high-performance liquid chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. Particularly high sensitivity towards compounds with high vapor pressure. Detection limits below 0.5μM were shown for acetaldehyde...

  8. Possibilities and limitations of dynamic headspace sampling as a pre-concentration technique for trace analysis of organics by capillary gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curvers, J.M.P.M.; Noij, T.H.M.; Cramers, C.A.M.G.; Rijks, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The possibilities, the limitations and the quantitative performance of dynamic headspace sampling, in particular closed-loop stripping, were investigated for various classes of organic substances in aqueous samples with concentrations down to the parts per 1012 (ppt) level. The effects of variations

  9. The effect of surfactant on headspace single drop microextraction for the determination of some volatile aroma compounds in citronella grass and lemongrass leaves by gas chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid method for the determination of some volatile aromatic compounds (VACs), including citronellal, citronellol, neral, geranial, geraniol, and eugenol in citronella grass and lemongrass leaves, was developed using surfactant as a surface tension modifier while performing headspace single drop m...

  10. Tank 241-BY-105 Headspace Gas and Vapor Characterization Results for Samples Collected in May 1994 and July 1994. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    Significant changes have been made to all of the original vapor characterization reports. This report documents specific headspace gas and vapor characterization results for all vapor sampling events to date. In addition, changes have been made to the original vapor reports to qualify the data based on quality assurance issues associated with the performing laboratories

  11. Comparison of direct, headspace and headspace cold fiber modes in solid phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a new coating based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/graphene oxide composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banitaba, Mohammad Hossein; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Kazemi Movahed, Siyavash

    2014-01-17

    A novel nanocomposite coating made of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and graphene oxide was electrochemically prepared on gold wire. The prepared fiber was applied to the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatographic analysis of six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Three modes of extraction i.e. direct immersion (DI), headspace (HS) and headspace cold fiber (HS-CF) in SPME were investigated. The results were compared under optimized conditions of each mode, considering the effects of the three most important parameters which are extraction temperature, extraction time and ionic strength. The comparison showed that HS-CF-SPME results in the best outcome for the extraction of PAHs from water samples. Under the optimized conditions of this mode, the calibration curves were linear within the range of 0.4-600μgL(-1) and the detection limits were between 0.05 and 0.13μgL(-1). The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations obtained at 10μgL(-1) (n=5), using a single fiber, were 4.1-6.8% and 4.8-8.4%, respectively. The fiber-to-fiber repeatabilities (n=4), expressed as the relative standard deviations (RSD%), were between 6.5% and 10.7% at a 10μgL(-1) concentration level. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of PAHs in seawater samples showing recoveries from 85% to 107%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of volatiles in silver carp by headspace solid phase micro-extraction coupled with GC-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yuping; Xiong Guangquan; Cheng Wei; Liao Tao; Lin Ruotai; Geng Shengrong; Li Xin; Li Xiaoding; Wu Wenjin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a method for the determination of volatiles using headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was presented. The extraction conditions were optimized with reference to these volatiles as hexanal, heptanal, benzaldehyde, 1-Octen-3-ol, octanal, nonanal, decenal, 2,4-heptadienal and 2,4-decadienal. The extraction of fish muscle followed by incubation on a StableFlex divinyl benzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS) fiber during 50 in at 60 obtained the most effective extraction of the analytes. The methods by HS-SPME and GC-MS were effective in detecting volatiles in the gills, scales, viscera and fish muscles. The types of volatiles in the gill were more than other organs and the number of odors compounds was 63, and the number of volatiles in scales, viscera and fish muscles was 48, 44 and 42 respectively. (authors)

  13. Analysis of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in soils by headspace and gas chromatography/flame ionization detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurandir Pereira Pinto

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The constituents of gasoline: benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX are frequently found in soils due to leaks in fuel storage tanks and they present chronic toxicity. In this work it was developed and validated a methodology of BTEX analysis in soil by gas chromatography/ flame ionization detector and static headspace. The recovery of BTEX in soil samples was evaluated using soils with different textures (sandy and loamy. The analysis method showed good resolution, in a low time of analysis (less than 30 minutes. Limits of quantification of 0.05 mg Kg¯¹ soil for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes are below the guiding values that range from 0.15 to 95 mg Kg¯¹ soil, established to determine soil quality. It was verified that the methodology enables the use of this method for BTEX analysis of soil samples for passive environmental identification of gas stations.

  14. Headspace solid-phase microextraction with 1-pyrenyldiazomethane on-fibre derivatisation for analysis of fluoroacetic acid in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporkert, Frank; Pragst, Fritz; Hübner, Sandra; Mills, Graham

    2002-05-25

    A new and in part automated headspace solid-phase microextraction method for quantitative determination of the highly toxic rodenticide fluoroacetic acid (FAA) in serum and other biological samples has been developed. FAA and deuterated acetic acid (internal standard) were extracted from acidified samples by a StableFlex divinylbenzene-Carboxen on polydimethylsiloxane fibre. The acids were derivatised on the fibre in-situ with 1-pyrenyldiazomethane and detected using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron impact ionisation and selected ion monitoring. The calibration curve for FAA in serum was linear over the range from 0.02 to 5 microg/ml, with limits of detection and quantification of 0.02 and 0.07 microg/ml, respectively. The method was also tested with spiked whole blood, urine, stomach contents and kidney samples. It was sufficiently reliable, reproducible and sensitive for use in routine forensic toxicology applications.

  15. Determination of the solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds in water using volatile-tracer assisted headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Chai, Xin-Sheng; Barnes, Donald G

    2016-02-26

    This study reports a new headspace gas chromatographic method (HS-GC) for the determination of water solubility of low volatility liquid organic compounds (LVLOs). The HS-GC analysis was performed on a set of aqueous solutions containing a range of concentrations of toluene-spiked (as a tracer) LVLOs, from under-saturation to over-saturation. A plot of the toluene tracer GC signal vs. the concentration of the LVLO results in two lines of different slopes that intersect at the concentration corresponding to the compound's solubility in water. The results showed that the HS-GC method has good precision (RSD waters of environmental and biological systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  17. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSDfuraneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Headspace versus direct immersion solid phase microextraction in complex matrixes: investigation of analyte behavior in multicomponent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionfriddo, Emanuela; Souza-Silva, Érica A; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-08-18

    This work aims to investigate the behavior of analytes in complex mixtures and matrixes with the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Various factors that influence analyte uptake such as coating chemistry, extraction mode, the physicochemical properties of analytes, and matrix complexity were considered. At first, an aqueous system containing analytes bearing different hydrophobicities, molecular weights, and chemical functionalities was investigated by using commercially available liquid and solid porous coatings. The differences in the mass transfer mechanisms resulted in a more pronounced occurrence of coating saturation in headspace mode. Contrariwise, direct immersion extraction minimizes the occurrence of artifacts related to coating saturation and provides enhanced extraction of polar compounds. In addition, matrix-compatible PDMS-modified solid coatings, characterized by a new morphology that avoids coating fouling, were compared to their nonmodified analogues. The obtained results indicate that PDMS-modified coatings reduce artifacts associated with coating saturation, even in headspace mode. This factor, coupled to their matrix compatibility, make the use of direct SPME very practical as a quantification approach and the best choice for metabolomics studies where wide coverage is intended. To further understand the influence on analyte uptake on a system where additional interactions occur due to matrix components, ex vivo and in vivo sampling conditions were simulated using a starch matrix model, with the aim of mimicking plant-derived materials. Our results corroborate the fact that matrix handling can affect analyte/matrix equilibria, with consequent release of high concentrations of previously bound hydrophobic compounds, potentially leading to coating saturation. Direct immersion SPME limited the occurrence of the artifacts, which confirms the suitability of SPME for in vivo applications. These findings shed light into the implementation of in

  19. An analytical method for trifluoroacetic Acid in water and air samples using headspace gas chromatographic determination of the methyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehavi, D; Seiber, J N

    1996-10-01

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace levels of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), an atmospheric breakdown product of several of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) replacements for the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) refrigerants, in water and air. TFA is derivatized to the volatile methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) and determined by automated headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) with electron-capture detection or manual HSGC using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method is based on the reaction of an aqueous sample containing TFA with dimethyl sulfate (DMS) in concentrated sulfuric acid in a sealed headspace vial under conditions favoring distribution of MTFA to the vapor phase. Water samples are prepared by evaporative concentration, during which TFA is retained as the anion, followed by extraction with diethyl ether of the acidified sample and then back-extraction of TFA (as the anion) in aqueous bicarbonate solution. The extraction step is required for samples with a relatively high background of other salts and organic materials. Air samples are collected in sodium bicarbonate-glycerin-coated glass denuder tubes and prepared by rinsing the denuder contents with water to form an aqueous sample for derivatization and analysis. Recoveries of TFA from spiked water, with and without evaporative concentration, and from spiked air were quantitative, with estimated detection limits of 10 ng/mL (unconcentrated) and 25 pg/mL (concentrated 250 mL:1 mL) for water and 1 ng/m(3) (72 h at 5 L/min) for air. Several environmental air, fogwater, rainwater, and surface water samples were successfully analyzed; many showed the presence of TFA.

  20. Investigation of the Extinguishing Features for Liquid Fuels and Organic Flammable Liquids Atomized by a Water Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voytkov Ivan V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of heat and mass transfer were investigated experimentally while moving and evaporating the atomized water flow in high-temperature combustion products of typical liquid fuels and organic flammable liquids: gasoline, kerosene, acetone, crude oil, industrial alcohol. We determined typical periods of liquid extinguishing by an atomized water flow of various dispersability. Data of the discharge of extinguishing medium corresponding to various parameters of atomization and duration of using the atomization devices was presented. It is shown that Um≈3.5 m/s is a minimal outflow velocity of droplets during moving while passing the distance of 1m in the high-temperature gas medium to stop the combustion of organic liquids.

  1. Vanguard/rearguard strategy for the evaluation of the degradation of yoghurt samples based on the direct analysis of the volatiles profile through headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Carrión, C; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2007-02-02

    A vanguard/rearguard analytical strategy for the monitoring of the degradation of yoghurt samples is proposed. The method is based on the headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) instrumental coupling. In this combination, the chromatographic column is firstly used as an interface between the HS and the MS (vanguard mode) avoiding separation of the volatile components by maintaining the chromatographic oven at high, constant temperature. By changing the thermal conditions of the oven, the aldehydes can be properly separated for individual identification/quantification (rearguard mode). In the vanguard method, the quantification of the volatile aldehydes was calculated through partial least square and given as a total index. The rearguard method permits the detection of the aldehydes at concentrations between 12 and 35 ng/g. Both methods were applied to the study of the environmental factors favouring the presence of the volatile aldehydes (C(5)-C(9)) in the yoghurt samples. Principal component analysis of the total concentration of aldehydes with the time (from 0 to 30 days) demonstrates the capability of the HS-MS coupling for the estimation of the quality losses of the samples. The results were corroborated by the HS-GC-MS which also indicates that pentanal was present in the yoghurt from the beginning of the study and the combination of light/oxygen was the most negative influence for sample conservation.

  2. Comments on “innovative method for carbon dioxide determination in human postmortem cardiac gas samples using headspace-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and stable labeled isotope as internal standard” by Varlet et al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffaj, T., E-mail: taoufiq.saffaj@usmba.ac.ma [Centre Universitaire Régional d’Interface, Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, BP 2626, route d’Imouzzer, Fes Morocco (Morocco); Laboratoire de Chimie Organique Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP 2202, route d’Imouzzer, Fes Morocco (Morocco); Ihssane, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP 2202, route d’Imouzzer, Fes Morocco (Morocco)

    2014-01-31

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We comment on the validation results of the method for CO{sub 2} analysis in cardiac samples. •We demonstrate that the total error of the method exceeds the acceptance limits. •We show that the method is not valid according to the new SFSTP guideline. -- Abstract: Varlet et al. recently proposed a headspace-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-GC–MS) method applicable for the routine determination of CO{sub 2} in gaseous biologic matrices. This developed bioanalytical method was fully validated according to the SFSTP 1997 guidelines using the accuracy profile as a graphical decision-making tool.In this letter, we discuss the validity of HS-GC–MS method based on the newest SFSTP guideline. In particular, we demonstrate by the estimation of the β-expectation tolerance interval that the error total exceeds the acceptance limits (30%) for the second concentration level (0.5 μmol mL{sup −1} vial HS). Furthermore, we show through the risk profile that the probability to have future results inside the ±30% acceptance limits is smaller than 95%.

  3. Screening for γ-Nonalactone in the Headspace of Freshly Cooked Non-Scented Rice Using SPME/GC-O and SPME/GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yu Chen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The determination of γ-nonalactone as one of the important odor-active compounds in freshly cooked non-scented rice is reported. It was evaluated by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O analysis and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis in the headspace above the freshly cooked non-scented rice samples extracted by using a modified headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME method. This component had a mass spectrum with a characteristic ion peak at m/z 85 (100% and a linear retention index (RI of 2,023 on a DB Wax column, consistent with those of an authentic sample of γ-nonalactone. The odor characterization of a strong, sweet, coconut-like aroma of this compound was also validated by GC-O comparison with the authentic compound.

  4. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank U-203, Results from samples collected on August 8, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-203 (Tank U-203) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the results is listed. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text

  5. Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-102: Results from samples collected on June 27, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-AX-102 (Tank AX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text

  6. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank U-204, Results from samples collected on August 8, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Thomas, B.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the analytical results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of the waste storage tank 241-U-204 (Tank U-204) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The results described in this report were obtained to characterize the vapors present in the tank headspace and to support safety evaluations and tank-farm operations. The results include air concentrations of selected inorganic and organic analytes and grouped compounds from samples obtained by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and provided for analysis to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNL). Analyses were performed by the Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) at PNL. Analyte concentrations were based on analytical results and, where appropriate, sample volumes provided by WHC. A summary of the results is listed. Detailed descriptions of the analytical results appear in the text

  7. Determination of residual acetone and acetone related impurities in drug product intermediates prepared as Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) using gas chromatography with headspace autosampling (GCHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Emma; Doggett, Adrian; Bretnall, Alison

    2014-08-05

    Spray Dried Dispersions (SDD) are uniform mixtures of a specific ratio of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and polymer prepared via a spray drying process. Volatile solvents are employed during spray drying to facilitate the formation of the SDD material. Following manufacture, analytical methodology is required to determine residual levels of the spray drying solvent and its associated impurities. Due to the high level of polymer in the SDD samples, direct liquid injection with Gas Chromatography (GC) is not a viable option for analysis. This work describes the development and validation of an analytical approach to determine residual levels of acetone and acetone related impurities, mesityl oxide (MO) and diacetone alcohol (DAA), in drug product intermediates prepared as SDDs using GC with headspace (HS) autosampling. The method development for these analytes presented a number of analytical challenges which had to be overcome before the levels of the volatiles of interest could be accurately quantified. GCHS could be used after two critical factors were implemented; (1) calculation and application of conversion factors to 'correct' for the reactions occurring between acetone, MO and DAA during generation of the headspace volume for analysis, and the addition of an equivalent amount of polymer into all reference solutions used for quantitation to ensure comparability between the headspace volumes generated for both samples and external standards. This work describes the method development and optimisation of the standard preparation, the headspace autosampler operating parameters and the chromatographic conditions, together with a summary of the validation of the methodology. The approach has been demonstrated to be robust and suitable to accurately determine levels of acetone, MO and DAA in SDD materials over the linear concentration range 0.008-0.4μL/mL, with minimum quantitation limits of 20ppm for acetone and MO, and 80ppm for DAA. Copyright

  8. Data on changes in red wine phenolic compounds, headspace aroma compounds and sensory profile after treatment of red wines with activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe-Ribeiro, Lu?s; Milheiro, Juliana; Matos, Carlos C.; Cosme, Fernanda; Nunes, Fernando M.

    2017-01-01

    Data in this article presents the changes on phenolic compounds, headspace aroma composition and sensory profile of a red wine spiked with 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol and treated with seven activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics, namely surface area, micropore volume and mesopore volume (“Reduction of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol in red wine by activated carbons with different physicochemical characteristics: impact on wine quality” Filipe-Ribeiro et al. (...

  9. Characterization of volatile substances in apples from Rosaceae family by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by GC-qMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Liseth; Perestrelo, Rosa; Caldeira, Michael; Câmara, José S

    2009-06-01

    The volatile composition of different apple varieties of Malus domestica Borkh. species from different geographic regions at Madeira Islands, namely Ponta do Pargo (PP), Porto Santo (PS), and Santo da Serra (SS) was established by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) procedure followed by GC-MS (GC-qMS) analysis. Significant parameters affecting sorption process such as fiber coating, extraction temperature, extraction time, sample amount, dilution factor, ionic strength, and desorption time, were optimized and discussed. The SPME fiber coated with 50/30 microm divinylbenzene/carboxen/PDMS (DVB/CAR/PDMS) afforded highest extraction efficiency of volatile compounds, providing the best sensitivity for the target volatiles, particularly when the samples were extracted at 50 degrees C for 30 min with constant magnetic stirring. A qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis between the investigated apple species has been established. It was possible to identify about 100 of volatile compounds among pulp (46, 45, and 39), peel (64, 60, and 64), and entire fruit (65, 43, and 50) in PP, PS, and SS apples, respectively. Ethyl esters, terpenes, and higher alcohols were found to be the most representative volatiles. Alpha-farnesene, hexan-1-ol and hexyl 2-methylbutyrate were the compounds found in the volatile profile of studied apples with the largest GC area, representing, on average, 24.71, 14.06, and 10.80% of the total volatile fraction from PP, PS, and SS apples. In PP entire apple, the most abundant compounds identified were alpha-farnesene (30.49%), the unknown compound m/z (69, 101, 157) (21.82%) and hexyl acetate (6.57%). Regarding PS entire apple the major compounds were alpha-farnesene (16.87%), estragole (15.43%), hexan-1-ol (10.94), and E-2-hexenal (10.67). Alpha-farnesene (30.3%), hexan-1-ol (18.90%), 2-methylbutanoic acid (4.7%), and pentan-1-ol (4.6%) were also found as SS entire apple volatiles present in a higher relative content. Principal

  10. Determination of the analytical performance of a headspace capillary gas chromatographic technique and karl Fischer coulometric titration by system calibration using oil samples containing known amounts of moisture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, J; Gilbert, R; Tétreault, P

    1999-08-01

    Over the past few years, concerns have been raised in the literature about the accuracy of the Karl Fischer (KF) method for assessing moisture in transformer mineral oils. To better understand this issue, the performance of a static headspace capillary gas chromatographic (HS-CGC) technique was compared to that of KF coulometric titration by analyzing moisture in samples containing known amounts of water and various samples obtained from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Two modes of adding samples into the KF vessel were used:  direct injection and indirect injection via an azeotropic distillation of the moisture with toluene. Under the conditions used for direct injection, the oil matrix was totally dissolved in the anolyte, which allowed the moisture to be titrated in a single-phase solution rather than in a suspension. The results have shown that when HS-CGC and combined azeotropic distillation/KF titration are calibrated with moisture-in-oil standards, a linear relation is observed over 0-60 ppm H(2)O with a correlation coefficient better than 0.9994 (95% confidence), with the regression line crossing through zero. A similar relation can also be observed when calibration is achieved by direct KF addition of standards prepared with octanol-1, but in this case an intercept of 4-5 ppm is noted. The amount of moisture determined by curve interpolation in NIST reference materials by the three calibrated systems ranges from 13.0 to 14.8 ppm for RM 8506 and 42.5 to 46.4 ppm for RM 8507, and in any case, the results were as high as those reported in the literature with volumetric KF titration. However, titration of various dehydrated oil and solvent samples showed that direct KF titration is affected by a small bias when samples contain very little moisture. The source of error after correction for the large sample volume used for the determination (8 mL) is about 6 ppm for Voltesso naphthenic oil and 4 ppm for toluene, revealing a matrix

  11. Calibration-free sensor for pressure and H2O concentration in headspace of sterile vial using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tingdong; Gao, Guangzhen; Liu, Ying

    2013-11-10

    Tunable diode laser absorption measurements of pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials using a distributed-feedback (DFB) diode laser near 1.4 μm are reported. A H2O line located near 7161.41 cm(-1) is selected based on its strong absorption strength and isolation from interference of neighboring transitions. Direct absorption spectra of H2O are obtained for the measurement path as well as the reference path by scanning the laser wavelength. The pressure and H2O vapor concentration in the headspace of a vial are inferred from a differential absorption signal, which is the difference between the measured and the referenced absorbance spectra. This sensor is calibration-free and no purge gas is needed. The demonstrated capability would enable measurements of pressure and H2O concentration in the headspace of vials within 2.21% and 2.86%, respectively. A precision of 1.02 Torr and 390 ppm is found for the pressure and H2O concentration, respectively. A set of measurements for commercial freeze-dried products are also performed to illustrate the usefulness of this sensor.

  12. Multivariate analysis of the volatile components in tobacco based on infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanqin; Pan, Yuanjiang; Zhou, Guojun; Chu, Guohai; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Kailong; Xia, Qian; Cheng, Changhe

    2016-11-01

    A novel infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method has been developed for the rapid determination of the volatile components in tobacco. The optimal extraction conditions for maximizing the extraction efficiency were as follows: 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber, extraction time of 20 min, infrared power of 175 W, and distance between the infrared lamp and the headspace vial of 2 cm. Under the optimum conditions, 50 components were found to exist in all ten tobacco samples from different geographical origins. Compared with conventional water-bath heating and nonheating extraction methods, the extraction efficiency of infrared-assisted extraction was greatly improved. Furthermore, multivariate analysis including principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and similarity analysis were performed to evaluate the chemical information of these samples and divided them into three classifications, including rich, moderate, and fresh flavors. The above-mentioned classification results were consistent with the sensory evaluation, which was pivotal and meaningful for tobacco discrimination. As a simple, fast, cost-effective, and highly efficient method, the infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction technique is powerful and promising for distinguishing the geographical origins of the tobacco samples coupled to suitable chemometrics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-04-15

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  14. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ''beyond extremely unlikely'' frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  15. Prediction methods for the calculation of the flammability properties of gases and vapors: CHETAH and ASTM software. Part 1. Esters and Ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigante, L.; Dellavedova, M.; Pasturenzi, C.; Lunghi, A.; Cardillo, P.

    2008-01-01

    After the law by decree of the 12. June 2003, N 233 (ATEX Directive) and REACH regulation (Regulation EC n. 2907/2006 of the European Parliament), several industrial fields, also not chemical, need the flammability data for the substances used. Perhaps, many of these data, especially for compounds with not common uses, are not easy to collect. It would be helpful to provide prediction methods in order to calculate these data without any experimentation that sometimes results time consuming, expensive and practically impossible for all the commercial compounds. In this research the ASTM software CHETAH (CHEmical Thermodynamic And Hazard evaluation) has been used in order to compute the lower flammability limit (L i ), the limiting oxygen concentration (LOC, using nitrogen as inert gas) as a function of temperature, the adiabatic flame temperature T flame , the fundamental burning velocity (S u ), the quenching distance (Q d ), the minimum ignition energy (MIE) for esters and ethers, substances highly used in industry. [it

  16. Determination of multi-class herbicides in soil by liquid-solid extraction coupled with headspace solid phase microextraction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović-Pejčev Rada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is described for simultaneous determination of five herbicides (metribuzin, acetochlor, clomazone, oxyfluorfen and dimethenamid belonging to different pesticides groups in soil samples. Developed headspace solid phase microextraction method (HS-SPME in combination with liquid-solid sample preparation (LS was optimized and applied in the analysis of some agricultural samples. Optimization of microextraction conditions, such as temperature, extraction time and sodium chloride (NaCl content was perfor-med using 100 μm polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS fiber. The extraction effi-ciencies of methanol, methanol:acetone=1:1 and methanol:acetone:hexane= =2:2:1 and the optimum number of extraction steps during the sample prepa-ration, were tested, as well. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS was used for detection and quantification, obtaining relative standard deviation (RSD below 13%, and recovery values higher than 83% for multiple analyses of soil samples fortified at 30 μg kg-1 of each herbicide. Limits of detection (LOD were less than 1.2 μg kg-1 for all the studied herbicides. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31043 i br. III43005

  17. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Sandra [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Area de Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Vigo, Facultad de Ciencias (Quimica), As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36200 Vigo (Spain); Fragueiro, Sandra [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Area de Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Vigo, Facultad de Ciencias (Quimica), As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36200 Vigo (Spain); Lavilla, Isela [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Area de Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Vigo, Facultad de Ciencias (Quimica), As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36200 Vigo (Spain); Bendicho, Carlos [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Area de Quimica Analitica, Universidad de Vigo, Facultad de Ciencias (Quimica), As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36200 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: bendicho@uvigo.es

    2005-01-10

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-{mu}l volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium.

  18. Determination of roasted pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) key odorants by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceña, Laura; Vera, Luciano; Guasch, Josep; Busto, Olga; Mestres, Montserrat

    2011-03-23

    Key odorants in roasted pistachio nuts have been determined for the first time. Two different pistachio varieties (Fandooghi and Kerman) have been analyzed by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GCO). The aroma extract dilution analyses (AEDA) applied have revealed 46 and 41 odor-active regions with a flavor dilution (FD) factor≥64 for the Fandooghi and the Kerman varieties, respectively, and 39 of them were related to precisely identified compounds. These included esters, pyrazines, aldehydes, acids, furans, and phenols. The results show that the Fandooghi variety presents, not only more odor-active regions but also higher FD factors than the Kerman variety that can lead to the conclusion that the first variety has a richer aromatic profile than the second one. The descriptive sensory analysis (DSA) showed that the roasted, chocolate/coffee, and nutty attributes were rated significantly higher in the Fandooghi variety, whereas the green attribute was significantly higher in the Kerman one.

  19. Development of a Direct Headspace Collection Method from Arabidopsis Seedlings Using HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Saito

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants produce various volatile organic compounds (VOCs, which are thought to be a crucial factor in their interactions with harmful insects, plants and animals. Composition of VOCs may differ when plants are grown under different nutrient conditions, i.e., macronutrient-deficient conditions. However, in plants, relationships between macronutrient assimilation and VOC composition remain unclear. In order to identify the kinds of VOCs that can be emitted when plants are grown under various environmental conditions, we established a conventional method for VOC profiling in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis involving headspace-solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS. We grew Arabidopsis seedlings in an HS vial to directly perform HS analysis. To maximize the analytical performance of VOCs, we optimized the extraction method and the analytical conditions of HP-SPME-GC-TOF-MS. Using the optimized method, we conducted VOC profiling of Arabidopsis seedlings, which were grown under two different nutrition conditions, nutrition-rich and nutrition-deficient conditions. The VOC profiles clearly showed a distinct pattern with respect to each condition. This study suggests that HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS analysis has immense potential to detect changes in the levels of VOCs in not only Arabidopsis, but other plants grown under various environmental conditions.

  20. Microbes a Tool for the Remediation of Organotin Pollution Determined by Static Headspace Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Finnegan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tributyltin (TBT is one of the most toxic anthropogenic compounds introduced into the marine environment. Despite its global ban in 2008, TBT is still a problem of great concern due to its high affinity for particulate matter, providing a direct and potentially persistent route of entry into benthic sediments. Bioremediation strategies may constitute an alternative approach to conventional physicochemical methods, benefiting from the microorganism’s potential to metabolize anthropogenic compounds. In this work, a simple, precise and accurate static headspace gas chromatography method was developed to investigate the ability of TBT degrading microbes in sedimentary microcosms over a period of 120 days. The proposed method was validated for linearity, repeatability, accuracy, specificity, limit of detection and limit of quantification. The method was subsequently successfully applied for the detection and quantification of TBT and degradation compounds in sediment samples on day 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 of the experiment employing the principles of green chemistry. On day 120 the concentration of TBT remaining in the microcosms ranged between 91.91 ng/g wet wt for the least effective microbial inoculant to 52.73 ng/g wet wt for the most effective microbial inoculant from a starting concentration of 100 ng/g wet wt.

  1. Multi-volatile method for aroma analysis using sequential dynamic headspace sampling with an application to brewed coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Tsunokawa, Jun; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas

    2014-12-05

    A novel multi-volatile method (MVM) using sequential dynamic headspace (DHS) sampling for analysis of aroma compounds in aqueous sample was developed. The MVM consists of three different DHS method parameters sets including choice of the replaceable adsorbent trap. The first DHS sampling at 25 °C using a carbon-based adsorbent trap targets very volatile solutes with high vapor pressure (>20 kPa). The second DHS sampling at 25 °C using the same type of carbon-based adsorbent trap targets volatile solutes with moderate vapor pressure (1-20 kPa). The third DHS sampling using a Tenax TA trap at 80 °C targets solutes with low vapor pressure (0.9910) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 1.0-7.5 ng mL(-1)) even with MS scan mode. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analysis of a wide variety of aroma compounds in brewed coffee. Ten potent aroma compounds from top-note to base-note (acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, 4-ethyl guaiacol, furaneol, guaiacol, 3-methyl butanal, 2,3-pentanedione, 2,3,5-trimethyl pyrazine, vanillin, and 4-vinyl guaiacol) could be identified together with an additional 72 aroma compounds. Thirty compounds including 9 potent aroma compounds were quantified in the range of 74-4300 ng mL(-1) (RSD<10%, n=5). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of transformation products of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine in water using vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazbayeva, Dina; Kenessov, Bulat; Psillakis, Elefteria; Nassyrova, Dayana; Bektassov, Marat

    2018-06-22

    A new, sensitive and simple method based on vacuum-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (Vac-HSSPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS), is proposed for the quantification of rocket fuel unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) transformation products in water samples. The target transformation products were: pyrazine, 1-methyl-1H-pyrazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, N,N-dimethylformamide, 1-methyl-1Н-1,2,4-triazole, 1-methyl-imidazole and 1H-pyrazole. For these analytes and within shorter sampling times, Vac-HSSPME yielded detection limits (0.5-100 ng L -1 ) 3-10 times lower than those reported for regular HSSPME. Vac-HSSPME sampling for 30 min at 50 °C yielded the best combination of analyte responses and their standard deviations (24 h). Finally, multiple Vac-HSSME proved to be an efficient tool for controlling the matrix effect and quantifying UDMH transformation products. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of tetrachloroethylene and other volatile halogenated organic compounds in oil wastes by headspace SPME GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, D.; Bezzi, R.; Torri, C.; Galletti, P.; Tagliavini, E. [Bologna Univ., Ravenna (Italy). Lab. of Chemistry, C.I.R.S.A

    2007-09-15

    Oil wastes and slops are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, which may contain a variety of contaminants including tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) and other volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOCs). The analytical determination of PCE at trace levels in petroleum-derived matrices is difficult to carry out in the presence of large amounts of hydrocarbon matrix components. In the following study, we demonstrate that headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with GC-MS analysis can be applied for the rapid measurement of PCE concentration in oil samples. The HS-SPME method was developed using liquid paraffin as matrix matching reference material for external and internal calibration and optimisation of experimental parameters. The limit of quantitation was 0.05 mg kg{sup -1}, and linearity was established up to 25 mg kg{sup -1}. The HS-SPME method was extended to several VHOCs, including trichloroethylene (TCE) in different matrices and was applied to the quantitative analysis of PCE and TCE in real samples.

  4. Rapid analysis of dissolved methane, ethylene, acetylene and ethane using partition coefficients and headspace-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomond, Jasmine S; Tong, Anthony Z

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of dissolved methane, ethylene, acetylene, and ethane in water is crucial in evaluating anaerobic activity and investigating the sources of hydrocarbon contamination in aquatic environments. A rapid chromatographic method based on phase equilibrium between water and its headspace is developed for these analytes. The new method requires minimal sample preparation and no special apparatus except those associated with gas chromatography. Instead of Henry's Law used in similar previous studies, partition coefficients are used for the first time to calculate concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbon gases, which considerably simplifies the calculation involved. Partition coefficients are determined to be 128, 27.9, 1.28, and 96.3 at 30°C for methane, ethylene, acetylene, and ethane, respectively. It was discovered that the volume ratio of gas-to-liquid phase is critical to the accuracy of the measurements. The method performance can be readily improved by reducing the volume ratio of the two phases. Method validation shows less than 6% variation in accuracy and precision except at low levels of methane where interferences occur in ambient air. Method detection limits are determined to be in the low ng/L range for all analytes. The performance of the method is further tested using environmental samples collected from various sites in Nova Scotia.

  5. Determination of methylmercury by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using headspace single-drop microextraction with in situ hydride generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Fragueiro, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed for preconcentration and matrix separation of methylmercury prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Generation of methylmercury hydride (MeHgH) from a 5-ml solution is carried out in a closed vial and trapped onto an aqueous single drop (3-μl volume) containing Pd(II) or Pt(IV) (50 and 10 mg/l, respectively). The hydrogen evolved in the headspace (HS) after decomposition of sodium tetrahydroborate (III) injected for hydride generation caused the formation of finely dispersed Pd(0) or Pt(0) in the drop, which in turn, were responsible for the sequestration of MeHgH. A preconcentration factor of ca. 40 is achieved with both noble metals used as trapping agents. The limit of detection of methylmercury was 5 and 4 ng/ml (as Hg) with Pd(II) or Pt(IV) as trapping agents, and the precision expressed as relative standard deviation was about 7%. The preconcentration system was fully characterised through optimisation of the following variables: Pd(II) or Pt(IV) concentration in the drop, extraction time, pH of the medium, temperatures of both sample solution and drop, concentration of salt in the sample solution, sodium tetrahydroborate (III) concentration in the drop and stirring rate. The method has been successfully validated against two fish certified reference materials (CRM 464 tuna fish and CRM DORM-2 dogfish muscle) following selective extraction of methylmercury in 2 mol/l HCl medium

  6. Forming and sustaining partnerships to provide integrated services for young people: an overview based on the headspace Geelong experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaly, Tom; von Treuer, Kathryn; van Hamond, Toni; Windle, Kelly

    2011-02-01

    To discuss critical considerations in the formation and maintenance of agency partnerships designed to provide integrated care for young people. Two years after its establishment, an evaluation of the headspace Barwon collaboration and a review of the health-care and management literature on agency collaboration were conducted. The principal findings together with the authors' experience working at establishing and maintaining the partnership are used to discuss critical issues in forming and maintaining inter-agency partnerships. Structural and process considerations are necessary but not sufficient for the successful formation and maintenance of inter-agency partnerships and integrated care provision. Specifically, organizational culture change and staff engagement is a significant challenge and planning for this is essential and often neglected. Although agreeing on common goals and objectives is an essential first step in forming partnerships designed to provide integrated care, goodwill is not enough, and the literature consistently shows that most collaborations fail to meet their objectives. Principles and lessons of organizational behaviour and management practices in the business sector can contribute a great deal to partnership planning. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography for the analysis of aldehydes in edible oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunhua; Ji, Jiaojiao; Tan, Connieal; Chen, Dongmei; Luo, Feng; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2014-03-01

    Oxidation has important effects on the quality of edible oils. In particular, the generation of aldehydes produced by the oxidation of oils is one of the deteriorative factors to their quality. The aim of this study was to develop a method to determine the aldehydes as lipid oxidation markers in edible oils. Seven aldehydes generated from lipid oxidation were studied using headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The extraction efficiency of five commercial fibers was investigated and the influence of extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature, and desorption time were optimized. The best result was obtained with 85 μm carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane, extraction at 50 °C for 15 min and desorption in the gas chromatography injector at 250 °C for 2 min. Under the optimized conditions, the content of hexanal was the highest of the seven aldehydes in all edible oils. The limits of detection for hexanal in the three oils were found to range from 4.6 to 10.2 ng L(-1). The reproducibility of the method was evaluated and the relative standard deviations were less than 8.9%. This developed approach was successfully applied to analyze hexanal in peanut oil, soy oil, and olive oil samples, and these results were compared with those obtained using the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARs) method. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Second Order Kinetic Modeling of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction of Flavors Released from Selected Food Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyuan Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME has been widely used in various fields as a simple and versatile method, yet challenging in quantification. In order to improve the reproducibility in quantification, a mathematical model with its root in psychological modeling and chemical reactor modeling was developed, describing the kinetic behavior of aroma active compounds extracted by SPME from two different food model systems, i.e., a semi-solid food and a liquid food. The model accounted for both adsorption and release of the analytes from SPME fiber, which occurred simultaneously but were counter-directed. The model had four parameters and their estimated values were found to be more reproducible than the direct measurement of the compounds themselves by instrumental analysis. With the relative standard deviations (RSD of each parameter less than 5% and root mean square error (RMSE less than 0.15, the model was proved to be a robust one in estimating the release of a wide range of low molecular weight acetates at three environmental temperatures i.e., 30, 40 and 60 °C. More insights of SPME behavior regarding the small molecule analytes were also obtained through the kinetic parameters and the model itself.

  10. Solid phase microextraction headspace sampling of chemical warfare agent contaminated samples : method development for GC-MS analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson Lepage, C.R.; Hancock, J.R. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Medicine Hat, AB (Canada); Wyatt, H.D.M. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Defence R and D Canada-Suffield (DRDC-Suffield) is responsible for analyzing samples that are suspected to contain chemical warfare agents, either collected by the Canadian Forces or by first-responders in the event of a terrorist attack in Canada. The analytical techniques used to identify the composition of the samples include gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. GC-MS and LC-MS generally require solvent extraction and reconcentration, thereby increasing sample handling. The authors examined analytical techniques which reduce or eliminate sample manipulation. In particular, this paper presented a screening method based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) headspace sampling and GC-MS analysis for chemical warfare agents such as mustard, sarin, soman, and cyclohexyl methylphosphonofluoridate in contaminated soil samples. SPME is a method which uses small adsorbent polymer coated silica fibers that trap vaporous or liquid analytes for GC or LC analysis. Collection efficiency can be increased by adjusting sampling time and temperature. This method was tested on two real-world samples, one from excavated chemical munitions and the second from a caustic decontamination mixture. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  11. Headspace Hanging Drop Liquid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Flavors from Clove Buds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi Jin; Shin, Yeon Jae; Oh, Se Yeon; Kim, Nam Sun; Kim, Kun; Lee, Dong Sun [Seoul Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    A novel sample pretreatment technique, headspace hanging drop liquid phase microextraction (HS-LPME) was studied and applied to the determination of flavors from solid clove buds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Several parameters affecting on HS-LPME such as organic solvent drop volume, extraction time, extraction temperature and phase ratio were investigated. 1-Octanol was selected as the extracting solvent, drop size was fixed to 0.6 μL. 60 min extraction time at 25 .deg. C was chosen. HS-LPME has the good efficiency demonstrated by the higher partition equilibrium constant (K{sub lh}) values and concentration factor (CF) values. The limits of detection (LOD) were 1.5-3.2 ng. The amounts of eugenol, β-caryophyllene and eugenol acetate from the clove bud sample were 1.90 mg/g, 1.47 mg/g and 7.0 mg/g, respectively. This hanging drop based method is a simple, fast and easy sample enrichment technique using minimal solvent. HSLPME is an alternative sample preparation method for the analysis of volatile aroma compounds by GC-MS.

  12. [A novel vapor dynamic headspace enrichment equipment for nontarget screening of volatile organic compounds in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Zhang, Haijun; Tian, Yuzeng; Wang, Longxing; Chen, Jiping

    2011-09-01

    A novel vapor dynamic headspace enrichment device was set up for nontarget screening of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. The main operating parameters of this device, such as length of distillation tube, volume of collected condensate, and choice of absorbent, were optimized. In this device, vapor was utilized as a purge gas and water was utilized as a absorbent. With the help of the device, one liter of water sample could be concentrated to 5 mL and the sensitivity of traditional purge and trap-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (P&T-GC-MS) could be improved 1-2 orders of magnitude. Source and disinfected water samples from a water treatment plant were analyzed with this method. Compared with the traditional P&T-GC-MS analysis without pre-enrichment, the numbers of identified VOCs were improved from 0 to 16 for source water and 5 to 35 for disinfected water samples. It is also shown that there are many halide compounds in VOCs in disinfected water which do not exist in source water.

  13. Determination of Lactones in Wines by Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Pérez-Olivero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME coupled with high-resolution gas chromatographic (HRGC analysis was studied for determining lactones in wines. Six different SPME fibers were tested, and the influence of different factors such as temperature and time of desorption, ionic strength, time of extraction, content of sugar, ethanol, tannins and anthocyanins, and pH and influence of SO2 were studied. The proposed HS-SPME-GC method is an appropriate technique for the quantitative analysis of γ-butyrolactone, γ-hexalactone, trans-whiskey lactone, γ-octalactone, cis-whiskey lactone, γ-nonalactone, γ-decalactone, δ-decalactone, and γ-undecalactone in wines. Method reproducibility and repeatability ranged between 0.6 and 5.2% for all compounds. Detection limit for γ-butyrolactone was 0.17 mg/L and a few μg/L for the rest of the compounds. The optimized method has been applied to several wine samples.

  14. Investigation into the conditions under which HFC134a may become flammable.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kramers, AP

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available or approaching 180°C would be associated with an onset of catastrophic conditions such as plant room fires and total mechanical failure of equipment. It is suggested in that the guidelines listed in Section 5.2, pertaining to abnormal plant conditions... /lubricant mixtures can become explosive. The work must therefore consider both normal and abnormal operating conditions to which HFC134a may be exposed to empower machine operators, mine maintenance personnel and contractors to take preventative...

  15. Analysis of Odorants in Marking Fluid of Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) Using Simultaneous Sensory and Chemical Analysis with Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Multidimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soso, Simone B; Koziel, Jacek A

    2016-06-25

    Scent-marking is the most effective method of communication in the presence or absence of a signaler. These complex mixtures result in a multifaceted interaction triggered by the sense of smell. The objective was to identify volatile organic compound (VOC) composition and odors emitted by total marking fluid (MF) associated with Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica). Siberian tiger, an endangered species, was chosen because its MF had never been analyzed. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) for headspace volatile collection combined with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry for simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses were used. Thirty-two VOCs emitted from MF were identified. 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, the sole previously identified compound responsible for the "characteristic" odor of P. tigris MF, was identified along with two additional compounds confirmed with standards (urea, furfural) and four tentatively identified compounds (3-methylbutanamine, (R)-3-methylcyclopentanone, propanedioic acid, and 3-hydroxybutanal) as being responsible for the characteristic aroma of Siberian tiger MF. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses improved characterization of scent-markings and identified compounds not previously reported in MF of other tiger species. This research will assist animal ecologists, behaviorists, and zookeepers in understanding how scents from specific MF compounds impact tiger and wildlife communication and improve management practices related to animal behavior. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses is applicable to unlocking scent-marking information for other species.

  16. Analysis of Odorants in Marking Fluid of Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica Using Simultaneous Sensory and Chemical Analysis with Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Multidimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone B. Soso

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scent-marking is the most effective method of communication in the presence or absence of a signaler. These complex mixtures result in a multifaceted interaction triggered by the sense of smell. The objective was to identify volatile organic compound (VOC composition and odors emitted by total marking fluid (MF associated with Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica. Siberian tiger, an endangered species, was chosen because its MF had never been analyzed. Solid phase microextraction (SPME for headspace volatile collection combined with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry for simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses were used. Thirty-two VOCs emitted from MF were identified. 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, the sole previously identified compound responsible for the “characteristic” odor of P. tigris MF, was identified along with two additional compounds confirmed with standards (urea, furfural and four tentatively identified compounds (3-methylbutanamine, (R-3-methylcyclopentanone, propanedioic acid, and 3-hydroxybutanal as being responsible for the characteristic aroma of Siberian tiger MF. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses improved characterization of scent-markings and identified compounds not previously reported in MF of other tiger species. This research will assist animal ecologists, behaviorists, and zookeepers in understanding how scents from specific MF compounds impact tiger and wildlife communication and improve management practices related to animal behavior. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses is applicable to unlocking scent-marking information for other species.

  17. Influence of harvest maturity and fruit logistics on pineapple (Ananas comosus [L.] Merr.) volatiles assessed by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingass, Christof B; Grauwet, Tara; Carle, Reinhold

    2014-05-01

    Profiling of volatiles from pineapple fruits was performed at four ripening stages using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). In total, 142 volatiles were detected, of which 132 were identified. Multivariate data analysis was carried out to assess the effect of post-harvest storage on volatiles composition of green-ripe sea-freighted pineapple in comparison to air-freighted fruits harvested at full maturity. The latter fruits were characterised by volatiles described as potent odorants in pineapples, such as δ-octalactone, γ-lactones, 1-(E,Z)-3,5-undecatriene and 1,3,5,8-undecatetraene, as well as various methyl esters. In contrast, post-harvest storage of green-ripe sea-freighted fruits resulted in an increased formation of ethyl esters, acetates, acetoxy esters and alcohols, thus allowing the authentication of sea- and air-freighted pineapples, respectively. Particularly, compounds presumably derived from methyl-branched amino acid catabolism were identified in the fruits at later post-harvest stages. In addition, physicochemical traits were determined to characterise the fruit maturity stages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Earth-Based Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus to Assess Material Flammability for Microgravity and Extraterrestrial Fire-Safety Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, S. L.; Beeson, H.; Haas, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to modify the standard oxygen consumption (cone) calorimeter (described in ASTM E 1354 and NASA STD 6001 Test 2) to provide a reproducible bench-scale test environment that simulates the buoyant or ventilation flow that would be generated by or around a burning surface in a spacecraft or extraterrestrial gravity level. This apparatus will allow us to conduct normal gravity experiments that accurately and quantitatively evaluate a material's flammability characteristics in the real-use environment of spacecraft or extra-terrestrial gravitational acceleration. The Equivalent Low Stretch Apparatus (ELSA) uses an inverted cone geometry with the sample burning in a ceiling fire configuration that provides a reproducible bench-scale test environment that simulates the buoyant or ventilation flow that would be generated by a flame in a spacecraft or extraterrestrial gravity level. Prototype unit testing results are presented in this paper. Ignition delay times and regression rates for PMMA are presented over a range of radiant heat flux levels and equivalent stretch rates which demonstrate the ability of ELSA to simulate key features of microgravity and extraterrestrial fire behavior.

  19. Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Analysis of Volatile Components in Phalaenopsis Nobby’s Pacific Sunset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsin Yeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Phalaenopsis is the most important economic crop in the Orchidaceae family. There are currently numerous beautiful and colorful Phalaenopsis flowers, but only a few species of Phalaenopsis have an aroma. This study reports the analysis volatile components present in P. Nobby’s Pacific Sunset by solid-phase microextraction (SPME coupled with gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The results show that the optimal extraction conditions were obtained by using a DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber. A total of 31 compounds were identified, with the major compounds being geraniol, linalool and α-farnesene. P. Nobby’s Pacific Sunset had the highest odor concentration from 09:00 to 13:00 on the eighth day of storage. It was also found that in P. Nobby’s Pacific Sunset orchids the dorsal sepals and petals had the highest odor concentrations, whereas the column had the lowest.

  20. Expanding the use of polymeric ionic liquids in headspace solid-phase microextraction: Determination of ultraviolet filters in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Rodríguez, María J; Nan, He; Anderson, Jared L

    2018-03-09

    Three crosslinked polymeric ionic liquid (PIL) sorbent coatings were used in headspace solid-phase microextraction for the determination of a group of ultraviolet filters. The developed crosslinked PIL-based materials include two polycations and a double confined PIL. The method, in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, is simple, solvent free, and does not require of any derivatization step. After proper optimization of the methodologies with each developed fiber, the analytical performance was compared with a commercial polyacrylate fiber. A study of the normalized calibration slopes, obtained by dividing the calibration slope of each analyte by the coating volume, revealed that the crosslinked fibers can be used as alternatives to commercial fibers for the determination of the selected group of compounds. In particular, the coating nature of the PIL containing the 1-vinylbenzyl-3-hexadecylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide IL as monomer and the 1,12-di(3-vinylbenzylimidazolium)dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide IL as crosslinker is the most suitable for the extraction of the selected compounds despite their coating volume, being 3.6 times lower than the commercial polyacrylate fiber. For this fiber, wide linear ranges, correlation coefficients higher than 0.990, limits of detection ranging from 2.8 ng L -1 to 26 ng L -1 and relative standard deviations ranging from 2.5 to 15% were achieved. Finally, all proposed PIL-based fibers were applied towards the analysis of tap water, pool water and lake water, with the majority of the ultraviolet filters being detected and quantified in the last two types of samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.