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Sample records for total daily insulin

  1. Carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio is estimated from 300-400 divided by total daily insulin dose in type 1 diabetes patients who use the insulin pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Akio; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Fumie; Kasami, Ryuichi; Miyashita, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Sumiko; Kondo, Eri; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Endo, Itsuro; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Toshio; Shimomura, Iichiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide

    2012-11-01

    To optimize insulin dose using insulin pump, basal and bolus insulin doses are widely calculated from total daily insulin dose (TDD). It is recommended that total daily basal insulin dose (TBD) is 50% of TDD and that the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) equals 500 divided by TDD. We recently reported that basal insulin requirement is approximately 30% of TDD. We therefore investigated CIR after adjustment of the proper basal insulin rate. Forty-five Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes were investigated during several weeks of hospitalization. The patients were served standard diabetes meals (25-30 kcal/kg of ideal body weight). Each meal omission was done to confirm basal insulin rate. Target blood glucose level was set at 100 and 150 mg/dL before and 2 h after each meal, respectively. After the basal insulin rate was fixed and target blood glucose levels were achieved, TBD, CIR, TDD, and their products were determined. Mean (±SD) blood glucose levels before and 2 h after meals were 121±47 and 150±61 mg/dL, respectively. TDD was 31.5±9.0 U, and TBD was 27.0±6.5% of TDD. CIR×TDD of breakfast was significantly lower than those of lunch and supper (288±73 vs. 408±92 and 387±83, respectively; Plunch and supper in type 1 diabetes patients. These results indicate that the insulin dose has been underestimated by using previously established calculations.

  2. Evaluation of Total Daily Dose and Glycemic Control for Patients on U-500 Insulin Admitted to the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    regular insulin has significantly increased in recent years. These patients are severely insulin resistant requiring high doses of insulin to achieve...on U-500 Insulin Admitted to the Hospital presented at SURF Conference, San Antonio, TX 20 May 201 6 with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local...59th CSPG/SGVU) C.201 4 . I 52d PROTOCOL TITLE Evaluation of Total Dai ly Dose and Glycemic Control for Patients on U-500 Insulin Admitted to the

  3. Evaluation of Total Daily Dose and Glycemic Control for Patients Taking U-500 Insulin Admitted to the Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-27

    mail:jack.e.lewi.mil@mail.mil Key Words: U-500 regular insulin , inpatient diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance Conflict of Interest Statements...500 regular insulin are severely insulin resistant requiring high doses of insulin . It has been observed that a patient’s insulin requirements may...concentrated than U-100 regular insulin and is generally used in patients with severe insulin resistance requiring greater than 200 units of insulin

  4. Ethnic variation in the correlation between waist to height ratio and total daily insulin requirement in children with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uday, Suma; Gorman, Shaun; Feltbower, Richard G; Mathai, Mathew

    2017-03-01

    Total daily insulin required to achieve glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes (T1D) depends on numerous factors. Correlation of insulin requirement to body mass index and waist circumference has been variably reported in the literature and that of waist-to-height ratio has not been studied. To study the correlation between daily insulin requirement [total daily dose (TDD)] and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) in a multiethnic population. A cross-sectional study of children (5-18 years) with T1D attending a diabetes clinic in a multiethnic population in Bradford, UK was conducted. Physical measurements were undertaken in the clinic setting and data collected from case notes and patients/carers. Sixty nine patients with mean age 12.7(±3.1) yr, duration of diabetes 5.4(±3.5) yr and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 80(±18)mmol/mol(9.5 ± 1.6%) were recruited. Nearly 54% (n = 37) were white and 46% were non-white (29 Asian Pakistani; 1 Indian; 2 mixed White Afro-Caribbean). The two groups had similar demographics and disease profiles. Non-whites compared with whites had a higher prevalence of obesity (15 vs 5%, p 1), family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D) (49% vs. 33%), microalbuminuria (22% vs. 11%, p 1). WHtR and TDD were poorly correlated in the whole group. There was however a significant positive correlation in Caucasians (r = 0.583, N = 37, p 1) and a negative correlation in Asian Pakistanis (r = -0.472, N = 32, p 1); with a significant negative correlation seen in subjects with relatives with T2D (r = -0.86, N = 6, p = 0.02). The variation in correlations highlights that the two ethnic groups behave differently and should therefore be studied separately with regards to factors influencing insulin requirements with careful consideration to the presence of parental IR. Further prospective studies are required to explore the reasons for these differences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The impact of extended release exenatide as adjuvant therapy on hemoglobin A1C, weight, and total daily dose of insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using U-500 insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwig, Phillip A; Zielinski, Angela J; Accursi, Mallory L; Burant, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant exenatide extended release (ER) therapy in patients treated with regular U-500 insulin. In this retrospective chart review at an ambulatory care center in the Midwest, 18 patients with type 2 diabetes being treated with regular U-500 insulin and adjuvant exenatide ER were identified. These patients were evaluated for outcomes following the addition of exenatide ER. The primary outcome was change in HbA 1C from baseline to 3, 6, and 12months. Secondary outcomes included change in weight, total daily dose (TDD) of insulin, and hypoglycemia. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed to assess the differences in mean scores over four time periods. A total of 18 of 50 patients met inclusion criteria with sufficient data to be included in analysis. HbA 1C showed non-significant findings from baseline to 12months (8.08% vs. 8.23%; p=0.75). A non-significant, modest weight loss occurred (146.4kgvs. 144.2kg; -2.2kg; p=0.31). A significant decrease in TDD of insulin was observed (378 units vs. 326 units; p1). There was a trend towards hypoglycemia from baseline to month 3 post addition of exenatide ER (0.33 events vs. 1.33 events; p=0.055). In patients treated with regular U-500 insulin, adjuvant exenatide ER therapy showed no significant improvement in HbA 1C , but did show modest weight loss as well as decreased insulin requirements to achieve a HbA 1C that was comparable to baseline. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Determinants of daily insulin use in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, Marian J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Insulin need for a given degree of glucose control varies markedly among individuals. We examined which factors determine daily insulin use in patients with Type I diabetes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed in 416 patients. Clinical parameters, medication use, physical

  7. Determinants of daily insulin use in Type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, Marian J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin need for a given degree of glucose control varies markedly among individuals. We examined which factors determine daily insulin use in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 416 patients. Clinical parameters, medication use, physical

  8. Detemir as a once-daily basal insulin in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson SE

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Scott E NelsonCleveland Family Medicine, Cleveland, Mississippi, USABackground: Insulin detemir, a long-acting basal insulin analog, is labeled for once-daily or twice-daily dosing in patients with type 1 (T1DM or type 2 (T2DM diabetes mellitus. Protocols for some earlier clinical studies of detemir evaluated twice-daily dosing, which may have generated the misperception that detemir should be prescribed twice daily for most patients. This review examines pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD, observational, and controlled studies that have evaluated once-daily and twice-daily detemir in patients with T2DM to determine the efficacy and safety of once-daily dosing.Methods: PubMed was searched using the keywords “detemir,” “once daily,” “twice daily,” and “type 2 diabetes” with the limits of clinical trial, human, and English.Results: Detemir has a relatively flat time–action profile and duration of action of up to 24 hours for patients with T2DM. Once-daily dosing is the most commonly used detemir regimen reported in observational studies, and controlled clinical studies indicate that once-daily dosing controls glycosylated hemoglobin when detemir is administered alone or in combination with a prandial insulin or oral antidiabetes drugs. In comparative clinical trials, detemir had a similar time–action profile and duration of action to another long-acting insulin analog, glargine, with less within-subject variability. Once-daily detemir was associated with no weight gain or less weight gain than comparator regimens. For patients who had not achieved glycemic control with a basal dose of once-daily detemir, adding a prandial insulin provided better glycemic control, less postprandial hypoglycemia, and a lower total daily dose of detemir than twice-daily detemir. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team and the use of a holistic approach for the treatment of T2DM patients are recommended to achieve and maintain the best

  9. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections: the impact of baseline A1c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retnakaran, Ravi; Hochman, Jackie; DeVries, J. Hans; Hanaire-Broutin, Helene; Heine, Robert J.; Melki, Vincent; Zinman, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Rapid-acting insulin analogs (insulin lispro and insulin aspart) have emerged as the meal insulin of choice in both multiple daily insulin injection (MDII) therapy and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for type 1 diabetes. Thus, a comparison of efficacy between CSII and MDII should be

  10. V-Go Insulin Delivery System Versus Multiple Daily Insulin Injections for Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Abigail; Lintner, Michaela; Knezevich, Emily

    2015-04-21

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus affects over 29.1 million Americans, diagnosed and undiagnosed. Achieving and maintaining glycemic control for these patients is of extreme importance when working to prevent complications and improve quality of life for patients. The V-Go is a newly developed insulin delivery system. The push of a button inserts a needle into the patient once daily and remains attached for 24 hours. The V-Go is designed to release a set basal rate throughout the day, while allowing patients to provide up to 36 units of on-demand bolus insulin with the manual click of 2 buttons. It is a spring-loaded device filled daily with rapid-acting insulin that runs without the use of batteries or computer software. The main objective of this prospective active comparator study was to observe the A1C lowering effects of multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) versus the use of the V-Go insulin delivery system for patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus over a 3-month period. In addition, the effect on insulin requirement for these patients was assessed with secondary comparisons of weight, blood pressure, prevalence of hypoglycemic events, and quality of life before and after 3 months of intensified insulin therapy with regular monitoring by a clinical pharmacist at an internal medicine clinic. The average A1C lowering experienced by the 3 patients in the V-Go group was 1.5%, while the average A1C change in the 3 patients in the MDII group was an increase of 0.2%. All patients in the V-Go group experienced a decrease in insulin total daily dose (TDD), with an average decrease of 26.3 units. All patients in the MDII group experienced an increase in insulin TDD with an average of 15 units daily to achieve therapeutic goals individualized for each patient. All patients who underwent intensification of insulin therapy experienced an increase in subjective quality of life (QOL) as determined using the Diabetes-39 (D-39) questionnaire, though QOL results lacked

  11. Body fat related to daily physical activity and insulin concentrations in non-diabetic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Magnus; Thorsson, Ola; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the associations between body fat versus daily physical activity and insulin concentrations in non-diabetic young children in a cross-sectional study of 172 children (93 boys and 79 girls) aged 8-11 years. Blood samples were analysed for serum insulin and daily physical activity......%). Body fat distribution was calculated as AFM/TBF. Body fat distribution was independently linked to both insulin concentrations and physical activity. In contrast, TBF, AFM, and BF% were linked to physical activity only and not to insulin concentrations. In conclusion in this population of non-diabetic...... was measured by accelerometers. Time spent performing vigorous activity was estimated from accelerometer data by using established cut-off points. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to quantify abdominal fat mass (AFM) and total body fat (TBF), also calculated as percentage of body weight (BF...

  12. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections of insulin for pregnant women with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Diane; Tuffnell, Derek J; West, Jane; West, Helen M

    2016-06-07

    Diabetes results in a rise in blood glucose above normal physiological levels; if untreated this may cause damage to many systems including the cardiovascular and renal systems. Pregnancy increases resistance to insulin action; for those women who have pre-gestational diabetes, this results in an increasing insulin requirement. There are several methods of administering insulin. Conventionally, insulin has been administered subcutaneously, formally referred to as intensive conventional treatment, but now more usually referred to as multiple daily injections (MDI). An alternative method of insulin administration is the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump (CSII). To compare CSII with MDI of insulin for pregnant women with pre-existing and gestational diabetes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 March 2016) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials comparing CSII with MDI for pregnant women with diabetes. Three review authors independently assessed studies and two review authors extracted data. Disagreements were resolved through discussion with the third author. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included five single-centre trials (undertaken in Italy) with 153 women and 154 pregnancies in this review.There were no clear differences in the primary outcomes reported between CSII and MDI in the included trials: caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66 to 1.77; three trials, 71 women, evidence graded very low), large-for-gestational age (RR 4.15, 95% CI 0.49 to 34.95; three trials, 73 infants; evidence graded very low), and perinatal mortality (RR 2.33, 95% CI 0.38 to 14.32; four trials, 83 infants, evidence graded very low). Other primary outcomes were not reported in these trials (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, development of type 2 diabetes, composite outcome of serious neonatal outcomes, and neurosensory disability

  13. TCTE Level 3 Total Solar Irradiance Daily Means V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Calibration Transfer Experiment (TCTE) data set TCTE3TSID contains daily averaged total solar irradiance (a.k.a solar constant) data...

  14. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  15. Water Quality Assessment and Total Maximum Daily Loads Information (ATTAINS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Water Quality Assessment TMDL Tracking And Implementation System (ATTAINS) stores and tracks state water quality assessment decisions, Total Maximum Daily Loads...

  16. Effect of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Samimi, M; Tabassi, Z; Naghibi Rad, M; Rahimi Foroushani, A; Khorammian, H; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to excess body weight and increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines primarily during the third trimester, pregnancy is associated with elevated insulin resistance. To our knowledge, no report is available indicating the effects of probiotic yoghurt consumption on serum insulin levels in pregnant women. This study was designed to determine the effects of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance and serum insulin levels of Iranian pregnant women. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 primigravida pregnant women with singleton pregnancy at their third trimester were participated. We randomly assigned participants to consume 200 g per day of conventional (n=33) or the probiotic group (n=37) for 9 weeks. The probiotic yoghurt was a commercially available product prepared with the starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, enriched with probiotic culture of two strains of lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium animalis BB12) with a total of min 1 × 10⁷ colony-forming units. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance score. Although consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR score, significant differences were found comparing changes in these variables between probiotic and conventional yogurts (changes from baseline in serum insulin levels: +1.2±1.2 vs +5.0±1.1 μIU/ml, respectively, P=0.02; and in HOMA-IR score: -0.2±0.3 vs 0.7±0.2, respectively, P=0.01). It is concluded that in contrast to conventional yogurt, daily consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks maintains serum insulin levels and might help pregnant women prevent developing insulin resistance.

  17. Once-daily basal insulin glargine versus thrice-daily prandial insulin lispro in people with type 2 diabetes on oral hypoglycaemic agents (APOLLO): an open randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bretzel, R.G.; Nuber, U.; Landgraf, W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As type 2 diabetes mellitus progresses, oral hypoglycaemic agents often fail to maintain blood glucose control and insulin is needed. We investigated whether the addition of once-daily insulin glargine is non-inferior to three-times daily prandial insulin lispro in overall glycaemic c...

  18. Cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuyan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Qiao, Qing; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Jian; Dong, Hengjin

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetic agents (OADs) for Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The Cardiff Diabetes Model was used to simulate disease progression and estimate the long-term effects of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily. Patient profiles and treatment effects required for the model were obtained from literature reviews (English and Chinese databases) and from a meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials comparing exenatide twice daily with insulin glargine once daily add-on to OADs for T2DM in China. Medical expenditure data were collected from 639 patients with T2DM (aged ≥18 years) with and without complications incurred between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015 from claims databases in Shandong, China. Costs (2014 Chinese Yuan [¥]) and benefits were estimated, from the payers' perspective, over 40 years at a discount rate of 3%. A series of sensitivity analyses were performed. Patients on exenatide twice daily + OAD had a lower predicted incidence of most cardiovascular and hypoglycaemic events and lower total costs compared with those on insulin glargine once daily + OAD. A greater number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; 1.94) at a cost saving of ¥117 706 gained was associated with exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily. (i.e. cost saving of ¥60 764/QALY) per patient. In Chinese patients with T2DM inadequately controlled by OADs, exenatide twice daily is a cost-effective add-on therapy alternative to insulin glargine once daily, and may address the problem of an excess of medical needs resulting from weight gain and hypoglycaemia in T2DM treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comparing twice- versus four-times daily insulin in mothers with gestational diabetes in Pakistan and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Nazish; Godman, Brian; Hussain, Shahzad

    2016-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a common medical problem associated with maternal and fetal complications. Good glycemic control is the cornerstone of treatment. Compare outcomes between four times (q.i.d) and twice daily (b.i.d) regimens. The morning dose of the b.i.d regimen contained two-thirds of the total insulin, comprising a third human regular insulin and two-thirds human intermediate insulin; equal amounts in the evening. 480 women at >30 weeks with gestational diabetes mellitus with failure to control blood glucose were randomly assigned to either regimen. Mean time to the control of blood glucose was significantly less and glycemic control significantly increased with the q.i.d regimen. Operative deliveries, extent of neonatal hypoglycemia, babies with low Agpar scores and those with hyperbilirubinemia were significantly higher with the b.i.d daily regimen. The q.i.d daily regime was associated with improved fetal and maternal outcomes. Consequently should increasingly be used in Pakistan, assisted by lower acquisition costs.

  20. Comparison of insulin intensification strategies with insulin lispro low mixture twice daily versus basal insulin glargine and prandial insulin lispro once daily in East Asian and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In-Kyung; Chung, Choon Hee; Zhou, Zhiguang; Han, Jeong Hee; Duan, Ran; Edralin, Diana M; Rodriguez, Angel

    2017-04-01

    This analysis evaluated efficacy and safety of insulin lispro low mixture (LM25) twice daily (breakfast and dinner) versus basal insulin glargine (bedtime) plus prandial insulin lispro (IGL) once daily before the largest meal in East Asian (EA) and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who failed to reach glycemic targets on basal insulin glargine with metformin and/or pioglitazone. Included patients had an HbA1c ≥7.5% and ≤10.5% and fasting plasma glucose ≤6.7 mmol/L. Primary outcome was HbA1c change at 24 weeks. Baseline mean HbA1c was numerically similar between groups in EA (n = 79) and Caucasian (n = 278) patients. Mean (± SD) HbA1c decreased significantly from baseline to 24 weeks for LM25 and IGL in both subpopulations (EA: -1.32 ± 0.96% and -0.89 ± 0.96%; Caucasian: -1.24 ± 0.98% and -1.04 ± 0.97; all P 1). The respective proportions reaching HbA1c ≤7.0% at Week 24 in the LM25 and IGL groups were 33.3% and 22.9% (EA) and 37.2% and 34.1% (Caucasian). Mean (± SD) rates of hypoglycemia per 30 days in the LM25 and IGL groups were 0.74 ± 1.16 and 1.22 ± 1.36 (EA) and 1.38 ± 2.04 and 1.65 ± 2.43 (Caucasian). Mean (± SD) weight gain changes in the LM25 and IGL groups were 0.62 ± 2.78 and 0.51 ± 2.63 kg (EA) and 1.77 ± 2.91 and 0.67 ± 3.09 kg (Caucasian). Both strategies improved glycemic control in a small group of EA and Caucasian patients not adequately controlled on insulin glargine plus metformin and/or pioglitazone. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Effect of once-daily insulin detemir on oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) use in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, J; Caputo, S; Damci, T; Orozco-Beltran, D; Pan, C; Svendsen, A L; Sølje, K S; Khunti, K

    2014-04-01

    There are acknowledged benefits to continuing metformin when initiating insulin, but there appears to be growing concern over the role of sulphonylureas and thiazolidinediones when used in combination with insulin. This analysis investigates the effects of continuing or discontinuing oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) following the initiation of once-daily insulin detemir. SOLVE is a 24-week, multinational observational study of insulin detemir initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with one or more OADs. In the total cohort (n = 17 374), there were significant improvements in HbA1c (-1·3%, 95% CI -1·34; -1·27%) and weight (-0·6 kg, 95% CI -0·65; -0·47 kg), with an increase in the incidence rate of minor hypoglycaemia (+0·256 events ppy, P use either prior to (n = 17 086) or during insulin initiation (n = 16 346). HbA1c reductions were significantly greater in patients continuing treatment with metformin (-1·3% vs. -1·1%, P < 0·01), thiazolidinediones (-1·3% vs. -1·0%, P < 0·01) and DPP-IV inhibitors (-1·3% vs. -0·9%, P < 0·001). Final insulin doses were significantly greater in patients discontinuing treatment with sulphonylureas (0·29 vs. 0·26 IU/kg, P < 0·001), glinides (0·28 vs. 0·26 IU/kg, P < 0·01), thiazolidinediones (0·31 vs. 0·26 IU/kg, P < 0·001) and DPP-IV inhibitors (0·35 vs. 0·29 IU/kg, P < 0·001) compared with patients continuing these respective agents. All patient subgroups had a mean weight loss irrespective of OAD continuation, apart from those continuing thiazolidinediones (+0·2 kg). The largest improvements in weight were seen following the withdrawal of sulphonylureas and thiazolidinediones (-1·1 and -1·1 kg, respectively). Discontinuation (or switching) of OADs at the time of insulin initiation appears to be governed principally by concerns about hypoglycaemia and weight. HbA1c improvements were smaller in patients discontinuing OADs at the time of insulin

  2. Effect of insulin degludec versus insulin glargine on glycemic control and daily fasting blood glucose variability in insulin-naïve Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: I'D GOT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Chiba, Yasuko; Sato, Minoru; Fujita, Nobuya; Takada, Yoshihisa; Murano, Shunichi; Kuroda, Hisamoto

    2017-08-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultra-long-acting insulin that has a smooth time/action profile over more than 42h. The present study compared the effects of IDeg and insulin glargine (IGlar) on HbA1c reduction and on within-subject day-to-day variability of fasting blood glucose (FBG) in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible patients were randomly allocated at a 3:1 ratio to receive once-daily IDeg (n=31) or IGlar (n=12). Both basal insulins were administered before breakfast and titrated to achieve a target FBG <110mg/dl. The primary endpoints were the change in HbA1c from baseline to 24weeks of treatment, as well as the standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) of FBG from 8 to 12weeks and from 20 to 24weeks. Secondary endpoints included the QOL evaluated by the Diabetes Therapy-Related QOL questionnaire. After 24weeks, HbA1c was decreased by 1.6% in the IDeg group and 1.7% in the IGlar at the same insulin dosage. At 24weeks, FBG was significantly lower in the IDeg group than in the IGlar group and the CV of FBG was significantly smaller in the IDeg group. The frequency of total and severe hypoglycemic episodes did not differ between the groups. In the IDeg group, QOL showed significant improvement regarding anxiety and dissatisfaction with treatment. Treatment with IDeg or IGlar achieved similar improvement in glycemic control in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. The day-to-day variation of FBG was smaller in patients receiving IDeg. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. SORCE Level 3 Total Solar Irradiance Daily Average V016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) data set SOR3TSID contains the total solar irradiance (a.k.a solar constant) data collected by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM)...

  4. Use and Effectiveness of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII) and Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Therapy (MIT) in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel, R; Burgard, D; Perenthaler, T; Stein, G; Kramer, G; Steveling, A

    2016-02-01

    Today continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is frequently used in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The present cross-sectional trial aimed to document current practice, quality of diabetes control and incidence of acute complications in different age-groups under CSII vs. multiple daily insulin injection therapy (MIT). Moreover the survey analyzed socio-demographic backgrounds of the patients. A total of 901 patients (age 11.5±4.0, diabetes duration 4.0±3.6 years) was entered in the database. Clinical data, laboratory parameters and, using a standardized questionnaire, socio-demographic data were assessed. For age-related analyses patients were allocated to 4 groups: pre-school children (MIT. Patients with CSII vs. MIT had a longer diabetes duration, they used more frequently insulin analogues, performed more frequently blood-glucose self-tests and had a lower insulin dosage per kilogram body weight. In respect of HbA1c, the mean amplitude of blood-glucose excursions, but also of lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria and blood pressure, there were no differences in neither age-group between patients with CSII and MIT. In patients with CSII and MIT, there was a tendency (pMIT there is an increase of HbA1c towards adolescence. It must also highlighted that CSII seems to be expansive and that CSII is more frequently used in patients with better educational levels and deriving from higher social classes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Islet Transplantation Provides Superior Glycemic Control With Less Hypoglycemia Compared With Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion or Multiple Daily Insulin Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Walker, Deborah Jane; Gunton, Jenny E; Hawthorne, Wayne; Payk, Marlene; Anderson, Patricia; Donath, Susan; Loudovaris, Tom; Ward, Glenn M; Kay, Thomas Wh; OʼConnell, Philip J

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to compare efficacy of multiple daily injections (MDI), continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and islet transplantation to reduce hypoglycemia and glycemic variability in type 1 diabetes subjects with severe hypoglycemia. This was a within-subject, paired comparison of MDI and CSII and CSII with 12 months postislet transplantation in 10 type 1 diabetes subjects referred with severe hypoglycemia, suitable for islet transplantation. Individuals were assessed with HbA1c, Edmonton Hypoglycemia Score (HYPOscore), continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and in 8 subjects measurements of glucose variability using standard deviation of glucose (SD glucose) from CGM and continuous overlapping net glycemic action using a 4 hour interval (CONGA4). After changing from MDI to CSII before transplantation, 10 subjects reduced median HYPOscore from 2028 to 1085 (P transplantation, there were significant reductions in all baseline parameters versus CSII, respectively, HbA1c (6.4% cf 8.2%), median HYPOscore (0 cf 1085), mean glucose (7.1 cf 8.6 mmol L), SD glucose (1.7 cf 3.2 mmol/L), and CONGA4 (1.6 cf 3.0). In subjects with severe hypoglycemia suitable for islet transplantation, CSII decreased hypoglycemia frequency and glycemic variability compared with MDI whereas islet transplantation resolved hypoglycemia and further improved glycemic variability regardless of insulin independence.

  6. Total antioxidant and oxidant status in obese children without insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşegül Doğan Demir; Ufuk Erenberk; İlker Tolga Özgen; Emin Özkaya; Aysel Vahapoğlu Türkmen; M. Ruşen Dündaröz; Özcan Erel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Oxidative stress in obese children may lead in adulthood serious conditions such as coronary heart diseases or type 2 diabetes mellitus. In childhood oxidative stress is associated with insulin resistance or extreme obesity. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oxidative stress status in moderately obese children without insulin resistance. Methods: A total of 38 obese children (21 male, 17 female) without insulin resistance, mean aged 9.4±3.8 years) and 51 normal weight children...

  7. Trends in total and daily precipitation indices in japan from 1901 to 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Rena; Zaiki, Masumi

    2008-01-01

    Long-term trends in seasonal precipitation amount and daily precipitation indices were investigated for spring, summer, autumn, and winter with a daily precipitation dataset for Japan from 1901 to 2000. Heavy precipitation in spring and summer has significantly increased along the west coast of Japan. Such changes in precipitation have resulted in the increased heavy precipitation intensity. For autumn and winter, total precipitation significantly decreased in the Kanto district and central J...

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  9. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells

  10. Quality of life in Danish children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or multiple daily injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebæk, Niels; Kristensen, Lene Juel; Mose, Anne

    2014-01-01

    ), and to investigate whether HRQoL assessments were influenced by treatment duration. METHODS: Participants were recruited through the Danish Registry for Diabetes in Childhood and Adolescence. A total of 700 children and adolescents (360 girls), 8-17 years, were included. Of these, 295 were treated with CSII (160......AIMS: The aims of the study were to compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a National Danish population of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) treated with either continuous subcutaneous insulin injection (CSII) or multiple daily insulin injections (MDI...... for more than one year) and 405 with MDI (238 for more than one year). Participants and their parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Diabetes and Generic Module. HbA1c was analyzed centrally. RESULTS: Parents reported children and adolescents on CSII for more than one year to have less...

  11. Relative effectiveness of insulin pump treatment over multiple daily injections and structured education during flexible intensive insulin treatment for type 1 diabetes: cluster randomised trial (REPOSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    Objective  To compare the effectiveness of insulin pumps with multiple daily injections for adults with type 1 diabetes, with both groups receiving equivalent training in flexible insulin treatment. Design  Pragmatic, multicentre, open label, parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial (Relative Effectiveness of Pumps Over MDI and Structured Education (REPOSE) trial). Setting  Eight secondary care centres in England and Scotland. Participants  Adults with type 1 diabetes who were willing to undertake intensive insulin treatment, with no preference for pumps or multiple daily injections. Participants were allocated a place on established group training courses that taught flexible intensive insulin treatment ("dose adjustment for normal eating," DAFNE). The course groups (the clusters) were then randomly allocated in pairs to either pump or multiple daily injections. Interventions  Participants attended training in flexible insulin treatment (using insulin analogues) structured around the use of pump or injections, followed for two years. Main outcome measures  The primary outcomes were a change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) values (%) at two years in participants with baseline HbA1c value of ≥7.5% (58 mmol/mol), and the proportion of participants achieving an HbA1c value of intention to treat analysis, of which 235 (119 pump and 116 injection) had baseline HbA1c values of ≥7.5%. Glycaemic control and rates of severe hypoglycaemia improved in both groups. The mean change in HbA1c at two years was -0.85% with pump treatment and -0.42% with multiple daily injections. Adjusting for course, centre, age, sex, and accounting for missing values, the difference was -0.24% (-2.7 mmol/mol) in favour of pump users (95% confidence interval -0.53 to 0.05, P=0.10). Most psychosocial measures showed no difference, but pump users showed greater improvement in treatment satisfaction and some quality of life domains (dietary freedom and daily hassle) at 12 and 24

  12. Cost-effectiveness of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections of insulin in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roze, S.; Smith-Palmer, J.; Valentine, W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is increasingly used in clinical practice for the management of selected patients with Type 1 diabetes. Several cost-effectiveness studies comparing CSII vs. multiple insulin injections (MDI) have been reported. The aim was systematically...... to review these analyses and test the hypothesis that CSII is a cost-effective use of healthcare resources across settings. Methods: A literature review was performed using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and other databases. No time limit or language restrictions were applied. After two rounds of screening, 11...... cost-effectiveness analyses were included in the final review, of which nine used the CORE Diabetes Model. A narrative synthesis was conducted and mean cost effectiveness calculated. Results: CSII was considered cost-effective vs. MDI in Type 1 diabetes in all 11 studies in 8 countries, with a mean (95...

  13. The effects of feeding time on milk production, total-tract digestibility, and daily rhythms of feeding behavior and plasma metabolites and hormones in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, M; Ying, Y; Bartell, P A; Harvatine, K J

    2014-12-01

    The timing of feed intake entrains circadian rhythms regulated by internal clocks in many mammals. The objective of this study was to determine if the timing of feeding entrains daily rhythms in dairy cows. Nine Holstein cows were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design with 14-d periods. An automated system recorded the timing of feed intake over the last 7 d of each period. Treatments were feeding 1×/d at 0830 h (AM) or 2030 h (PM) and feeding 2×/d in equal amounts at 0830 and 2030 h. All treatments were fed at 110% of daily intake. Cows were milked 2×/d at 0500 and 1700 h. Milk yield and composition were not changed by treatment. Daily intake did not differ, but twice-daily feeding tended to decrease total-tract digestibility of organic matter and neutral detergent fiber (NDF). A treatment by time of day interaction was observed for feeding behavior. The amount of feed consumed in the first 2h after feeding was 70% greater for PM compared with AM feeding. A low rate of intake overnight (2400 to 0500 h; 2.2 ± 0.74% daily intake/h, mean ± SD) and a moderate rate of intake in the afternoon (1200 to 1700 h; 4.8 ± 1.1% daily intake/h) was noted for all treatments, although PM slightly reduced the rate during the afternoon period compared with AM. A treatment by time of day interaction was seen for fecal NDF and indigestible NDF (iNDF) concentration, blood urea nitrogen, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, body temperature, and lying behavior. Specifically, insulin increased and glucose decreased more after evening feeding than after morning feeding. A cosine function within a 24-h period was used to characterize daily rhythms using a random regression. Rate of feed intake during spontaneous feeding, fecal NDF and iNDF concentration, plasma glucose, insulin, NEFA, body temperature, and lying behavior fit a cosine function within a 24-h period that was modified by treatment. In conclusion, feeding time can reset the daily rhythms of feeding and

  14. Springs-neaps cycles in daily total seabed light: Daylength-induced changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E. M.; Bowers, D. G.; Davies, A. J.

    2014-04-01

    In shallow, tidal seas, daily total seabed light is determined largely by the interaction of the solar elevation cycle, the tidal cycle in water depth, and any temporal variability in turbidity. Since tidal range, times of low water, and often turbidity vary in regular ways over the springs-neaps cycle, daily total seabed light exhibits cycles of the same periodicity. Corresponding cycles are likely to be induced in the daily total primary production of benthic algae and plants, particularly those light-limited specimens occupying the lower reaches of a sub-tidal population. Consequently, this effect is an important control on the growth patterns, depth distribution and survival of, for example, macroalgal forests and seagrass meadows. Seasonal changes in daylength exert an important additional control on these cycles, as they alter the fraction of the tidal and turbidity cycles occurring within daylight hours. Bowers et al. (1997) modelled this phenomenon numerically and predicted that for a site with low water at about midday and midnight at neaps tides, 6 am and 6 pm at springs, daily total seabed light peaks at neaps in winter, but the ‘sense' of the cycle ‘switches' so that it peaks at springs in summer - the longer daylength permits the morning and evening low water springs to contribute substantially to the daily total. Observations for such a site in North Wales (UK), presented in this paper, show that no such ‘switch' occurs, and neaps tides host the largest daily totals throughout the year. The predicted ‘switch' is not observed because turbidity increases generally at spring tides, and specifically at low water springs, both of which were not accounted for in the model. Observations at a second site in Brittany (France), diametrically opposite in terms of the times of low water at neaps and at springs, indicate a peak at springs throughout the year. Analytical tools are developed to calculate the percentage of daily total sea surface irradiance

  15. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy and multiple daily insulin injections in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a comparative overview and future horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy is currently accepted as a treatment strategy for type 1 diabetes. Transition from multiple daily injection therapy (MDI; including basal-bolus regimens) to CSII is based on expectations of better metabolic control and fewer hypoglycaemic events. Evidence to date has not been always conclusive. Evidence for CSII and MDI in terms of glycaemic control, hypoglycaemia and psychosocial outcomes is reviewed in the adult and paediatric population with type 1 diabetes. Findings from studies on threshold-based insulin pump suspension and predictive low glucose management (PLGM) are outlined. Limitations of current CSII application and future technological developments are discussed. Glycaemic control and quality of life (QOL) may be improved by CSII compared to MDI depending on baseline HbA1c and hypoglycaemia rates. Future studies are expected to provide evidence on clinical and cost effectiveness in those who will benefit the most. Training, structured education and support are important to benefit from CSII. Novel technological approaches linking continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and CSII may help mitigate against frequent hypoglycaemia in those at risk. Development of glucose-responsive automated closed-loop insulin delivery systems may reduce the burden of disease management and improve outcomes in type 1 diabetes.

  16. Daily Physical Activity Assessed by a Triaxial Accelerometer Is Beneficially Associated with Waist Circumference, Serum Triglycerides, and Insulin Resistance in Japanese Patients with Prediabetes or Untreated Early Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Moriyama, Sumie; Yoshikawa, Reo; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Sako, Akahito; Mishima, Shuichi; Kakei, Masafumi; Ezaki, Osamu; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between daily physical activity and metabolic risk factors in Japanese adults with prediabetes or untreated early type 2 diabetes (T2D). Daily physical activity level was measured using a triaxial accelerometer. We assessed correlations between physical activity level and waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting levels of plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, and insulin and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A total of 80 patients were studied. After adjustment for age and body mass index, in all subjects, physical activity level was negatively associated with waist circumference (β = -0.124, P = 0.018) and fasting serum triglycerides (β = -0.239, P = 0.035), insulin (β = -0.224, P = 0.022). In men, physical activity level was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure (β = -0.351, P = 0.044), fasting plasma glucose (β = -0.369, P = 0.025) and insulin (β = -0.362, P = 0.012), and HOMA-IR (β = -0.371, P = 0.011). No significant associations were found between physical activity level and metabolic risk factors in women. Objectively measured daily physical activity is beneficially associated with waist circumference, serum triglycerides, and insulin resistance in individuals with prediabetes or untreated early T2D. (This trial is registered with UMIN000015774.).

  17. In adolescence a higher 'eveningness in energy intake' is associated with higher total daily energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichs, Tanja; Perrar, Ines; Roßbach, Sarah; Alexy, Ute; Buyken, Anette E

    2018-05-26

    The present manuscript addressed two hypotheses: (i) As children age, energy intake is shifted from morning (energy intake energy intake >6pm) (ii) A higher 'eveningness in energy intake' (i.e. evening minus morning energy intake) is associated with a higher total daily energy intake. Data were analyzed from 262 DONALD cohort study participants, who had completed at least one 3-day weighed dietary record in the age groups 3/4, 5/6, 7/8, 9/10, 11/12, 13/14, 15/16 and 17/18 years (y). 'Eveningness in energy intake' was compared across age groups and related to total daily energy intake for each age group (multiple cross-sectional analyses). 'Eveningness' increased progressively from age group 3/4y to age group 17/18y. A median surplus of evening energy intake (i.e. when evening intake exceeded morning intake) was firstly observed for age group 11/12y. From age group 11/12y onwards, a higher 'eveningness' was associated with a higher total daily energy intake (all p energy intake between the highest and the lowest tertile of 'eveningness' was largest for age group 17/18y, amounting to an 11% higher intake among adolescents in the highest as compared to those in the lowest tertile. In conclusion, energy intake progressively shifts from morning to evening hours as children age. Once evening energy intake exceeds morning energy intake, a higher 'eveningness in energy intake' is associated with higher total daily energy intake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An adaptive wavelet-network model for forecasting daily total solar-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellit, A.; Benghanem, M.; Kalogirou, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of wavelet theory and neural networks has lead to the development of wavelet networks. Wavelet-networks are feed-forward networks using wavelets as activation functions. Wavelet-networks have been used successfully in various engineering applications such as classification, identification and control problems. In this paper, the use of adaptive wavelet-network architecture in finding a suitable forecasting model for predicting the daily total solar-radiation is investigated. Total solar-radiation is considered as the most important parameter in the performance prediction of renewable energy systems, particularly in sizing photovoltaic (PV) power systems. For this purpose, daily total solar-radiation data have been recorded during the period extending from 1981 to 2001, by a meteorological station in Algeria. The wavelet-network model has been trained by using either the 19 years of data or one year of the data. In both cases the total solar radiation data corresponding to year 2001 was used for testing the model. The network was trained to accept and handle a number of unusual cases. Results indicate that the model predicts daily total solar-radiation values with a good accuracy of approximately 97% and the mean absolute percentage error is not more than 6%. In addition, the performance of the model was compared with different neural network structures and classical models. Training algorithms for wavelet-networks require smaller numbers of iterations when compared with other neural networks. The model can be used to fill missing data in weather databases. Additionally, the proposed model can be generalized and used in different locations and for other weather data, such as sunshine duration and ambient temperature. Finally, an application using the model for sizing a PV-power system is presented in order to confirm the validity of this model

  19. Total antioxidant and oxidant status in obese children without insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Doğan Demir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Oxidative stress in obese children may lead in adulthood serious conditions such as coronary heart diseases or type 2 diabetes mellitus. In childhood oxidative stress is associated with insulin resistance or extreme obesity. In this study, we aimed to evaluate oxidative stress status in moderately obese children without insulin resistance. Methods: A total of 38 obese children (21 male, 17 female without insulin resistance, mean aged 9.4±3.8 years and 51 normal weight children (25 male, 26 female as the control group, mean aged 9.3±3.9 years were enrolled to the study. Total oxidative status (TOS, total antioxidant capacity (TAC were measured and oxidative stress index (OSI was calculated. Results: The results reveal that obese children had lower TAC than normal weight children (2,27±0,28 vs. 2.76±0.35 mmol Trolox Eq./L; p<0,001. There was no statistical difference between obese and control groups regarding TOS (6,08±3,63 vs 5.25±4.16 μmol H2O2 Eq./L; p=0.333. OSI was higher in obese group (2.65±1.52 vs 1.92±1.56; p=0.029 Conclusion: Balance between oxidant and antioxidant system is disrupted due to the reduced TAC even in moderately obese children without insulin resistance. Further studies should also be performed to evaluate the beneficial effects of dietary intake of antioxidants in these children.

  20. Total body fat, pro-inflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in Indian subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajnik, C S [Diabetes Unit, KEM Hospital Research Centre, Pune (India); Yudkin, J S [Whittington Hospital, University College of London, London (United Kingdom); Shetty, P S [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Kurpad, A [St. John' s Medical College, Bangalore (India)

    1999-07-01

    There is a growing epidemic of insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in Indians. We postulate that increased susceptibility of the urban Indians to insulin resistance is a result of a tendency to increased fat deposition from the time of intrauterine life (thrifty phenotype), exaggerated in the urban environment by a positive energy balance. The pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by the inflammatory cells as well by the adipose tissue could aggravate insulin resistance and endothelial damage and therefore, increase the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD) independent of the previously proposed glucose fatty acid cycle mechanism. In a preliminary study, we propose to make detailed measurements of the proposed mechanisms in a selected population from 3 geographical locations in and near the city of Pune, India and also validate simple 'epidemiologic' measurements of body composition with 'reference' measurements. One hundred men (30 to 50y) each from the three geographical locations (rural, urban slum-dwellers and urban middle class in Pune) will be studied for: (i) Body composition: Anthropometric and bioimpedance measurement of total body fat (to be calibrated against deuterated water in 30 subjects from each location), and muscle mass by anthropometry and urinary creatinine excretion; (ii) Body fat distribution by subscapular- triceps ratio, waist-hip ratio; (iii) Metabolic: Glucose tolerance and insulin resistance variables (insulin, lipids, NEFA) and leptin; (iv) Endothelial markers: e-Selectin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF); (v) Inflammatory markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines: C-reactive protein (CRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF- {alpha}); (vi) Energy Balance: Assessment of nutritional intake (calories, carbohydrates, proteins and fats, n3 and n6 fatty acids) and physical activity by a questionnaire. Insulin resistance variables, endothelial markers, cytokines and obesity parameters will be compared in

  1. Total body fat, pro-inflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in Indian subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajnik, C.S.; Yudkin, J.S.; Shetty, P.S.; Kurpad, A.

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing epidemic of insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in Indians. We postulate that increased susceptibility of the urban Indians to insulin resistance is a result of a tendency to increased fat deposition from the time of intrauterine life (thrifty phenotype), exaggerated in the urban environment by a positive energy balance. The pro-inflammatory cytokines secreted by the inflammatory cells as well by the adipose tissue could aggravate insulin resistance and endothelial damage and therefore, increase the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD) independent of the previously proposed glucose fatty acid cycle mechanism. In a preliminary study, we propose to make detailed measurements of the proposed mechanisms in a selected population from 3 geographical locations in and near the city of Pune, India and also validate simple 'epidemiologic' measurements of body composition with 'reference' measurements. One hundred men (30 to 50y) each from the three geographical locations (rural, urban slum-dwellers and urban middle class in Pune) will be studied for: (i) Body composition: Anthropometric and bioimpedance measurement of total body fat (to be calibrated against deuterated water in 30 subjects from each location), and muscle mass by anthropometry and urinary creatinine excretion; (ii) Body fat distribution by subscapular- triceps ratio, waist-hip ratio; (iii) Metabolic: Glucose tolerance and insulin resistance variables (insulin, lipids, NEFA) and leptin; (iv) Endothelial markers: e-Selectin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF); (v) Inflammatory markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines: C-reactive protein (CRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF- α); (vi) Energy Balance: Assessment of nutritional intake (calories, carbohydrates, proteins and fats, n3 and n6 fatty acids) and physical activity by a questionnaire. Insulin resistance variables, endothelial markers, cytokines and obesity parameters will be compared in the 3

  2. Effect of prandial treatment timing adjustment, based on continuous glucose monitoring, in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with once-daily basal insulin: A randomized, phase IV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilany, Jacob; Bhandari, Hamad; Nabriski, Dan; Toledano, Yoel; Konvalina, Noa; Cohen, Ohad

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the glycaemic control achieved by prandial once-daily insulin glulisine injection timing adjustment, based on a continuous glucose monitoring sensor, in comparison to once-daily insulin glulisine injection before breakfast in patients with type 2 diabetes who are uncontrolled with once-daily basal insulin glargine. This was a 24-week open-label, randomized, controlled, multicentre trial. At the end of an 8-week period of basal insulin optimization, patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% and FPG sensor) or arm B (sensor) to receive 16-week intensified prandial glulisine treatment. Patients in arm A received pre-breakfast glulisine, and patients in arm B received glulisine before the meal with the highest glucose elevation based on sensor data. The primary outcome was mean HbA1c at week 24 and secondary outcomes included rates of hypoglycaemic events and insulin dosage. A total of 121 patients were randomized to arm A (n = 61) or arm B (n = 60). There was no difference in mean HbA1c at week 24 between arms A and B (8.5% ± 1.2% vs 8.4% ± 1.0%; P = .66). The prandial insulin glulisine dosage for arm A and arm B was 9.3 and 10.1 units, respectively (P = .39). The frequency of hypoglycaemic events did not differ between study arms (36.1% vs 51.7%; P = .08). Using a CGM sensor to identify the meal with the highest glucose excursion and adjusting the timing of prandial insulin treatment did not show any advantage in terms of glycaemic control or safety in our patients. © 2018 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparison of treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily insulin injections with bolus calculator in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, L; Goñi-Iriarte, M J; García-Mouriz, M

    2015-01-01

    A study of the glycemic control, quality of life, and fear and perception of hypoglycemia by comparing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) group with multiple daily inyections (MDI) with bolus calculator group. This is a retrospective cohort study with following up during the first 12 months that CSII group (n=30) begins the use of "bolus wizard" and the MDI-calculator (n=30) group begins the use of the bolus calculator (Accu-Chek(®) Aviva Expert). HbA1c (3, 6 and 12 months). Questionnaires used: EsDQOL (quality of life), FH-15 (fear of hypoglycemia), and Clarke (perception of hypoglycemia). T Student and nonparametric tests. The average reduction in HbA1c during the study was significantly higher in CSII group (-0.56±0.84%) compared with the MDI group (0.097±0.94%), P=.028. The average basal insulin dose was significantly higher in the MDI group (at baseline, 6 and 12 months). No significant differences were found between the 2 treatment groups after analyzing the EsDQOL, FH-15 and Clarke questionnaires. In the CSII group, perceived quality of life assessed by the EsDQOL questionnaire was found to be better at the end of the study than at the beginning of using the insulin pump. The average reduction in HbA1c was significantly higher in the CSII group. In the CSII group, perceived quality of life was better at the end of the study than at the beginning. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of Multiple Daily Injections or Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion for Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-xiu Gong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To determine whether multiple daily injections (MDIs or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII contributes to better glucose control in children with different type 1 diabetes duration. Methods. Subjects were grouped according to early (≤1 year after disease onset; 1A or late (1–3 years after onset; 2A MDIs/CSII treatment initiation. Corresponding control groups (1B, 2B received insulin injections twice daily. Results. HbA1c levels were consistently lower in group 1A than in group 1B (6 months (T2: 7.37% versus 8.21%; 12 months (T3: 7.61% versus 8.41%; 24/36 months (T4/T5: 7.61% versus 8.72%; all P<0.05, but were lower in group 2A than in group 2B only at T2 (8.36% versus 9.19%; P=0.04. Levels were lower in group 1A than in group 2A when disease duration was matched (7.61% versus 8.49%; P<0.05. Logistic regression revealed no correlation between HbA1c level and MDIs/CSII therapy. HbA1c levels were only negatively related to insulin dosage. Conclusions. Blood glucose control was better in patients receiving MDIs/CSII than in those receiving conventional treatment. Early MDIs/CSII initiation resulted in prolonged maintenance of low HbA1c levels compared with late initiation. MDIs/CSII therapy should be combined with comprehensive management.

  5. Prediction equation for estimating total daily energy requirements of special operations personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, N D; Pasiakos, S M; McClung, H L; Crombie, A P; Margolis, L M

    2018-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) engage in a variety of military tasks with many producing high energy expenditures, leading to undesired energy deficits and loss of body mass. Therefore, the ability to accurately estimate daily energy requirements would be useful for accurate logistical planning. Generate a predictive equation estimating energy requirements of SOF. Retrospective analysis of data collected from SOF personnel engaged in 12 different SOF training scenarios. Energy expenditure and total body water were determined using the doubly-labeled water technique. Physical activity level was determined as daily energy expenditure divided by resting metabolic rate. Physical activity level was broken into quartiles (0 = mission prep, 1 = common warrior tasks, 2 = battle drills, 3 = specialized intense activity) to generate a physical activity factor (PAF). Regression analysis was used to construct two predictive equations (Model A; body mass and PAF, Model B; fat-free mass and PAF) estimating daily energy expenditures. Average measured energy expenditure during SOF training was 4468 (range: 3700 to 6300) Kcal·d- 1 . Regression analysis revealed that physical activity level ( r  = 0.91; P  plan appropriate feeding regimens to meet SOF nutritional requirements across their mission profile.

  6. Hypophosphatemia occurs with insulin administration during refeeding by total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Sarasa; Uenami, Yuri; Tani, Mariko; Ishitani, Midori; Morii, Saeko; Sakaue, Motoyoshi; Ito, Mikiko

    2018-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RFS) is characterized by the metabolic and clinical changes that occur following aggressive nutritional supplementation in malnourished patients. Hypophosphatemia is the hallmark of RFS and is key to its prevention and treatment in clinical practice. However, the mechanism of hypophosphatemia during RFS is unclear because of the lack of an animal model. In this study, we developed a rat RFS model as a first step to clarifying the molecular mechanism. After establishing the parenteral route, rats were fasted for 5 days and refeeding was started using total parenteral nutrition. The animals were infused with a high calorie solution with or without insulin administration. Results showed that plasma phosphate levels did not decrease in rats infused with the high calorie solution alone;in contrast, a 20% reduction compared to baseline was observed in rats administered insulin. In addition, rats infused with the high calorie solution containing added phosphate did not present with hypophosphatemia. Thus, we developed a rat RFS model with hypophosphatemia by tube feeding and insulin administration, and demonstrated the importance of phosphate in preventing refeeding hypophosphatemia. J. Med. Invest. 65:50-55, February, 2018.

  7. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet ... I start having side effects? What is my target blood sugar level? How often should I check ...

  8. Continuous Glucose Monitoring vs Conventional Therapy for Glycemic Control in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Treated With Multiple Daily Insulin Injections: The GOLD Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Marcus; Polonsky, William; Hirsch, Irl B; Heise, Tim; Bolinder, Jan; Dahlqvist, Sofia; Schwarz, Erik; Ólafsdóttir, Arndís Finna; Frid, Anders; Wedel, Hans; Ahlén, Elsa; Nyström, Thomas; Hellman, Jarl

    2017-01-24

    The majority of individuals with type 1 diabetes do not meet recommended glycemic targets. To evaluate the effects of continuous glucose monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections. Open-label crossover randomized clinical trial conducted in 15 diabetes outpatient clinics in Sweden between February 24, 2014, and June 1, 2016 that included 161 individuals with type 1 diabetes and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of at least 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) treated with multiple daily insulin injections. Participants were randomized to receive treatment using a continuous glucose monitoring system or conventional treatment for 26 weeks, separated by a washout period of 17 weeks. Difference in HbA1c between weeks 26 and 69 for the 2 treatments. Adverse events including severe hypoglycemia were also studied. Among 161 randomized participants, mean age was 43.7 years, 45.3% were women, and mean HbA1c was 8.6% (70 mmol/mol). A total of 142 participants had follow-up data in both treatment periods. Mean HbA1c was 7.92% (63 mmol/mol) during continuous glucose monitoring use and 8.35% (68 mmol/mol) during conventional treatment (mean difference, -0.43% [95% CI, -0.57% to -0.29%] or -4.7 [-6.3 to -3.1 mmol/mol]; P < .001). Of 19 secondary end points comprising psychosocial and various glycemic measures, 6 met the hierarchical testing criteria of statistical significance, favoring continuous glucose monitoring compared with conventional treatment. Five patients in the conventional treatment group and 1 patient in the continuous glucose monitoring group had severe hypoglycemia. During washout when patients used conventional therapy, 7 patients had severe hypoglycemia. Among patients with inadequately controlled type 1 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections, the use of continuous glucose monitoring compared with conventional treatment for 26 weeks resulted in lower HbA1c. Further research is needed to assess clinical outcomes and longer

  9. Estimating total maximum daily loads with the Stochastic Empirical Loading and Dilution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Gregory; Jones, Susan Cheung

    2017-01-01

    The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Rhode Island DOT are assessing and addressing roadway contributions to total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). Example analyses for total nitrogen, total phosphorus, suspended sediment, and total zinc in highway runoff were done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with FHWA to simulate long-term annual loads for TMDL analyses with the stochastic empirical loading and dilution model known as SELDM. Concentration statistics from 19 highway runoff monitoring sites in Massachusetts were used with precipitation statistics from 11 long-term monitoring sites to simulate long-term pavement yields (loads per unit area). Highway sites were stratified by traffic volume or surrounding land use to calculate concentration statistics for rural roads, low-volume highways, high-volume highways, and ultraurban highways. The median of the event mean concentration statistics in each traffic volume category was used to simulate annual yields from pavement for a 29- or 30-year period. Long-term average yields for total nitrogen, phosphorus, and zinc from rural roads are lower than yields from the other categories, but yields of sediment are higher than for the low-volume highways. The average yields of the selected water quality constituents from high-volume highways are 1.35 to 2.52 times the associated yields from low-volume highways. The average yields of the selected constituents from ultraurban highways are 1.52 to 3.46 times the associated yields from high-volume highways. Example simulations indicate that both concentration reduction and flow reduction by structural best management practices are crucial for reducing runoff yields.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of once daily GLP-1 receptor agonist lixisenatide compared to bolus insulin both in combination with basal insulin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetson, Pernilla; Palmer, James L; Levorsen, Andrée; Fournier, Marie; Germe, Maeva; McLeod, Euan

    2015-01-01

    Lixisenatide is a potent, selective and short-acting once daily prandial glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist which lowers glycohemoglobin and body weight by clinically significant amounts in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin, with limited risk of hypoglycemia. To assess the cost-effectiveness of lixisenatide versus bolus insulin, both in combination with basal insulin, in patients with type 2 diabetes in Norway. The IMS CORE Diabetes Model, a non-product-specific and validated simulation model, was used to make clinical and cost projections. Transition probabilities, risk adjustments and the progression of complication risk factors were derived from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study, supplemented with Norwegian data. Patients were assumed to receive combination treatment with basal insulin, lixisenatide or bolus insulin therapy for 3 years, followed by intensification of a basal-bolus insulin regimen for their remaining lifetime. Simulated healthcare costs, taken from the public payer perspective, were derived from microcosting and diagnosis related groups, discounted at 4% per annum and reported in Norwegian krone (NOK). Productivity costs were also captured based on extractions from the Norwegian Labor and Welfare Administration. Health state utilities were derived from a systematic literature review. Sensitivity and scenario analyses were performed. Lixisenatide in combination with basal insulin was associated with increased quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and reduced lifetime healthcare costs compared to bolus insulin in combination with basal insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes, and can be considered dominant. The net monetary benefit of lixisenatide versus bolus insulin was NOK 39,369 per patient. Results were sensitive to discounting, the application of excess body weight associated disutility and uncertainty surrounding the changes in HbA1c. Lixisenatide may be considered an economically efficient therapy in combination

  11. Effect of plane of milk replacer intake and age on glucose and insulin kinetics and abomasal emptying in female Holstein Friesian dairy calves fed twice daily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, J A R; Berends, H; Leal, L N; Cant, J P; Martín-Tereso, J; Steele, M A

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how preweaning plane of milk replacer intake and age can affect insulin and glucose kinetics as well as abomasal emptying rate in dairy calves fed twice a day. A total of 12 female Holstein Friesian calves were blocked by cow parity, paired by colostrum origin, and were randomly assigned to a high plane of milk replacer intake (8 L/d, 1.2kg of milk replacer/d; n=6) or a low plane of nutrition (4 L/d, 0.6kg of milk replacer/d; n=6). All calves received 4 L of colostrum over 2 meals (1 and 6h after birth) and were then directly transferred to their assigned feeding plans until they were stepped-down from milk by 50% during wk 7 and weaned on wk 8. Milk replacer (24% crude protein, 18% crude fat) was fed at 150g/L twice daily (0700 and 1700h) and all calves had ad libitum access to pelleted calf starter, chopped wheat straw, and water. Jugular catheters were placed in all calves at 4, 7, and 10wk of age. Then, postprandial response to plasma glucose, insulin, and acetaminophen (supplied with the meal) were determined to measure abomasal emptying. The next day, a glucose tolerance test was conducted by infusing glucose via the jugular catheter. At 4 and 7wk of age, the rate constant (%/h) for abomasal emptying of the meal was lower in high calves (0.21±0.02 in wk 4; 0.27±0.02 in wk 7) compared with low (0.34±0.02 in wk 4; 0.47±0.02 in wk 7). The postprandial plasma insulin area under the curve over 420min was greater in high calves (18,443±7,329; low=5,834±739 µU/mL) compared with low. We found no differences in glucose tolerance test kinetics between the high and low dairy calves at 4, 7, or 10wk of age. The findings from this study suggest that feeding dairy calves an elevated plane of nutrition in 2 meals of milk replacer per day does not decrease insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Effects of total glucosides of paeony on enhancing insulin sensitivity and antagonizing nonalcoholic fatty liver in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin-Ying; Pan, Jing-Qiang; Lv, Jun-Hua

    2008-10-01

    To study the pathological changes of blood glucose, serum lipid, insulin resistance, liver function, liver cell denaturalization of total glucosides of paeony on nonalcoholic fatty liver rats caused by insulin resistance and discuss the acting mechanism. Adult SD rats were maintained on high-fat-sugar-salt diet for 56 days. In the 57th day, their fasting blood glucose (FBG) and 2-hours blood glucose after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT-2 hBG) were mensurated, according to which and the weight the rats were divided randomly into nonalcoholic fatty liver model group, metformin group (0.2 g x kg(-1)) and total glucosides of paeony group (high dosage 0.15 g x kg(-1), low dosage 0.05 g x kg(-1)). All the rats were still administered the same diet and given different drugs by intragastric administration for 28 days. In the 29th day, all of them were killed and the blood was sampled to measure the levels of blood glucose [FBG, OGTT-2 hBG, fasting insulin (Fins)] and serum lipid [free fatty acids (FFA), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)], then the HOMA insulin resistance index (HOMA-IRI, fasting glucosexinsulin) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were counted. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), cholinesterase (ChE), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured also. Livers were weighed and collected to be observed the pathological changes. Compared with normal group, in nonalcoholic fatty liver model group the levels of Fins and IRI were increased obviously (P insulin resistence were resisted (P insulin resistance, and its action mechanism may be concerned with enhancing insulin sensitivity and antioxidative ability, decreasing serum lipid.

  13. Economic total maximum daily load for watershed-based pollutant trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, A Z; deMonsabert, S M

    2015-04-01

    Water quality trading (WQT) is supported by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) under the framework of its total maximum daily load (TMDL) program. An innovative approach is presented in this paper that proposes post-TMDL trade by calculating pollutant rights for each pollutant source within a watershed. Several water quality trading programs are currently operating in the USA with an objective to achieve overall pollutant reduction impacts that are equivalent or better than TMDL scenarios. These programs use trading ratios for establishing water quality equivalence among pollutant reductions. The inbuilt uncertainty in modeling the effects of pollutants in a watershed from both the point and nonpoint sources on receiving waterbodies makes WQT very difficult. A higher trading ratio carries with it increased mitigation costs, but cannot ensure the attainment of the required water quality with certainty. The selection of an applicable trading ratio, therefore, is not a simple process. The proposed approach uses an Economic TMDL optimization model that determines an economic pollutant reduction scenario that can be compared with actual TMDL allocations to calculate selling/purchasing rights for each contributing source. The methodology is presented using the established TMDLs for the bacteria (fecal coliform) impaired Muddy Creek subwatershed WAR1 in Rockingham County, Virginia, USA. Case study results show that an environmentally and economically superior trading scenario can be realized by using Economic TMDL model or any similar model that considers the cost of TMDL allocations.

  14. Bayesian modeling of the assimilative capacity component of nutrient total maximum daily loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, B. R.

    2008-08-01

    Implementing stream restoration techniques and best management practices to reduce nonpoint source nutrients implies enhancement of the assimilative capacity for the stream system. In this paper, a Bayesian method for evaluating this component of a total maximum daily load (TMDL) load capacity is developed and applied. The joint distribution of nutrient retention metrics from a literature review of 495 measurements was used for Monte Carlo sampling with a process transfer function for nutrient attenuation. Using the resulting histograms of nutrient retention, reference prior distributions were developed for sites in which some of the metrics contributing to the transfer function were measured. Contributing metrics for the prior include stream discharge, cross-sectional area, fraction of storage volume to free stream volume, denitrification rate constant, storage zone mass transfer rate, dispersion coefficient, and others. Confidence of compliance (CC) that any given level of nutrient retention has been achieved is also determined using this approach. The shape of the CC curve is dependent on the metrics measured and serves in part as a measure of the information provided by the metrics to predict nutrient retention. It is also a direct measurement, with a margin of safety, of the fraction of export load that can be reduced through changing retention metrics. For an impaired stream in western Oklahoma, a combination of prior information and measurement of nutrient attenuation was used to illustrate the proposed approach. This method may be considered for TMDL implementation.

  15. Intraspecies variation in BMR does not affect estimates of early hominin total daily energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehle, Andrew W; Schoeninger, Margaret J

    2006-12-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 45 studies reporting basal metabolic rate (BMR) data for Homo sapiens and Pan troglodytes to determine the effects of sex, age, and latitude (a proxy for climate, in humans only). BMR was normalized for body size using fat-free mass in humans and body mass in chimpanzees. We found no effect of sex in either species and no age effect in chimpanzees. In humans, juveniles differed significantly from adults (ANCOVA: P BMR and body size, and used them to predict total daily energy expenditure (TEE) in four early hominin species. Our predictions concur with previous TEE estimates (i.e. Leonard and Robertson: Am J Phys Anthropol 102 (1997) 265-281), and support the conclusion that TEE increased greatly with H. erectus. Our results show that intraspecific variation in BMR does not affect TEE estimates for interspecific comparisons. Comparisons of more closely related groups such as humans and Neandertals, however, may benefit from consideration of this variation. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Switching to multiple daily injection therapy with glulisine improves glycaemic control, vascular damage and treatment satisfaction in basal insulin glargine-injected diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Katsuyuki; Ashihara, Junya; Obara, Shinji; Wada, Norio; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Nishino, Yuri; Maeda, Sayaka; Ishibashi, Yuji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Basal and bolus insulin therapy is required for strict blood control in diabetic patients, which could lead to prevention of vascular complications in diabetes. However, the optimal combination regimen is not well established. Fifty-nine diabetic patients (49 type 1 and 10 type 2; 52.9 ± 13.3 years old) whose blood glucose levels were uncontrolled (HbA1c  > 6.2%) by combination treatment of basal insulin glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of bolus short-acting insulin [aspart (n = 19), lispro (n = 37) and regular human insulin (n = 3)] for at least 8 weeks were enrolled in this study. We examined whether glycaemic control and vascular injury were improved by replacement of short-acting insulin with glulisine. Patient satisfaction was assessed with Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Although bolus and basal insulin doses were almost unchanged before and after replacement therapy, switching to glulisine insulin for 24 weeks significantly decreased level of HbA1c , advanced glycation end products (AGEs), soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and urinary albumin excretion. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, change in MCP-1 values from baseline (ΔMCP-1) was a sole determinant of log urinary albumin excretion. ΔAGEs and ΔsRAGE were independently correlated with each other. The relationship between ΔMCP-1 and ΔsRAGE was marginally significant (p = 0.05). Replacement of short-acting insulin by glulisine significantly increased Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores. Our present study suggests that combination therapy of glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of glulisine might show superior efficacy in controlling blood glucose, preventing vascular damage and improving treatment satisfaction in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesić, Milica; Zivić, Sasa; Radenković, Sasa; Velojić, Milena; Dimić, Dragan; Antić, Slobodan

    2007-04-01

    Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin) for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IT) were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15); 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15); 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18). Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) was lower in the glargine group (7.30+/-0.98 mmol/1) than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47+/-1.06 mmol/1), but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44+/-0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05). HbAlc after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72+/-0.86% to 6.87+/-0.50%), as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80+/-0.83% to 7.01+/-0.63%). Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56+/-2.09) than in both NPH groups (9.0+/-1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13+/-1.30 in other NPH group) (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05). Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbAlc and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  18. Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IIT were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15; 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15; 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18. Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Results. Fasting blood glucose (FBG was lower in the glargine group (7.30±0.98 mmol/l than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47±1.06 mmol/l, but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44±0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05. HbA1c after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72±0.86% to 6.87±0.50%, as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80±0.83% to 7.01±0.63%. Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56±2.09 than in both NPH groups (9.0±1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13±1.30 in other NPH group (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  19. Association of total daily physical activity with disability in community-dwelling older persons: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Raj C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on findings primarily using self-report measures, physical activity has been recommended to reduce disability in old age. Collecting objective measures of total daily physical activity in community-dwelling older adults is uncommon, but might enhance the understanding of the relationship of physical activity and disability. We examined whether greater total daily physical activity was associated with less report of disability in the elderly. Methods Data were from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a longitudinal prospective cohort study of common, age-related, chronic conditions. Total daily physical activity was measured in community-dwelling participants with an average age of 82 using actigraphy for approximately 9 days. Disability was measured via self-reported basic activities of daily living (ADL. The odds ratio and 95% Confidence Interval (CI were determined for the baseline association of total daily physical activity and ADL disability using a logistic regression model adjusted for age, education level, gender and self-report physical activity. In participants without initial report of ADL disability, the hazard ratio and 95% CI were determined for the relationship of baseline total daily physical activity and the development of ADL disability using a discrete time Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for demographics and self-report physical activity. Results In 870 participants, the mean total daily physical activity was 2. 9 × 105 counts/day (range in 105 counts/day = 0.16, 13. 6 and the mean hours/week of self-reported physical activity was 3.2 (SD = 3.6. At baseline, 718 (82.5% participants reported being independent in all ADLs. At baseline, total daily physical activity was protective against disability (OR per 105 counts/day difference = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.65. Of the participants without baseline disability, 584 were followed for 3.4 years on average. Each 105 counts/day additional total

  20. An ecological function and services approach to total maximum daily load (TMDL) prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert K; Guiliano, David; Swanson, Sherman; Philbin, Michael J; Lin, John; Aron, Joan L; Schafer, Robin J; Heggem, Daniel T

    2014-04-01

    Prioritizing total maximum daily load (TMDL) development starts by considering the scope and severity of water pollution and risks to public health and aquatic life. Methodology using quantitative assessments of in-stream water quality is appropriate and effective for point source (PS) dominated discharge, but less so in watersheds with mostly nonpoint source (NPS) related impairments. For NPSs, prioritization in TMDL development and implementation of associated best management practices should focus on restoration of ecosystem physical functions, including how restoration effectiveness depends on design, maintenance and placement within the watershed. To refine the approach to TMDL development, regulators and stakeholders must first ask if the watershed, or ecosystem, is at risk of losing riparian or other ecologically based physical attributes and processes. If so, the next step is an assessment of the spatial arrangement of functionality with a focus on the at-risk areas that could be lost, or could, with some help, regain functions. Evaluating stream and wetland riparian function has advantages over the traditional means of water quality and biological assessments for NPS TMDL development. Understanding how an ecosystem functions enables stakeholders and regulators to determine the severity of problem(s), identify source(s) of impairment, and predict and avoid a decline in water quality. The Upper Reese River, Nevada, provides an example of water quality impairment caused by NPS pollution. In this river basin, stream and wetland riparian proper functioning condition (PFC) protocol, water quality data, and remote sensing imagery were used to identify sediment sources, transport, distribution, and its impact on water quality and aquatic resources. This study found that assessments of ecological function could be used to generate leading (early) indicators of water quality degradation for targeting pollution control measures, while traditional in-stream water

  1. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total...

  2. Fear of needles in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus on multiple daily injections and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeroglu, Ayse Pinar; Can, Argun; Davis, Alan T; Cemeroglu, Ozlem; Kleis, Lora; Daniel, Maala S; Bustraan, Jessica; Koehler, Tracy J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of fear of needles and its effect on glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) on multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Patients aged 6 to 17 years with T1DM on MDI or CSII (n = 150) were enrolled. All caregivers and patients aged ≥11 years completed a "Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-testing Questionnaire" (D-FISQ). Needle phobia was defined as a score ≥6 for fear of self-testing (FST), fear of injections (FI), and fear of infusion-site changes (FISC). Positive FST scores were noted in 10.0% and positive FI or FISC scores in 32.7% (caregivers' responses). Patients aged 6 to 10 years on CSII had greater fear (FISC) than those on MDI (FI) (P = .010). FST was inversely related to the number of daily blood sugar checks (P = .003). Patients with positive scores for FI/FISC or FST had significantly higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels than those without. An inverse association was noted between positive FI/FISC scores and age of the patient (P = .029). Based on patient responses, FST severity was directly related to the age of the patient (P = .013). Needle phobia is common in children with T1DM. Although FI/FISC are more common in younger children, especially in those on CSII, FST is more often encountered in older patients. Patients with a more intense fear of needles have higher HbA1c levels and less frequent blood sugar monitoring. Identifying these patients may help improve glycemic control.

  3. Total and high molecular weight adiponectin have similar utility for the identification of insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilar-Salinas Carlos A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance (IR and related metabolic disturbances are characterized by low levels of adiponectin. High molecular weight adiponectin (HMWA is considered the active form of adiponectin and a better marker of IR than total adiponectin. The objective of this study is to compare the utility of total adiponectin, HMWA and the HMWA/total adiponectin index (SA index for the identification of IR and related metabolic conditions. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed in a group of ambulatory subjects, aged 20 to 70 years, in Mexico City. Areas under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve for total, HMWA and the SA index were plotted for the identification of metabolic disturbances. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for the identification of IR were calculated. Results The study included 101 men and 168 women. The areas under the ROC curve for total and HMWA for the identification of IR (0.664 vs. 0.669, P = 0.74, obesity (0.592 vs. 0.610, P = 0.32, hypertriglyceridemia (0.661 vs. 0.671, P = 0.50 and hypoalphalipoproteinemia (0.624 vs. 0.633, P = 0.58 were similar. A total adiponectin level of 8.03 μg/ml was associated with a sensitivity of 57.6%, a specificity of 65.9%, a positive predictive value of 50.0%, a negative predictive value of 72.4%, and an accuracy of 62.7% for the diagnosis of IR. The corresponding figures for a HMWA value of 4.25 μg/dl were 59.6%, 67.1%, 51.8%, 73.7% and 64.2%. The area under the ROC curve of the SA index for the identification of IR was 0.622 [95% CI 0.554-0.691], obesity 0.613 [95% CI 0.536-0.689], hypertriglyceridemia 0.616 [95% CI 0.549-0.683], and hypoalphalipoproteinemia 0.606 [95% CI 0.535-0.677]. Conclusions Total adiponectin, HMWA and the SA index had similar utility for the identification of IR and metabolic disturbances.

  4. The effects of synbiotic supplementation on insulin resistance/sensitivity, lipid profile and total antioxidant capacity in women with gestational diabetes mellitus: A randomized double blind placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabhani, Zohoor; Hezaveh, Seyed Jamal Ghaemmaghami; Razmpoosh, Elham; Asghari-Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Gargari, Bahram Pourghassem

    2018-04-01

    The role of gut microbiota in the management of diabetes is shown. In this randomized clinical trial we assessed the effects of synbiotic supplementation on insulin, lipid profile and antioxidative status among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Ninety pregnant women with GDM were randomly assigned into two groups to receive either a daily synbiotic capsule - consisting of L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, L. fermentum, L. gasseri (1.5-7.0 × 10 9-10  CFU/g) - with fructooligosaccharide (38.5 mg), or placebo for 6 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), high- and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DSP) were assessed before and after the intervention. No significant changes in FPG, insulin resistance/sensitivity, lipid profile and TAC indices were seen in synbiotic group compared to the placebo one (p > 0.05). Significant within group increases for HDL-C and TAC levels in synbiotic group were observed (p insulin resistance/sensitivity indices. Lipid profile and TAC status may be affected by synbiotic supplementation. Synbiotic is effective in reducing of blood pressure in women with GDM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of exenatide twice daily (BID) vs insulin glargine once daily (QD) as add-on therapy in Chinese patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled by oral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jing; Gu, Shuyan; Shao, Hui; Dong, Hengjin; Zou, Dajin; Shi, Lizheng

    2015-01-01

    To estimate cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily (BID) vs insulin glargine once daily (QD) as add-on therapy in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients not well controlled by oral anti-diabetic (OAD) agents. The Cardiff model was populated with data synthesized from three head-to-head randomized clinical trials of up to 30 weeks in China comparing exenatide BID vs insulin glargine as add-on therapies to oral therapies in the Chinese population. The Cardiff model generated outputs including macrovascular and microvascular complications, diabetes-specific mortality, costs, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost and QALYs were estimated with a time horizon of 40 years at a discount rate of 3% from a societal perspective. Compared with insulin glargine plus OAD treatments, patients on exenatide BID plus OAD gained 1.88 QALYs, at an incremental cost saving of Chinese Renminbi (RMB) 114,593 (i.e., cost saving of RMB 61078/QALY). The cost-effectiveness results were robust to various sensitivity analyses including probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The variables with the most impact on incremental cost-effectiveness ratio included HbA1c level at baseline, health utilities decrement, and BMI at baseline. Compared with insulin glargine QD, exenatide BID as add-on therapy to OAD is a cost-effective treatment in Chinese patients inadequately controlled by OAD treatments.

  6. Daily insulin requirement of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: effect of age, gender, body mass index and mode of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Susanna; Raile, Klemens; Reinehr, Thomas; Hofer, Sabine; Näke, Andrea; Rabl, Wolfgang; Holl, Reinhard W

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate insulin dose (ID) percentiles for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) having the opportunity to assess this important parameter in relation to age and sex. Daily IDs per weight (ID/kg) were recorded in 22,177 patients with DM1 (3-25 years of age, DM1 duration of more than 2 years, 48% female) and ID percentiles (ID-Perc) were created statistically. The ID-Perc were compared between male and female, and between multiple insulin injection therapy (MIT) and continuous s.c. insulin infusion (CSII). A multivariate regression analysis was performed for ID in the third year of DM1 with ID/kg, body weight, age, gender, and insulin delivery regimen as variables. The 50th ID-Perc (P50) varied among 0.67 IU/kg (age 3 years), 0.93 IU/kg (13 years), and 0.70 IU/kg (23 years) increasing from early childhood to adolescence and decreasing toward adulthood. Highest P50 ID was found at 12 years in females (0.94 IU/kg) and at 14 years in males (0.92 IU/kg). Using ICT, the ID was significantly higher compared with CSII (P50: 0.94 IU/kg versus 0.79 IU/kg at 13 years). In multivariate regression analysis, ID was significantly (P>0.001) associated with age, gender, and insulin delivery regime. The ID-Perc were significantly different during various periods of childhood and were influenced by gender, body weight, and insulin injection regimes. Therefore, the presented data 1) provide evidence to interpret individual ID in children and adolescents with DM1 and 2) more specifically identify children with unusually high (insulin resistance and non-compliance) or low (MODY and persistent remission) insulin requirement.

  7. TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Aerosol Index UV-Reflectivity UV-B Erythemal Irradiances Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) version 8 Daily Gridded Data consist of daily, global coverage of total column ozone, aerosol index, Lambertian effective...

  8. Insulin Degludec/Insulin Aspart Administered Once Daily at Any Meal, With Insulin Aspart at Other Meals Versus a Standard Basal-Bolus Regimen in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Irl B.; Bode, Bruce; Courreges, Jean-Pierre; Dykiel, Patrik; Franek, Edward; Hermansen, Kjeld; King, Allen; Mersebach, Henriette; Davies, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate efficacy and tolerability of a co-formulation of insulin degludec and insulin aspart (IDegAsp) with insulin aspart (IAsp) at other meals compared with basal-bolus therapy using insulin detemir (IDet) and IAsp. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adults (n = 548) with type 1 diabetes (A1C 7.0–10.0%; BMI ≤35.0 kg/m2) were randomized 2:1 in a 26-week, multinational, parallel-group, treat-to-target trial to IDegAsp or IDet. IDegAsp was given with a meal, and IDet was given in the evening, with a second (breakfast) dose added if needed. RESULTS Non-inferiority for IDegAsp versus IDet was confirmed; A1C improved by 0.75% with IDegAsp and 0.70% with IDet to 7.6% in both groups (estimated treatment difference IDegAsp − IDet: –0.05% [95% CI –0.18 to 0.08]). There was no statistically significant difference between IDegAsp and IDet in the rates of severe hypoglycemia (0.33 and 0.42 episodes/patient-year, respectively) or overall confirmed (plasma glucose <3.1 mmol/L) hypoglycemia (39.17 and 44.34 episodes/patient-year, respectively). Nocturnal confirmed hypoglycemia rate was 37% lower with IDegAsp than IDet (3.71 vs. 5.72 episodes/patient-year, P < 0.05). Weight gain was 2.3 and 1.3 kg with IDegAsp and IDet, respectively (P < 0.05). Total insulin dose was 13% lower in the IDegAsp group (P < 0.0001). No treatment differences were detected in Health-Related Quality of Life, laboratory measurements, physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiograms, fundoscopy, or adverse events. CONCLUSIONS IDegAsp in basal-bolus therapy with IAsp at additional mealtimes improves overall glycemic control and was non-inferior to IDet, with a reduced risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia and fewer injections in comparison with IDet + IAsp basal-bolus therapy. PMID:22933438

  9. Switching from NPH insulin to once-daily insulin detemir in basal-bolus-treated patients with diabetes mellitus: data from the European cohort of the PREDICTIVE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sreenan, S

    2008-12-01

    The PREDICTIVE study is a multinational observational study designed to follow up patients with diabetes who started insulin detemir (IDet) in routine care. Recruitment started in June 2004 and is ongoing in some countries.

  10. Contribution of complementary foods to the total daily water needs of urban Guatemalan infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneman, A.; Campos, R.; Hernandez, L.; Palma, A.V.; Vossenaar, M.; Solomons, N.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Estimates of adequate intake (AI) for water only became available in 2005. The daily water AI for 6-12-month-old infants of both sexes is 800 mL. The present study aimed to estimate the water intake of urban infants receiving both breast milk and complementary feeding (CF) and to compare

  11. TOMS/Earth-Probe Total Ozone Aerosol Index UV-Reflectivity UV-B Erythemal Irradiance Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) version 8 daily global gridded data consist of total column ozone, aerosol index, Lambertian effective surface...

  12. 76 FR 549 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Notice for the Establishment of the Total Maximum Daily Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Establishment of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for the Chesapeake Bay AGENCY: Environmental Protection... that when met will assure the attainment and maintenance of all applicable water quality standards for... productive estuaries in the world. Despite significant efforts by federal, state, and local governments and...

  13. Daily chocolate consumption is inversely associated with insulin resistance and liver enzymes in the Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkerwi, Ala'a; Sauvageot, Nicolas; Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Stranges, Saverio

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the association of chocolate consumption with insulin resistance and serum liver enzymes in a national sample of adults in Luxembourg. A random sample of 1153 individuals, aged 18-69 years, was recruited to participate in the cross-sectional Observation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Luxembourg study. Chocolate consumption (g/d) was obtained from a semi-quantitative FFQ. Blood glucose and insulin levels were used for the homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Hepatic biomarkers such as serum γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (γ-GT), serum aspartate transaminase and serum alanine transaminase (ALT) (mg/l) were assessed using standard laboratory assays. Chocolate consumers (81·8 %) were more likely to be younger, physically active, affluent people with higher education levels and fewer chronic co-morbidities. After excluding subjects taking antidiabetic medications, higher chocolate consumption was associated with lower HOMA-IR (β=-0·16, P=0·004), serum insulin levels (β=-0·16, P=0·003) and γ-GT (β=-0·12, P=0·009) and ALT (β=-0·09, P=0·004), after adjustment for age, sex, education, lifestyle and dietary confounding factors, including intakes of fruits and vegetables, alcohol, polyphenol-rich coffee and tea. This study reports an independent inverse relationship between daily chocolate consumption and levels of insulin, HOMA-IR and liver enzymes in adults, suggesting that chocolate consumption may improve liver enzymes and protect against insulin resistance, a well-established risk factor for cardiometabolic disorders. Further observational prospective research and well-designed randomised-controlled studies are needed to confirm this cross-sectional relationship and to comprehend the role and mechanisms that different types of chocolate may play in insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disorders.

  14. Total error shift patterns for daily CT on rails image-guided radiotherapy to the prostate bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mota Helvecio C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the daily total error shift patterns on post-prostatectomy patients undergoing image guided radiotherapy (IGRT with a diagnostic quality computer tomography (CT on rails system. Methods A total of 17 consecutive post-prostatectomy patients receiving adjuvant or salvage IMRT using CT-on-rails IGRT were analyzed. The prostate bed's daily total error shifts were evaluated for a total of 661 CT scans. Results In the right-left, cranial-caudal, and posterior-anterior directions, 11.5%, 9.2%, and 6.5% of the 661 scans required no position adjustments; 75.3%, 66.1%, and 56.8% required a shift of 1 - 5 mm; 11.5%, 20.9%, and 31.2% required a shift of 6 - 10 mm; and 1.7%, 3.8%, and 5.5% required a shift of more than 10 mm, respectively. There was evidence of correlation between the x and y, x and z, and y and z axes in 3, 3, and 3 of 17 patients, respectively. Univariate (ANOVA analysis showed that the total error pattern was random in the x, y, and z axis for 10, 5, and 2 of 17 patients, respectively, and systematic for the rest. Multivariate (MANOVA analysis showed that the (x,y, (x,z, (y,z, and (x, y, z total error pattern was random in 5, 1, 1, and 1 of 17 patients, respectively, and systematic for the rest. Conclusions The overall daily total error shift pattern for these 17 patients simulated with an empty bladder, and treated with CT on rails IGRT was predominantly systematic. Despite this, the temporal vector trends showed complex behaviors and unpredictable changes in magnitude and direction. These findings highlight the importance of using daily IGRT in post-prostatectomy patients.

  15. Liraglutide, a once-daily human GLP-1 analogue, improves pancreatic B-cell function and arginine-stimulated insulin secretion during hyperglycaemia in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Brock, Birgitte; Perrild, Hans

    2008-01-01

    To assess the effect of liraglutide, a once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue on pancreatic B-cell function. methods: Patients with Type 2 diabetes (n = 39) were randomized to treatment with 0.65, 1.25 or 1.9 mg/day liraglutide or placebo for 14 weeks. First- and second-phase insulin...... release were measured by means of the insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Arginine-stimulated insulin secretion was measured during a hyperglycaemic clamp (20 mmol/l). Glucose effectiveness and insulin sensitivity were estimated by means of the insulin...

  16. Design of spray dried insulin microparticles to bypass deposition in the extrathoracic region and maximize total lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Keith T; Rao, Nagaraja; Weers, Jeffry G; Huang, Daniel; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-09-25

    Inhaled drugs all too often deliver only a fraction of the emitted dose to the target lung site due to deposition in the extrathoracic region (i.e., mouth and throat), which can lead to increased variation in lung exposure, and in some instances increases in local and systemic side effects. For aerosol medications, improved targeting to the lungs may be achieved by tailoring the micromeritic properties of the particles (e.g., size, density, rugosity) to minimize deposition in the mouth-throat and maximize the total lung dose. This study evaluated a co-solvent spray drying approach to modulate particle morphology and dose delivery characteristics of engineered powder formulations of insulin microparticles. The binary co-solvent system studied included water as the primary solvent mixed with an organic co-solvent, e.g., ethanol. Factors such as the relative rate of evaporation of each component of a binary co-solvent mixture, and insulin solubility in each component were considered in selecting feedstock compositions. A water-ethanol co-solvent mixture with a composition range considered suitable for modulating particle shell formation during drying was selected for experimental investigation. An Alberta Idealized Throat model was used to evaluate the in vitro total lung dose of a series of spray dried insulin formulations engineered with different bulk powder properties and delivered with two prototype inhalers that fluidize and disperse powder using different principles. The in vitro total lung dose of insulin microparticles was improved and favored for powders with low bulk density and small primary particle size, with reduction of deposition in the extrathoracic region. The results demonstrated that a total lung dose >95% of the delivered dose can be achieved with engineered particles, indicating a high degree of lung targeting, almost completely bypassing deposition in the mouth-throat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Free and total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-3 and their relationships to the presence of diabetic retinopathy and glomerular hyperfiltration in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); M.L. Jacobs (Marloes); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); R.F.A. Weber (Rob); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe existing literature on serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is conflicting. Free IGF-I may have greater physiological and clinical relevance than total IGF- I. Recently, a validated method has been developed to measure free

  18. Free and total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), and IGFBP-3 and their relationships to the presence of diabetic retinopathy and glomerular hyperfiltration in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); M.L. Jacobs (Marloes); F.H.M. Derkx (Frans); R.F.A. Weber (Robert); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe existing literature on serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is conflicting. Free IGF-I may have greater physiological and clinical relevance than total IGF-I. Recently, a validated method has

  19. Daily total physical activity level and total cancer risk in men and women: results from a large-scale population-based cohort study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Kurahashi, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2008-08-15

    The impact of total physical activity level on cancer risk has not been fully clarified, particularly in non-Western, relatively lean populations. The authors prospectively examined the association between daily total physical activity (using a metabolic equivalents/day score) and subsequent cancer risk in the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. A total of 79,771 general-population Japanese men and women aged 45-74 years who responded to a questionnaire in 1995-1999 were followed for total cancer incidence (4,334 cases) through 2004. Compared with subjects in the lowest quartile, increased daily physical activity was associated with a significantly decreased risk of cancer in both sexes. In men, hazard ratios for the second, third, and highest quartiles were 1.00 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90, 1.11), 0.96 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.07), and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.96), respectively (p for trend = 0.005); in women, hazard ratios were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.05), 0.84 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.96), and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.97), respectively (p for trend = 0.007). The decreased risk was more clearly observed in women than in men, especially among the elderly and those who regularly engaged in leisure-time sports or physical exercise. By site, decreased risks were observed for cancers of the colon, liver, and pancreas in men and for cancer of the stomach in women. Increased daily physical activity may be beneficial in preventing cancer in a relatively lean population.

  20. Estimation of the total daily oral intake of NDMA attributable to drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristachi, Anthony; Rice, Glenn

    2007-09-01

    Disinfection with chlorine and chloramine leads to the formation of many disinfection by-products including N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Because NDMA is a probable human carcinogen, public health officials are concerned with its occurrence in drinking water. The goal of this study was to estimate NDMA concentrations from exogenous (i.e., drinking water and food) and endogenous (i.e., formed in the human body) sources, calculate average daily doses for ingestion route exposures and estimate the proportional oral intake (POI) of NDMA attributable to the consumption of drinking water relative to other ingestion sources of NDMA. The POI is predicted to be 0.02% relative to exogenous and endogenous NDMA sources combined. When only exogenous sources are considered, the POI was predicted to be 2.7%. The exclusion of endogenously formed NDMA causes the POI to increase dramatically, reflecting its importance as a potentially major source of exposure and uncertainty in the model. Although concentrations of NDMA in foods are small and human exposure to NDMA from foods is quite low, the contribution from food is predicted to be high relative to that of drinking water. The mean concentration of NDMA in drinking water would need to increase from 2.1 x 10(-3) microg/L to 0.10 microg/L, a 47-fold increase, for the POI to reach 1%, relative to all sources of NDMA considered in our model, suggesting that drinking water consumption is most likely a minor source of NDMA exposure.

  1. The contact mechanics and occurrence of edge loading in modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement during daily activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of edge loading in hip joint replacement has been associated with many factors such as prosthetic design, component malposition and activities of daily living. The present study aimed to quantify the occurrence of edge loading/contact at the articulating surface and to evaluate the effect of cup angles and edge loading on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR) during different daily activities. A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing system. Different cup inclination and anteversion angles were modelled and six daily activities were considered. The results showed that edge loading was predicted during normal walking, ascending and descending stairs activities under steep cup inclination conditions (≥55°) while no edge loading was observed during standing up, sitting down and knee bending activities. The duration of edge loading increased with increased cup inclination angles and was affected by the cup anteversion angles. Edge loading caused elevated contact pressure at the articulating surface and substantially increased equivalent plastic strain of the polyethylene liner. The present study suggested that correct positioning the component to avoid edge loading that may occur during daily activities is important for MoP THR in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Estimating the contribution of strong daily export events to total pollutant export from the United States in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuanyuan; Fiore, Arlene M.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Levy, Hiram; Hu, Yongtao; Russell, Armistead G.

    2009-12-01

    While the export of pollutants from the United States exhibits notable variability from day to day and is often considered to be "episodic," the contribution of strong daily export events to total export has not been quantified. We use carbon monoxide (CO) as a tracer of anthropogenic pollutants in the Model of OZone And Related Tracers (MOZART) to estimate this contribution. We first identify the major export pathway from the United States to be through the northeast boundary (24-48°N along 67.5°W and 80-67.5°W along 48°N), and then analyze 15 summers of daily CO export fluxes through this boundary. These daily CO export fluxes have a nearly Gaussian distribution with a mean of 1100 Gg CO day-1 and a standard deviation of 490 Gg CO day-1. To focus on the synoptic variability, we define a "synoptic background" export flux equal to the 15 day moving average export flux and classify strong export days according to their fluxes relative to this background. As expected from Gaussian statistics, 16% of summer days are "strong export days," classified as those days when the CO export flux exceeds the synoptic background by one standard deviation or more. Strong export days contributes 25% to the total export, a value determined by the relative standard deviation of the CO flux distribution. Regressing the anomalies of the CO export flux through the northeast U.S. boundary relative to the synoptic background on the daily anomalies in the surface pressure field (also relative to a 15 day running mean) suggests that strong daily export fluxes are correlated with passages of midlatitude cyclones over the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. The associated cyclonic circulation and Warm Conveyor Belts (WCBs) that lift surface pollutants over the northeastern United States have been shown previously to be associated with long-range transport events. Comparison with observations from the 2004 INTEX-NA field campaign confirms that our model captures the observed enhancements in CO outflow

  3. Polyamines: total daily intake in adolescents compared to the intake estimated from the Swedish Nutrition Recommendations Objectified (SNO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Atiya Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dietary polyamines have been shown to give a significant contribution to the body pool of polyamines. Knowing the levels of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine in different foods and the contribution of daily food choice to polyamine intake is of interest, due to the association of these bioactive amines to health and disease. Objective: To estimate polyamine intake and food contribution to this intake in adolescents compared to a diet fulfilling the Swedish Nutrition Recommendations. Design: A cross-sectional study of dietary intake in adolescents and an ‘ideal diet’ (Swedish nutrition recommendations objectified [SNO] list of foods was used to compute polyamine intake using a database of polyamine contents of foods. For polyamine intake estimation, 7-day weighed food records collected from 93 adolescents were entered into dietetic software (Dietist XP including data on polyamine contents of foods. The content of polyamines in foods recommended according to SNO was entered in the same way. Results: The adolescents’ mean daily polyamine intake was 316±170 µmol/day, while the calculated contribution according to SNO was considerably higher with an average polyamine intake of 541 µmol/day. In both adolescent's intake and SNO, fruits contributed to almost half of the total polyamine intake. The reason why the intake among the adolescents was lower than the one calculated from SNO was mainly due to the low vegetable consumption in the adolescents group. Conclusions: The average daily total polyamine intake was similar to that previously reported in Europe. With an ‘ideal’ diet according to Swedish nutrition recommendations, the intake of this bioactive non-nutrient would be higher than that reported by our adolescents and also higher than that previously reported from Europe.

  4. Development and daily use of an electronic oncological patient record for the total management of cancer patients: 7 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligioni, E; Berloffa, F; Caffo, O; Tonazzolli, G; Ambrosini, G; Valduga, F; Eccher, C; Ferro, A; Forti, S

    2009-02-01

    We describe our experience with an electronic oncological patient record (EOPR) for the total management of cancer patients. The web-based EOPR was developed on the basis of a user-centred design including user education and training, followed by continuous assistance; user acceptance was monitored by means of three questionnaires administered after 2 weeks, 6 months and 6 years. The EOPR has been used daily for all in-ward, day hospital and ambulatory clinical activities since July 2000. The most widely appreciated functions are its rapid multipoint access, the self-updated summary of the patients' clinical course, the management of the entire therapeutic programme synchronised with working agendas and oncological teleconsultation. Security and privacy are assured by means of the separate storage of clinical and demographic data, with access protected by login and a password. The questionnaires highlighted appreciation of rapid data retrieval and exchange and the perception of improved quality of care, but also revealed a sense of additional work and a negative impact on doctor-patient relationships. Our EOPR has proved to be effective in the total management of cancer patients. Its user-centred design and flexible web technology have been key factors in its successful implementation and daily use.

  5. Multiple daily injection of insulin regimen for a 10-month-old infant with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing worldwide, and the greatest increase has been observed in very young children under 4 years of age. A case of infantile diabetic ketoacidosis in a 10-month-old male infant was encountered by these authors. The infant's fasting glucose level was 490 mg/dL, his PH was 7.13, his pCO2 was 15 mmHg, and his bicarbonate level was 5.0 mmol/L. The glycosylated hemoglobin level had increased to 9.4%. Ketonuria and glucosuria were detected in the urinalysis. The fasting C-peptide and insulin levels had decreased. The infant was positive for anti-insulin and antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. Immediately after the infant's admission, fluid therapy and intravenous insulin infusion therapy were started. On the second day of the infant's hospitalization and after fluid therapy, he recovered from his lethargic condition, and his general condition improved. Feeding was started on the third day, and he was fed a formula 5 to 7 times a day and ate rice, vegetables, and lean meat. Due to the frequent feeding, the frequency of rapid-acting insulin injection was increased from 3 times before feeding to 5 times, adjusted according to the feeding frequency. The total dose of insulin that was injected was 0.8–1.1 IU/kg/day, and the infant was discharged on the 12th day of his hospitalization. The case is presented herein with a brief review of the relevant literature.

  6. Correlations between patient satisfaction and ability to perform daily activities after total knee arthroplasty: why aren't patients satisfied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Ken; Mizu-Uchi, Hideki; Hamai, Satoshi; Tashiro, Yasutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has become an important parameter for assessing overall outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The level of difficulty in performing activities of daily life that affects overall patient satisfaction is unknown. We therefore evaluated the influence of difficulty in performing activities of daily life on patient satisfaction and expectations. The 2011 Knee Society Knee Scoring System Questionnaire was mailed to patients who had undergone TKA with 375 patients completing and returning it. We evaluated the relationship between the ability to perform daily activities, as assessed via the questionnaire, and patient satisfaction and expectations of the same score in each patient using linear regression analysis. We also determined which activities affected patient satisfaction and expectations using multivariate linear regression analyses. All patient-derived functional activities correlated significantly with the patient satisfaction score. In particular, "climbing up or down a flight of stairs" followed by "getting into or out of a car," "moving laterally (stepping to the side)" and "walking and standing" correlated strongly with patient satisfaction by linear regression analysis and were revealed to have significant contributions to patient satisfaction by multivariate linear regression analysis. Regarding expectations, all patient-derived functional activities correlated significantly with the patient expectation score, although none of the correlation coefficients was very high. "Squatting," followed by "walking and standing," contributed to the patient expectation score by multivariate linear regression analysis. Activities related to walking and standing are some of the most basic movements and basic demands for patients. In addition, "climbing up or down a flight of stairs," "getting into and out of a car" and "squatting" are very important and distressing activities that significantly correlate with patient satisfaction after TKA.

  7. Knee Flexion and Daily Activities in Patients following Total Knee Replacement: A Comparison with ISO Standard 14243

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A. Wimmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking is only one of many daily activities performed by patients following total knee replacement (TKR. The purpose of this study was to examine the hypotheses (a that subject activity characteristics are correlated with knee flexion range of motion (ROM and (b that there is a significant difference between the subject’s flexion/extension excursion throughout the day and the ISO specified input for knee wear testing. In order to characterize activity, the number of walking and stair stepping cycles, the time spent with dynamic and stationary activities, the number of activity sequences, and the knee flexion/extension excursion of 32 TKR subjects were collected during daily activity. Flexion/extension profiles were compared with the ISO 14243 simulator input profile using a level crossing classification algorithm. Subjects took an average of 3102 (range: 343–5857 walking cycles including 65 (range: 0–319 stair stepping cycles. Active and passive ROMs were positively correlated with stair walking time, stair step counts, and stair walking sequences. Simulated knee motion according to ISO showed significantly fewer level crossings at the flexion angles 20–40° and beyond 50° than those measured with the monitor. This suggests that implant wear testing protocols should contain more cycles and a variety of activities requiring higher knee flexion angles with incorporated resting/transition periods to account for the many activity sequences.

  8. Waste Load Allocation Based on Total Maximum Daily Load Approach Using the Charged System Search (CSS Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Faraji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the capability of a charged system search algorithm (CSS in handling water management optimization problems is investigated. First, two complex mathematical problems are solved by CSS and the results are compared with those obtained from other metaheuristic algorithms. In the last step, the optimization model developed by the CSS algorithm is applied to the waste load allocation in rivers based on the total maximum daily load (TMDL concept. The results are presented in Tables and Figures for easy comparison. The study indicates the superiority of the CSS algorithm in terms of its speed and performance over the other metaheuristic algorithms while its precision in water management optimization problems is verified.

  9. A free sugars daily value (DV) identifies more "less healthy" prepackaged foods and beverages than a total sugars DV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jodi T; Labonté, Marie-Ève; Franco-Arellano, Beatriz; Schermel, Alyssa; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2018-04-01

    Regulatory changes in Canada will require food labels to have a benchmark [% Daily Value, %DV] for total sugars, based on 100 g/day, while US labels will require a %DV for added sugars, based on 50 g/day. The objective of this study was to compare two labelling policies, a total sugars DV (100 g/day) and a free sugars DV (50 g/day) on food labels. This cross-sectional analysis of the Food Label Information Program database focussed on top sources of total sugars intake in Canada (n = 6924 foods). Products were categorized as "less healthy" using two sets of criteria: a) free sugars levels exceeding the WHO guidelines (≥10% energy from free sugars); and b) exceeding healthfulness cut-offs of the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (FSANZ-NPSC). The proportion of "less healthy" products with ≥15%DV (defined as "a lot" of sugars i.e. high in sugars, based on Health Canada's %DV labelling footnote and educational message for dietary guidance) were compared for each sugar labelling scenario. The free sugars DV showed better alignment with both methods for assessing "healthfulness" than the total sugars DV. The free sugars DV identified a greater proportion of "less healthy" foods with ≥15%DV, based on both the FSANZ-NPSC (70% vs. 45%, p chocolate bars, confectionery, and frozen desserts categories. Compared to total sugars DV labelling, using a free sugars DV identified more "less healthy" foods. Findings support the adoption of free sugars labelling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Daily sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and insulin resistance in European adolescents: the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondaki, Katerina; Grammatikaki, Evangelia; Jiménez-Pavón, David; De Henauw, Stefaan; González-Gross, Marcela; Sjöstrom, Michael; Gottrand, Frédéric; Molnar, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A; Kafatos, Anthony; Gilbert, Chantal; Kersting, Mathilde; Manios, Yannis

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the consumption of selected food groups and insulin resistance, with an emphasis on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB). The present research is a large multicentre European study in adolescents, the HELENA-CSS (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Cross-Sectional Study). Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Several anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics were recorded. Dietary assessment was conducted by using a short FFQ. The participants were a subset of the original sample (n 546) with complete data on glucose, insulin and FFQ. All participants were recruited at schools. Median (25th, 75th percentile) HOMA-IR was 0.62 (0.44, 0.87). Mean HOMA-IR was significantly higher among adolescents consuming brown bread ≤1 time/week than among those consuming 2-6 times/week (P = 0·011). Mean values of HOMA-IR were also higher in adolescents consuming SSB >5 times/week compared with those consuming less frequently, although a statistically significant difference was detected between those consuming SSB 5-6 times/week and 2-4 times/week (P = 0.049). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the frequency of SSB consumption was significantly associated with HOMA-IR after controlling for potential confounders. In particular, it was found that HOMA-IR levels were higher among adolescents consuming SSB 5-6 times/week and ≥1 time/d compared with those consuming ≤1 time/week by 0.281 and 0.191 units, respectively (P = 0.009 and 0.046, respectively). The present study revealed that daily consumption of SSB was related with increased HOMA-IR in adolescents.

  11. Treatment outcomes after initiation of exenatide twice daily or insulin in clinical practice: 12-month results from CHOICE in six European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostenson CG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Claes-Göran Östenson,1 Stephan Matthaei,2 Matthew Reaney,3 Thure Krarup,4 Bruno Guerci,5 Jacek Kiljanski,6 Carole Salaun-Martin,7 Hélène Sapin,7 David Bruhn,8 Chantal Mathieu,9 Michael Theodorakis10 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Diabetes-Center Quakenbrück, Quakenbrück, Germany; 3Eli Lilly, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 4Department of Endocrinology I, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; 5Diabetology, Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition, Brabois Hospital, CHU Nancy, and INSERM CIC, ILCV, Vandoeuvre Lès Nancy, France; 6Eli Lilly, Warsaw, Poland; 7Eli Lilly, Neuilly Cedex, France; 8Eli Lilly, San Diego, California, USA; 9Department of Endocrinology, UZ Gasthuisberg, Leuven, Belgium; 10Department of Clinical Therapeutics, University of Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece* *Michael Theodorakis was affiliated with the institution shown at the time of the study, but has since left this institution Objective: The CHanges to treatment and Outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes initiating InjeCtablE therapy (CHOICE study assessed time to, and reasons for, significant treatment change after patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM initiated their first injectable glucose-lowering therapy (exenatide twice daily [BID] or insulin in routine clinical practice, and these patients’ clinical outcomes, in six European countries. This paper reports interim data from the first 12 months of the study. Research design and methods: CHOICE (NCT00635492 is a prospective, noninterventional, observational study. Clinical data were collected at initiation of first injectable therapy and after approximately 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Of 2497 patients enrolled in CHOICE, 1096 in the exenatide BID and 1239 in the insulin cohorts had ≥1 post-baseline assessment and were included in this analysis. Overall, 32.2% of the exenatide BID cohort and 29.1% of the insulin cohort (Kaplan–Meier estimates had

  12. Experimental application of the "total maximum daily load" approach as a tool for WFD implementation in temporary rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Porto, A.; De Girolamo, A. M.; Santese, G.

    2012-04-01

    In this presentation, the experience gained in the first experimental use in the UE (as far as we know) of the concept and methodology of the "Total Maximum Daily Load" (TMDL) is reported. The TMDL is an instrument required in the Clean Water Act in U.S.A for the management of water bodies classified impaired. The TMDL calculates the maximum amount of a pollutant that a waterbody can receive and still safely meet water quality standards. It permits to establish a scientifically-based strategy on the regulation of the emission loads control according to the characteristic of the watershed/basin. The implementation of the TMDL is a process analogous to the Programmes of Measures required by the WFD, the main difference being the analysis of the linkage between loads of different sources and the water quality of water bodies. The TMDL calculation was used in this study for the Candelaro River, a temporary Italian river, classified impaired in the first steps of the implementation of the WFD. A specific approach based on the "Load Duration Curves" was adopted for the calculation of nutrient TMDLs due to the more robust approach specific for rivers featuring large changes in river flow compared to the classic approach based on average long term flow conditions. This methodology permits to establish the maximum allowable loads across to the different flow conditions of a river. This methodology enabled: to evaluate the allowable loading of a water body; to identify the sources and estimate their loads; to estimate the total loading that the water bodies can receives meeting the water quality standards established; to link the effects of point and diffuse sources on the water quality status and finally to individuate the reduction necessary for each type of sources. The loads reductions were calculated for nitrate, total phosphorus and ammonia. The simulated measures showed a remarkable ability to reduce the pollutants for the Candelaro River. The use of the Soil and

  13. Using spatially detailed water-quality data and solute-transport modeling to improve support total maximum daily load development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Day, Katherine; Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially detailed mass-loading studies and solute-transport modeling using OTIS (One-dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage) demonstrate how natural attenuation and loading from distinct and diffuse sources control stream water quality and affect load reductions predicted in total maximum daily loads (TMDLs). Mass-loading data collected during low-flow from Cement Creek (a low-pH, metal-rich stream because of natural and mining sources, and subject to TMDL requirements) were used to calibrate OTIS and showed spatially variable effects of natural attenuation (instream reactions) and loading from diffuse (groundwater) and distinct sources. OTIS simulations of the possible effects of TMDL-recommended remediation of mine sites showed less improvement to dissolved zinc load and concentration (14% decrease) than did the TMDL (53-63% decrease). The TMDL (1) assumed conservative transport, (2) accounted for loads removed by remediation by subtracting them from total load at the stream mouth, and (3) did not include diffuse-source loads. In OTIS, loads were reduced near their source; the resulting concentration was decreased by natural attenuation and increased by diffuse-source loads during downstream transport. Thus, by not including natural attenuation and loading from diffuse sources, the TMDL overestimated remediation effects at low flow. Use of the techniques presented herein could improve TMDLs by incorporating these processes during TMDL development.

  14. Development of total maximum daily loads for bacteria impaired watershed using the comprehensive hydrology and water quality simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang M; Brannan, Kevin M; Zeckoski, Rebecca W; Benham, Brian L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop bacteria total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for the Hardware River watershed in the Commonwealth of Virginia, USA. The TMDL program is an integrated watershed management approach required by the Clean Water Act. The TMDLs were developed to meet Virginia's water quality standard for bacteria at the time, which stated that the calendar-month geometric mean concentration of Escherichia coli should not exceed 126 cfu/100 mL, and that no single sample should exceed a concentration of 235 cfu/100 mL. The bacteria impairment TMDLs were developed using the Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF). The hydrology and water quality components of HSPF were calibrated and validated using data from the Hardware River watershed to ensure that the model adequately simulated runoff and bacteria concentrations. The calibrated and validated HSPF model was used to estimate the contributions from the various bacteria sources in the Hardware River watershed to the in-stream concentration. Bacteria loads were estimated through an extensive source characterization process. Simulation results for existing conditions indicated that the majority of the bacteria came from livestock and wildlife direct deposits and pervious lands. Different source reduction scenarios were evaluated to identify scenarios that meet both the geometric mean and single sample maximum E. coli criteria with zero violations. The resulting scenarios required extreme and impractical reductions from livestock and wildlife sources. Results from studies similar to this across Virginia partially contributed to a reconsideration of the standard's applicability to TMDL development.

  15. Total body fat, proinflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in Indian subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajnik, C.S.; Lubree, H.G.; Rege, S.S.; Bhat, D.S.; Raut, K.N.; Panchanadikar, A.S.; Joglekar, C.B.; Naik, S.S.; Shetty, P.; Yudkin, J.; Kurpad, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    We studied cardiovascular risk factors in 30 to 50 year old Indian men in three geographical locations (rural, urban slums and urban middle class) in relation to their body fat. A total of 1,222 subjects, selected by stratified random sampling were screened: 39 reported diabetic or hypertensive. Of the remaining subjects 600 were randomly selected for further testing. This is a report 441 men studied (149 rural, 142 slums, 150 urban middle class). The mean age of these men was 38 y rural, 38 y urban slums, 41 y urban middle class, mean BMI 21.0 kg/m 2 , 22.3 kg/m 2 and 24.3 kg/m 2 respectively, mean body fat percent by bio-impedance 20.4%, 22.5% and 30.4% and by Deuterated water was 19.9%, 21.6% and 27.2% respectively. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (WHO 1985) showed no diabetes in rural subjects, while 4% urban slum dwellers and 10 in urban middle class were diabetic; 9% rural men had IGT, compared to 12% in urban slums and 20% in urban middle class. Hypertension (blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mm Bg) was present in 2% rural men, 4% in urban slums and in 10% men in urban middle class. Mean plasma cholesterol concentration was 148 mg% in rural, 53 mg% in urban slums and 64 mg% in urban middle class, mean plasma triglyceride concentrations were 82 mg%, 95 mg% and 108 mg% respectively. All cardiovascular risk factors were strongly related to measures of obesity (body fat % and waist hip ratio). On multivariate analysis 2h plasma glucose (OGTT) concentration and blood pressure were additionally related to geographical location (urban middle class>slums>rural). Our results suggest that urbanisation increases the risk of glucose intolerance and hypertension independent of the body fat percent or its central distribution. This suggests there may he additional environmental factors in the urban environment increasing the risk of diabetes over and above the effect of body fat. (author)

  16. Total body fat, proinflammatory cytokines and insulin resistance in Indian subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajnik, C S; Lubree, H G; Rege, S S; Bhat, D S; Raut, K N; Panchanadikar, A S; Joglekar, C B; Naik, S S [Diabetest Unit, KEM Hospital Resarch Centre, Pune (India); Shetty, P [London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Yudkin, J [International Health and Medical Education Centre, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Kurpad, A V [St. John' s Medical College, Bangalore (India)

    2002-07-01

    We studied cardiovascular risk factors in 30 to 50 year old Indian men in three geographical locations (rural, urban slums and urban middle class) in relation to their body fat. A total of 1,222 subjects, selected by stratified random sampling were screened: 39 reported diabetic or hypertensive. Of the remaining subjects 600 were randomly selected for further testing. This is a report 441 men studied (149 rural, 142 slums, 150 urban middle class). The mean age of these men was 38 y rural, 38 y urban slums, 41 y urban middle class, mean BMI 21.0 kg/m{sup 2}, 22.3 kg/m{sup 2} and 24.3 kg/m{sup 2} respectively, mean body fat percent by bio-impedance 20.4%, 22.5% and 30.4% and by Deuterated water was 19.9%, 21.6% and 27.2% respectively. A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (WHO 1985) showed no diabetes in rural subjects, while 4% urban slum dwellers and 10 in urban middle class were diabetic; 9% rural men had IGT, compared to 12% in urban slums and 20% in urban middle class. Hypertension (blood pressure {>=} 140/90 mm Bg) was present in 2% rural men, 4% in urban slums and in 10% men in urban middle class. Mean plasma cholesterol concentration was 148 mg% in rural, 53 mg% in urban slums and 64 mg% in urban middle class, mean plasma triglyceride concentrations were 82 mg%, 95 mg% and 108 mg% respectively. All cardiovascular risk factors were strongly related to measures of obesity (body fat % and waist hip ratio). On multivariate analysis 2h plasma glucose (OGTT) concentration and blood pressure were additionally related to geographical location (urban middle class>slums>rural). Our results suggest that urbanisation increases the risk of glucose intolerance and hypertension independent of the body fat percent or its central distribution. This suggests there may he additional environmental factors in the urban environment increasing the risk of diabetes over and above the effect of body fat. (author)

  17. Daily total physical activity level and premature death in men and women: results from a large-scale population-based cohort study in Japan (JPHC study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Manami; Iso, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Kurahashi, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2008-07-01

    The impact of daily total physical activity level on premature deaths has not been fully clarified in non-Western, relatively lean populations. We prospectively examined the association between daily total physical activity level (METs/day) and subsequent risk of all-cause mortality and mortalities from cancer, heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease. A total of 83,034 general Japanese citizens ages 45-74 years who responded to the questionnaire in 1995-1999 were followed for any cause of death through December 2005. Mutlivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were calculated with a Cox proportional hazards model controlling for potential confounding factors. During follow-up, a total of 4564 deaths were recorded. Compared with subjects in the lowest quartile, increased daily total physical activity was associated with a significantly decreased risk of all-cause mortality in both sexes (hazard ratios for the second, third, and highest quartiles were: men, 0.79, 0.82, 0.73 and women, 0.75, 0.64, 0.61, respectively). The decreased risk was observed regardless of age, frequency of leisure-time sports or physical exercise, or obesity status, albeit with a degree of risk attenuation among those with a high body mass index. A significantly decreased risk was similarly observed for death from cancer and heart disease in both sexes, and from cerebrovascular disease in women. Greater daily total physical activity level, either from occupation, daily life, or leisure time, may be of benefit in preventing premature death.

  18. TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Nimbus-7 Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. The Total Ozone Mapping...

  19. Total adiponectin and adiponectin multimeric complexes in relation to weight loss-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity in obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polak, J.; Kovacova, Z.; Holst, C.

    2008-01-01

    , and LMW). The HMW form was suggested to be closely associated with insulin sensitivity. This study investigated whether diet-induced changes in insulin sensitivity were associated with changes in adiponectin multimeric complexes. SUBJECTS: Twenty obese women with highest and twenty obese women with lowest...... diet induced changes in insulin sensitivity (responders and non-responders respectively), matched for weight loss (body mass index (BMI)=34.5 (s.d. 2.9) resp. 36.5 kg/m(2) (s.d. 4.0) for responders and non-responders), were selected from 292 women who underwent a 10-week low-caloric diet (LCD; 600 kcal...

  20. Economic benefits of improved insulin stability in insulin pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Richard C; van Amerongen, Derek; Bazalo, Gary; Aagren, Mark; Bouchard, Jonathan R

    2011-05-01

    Insulin pump users discard unused medication and infusion sets according to labeling and manufacturer's instructions. The stability labeling for insulin aspart (rDNA origin] (Novolog) was increased from two days to six. The associated savings was modeled from the perspective of a hypothetical one-million member health plan and the total United States population. The discarded insulin volume and the number of infusion sets used under a two-day stability scenario versus six were modeled. A mix of insulin pumps of various reservoir capacities with a range of daily insulin dosages was used. Average daily insulin dose was 65 units ranging from 10 to 150 units. Costs of discarded insulin aspart [rDNA origin] were calculated using WAC (Average Wholesale Price minus 16.67%). The cost of pump supplies was computed for the two-day scenario assuming a complete infusion set change, including reservoirs, every two days. Under the six-day scenario complete infusion sets were discarded every six days while cannulas at the insertion site were changed midway between complete changes. AWP of least expensive supplies was used to compute their costs. For the hypothetical health plan (1,182 pump users) the annual reduction in discarded insulin volume between scenarios was 19.8 million units. The corresponding cost reduction for the plan due to drug and supply savings was $3.4 million. From the U.S. population perspective, savings of over $1 billion were estimated. Using insulin that is stable for six days in pump reservoirs can yield substantial savings to health plans and other payers, including patients.

  1. Continuous glucose monitoring with Humalog Mix 25 versus Humalog Mix 50, twice daily: A comparative pilot study -Results from the Jikei-EValuation of insulin Lispro mixture on pharmacodynamics and glycemic VariancE (J-EVOLVE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morimoto Aya

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate glycemic variability associated with two different premixed insulin analogue formulations when used in a twice-daily regimen. Patients and Methods Subjects comprised type 2 diabetic patients aged 20-79 years, treated with twice daily premixed insulin or insulin analogue formulations. All subjects were hospitalized for 6 days and randomized to receive either Humalog Mix 25 (Mix 25 or Humalog Mix 50 (Mix 50. They were then crossed over to the other arm between day 3 and day 4 of the study. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM was performed on all subjects to examine the differences in glycemic variability. Results Eleven type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled. No significant difference was found in 24-hour mean glucose values and their SDs, pre-meal glucose values, increases from pre-meal to peak glucose values, or time to peak glucose levels between either group. However, the mean glucose values observed during 0-8 hrs were significantly lower with Mix 25 compared to Mix 50 (128 vs. 147 mg/dL; p = 0.024. Conclusions The twice-daily Mix 25 regimen provided superior overnight glycemic control compared to the Mix 50 regimen in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. However, both twice-daily regimens with either Mix 25 or Mix 50 provided inadequate post-lunch glycemic control. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials UMIN000001327

  2. TOMS/Earth Probe Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/Earth Probe Total Column Ozone Daily L3 Global 1x1.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this...

  3. Betel quid chewing as a source of manganese exposure: total daily intake of manganese in a Bangladeshi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rmalli, Shaban W; Jenkins, Richard O; Haris, Parvez I

    2011-02-07

    A relationship between betel quid chewing in Bangladeshi populations and the development of skin lesions and tremor has been previously reported, for people exposed to high levels of arsenic (As) through drinking contaminated groundwater. Exposure to manganese (Mn) is also known to induce neurotoxicity and levels of Mn in Bangladeshi groundwater are also high. The present study evaluates betel quid chewing as an overlooked source of Mn exposure in a Bangladeshi population. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to determine (1) urinary Mn levels for 15 chewers and 22 non-chewers from the ethnic Bangladeshi community in the United Kingdom, and (2) Mn levels in betel quids, its individual components and other Bangladeshi foods. Betel quid chewers displayed a significantly higher (P = 0.009) mean Mn concentration in urine (1.93 μg L(-1)) compared to non-chewers (0.62 μg L(-1)). High levels of Mn were detected in Piper betel leaves with an overall average of 135 mg kg(-1) (range 26 -518 mg kg(-1)). The mean concentration of Mn in betel quid was 41 mg kg(-1) (SD 27) and the daily intake of Mn in the Bangladeshi population was estimated to be 20.3 mg/day. Chewing six betel quids could contribute up to 18% of the maximum recommended daily intake of Mn. We have demonstrated that Mn in betel quids is an overlooked source of exposure to Mn in humans. Chewers display a 3.1 fold increased urinary Mn concentration compared to non-chewers. The practice of betel quid chewing contributes a high proportion of the maximum recommended daily intake of Mn, which could make chewers in Bangladesh more vulnerable to Mn neurotoxicity.

  4. Review of revised Klamath River Total Maximum Daily Load models from Link River Dam to Keno Dam, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Sullivan, Annett B.

    2013-01-01

    Flow and water-quality models are being used to support the development of Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) plans for the Klamath River downstream of Upper Klamath Lake (UKL) in south-central Oregon. For riverine reaches, the RMA-2 and RMA-11 models were used, whereas the CE-QUAL-W2 model was used to simulate pooled reaches. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was asked to review the most upstream of these models, from Link River Dam at the outlet of UKL downstream through the first pooled reach of the Klamath River from Lake Ewauna to Keno Dam. Previous versions of these models were reviewed in 2009 by USGS. Since that time, important revisions were made to correct several problems and address other issues. This review documents an assessment of the revised models, with emphasis on the model revisions and any remaining issues. The primary focus of this review is the 19.7-mile Lake Ewauna to Keno Dam reach of the Klamath River that was simulated with the CE-QUAL-W2 model. Water spends far more time in the Lake Ewauna to Keno Dam reach than in the 1-mile Link River reach that connects UKL to the Klamath River, and most of the critical reactions affecting water quality upstream of Keno Dam occur in that pooled reach. This model review includes assessments of years 2000 and 2002 current conditions scenarios, which were used to calibrate the model, as well as a natural conditions scenario that was used as the reference condition for the TMDL and was based on the 2000 flow conditions. The natural conditions scenario included the removal of Keno Dam, restoration of the Keno reef (a shallow spot that was removed when the dam was built), removal of all point-source inputs, and derivation of upstream boundary water-quality inputs from a previously developed UKL TMDL model. This review examined the details of the models, including model algorithms, parameter values, and boundary conditions; the review did not assess the draft Klamath River TMDL or the TMDL allocations

  5. Uric Acid or 1-Methyl Uric Acid in the Urinary Bladder Increases Serum Glucose, Insulin, True Triglyceride, and Total Cholesterol Levels in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Balasubramanian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In animals deprived of food for a long period, a drop in the fat mass below 5% of the total body mass results in an increase in blood glucocorticoids and uric acid levels, followed by foraging activity. Since the glucocorticoids increase the uric acid excretion, an increase in the level of uric acid in the bladder urine could be the signal for this feeding behaviour and subsequent fat storage. Accumulation of fat is associated with hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, hyperlipidaemia, and hypercholesterolaemia as seen in the metabolic syndrome or hibernation. It is hypothesized that uric acid or its structurally related compound, 1-methyl uric acid (one of the metabolites of the methyl xanthines namely caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine present in coffee, tea, cocoa, and some drugs, can act on the urinary bladder mucosa and increases the blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels. In rats, perfusion of the urinary bladder with saturated aqueous solution of uric acid or 1-methyl uric acid results in a significant increase in the serum levels of glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol in comparison with perfusion of the bladder with distilled water at 20, 40, and 80 min. The uric acid or the 1-methyl uric acid acts on the urinary bladder mucosa and increases the serum glucose, insulin, true triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels.

  6. 75 FR 43160 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... taking final agency action on the following TMDL for waters located within the State of Arkansas: Segment-reach Waterbody name Pollutant 11070208-901 Town Branch..... Total Phosphorus. EPA requested the public...

  7. A simple approach to estimate daily loads of total, refractory, and labile organic carbon from their seasonal loads in a watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ying; Grace, Johnny M; Zipperer, Wayne C; Hatten, Jeff; Dewey, Janet

    2018-05-22

    Loads of naturally occurring total organic carbons (TOC), refractory organic carbon (ROC), and labile organic carbon (LOC) in streams control the availability of nutrients and the solubility and toxicity of contaminants and affect biological activities through absorption of light and complex metals with production of carcinogenic compounds. Although computer models have become increasingly popular in understanding and management of TOC, ROC, and LOC loads in streams, the usefulness of these models hinges on the availability of daily data for model calibration and validation. Unfortunately, these daily data are usually insufficient and/or unavailable for most watersheds due to a variety of reasons, such as budget and time constraints. A simple approach was developed here to calculate daily loads of TOC, ROC, and LOC in streams based on their seasonal loads. We concluded that the predictions from our approach adequately match field measurements based on statistical comparisons between model calculations and field measurements. Our approach demonstrates that an increase in stream discharge results in increased stream TOC, ROC, and LOC concentrations and loads, although high peak discharge did not necessarily result in high peaks of TOC, ROC, and LOC concentrations and loads. The approach developed herein is a useful tool to convert seasonal loads of TOC, ROC, and LOC into daily loads in the absence of measured daily load data.

  8. Estimation of Insulin Resistance in Mexican Adults by the [13C]Glucose Breath Test Corrected for Endogenous Total CO2 Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ibarra-Pastrana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of the [13C]glucose breath test for measuring insulin resistance in Mexican adults with different glycemic states. Research Design and Methods. Fifty-eight adults underwent a [13C]glucose breath test with simultaneous measurement of total CO2 production by indirect calorimetry, at baseline and 90 minutes after the ingestion of 15 g of dextrose and 25 mg of [13C]glucose. HOMA was used as a marker of insulin resistance. Results. We found an inverse correlation between HOMA and the breath test δ13CO2 (‰, r=-0.41 (P=0.001. After adjusting for total CO2 production, correlations between HOMA and fasting glucose were less strong but remained significant. An ROC curve was constructed using δ13CO2 (‰ and HOMA values; the cut-off point was 9.99‰ δ13CO2, corresponding to a sensitivity of 80.0 (95% CI: 51.9, 95.7 and a specificity of 67.4 (95% CI: 51.5, 80.9. Conclusions. The [13C]glucose breath test is a simple noninvasive procedure but was not sufficiently robust for an accurate diagnosis of insulin resistance. Our findings suggest that the test might be helpful in identifying individuals who are not IR, which in turn may contribute to improved diabetes prevention.

  9. 75 FR 26956 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of Los Angeles Area Lakes Total Maximum Daily Loads...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9146-6] Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of Los...: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: This action announces the availability of EPA proposed total maximum... nutrient, mercury, chlordane, dieldrin, DDT, PCB, and trash impairments pursuant to Clean Water Act Section...

  10. Differential changes in free and total insulin-like growth factor I after major, elective abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, Christian; Frystyk, Jan; Ørskov, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Major surgery is accompanied by extensive proteolysis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). Proteolysis of IGFBP-3 is generally believed to increase IGF bioavailability due to a diminished affinity of the IGFBP-3 fragments for IGFs. We have investigated 18 patients...... undergoing elective ileo-anal J-pouch surgery. Patients were randomized to treatment with GH (12 IU/day; n = 9) or placebo (n = 9) from 2 days before to 7 days after operation. Free IGF-I and IGF-II were measured by ultrafiltration of serum, and IGFBP-3 proteolytic activity was determined by a [125I...

  11. Determination of daily intake of elements from Philippine total diet samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, G.C. de; Shiraishi, K.; Kawamura, H.; Igaraishi, Y.; Palattao, M.V.; Azanon, E.M.

    1990-10-01

    Total diet samples were analyzed for major elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and some minor trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn, Al, Sr, Cu, Ba, Yt) using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Samples analyzed were classified into sex and age groups. Results for some elements (Na, K, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn) were compared with values from Bataan dietary survey calculated using the Philippine composition table. Exceot for Na, analytical results were similar to calculated values. Analytical results for Ca and Fe were also compared with the values from Food and Nutrition Research Institute. In general, values obtained in the study were lower than the FNRI values. Comparison of the analytical and calculated results with the Japanese and ICRP data showed that Philippine values were lower than foreign values. (Auth.). 22 refs., 9 tabs

  12. Effect of treatment with single total-dose intravenous iron versus daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose on moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoke CA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chukwuemeka Anthony Iyoke,1 Fausta Chioma Emegoakor,1 Euzebus Chinonye Ezugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,2 Leonard Ogbonna Ajah,1 Jude Anazoeze Madu,3 Hyginus Uzo Ezegwui,1 Frank Okechukwu Ezugwu4 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 3Department of Haematology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, Enugu State University, Enugu, Nigeria Background: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional cause of anemia in pregnancy and is often responsible for puerperal anemia. Puerperal anemia can impair postpartum maternal and neonatal well-being. Objective: To determine the effect of treatment of moderate puerperal iron-deficiency anemia using a single intravenous total-dose iron dextran versus daily single dose oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose. Methodology: A randomized controlled study in which postpartum women with moderate iron-deficiency anemia were randomized into treatment with either a single total-dose intravenous iron dextran or with daily single doses of oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets for 6 weeks. Effects on hemoglobin concentration using either method were compared at 6 weeks postpartum. Analysis was per protocol using SPSS version 17 for windows. P-values ≤0.05 were considered significant. Results: Two hundred eighty-four women were recruited for the study: 142 women received single total dose intravenous infusion of iron dextran while 142 received daily oral iron(III-hydroxide polymaltose tablets. Approximately 84.0% (237/282 completed the study and were analyzed including 81% (115/142 of those randomized to injectable iron therapy compared to 85.9% (122/142 of those randomized to oral treatment. The proportions of women who had attained hemoglobin concentration of at least 10 g/dL by the 6 weeks postpartum visit did not differ

  13. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M

    2001-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate, markers of disease activity in acromegaly in relation to perceived disease activity. Thirty-seven consecutively treated, acromegalic patients, classified by clinical symptoms as inactive (n=16), slightly active (n=10) and active (n=11), entered the study. When evaluating......-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease activity...

  14. Long-term effects of continuous subcutaneous infusion versus daily subcutaneous injections of growth hormone (GH) on the insulin-like growth factor system, insulin sensitivity, body composition, and bone and lipoprotein metabolism in GH-deficient adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Torben; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Heickendorff, Lene

    2001-01-01

    injections (inj) in the evening as usual, and 7 received a continuous infusion (inf) of GH by means of a portable pump. The GH dose was kept unchanged before and during the study. Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) tended to increase in the patients switched to constant infusion (from 175...... for 6 months are comparable with respect to the IGF-IGFBP axis, whereas intermittent exposure may be of importance for the lipolytic effect of GH. The data on insulin sensitivity and lipoproteins suggest that constant GH exposure is as safe as intermittent GH administration....

  15. Daily variation of food-induced changes in blood glucose and insulin in the rat and the control by the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the vagus nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, J.H.; Alingh Prins, A.J.; Bruggink, Jan; Steffens, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    Rats were provided with permanent cardiac catheters allowing free movement and blood sampling without anaesthesia. During food intake the increments of plasma insulin and blood glucose were smaller and more slowly increasing in the light phase than during the dark phase. After vagal blockade the

  16. Role of rs1501299 variant in the adiponectin gene on total adiponectin levels, insulin resistance and weight loss after a Mediterranean hypocaloric diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, Daniel Antonio; Izaola, Olatz; Primo, David; Aller, Rocio

    2017-11-14

    Several adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPS) have been related with adiponectin levels and risk for obesity. Our aim was to analyze the effects of rs1501299 ADIPOQ gene polymorphism on total adiponectin levels, insulin resistance and weight loss after a Mediterranean hypocaloric diet in obese subjects. A Caucasian population of 82 obese patients was analyzed, before and after 3 months on a Mediterranean hypocaloric diet. Before and after 3 months on a hypocaloric diet, an anthropometric evaluation, an assessment of nutritional intake and a biochemical analysis were performed. After dietary treatment and in wild type group, weight, BMI, fat mass, leptin levels, systolic blood pressure and waist circumference decreases were similar to the mutant type group. In wild type group, the decrease in total cholesterol was -28.1±15.3 mg/dl (mutant group: -12.6±16.7 mg/dl:p=0.009), LDL- cholesterol was -31.8±20.5 mg/dl (-12.2±11.5 mg/dl:p=0.006), fasting glucose plasma -4.8±2.5 mg/dL (-0.5±0.1 mg/dL:p=0.02), insulin -3.6±1.5 mUI/L (+0.6±1.1 mUI/L:p=0.02) and HOMA-IR -1.2±0.9 (-0.1±1.1:p=0.03). The present study suggests that T allele of ADIPO (rs1501299) could be a predictor of a lack of response of HOMA-IR, insulin, fasting glucose and LDL cholesterol secondary to a Mediterranean hypocaloric diet in obese subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum Levels Of Free And Total Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-1 And IGF Binding Protein-3 In Normal And Growth Hormone Deficient Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M.A.; Soliman, S.E.T.; Hafez, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Serum levels of total insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) reflect the endogenous GH secretion in healthy children, which makes them good diagnostic markers for screening growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in short children, although some controversy still exists. Only a minor fraction of the total IGF-1 circulates in its free form, which is believed to be the biologically active form. Serum levels of free IGF-1, total IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured in 144 healthy children (72 boys and 72 girls, aged from 0 to 16 years) and in 12 pre-pubertal GH deficient (GHD) children to study the correlation between the age and free IGF-1, total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels. In healthy subjects (both sexes), serum free IGF-1, total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were low in infancy, increasing during puberty and declining thereafter. Free IGF-1 in serum occupied about 0.97-1.45 % of the total IGF-1 values, and the ratios of free IGF-1 to total IGF-1 were significantly increased in the pubertal age groups than in the pre-pubertal age groups. Serum levels of free IGF-1 showed significant positive correlation with those of total IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Serum free IGF-1, total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in patients with GHD were decreased significantly with increasing the degree of hypopituitarism. These observations suggest that the increase in serum free IGF-1 level during puberty was caused by a dramatic increase in total IGF-1 rather than IGFBP-3. Also, high levels of these hormones may play an important role in pubertal growth spurt and may become a useful tool for diagnosing GHD and predicting growth response to long term GH therapy

  18. Serum levels of free and total insulin-link growth factor (IGF)-1 and (IGF) binding protein-3 in normal and growth hormone deficient children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M.A.; Soliman, S.E.T.; Hafez, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Serum levels of total insulin-like growth factor- 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) reflect endogenous GH secretion in healthy children, which makes them good diagnostic markers for screening GH deficiency (GHD) in short children, although some controversy still exists. Only a minor fraction of the total IGF-1 circulates in its free form, which is believed to be the biologically active form. Serum levels of free IGF-1, total IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured in 144 healthy children (72 boys and 72 girls, aged from 0 to 16 years) and in 12 prepubertal GH. deficient (GHD) children to study correlation between the age and free IGF-1, total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels. In healthy subjects (both sexes), serum free IGF-1, total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were low in infancy, increasing during puberty and declining thereafter. Free IGF-1 in serum occupied about 0.97. 1.45 % of the total IGF-1 values, and the ratios of free IGF-1 to total IGF-1 were significantly increased in the pubertal age groups than in the prepubertal age groups. Serum levels of free IGF-1 showed significant positive correlation with those of total IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Serum free IGF-1, total IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in patients with GHD decreased significantly with increasing degree of hypopituitarism. These observations suggest that the increase in serum free IGF-1 level during puberty was caused by a dramatic increase in total IGF-1 rather than IGFBP-3. Also, high levels of these hormones may play an important role in pubertal growth spurt and may become a useful tool for diagnosing GHD and predicting growth response to long term GH therapy

  19. Guideline recommendations for post-acute postoperative physiotherapy in total hip and knee arthroplasty: are they used in daily clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, W F; Nelissen, R G H H; Vlieland, T P M Vliet

    2014-09-01

    In a Dutch guideline on physiotherapy (PT) in hip and knee osteoarthritis, a number of recommendations on post-acute (i.e. after discharge from hospital) PT following total hip (THA) and total knee (TKA) arthroplasty were included. Little is known about the uptake of these recommendations in daily clinical practice. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which the guideline recommendations regarding post-acute PT after THA and TKA are followed in daily clinical practice. An online pilot survey on the delivery of post-acute, postoperative PT was sent to a random sample of 957 Dutch physiotherapists. The survey included questions on the application of recommended, neither recommended nor advised against, and advised against treatment modalities and various treatment modalities for which there were no formulated recommendations. A total of 219 physiotherapists completed the questionnaire, with a mean age of 40 years (standard deviation 12.6), 55% female and 95% working in primary care. The vast majority reported the use of the recommended exercise modalities (muscle strengthening exercises (96%), and functional exercises (99%). Continuous passive motion, which was neither recommended nor advised against, and electrical muscle stimulation, which was not recommended, were provided by 1%. Reported treatment modalities for which there were no formulated recommendations included patient education (99%), gait training (95%), active range of motion (ROM) exercises (93%), balance exercises (86%), passive ROM exercises (58%), aerobic exercises (50%), massage (18%) and cold therapy (11%). The vast majority of physiotherapists reported adhering to recommendations on post-acute postoperative PT in THA and TKA patients after discharge from hospital. Although yet to be confirmed in a larger nationwide survey, the relatively high frequency of use of many other treatment modalities, for which there were no formulated recommendations, suggests the need to extend

  20. Effects of daily consumption of synbiotic bread on insulin metabolism and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein among diabetic patients: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajadadi-Ebrahimi, Maryam; Bahmani, Fereashteh; Shakeri, Hossein; Hadaegh, Haleh; Hijijafari, Mohammad; Abedi, Fatemeh; Asemi, Zatollah

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of synbiotic bread on the metabolic status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was performed in 81 diabetic patients. The subjects were randomly assigned to consumption of synbiotic (n = 27), probiotic (n = 27), or control bread (n = 27) for 8 weeks 3 times a day in a 40-gram package. The synbiotic bread contained Lactobacillus sporogenes (1 × 10(8) CFU) and 0.07 g inulin per 1 g. The probiotic bread contained L. sporogenes (1 × 10(8) CFU per 1 g). Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after an 8-week intervention for quantification of related factors. Consumption of the synbiotic bread resulted in a significant reduction in serum insulin levels (-3.2 ± 5.4 vs. -0.3 ± 3.4 and 0.6 ± 4.7 µIU/ml, respectively, p = 0.007), homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance scores (-1.5 ± 2.7 vs. -0.2 ± 1.6 and 0.4 ± 3.5, respectively, p = 0.03), and homeostatic model assessment-β-cell function (-7.2 ± 16.3 vs. -0.7 ± 10.8 and 0.7 ± 8.2, respectively, p = 0.04) compared to the probiotic and control breads. We did not find any significant effect of synbiotic bread consumption on fasting plasma glucose, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, or serum hs-CRP levels compared to other breads. Consumption of the synbiotic bread among diabetic patients had beneficial effects on insulin metabolism. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. No difference between fixed- and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty in activities of daily living and pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Joicemar Tarouco; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego Costa; Debieux, Pedro; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moises

    2017-06-01

    Until now, there are no definitive conclusions regarding functional differences related to middle- and long-term everyday activities and patient pain following implantation of mobile- and fixed-platform tibial prostheses. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are middle-term differences in knee function and pain in patients undergoing fixed- and mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Eligible patients were randomized into two groups: the first group received TKA implantation with a fixed tibial platform (group A); the second group received TKA with a mobile tibial platform (group B). Patients were followed up (2 years), and their symptoms and limitations in daily living activities were evaluated using the Knee Outcome Survey-Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS), in addition to pain evaluation assessed using the pain visual analogue scale (VAS). There were no significant differences in function and symptoms in the ADLS and VAS between the study groups. The type of platform used in TKA (fixed vs. mobile) does not change the symptoms, function or pain of patients 2 years post-surgery. Although mobile TKAs may have better short-term results, at medium- and long-term follow-up they do not present important clinical differences compared with fixed-platform TKAs. This information is important so that surgeons can choose the most suitable implant for each patient. Randomized clinical trial, Level I.

  2. Gluconeogenesis is not regulated by either glucose or insulin in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to determine potential factors regulating gluconeogenesis (GNG) in extremely low birth weight infants receiving total parenteral nutrition. Seven infants (birth weight, 0.824 +/- 0.068 kg; gestational age, 25.4 +/- 0.5 weeks; postnatal age, 3.3 +/- 0.2 days) were studied for 11 hou...

  3. Determination of total vanadium and vanadium(V) in groundwater from Mt. Etna and estimate of daily intake of vanadium(V) through drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Giovanni; Copat, Chiara; Dimartino, Angela; Grasso, Alfina; Fallico, Roberto; Sciacca, Salvatore; Fiore, Maria; Ferrante, Margherita

    2015-06-01

    Vanadium(V) can be found in natural waters in the form of V(IV) and V(V) species, which have different biological properties and toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of total V and V(V) in groundwater from the area of Mt. Etna and to assess the estimated daily intake (EDI) of V(V) of adults and children through drinking water. Water was sampled monthly at 21 sites in 2011. Total vanadium was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and speciation by ion chromatography-ICP-MS (IC-ICP-MS). The concentration of V(V) species ranged from 62.8 to 98.9% of total V, with significantly higher concentrations in samples from the S/SW slope of Mt. Etna. The annual mean concentrations of total V exceeded the Italian legal limit of 140 μg/L at four sites on the S/SW slope. In the absence of thresholds for V(V) intake, only the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has calculated a reference dose. Children's EDI of V(V) at the sites with the higher V concentrations exceeded EPA thresholds (9 μg/kg/day). In particular, we found in Camporotondo, Mascalucia, Ragalna and San Pietro Clarenza sites children's EDIs of 11, 9.3, 11 and 9.9, respectively. The EDI of V(V) was significantly higher than the literature range (0.09-0.34 μg/kg/day).

  4. Estimation of total as well as bioaccessible levels and average daily dietary intake of iodine from Japanese edible seaweeds by epithermal neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, M.; Chatt, A.

    2012-01-01

    An epi-thermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with Compton suppression spectrometry (EINAA-CSS) was used for the determination of total iodine in eight different species of edible seaweeds from Japan. This method gave an absolute detection limit of about 2 μg. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using various reference materials and found to be generally in agreement within ±6% of the certified values. The longitudinal distributions of iodine at different growing stages in Japanese sea mustard and tangle seaweeds were investigated. For a 150-cm-high tangle, the highest concentration (5,360 mg/kg) of iodine was found at the root, then decreased slowly to 780 mg/kg in the middle portion (60-75 cm), and increased to 2,300 mg/kg at the apex. On the other hand, for a 190-cm-high sea mustard the highest levels of iodine were found both at the roots (164 mg/kg) and apex (152 mg/kg) with lower values (98 mg/kg) in the middle section. In order to estimate the bioaccessible fraction of iodine, seaweeds were digested by an in vitro enzymolysis method, dietary fibre separated from residue, and both fractions analyzed by EINAA-CSS. The average daily dietary intakes of total (0.14 mg) as well as bioaccessible fraction (0.12 mg) of iodine from the consumption of sea mustards were estimated. (author)

  5. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  6. Sustained Treatment with Insulin Detemir in Mice Alters Brain Activity and Locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sartorius

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified unique brain effects of insulin detemir (Levemir®. Due to its pharmacologic properties, insulin detemir may reach higher concentrations in the brain than regular insulin. This might explain the observed increased brain stimulation after acute insulin detemir application but it remained unclear whether chronic insulin detemir treatment causes alterations in brain activity as a consequence of overstimulation.In mice, we examined insulin detemir's prolonged brain exposure by continuous subcutaneous (s.c. application using either micro-osmotic pumps or daily s.c. injections and performed continuous radiotelemetric electrocorticography and locomotion recordings.Acute intracerebroventricular injection of insulin detemir activated cortical and locomotor activity significantly more than regular insulin in equimolar doses (0.94 and 5.63 mU in total, suggesting an enhanced acute impact on brain networks. However, given continuously s.c., insulin detemir significantly reduced cortical activity (theta: 21.3±6.1% vs. 73.0±8.1%, P<0.001 and failed to maintain locomotion, while regular insulin resulted in an increase of both parameters.The data suggest that permanently-increased insulin detemir levels in the brain convert its hyperstimulatory effects and finally mediate impairments in brain activity and locomotion. This observation might be considered when human studies with insulin detemir are designed to target the brain in order to optimize treatment regimens.

  7. Measurements of Daily Energy Intake and Total Energy Expenditure in People with Dementia in Care Homes: The Use of Wearable Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J; Holmes, J; Brooks, C

    2017-01-01

    To estimate daily total energy expenditure (TEE) using a physical activity monitor, combined with dietary assessment of energy intake to assess the relationship between daily energy expenditure and patterns of activity with energy intake in people with dementia living in care homes. A cross-sectional study in care homes in the UK. Twenty residents with confirmed dementia diagnosis were recruited from two care homes that specialised in dementia care. A physical activity monitor (SensewearTM Armband, Body Media, Pittsburgh, PA) was employed to objectively determine total energy expenditure, sleep duration and physical activity. The armband was placed around the left upper triceps for up to 7 days. Energy intake was determined by weighing all food and drink items over 4 days (3 weekdays and 1 weekend day) including measurements of food wastage. The mean age was 78.7 (SD ± 11.8) years, Body Mass Index (BMI) 23.0 (SD ± 4.2) kg/m2; 50% were women. Energy intake (mean 7.4; SD ± 2.6) MJ/d) was correlated with TEE (mean 7.6; SD ± 1.8 MJ/d; r=0.49, p<0.05). Duration of sleeping ranged from 0.4-12.5 (mean 6.1) hrs/d and time spent lying down was 1.3-16.0 (8.3) hrs/d. On average residents spent 17.9 (6.3-23.4) hrs/d undertaking sedentary activity. TEE was correlated with BMI (r=0.52, p<0.05) and body weight (r=0.81, p<0.001) but inversely related to sleep duration (r=-0.59, p<0.01) and time lying down (r=-0.62, p<0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that after taking BMI, sleep duration and time spent lying down into account, TEE was no longer correlated with energy intake. The results show the extent to which body mass, variable activity and sleep patterns may be contributing to TEE and together with reduced energy intake, energy requirements were not satisfied. Thus wearable technology has the potential to offer real-time monitoring to provide appropriate nutrition management that is more person-centred to prevent weight loss in dementia.

  8. Insulin production rate in normal man as an estimate for calibration of continuous intravenous insulin infusion in insulin-dependent diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhäusl, W K; Bratusch-Marrain, P R; Francesconi, M; Nowotny, P; Kiss, A

    1982-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of deriving the 24-h insulin requirement of insulin-dependent diabetic patients who were devoid of any endogenous insulin release (IDD) from the insulin-production rate (IPR) of healthy man (basal, 17 mU/min; stimulated 1.35 U/12.5 g glucose). To this end, continuous intravenous insulin infusion (CIVII) was initiated at a precalculated rate of 41.2 +/- 4.6 (SD) U/24 h in IDD (N - 12). Blood glucose profiles were compared with those obtained during intermittent subcutaneous (s.c.) insulin therapy (IIT) and those of healthy controls (N = 7). Regular insulin (Hoechst CS) was infused with an adapted Mill Hill Infuser at a basal infusion rate of 1.6 U/h (6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.), and of 0.8 U/h from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Preprandial insulin (3.2-6.4 U) was added for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Daily individual food intake totaled 7688 +/- 784 kJ (1836 +/- 187 kcal)/24 h including 184 +/- 37 g of glucose. Proper control of blood glucose (BG) (mean BG 105 +/- 10 mg/dl; mean amplitude of glycemic excursions 54 +/- 18 mg/dl; and 1 h postprandial BG levels not exceeding 160 mg/dl) and of plasma concentrations of beta-hydroxybutyrate and lactate was maintained by 41.4 +/- 4.4 U insulin/24 h. Although BG values only approximated the upper normal range as seen in healthy controls, they were well within the range reported by others during CIVII. Therefore, we conclude that in adult IDD completely devoid of endogenous insulin (1) the IPR of normal man can be used during CIVII as an estimate for the patient's minimal insulin requirement per 24 h, and (2) this approach allows for a blood glucose profile close to the upper range of a normal control group. Thus, deriving a patient's daily insulin dose from the insulin production rate of healthy man may add an additional experimental protocol which aids in making general calculations of a necessary insulin dose instead of using trial and error or a closed-loop insulin infusion system.

  9. Effect of total mixed ration composition and daily grazing pattern on milk production, composition and fatty acids profile of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ortega, Martha; Martínez-Fernández, Adela; Soldado, Ana; González, Amelia; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos M; Argamentería, Alejandro; de la Roza-Delgado, Begoña; Vicente, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    The possibilities of using high quality pastures in conjunction with total mixed ration (TMR) during the grazing season have been examined. An experiment with sixteen Holstein cows blocked and randomly assigned to four treatments in a factorial arrangement was conducted in order to evaluate the influence of grazing time of day (day or night) and type of silage (maize or Italian ryegrass) included in the TMR of dairy cows grazing 12 h daily on milk yield, composition and fatty acid profile. The silage type had no effect on the dry matter intake, milk yield and fat and protein proportions. However, cows grazing during the night ate more grass than cows grazing during the day (8·53 vs. 5·65 kg DM/d; Pdairy cows grazing at night-time than grazing at day-time, especially 18:2n-6 (2·37 vs. 2·12 g/100 g FA respectively, P<0·05) and 18:2cis9trans11 (2·08 vs. 1·74 g/100 g FA respectively, P<0·05).

  10. A field studies and modeling approach to develop organochlorine pesticide and PCB total maximum daily load calculations: Case study for Echo Park Lake, Los Angeles, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, V.R., E-mail: vrvasquez@ucla.edu [Environmental Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 (United States); Curren, J., E-mail: janecurren@yahoo.com [Environmental Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 (United States); Lau, S.-L., E-mail: simlin@ucla.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 (United States); Stenstrom, M.K., E-mail: stenstro@seas.ucla.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 (United States); Suffet, I.H., E-mail: msuffet@ucla.edu [Environmental Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1496 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Echo Park Lake is a small lake in Los Angeles, CA listed on the USA Clean Water Act Section 303(d) list of impaired water bodies for elevated levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish tissue. A lake water and sediment sampling program was completed to support the development of total maximum daily loads (TMDL) to address the lake impairment. The field data indicated quantifiable levels of OCPs and PCBs in the sediments, but lake water data were all below detection levels. The field sediment data obtained may explain the contaminant levels in fish tissue using appropriate sediment-water partitioning coefficients and bioaccumulation factors. A partition-equilibrium fugacity model of the whole lake system was used to interpret the field data and indicated that half of the total mass of the pollutants in the system are in the sediments and the other half is in soil; therefore, soil erosion could be a significant pollutant transport mode into the lake. Modeling also indicated that developing and quantifying the TMDL depends significantly on the analytical detection level for the pollutants in field samples and on the choice of octanol-water partitioning coefficient and bioaccumulation factors for the model. - Research highlights: {yields} Fugacity model using new OCP and PCB field data supports lake TMDL calculations. {yields} OCP and PCB levels in lake sediment were found above levels for impairment. {yields} Relationship between sediment data and available fish tissue data evaluated. {yields} Model provides approximation of contaminant sources and sinks for a lake system. {yields} Model results were sensitive to analytical detection and quantification levels.

  11. New England SPARROW Water-Quality Modeling to Assist with the Development of Total Maximum Daily Loads in the Connecticut River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. B.; Robinson, K. W.; Simcox, A. C.; Johnston, C. M.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEWIPCC), is currently preparing a water-quality model, called SPARROW, to assist in the regional total maximum daily load (TMDL) studies in New England. A model is required to provide estimates of nutrient loads and confidence intervals at unmonitored stream reaches. SPARROW (Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed Attributes) is a spatially detailed, statistical model that uses regression equations to relate total phosphorus and nitrogen (nutrient) stream loads to pollution sources and watershed characteristics. These statistical relations are then used to predict nutrient loads in unmonitored streams. The New England SPARROW model is based on a hydrologic network of 42,000 stream reaches and associated watersheds. Point source data are derived from USEPA's Permit Compliance System (PCS). Information about nonpoint sources is derived from data such as fertilizer use, livestock wastes, and atmospheric deposition. Watershed characteristics include land use, streamflow, time-of-travel, stream density, percent wetlands, slope of the land surface, and soil permeability. Preliminary SPARROW results are expected in Spring 2002. The New England SPARROW model is proposed for use in the TMDL determination for nutrients in the Connecticut River Basin, upstream of Connecticut. The model will be used to estimate nitrogen loads from each of the upstream states to Long Island Sound. It will provide estimates and confidence intervals of phosphorus and nitrogen loads, area-weighted yields of nutrients by watershed, sources of nutrients, and the downstream movement of nutrients. This information will be used to (1) understand ranges in nutrient levels in surface waters, (2) identify the environmental factors that affect nutrient levels in streams, (3) evaluate monitoring efforts for better determination of

  12. Glucose-lowering effect and glycaemic variability of insulin glargine, insulin detemir and insulin lispro protamine in people with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, G; Franzetti, I; Querci, F; Romano, D; D'Angelo, A; Maffioli, P

    2015-06-01

    To compare, using a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, the effect on glycaemic variability of insulin glargine, detemir and lispro protamine. A total of 49 white people with type 1 diabetes, not well controlled by three times daily insulin lispro, taken for at least 2 months before study and on a stable dose, were enrolled. The study participants were randomized to add insulin glargine, detemir or lispro protamine, once daily, in the evening. We used a CGM system, the iPro Digital Recorder (Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA, USA) for 1 week. Glycaemic control was assessed according to mean blood glucose values, the area under the glucose curve above 3.9 mmol/l (AUC(>3.9)) or above 10.0 mmol/l (AUC(>10.0)), and the percentage of time spent with glucose values >3.9 or >10.0 mmol/l. Intraday glycaemic variability was assessed using standard deviation (s.d.) values, the mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions and continuous overlapping of net glycaemic action. Day-to-day glycaemic variability was assessed using the mean of daily differences. The s.d. was found to be significantly lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with insulin detemir. AUC(>3.9) was higher and AUC(>10.0) was lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. The mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions and continuous overlapping net glycaemic action values were lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. In addition, the mean of daily differences was significantly lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. Fewer hypoglycaemic events were recorded during the night-time with insulin lispro protamine compared with glargine and detemir. The results suggest that insulin lispro protamine and glargine are more effective than detemir in reducing glycaemic variability and improving glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes. Insulin lispro protamine seems to lead to fewer hypoglycaemic

  13. Intake of total dietary sugar and fibre is associated with insulin resistance among Danish 8-10- and 14-16-year-old girls but not boys. European Youth Heart Studies I and II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Iben; Johnsen, Nina Føns; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the dietary intake of total sugar, added sugar, non-added sugar and starch as well as dietary fibre and glycaemic index (GI) and their respective associations with insulin resistance. Design: Mixed linear models were used to study both cross-sectional and prospective...... associations between carbohydrate components and insulin resistance separately in girls and boys. Diet was assessed by a single 24 h recall interview and insulin resistance was calculated using the homoestasis model assessment (HOMA). Setting: The Danish part of the European Youth Heart Studies (EYHS) I and II....... Subjects: Girls and boys at 8–10 and 14–16 years from EYHS I (n 651) and 8–10-year olds from baseline followed up 6 years later in EYHS II (n 233). Results: Among girls, a difference in dietary total sugar of 43 g/MJ was associated with a 1 SD difference of HOMA and a difference in dietary fibre of 28g...

  14. Distribution of Serum Total Homocysteine and Its Association with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors of the Insulin Resistance Syndrome in Mexican American Men: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillum Richard

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data have been published on the association of variables of the insulin resistance syndrome and serum total homocysteine (tHcy, a putative risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity, in representative samples of total populations or in Hispanic Americans. Methods To describe the distributions of serum tHcy concentration and variables associated with insulin resistance in Mexican American men and to assess their association, data from a cross-sectional survey of a large national sample, the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Analyses were restricted to Mexican American men aged 40–74 years with data on glycated hemoglobin (%, body mass index (BMI, body fat distribution, HDL cholesterol, fasting serum insulin, serum triglycerides and serum tHcy concentrations. Results Cumulative distributions of serum tHcy shifted to the right with increasing age. Log serum tHcy was not associated with prevalence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus or glycated hemoglobin percent or other risk factors other than age. Log serum tHcy concentration showed borderline significant (p = 0.049 positive association with fasting serum insulin concentration independent of age and BMI, only in men aged 60–74. Conclusion No consistent association of tHcy with diabetes prevalence or variables of the insulin resistance syndrome were found in Mexican American men aged 40–74 years. Further research is needed on the associations of serum tHcy concentration with insulin resistance and other components of the insulin resistance syndrome in persons of varying ethnicity.

  15. Low serum levels of free and total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in patients with anorexia nervosa are not associated with increased IGF-binding protein-3 proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Flyvbjerg, A; Frystyk, J

    1999-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) are GH resistant, with elevated GH levels and low serum levels of total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). IGF-I action is modulated by IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), and a variety of catabolic states has been characterized by the presence of increased IGFBP-3...

  16. Pregestational diabetes with extreme insulin resistance: use of U-500 insulin in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwise, Lisa C; Werner, Erika F; Pettker, Christian M; McMahon-Brown, Erin K; Thung, Stephen F; Han, Christina S

    2012-08-01

    Increased insulin requirements in pregnancy can hinder attainment of glycemic control in diabetic patients. U-500 insulin is a concentrated form of regular insulin that can be a valuable tool in the treatment of patients with severe insulin resistance. A 24-year-old woman with pregestational diabetes mellitus experienced increasing insulin requirements during pregnancy, peaking at 650 units daily. The frequent, large-volume injections of standard-concentration insulin were poorly tolerated by the patient and resulted in nonadherence. She subsequently achieved glycemic control on thrice-daily U-500 insulin. Pregnancy exacerbates insulin resistance in diabetic patients, and these patients may require high doses of insulin. U-500 insulin is an effective alternative for patients with severe insulin resistance and should be considered for pregnant women with difficulty achieving glycemic control.

  17. Monitoring to assess progress toward meeting the Assabet River, Massachusetts, phosphorus total maximum daily load - Aquatic macrophyte biomass and sediment-phosphorus flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Qian, Yu; Yong Q., Tian

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for Total Phosphorus in the Assabet River, Massachusetts, was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The goal of the TMDL was to decrease the concentrations of the nutrient phosphorus to mitigate some of the instream ecological effects of eutrophication on the river; these effects were, for the most part, direct consequences of the excessive growth of aquatic macrophytes. The primary instrument effecting lower concentrations of phosphorus was to be strict control of phosphorus releases from four major wastewatertreatment plants in Westborough, Marlborough, Hudson, and Maynard, Massachusetts. The improvements to be achieved from implementing this control were lower concentrations of total and dissolved phosphorus in the river, a 50-percent reduction in aquatic-plant biomass, a 30-percent reduction in episodes of dissolved oxygen supersaturation, no low-flow dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 5.0 milligrams per liter, and a 90-percent reduction in sediment releases of phosphorus to the overlying water. In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, initiated studies to evaluate conditions in the Assabet River prior to the upgrading of wastewater-treatment plants to remove more phosphorus from their effluents. The studies, completed in 2008, implemented a visual monitoring plan to evaluate the extent and biomass of the floating macrophyte Lemna minor (commonly known as lesser duckweed) in five impoundments and evaluated the potential for phosphorus flux from sediments in impounded and free-flowing reaches of the river. Hydrologically, the two study years 2007 and 2008 were quite different. In 2007, summer streamflows, although low, were higher than average, and in 2008, the flows were generally higher than in 2007. Visually, the effects of these streamflow differences on the distribution of Lemna were obvious. In 2007, large amounts of

  18. Structural differences between rye and wheat breads but not total fiber content may explain the lower postprandial insulin response to rye bread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juntunen, Katri S; Laaksonen, David E; Autio, Karin

    2003-01-01

    and glucose responses. DESIGN: Nineteen healthy postmenopausal women aged 61 +/- 1 y, with a body mass index (in kg/m(2)) of 26.0 +/- 0.6, and with normal glucose tolerance participated in the study. The test products were refined wheat bread (control), endosperm rye bread, traditional rye bread, and high......BACKGROUND: Rye bread has a beneficial effect on the postprandial insulin response in healthy subjects. The role of rye fiber in insulin and glucose metabolism is not known. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the content of rye fiber in rye breads on postprandial insulin...

  19. Parity Increases Insulin Requirements in Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skajaa, Gitte Ø; Fuglsang, Jens; Kampmann, Ulla; Ovesen, Per G

    2018-06-01

    Tight glycemic control throughout pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes is crucial, and knowledge about which factors that affect insulin sensitivity could improve the outcome for both mother and offspring. To evaluate insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during pregnancy and test whether parity affects insulin requirements. Observational cohort study consisting of women with type 1 diabetes who gave birth at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, from 2004 to 2014. Daily insulin requirement (the hypothesis that parity could affect insulin resistance was formulated before data collection). A total of 380 women with a total of 536 pregnancies were included in the study. Mean age was 31.1 years, and prepregnancy hemoglobin A1c was 60 mmol/mol. Parity was as follows: P0, 43%; P1, 40%; P2, 14%; and P3+4, 3%. Insulin requirements from weeks 11 to 16 decreased significantly by 4% (P = 0.0004) and rose from week 19 to delivery with a peak of 70% (P insulin requirements increased significantly with parity. The unadjusted differences between P0 and P1, P2, and P3+4 were 9% (P insulin requirements from week to week in pregnancy and indicate that insulin requirements increase with parity. This suggests that the patient's parity probably should be considered in choosing insulin dosages for pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.

  20. Efficacy and safety comparison between liraglutide as add-on therapy to insulin and insulin dose-increase in Chinese subjects with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and abdominal obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chun-jun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of adding liraglutide to established insulin therapy in poorly controlled Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes and abdominal obesity compared with increasing insulin dose. Methods A 12-week, randomized, parallel-group study was carried out. A total of 84 patients completed the trial who had been randomly assigned to either the liraglutide-added group or the insulin-increasing group while continuing current insulin based treatment. Insulin dose was reduced by 0-30% upon the initiation of liraglutide. Insulin doses were subsequently adjusted to optimized glycemic control. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c values, blood glucose, total daily insulin dose, body weight, waist circumference, and the number of hypoglycemic events and adverse events were evaluated. Results At the end of study, the mean reduction in HbA1c between the liraglutide-added group and the insulin-increasing group was not significantly different (1.9% vs. 1.77%, p>0.05. However, the percentage of subjects reaching the composite endpoint of HbA1c ≤ 7.0% with no weight gain and no hypoglycemia, was significantly higher in the liraglutide-added group than in the insulin-increasing group (67% vs. 19%, p2, p Conclusions Addition of liraglutide to abdominally obese, insulin-treated patients led to improvement in glycemic control similar to that achieved by increasing insulin dosage, but with a lower daily dose of insulin and fewer hypoglycemic events. Adding liraglutide to insulin also induced a significant reduction in body weight and waist circumference. Liraglutide combined with insulin may be the best treatment option for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and abdominal obesity.

  1. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz?Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short?term and long?term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid?acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion ...

  2. Protein and fat meal content increase insulin requirement in children with type 1 diabetes – Role of duration of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. van der Hoogt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Hyperglycaemia remains a challenge in type 1 diabetes since current regimes used to determine meal insulin requirements prove to be ineffective. This is particularly problematic for meals containing high amounts of protein and fat. We aimed to determine the post-prandial glycaemic response and total insulin need for mixed meals, using sensor-augmented insulin pumps in children with type 1 diabetes. Methods: Twenty-two children with type 1 diabetes, aged 4–17 years on insulin pump therapy completed this home-based, cross-over, randomised controlled trial. Two meals with identical carbohydrate content – one with low fat and protein (LFLP and one with high fat and protein (HFHP contents – were consumed using normal insulin boluses. Blood glucose monitoring was done for 10 h post-meal, with correction bolus insulin given two-hourly if required. Results: The HFHP meal required significantly more total insulin (3.48 vs. 2.7 units as a result of increased post-meal correction insulin requirement (1.2 vs. 0.15 units spread over a longer duration (6 vs. 3 h. The HFHP meals significantly increased the time spent above target glucose level. Duration of diabetes and total daily insulin use significantly influenced the post-prandial blood glucose response to the two meals. Conclusion: When consuming carbohydrate-based mixed meals, children with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy, required significantly more insulin over a longer period of time than the insulin requirement calculated using current regimes. This additional amount required is influenced by the duration of diabetes and total daily insulin use. Keywords: Carbohydrate, Protein and fat, Type 1 diabetes, Glucose, Insulin infusion systems

  3. Cost-effectiveness of insulin pumps compared with multiple daily injections both provided with structured education for adults with type 1 diabetes: a health economic analysis of the Relative Effectiveness of Pumps over Structured Education (REPOSE) randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Daniel John; Brennan, Alan; Dixon, Simon; Waugh, Norman; Elliott, Jackie; Heller, Simon; Lee, Ellen; Campbell, Michael; Basarir, Hasan; White, David

    2018-04-07

    To assess the long-term cost-effectiveness of insulin pumps and Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (pumps+DAFNE) compared with multiple daily insulin injections and DAFNE (MDI+DAFNE) for adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in the UK. We undertook a cost-utility analysis using the Sheffield Type 1 Diabetes Policy Model and data from the Relative Effectiveness of Pumps over Structured Education (REPOSE) trial to estimate the lifetime incidence of diabetic complications, intervention-based resource use and associated effects on costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). All economic analyses took a National Health Service and personal social services perspective and discounted costs and QALYs at 3.5% per annum. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed on the base case. Further uncertainties in the cost of pumps and the evidence used to inform the model were explored using scenario analyses. Eight diabetes centres in England and Scotland. Adults with T1DM who were eligible to receive a structured education course and did not have a strong clinical indication or a preference for a pump. Pumps+DAFNE. MDI+DAFNE. Incremental costs, incremental QALYs gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Compared with MDI+DAFNE, pumps+DAFNE was associated with an incremental discounted lifetime cost of +£18 853 (95% CI £6175 to £31 645) and a gain in discounted lifetime QALYs of +0.13 (95% CI -0.70 to +0.96). The base case mean ICER was £142 195 per QALY gained. The probability of pump+DAFNE being cost-effective using a cost-effectiveness threshold of £20 000 per QALY gained was 14.0%. All scenario and subgroup analyses examined indicated that the ICER was unlikely to fall below £30 000 per QALY gained. Our analysis of the REPOSE data suggests that routine use of pumps in adults without an immediate clinical need for a pump, as identified by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, would not be cost-effective. ISRCTN61215213

  4. Diabetes and Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are usually used twice daily before breakfast and dinner. They can be used alone or in combination with oral medicines. The type of insulin your doctor prescribes will depend on the type of diabetes you have, your lifestyle (when and what you eat, how much you exercise), your age, and your ...

  5. Subject-driven titration of biphasic insulin aspart 30 twice daily is non-inferior to investigator-driven titration in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with premixed human insulin: A randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenying; Zhu, Lvyun; Meng, Bangzhu; Liu, Yu; Wang, Wenhui; Ye, Shandong; Sun, Li; Miao, Heng; Guo, Lian; Wang, Zhanjian; Lv, Xiaofeng; Li, Quanmin; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhao, Weigang; Yang, Gangyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of subject-driven and investigator-driven titration of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) twice daily (BID). In this 20-week, randomized, open-label, two-group parallel, multicenter trial, Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by premixed/self-mixed human insulin were randomized 1:1 to subject-driven or investigator-driven titration of BIAsp 30 BID, in combination with metformin and/or α-glucosidase inhibitors. Dose adjustment was decided by patients in the subject-driven group after training, and by investigators in the investigator-driven group. Eligible adults (n = 344) were randomized in the study. The estimated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction was 14.5 mmol/mol (1.33%) in the subject-driven group and 14.3 mmol/mol (1.31%) in the investigator-driven group. Non-inferiority of subject-titration vs investigator-titration in reducing HbA1c was confirmed, with estimated treatment difference -0.26 mmol/mol (95% confidence interval -2.05, 1.53) (-0.02%, 95% confidence interval -0.19, 0.14). Fasting plasma glucose, postprandial glucose increment and self-measured plasma glucose were improved in both groups without statistically significant differences. One severe hypoglycemic event was experienced by one subject in each group. A similar rate of nocturnal hypoglycemia (events/patient-year) was reported in the subject-driven (1.10) and investigator-driven (1.32) groups. There were 64.5 and 58.1% patients achieving HbA1c titration of BIAsp 30 BID was as efficacious and well-tolerated as investigator-titration. The present study supported patients to self-titrate BIAsp 30 BID under physicians' supervision.

  6. Changes in acyl and total ghrelin concentrations and their association with dry matter intake, average daily gain, and feed efficiency of finishing beef steers and heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone produced in the gut that is implicated in signaling appetite and regulating DMI. The objective of this experiment was to determine the change in acyl ghrelin, total ghrelin, and the ghrelin ratio (acyl ghrelin/total ghrelin) over an 84-d DMI and ADG measurement period a...

  7. Long-acting insulins alter milk composition and metabolism of lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, L A; Overton, T R

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of 2 different types of long-acting insulin on milk production, milk composition, and metabolism in lactating dairy cows. Multiparous cows (n=30) averaging 88 d in milk were assigned to one of 3 treatments in a completely randomized design. Treatments consisted of control (C), Humulin-N (H; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN), and insulin glargine (L). The H and L treatments were administered twice daily at 12-h intervals via subcutaneous injection for 10d. Cows were milked twice daily, and milk composition was determined every other day. Mammary biopsies were conducted on d 11, and mammary proteins extracted from the biopsies were analyzed by Western blot for components of insulin and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways. Treatment had no effect on dry matter intake or milk yield. Treatment with both forms of long-acting insulin increased milk protein content and tended to increase milk protein yield over the 10-d treatment period. Analysis of milk N fractions from samples collected on d 10 of treatment suggested that cows administered L tended to have higher yields of milk protein fractions than cows administered H. Milk fat content and yield tended to be increased for cows administered long-acting insulins. Lactose content and yields were decreased by treatment with long-acting insulins. Administration of long-acting insulins, particularly L, tended to shift milk fatty acid composition toward increased short- and medium-chain fatty acids and decreased long-chain fatty acids. Plasma concentrations of glucose and urea N were lower for cows administered long-acting insulins; interactions of treatment and sampling time were indicative of more pronounced effects of L than H on these metabolites. Concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and insulin were increased in cows administered long-acting insulins. Decreased concentrations of urea N in both plasma and milk suggested more efficient use of N in cows

  8. A two-week reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2009-01-01

    after step reduction, with a post hoc analysis revealing the most pronounced effect after 4 h of insulin infusion. In addition, the two-week period induced a 7% decline in VO2max (ml/min; cardiovascular fitness). Lean mass of legs, but not arms and truck, decreased concurrently. Taken together, one...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for two weeks in healthy, non-exercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass. Key words: Inactivity, Insulin...... number of daily steps induced a significant reduction of 17% in the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the clamp. This reduction was due to a decline in peripheral insulin sensitivity with no effect on hepatic endogenous glucose production. The insulin-stimulated ratio of pAkt(thr308)/total Akt decreased...

  9. Insulin Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than sulfonylureas. What are the side effects and disadvantages of insulin secretagogues? Both types of insulin-releasing ... help find the cause. Questions to ask your doctor What else can I do to keep my ...

  10. Method to support Total Maximum Daily Load development using hydrologic alteration as a surrogate to address aquatic life impairment in New Jersey streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennen, Jonathan G.; Riskin, Melissa L.; Reilly, Pamela A.; Colarullo, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    More than 300 ambient monitoring sites in New Jersey have been identified by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) in its integrated water-quality monitoring and assessment report (that is, the 305(b) Report on general water quality and 303(d) List of waters that do not support their designated uses) as being impaired with respect to aquatic life; however, no unambiguous stressors (for example, nutrients or bacteria) have been identified. Because of the indeterminate nature of the broad range of possible impairments, surrogate measures that more holistically encapsulate the full suite of potential environmental stressors need to be developed. Streamflow alteration resulting from anthropogenic changes in the landscape is one such surrogate. For example, increases in impervious surface cover (ISC) commonly cause increases in surface runoff, which can result in “flashy” hydrology and other changes in the stream corridor that are associated with streamflow alteration. The NJDEP has indicated that methodologies to support a hydrologically based Total Maximum Daily Load (hydro-TMDL) need to be developed in order to identify hydrologic targets that represent a minimal percent deviation from a baseline condition (“minimally altered”) as a surrogate measure to meet criteria in support of designated uses. The primary objective of this study was to develop an applicable hydro-TMDL approach to address aquatic-life impairments associated with hydrologic alteration for New Jersey streams. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NJDEP, identified 51 non- to moderately impaired gaged streamflow sites in the Raritan River Basin for evaluation. Quantile regression (QR) analysis was used to compare flow and precipitation records and identify baseline hydrographs at 37 of these sites. At sites without an appropriately long period of record (POR) or where a baseline hydrograph could not be identified with QR, a rainfall-runoff model was used

  11. OMI/Aura Ozone (O3) DOAS Total Column Daily L2 Global 0.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OMI/Aura Level-2G Total Column Ozone Data Product OMDOAO3G (Version 003) is now available ( http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/OMI/omdoao3g_v003.shtml ) from the...

  12. OMI/Aura Ozone (O3) Total Column Daily L2 Global 0.25 deg Lat/Lon Grid V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OMI/Aura Level-2G Total Column Ozone Data Product OMTO3G (Version 003) is made available ( http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura/OMI/omto3g_v003.shtml ) from the NASA...

  13. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During in vitro fertilization (IVF, fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Methods Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Results Completed questionnaires (n = 71 revealed a mean +/− SD patient age of 34 +/− 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1% had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s. When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/− 11.75 and $654.55 +/− 106.34, respectively (p  Conclusions This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs

  14. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Salem, Shala A; Jones, Christopher A; Peck, Alison C; Salem, Rifaat D

    2012-08-30

    During in vitro fertilization (IVF), fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Completed questionnaires (n = 71) revealed a mean +/- SD patient age of 34 +/- 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1%) had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s). When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/- 11.75 and $654.55 +/- 106.34, respectively (p cost difference increased. This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist) was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs reach a critical level.

  15. Preliminary assessment of a water-quality monitoring program for total maximum daily loads in Johnson County, Kansas, January 2015 through June 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Teresa J.; Paxson, Chelsea R.

    2017-08-25

    Municipalities in Johnson County in northeastern Kansas are required to implement stormwater management programs to reduce pollutant discharges, protect water quality, and comply with applicable water-quality regulations in accordance with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits for stormwater discharge. To this end, municipalities collect grab samples at streams entering and leaving their jurisdiction to determine levels of excessive nutrients, sediment, and fecal bacteria to characterize pollutants and understand the factors affecting them.In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Johnson County Stormwater Management Program, with input from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, initiated a 5-year monitoring program to satisfy minimum sampling requirements for each municipality as described by new stormwater permits issued to Johnson County municipalities. The purpose of this report is to provide a preliminary assessment of the monitoring program. The monitoring program is described, a preliminary assessment of the monitoring program design is provided using water-quality data collected during the first 2 years of the program, and the ability of the current monitoring network and sampling plan to provide data sufficient to quantify improvements in water quality resulting from implemented and planned best management practices is evaluated. The information in this initial report may be used to evaluate changes in data collection methods while data collection is still ongoing that may lead to improved data utility.Discrete water-quality samples were collected at 27 sites and analyzed for nutrients, Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, total suspended solids, and suspended-sediment concentration. In addition, continuous water-quality data (water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, turbidity, and nitrate plus nitrite) were collected at one site to characterize variability and provide a basis for comparison to discrete

  16. Relationship between Optimum Mini-doses of Glucagon and Insulin Levels when Treating Mild Hypoglycaemia in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes - A Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Schmidt, Signe

    2017-01-01

    -treated type 1 diabetes. In each simulation, one of ten different and individualized subcutaneous insulin boluses was administered to decrease plasma glucose (PG) from 7.0 to ≤3.9 mmol/l. Insulin levels were estimated as ratio of actual to baseline serum insulin concentration (se/ba-insulin), insulin on board...... (IOB) or percentage of IOB to total daily insulin dose (IOB/TDD). Insulin bolus sizes were chosen to provide pre-defined insulin levels when PG reached 3.9 mmol/l, where one of 17 subcutaneous glucagon boluses was administered. Optimum glucagon bolus to treat mild hypoglycaemia at varying insulin...... levels was the lowest dose that in most patients caused PG peak between 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/l and sustained PG ≥ 3.9 mmol/l for 2 hr after the bolus. PG response to glucagon declined with increasing insulin levels. The glucagon dose to optimally treat mild hypoglycaemia depended exponentially on insulin...

  17. Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, fiber, simple sugars, and insulin resistance - The Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Cathrine; Pedersen, Oluf; Færch, Kristine

    2005-01-01

    , and insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Multiple regressions were performed with HOMA-IR as the dependent variable and carbohydrate-related factors as explanatory variables. All models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, physical activity......, total energy intake, BMI, and waist circumference. RESULTS - intake of lactose was positively associated with HOMA-IR (P < 0.0001), whereas daily glycemic load and intake of glucose, fructose, dietary fiber, total carbohydrate, fruit, and vegetables were inversely associated with HOMA-IR (P < 0...

  18. Insulin degludec in type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial of a new-generation ultra-long-acting insulin compared with insulin glargine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkeland, Kåre I.; Home, Philip D.; Wendisch, Ulrich; Ratner, Robert E.; Johansen, Thue; Endahl, Lars A.; Lyby, Karsten; Jendle, Johan H.; Roberts, Anthony P.; DeVries, J. Hans; Meneghini, Luigi F.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a basal insulin that forms soluble multihexamers after subcutaneous injection, resulting in an ultra-long action profile. We assessed the efficacy and safety of IDeg formulations administered once daily in combination with mealtime insulin aspart in people with type 1

  19. A 2-wk reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2010-01-01

    decreased after step reduction, with a post hoc analysis revealing the most pronounced effect after 4 h of insulin infusion. In addition, the 2-wk period induced a 7% decline in VO2 max (ml/min; cardiovascular fitness). Lean mass of legs, but not arms and trunk, decreased concurrently. Taken together, one...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of Type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for 2 wk in healthy, nonexercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass........ A reduced number of daily steps induced a significant reduction of 17% in the glucose infusion rate (GIR) during the clamp. This reduction was due to a decline in peripheral insulin sensitivity with no effect on hepatic endogenous glucose production. The insulin-stimulated ratio of pAktthr308/total Akt...

  20. Novel Simple Insulin Delivery Device Reduces Barriers to Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C.; Mader, Julia K.; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. Methods: This single-center, open-label, single-arm study comprised three 2-week periods: baseline (MDI), transition from MDI to PaQ, and PaQ treatment. Validated questionnaires were administered during the baseline and PaQ treatment periods: Barriers to Insulin Treatment questionnaire (BIT), Insulin Treatment Appraisal Scale (ITAS), and Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID). Results: Eighteen patients (age 59 ± 5 years, diabetes duration 15 ± 7 years, 21% female, HbA1c 7.7 ± 0.7%) completed the questionnaires. There was a strong, significant effect of PaQ use in mean BIT total scores (difference [D] = −5.4 ± 0.7.7, P = .01, effect size [d] = 0.70). Patients perceived less stigmatization by insulin injection (D = −2.2 ± 6.2, P = .18, d = 0.35), increased positive outcome (D = 1.9 ± 6.6, P = .17, d = 0.29), and less fear of injections (1.3 ± 4.8, P = .55, d = 0.28). Mean change in ITAS scores after PaQ device use showed a nonsignificant improvement of 1.71 ± 5.63 but moderate effect size (d = 0.30, P = .14). No increase in PAID scores was seen. Conclusions: The results and moderate to large effects sizes suggest that PaQ device use has beneficial and clinically relevant effects to overcoming barriers to and negative appraisal of insulin treatment, without increasing other diabetes-related distress. PMID:25670847

  1. Reversal of the toxic effects of cachectin by concurrent insulin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraker, D L; Merino, M J; Norton, J A

    1989-06-01

    Rats treated with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-cachectin, 100 micrograms/kg ip twice daily for 5 consecutive days, had a 56% decrease in food intake, a 54% decrease in nitrogen balance, and a 23-g decrease in body weight gain vs. saline-treated controls. Concurrent neutral protamine hagedorn insulin administration of 2 U/100 g sc twice daily reversed all of these changes to control levels without causing any treatment deaths. The improvement seen with insulin was dose independent. Five days of cachectin treatment caused a severe interstitial pneumonitis, periportal inflammation in the liver, and an increase in wet organ weight in the heart, lungs, kidney, and spleen. Concurrent insulin treatment led to near total reversal of these histopathologic changes. Cachectin treatment did not significantly change blood glucose levels from control values of 130-140 mg/dl, but insulin plus cachectin caused a significant decrease in blood glucose from 1 through 12 h after injection. Administration of high-dose insulin can near totally reverse the nutritional and histopathologic toxicity of sublethal doses of cachectin in rats.

  2. Patterns, Policy and Appropriateness: A 12-Year Utilization Review of Blood Glucose Test Strip Use in Insulin Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jamie; Friesen, Kevin J; Okunnu, Anuoluwapo; Bugden, Shawn

    2017-08-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to the rising costs of the use of blood glucose test strips (BGTS). Insulin users have generally been treated as a single homogeneous group, resulting in policies that cap usage (8.2 strips/day) in provincial drug insurance programs. The objective of this study was to conduct a utilization review of BGTS by insulin users and to evaluate use patterns against current insulin use patterns and BGTS policy. BGTS usage was examined in a cohort of insulin users with type 1 and type 2 diabetes over a 12-year period (2001 to 2013) using the population-based administrative data in Manitoba, Canada. Total BGTS strip use increased by 121%, from $4.3 to $9.5 million. However, the number of insulin users also increased by 115%. Use has been stable at 1.5 strips per day per person since 2004 by insulin users with type 2 diabetes but has risen from 1.9 to 3.0 strips per day per person in those with type 1 diabetes. Mean daily test strip use was below the number of daily tests recommended for patients using insulin as per the current Canadian guidelines, with 11% and 15% of insulin users with type 1 and type 2 diabetes not claiming any BGTS use and a further 15% (type 1) and 28% (type 2) using fewer than 1 strip per day. BGTS use per insulin user has been stable for most of the past decade, and the vast majority of use falls well below provincial insurance caps. The amount of low-level testing (0 to <1 strip/day) suggests that greater attention should be directed to ensuring a safe level of testing by all insulin users. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimativa do total de horas abaixo de determinada temperatura-base através das medidas diárias da temperatura do ar Number of hours below any base temperature estimated by daily measurements of air temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz B. Angelocci

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available São propostas equações matemáticas para estimar o total diário de horas abaixo de determinada temperatura-base, em certo período, utilizando-se somente dos valores diários das temperaturas máxima, mínima e das 21 horas (hora local. A comparação entre os totais diários e mensais de "horas de frio" estimados pelas equações propostas e os observados através de termogramas, para várias localidades do Estado de São Paulo, mostrou boa concordância entre os métodos de cálculo. O modelo proposto dispensa o uso de registros contínuos de temperatura. As vantagens de tal estimativa residem na maior disponibilidade de registros de temperaturas máximas, mínimas e das 21 horas, permitindo maior densidade de pontos em trabalhos de zoneamento agroclimático e de cartografia, além da eliminação do processo de cotação de termogramas.Mathematical equations are proposed to estimate the daily number of hours in which the air temperature remains below a determined treshold value. The equations require only daily values of maximum, minimum and 9 p.m. local time temperature, measured inside the meteorological shelter. This technique is suitable for machine computation thus avoiding the tremendous task of quantifying a large number of thermograms. This fact permits the utilization of a greater number of stations in studies of crop zonation and cartography. Good correlations were obtained between estimated and observed data of the daily and monthly total number of hours below 7°C, 13°C and 17°C, for five stations in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, showing relative accuracy of the proposed equations.

  4. The role of adding metformin in insulin-resistant diabetic pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Moustafa Ibrahim; Hamdy, Ahmed; Shafik, Adel; Taha, Salah; Anwar, Mohammed; Faris, Mohammed

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of adding oral metformin to insulin therapy in pregnant women with insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus. The current non-inferiority randomized controlled trial was conducted at Ain Shams University Maternity Hospital. The study included pregnant women with gestational or pre-existing diabetes mellitus at gestations between 20 and 34 weeks, who showed insulin resistance (defined as poor glycemic control at a daily dose of ≥1.12 units/kg). Recruited women were randomized into one of two groups: group I, including women who received oral metformin without increasing the insulin dose; and group II, including women who had their insulin dose increased. The primary outcome was maternal glycemic control. Secondary outcomes included maternal bouts of hypoglycemia, need for another hospital admission for uncontrolled diabetes during pregnancy, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, birth trauma, congenital anomalies, 1- and 5-min Apgar score, neonatal hypoglycemia, need for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and adverse neonatal outcomes. A total number of 154 women with diabetes mellitus with pregnancy were approached; of them 90 women were eligible and were randomly allocated and included in the final analysis. The recruited 90 women were randomized into one of two groups: group I (metformin group) (n = 46), including women who received oral metformin in addition to the same initial insulin dose; and group II (control group) (n = 44), including women who had their insulin dose increased according to the standard protocol. The mean age of included women was 29.84 ± 5.37 years (range 20-42 years). The mean gestational age at recruitment was 28.7 ± 3.71 weeks (range 21-34 weeks). Among the 46 women of group I, 17 (36.9 %) women reached proper glycemic control at a daily metformin dose of 1,500 mg, 18 (39.2 %) at a daily dose of 2,000 mg, while 11 (23.9 %) received metformin at a daily

  5. Impact of diet on the efficacy of insulin lispro mix 25 and insulin lispro mix 50 as starter insulin in East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes: Subgroup analysis of the Comparison Between Low Mixed Insulin and Mid Mixed Insulin as Starter Insulin For Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (CLASSIFY Study) randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Qian, Lei; Watada, Hirotaka; Li, Peng Fei; Iwamoto, Noriyuki; Imori, Makoto; Yang, Wen Ying

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiology of diabetes differs between Asian and Western patients in many ways, and diet is a primary contributor. The present study examined the effect of diet on the efficacy of 25% insulin lispro/75% insulin lispro protamine suspension (LM25) and 50% insulin lispro/50% insulin lispro protamine suspension (LM50) as starter insulin in Chinese and Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycemic control with oral antidiabetic medication. This was a predefined subgroup analysis of a phase 4, open-label, 26-week, parallel-arm, randomized (computer-generated random sequence) trial (21 January 2013 to 22 August 2014). Nutritional intake was assessed from food records kept by participants before study drug administration. Outcomes assessed were changes from baseline in self-monitored blood glucose, 1,5-anhydroglucitol and glycated hemoglobin. In total, 328 participants were randomized to receive twice-daily LM25 (n = 168) or LM50 (n = 160). Median daily nutritional intake (by weight and percentage of total energy) was 230.8 g of carbohydrate (54%), 56.5 g of fat (31%) and 66 g of protein (15%). Improvements in self-monitored blood glucose were significantly greater (P ≤ 0.028) in the LM50 group than in the LM25 group, regardless of nutritional intake. When carbohydrate (by weight or percentage energy) or fat (by weight) intake exceeded median levels, LM50 was significantly more efficacious than LM25 (P ≤ 0.026) in improving 1,5-anhydroglucitol and glycated hemoglobin. Glycemic control improved in both LM25 and LM50 groups, but LM50 was significantly more efficacious under certain dietary conditions, particularly with increased carbohydrate intake. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Circadian variation in serum free and total insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II in untreated and treated acromegaly and growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjaerbaek, Christian; Frystyk, Jan; Kaal, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    to the nocturnal increase in IGF binding protein-1. In this study we have investigated the circadian variation in circulating free IGF-I and IGF-II in patients with acromegaly and patients with adult onset growth hormone deficiency. PATIENTS: Seven acromegalic patients were studied with and without treatment...... no significant circadian variations in free IGF-I or free IGF-II in either of the two occasions. In contrast, there was a significant circadian variation of total IGF-I after adjustment for changes in plasma volume in both treated and untreated acromegaly and GH deficiency in all cases with a peak between 0300 h...

  7. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Casablanca cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farouqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Casablanca, Morocco. Results: A total of 495 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 231, insulin detemir (n = 151, insulin aspart (n = 19, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 53 and other insulin combinations (n = 41. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.2% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.3%, insulin users: −1.8%. Major hypoglycaemia was observed in the insulin naïve group after 24 weeks. SADRs were reported in 1.2% of insulin naïve and 2.1% of insulin user groups. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  8. Insulin resistance, insulin sensitization and inflammation in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhindsa G

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5-10% of women of reproductive age have polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. While insulin resistance is not part of the diagnostic criteria for PCOS, its importance in the pathogenesis of PCOS cannot be denied. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance independent of total or fat-free body mass. Post-receptor defects in the action of insulin have been described in PCOS which are similar to those found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Treatment with insulin sensitizers, metformin and thiazolidinediones, improve both metabolic and hormonal patterns and also improve ovulation in PCOS. Recent studies have shown that PCOS women have higher circulating levels of inflammatory mediators like C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor- , tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 . It is possible that the beneficial effect of insulin sensitizers in PCOS may be partly due to a decrease in inflammation.

  9. Guava leaf extracts promote glucose metabolism in SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/Izm rats by improving insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiangyu; Yoshitomi, Hisae; Gao, Ming; Qin, Lingling; Duan, Ying; Sun, Wen; Xu, Tunhai; Xie, Peifeng; Zhou, Jingxin; Huang, Liansha; Liu, Tonghua

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with insulin-resistance; however, the effective therapies in improving insulin sensitivity are limited. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of Guava Leaf (GL) extracts on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/Izm rats (SHRSP/ZF), a model of spontaneously metabolic syndrome. Male rats at 7 weeks of age were administered with vehicle water or treated by gavage with 2 g/kg GL extracts daily for six weeks, and their body weights, water and food consumption, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance were measured. Compared with the controls, treatment with GL extracts did not modulate the amounts of water and food consumption, but significantly reduced the body weights at six weeks post treatment. Treatment with GL extracts did not alter the levels of fasting plasma glucose and insulin, but significantly reduced the levels of plasma glucose at 60 and 120 min post glucose challenge, also reduced the values of AUC and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) at 42 days post treatment. Furthermore, treatment with GL extracts promoted IRS-1, AKT, PI3Kp85 expression, then IRS-1, AMKP, and AKT308, but not AKT473, phosphorylation, accompanied by increasing the ratios of membrane to total Glut 4 expression and adiponectin receptor 1 transcription in the skeletal muscles. These data indicated that GL extracts improved glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in the skeletal muscles of rats by modulating the insulin-related signaling.

  10. A randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of basal insulin and inhaled mealtime insulin on glucose variability and oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegelaar, S. E.; Kulik, W.; van Lenthe, H.; Mukherjee, R.; Hoekstra, J. B. L.; DeVries, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect of three times daily mealtime inhaled insulin therapy compared with once daily basal insulin glargine therapy on 72-h glucose profiles, glucose variability and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes patients. In an inpatient crossover study, 40 subjects with type 2 diabetes were

  11. Variation in 125I-Insulin absorption and blood glucose concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, T.; Faber, O.K.; Binder, C.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption of monocomponent porcine 125 I-insulin Monotard and Isophane was studied in six insulin dependent diabetic patients over a period of 12 days. The absorption of insulin was measured as the disappearance of radioactivity from sites of injection. The daily 125 I-insulin doses ranged from 20 to 48 IU between patients. The insulin absorbed varied considerably within and between patients. The range of individual daily absorbed insulin varied from 19 to 104 per cent of the 125 I-insulin dose. A significant correlation (p [de

  12. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific 125 I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of 125 I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific 125 I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens

  13. SGLT2 inhibitors as adjunct therapy to insulin in type 1 diabetes: Meta analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao CHEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2 inhibitors as adjunct therapy to insulin in type 1 diabetes (T1DM. Methods The PubMed, The Cochrane Library, EMbase, CENTRRAI, CBM, CNKI, VIP and WangFang database were searched from inception to April 5, 2016 for systematic reviews, references screen was performed manually. The trials of SGLT2 inhibitors versus placebo add to insulin carried out in patients with T1DM were collected, and their bias risk was assessed and meta-analysis was conducted by using RevMan 5.3 software. Results Four randomized control trials (RCTs were yielded for meta-analysis, including 529 patients. Compared with control group, SGLT2 inhibitors as adjunct therapy to insulin significantly reduced fasting plasma glucose (FPG [weighted mean difference (WMD=–0.65mmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI=–1.30 to –0.08, P<0.05], glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c (WMD=–0.37%, 95%CI=–0.54 to –0.20, P<0.00001, body weight (WMD=–2.54kg, 95%CI=–3.48 to –1.60, P<0.0001 and total daily insulin dose (WMD=–6.23IU, 95% CI=–8.05 to –4.40, P<0.0001, but the total adverse events (AEs, hypoglycemia, genital and urinary infections showed no significant difference. Conclusions Based on current studies, SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective as adjunct therapy to insulin in T1DM, may improve glycemic control, reduce body weight and total daily insulin dose without increase of total AEs, hypoglycemia, and genital and urinary infections. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.12.15

  14. Conversion from insulin glargine U-100 to insulin glargine U-300 or insulin degludec and the impact on dosage requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Scott M; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2018-04-01

    We wanted to determine whether basal insulin requirements change when patients transition from insulin glargine U-100 (Gla-100) to insulin glargine U-300 (Gla-300) or insulin degludec. This study involved subjects seen in the University of Colorado Health Endocrine Clinic who were transitioned from Gla-100 to either Gla-300 ( n = 95) or insulin degludec ( n = 39). The primary outcome was the difference between baseline Gla-100 dose and dose of Gla-300 or insulin degludec prescribed after first follow-up visit within 1-12 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in glycemic control and empiric dose conversion from Gla-100 to Gla-300 or insulin degludec on the day of transition. Wilcoxon rank sum tests evaluated changes in insulin doses, and paired t tests assessed changes in glycemic control using GraphPad statistical software. Median daily basal insulin dose increased for individuals transitioned from Gla-100 to Gla-300 from 30 [19-60 interquartile range (IQR)] units at baseline to 34.5 (19-70 IQR) units after follow up ( p = 0.01). For patients transitioned to insulin degludec, dose changes from baseline to follow up were not significantly different ( p = 0.56). At the time of transition, the prescribed dose of Gla-300 or insulin degludec did not significantly differ from the previous dose of Gla-100 ( p = 0.73 and 0.28, respectively), indicating that empiric dose adjustments were not routinely prescribed. Patients who transitioned from Gla-100 to Gla-300 had increased basal insulin requirements between visits, while basal insulin requirements for those transitioned from Gla-100 to insulin degludec were not significantly different.

  15. Insulin analogues: have they changed insulin treatment and improved glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2002-01-01

    To improve insulin therapy, new insulin analogues have been developed. Two fast-acting analogues with a more rapid onset of effect and a shorter duration of action combined with a low day-to-day variation in absorption rate are now available. Despite this favourable time-action profile most studies....... This is probably the main explanation for the absence of improvement in overall glycaemic control when compared with regular human insulin. A tendency to a reduction in hypoglycaemic events during treatment with fast-acting analogues has been observed in most studies. Recent studies have indicated that NPH insulin...... administered several times daily at mealtimes can improve glycaemic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia. The fast-acting analogues are now also available as insulin mixed with NPH. Insulin glargine is a new long-acting insulin which is soluble and precipitates after injection, resulting...

  16. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  17. Will the next generation of basal insulins offer clinical advantages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, A J

    2014-06-01

    The 21st century has seen the arrival of several insulin analogue products and the refinement of insulin regimens, with widespread advocacy of continuous titration algorithms and earlier initiation of supplementary insulin therapy (predominantly using basal insulins) in type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, many insulin-treated diabetes patients remain in poor glycaemic control. This might reflect insufficient titration effort or lax adherence, but these issues could in some cases result from concerns about hypoglycaemia. Certainly there is scope for improving the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profile of basal insulin, and three new products offer this prospect. Insulin degludec, now in clinical use, and PEGylated insulin lispro, in development, have greatly extended action profiles that result from two very different, but unique, mechanisms. With once-daily dosing, these insulins produce stable PK/PD profiles at steady state, associated with a low incidence of hypoglycaemia. The feasibility of varied daily dose timing has also been confirmed with insulin degludec. High strength formulations of insulin glargine and insulin degludec offer the prospect of a reduced injection number/volume in high dose users, and in the case of glargine, the PK/PD profile might also be favourably modified. This review considers critically the clinical evidence and expectations we should have for these new basal insulins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Patient safety and minimizing risk with insulin administration - role of insulin degludec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Myint M; Atkin, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a lifelong condition requiring ongoing medical care and patient self-management. Exogenous insulin therapy is essential in type 1 diabetes and becomes a necessity in patients with longstanding type 2 diabetes who fail to achieve optimal control with lifestyle modification, oral agents, and glucagon-like peptide 1-based therapy. One of the risks that hinders insulin use is hypoglycemia. Optimal insulin therapy should therefore minimize the risk of hypoglycemia while improving glycemic control. Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a novel basal insulin that, following subcutaneous injection, assembles into a depot of soluble multihexamer chains. These subsequently release IDeg monomers that are absorbed at a slow and steady rate into the circulation, with the terminal half-life of IDeg being ~25 hours. Thus, it requires only once-daily dosing unlike other basal insulin preparations that often require twice-daily dosing. Despite its long half-life, once-daily IDeg does not cause accumulation of insulin in the circulation after reaching steady state. IDeg once a day will produce a steady-state profile with a lower peak:trough ratio than other basal insulins. In clinical trials, this profile translates into a lower frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with insulin glargine, as well as an ability to allow some flexibility in dose timing without compromising efficacy and safety. Indeed, a study that tested the extremes of dosing intervals of 8 and 40 hours showed no detriment in either glycemic control or hypoglycemic frequency versus insulin glargine given at the same time each day. While extreme flexibility in dose timing is not recommended, these findings are reassuring. This may be particularly beneficial to elderly patients, patients with learning difficulties, or others who have to rely on health-care professionals for their daily insulin injections. Further studies are required to confirm whether this might benefit adherence to treatment, reduce long

  19. Stochastic modelling of optimum initial body weight, daily weight gain and effect of genetic changes in ovulation rate and age at sexual maturity on total egg production of broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, R; Hocking, P M

    2009-01-01

    1. A model that simulates the total production of eggs (TEP) in broiler breeders was used to predict the optimum initial (20 week) body weight (IBWexp), daily weight gains from 20 to 30 (DWGexp(20-30)) and 31 to 62 weeks of age (DWGexp(31-62)), age at photostimulation (affecting age at first egg, AFEexp), coefficients of variation of initial body weight (CV-IBWexp) and age at first egg (CV-AFEexp), and the effect of genetically increasing the numbers of yellow follicles at the onset of lay. 2. The results suggest that TEP in broiler breeders is very sensitive to changes in body weight gain during the first 10 weeks of the production period and body weight at the start of egg production, whereas changes in body weight gain after peak rate of lay showed only minor effects on TEP. Increasing CV-IBWexp was associated with a linear decrease in the mean and increased variability of TEP. 3. Decreasing AFEexp was negatively associated with TEP, whereas higher CV-AFEexp increased variability of TEP and had a trivial affect on the mean. 4. Results of the simulation suggested that reducing ovarian yellow follicle numbers by means of genetic selection could reduce the degree of feed restriction currently used in broiler breeder commercial stocks while maintaining total egg production. Higher numbers of yellow follicles associated with selection for higher growth rate would not result in lower egg production if the body weight target was maintained at the currently recommended commercial level and the effect on TEP of increasing the target in proportion to potential body weight may be relatively small.

  20. Measuring Acetabular Cup Orientation on Antero-Posterior Radiographs of the Hip after Total Hip Arthroplasty with a Vector Arithmetic Radiological Method. Is It Valid and Verified for Daily Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craiovan, B; Weber, M; Worlicek, M; Schneider, M; Springorum, H R; Zeman, F; Grifka, J; Renkawitz, T

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this prospective study is to validate a vector arithmetic method for measuring acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to verify the clinical practice. We measured cup anteversion and inclination of 123 patients after cementless primary THA twice by two examiners on AP pelvic radiographs with a vector arithmetic method and compared with a 3D-CT based reconstruction model within the same radiographic coronal plane. The mean difference between the radiographic and the 3D-CT measurements was - 1.4° ± 3.9° for inclination and 0.8°± 7.9° for anteversion with excellent correlation for inclination (r = 0.81, p cup position after THA on pelvic radiographs by this vector arithmetic method, there is a need for a correct postoperative ap view, with special regards to the pelvic tilt for the future. • Measuring acetabular cup orientation on anteroposterior radiographs of the hip after THA is a helpful procedure in everyday clinical practice as a first-line imaging modality• CT remains the golden standard to accurately determine acetabular cup position.• Future measuring on radiographs for cup orientation after THA should account for integration of the pelvic tilt in order to maximize the measurement accuracy. Citation Format: • Craiovan B, Weber M, Worlicek M et al. Measuring Acetabular Cup Orientation on Antero-Posterior Radiographs of the Hip after Total Hip Arthroplasty with a Vector Arithmetic Radiological Method. Is It Valid and Verified for Daily Clinical Practice?. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2016; 188: 574 - 581. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. A Phytosterol-Enriched Spread Improves Lipid Profile and Insulin Resistance of Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Xing, Baoheng

    2016-08-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has become a serious health risk among pregnant women throughout the world. Phytosterol-enriched margarines are capable of lowering total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but little is known about its effects on GDM. We aimed to examine the effects of daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread on insulin resistance and lipid profile in pregnant GDM women. Pregnant women suffering from GDM in their second trimester were recruited and randomly assigned to consume a margarine spread either with or without phytosterols daily for 16 weeks. Serum lipid profile and glucose and insulin metabolisms were assessed at week 0 (baseline) and week 16 (end of trial). After 16 weeks, levels of triacylglycerol, TC, and LDL were significantly decreased, while high-density lipoprotein was significantly increased, compared with the baseline in the phytosterol group. In addition, in the same treatment group, glucose metabolic parameters, including fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, the quantitative insulin check index, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance, and β-cell function, were also significantly improved. Daily consumption of a phytosterol-enriched spread improved insulin resistance and lipid profile in women with GDM.

  2. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  3. Counter-regulatory hormone responses to spontaneous hypoglycaemia during treatment with insulin Aspart or human soluble insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock Jacobsen, I; Vind, B F; Korsholm, Lars

    2011-01-01

    examined in a randomized, double-blinded cross-over study for two periods of 8 weeks. Sixteen patients with type 1 diabetes were subjected to three daily injections of human soluble insulin or Aspart in addition to Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin twice daily. Each intervention period was followed......-regulatory responses regarding growth hormone, glucagon and ghrelin whereas no differences were found in relation to free fatty acid, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and IGF-binding proteins 1 and 2. Treatment with insulin Aspart resulted in well-defined peaks in serum insulin concentrations...... elicited a slightly different physiological response to spontaneous hypoglycaemia compared with human insulin. Keywords hypoglycaemia counter-regulation, insulin Aspart, type 1 diabetes....

  4. Safety and efficacy of an intensive insulin protocol in a burn-trauma intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Amalia; Davis, Lynn; Morris, Stephen E; Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    Aggressive glycemic management in critically ill patients with acute burn injury or life-threatening soft-tissue infections has not been thoroughly evaluated. An intensive insulin protocol with target glucose values of less than 120 mg/dl was implemented in October 2005 in our regional Burn-Trauma intensive care unit. We reviewed our initial experience with this protocol to evaluate the safety and efficacy of aggressive glycemic control in these patient groups. Patients were placed on the intensive insulin protocol based upon the need for glycemic management during their hospitalization for burn or soft-tissue disease. Patient information prospectively collected while on protocol included all measured blood glucose values, total daily insulin use, and incidence of hypoglycemic episodes, defined as serum glucose patients (17 burns, 13 soft-tissue infections) were placed on the intensive insulin protocol during the first 16 months of use. The mean daily blood glucose level for burn patients was 115.9 mg/dl and for soft-tissue disease patients was 119.5 mg/dl. There was a 5% incidence of hypoglycemic episodes per protocol day. All hypoglycemic episodes were treated by holding the insulin infusion, and no episode had known adverse effects. Hyperglycemia in critically ill patients with burns and extensive soft-tissue disease can be effectively managed with an insulin protocol that targets blood glucose values of less than 120 mg/dl with minimal incidence of hypoglycemia. A multicenter prospective randomized trial would provide the ideal forum for evaluating clinical outcome benefits of using an intensive insulin protocol.

  5. A Single Day of Excessive Dietary Fat Intake Reduces Whole-Body Insulin Sensitivity: The Metabolic Consequence of Binge Eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siôn A. Parry

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Consuming excessive amounts of energy as dietary fat for several days or weeks can impair glycemic control and reduce insulin sensitivity in healthy adults. However, individuals who demonstrate binge eating behavior overconsume for much shorter periods of time; the metabolic consequences of such behavior remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a single day of high-fat overfeeding on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Fifteen young, healthy adults underwent an oral glucose tolerance test before and after consuming a high-fat (68% of total energy, high-energy (78% greater than daily requirements diet for one day. Fasting and postprandial plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, non-esterified fatty acids, and triglyceride were measured and the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index was calculated. One day of high-fat overfeeding increased postprandial glucose area under the curve (AUC by 17.1% (p < 0.0001 and insulin AUC by 16.4% (p = 0.007. Whole-body insulin sensitivity decreased by 28% (p = 0.001. In conclusion, a single day of high-fat, overfeeding impaired whole-body insulin sensitivity in young, healthy adults. This highlights the rapidity with which excessive consumption of calories through high-fat food can impair glucose metabolism, and suggests that acute binge eating may have immediate metabolic health consequences for the individual.

  6. Postreceptor defects causing insulin resistance in normoinsulinemic non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolinder, J.; Ostman, J.; Arner, P.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanisms of the diminished hypoglycemic response to insulin in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with normal levels of circulating plasma insulin were investigated. Specific binding of mono- 125 I (Tyr A14)-insulin to isolated adipocytes and effects of insulin (5--10,000 microunits/ml) on glucose oxidation and lipolysis were determined simultaneously in subcutaneous adipose tissue of seven healthy subjects of normal weight and seven untreated NIDDM patients with normal plasma insulin levels. The two groups were matched for age, sex, and body weight. Insulin binding, measured in terms of receptor number and affinity, was normal in NIDDM, the total number of receptors averaging 350,000 per cell. Neither sensitivity nor the maximum antilipolytic effect of insulin was altered in NIDDM patients as compared with control subjects; the insulin concentration producing half the maximum effect (ED50) was 10 microunits/ml. As regards the effect of insulin on glucose oxidation, for the control subjects ED50 was 30 microunits/ml, whereas in NIDDM patients, insulin exerted no stimulatory effect. The results obtained suggest that the effect of insulin on glucose utilization in normoinsulinemic NIDDM may be diminished in spite of normal insulin binding to receptors. The resistance may be due solely to postreceptor defects, and does not involve antilipolysis

  7. Efficacy and safety of teneligliptin in addition to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on hemodialysis evaluated by continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takahiro; Yajima, Kumiko; Hayashi, Makoto; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Keigo

    2016-12-01

    Appropriate glycemic control without hypoglycemia is important in patients with type 2 diabetes on hemodialysis. Teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, can be used without dose adjustment for these patients. Using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), we evaluated the efficacy and safety of adding teneligliptin to insulin therapy. Twenty-one type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on hemodialysis treated with insulin were enrolled. After the adjustment of insulin dose, their blood glucose level was monitored by CGM. Insulin dose was reduced after teneligliptin administration. The median total daily insulin dose significantly reduced from 18 (9-24)U to 6 (0-14)U (p1). Maximum, mean, and standard deviation of blood glucose level on the hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis days did not change after teneligliptin administration. However, minimum blood glucose level was significantly elevated on the hemodialysis day after teneligliptin administration (from 3.9±1.0mmol/L to 4.4±0.9mmol/L, p=0.040). The incidence of asymptomatic hypoglycemia on the hemodialysis day detected by CGM significantly decreased from 38.1% to 19.0% (p=0.049). Teneligliptin may contribute toward reducing the total daily insulin dose and preventing hypoglycemic events on the hemodialysis day in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Insulin Increases Ceramide Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscle. Methods. Skeletal muscle cells were treated with insulin with or without palmitate for various time periods. Lipids (ceramides and TAG were isolated and gene expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes were quantified. Additionally, adult male mice received daily insulin injections for 14 days, followed by muscle ceramide analysis. Results. In muscle cells, insulin elicited an increase in ceramides comparable to palmitate alone. This is likely partly due to an insulin-induced increase in expression of multiple enzymes, particularly SPT2, which, when knocked down, prevented the increase in ceramides. In mice, 14 days of insulin injection resulted in increased soleus ceramides, but not TAG. However, insulin injections did significantly increase hepatic TAG compared with vehicle-injected animals. Conclusions. This study suggests that insulin elicits an anabolic effect on sphingolipid metabolism in skeletal muscle, resulting in increased ceramide accumulation. These findings reveal a potential mechanism of the deleterious consequences of the hyperinsulinemia that accompanies insulin resistance and suggest a possible novel therapeutic target to mitigate its effects.

  9. Prolactin effect on the insulin content of albino rats in different physiological states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, Y.M.; Abdel-Wahab, M.F.; El-Mougi, S.M.; El-Sayed, F.B.; Kuwait Univ.)

    1980-01-01

    The metabolic action of prolactin on insulin levels in plasma and pancreas has been studied. Prolactin was injected in a single dose or single daily doses on 4 successive days into albino rats in six different physiological states. Insulin was determined by radioimmunoassay using 125 I insulin. From the results it is concluded that prolactin injected i.p. influences the output of insulin and stimulates the pancreas to secrete insulin into the plasma. (author)

  10. Serum Insulin, Glucose, Indices of Insulin Resistance, and Risk of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argirion, Ilona; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius; Mondul, Alison M

    2017-10-01

    Background: Although insulin may increase the risk of some cancers, few studies have examined fasting serum insulin and lung cancer risk. Methods: We examined serum insulin, glucose, and indices of insulin resistance [insulin:glucose molar ratio and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and lung cancer risk using a case-cohort study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study of Finnish men. A total of 196 cases and 395 subcohort members were included. Insulin and glucose were measured in fasting serum collected 5 to 12 years before diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate the relative risk of lung cancer. Results: The average time between blood collection and lung cancer was 9.6 years. Fasting serum insulin levels were 8.7% higher in subcohort members than cases. After multivariable adjustment, men in the fourth quartile of insulin had a significantly higher risk of lung cancer than those in the first quartile [HR = 2.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.94]. A similar relationship was seen with HOMA-IR (HR = 1.83; 95% CI, 0.99-3.38). Risk was not strongly associated with glucose or the insulin:glucose molar ratio ( P trend = 0.55 and P trend = 0.27, respectively). Conclusions: Higher fasting serum insulin concentrations, as well as the presence of insulin resistance, appear to be associated with an elevated risk of lung cancer development. Impact: Although insulin is hypothesized to increase risk of some cancers, insulin and lung cancer remain understudied. Higher insulin levels and insulin resistance were associated with increased lung cancer risk. Although smoking cessation is the best method of lung cancer prevention, other lifestyle changes that affect insulin concentrations and sensitivity may reduce lung cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(10); 1519-24. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Oral insulin reloaded: a structured approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Eric; Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-05-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion's share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  12. Effect of Iranian Honey bee (Apis Mellifera Venom on Blood Glucose and Insulin in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyedeh Mahbubeh Mousavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is an important disease. This disease is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from perturbation in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Honey bee venom contains a wide range of polypeptide agents. The principle components of bee venom are mellitin and phospholipase A2. These components increase insulin secretion from the β-cells of pancreas. This study was conducted to show the hypoglycemic effect of honey bee venom on alloxan induced diabetic male rats.Methods: Eighteen adult male rats weighting 200±20 g were placed into 3 randomly groups: control, alloxan monohy­drate-induced diabetic rat and treated group that received honey bee venom daily before their nutrition for four months. Forty eight hours after the last injection, blood was collected from their heart, serum was dissented and blood glucose, insulin, triglyceride and total cholesterol were determined.Results: Glucose serum, triglyceride and total cholesterol level in treated group in comparison with diabetic group was significantly decreased (P< 0.01. On the other hand, using bee venom causes increase in insulin serum in com­parison with diabetic group (P< 0.05.Conclusion: Honeybee venom (apitoxin can be used as therapeutic option to lower blood glucose and lipids in dia­betic rats.

  13. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Kolkata cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Majumder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Kolkata, India. Results: A total of 576 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 417, insulin detemir (n = 70, insulin aspart (n = 55, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 19 and other insulin combinations (n = 15. At baseline, glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.6% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −1.3%, insulin users: −1.4%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  14. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Mumbai cohort of the A1chieve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwalkar, P G; Gupta, Vishal; Kovil, Rajiv

    2013-11-01

    The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Mumbai, India. A total of 2112 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 1561), insulin detemir (n = 313), insulin aspart (n = 144), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 53) and other insulin combinations (n = 41). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 8.7%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.2%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: -1.4%, insulin users: -1.8%). SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  15. The effect of functional insulin therapy on glycaemic parameters in children with diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štimjanin-Koldžo, Diana; Alajbegović, Salem; Štimjanin, Ena; Mehinagić, Jasmina

    2017-08-01

    Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a prospectively conducted interactive 5-day education programme based on Düsseldorf model on glycated haemoglobin (A1C), and total daily dose of insulin in type 1 diabetes patients. Methods A total of 67 type 1 diabetes patients was analysed; mean age of 11±0.68 years, 43 females and 24 males. The programme was led by a trained team of diabetes specialist doctors and nurses. All subjects and their parents completed a knowledge test about diabetes at beginning, and at the end of education, and after 12 months (30 questions). Subjects were evaluated for total daily insulin, and HbA1c at baseline, as well as 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the end of the education programme. Results Results of the knowledge test after the education have shown higher knowledge at baseline. At the end of the education programme an average of total daily insulin dose was significantly lower. There was a 3.17% reduction in HbA1c values over 9 months, and 1.8% over 12 months in the comparison to the baseline values (p1). Conclusions Structured education programme of functional insulin therapy was associated with improved glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes patients and their parents. It motivated patients and parents to improve glycaemic control. One year after the follow up, glycaemic control was worsening, due to lack of patients' motivation, therefore, there is a need for yearly re-education. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  16. Insulin Initiation in Insulin-Naïve Korean Type 2 Diabetic Patients Inadequately Controlled on Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Real-World Practice: The Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Modality of Insulin Treatment Evaluation (MOTIV study was performed to provide real-world data concerning insulin initiation in Korean type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs.MethodsThis multicenter, non-interventional, prospective, observational study enrolled T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] ≥7.0% who had been on OHAs for ≥3 months and were already decided to introduce basal insulin by their physician prior to the start of the study. All treatment decisions were at the physician's discretion to reflect real-world practice.ResultsA total of 9,196 patients were enrolled, and 8,636 patients were included in the analysis (mean duration of diabetes, 8.9 years; mean HbA1c, 9.2%. Basal insulin plus one OHA was the most frequently (51.0% used regimen. After 6 months of basal insulin treatment, HbA1c decreased to 7.4% and 44.5% of patients reached HbA1c <7%. Body weight increased from 65.2 kg to 65.5 kg, which was not significant. Meanwhile, there was significant increase in the mean daily insulin dose from 16.9 IU at baseline to 24.5 IU at month 6 (P<0.001. Overall, 17.6% of patients experienced at least one hypoglycemic event.ConclusionIn a real-world setting, the initiation of basal insulin is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in Korean patients with T2DM who are failing to meet targets with OHA therapy.

  17. A low-fat Diet improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, AM; Almdal, Thomas Peter; Viggers, Lone

    2006-01-01

    diet (P = 0.039). The daily protein and carbohydrate intake increased (+4.4% of total energy intake, P = 0.0049 and +2.5%, P = 0.34, respectively), while alcohol intake decreased (-3.2% of total energy intake, P = 0.02). There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity on the isocaloric, low-fat......AIMS: To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Thirteen Type 1 patients were...... by the insulin clamp technique at baseline and after each of the diet intervention periods. RESULTS: On an isocaloric low-fat diet, Type 1 diabetic patients significantly reduced the proportion of fat in the total daily energy intake by 12.1% (or -3.6% of total energy) as compared with a conventional diabetes...

  18. Novel simple insulin delivery device reduces barriers to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes: results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C; Mader, Julia K; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R

    2015-05-01

    The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. This single-center, open-label, single-arm study comprised three 2-week periods: baseline (MDI), transition from MDI to PaQ, and PaQ treatment. Validated questionnaires were administered during the baseline and PaQ treatment periods: Barriers to Insulin Treatment questionnaire (BIT), Insulin Treatment Appraisal Scale (ITAS), and Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID). Eighteen patients (age 59 ± 5 years, diabetes duration 15 ± 7 years, 21% female, HbA1c 7.7 ± 0.7%) completed the questionnaires. There was a strong, significant effect of PaQ use in mean BIT total scores (difference [D] = -5.4 ± 0.7.7, P = .01, effect size [d] = 0.70). Patients perceived less stigmatization by insulin injection (D = -2.2 ± 6.2, P = .18, d = 0.35), increased positive outcome (D = 1.9 ± 6.6, P = .17, d = 0.29), and less fear of injections (1.3 ± 4.8, P = .55, d = 0.28). Mean change in ITAS scores after PaQ device use showed a nonsignificant improvement of 1.71 ± 5.63 but moderate effect size (d = 0.30, P = .14). No increase in PAID scores was seen. The results and moderate to large effects sizes suggest that PaQ device use has beneficial and clinically relevant effects to overcoming barriers to and negative appraisal of insulin treatment, without increasing other diabetes-related distress. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  20. Role of sialic acid in insulin action and the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salhanick, A.I.; Amatruda, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Adipocytes treated with neuraminidase show markedly reduced responsiveness to insulin without any alteration in insulin binding. In addition, several studies have separately demonstrated both insulin resistance and decreases in membrane sialic acid content and associated biosynthetic enzymes in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the authors investigated the role that sialic acid residues may play in insulin action and in the hepatic insulin resistance associated with nonketotic diabetes. Primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats treated with neuraminidase demonstrated a dose-dependent decrease in insulin-stimulated lipogenesis. At a concentration of neuraminidase that decreases insulin action by 50%, 23% of total cellular sialic acid content was released. Neuraminidase-releasable sialic acid was significantly decreased in hepatocytes from diabetic rats and this was associated with significant insulin resistance. Treatment of hepatocytes from diabetic rats with cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NANA) enhanced insulin responsiveness 39%. The enhanced insulin responsiveness induced by CMP-NANA was blocked by cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) suggesting that the CMP-NANA effect was catalyzed by a cell surface sialyl-transferase. CMP reduced neuraminidase-releasable [ 14 C]sialic acid incorporation into hepatocytes by 43%. The data demonstrate a role for cell surface sialic acid residues in hepatic insulin action and support a role for decreased cell surface sialic acid residues in the insulin resistance of diabetes mellitus

  1. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ting Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin antibodies (IA associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%, high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly.

  2. Radiation in daily life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Rodriguez, P.

    1999-01-01

    The medical community benefits on a daily basis from the ionizing radiations used in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The doses received in the medical field are only a small fraction of the total radiation received in a year. This bibliographic review has several objectives. The first one is to present the different components of natural radiation (background radiation). Secondly, it will introduce many consumer products that contain radioactive sources and expose our bodies. Third, arguments to diminish the radiation phobia will be presented and finally an easy to understand dosimetric magnitude will be introduced for the physician, the technologist and the patient. (author) [es

  3. Sweet taste of saccharin induces weight gain without increasing caloric intake, not related to insulin-resistance in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Melo Batista, Bruna Aparecida; Neves, Alice Magagnin; de Matos Feijó, Fernanda; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Marques Ribeiro, Maria Flávia; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that saccharin can induce weight gain when compared with sucrose in Wistar rats despite similar total caloric intake. We now question whether it could be due to the sweet taste of saccharin per se. We also aimed to address if this weight gain is associated with insulin-resistance and to increases in gut peptides such as leptin and PYY in the fasting state. In a 14 week experiment, 16 male Wistar rats received either saccharin-sweetened yogurt or non-sweetened yogurt daily in addition to chow and water ad lib. We measured daily food intake and weight gain weekly. At the end of the experiment, we evaluated fasting leptin, glucose, insulin, PYY and determined insulin resistance through HOMA-IR. Cumulative weight gain and food intake were evaluated through linear mixed models. Results showed that saccharin induced greater weight gain when compared with non-sweetened control (p = 0.027) despite a similar total caloric intake. There were no differences in HOMA-IR, fasting leptin or PYY levels between groups. We conclude that saccharin sweet taste can induce mild weight gain in Wistar rats without increasing total caloric intake. This weight gain was not related with insulin-resistance nor changes in fasting leptin or PYY in Wistar rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  5. Aplicação do método da carga máxima total diária (CMTD para a amônia no Rio Atibaia, região de Campinas/Paulínia - SP Application of ammonia total maximum daily load (TMDL to Atibaia River, Campinas/Paulínia region - São Paulo state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Silvério da Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo foram avaliadas a capacidade de suporte e o estado de degradação do Rio Atibaia, considerando a ameaça para a vida aquática pela presença da Amônia, a qual representa um dos principais riscos às comunidades aquáticas no Rio Atibaia. Com este objetivo foi aplicado o método da Carga Máxima Total Diária (CMTD, da Agência de Proteção Ambiental dos Estados Unidos (EPA. Os resultados revelaram que as cargas de Amônia aumentavam progressivamente ao longo do Rio Atibaia, principalmente devido às fontes pontuais. As cargas de Amônia diárias assumiram valores de 30 a 5000 kg NH3. A capacidade de suporte das águas Rio Atibaia, para proteger a vida aquática contra os efeitos tóxicos da Amônia, tem sido violadas em trechos próximos à sua foz. A degradação dessas águas foi mais intensa na estação seca. Este trabalho mostrou que o esgoto doméstico não-tratado de uma população aproximada de 250 mil habitantes da cidade de Campinas, via Ribeirão Anhumas, é a principal fonte de Amônia na bacia do Rio Atibaia, apesar do grande número de indústrias ali presentes.This study evaluated the tolerance capacity and the impairment state of the Atibaia River, considering the threat to aquatic life by the presence of Ammonia, which represents one of the main risks to the aquatic communities in the Atibaia River. With this aim, the method Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL, from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, was applied. The results revealed that the Ammonia loads increased progressively through the Atibaia River, especially due to the point sources. The daily Ammonia loads assumed values that ranged from 30 to 5000 kg NH3. The tolerance capacity of the waters of the Atibaia River, to protect aquatic life against the toxic effects of the Ammonia, has been violated in reaches near its mouth. The impairment of these waters was more intense during the dry season. This study showed that the domestic sewer

  6. Depressive symptoms, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the RISC cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, M; Pouwer, F; De Jonge, P

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk (RISC) study. Presence of significant depressive symptoms was defined as a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score ≥ 16. Standard oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed with the oral glucose insulin......AIM: This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. METHODS: The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin...... sensitivity (OGIS) index. Insulin secretion was estimated using three model-based parameters of insulin secretion (beta-cell glucose sensitivity, the potentiation factor ratio, and beta-cell rate sensitivity). RESULTS: A total of 162 out of 1027 participants (16%) had significant depressive symptoms. Having...

  7. Associations between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriaanse, M C; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G

    2006-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The association between depression and insulin resistance has been investigated in only a few studies, with contradictory results reported. The aim of this study was to determine whether the association between symptoms of depression and insulin resistance varies across glucose...... established type 2 diabetes mellitus. Main outcome measures were insulin resistance defined by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and symptoms of depression using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). RESULTS: In the total sample, we found a weak.......942). The association between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance was similar for men and women. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We found only weak associations between depressive symptoms and insulin resistance, which did not differ among different glucose metabolism subgroups or between men and women....

  8. [Effect of oral administration of ascorbic acid on insulin sensitivity and lipid profile in obese individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abundis, E; Pascoe-González, S; González-Ortiz, M; Mora-Martínez, J M; Cabrera-Pivaral, C E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the effect of an oral ascorbic acid (AA) supplement on lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in obese people. A randomized double-blind clinical trial placebo controlled was performed in 16 obese male volunteers [body mass index (BMI) 30-40 kg/m2]. Eight received orally 1 g of AA daily for four weeks and the other eight volunteers received placebo by the same scheme and period of time. Before and after the pharmacological intervention were measured total cholesterol, high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, creatinine and uric acid. Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) triglycerides were calculated using formulas. In order to assess insulin sensitivity before and after the intervention, the steady-state glucose (SSG) was calculated from the insulin suppression test modified with octreotide. There were not significant differences in clinical characteristics between both groups. Basal metabolic profile and SSG were similar between both groups. There were not significant differences in both groups between before and after the intervention in metabolic profile and insulin sensitivity. AA did not modify the lipid profile nor insulin sensitivity in the group of obese people studied.

  9. Skeletal muscle and hepatic insulin signaling is maintained in heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, G; Cole, L C; Zhao, L D; Skrzypek, M V; Sanders, S R; Rhoads, M L; Baumgard, L H; Rhoads, R P

    2016-05-01

    Multiparous cows (n=12; parity=2; 136±8 d in milk, 560±32kg of body weight) housed in climate-controlled chambers were fed a total mixed ration (TMR) consisting primarily of alfalfa hay and steam-flaked corn. During the first experimental period (P1), all 12 cows were housed in thermoneutral conditions (18°C, 20% humidity) with ad libitum intake for 9 d. During the second experimental period (P2), half of the cows were fed for ad libitum intake and subjected to heat-stress conditions [WFHS, n=6; cyclical temperature 31.1 to 38.9°C, 20% humidity: minimum temperature humidity index (THI)=73, maximum THI=80.5], and half of the cows were pair-fed to match the intake of WFHS cows in thermal neutral conditions (TNPF, n=6) for 9 d. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were measured thrice daily at 0430, 1200, and 1630 h. To evaluate muscle and liver insulin responsiveness, biopsies were obtained immediately before and after an insulin tolerance test on the last day of each period. Insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), AKT/protein kinase B (AKT), and phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) were measured by Western blot analyses for both tissues. During P2, WFHS increased rectal temperature and respiration rate by 1.48°C and 2.4-fold, respectively. Heat stress reduced dry matter intake by 8kg/d and, by design, TNPF cows had similar intake reductions. Milk yield was decreased similarly (30%) in WFHS and TNPF cows, and both groups entered into a similar (-4.5 Mcal/d) calculated negative energy balance during P2. Insulin infusion caused a less rapid glucose disposal in P2 compared with P1, but glucose clearance did not differ between environments in P2. In liver, insulin increased p-AKT protein content in each period. Phosphorylation ratio of AKT increased 120% in each period after insulin infusion. In skeletal muscle, protein abundance of the IR, IRS, and AKT remained stable between periods and environment. Insulin increased skeletal muscle p-AKT in each

  10. Enhanced escape of non-esterified fatty acids from tissue uptake : its role in impaired insulin-induced lowering of total rate of appearance in obesity and Type II diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, SC; Sluiter, WJ; Dullaart, RPF

    Aims/hypothesis. To estimate non-esterified fatty acids kinetics in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and obese subjects in the postabsorptive state and during hyperinsulinaemia using non-equlibrium tracer conditions. Methods. We evaluated the effect of

  11. Evaluation of the effect of metformin and insulin in hyperglycemia treatment after coronary artery bypass surgery in nondiabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Ghods

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Insulin therapy is the most commonly used treatment for controlling hyperglycemia after coronary artery bypass surgery in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Metformin has been indicated for critically ill patients as an alternate for the treatment of hyperglycemia. This study evaluated the effect of metformin and insulin in hyperglycemia treatment after coronary artery bypass surgery in nondiabetic patients. Settings and Design: This study was a clinical trial comprising nondiabetic patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery. Patients were randomly divided into the insulin group and the metformin group. Methods: Patients in the insulin group received continuous infusion of insulin while those in the metformin group received 500 mg metformin tablets twice daily. All the patients were followed up for 3 days after stabilization of blood glucose levels. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: This study included a total of 56 patients. During the study period, the mean blood glucose levels decreased from 225.24 to 112.36 mg/dl (↓112.88 mg/dl in the insulin group and from 221.80 to 121.92 mg/dl in the metformin group (↓99.88 mg/dl. There was no significant difference in the blood glucose levels of the patients between the two groups at any measurement times (P > 0.05. Conclusion: Using 500 mg metformin twice daily is similar to using insulin in nondiabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Therefore, the use of metformin can be considered as a treatment strategy for controlling hyperglycemia in this group of patients.

  12. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  13. Insulin requirements in non-critically ill hospitalized patients with diabetes and steroid-induced hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanakis, Elias K; Shah, Nina; Malhotra, Keya; Kemmerer, Terri; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2014-04-01

    Steroid-induced hyperglycemia is common in hospitalized patients with diabetes mellitus. Guidelines for glucose management in this setting are lacking. We conducted a retrospective chart review of non-critically ill patients with diabetes receiving steroids, hospitalized from January 2009 to October 2012. Fifty-eight patients were identified from 247 consults. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess median daily insulin requirements of normoglycemic patients compared with hyperglycemic patients. Of the 58 total patients included in our study, 20 achieved normoglycemia during admission (patient-day weighted mean blood glucose [PDWMBG] level = 154 ± 16 mg/dL) and 38 remained hyperglycemic (PDWMBG level = 243 ± 39 mg/dL; P < 0.001). There were no differences between the 2 patient groups in age, sex, race, body weight, renal function, HbA1c level, glucose-altering medications, diabetes type, or disease duration. Following multivariable adjustment, compared with hyperglycemic patients, normoglycemic patients required similar units of basal insulin (median interquartile range [IQR])(23.6 [17.9, 31.2] vs 20.1 [16.5, 24.4]; P = 0.35); higher units of nutritional insulin (45.5 [34.2, 60.4] vs 20.1 [16.4, 24.5]; P < 0.001]; and lower units of correctional insulin (5.8 [4.1, 8.1] vs 13.0 [10.2, 16.5]; P < 0.001]). Patients achieving normoglycemia required a significantly lower percentage of correction insulin (total daily dose [TDD]: 7.4% vs 23.4%; P < 0.001) and a higher percentage of nutritional insulin (TDD: 58.1% vs 36.2%; P <0.001) than hyperglycemic patients. There was no difference in the TDD per kilogram, TDD per milligram hydrocortisone dose, or TDD per milligram hydrocortisone dose per kilogram weight between the 2 groups. The data suggest that non-critically ill patients with hyperglycemia receiving steroids require a higher percentage of TDD insulin therapy as nutritional insulin to achieve normoglycemia.

  14. Consumption of Fresh Yellow Onion Ameliorates Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance in Breast Cancer Patients During Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarpour-Sadegh, Farnaz; Montazeri, Vahid; Adili, Ali; Esfehani, Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza; Pirouzpanah, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    Doxorubicin has been found to be associated with insulin resistance in animal models. Onion, a so-called functional food, is noted to affect the insulin signaling pathway of diabetes in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects of consuming fresh yellow onions on insulin-related indices compared with a low-onion-containing diet among breast cancer (BC) patients treated with doxorubicin. This parallel-design, randomized, triple-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted on 56 eligible BC patients (aged 30-63 years), diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Following their second cycle of chemotherapy, subjects were assigned in a stratified-random allocation to receive body mass index-dependent 100 to 160 g/d of onion as high onion group (HO; n = 28) or 30 to 40 g/d small onions in low onion group (LO; n = 28) for 8 weeks intervention. Participants, care givers, and those who assessed laboratory analyses were blinded to the assignments (IRCT Registry No.: IRCT2012103111335N1). The compliance level of participants in the analysis was as high as 87.85%. A total of 23 available cases was analyzed in each group. The daily use of HO resulted in a significant decrease in serum fasting blood glucose and insulin levels in comparison with LO, over the period of study ( P insulin resistance relative to changes in the LO group ( P insulin sensitivity check index ( P insulin resistance in BC during doxorubicin-based chemotherapy.

  15. Metformin versus Insulin in the Management of Pre-Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyuo, Titus; Obed, Samuel Amenyi; Adjepong-Yamoah, Kenneth Kweku; Bugyei, Kwasi Agyei; Oppong, Samuel Antwi; Marfoh, Kissinger

    2015-01-01

    To determine if metformin monotherapy or metformin in combination with insulin is equally effective as insulin monotherapy at glycemic control in diabetes mellitus in pregnancy among Ghanaians. This was a study involving 104 pregnant women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) at 20-30 weeks gestation. Participants were randomized into metformin and insulin treatment groups. Starting dose of metformin was 500 mg once a day and increased gradually over two (2) weeks, to meet glycemic targets. Insulin was added if targets could not be reached on metformin alone at maximum doses. Total daily dose of premixed insulin at initiation was calculated as 0.3 IU/kg body weight and titrated upwards to achieve glycemic control. Glycemic profile monitoring was done every two weeks. The two hour post prandial blood glucose (2HPG) levels were significantly lower in the metformin group than the insulin group (p= 0.004). The findings of this study suggest that metformin monotherapy is effective in achieving glycemic targets in the management of diabetes in pregnancy. It is more effective than insulin in lowering the 2HPG level. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12614000942651.

  16. Metformin versus Insulin in the Management of Pre-Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Beyuo

    Full Text Available To determine if metformin monotherapy or metformin in combination with insulin is equally effective as insulin monotherapy at glycemic control in diabetes mellitus in pregnancy among Ghanaians.This was a study involving 104 pregnant women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM or gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM at 20-30 weeks gestation. Participants were randomized into metformin and insulin treatment groups. Starting dose of metformin was 500 mg once a day and increased gradually over two (2 weeks, to meet glycemic targets. Insulin was added if targets could not be reached on metformin alone at maximum doses. Total daily dose of premixed insulin at initiation was calculated as 0.3 IU/kg body weight and titrated upwards to achieve glycemic control. Glycemic profile monitoring was done every two weeks.The two hour post prandial blood glucose (2HPG levels were significantly lower in the metformin group than the insulin group (p= 0.004.The findings of this study suggest that metformin monotherapy is effective in achieving glycemic targets in the management of diabetes in pregnancy. It is more effective than insulin in lowering the 2HPG level.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR ACTRN12614000942651.

  17. Insulin secretion and glucose uptake by isolated islets of the hamster. Effect of insulin, proinsulin and C-peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, J C; McLaughlin, W J; Walsh, M F.J.; Foa, P P [Sinai Hospital of Detroit, Mich. (USA). Dept. of Research

    1976-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic islets of normal hamsters were perfused either in a closed or in a open system. When the buffer was recirculated and the endogenous insulin was allowed to accumulate, the islets secreted significantly less insulin than when the system was open and the endogenous insulin was washed away. The addition of monocomponent insulin or of proinsulin to the perfusion buffer significantly decreased insulin secretion. The inhibitory action of proinsulin was significantly greater than that of monocomponent insulin. C peptide had no effect. When pancreatic islets were incubated in a fixed volume of stationary buffer containing unlabeled glucose (1.0 mg or 3.0 mg/ml) and glucose-U-/sup 14/C (1.0 ..mu..C/ml), the amount of insulin secreted and the /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ produced by each islet decreased progressively as the number of islets in the sample increased. Under these conditions, the concentration of insulin required to inhibit insulin secretion increased with the concentration of glucose in the medium. Proinsulin did not alter the incorporation of leucine-4.5-/sup 3/H into total extractable insulin (insulin + proinsulin). Thus, insulin and proinsulin appear to inhibit insulin release, but not insulin synthesis.

  18. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Rajasthan cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Rajasthan, India. Results: A total of 477 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 340, insulin detemir (n = 90, insulin aspart (n = 37, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 7 and other insulin combinations (n = 2. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 8.3% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 8.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −0.9%, insulin users: −1.2%. Major hypoglycaemic events decreased from 0.5 events/patient-year to 0.0 events/patient-year in insulin naïve group while no change from baseline (1.3 events/patients-year was observed for insulin users. SADRs were not reported in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  19. Total pancreatectomy and islet autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David E R; Radosevich, David M; Bellin, Melena D; Hering, Bernard J; Beilman, Gregory J; Dunn, Ty B; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Vickers, Selwyn M; Bland, Barbara; Balamurugan, A N; Freeman, Martin L; Pruett, Timothy L

    2012-04-01

    Total pancreatectomy (TP) with intraportal islet autotransplantation (IAT) can relieve pain and preserve β-cell mass in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) when other therapies fail. We report on a >30-year single-center series. Four hundred and nine patients (including 53 children, 5 to 18 years) with CP underwent TP-IAT from February 1977 to September 2011 (etiology: idiopathic, 41%; Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction/biliary, 9%; genetic, 14%; divisum, 17%; alcohol, 7%; and other, 12%; mean age was 35.3 years, 74% were female; 21% has earlier operations, including 9% Puestow procedure, 6% Whipple, 7% distal pancreatectomy, and 2% other). Islet function was classified as insulin independent for those on no insulin; partial, if known C-peptide positive or euglycemic on once-daily insulin; and insulin dependent if on standard basal-bolus diabetic regimen. A 36-item Short Form (SF-36) survey for quality of life was completed by patients before and in serial follow-up since 2007, with an integrated survey that was added in 2008. Actuarial patient survival post TP-IAT was 96% in adults and 98% in children (1 year) and 89% and 98% (5 years). Complications requiring relaparotomy occurred in 15.9% and bleeding (9.5%) was the most common complication. IAT function was achieved in 90% (C-peptide >0.6 ng/mL). At 3 years, 30% were insulin independent (25% in adults, 55% in children) and 33% had partial function. Mean hemoglobin A1c was 5,000/kg [24%]) correlated with degree of function with insulin-independent rates at 3 years of 12%, 22%, and 72%, and rates of partial function 33%, 62%, and 24%. All patients had pain before TP-IAT and nearly all were on daily narcotics. After TP-IAT, 85% had pain improvement. By 2 years, 59% had ceased narcotics. All children were on narcotics before, 39% at follow-up; pain improved in 94%; and 67% became pain-free. In the SF-36 survey, there was significant improvement from baseline in all dimensions, including the Physical and Mental

  20. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  1. Cancer risk among insulin users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    But, Anna; De Bruin, Marie L.; Bazelier, Marloes T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between use of certain insulins and risk for cancer, when addressing the limitations and biases involved in previous studies. Methods: National Health Registries from Denmark (1996–2010), Finland (1996–2011), Norway (2005......–2010) and Sweden (2007–2012) and the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database (1987–2013) were used to conduct a cohort study on new insulin users (N = 327,112). By using a common data model and semi-aggregate approach, we pooled individual-level records from five cohorts and applied Poisson regression...... models. For each of ten cancer sites studied, we estimated the rate ratios (RRs) by duration (≤0.5, 0.5–1, 1–2, 2–3, 3–4, 4–5, 5–6 and >6 years) of cumulative exposure to insulin glargine or insulin detemir relative to that of human insulin. Results: A total of 21,390 cancer cases occurred during a mean...

  2. Clinical experience with insulin detemir type 2 diabetes mellitus, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Rabat-Sale-Zemmour-Zaer Region cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmjid Chraibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66 726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Rabat-Sale-Zemmour-Zaer region, Morocco. Results: A total of 424 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 177, insulin detemir (n = 150, insulin aspart (n = 11, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 45 and other insulin combinations (n = 41. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.1% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.4% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, all the study groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.5%, insulin users: −1.8%. Major hypoglycaemia was observed in the insulin user group after 24 weeks (0.1 events/patient-year. SADRs were reported in 0.5% of insulin users. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  3. Clinical experience with insulin detemir type 2 diabetes mellitus, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Rabat-Sale-Zemmour-Zaer Region cohort of the A1chieve study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chraibi, Abdelmjid; Belmejdoub, Ghizlane

    2013-11-01

    The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66 726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Rabat-Sale-Zemmour-Zaer region, Morocco. A total of 424 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 177), insulin detemir (n = 150), insulin aspart (n = 11), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 45) and other insulin combinations (n = 41). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 10.1%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.4%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, all the study groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: -2.5%, insulin users: -1.8%). Major hypoglycaemia was observed in the insulin user group after 24 weeks (0.1 events/patient-year). SADRs were reported in 0.5% of insulin users. Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  4. rDNA insulin glargine U300 – a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fei Wang,1 Stefanie Zassman,1 Philip A Goldberg2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Background: As the first once-daily basal insulin analog, insulin glargine 100 U/mL (Gla‑100; Lantus® rapidly evolved into the most commonly prescribed insulin therapy worldwide. However, this insulin has clinical limitations. The approval of new basal insulin analogs in 2015 has already started to alter the prescribing landscape.Objective: To review the available evidence on the clinical efficacy and safety of a more concentrated insulin glargine (recombinant DNA origin injection 300 U/mL (Gla-300 compared to insulin Gla-100 in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM.Methods: The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed and MEDLINE (using Ovid platform, Scopus, BIOSIS, and Google Scholar through June 2016. Conference proceedings of the American Diabetes Association (2015–2016 were reviewed. We also manually searched reference lists of pertinent reviews and trials.Results: A total of 6 pivotal Phase III randomized controlled trials known as the EDITION series were reviewed. All of these trials (n=3,500 were head-to-head comparisons evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of Gla-300 vs Gla-100 in a diverse population with T1DM and T2DM. These trials were of 6 months duration with a 6-month safety extension phase.Conclusion: Gla-300 was as effective as Gla-100 for improving glycemic control over 6 months in all studies, with a lower risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia significant only in insulin-experienced patients with T2DM. Overall, patients on Gla-300 required 10%–18% more basal insulin, but with less weight gain compared with Gla-100. Keywords: basal insulin, glargine 300 U/mL, glargine 100 U/mL

  5. Novel Simple Insulin Delivery Device Reduces Barriers to Insulin Therapy in Type 2 Diabetes: Results From a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hermanns, Norbert; Lilly, Leslie C.; Mader, Julia K.; Aberer, Felix; Ribitsch, Anja; Kojzar, Harald; Warner, Jay; Pieber, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The PaQ® insulin delivery system is a simple-to-use patch-on device that provides preset basal rates and bolus insulin on demand. In addition to feasibility of use, safety, and efficacy (reported elsewhere), this study analyzed the impact of PaQ on patient-reported outcomes, including barriers to insulin treatment, diabetes-related distress, and attitudes toward insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes on a stable multiple daily injection (MDI) regimen. Methods: This singl...

  6. Effects of combined calcium and vitamin D supplementation on insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in multi-ethnic vitamin D-deficient adults at risk for type 2 diabetes: a pilot randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gagnon

    Full Text Available To examine whether combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation improves insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, β-cell function, inflammation and metabolic markers.6-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial.Ninety-five adults with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] ≤55 nmol/L at risk of type 2 diabetes (with prediabetes or an AUSDRISK score ≥15 were randomized. Analyses included participants who completed the baseline and final visits (treatment n = 35; placebo n = 45.Daily calcium carbonate (1,200 mg and cholecalciferol [2,000-6,000 IU to target 25(OHD >75 nmol/L] or matching placebos for 6 months.Insulin sensitivity (HOMA2%S, Matsuda index, insulin secretion (insulinogenic index, area under the curve (AUC for C-peptide and β-cell function (Matsuda index x AUC for C-peptide derived from a 75 g 2-h OGTT; anthropometry; blood pressure; lipid profile; hs-CRP; TNF-α; IL-6; adiponectin; total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin.Participants were middle-aged adults (mean age 54 years; 69% Europid at risk of type 2 diabetes (48% with prediabetes. Compliance was >80% for calcium and vitamin D. Mean serum 25(OHD concentration increased from 48 to 95 nmol/L in the treatment group (91% achieved >75 nmol/L, but remained unchanged in controls. There were no significant changes in insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and β-cell function, or in inflammatory and metabolic markers between or within the groups, before or after adjustment for potential confounders including waist circumference and season of recruitment. In a post hoc analysis restricted to participants with prediabetes, a significant beneficial effect of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on insulin sensitivity (HOMA%S and Matsuda was observed.Daily vitamin D and calcium supplementation for 6 months may not change OGTT-derived measures of insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and β-cell function in multi-ethnic adults with low vitamin D status at risk of type 2 diabetes

  7. Managing Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duchenne / Managing Daily Life Print Email Managing Daily Life Environmental accessibility As the person with Duchenne starts ... such as wider doorways and ramps, can make life easier once the person with Duchenne cannot climb ...

  8. Daily Weather Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These daily weather records were compiled from a subset of stations in the Global Historical Climatological Network (GHCN)-Daily dataset. A weather record is...

  9. Giving an insulin injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hand. The bubbles will float to the top. Push the bubbles back into the insulin bottle, then pull back to ... hand. The bubbles will float to the top. Push the bubbles back into the insulin bottle, then pull back to ...

  10. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Baby is Born Monogenic Diabetes Insulin Resistance & Prediabetes Insulin resistance and prediabetes occur when your body ... will stay in the healthy range. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes means your blood glucose levels are higher ...

  11. Effects of aspartame-, monk fruit-, stevia- and sucrose-sweetened beverages on postprandial glucose, insulin and energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, S L; Salleh, N B; Henry, J; Forde, C G

    2017-03-01

    Substituting sweeteners with non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) may aid in glycaemic control and body weight management. Limited studies have investigated energy compensation, glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to artificial and natural NNS. This study compared the effects of consuming NNS (artificial versus natural) and sucrose (65 g) on energy intake, blood glucose and insulin responses. Thirty healthy male subjects took part in this randomised, crossover study with four treatments: aspartame-, monk fruit-, stevia- and sucrose-sweetened beverages. On each test day, participants were asked to consume a standardised breakfast in the morning, and they were provided with test beverage as a preload in mid-morning and ad libitum lunch was provided an hour after test beverage consumption. Blood glucose and insulin concentrations were measured every 15 min within the first hour of preload consumption and every 30 min for the subsequent 2 h. Participants left the study site 3 h after preload consumption and completed a food diary for the rest of the day. Ad libitum lunch intake was significantly higher for the NNS treatments compared with sucrose (P=0.010). The energy 'saved' from replacing sucrose with NNS was fully compensated for at subsequent meals; hence, no difference in total daily energy intake was found between the treatments (P=0.831). The sucrose-sweetened beverage led to large spikes in blood glucose and insulin responses within the first hour, whereas these responses were higher for all three NNS beverages following the test lunch. Thus, there were no differences in total area under the curve (AUC) for glucose (P=0.960) and insulin (P=0.216) over 3 h between the four test beverages. The consumption of calorie-free beverages sweetened with artificial and natural NNS have minimal influences on total daily energy intake, postprandial glucose and insulin compared with a sucrose-sweetened beverage.

  12. Classifying insulin regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied. Despite clear recommendations for insulin management in children and adolescents with type 1...

  13. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  14. Effects of the daily consumption of protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt on the total protein intake in older adults in a rehabilitation centre: A single blind randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Til, A.J.; Naumann, E.; Cox-Claessens, I.J.H.M.; Kremer, S.; Boelsma, E.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of protein enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, substituting regular products, on the total protein intake and the distribution of protein intake over the day in older adults.Design: A single blind randomised controlled trial.Setting: Rehabilitation

  15. Effect of the daily consumption of protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt on the total protein intake in older adults in a rehabilitation centre: a single blind randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Til, van A.J.; Naumann, E.; Cox-Claessens, I.J.H.M.; Kremer, S.; Boelsma, E.; Schueren, van der D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of protein enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, substituting regular products, on the total protein intake and the distribution of protein intake over the day in older adults. Design A single blind randomised controlled trial. Setting Rehabilitation centre.

  16. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Jianwei, E-mail: wangjianwei1968@gmail.com [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Gu, Tieguang [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia); Yamahara, Johji [Pharmafood Institute, Kyoto 602-8136 (Japan); Li, Yuhao, E-mail: yuhao@sitcm.edu.au [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  17. Oleanolic acid supplement attenuates liquid fructose-induced adipose tissue insulin resistance through the insulin receptor substrate-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Jianwei; Gu, Tieguang; Yamahara, Johji; Li, Yuhao

    2014-01-01

    Oleanolic acid, a triterpenoid contained in more than 1620 plants including various fruits and foodstuffs, has numerous metabolic effects, such as hepatoprotection. However, its underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Adipose tissue insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) may contribute to the development and progress of metabolic abnormalities through release of excessive free fatty acids from adipose tissue. This study investigated the effect of oleanolic acid on Adipo-IR. The results showed that supplement with oleanolic acid (25 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 10 weeks attenuated liquid fructose-induced increase in plasma insulin concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in rats. Simultaneously, oleanolic acid reversed the increase in the Adipo-IR index and plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations during the oral glucose tolerance test assessment. In white adipose tissue, oleanolic acid enhanced mRNA expression of the genes encoding insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. At the protein level, oleanolic acid upregulated total IRS-1 expression, suppressed the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 at serine-307, and restored the increased phosphorylated IRS-1 to total IRS-1 ratio. In contrast, phosphorylated Akt to total Akt ratio was increased. Furthermore, oleanolic acid reversed fructose-induced decrease in phosphorylated-Akt/Akt protein to plasma insulin concentration ratio. However, oleanolic acid did not affect IRS-2 mRNA expression. Therefore, these results suggest that oleanolic acid supplement ameliorates fructose-induced Adipo-IR in rats via the IRS-1/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms of metabolic actions of oleanolic acid. - Highlights: • Adipose insulin resistance (Adipo-IR) contributes to metabolic abnormalities. • We investigated the effect of oleanolic acid (OA) on adipo-IR in

  18. Insulin structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Langkjoer, L

    1993-01-01

    Insulin is composed of 51 amino acids in two peptide chains (A and B) linked by two disulfide bonds. The three-dimensional structure of the insulin molecule (insulin monomer), essentially the same in solution and in solid phase, exists in two main conformations. These differ in the extent of helix in the B chain which is governed by the presence of phenol or its derivatives. In acid and neutral solutions, in concentrations relevant for pharmaceutical formulation, the insulin monomer assembles to dimers and at neutral pH, in the presence of zinc ions, further to hexamers. Many crystalline modifications of insulin have been identified but only those with the hexamer as the basic unit are utilized in preparations for therapy. The insulin hexamer forms a relatively stable unit but some flexibility remains within the individual molecules. The intrinsic flexibility at the ends of the B chain plays an important role in governing the physical and chemical stability of insulin. A variety of chemical changes of the primary structure (yielding insulin derivatives), and physical modifications of the secondary to quaternary structures (resulting in "denaturation," aggregation, and precipitation) are known to affect insulin and insulin preparations during storage and use (Fig. 8). The tendency of insulin to undergo structural transformation resulting in aggregation and formation of insoluble insulin fibrils has been one of the most intriguing and widely studied phenomena in relation to insulin stability. Although the exact mechanism of fibril formation is still obscure, it is now clear that the initial step is an exposure of certain hydrophobic residues, normally buried in the three-dimensional structure, to the surface of the insulin monomer. This requires displacement of the COOH-terminal B-chain residues from their normal position which can only be accomplished via monomerization of the insulin. Therefore, most methods stabilizing insulin against fibrillation share the

  19. Evaluation of current trends and recent development in insulin therapy for management of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad Sarfraz; Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Rehman, Asim Ur; Rashid, Haroon Ur; Mahmood, Sajid; Khan, Shahzeb; Farrukh, Muhammad Junaid

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem in developing countries. There are various insulin therapies to manage diabetes mellitus. This systematic review evaluates various insulin therapies for management of diabetes mellitus worldwide. This review also focuses on recent developments being explored for better management of diabetes mellitus. We reviewed a number of published articles from 2002 to 2016 to find out the appropriate management of diabetes mellitus. The paramount parameters of the selected studies include the insulin type & its dose, type of diabetes, duration and comparison of different insulin protocols. In addition, various newly developed approaches for insulin delivery with potential output have also been evaluated. A great variability was observed in managing diabetes mellitus through insulin therapy and the important controlling factors found for this therapy include; dose titration, duration of insulin use, type of insulin used and combination therapy of different insulin. A range of research articles on current trends and recent advances in insulin has been summarized, which led us to the conclusion that multiple daily insulin injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pump) is the best method to manage diabetes mellitus. In future perspectives, development of the oral and inhalant insulin would be a tremendous breakthrough in Insulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intensive insulin therapy improves insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in severely burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Mlcak, Ronald P; Qian, Ting; Chinkes, David L; Herndon, David N

    2010-06-01

    To institute intensive insulin therapy protocol in an acute pediatric burn unit and study the mechanisms underlying its benefits. Prospective, randomized study. An acute pediatric burn unit in a tertiary teaching hospital. Children, 4-18 yrs old, with total body surface area burned > or =40% and who arrived within 1 wk after injury were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized to one of two groups. Intensive insulin therapy maintained blood glucose levels between 80 and 110 mg/dL. Conventional insulin therapy maintained blood glucose patients were included in the data analysis consisting of resting energy expenditure, whole body and liver insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Studies were performed at 7 days postburn (pretreatment) and at 21 days postburn (posttreatment). Resting energy expenditure significantly increased posttreatment (1476 +/- 124 to 1925 +/- 291 kcal/m(2) x day; p = .02) in conventional insulin therapy as compared with a decline in intensive insulin therapy. Glucose infusion rate was identical between groups before treatment (6.0 +/- 0.8 conventional insulin therapy vs. 6.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg x min intensive insulin therapy; p = .5). Intensive insulin therapy displayed a significantly higher glucose clamp infusion rate posttreatment (9.1 +/- 1.3 intensive insulin therapy versus 4.8 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min conventional insulin therapy, p = .005). Suppression of hepatic glucose release was significantly greater in the intensive insulin therapy after treatment compared with conventional insulin therapy (5.0 +/- 0.9 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min; intensive insulin therapy vs. conventional insulin therapy; p = .03). States 3 and 4 mitochondrial oxidation of palmitate significantly improved in intensive insulin therapy (0.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.7 +/- 0.1 microm O(2)/CS/mg protein/min for state 3, p = .004; and 0.7 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 microm O(2)/CS/mg protein/min for state 4, p protocol improves insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial

  1. Effects of the daily consumption of protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt on the total protein intake in older adults in a rehabilitation centre: a single blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Til, A J; Naumann, E; Cox-Claessens, I J H M; Kremer, S; Boelsma, E; de van der Schueren, M A E

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effects of protein enriched bread and drinking yoghurt, substituting regular products, on the total protein intake and the distribution of protein intake over the day in older adults. A single blind randomised controlled trial. Rehabilitation centre. Older adults (≥ 55 years) admitted to a rehabilitation centre after hospital discharge (n=34). Participants received a high protein diet (protein enriched bread and protein enriched drinking yoghurt; n=17) or a regular diet (regular bread and regular drinking yoghurt; n=17) for three consecutive weeks. Total protein intake and protein intake per meal, measured twice weekly over a three weeks period (six measurements per participant). Compared with controls, patients who received the protein enriched products had a significantly higher protein intake (115.3 g/d vs 72.5 g/d, Pconsumption of protein enriched products improves protein distribution over the day.

  2. Insulin and the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Suchita; Prakash, Y S; Linneberg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    , molecular understanding is necessary. Insulin resistance is a strong, independent risk factor for asthma development, but it is unknown whether a direct effect of insulin on the lung is involved. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the effect of insulin on cellular components of the lung...... and highlights the molecular consequences of insulin-related metabolic signaling cascades that could adversely affect lung structure and function. Examples include airway smooth muscle proliferation and contractility and regulatory signaling networks that are associated with asthma. These aspects of insulin...

  3. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial...... hyperglycemia with a tendency towards fewer episodes of severe hypoglycemia compared with human insulin. Treatment with insulin aspart was associated with a tendency toward fewer fetal losses and preterm deliveries than treatment with human insulin. Insulin aspart could not be detected in the fetal circulation...... and no increase in insulin antibodies was found. Thus, the use of insulin aspart in pregnancy is regarded safe....

  4. Metformin and insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  5. Toward understanding insulin fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Andersen, L; Laursen, E D; Meyn, G; Rasmussen, E

    1997-05-01

    Formation of insulin fibrils is a physical process by which partially unfolded insulin molecules interact with each other to form linear aggregates. Shielding of hydrophobic domains is the main driving force for this process, but formation of intermolecular beta-sheet may further stabilize the fibrillar structure. Conformational displacement of the B-chain C-terminal with exposure of nonpolar, aliphatic core residues, including A2, A3, B11, and B15, plays a crucial role in the fibrillation process. Recent crystal analyses and molecular modeling studies have suggested that when insulin fibrillates this exposed domain interacts with a hydrophobic surface domain formed by the aliphatic residues A13, B6, B14, B17, and B18, normally buried when three insulin dimers form a hexamer. In rabbit immunization experiments, insulin fibrils did not elicit an increased immune response with respect to formation of IgG insulin antibodies when compared with native insulin. In contrast, the IgE response increased with increasing content of insulin in fibrillar form. Strategies and practical approaches to prevent insulin from forming fibrils are reviewed. Stabilization of the insulin hexameric structure and blockage of hydrophobic interfaces by addition of surfactants are the most effective means of counteracting insulin fibrillation.

  6. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 increased in preterm neonates following massage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Dieter, John N I; Kumar, Adarsh M; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia

    2008-12-01

    To determine if massage therapy increased serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in preterm neonates. Forty-two preterm neonates who averaged 34.6 weeks (M = 29.5 wk gestational age; M birth weight = 1237 g) and were in the "grower" (step-down) nursery were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group (body stroking and passive limb movements for three, 15-minute periods per day for 5 days) or a control group that received the standard nursery care without massage therapy. On Days 1 and 5, the serum collected by clinical heelsticks was also assayed for insulin and IGF-1, and weight gain and kilocalories consumed were recorded daily. Despite similar formula intake, the massaged preterm neonates showed greater increases during the 5-day period in (1) weight gain; (2) serum levels of insulin; and (3) IGF-1. Increased weight gain was significantly correlated with insulin and IGF-1. Previous data suggested that preterm infant weight gain following massage therapy related to increased vagal activity, which suggests decreased stress and gastric motility, which may contribute to more efficient food absorption. The data from this study suggest for the first time that weight gain was also related to increased serum insulin and IGF-1 levels following massage therapy. Preterm infants who received massage therapy not only showed greater weight gain but also a greater increase in serum insulin and IGF-1 levels, suggesting that massage therapy might be prescribed for all growing neonates.

  7. Insulin requirement profiles of short-term intensive insulin therapy in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and its association with long-term glycemic remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liehua; Ke, Weijian; Wan, Xuesi; Zhang, Pengyuan; Cao, Xiaopei; Deng, Wanping; Li, Yanbing

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the insulin requirement profiles during short-term intensive continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and its relationship with long-term glycemic remission. CSII was applied in 104 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Daily insulin doses were titrated and recorded to achieve and maintain euglycemia for 2 weeks. Measurements of blood glucose, lipid profiles as well as intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed before and after the therapy. Afterwards, patients were followed up for 1 year. Total daily insulin dose (TDD) was 56.6±16.1IU at the first day when euglycemia was achieved (TDD-1). Thereafter, TDD progressively decreased at a rate of 1.4±1.0IU/day to 36.2±16.5IU at the end of the therapy. TDD-1 could be estimated with body weight, FPG, triglyceride and waist circumference in a multiple linear regression model. Decrement of TDD after euglycemia was achieved (ΔTDD) was associated with reduction of HOMA-IR (r=0.27, P=0.008) but not with improvement in β cell function. Patients in the lower tertile of ΔTDD had a significantly higher risk of hyperglycemia relapse than those in the upper tertile within 1 year (HR 3.4, 95%CI [1.4, 8.4], P=0.008). There is a steady decline of TDD after euglycemia is achieved in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes treated with CSII, and ΔTDD is associated with a better long-term glycemic outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interleukin-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-12-05

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) promotes insulin resistance in tissues such as liver and skeletal muscle; however the influence of IL-1β on placental insulin signaling is unknown. We recently reported increased IL-1β protein expression in placentas of obese mothers, which could contribute to insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IL-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in cultured primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells. Cultured trophoblasts isolated from term placentas were treated with physiological concentrations of IL-1β (10pg/ml) for 24h. IL-1β increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser307 (inhibitory) and decreased total IRS-1 protein abundance but did not affect insulin receptor β expression. Furthermore, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Tyr612, activation site) and Akt (Thr308) and prevented insulin-stimulated increase in PI3K/p85 and Grb2 protein expression. IL-1β alone stimulated cRaf (Ser338), MEK (Ser221) and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation. The inflammatory pathways nuclear factor kappa B and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which are involved in insulin resistance, were also activated by IL-1β treatment. Moreover, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated System A, but not System L amino acid uptake, indicating functional impairment of insulin signaling. In conclusion, IL-1β inhibited the insulin signaling pathway by inhibiting IRS-1 signaling and prevented insulin-stimulated System A transport, thereby promoting insulin resistance in cultured PHT cells. These findings indicate that conditions which lead to increased systemic maternal or placental IL-1β levels may attenuate the effects of maternal insulin on placental function and consequently fetal growth. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Effect of sensor-augmented pump treatment vs. multiple daily injections on albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Rosenlund, Signe; Willum Hansen, Tine; Rossing, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: The effect of glycaemic control on persisting albuminuria remains unclear. Insulin delivery and glucose variability may be important Objective: To investigate the effect of 1 year treatment with sensor-augmented insulin pump (SAP) or multiple daily injections (MDI) on albuminuria. DESIGN...

  10. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Northern Tunisia cohort of the A1chieve study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouza, Samira; Jamoussi, Henda

    2013-01-01

    Background: The A1chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Northern Tunisia. Results: A total of 443 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 137), insulin detemir (n = 243), insulin aspart (n = 11), basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 39) and other insulin combinations (n = 13). At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA1c: 10.2%) and insulin user (mean HbA1c: 9.8%) groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the study groups showed improvement in HbA1c (insulin naïve: −2.1%, insulin users: −0.9%). SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia. PMID:24404473

  11. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Northern Tunisia cohort of the A 1 chieve study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Blouza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries, 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726 in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Northern Tunisia. Results: A total of 443 patients were enrolled in the study. Four different insulin analogue regimens were used in the study. Study patients had started on or were switched to biphasic insulin aspart (n = 137, insulin detemir (n = 243, insulin aspart (n = 11, basal insulin plus insulin aspart (n = 39 and other insulin combinations (n = 13. At baseline glycaemic control was poor for both insulin naïve (mean HbA 1 c: 10.2% and insulin user (mean HbA 1 c: 9.8% groups. After 24 weeks of treatment, both the study groups showed improvement in HbA 1 c (insulin naïve: −2.1%, insulin users: −0.9%. SADRs including major hypoglycaemic events or episodes did not occur in any of the study patients. Conclusion: Starting or switching to insulin analogues was associated with improvement in glycaemic control with a low rate of hypoglycaemia.

  12. Measuring acetabular cup orientation on antero-posterior radiographs of the hip after total hip arthroplasty with a vector arithmetic radiological method. Is it valid and verified for daily clinical practice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craiovan, B.; Weber, M.; Worlicek, M.; Schneider, M.; Springorum, H.R.; Grifka, J.; Renkawitz, T. [University Medical Center Regensburg, Bad Abbach/Regensburg (Germany). Orthopedic Surgery; Zeman, F. [University Medical Center Regensburg, Bad Abbach/Regensburg (Germany). Center for Clinical Studies

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this prospective study is to validate a vector arithmetic method for measuring acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and to verify the clinical practice. We measured cup anteversion and inclination of 123 patients after cementless primary THA twice by two examiners on AP pelvic radiographs with a vector arithmetic method and compared with a 3D-CT based reconstruction model within the same radiographic coronal plane. The mean difference between the radiographic and the 3D-CT measurements was -1.4 ±3.9 for inclination and 0.8 ±7.9 for anteversion with excellent correlation for inclination (r=0.81, p < 0.001) and moderate correlation for anteversion (r=0.65, p < 0.001). The intraclass correlation coefficient for measurements on radiographs ranged from 0.98 (95%-CI: 0.98; 0.99) for the first observer to 0.94 (95%-CI: 0.92; 0.96) for the second observer. The interrater reliability was 0.96 (95%-CI: 0.93; 0.98) for inclination and 0.93 (95%-CI: 0.85; 0.96) for anteversion. The largest errors in measurements were associated with an extraordinary pelvic tilt. In order to get a valuable measurement for measuring cup position after THA on pelvic radiographs by this vector arithmetic method, there is a need for a correct postoperative ap view, with special regards to the pelvic tilt for the future.

  13. Insulin resistance in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, Jenne D; Opsomer, Geert

    2013-07-01

    Glucose is the molecule that drives milk production, and insulin plays a pivotal role in the glucose metabolism of dairy cows. The effect of insulin on the glucose metabolism is regulated by the secretion of insulin by the pancreas and the insulin sensitivity of the skeletal muscles, the adipose tissue, and the liver. Insulin resistance may develop as part of physiologic (pregnancy and lactation) and pathologic processes, which may manifest as decreased insulin sensitivity or decreased insulin responsiveness. A good knowledge of the normal physiology of insulin is needed to measure the in vivo insulin resistance of dairy cows. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies on interaction of insulin and insulin receptor in rat liver cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y; Hara, H; Kawate, R; Kawasaki, T [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-07-01

    Rat liver was homogenized with a Polytron PT 20 ST and fractionated by differential centrifugation. Prepared plasma membranes (100 ..mu..g protein) were incubated with enzymatically iodinated /sup 125/I-insulin (0.3 ng, specific activity 107 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g) in 25 mM Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.5, containing 0.9% NaCl and 1% bovine serum albumin. The 12,000xg- and 17,000xg-sediments obtained after subfractionation of liver homogenates showed almost equally high specific binding activity with /sup 125/I-insulin and less activity was detected in the 600 g-, 5,000 g- and 40,000 g- sediments and the 40,000 g- supernatant. Specific binding of insulin with the membrane fraction was time-, temperature- and ionic strength-dependent. The highest binding was obtained under conditions in which the membrane fraction was incubated with insulin for 24 hours at 4/sup 0/C in the buffer containing 1 M NaCl. Under these conditions, specific binding of /sup 125/I-insulin was 26.8% of the total radioactivity. The effect of native insulin on the binding of /sup 125/I-insulin with the membrane fraction was studied in the range of 0--6.4 x 10/sup 5/ ..mu..U/ml of unlabeled insulin and a distinct competitive displacement of /sup 125/I-insulin with native insulin was observed between 10 and 10/sup 4/ ..mu..U/ml. Kinetic studies by Scatchard plot analysis of the above results revealed heterogeneity in insulin receptors or receptor sites, one with a high affinity of 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ order and the other with a low affinity of 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ order. Both affinities were also affected by temperature and ionic strength.

  15. Skeletal Muscle Sorbitol Levels in Diabetic Rats with and without Insulin Therapy and Endurance Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, O. A.; Walseth, T. F.; Snow, L. M.; Serfass, R. C.; Thompson, L. V.

    2009-01-01

    Sorbitol accumulation is postulated to play a role in skeletal muscle dysfunction associated with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of insulin and of endurance exercise on skeletal muscle sorbitol levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Rats were assigned to one experimental group (control sedentary, control exercise, diabetic sedentary, diabetic exercise, diabetic sedentary no-insulin). Diabetic rats received daily subcutaneous insulin. The exercise-trained rats ran on a treadmill (1 hour, 5X/wk, for 12 weeks). Skeletal muscle sorbitol levels were the highest in the diabetic sedentary no-insulin group. Diabetic sedentary rats receiving insulin had similar sorbitol levels to control sedentary rats. Endurance exercise did not significantly affect sorbitol levels. These results indicate that insulin treatment lowers sorbitol in skeletal muscle; therefore sorbitol accumulation is probably not related to muscle dysfunction in insulin-treated diabetic individuals. Endurance exercise did not influence intramuscular sorbitol values as strongly as insulin. PMID:20016800

  16. Flexibility in insulin prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication explores the concept of flexibility, a propos insulin preparations and insulin regimes used in the management of type 2 diabetes. The flexibility of an insulin regime or preparation is defined as their ability to be injected at variable times, with variable injection-meal time gaps, in a dose frequency and quantum determined by shared decision making, with a minimal requirement of glucose monitoring and health professional consultation, with no compromise on safety, efficiency and tolerability. The relative flexibility of various basal, prandial and dual action insulins, as well as intensive regimes, is compared. The biopsychosocial model of health is used to assess the utility of different insulins while encouraging a philosophy of flexible insulin usage.

  17. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS: We investigated 1,415 healthy, nondiabetic participants (mean age 43.9 ± 8.3 years; 54.3% women) from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study, of whom 852 participated in a follow-up examination after 3 years. At baseline, insulin sensitivity...... was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS...

  18. Insulin aspart pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Hove; Roge, Rikke Meldgaard; Ma, Zhulin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insulin aspart (IAsp) is used by many diabetics as a meal-time insulin to control postprandial glucose levels. As is the case with many other insulin types, the pharmacokinetics (PK), and consequently the pharmacodynamics (PD), is associated with clinical variability, both between...... to investigate and quantify the properties of the subcutaneous depot. Data from Brange et al. (1990) are used to determine the effects of insulin chemistry in subcutis on the absorption rate. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus and infusion PK data for human insulin are used to understand and quantify the systemic...... distribution and elimination (Porksen et al., 1997; Sjostrand et al., 2002). PK and PD profiles for type 1 diabetics from Chen et al. (2005) are analyzed to demonstrate the effects of IAsp antibodies in terms of bound and unbound insulin. PK profiles from Thorisdottir et al. (2009) and Ma et al. (2012b...

  19. Diabetes, insulin and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic and hormonal adaptations to single exercise sessions and to exercise training in normal man and in patients with insulin-dependent as well as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are reviewed. In insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes good metabolic control is best obtained...... by a regular pattern of life which will lead to a fairly constant demand for insulin from day to day. Exercise is by nature a perturbation that makes treatment of diabetes difficult: Muscle contractions per se tend to decrease the plasma glucose concentration whereas the exercise-induced response of the so......-called counter-regulatory hormones tend to increase plasma glucose by increasing hepatic glucose production and adipose tissue lipolysis. If the pre-exercise plasma insulin level is high, hypoglycaemia may develop during exercise whereas hyperglycaemia and ketosis may develop if pre-exercise plasma insulin...

  20. Effects of pomegranate seed oil followed by resistance exercise on insulin resistance and lipid profile in non-athletic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Shahidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although some studies have reported the health-related benefits for the pomegranate seed oil (PSO, there is not enough information on its combined effect with exercise. Therefore, in this study the effect of supplementation with pomegranate seed oil followed by resistance exercise on insulin resistance and lipid profile was considered in non-athletes men. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental double-blind randomized study non-athletic male (n=14 were divided into two groups: Exercise+Supplementation (n=7 and Exercise +Placebo (n=7. Both groups performed resistance training for 4 weeks (3 sessions per week. The experimental group consumed 2 capsules of pomegranate seed oil (400 mg and the control group received 2 placebo capsules daily. Glucose, fasting insulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, HDL-C, were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Insulin resistance was estimated using homeostasis formula (HOMA-IR. Results: While the average concentration of HDL-C in Supplement+Exercise group was significantly increased compared to pre-test, no significant increase was seen compared to Placebo + Exercise group (P<0.05. Between and within group comparison for the changes in total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, glucose, fasting insulin and insulin resistance was not significant. Conclusion: According to the results, it can be concluded that 4 weeks of resistance training followed by PSO supplementation, except for HDL-C, has no significant effect on the other lipid profiles and insulin resistance in healthy non-athlete men.

  1. Oxidative stress and metabolic syndrome: Effects of a natural antioxidants enriched diet on insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Antonio; Martorana, Giuseppe Ettore; Magini, Marinella; Festa, Roberto; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Silvestrini, Andrea; Nicolotti, Nicola; Mordente, Alvaro; Mele, Maria Cristina; Miggiano, Giacinto Abele Donato; Meucci, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) could play a role in metabolic syndrome-related manifestations contributing to insulin resistance (IR). The aim of the present study was to gain insight the relationships between OS, IR and other hormones involved in caloric balance, explaining the effects of a natural antioxidant-enriched diet in patients affected by metabolic syndrome. We investigated the effects of dietary antioxidants on IR, studying 53 obese (20 males and 33 females, 18-66 years old, BMI 36.3 ± 5.5 kg/m 2 ), with IR evaluated by Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA)-index, comparing 4 treatments: hypocaloric diet alone (group A) or plus metformin 1000 mg/daily (group B), natural antioxidants-enriched hypocaloric diet alone (group C) or plus metformin (group D). A personalized program, with calculated antioxidant intake of 800-1000 mg/daily, from fruit and vegetables, was administered to group C and D. The glycemic and insulinemic response to oral glucose load, and concentrations of total-, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, C reactive protein, fT3, fT4, TSH, insulin-like growth factor 1 were evaluated before and after 3-months. Plasma Total antioxidant capacity was determined by H 2 O 2 -metmyoglobin system, which interacting with the chromogen ABTS generates a radical with latency time (LAG) proportional to antioxidant content. Despite a similar BMI decrease, we found a significant decrease of HOMA and insulin peak only in group B and D. Insulin response (AUC) showed the greatest decrease in group D (25.60  ±  8.96%) and was significantly lower in group D vs B. No differences were observed in glucose response, lipid metabolism and TAC (expressed as LAG values). TSH values were significantly suppressed in group D vs B. These data suggest that dietary antioxidants ameliorate insulin-sensitivity in obese subjects with IR by enhancing the effect of insulin-sensitizing drugs albeit with molecular mechanisms which remain yet to be elucidated

  2. Fully convergent chemical synthesis of ester insulin: determination of the high resolution X-ray structure by racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Gates, Zachary P; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A; Kent, Stephen B H

    2013-02-27

    Efficient total synthesis of insulin is important to enable the application of medicinal chemistry to the optimization of the properties of this important protein molecule. Recently we described "ester insulin"--a novel form of insulin in which the function of the 35 residue C-peptide of proinsulin is replaced by a single covalent bond--as a key intermediate for the efficient total synthesis of insulin. Here we describe a fully convergent synthetic route to the ester insulin molecule from three unprotected peptide segments of approximately equal size. The synthetic ester insulin polypeptide chain folded much more rapidly than proinsulin, and at physiological pH. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin (i.e., [Asp(B10), Lys(B28), Pro(B29)]ester insulin) were prepared by total chemical synthesis. The atomic structure of the synthetic ester insulin molecule was determined by racemic protein X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Diffraction quality crystals were readily obtained from the racemic mixture of {D-DKP ester insulin + L-DKP ester insulin}, whereas crystals were not obtained from the L-ester insulin alone even after extensive trials. Both the D-protein and L-protein enantiomers of monomeric DKP ester insulin were assayed for receptor binding and in diabetic rats, before and after conversion by saponification to the corresponding DKP insulin enantiomers. L-DKP ester insulin bound weakly to the insulin receptor, while synthetic L-DKP insulin derived from the L-DKP ester insulin intermediate was fully active in binding to the insulin receptor. The D- and L-DKP ester insulins and D-DKP insulin were inactive in lowering blood glucose in diabetic rats, while synthetic L-DKP insulin was fully active in this biological assay. The structural basis of the lack of biological activity of ester insulin is discussed.

  3. Evidence-based insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben Brock; Henriksen, J E; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of the evidence base for recommending different insulin treatment regimens in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A computerised literature survey was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Pub Med database for the period of 1982-2007. RESULTS: A meta-analysis on only...... 49 out of 1295 references showed that CSII compared with conventional or multiple insulin injections therapy demonstrated a significant reduction in mean HbA1c (primary outcome) of 1.2% CI [0.73; 1.59] (P... daily insulin injections was based on only one publication demonstrating an improved quality of life but no significant reduction in HbA1c or hypoglycaemia. A comparison of rapid-acting insulin analogues and human soluble insulin demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in HbA1c of 0.1% CI: [0...

  4. Insulin, cognition, and dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholerton, Brenna; Baker, Laura D.; Craft, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive disorders of aging represent a serious threat to the social and economic welfare of current society. It is now widely recognized that pathology related to such conditions, particularly Alzheimer’s disease, likely begins years or decades prior to the onset of clinical dementia symptoms. This revelation has led researchers to consider candidate mechanisms precipitating the cascade of neuropathological events that eventually lead to clinical Alzheimer’s disease. Insulin, a hormone with potent effects in the brain, has recently received a great deal of attention for its potential beneficial and protective role in cognitive function. Insulin resistance, which refers to the reduced sensitivity of target tissues to the favorable effects of insulin, is related to multiple chronic conditions known to impact cognition and increase dementia risk. With insulin resistance-associated conditions reaching epidemic proportions, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders will continue to rise exponentially. Fortunately, these chronic insulin-related conditions are amenable to pharmacological intervention. As a result, novel therapeutic strategies that focus on increasing insulin sensitivity in the brain may be an important target for protecting or treating cognitive decline. The following review will highlight our current understanding of the role of insulin in brain, potential mechanisms underlying the link between insulin resistance and dementia, and current experimental therapeutic strategies aimed at improving cognitive function via modifying the brain’s insulin sensitivity. PMID:24070815

  5. Insulin and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Fatemeh; Toth, Cory

    2013-03-01

    Mainly known for its role in peripheral glucose homeostasis, insulin has also significant impact within the brain, functioning as a key neuromodulator in behavioral, cellular, biochemical and molecular studies. The brain is now regarded as an insulin-sensitive organ with widespread, yet selective, expression of the insulin receptor in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebellum, amygdala and cerebral cortex. Insulin receptor signaling in the brain is important for neuronal development, glucoregulation, feeding behavior, body weight, and cognitive processes such as with attention, executive functioning, learning and memory. Emerging evidence has demonstrated insulin receptor signaling to be impaired in several neurological disorders. Moreover, insulin receptor signaling is recognized as important for dendritic outgrowth, neuronal survival, circuit development, synaptic plasticity and postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptor trafficking. We review the multiple roles of insulin in the brain, as well as its endogenous trafficking to the brain or its exogenous intervention. Although insulin can be directly targeted to the brain via intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intraparenchymal delivery, these invasive techniques are with significant risk, necessitating repeated surgical intervention and providing potential for systemic hypoglycemia. Another method, intranasal delivery, is a non-invasive, safe, and alternative approach which rapidly targets delivery of molecules to the brain while minimizing systemic exposure. Over the last decades, the delivery of intranasal insulin in animal models and human patients has evolved and expanded, permitting new hope for associated neurodegenerative and neurovascular disorders.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of liraglutide versus lixisenatide as add-on therapies to basal insulin in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Åsa; Glah, Divina; Lorenzi, Maria; Jansen, Jeroen P; Fridhammar, Adam

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the cost-effectiveness of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists liraglutide 1.8 mg and lixisenatide 20 μg (both added to basal insulin) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Sweden. The Swedish Institute for Health Economics cohort model for T2D was used to compare liraglutide and lixisenatide (both added to basal insulin), with a societal perspective and with comparative treatment effects derived by indirect treatment comparison (ITC). Drug prices were 2016 values, and all other costs 2015 values. The cost-effectiveness of IDegLira (fixed-ratio combination of insulin degludec and liraglutide) versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin was also assessed, under different sets of assumptions. From the ITC, decreases in HbA1c were -1.32% and -0.43% with liraglutide and lixisenatide, respectively; decreases in BMI were -1.29 and -0.65 kg/m2, respectively. An estimated 2348 cases of retinopathy, 265 of neuropathy and 991 of nephropathy would be avoided with liraglutide compared with lixisenatide in a cohort of 10,000 patients aged over 40 years. In the base-case analysis, total direct costs were higher with liraglutide than lixisenatide, but costs associated with complications were lower. The cost/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for liraglutide added to basal insulin was SEK30,802. Base-case findings were robust in sensitivity analyses, except when glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) differences for liraglutide added to basal insulin were abolished, suggesting these benefits were driving the cost/QALY. With liraglutide 1.2 mg instead of liraglutide 1.8 mg (adjusted for efficacy and cost), liraglutide added to basal insulin was dominant over lixisenatide 20μg.IDegLira was dominant versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin when a defined daily dose was used in the model. The costs/QALY for liraglutide, 1.8 or 1.2 mg, added to basal insulin, and for IDegLira (all compared with lixisenatide 20 μg added to basal insulin) were below the threshold considered low

  7. Cost-effectiveness of liraglutide versus lixisenatide as add-on therapies to basal insulin in type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background We assessed the cost-effectiveness of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists liraglutide 1.8 mg and lixisenatide 20 μg (both added to basal insulin) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Sweden. Methods The Swedish Institute for Health Economics cohort model for T2D was used to compare liraglutide and lixisenatide (both added to basal insulin), with a societal perspective and with comparative treatment effects derived by indirect treatment comparison (ITC). Drug prices were 2016 values, and all other costs 2015 values. The cost-effectiveness of IDegLira (fixed-ratio combination of insulin degludec and liraglutide) versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin was also assessed, under different sets of assumptions. Results From the ITC, decreases in HbA1c were –1.32% and –0.43% with liraglutide and lixisenatide, respectively; decreases in BMI were –1.29 and –0.65 kg/m2, respectively. An estimated 2348 cases of retinopathy, 265 of neuropathy and 991 of nephropathy would be avoided with liraglutide compared with lixisenatide in a cohort of 10,000 patients aged over 40 years. In the base-case analysis, total direct costs were higher with liraglutide than lixisenatide, but costs associated with complications were lower. The cost/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for liraglutide added to basal insulin was SEK30,802. Base-case findings were robust in sensitivity analyses, except when glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) differences for liraglutide added to basal insulin were abolished, suggesting these benefits were driving the cost/QALY. With liraglutide 1.2 mg instead of liraglutide 1.8 mg (adjusted for efficacy and cost), liraglutide added to basal insulin was dominant over lixisenatide 20μg.IDegLira was dominant versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin when a defined daily dose was used in the model. Conclusions The costs/QALY for liraglutide, 1.8 or 1.2 mg, added to basal insulin, and for IDegLira (all compared with lixisenatide 20 μg added to basal

  8. Insulin resistance induced by physical inactivity is associated with multiple transcriptional changes in skeletal muscle in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, A C; Sonne, M P; Højbjerre, L

    2010-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a risk factor for insulin resistance. We examined the effect of 9 days of bed rest on basal and insulin-stimulated expression of genes potentially involved in insulin action by applying hypothesis-generating microarray in parallel with candidate gene real-time PCR approaches...... contribute to the development of insulin resistance induced by bed rest. Lack of complete normalization of changes after 4 wk of retraining underscores the importance of maintaining a minimum of daily physical activity....

  9. Effect of Artemisia dracunculus Administration on Glycemic Control, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Del Villar, Miriam; Puebla-Pérez, Ana M; Sánchez-Peña, María J; González-Ortiz, Luis J; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of Artemisia dracunculus on glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 24 patients with diagnosis of IGT. Before and after the intervention, glucose and insulin levels were measured every 30 min for 2 h after a 75-g dextrose load, along with glycated hemoglobin A1c (A1C) and lipid profile. Twelve patients received A. dracunculus (1000 mg) before breakfast and dinner for 90 days; the remaining 12 patients received placebo. Area under the curve (AUC) of glucose and insulin, total insulin secretion, first phase of insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity were calculated. Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests were used for statistical analyses. The institutional ethics committee approved the protocol. After A. dracunculus administration, there were significant decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP; 120.0 ± 11.3 vs. 113.0 ± 11.2 mmHg, P AUC of insulin (56,136.0 ± 27,426.0 vs. 44,472.0 ± 23,370.0 pmol/L, P AUC of insulin, and total insulin secretion with a significant increase in HDL-C levels.

  10. The effect of a very low calorie diet on insulin sensitivity, beta cell function, insulin clearance, incretin hormone secretion, androgen levels and body composition in obese young women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Pernille F; Jensen, Frank K; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the effect of an 8-week very low calorie diet (VLCD, 500-600 kcal daily) on weight, body fat distribution, glucose, insulin and lipid metabolism, androgen levels and incretin secretion in obese women.......Evaluation of the effect of an 8-week very low calorie diet (VLCD, 500-600 kcal daily) on weight, body fat distribution, glucose, insulin and lipid metabolism, androgen levels and incretin secretion in obese women....

  11. ACRIM III Level 2 Daily Mean Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) III Level 2 Daily Mean Data product consists of Level 2 total solar irradiance in the form of daily means...

  12. MOPITT Gridded Daily CO Retrievals (Thermal Infrared Radiances) V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT L3 files contain daily and monthly mean gridded versions of the daily L2 CO profile and total column retrievals. The averaging kernels associated with...

  13. Variability of HOMA and QUICKI insulin sensitivity indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žarković, Miloš; Ćirić, Jasmina; Beleslin, Biljana; Stojković, Mirjana; Savić, Slavica; Stojanović, Miloš; Lalić, Tijana

    2017-07-01

    Assessment of insulin sensitivity based on a single measurement of insulin and glucose, is both easy to understand and simple to perform. The tests most often used are HOMA and QUICKI. The aim of this study was to assess the biological variability of estimates of insulin sensitivity using HOMA and QUICKI indices. After a 12-h fast, blood was sampled for insulin and glucose determination. Sampling lasted for 90 min with an intersample interval of 2 min. A total of 56 subjects were included in the study, and in nine subjects sampling was done before and after weight reduction, so total number of analyzed series was 65. To compute the reference value of the insulin sensitivity index, averages of all 46 insulin and glucose samples were used. We also computed point estimates (single value estimates) of the insulin sensitivity index based on the different number of insulin/glucose samples (1-45 consecutive samples). To compute the variability of point estimates a bootstrapping procedure was used using 1000 resamples for each series and for each number of samples used to average insulin and glucose. Using a single insulin/glucose sample HOMA variability was 26.18 ± 4.31%, and QUICKI variability was 3.30 ± 0.54%. For 10 samples variability was 11.99 ± 2.22% and 1.62 ± 0.31% respectively. Biological variability of insulin sensitivity indices is significant, and it can be reduced by increasing the number of samples. Oscillations of insulin concentration in plasma are the major cause of variability of insulin sensitivity indices.

  14. Lightship Daily Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board lightships along the United States coasts from 1936 - 1983. Generally 4-6 observations daily. Also includes deck logs, which give...

  15. DailyMed

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — DailyMed provides high quality information about marketed drugs. This information includes FDA labels (package inserts). This Web site provides health information...

  16. Daily Weather Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Several different government offices have published the Daily weather maps over its history. The publication has also gone by different names over time. The U.S....

  17. Fifty Years of Insulin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    has since saved millions of lives throughout the world. The year 197I is the 50th anniversary of Banting's historic discovery. The story of insulin ... He found no evidence of injury. An impaired ... Prize in medicine for his discovery of insulin.

  18. Insulin Resistance of Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Megan M; Zeitler, Philip S

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is a time of considerable metabolic and hormonal change. Notably, puberty is associated with a marked decrease in insulin sensitivity, on par with that seen during pregnancy. In otherwise healthy youth, there is a nadir in insulin sensitivity in mid-puberty, and then it recovers at puberty completion. However, there is evidence that insulin resistance (IR) does not resolve in youth who are obese going into puberty and may result in increased cardiometabolic risk. Little is known about the underlying pathophysiology of IR in puberty, and how it might contribute to increased disease risk (e.g., type 2 diabetes). In this review, we have outlined what is known about the IR in puberty in terms of pattern, potential underlying mechanisms and other mediating factors. We also outline other potentially related metabolic changes that occur during puberty, and effects of underlying insulin resistant states (e.g., obesity) on pubertal changes in insulin sensitivity.

  19. Task 0715: Army Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    NDCEE/CTC The NDCEE is operated by: Office of the Assistant Sec etary of the Army for Installations, E ergy and Enviro ment Technology Transition...stockpiles of soils and sands; – Air emissions with deposition potential; – Construction projects; – Existence of septic systems/sewage holding tanks

  20. Clean Water Act Approved Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Documents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Information from Approved and Established TMDL Documents as well as TMDLs that have been Withdrawn. This includes the pollutants identified in the TMDL Document, the...

  1. Interfacial adsorption of insulin - Conformational changes and reversibility of adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollmann, SH; Jorgensen, L; Bukrinsky, JT; Elofsson, U; Norde, W; Frokjaer, S

    The adsorption of human insulin to Teflon particles was studied with respect to conformational changes and the reversibility of adsorption was examined by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Adsorption isotherms for the adsorption of human insulin indicated high affinity adsorption, even

  2. An uncommon cause of hypoglycemia: insulin autoimmune syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas-Erdeve, Senay; Yılmaz Agladioglu, Sebahat; Onder, Asan; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Sagsak, Elif; Cetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a condition characterized by hypoglycemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been injected with insulin. A female patient (aged 16 years and 3 months) presented with the complaint of being overweight. Physical examination revealed a body weight of 78.2 kg (+2.6 SD) and a height of 167 cm (+0.73 SD). While the patient's fasting blood glucose level was found to be 40 mg/dl, blood ketone was negative and the serum insulin level was determined as 379 mIU/ml. The patient was diagnosed with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Abdominal ultrasound, pancreas MRI and endoscopic ultrasound were normal. The daily blood glucose profile revealed postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia in addition to fasting hypoglycemia. The results of anti-insulin antibody measurements were as high as 41.8% (normal range 0-7%). A 1,600-calorie diet containing 40% carbohydrate and divided into 6 meals a day was given to the patient. Simple sugars were excluded from the diet. Hypoglycemic episodes were not observed, but during 2 years of observation, serum levels of insulin and anti-insulin antibodies remained elevated. In all hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia cases, IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis and insulin antibody measurements should be carried out. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Fasting and feeding variations of insulin requirements and insulin binding to erythrocytes at different times of the day in insulin dependent diabetics--assessed under the condition of glucose-controlled insulin infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, C T; Beyer, J; Schulz, G

    1986-07-01

    Nine insulin-dependent diabetic patients were examined for insulin requirement, counterregulatory hormones, and receptor binding during their connection to glucose-controlled insulin infusion system. They were of 103% ideal body weight. A diet of 45% carbohydrate, 20% protein and 35% fat was divided into three meals and three snacks averaging the daily calorie intake of 1859 kcal. Following an equilibrating phase of 14 hours after the connection to the glucose-controlled insulin infusion system the blood samples were taken at 0800, 1200 and 1800. The insulin infusion rate increased at 0300 in the early morning from 0.128 mU/kg/min to 0.221 mU/kg/min (P less than 0.02). The postprandial insulin infusion rate jumped from 0.7 U/h (0700-0800) to 7.5 U/h (0800-0900). The calorie related and carbohydrate related insulin demands after breakfast were also highest and declined after lunch respectively (1.16 uU/kg/min kj vs. 0.61 uU/kg/min kj, P less than 0.05 and 236 mU/g CHO vs. 129 mU/g CHO and 143 mU/g CHO). Of the counterregulatory hormones the cortisol showed a significant diurnal rhythm to insulin demands. The insulin tracer binding was higher at 0800 before breakfast than that at 1200 before lunch (P less than 0.05). The increased binding could be better attributed to receptor concentration change than to affinity change. The cause of insulin relative insensitivity in the morning could be due to altered liver response to the cortisol peak in type 1 diabetics. The preserved variation of insulin binding in our patients might be referred to feeding.

  4. Chronic daily headaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches.

  5. Self-Tuning Insulin Adjustment Algorithm for Type 1 Diabetic Patients based on Multi-Doses Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. U. Campos-Delgado

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-tuning algorithm is presented for on-line insulin dosage adjustment in type 1 diabetic patients (chronic stage. The algorithm suggested does not need information of the patient insulin–glucose dynamics (model-free. Three doses are programmed daily, where a combination of two types of insulin: rapid/short and intermediate/long acting is injected into the patient through a subcutaneous route. The doses adaptation is performed by reducing the error in the blood glucose level from euglycemics. In this way, a total of five doses are tuned per day: three rapid/short and two intermediate/long, where there is large penalty to avoid hypoglycemic scenarios. Closed-loop simulation results are illustrated using a detailed nonlinear model of the subcutaneous insulin–glucose dynamics in a type 1 diabetic patient with meal intake.

  6. Low serum levels of free and total insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in patients with anorexia nervosa are not associated with increased IGF-binding protein-3 proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Flyvbjerg, A; Frystyk, J

    1999-01-01

    by centrifugation. In addition, GH, GH-binding protein, total IGFs, IGFBP-1 to -4, and IGFBP-3 proteolytic activity were measured. The IGFBPs were measured by both immunoassays and Western ligand blotting. Twelve of the patients were restudied 3 months after a minor increase in body mass index. In AN, the levels...

  7. Insulin use and persistence in patients with type 2 diabetes adding mealtime insulin to a basal regimen: a retrospective database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Amelito M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to characterize insulin use and examine factors associated with persistence to mealtime insulin among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D on stable basal insulin therapy initiating mealtime insulin therapy. Methods Insulin use among patients with T2D initiating mealtime insulin was investigated using Thomson Reuters MarketScan® research databases from July 2001 through September 2006. The first mealtime insulin claim preceded by 6 months with 2 claims for basal insulin was used as the index event. A total of 21 months of continuous health plan enrollment was required. Patients were required to have a second mealtime insulin claim during the 12-month follow-up period. Persistence measure 1 defined non-persistence as the presence of a 90-day gap in mealtime insulin claims, effective the date of the last claim prior to the gap. Persistence measure 2 required 1 claim per quarter to be persistent. Risk factors for non-persistence were assessed using logistic regression. Results Patients initiating mealtime insulin (n = 4752; 51% male, mean age = 60.3 years primarily used vial/syringe (87% and insulin analogs (60%. Patients filled a median of 2, 3, and 4 mealtime insulin claims at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively, with a median time of 76 days between refills. According to measure 1, persistence to mealtime insulin was 40.7%, 30.2%, and 19.1% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Results for measure 2 were considerably higher: 74.3%, 55.3%, and 42.2% of patients were persistent at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Initiating mealtime insulin with human insulin was a risk factor for non-persistence by both measures (OR Conclusions Mealtime insulin use and persistence were both considerably lower than expected, and were significantly lower for human insulin compared to analogs.

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF THYROID FUNCTION AND BONE TURNOVER ON LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE IN YOUNG PHYSICALLY ACTIVE MEN WITH DIFFERENT INSULIN SENSITIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kęska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity induces changes in the endocrine system. Previous data indicated that changes in insulin secretion and the tissue response to this hormone are very important for energy metabolism. It is believed that they are accompanied by changes in lipid metabolism, but factors contributing to this process are still disputed. The aim of this study was to assess interactions among insulin sensitivity, thyroid function, a bone turnover marker and serum lipid profile in young physically active men. Eighty-seven physical education students, aged 18-23 years, participated in the study. We measured serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, osteocalcin and anthropometric parameters. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344 was used to divide the study population into Group A (above the median and Group B (below the median. Men from both groups did not differ in anthropometric parameters or in daily physical activity. Triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were higher in Group A (P<0.05. TSH and osteocalcin levels were similar in males with different HOMA-IR. Multiple regression analysis for TSH and osteocalcin showed that in Group A these hormones had no effect on plasma lipoproteins. However, in Group B they significantly determined the variation of plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels (in about 28% and 29%, respectively. We concluded that TSH and osteocalcin are involved in determination of a more healthy lipid profile at a certain level of insulin sensitivity.

  9. Differential effects of insulin injections and insulin infusions on levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have shown that while injections of insulin cause an increase in fat mass, infusions of insulin increase fat mass. The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that if an increase in glycogen is an indicator of an impending increase in adipose mass, then insulin infusions should not increase glycogen, while insulin ...

  10. The SWITCH study (sensing with insulin pump therapy to control HbA(1c))

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conget, Ignacio; Battelino, Tadej; Giménez, Marga

    2011-01-01

    studies investigating the effect of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) combined with pump therapy on glycemic outcomes in type 1 diabetes are increasing. Pump therapy is well established as a "gold standard" for insulin delivery, offering improvements over multiple daily insulin...

  11. Continuous glucose monitoring-enabled insulin-pump therapy in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna L; Schmidt, Signe; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    We describe the feasibility of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)-enabled insulin-pump therapy during pregnancy in a woman with type 1 diabetes, who was treated with CGM-enabled insulin-pump therapy in her third pregnancy. During her first pregnancy, the woman was treated with multiple daily inj...

  12. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  13. Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-Daily), Version 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Historical Climatology Network - Daily (GHCN-Daily) dataset integrates daily climate observations from approximately 30 different data sources. Version 3...

  14. Insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdo, Monica Cristina dos Santos; Nóbrega, Fernando José de; Escrivão, Maria Arlete Meil Schimith

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of insulin resistance and its association with other metabolic abnormalities in obese children and adolescents. Retrospective study of 220 children and adolescents aged 5-14 years. Anthropometric measurements were performed (weight, height, and waist circumference) and clinical (gender, age, pubertal stage, and degree of obesity) and biochemical (glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, and fractions, triglycerides) data were analyzed. Insulin resistance was identified by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. The analysis of the differences between the variables of interest and the HOMA-IR quartiles was performed by ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis tests. Insulin resistance was diagnosed in 33.20% of the sample. It was associated with low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; p=0.044), waist circumference measurement (p=0.030), and the set of clinical and metabolic (p=0.000) alterations. Insulin-resistant individuals had higher mean age (p=0.000), body mass index (BMI; p=0.000), abdominal circumference (p=0.000), median triglycerides (p=0.001), total cholesterol (p≤0.042), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C; p≤0.027); and lower HDL-C levels (p=0.005). There was an increase in mean BMI (p=0.000), abdominal circumference (p=0.000), and median triglycerides (p=0.002) as the values of HOMA -IR increased, with the exception of HDL-C, which decreased (p=0.001). Those with the highest number of simultaneous alterations were between the second and third quartiles of the HOMA-IR index (p=0.000). The results confirmed that insulin resistance is present in many obese children and adolescents, and that this condition is associated with alterations that represent an increased risk for developing metabolic disorders in adulthood. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. EGb761, an extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, reduces insulin resistance in a high-fat-fed mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na Cong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available EGb761, a standardized and well-defined product extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves, has beneficial effects on the treatment of multiple diseases, including diabetes and dyslipidemia. However, it is still unclear whether EGb761 can increase insulin sensitivity. The objectives of the present study are to evaluate the effects of EGb761 on insulin sensitivity in an obese and insulin-resistant mouse model, established through chronic feeding of C57BL/6J mice with a high-fat diet (HFD, and to explore potential mechanisms. Mice fed with HFD for 18 weeks (starting from 4 weeks of age developed obesity, dyslipidemia (as indicated by biochemical measurements of blood glucose, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, and free fatty acids (FFA, and insulin resistance (as determined by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR index, compared to control mice fed with a standard laboratory chow. Oral treatment of the HFD-fed mice with EGb761, at low (100 mg/kg, medium (200 mg/kg, or high (400 mg/kg doses, via oral gavage (once daily for 8 weeks (starting from 26 weeks of age dose-dependently enhanced glucose tolerance in OGTT, and decreased both the insulin levels (by 29%, 55%, and 70%, respectively, and the HOMA-IR index values (by 50%, 69%, and 80%, respectively. EGb761 treatment also ameliorated HFD-induced obesity, dyslipidemia, and liver injury, as indicated by decreases in body weight (by 4%, 11%, and 16%, respectively, blood TC levels (by 23%, 32%, and 37%, respectively, blood TG levels (by 17%, 23%, and 33%, respectively, blood FAA levels (by 35%, 38%, and 46%, respectively, and liver index (liver weight/body weight values (by 12.8%, 25%, and 28%, respectively in the low, medium, and high EGb761 dose groups, respectively. In further mechanism studies, EGb761 was found to protect hepatic insulin receptor β and insulin receptor substrate 1 from HFD-induced degradation, and to keep the AMP

  16. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naidoo, C.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, 125 I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and 125 I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture

  17. Studies on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in non-insulin-dependent diabetes in young Indians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidoo, C

    1986-01-01

    Patients with Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. In the discrete genetic syndrome of NIDDY (non-insulin-dependent diabetes in the young), the situation is less clear and these aspects is the subject of this thesis. This study included Indian pasients with three generation transmission of NIDDM via one parent. The insulin and C-peptide responses to oral and intravenous glucose in patients with NIDDY were studied. The insulin and glucose responses to non-glucose secretogogues glucagon, tolbutamide and arginine, in NIDDY were also investigated. The following aspects with regard to insulin resistance in NIDDY were examined: glucose and free fatty acid response to intravenous insulin administration, insulin binding to circulating erythrocytes and monocytes, /sup 125/I-insulin binding to the solubilized erythrocyte membrane receptor and /sup 125/I-insulin binding to fibroblasts in culture.

  18. Management of insulin pump therapy in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nadeem; Pesterfield, Claire; Elleri, Daniela; Dunger, David B

    2014-12-01

    Insulin pump therapy is a current treatment option for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Insulin pumps can provide a greater flexibility in insulin administration and meal planning, as compared with multiple insulin injections, and they may be particularly suitable for the paediatric age group. Many young people with diabetes have integrated insulin pumps into their daily practice. The use of insulin pumps can also be supplemented by the information retrieved from continuous glucose monitoring in the sensor-augmented pump therapy, which may improve glycaemic control. In this review, we describe the principles of pump therapy and summarise features of commercially available insulin pumps, with focus on practical management and the advantages and disadvantages of this technology. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Similar weight-adjusted insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in short-duration late autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, C B; Bradley, U; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To explore insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in people with latent autoimmune diabetes in adulthood (LADA) compared with that in people with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 12 people with LADA, defined as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody positivity and > 1 year...... of insulin independency (group A) were age-matched pairwise to people with Type 2 diabetes (group B) and to six people with Type 2 diabetes of similar age and BMI (group C). β-cell function (first-phase insulin secretion and assessment of insulin pulsatility), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic......-euglycemic clamp) and metabolic response during a mixed meal were studied. RESULTS: Both first-phase insulin secretion and insulin release during the meal were greater (P = 0.05 and P = 0.009, respectively) in Type 2 diabetes as compared with LADA; these differences were lost on adjustment for BMI (group C...

  20. Beneficial effects on fasting insulin and postprandial responses through 7-day intake of New Zealand blackcurrant powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Elisabeth Theodorus Willems

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood glucose and insulin are elevated after intake of carbohydrate, with levels returning to normal in about 2-3 hours after ingestion. We examined the effects of daily New Zealand blackcurrant intake over 7 days on fasting glucose and insulin levels and the responses of glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test (i.e. OGTT. Methods: Seventeen healthy participants (9 males, 8 females, age: 24±8 years, body mass: 75.4±16.4 kg, height 172±11 cm, body mass index: 25.3±3.3 consumed 6 g·day-1 New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC powder for 7 days. Every 6 g of the serving contained 138.6 mg anthocyanins, 49 mg vitamin C, and 5.2 g of carbohydrates with total phenolic content 271.6 mg. A cross-over design was used. Participants completed one OGTT before starting the supplementation (day 0 and another OGTT after 7 days of the supplementation (day 7. For the OGTT, participants were seated and consumed 75 g of glucose dissolved in 250 mL water. Finger prick capillary samples were taken before and every 30 minutes for a total of 120 minutes after consuming the glucose drink. Following duplicate glucose analysis, blood samples were centrifuged and then plasma was separated and frozen (-20°C for triplicate insulin analysis using a human 96-well insulin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IBL international, Hamburg, Germany. Results: NZBC had no effect on fasting glucose (control: 4.46±0.45; NZBC: 4.41±0.44 mmol·L1, P=0.657, although there was a trend for fasting insulin to be 14.3% lower (control: 66.5±28.2; NZBC: 57.0±29.5 pmol·L-1 (P=0.091. HOMA-IR was not different between the control and NZBC (1.81±0.73 vs 1.58±0.83 (P=0.126. With NZBC during the OGTT, plasma glucose at 60 min was 8.1% lower (control: 6.68±1.13; NZBC: 6.14±1.41 mmol·L-1; P=0.016, insulin at 30 min was 18.4% lower (control: 337.1±228.3; NZBC: 275.0±136.4 pmol·L-1; P= 0.021, and insulin at 60 min was 39.2% lower (control: 297.8±154.3; NZBC: 181.2

  1. Sodium retention and insulin treatment in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1994-01-01

    subcutaneously, contributes to the increased ENa. Three studies were performed. Study 1 was a cross-sectional study comprising 28 type 1 diabetic men (aged 18-35 years) with short-duration diabetes (diabetic complications, and 22 control subjects. Study 2 was a prospective study of 17...... subcutaneous insulin infusion for improvement of glycaemic control or to remain on conventional insulin treatment. In study 1, ENa was higher in short-duration type 1 diabetic men than in controls (3003 +/- 325 vs 2849 +/- 207 mEq/1.73 m2, P ...The hypothesis that total body exchangeable sodium (ENa) is elevated in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with short-duration diabetes and no signs of microangiopathy was tested. Also tested was whether peripheral hyperinsulinaemia, in terms of the amounts of insulin injected...

  2. Radioreceptor assay for insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazuo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Radioreceptor assay of insulin was discussed from the aspects of the measuring method, its merits and problems to be solved, and its clinical application. Rat liver 10 x g pellet was used as receptor site, and enzymatic degradation of insulin by the system contained in this fraction was inhibited by adding 1 mM p-CMB. /sup 125/I-labelled porcine insulin was made by lactoperoxidase method under overnight incubation at 4/sup 0/C and later purification by Sephadex G-25 column and Whatman CF-11 cellulose powder. Dog pancreatic vein serum insulin during and after the glucose load was determined by radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay resulting that both measurements accorded considerably. Radioreceptor assay would clarify the pathology of disorders of glucose metabolism including diabetes.

  3. AMPK and insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is considered "a metabolic master-switch" in skeletal muscle reducing ATP- consuming processes whilst stimulating ATP regeneration. Within recent years, AMPK has also been proposed as a potential target to attenuate insulin resistance, although the exact...... role of AMPK is not well understood. Here we hypothesized that mice lacking a2AMPK activity in muscle would be more susceptible to develop insulin resistance associated with ageing alone or in combination with high fat diet. Young (~4 month) or old (~18 month) wild type and muscle specific a2AMPK...... kinase-dead mice on chow diet as well as old mice on 17 weeks of high fat diet were studied for whole body glucose homeostasis (OGTT, ITT and HOMA-IR), insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle. We demonstrate that high fat diet in old mice results in impaired glucose homeostasis...

  4. Total Pancreatectomy (TP) and Islet Autotransplantation (IAT) for Chronic Pancreatitis (CP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David E.R.; Radosevich, David M.; Bellin, Melena D.; Hering, Bernard J.; Beilman, Gregory J.; Dunn, Ty B.; Chinnakotla, Srinath; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Bland, Barbara; Balamurugan, A.N.; Freeman, Martin L.; Pruett, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Total-pancreatectomy (TP) with intraportal-islet-auto-transplantation (IAT) can relieve pain and preserve beta-cell-mass in patients with chronic-pancreatitis (CP) when other-therapies fail. Reported is a >30-year-single-center-series. Study Design 409 patients (53 children, 5–18 yrs) with CP underwent TP-IAT from Feb/1977–Sept/2011; (etiology idiopathic-41%; SOD/biliary-9%; genetic-14%; divisum-17%; alcohol-7%; other-12%); mean age-35.3 yrs,); 74% female; prior-surgeries 21%--Puestow procedure 9%, Whipple 6%, distal pancreatectomy 7%; other 2%). Islet-function was classified as insulin-independent for those on no insulin; partial if known C-peptide positive or euglycemic on once-daily-insulin; and insulin-dependent if on standard basal–bolus diabetic regimen. An SF-36-survey for Quality-of-Life (QOL)) was completed before and in serial follow-up by patients done since 2007 with an integrated-survey that added in 2008. Results Actuarial-patient-survival post-TP-IAT was 96% in adults and 98% in children (1-year) and; 89% and 98% (5-years). Complications requiring relaparotomy occurred in 15.9%, bleeding (9.5%) being most common. IAT-function is achieved in 90% (C-peptide >0.6 ng/ml). At 3 years, 30% were insulin-independent (25% in adults, 55% in children) and 33% had partial-function. Mean HbA1C was 5000/kg (24%)] correlated with degree of function with insulin-independent rates at 3 yrs of 12, 22 and 72%, partial function 33, 62 and 24%. All patients had pain before TP-IAT and nearly all were on daily-narcotics. After TP-IAT, 85% had pain-improvement. By two years 59% had ceased-narcotics. All children were on narcotics before, 39% at follow-up; pain improved in 94%; 67% became pain-free. In the SF-36 survey, there was significant improvement from baseline in all dimensions including the Physical and Mental Component Summaries (P2/3 of patients with insulin-independence occurring in one-quarter of adults and half the children. PMID:22397977

  5. Insulin and insulin signaling play a critical role in fat induction of insulin resistance in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jie; Hong, Tao; Yang, Xuefeng; Mei, Shuang; Liu, Zhenqi; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The primary player that induces insulin resistance has not been established. Here, we studied whether or not fat can cause insulin resistance in the presence of insulin deficiency. Our results showed that high-fat diet (HFD) induced insulin resistance in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The HFD-induced insulin resistance was prevented largely by the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced moderate insulin deficiency. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD-induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and gastrocnemius. The STZ-induced insulin deficiency prevented the HFD- or insulin-induced increase in hepatic expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSL), which are necessary for fatty acid activation. HFD increased mitochondrial contents of long-chain acyl-CoAs, whereas it decreased mitochondrial ADP/ATP ratio, and these HFD-induced changes were prevented by the STZ-induced insulin deficiency. In cultured hepatocytes, we observed that expressions of ACSL1 and -5 were stimulated by insulin signaling. Results in cultured cells also showed that blunting insulin signaling by the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 prevented fat accumulation, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to either insulin or oleate plus sera that normally contain insulin. Finally, knockdown of the insulin receptor prevented the oxidative stress and insulin resistance induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin or oleate plus sera. Together, our results show that insulin and insulin signaling are required for fat induction of insulin resistance in mice and cultured mouse hepatocytes. PMID:21586696

  6. Insulin degludec versus insulin glargine in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinman, Bernard; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Cariou, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs).......To compare ultra-long-acting insulin degludec with glargine for efficacy and safety in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)....

  7. Insulin and Glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Holland, William; Gromada, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In August 2016, several leaders in glucagon biology gathered for the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Hagedorn Workshop in Oxford, England. A key point of discussion focused on the need for basal insulin to allow for the therapeutic benefit of glucagon blockade in the treatment...... of the discussion as a consensus was reached. Agents that antagonize glucagon may be of great benefit for the treatment of diabetes; however, sufficient levels of basal insulin are required for their therapeutic efficacy....

  8. Elemental constituent of food and the daily intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazumasa

    1976-01-01

    Constituent of element in foods and it's daily intake was discussed. In tables were shown instances of analysed values of major elements in Japanese foods, daily dietary intake of 8 elements in Japan (analysed value of total diet and estimated amounts of daily dietary intake of 32 elements. (J.P.N.)

  9. Diabetes induction by total pancreatectomy in minipigs with simultaneous splenectomy: a feasible approach for advanced diabetes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, Sophie; Ludwig, Barbara; Schubert, Undine; Schmid, Janine; Kiss, Thomas; Steffen, Anja; Bornstein, Stefan; Ludwig, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Safe and reliable diabetes models are a key prerequisite for advanced preclinical studies on diabetes. Chemical induction is the standard model of diabetes in rodents and also widely used in large animal models of non-human primates and minipigs. However, uncertain efficacy, the potential of beta-cell regeneration, and relevant side effects are debatable aspects particularly in large animals. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate a surgical approach of total pancreatectomy combined with splenectomy for diabetes induction in an exploratory study in Goettingen minipigs. Total pancreatectomy was performed in Goettingen minipigs (n = 4) under general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. Prior to surgery, a central venous line was established for drug application and blood sampling. After median laparotomy, splenectomy was performed and the lobular pancreas was carefully dissected with particular attention to the duodenal vascular arcade. Close monitoring of blood glucose was initiated immediately after surgery by standard glucometer measurement or continuous glucose monitoring systems (CGMS). Exogenous insulin was given by multiple daily subcutaneous (s.c.) injections or via insulin pump systems (CSII). Complete endogenous insulin deficiency was confirmed by intravenous glucose tolerance test (ivGTT) and measurement of c-peptide. For establishing a suitable regimen for diabetes management, the animals were followed for 4-6 weeks. Following pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the animals showed a quick recovery from surgery and initial analgetic medication and volume substitution could be terminated within 24 h. A rapid increase in blood glucose was observed immediately following pancreatectomy necessitating insulin therapy. The induced exocrine insufficiency did not cause any clinical symptoms. Complete insulin deficiency could be confirmed in all animals by determination of negative c-peptide during glucose challenge. The two regimen of insulin treatment (multiple daily

  10. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (homa-ir): a better marker for evaluating insulin resistance than fasting insulin in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, H.; Khan, A.H.; Masood, Q.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Methodology: Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value =12 micro IU/ml. Results: A total of 91 premenopausal women diagnosed with PCOS were included. Mean age was 30 +-5.5 years. Mean HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 +-1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 +-5.8 micro IU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Conclusion: Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMA-IR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR. (author)

  11. Total algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tel, G.

    We define the notion of total algorithms for networks of processes. A total algorithm enforces that a "decision" is taken by a subset of the processes, and that participation of all processes is required to reach this decision. Total algorithms are an important building block in the design of

  12. Efficacy of Additional Canagliflozin Administration to Type 2 Diabetes Patients Receiving Insulin Therapy: Examination of Diurnal Glycemic Patterns Using Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Mihoko; Nakatani, Yuki; Tanka, Seiichi; Aoki, Chie; Sagara, Masaaki; Yanagi, Kazunori; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-08-01

    The efficacy of administering a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor during insulin therapy has not been established. In this study, we examined its effects based on diurnal glycemic patterns using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The subjects were 15 patients who had received insulin therapy for 1 year or more. A CGM device was attached to all subjects for 1 week. The administration of canagliflozin at 100 mg was started 4 days after attachment. The mean glucose concentrations, standard deviation (SD), mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), mean of daily difference of blood glucose (MODD), and area under the curve (AUC) (≥180, glucose concentrations decreased from 161.1 to 139.1 mg/dL (P AUC of ≥180, i.e., the total area of blood glucose levels at or above 180 on the blood glucose curve of CGM, decreased from 339.1 to 113.6 mg/dL (P AUC of blood glucose levels below 70 on the blood glucose curve of CGM, slightly decreased from 1.6 to 0.3 mg/dL (P = 0.08). The total number of basal insulin units decreased from 128 to 76, and that of bolus insulin decreased from 266 to 154; the dose of insulin could be markedly decreased. In addition, the mean 8-OHdG level decreased from 11.4 to 10.8 ng/mg Cre (P blood glucose changes in type 2 diabetes using insulin. In addition, the results suggest its antioxidant actions. University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN no. 000019429).

  13. Changes in erythrocyte insulin receptors in normal dogs and keeshond dogs with inheritable, early onset, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaassen, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Validation of a procedure to evaluate insulin receptors on erythrocytes (RBC-IR) in dogs is described. The specific binding of ( 125 I)iodoinsulin to RBC-IR of normal dogs is significantly greater than binding in keeshonds with an inheritable form of early onset diabetes mellitus. This decreased binding was due to a significant decrease in RBC-IR affinity in the diabetic keeshonds. To determine the effect on RBC-IR, normal dogs were treated with either dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or prednisone (0.3 mg/kg) for 10 days: concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin, plus binding characteristics of RBC-IR were determined. In the dexamethasone treated group, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 6 and continued through day 10. Insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3 and remained elevated through day 10. In the prednisone treated group, glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3, while insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 8. Maximum binding of RBC-IR was unaffected by prednisone and neither affinities nor receptor numbers were significantly different from day 1. No changes in plasma cortisol concentration were seen. Diabetic keeshonds on daily insulin treatment were removed from exogenous insulin therapy for 48 hours. Significant increases in glucose concentrations were observed, but no significant changes in cortisol, insulin, average receptor binding affinity, or RBC-IR number per cell occurred

  14. The triglyceride content in skeletal muscle is associated with hepatic but not peripheral insulin resistance in elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, L G; Laurila, Esa; Hansson, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Total muscle triglyceride (MT) content has been associated with insulin resistance. We investigated the predictors and impact of MT on relevant metabolic parameters including peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance in elderly twins.......Total muscle triglyceride (MT) content has been associated with insulin resistance. We investigated the predictors and impact of MT on relevant metabolic parameters including peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance in elderly twins....

  15. Using mobile phone text messages to improve insulin injection technique and glycaemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus: a multi-centre study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Selda; Cosansu, Gulhan; Erdogan, Semra; Kahraman, Alev; Isik, Sengul; Bayrak, Gulay; Bektas, Belgin; Olgun, Nermin

    2015-06-01

    To improve the knowledge and skills of diabetic patients on insulin injections using mobile phone short message services and to evaluate the association of this intervention with metabolic outcomes. Mobile communication technologies are widely used in Turkey, which maintains a diabetic population of more than 6·5 million. However, there are a limited number of studies using mobile technologies in the challenging and complicated management of diabetes. A one group pretest-posttest design was used in this study. The study sample consisted of 221 people with type 1 and type 2 Diabetes Mellitus from eight outpatient clinics in six cities in Turkey. The 'Demographic and diabetes-related information Form' and 'Insulin Injection Technique and Knowledge Form' were used in the initial interview. Subsequently, 12 short messages related to insulin administration were sent to patients twice a week for six months. Each patient's level of knowledge and skills regarding both the insulin injection technique and glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin A1c) levels were measured at three months and six months during the text messaging period and six months later (12 months total) when text messaging was stopped. The mean age of the patients with diabetes was 39·8 ± 16·2 years (min: 18; max: 75). More than half of the patients were females with a mean duration of diabetes of 11·01 ± 7·22 years (min 1; max: 32). Following the text message reminders, the patients' level of knowledge and skills regarding the insulin injection technique improved at month 3 and 6 (p 12 compared to the baseline values (p insulin injection sites and the frequency of rotation of skin sites for insulin injections also increased. This study demonstrated that a short message services-based information and reminder system on insulin injection administration provided to insulin-dependent patients with diabetes by nurses resulted in improved self-administration of insulin and metabolic control

  16. Insulin initiation status of primary care physicians in Turkey, barriers to insulin initiation and knowledge levels about insulin therapy: A multicenter cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Elif; Set, Turan; Saglam, Zuhal; Tekin, Nil; Karatas Eray, Irep; Yavuz, Erdinc; Sahin, Mustafa Kursat; Selcuk, Engin Burak; Cadirci, Dursun; Cubukcu, Mahcube

    2017-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the insulin initiation status, barriers to insulin initiation and knowledge levels about treatment administered by primary care physicians (PCP). We conducted our study in accordance with a multicenter, cross-sectional design in Turkey, between July 2015 and July 2016. A questionnaire inquiring demographic features, status of insulin initiation, obstacles to insulin initiation and knowledge about therapy of the PCPs was administered during face-to-face interviews. 84 PCPs (19%) (n=446, mean age=41.5±8.4years, 62.9% male and 90.0% ministry certified family physicians) initiated insulin therapy in the past. Most of the stated primary barriers (51.9%, n=230) were due to the physicians. The most relevant barrier was "lack of clinical experience" with a rate of 19% (n=84 of the total). The average total knowledge score was 5.7±2.0 for the family medicine specialist, and 3.8±2.1 for the ministry certified family physicians (p=0.000, maximum knowledge score could be 10). The status of insulin initiation in Turkey by the primary care physicians is inadequate. Medical education programs and health care systems may require restructuring to facilitate insulin initiation in primary care. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Galantamine alleviates inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda M; Sangaleti, Carine T; Costa, Fernando O; Morais, Tercio L; Lopes, Heno F; Motta, Josiane M; Irigoyen, Maria C; Bortoloto, Luiz A; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Harris, Yael Tobi; Satapathy, Sanjaya K; Olofsson, Peder S; Akerman, Meredith; Chavan, Sangeeta S; MacKay, Meggan; Barnaby, Douglas P; Lesser, Martin L; Roth, Jesse; Tracey, Kevin J; Pavlov, Valentin A

    2017-07-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is an obesity-driven condition of pandemic proportions that increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, though inflammation has been implicated in MetS pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of galantamine, a centrally acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor with antiinflammatory properties, on markers of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk, and other metabolic and cardiovascular indices in subjects with MetS. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, subjects with MetS (30 per group) received oral galantamine 8 mg daily for 4 weeks, followed by 16 mg daily for 8 weeks or placebo. The primary outcome was inflammation assessed through plasma levels of cytokines and adipokines associated with MetS. Secondary endpoints included body weight, fat tissue depots, plasma glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), cholesterol (total, HDL, LDL), triglycerides, BP, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV). Galantamine resulted in lower plasma levels of proinflammatory molecules TNF (-2.57 pg/ml [95% CI -4.96 to -0.19]; P = 0.035) and leptin (-12.02 ng/ml [95% CI -17.71 to -6.33]; P < 0.0001), and higher levels of the antiinflammatory molecules adiponectin (2.71 μg/ml [95% CI 1.93 to 3.49]; P < 0.0001) and IL-10 (1.32 pg/ml, [95% CI 0.29 to 2.38]; P = 0.002) as compared with placebo. Galantamine also significantly lowered plasma insulin and HOMA-IR values, and altered HRV. Low-dose galantamine alleviates inflammation and insulin resistance in MetS subjects. These findings support further study of galantamine in MetS therapy. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02283242. Fundação de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Brazil, and the NIH.

  18. Insulin secretion and insulin action in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: which defect is primary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaven, G M

    1984-01-01

    Defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action exist in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The loss of the acute plasma insulin response to intravenous glucose is seen in patients with relatively mild degrees of fasting hyperglycemia, but patients with severe fasting hyperglycemia also demonstrate absolute hypoinsulinemia in response to an oral glucose challenge. In contrast, day-long circulating insulin levels are within normal limits even in severely hyperglycemic patients with NIDDM. The relationship between NIDDM and insulin action in NIDDM is less complex, and is a characteristic feature of the syndrome. This metabolic defect is independent of obesity, and the severity of the resistance to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake increases with magnitude of hyperglycemia. Control of hyperglycemia with exogenous insulin ameliorates the degree of insulin resistance, and reduction of insulin resistance with weight loss in obese patients with NIDDM leads to an enhanced insulin response. Since neither therapeutic intervention is capable of restoring all metabolic abnormalities to normal, these observations do not tell us which of these two defects is primarily responsible for the development of NIDDM. Similarly, the observation that most patients with impaired glucose tolerance are hyperinsulinemic and insulin resistant does not prove that insulin resistance is the primary defect in NIDDM. In conclusion, reduction in both insulin secretion and action is seen in patients with NIDDM, and the relationship between these two metabolic abnormalities is very complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Peter R.; Bailey, Clifford J.

    1991-01-01

    Information and current ideas on the factors regulating insulin secretion, the mechanisms underlying the secretion and biological actions of insulin, and the main characteristics of diabetes mellitus are presented. (Author)

  20. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  1. Heterogeneity of human plasma insulin: techniques for separating immunoreactive components and their determination by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Iracelia Torres de Toledo e

    1977-01-01

    When human plasma is filtered on Sephadex G-SO fine, insulin immunoreactivity is recovered in two peaks: 'big insulin', the higher molecular weight component and 'little insulin', the lower molecular component, having elution volumes that correspond to those of porcine proinsulin 125 I and porcine insulin 125 I respectively. The presence of another form of immunoreactive insulin 'big big insulin' was detected from an insuloma suspect and its elution pattern corresponding to serum albumin. The eluates correspondent to 'big' and 'little' insulin as well as 'big big' component were assayed by radioimmunoassay using crystalline human insulin as a standard, porcine insulin 125 tracer and anti insulin serum. The antibody, raised in guinea-pigs, was sensitive and potent being adequate for the assay. The reactivity of insulin and proinsulin was tested against the antibody. The relative proportions of several components of total immunoreactive insulin in plasma were studied in basal conditions in five normal subjects and in the patient JSC with pancreatic insulin-secreting tumor as well as after glucose stimuli in all tolbutamide in JSC. (author)

  2. The Daily Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold, Else

    2015-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, The Daily Selection, I will be addressing the overall question of how research on wardrobes can contribute to a more effective connection between the production and the consumption of dress objects. The thesis builds on exemplary studies of people in their wardrobes....... As such, the parts, when taken as a whole, represent an evolving process through which my overall research questions are being filtered and reflected. My scholarly approach builds on the fusing of fashion and dress research and design research, in this way closing a gap between dress practice as...

  3. The Role of Insulin, Insulin Growth Factor, and Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Brain Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Messier, Claude; Teutenberg, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Most brain insulin comes from the pancreas and is taken up by the brain by what appears to be a receptor-based carrier. Type 2 diabetes animal models associated with insulin resistance show reduced insulin brain uptake and content. Recent data point to changes in the insulin receptor cascade in obesity-related insulin resistance, suggesting that brain insulin receptors also become less sensitive to insulin, which could reduce synaptic plasticity. Insulin transport to the brain is reduced in a...

  4. Chemical and thermal stability of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B

    2006-01-01

    To study the correlation between the thermal and chemical stability of insulin formulations with various insulin hexamer ligands.......To study the correlation between the thermal and chemical stability of insulin formulations with various insulin hexamer ligands....

  5. Clinical study on insulin receptors of mononuclear cells in diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalimunthe, D [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-12-01

    /sup 125/I-insulin binding activity to mononuclear cells was studied in 75 noninsulin-dependent diabetic subjects and 31 normal subjects and the following results were obtained. 1. /sup 125/I-insulin binding is directly proportional to the mononuclear cell concentrations. There is a linear increase of specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. 2. The binding of /sup 125/I-insulin to mononuclear cells is displaced by the increasing concentration of native insulin. 3. The /sup 125/I-insulin degradation in the incubation medium after incubation of mononuclear cells for 24 hours at 4/sup 0/C was almost 5% in this study. 4. The insulin binding activity in diabetic subjects was lower than that in normal subjects (P < 0.001) without any significant difference in affinity constant. 5. The relationship of binding activity to age of diabetics (r = 0.06, N.S), relative body weitht (r = 0.06, N.S) and duration of diabetes from onset was not significant. 6. In untreated noninsulin-dependent diabetics the insulin binding activity was inversely correlated to fasting blood glucose level (r = 0.78, P < 0.001) and slightly inversely correlated to serum insulin level (r = 0.47, P < 0.01). A slight inverse correlation was also observed in serum triglyceride level (r = 0.53, P < 0.01) and in total cholesterol level (r = 0.29, P < 0.05). 7. No significant difference between the binding activity was observed by grade of diabetic retinopathy. 8. After treatment with diet and/or sulfonylurea, the diabetics exhibited a significant increase in insulin binding activity (P < 0.005) but no significant difference in plasma insulin level, body weight and plasma lipid levels was observed.

  6. Totally James

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with James Howe, author of "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe". In this interview, Howe discusses tolerance, diversity and the parallels between his own life and his literature. Howe's four books in addition to "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe" and his list of recommended books with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  7. Modern approach to basal-bolus therapy with glargine and glulisine insulin analoguesin various age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Nikitichna Volevodz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DCCT (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial study established that intensified insulin therapy in multiple daily injections (MDI or continuous insulin infusion (CSII regimens substantially reduce both development and progression of complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM as compared to conventional insulin therapy. Insulin analogues possess better pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics than unmodified human insulin agents. These characteristics are beneficial for management of diabetes mellitus, allowing better glycemic outcomes with lower incidence of hypoglycemia.Current review discusses specifics of therapy with glargine (Lantus? and glulisine (Apidra? insulin analogues. Authors analyzed available to date results from corresponding clinical trials in children, adolescents and adults. Pharmacoeconomic aspects and matters of dosage of glargine and glulisine are further addressed.

  8. Future of newer basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu, S. V.; Velmurugan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Basal insulin have been developed over the years. In recent times newer analogues have been added to the armanentarium for diabetes therapy. This review specifically reviews the current status of different basal insulins

  9. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  10. Knowledge of carbohydrate counting and insulin dose calculations in paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finner, Natalie; Quinn, Anne; Donovan, Anna; O'Leary, Orla; O'Gorman, Clodagh S

    2015-12-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who are able to adjust their insulin doses according to the carbohydrate content of a meal, as well as their blood glucose, are likely to have improved glycaemic control (Silverstein et al., 2005). With improved glycaemic control, patients have a lower risk of developing long-term microvascular complications associated with T1DM (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group, 1993). To assess the carbohydrate and insulin knowledge of patients attending our paediatric diabetes clinic at the University Hospital Limerick (UHL), the validated PedCarbQuiz (PCQ) was applied to our clinic population. This study was completed by applying a questionnaire called the PedCarbQuiz (PCQ) to children exclusively attending our paediatric diabetes clinic at UHL. Of the clinic's 220 patients, 81 participated in the study. The average total PCQ score (%) was higher in the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) group compared with the multiple daily insulin (MDI) injection user group (79.1 ± 12.1 versus 65.9 ± 6.6 p = 0.005). The CSII group also had a higher average carbohydrate score (%) compared with the MDI group (79.4 ± 12.4 versus 66.3 ± 16.2, p = 0.004). This study demonstrates that in a representative Irish regional paediatric T1DM clinic, knowledge of carbohydrates and insulin is better among patients treated with CSII compared with MDI. However, knowledge in both groups is poorer than in the original US sample. This study demonstrates that in a representative Irish regional paediatric T1DM clinic, knowledge of carbohydrates and insulin is poorer than in a US based sample, although this knowledge is better among patients treated with CSII compared with MDI. This highlights the need for improved resources for diabetes and carbohydrate counting education for patients with T1DM.

  11. Insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.H.; Khan, F.A.; Ijaz, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine insulin resistance in human subjects having impaired glucose regulation (IGR) by Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). A total of 100 subjects with impaired glucose regulation were selected for evaluation of metabolic syndrome as per the criteria of National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP, ATP III), along with 47 healthy age and gender-matched controls. Physical examination to determine blood pressure and waist circumference was carried out and so was sampling for plasma glucose, serum triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and insulin. Insulin resistance was calculated by the HOMA-IR. Finally, subjects with and without metabolic syndrome were compared with controls (n=47), using one-way ANOVA for studying insulin resistance between groups, with Tukey's post-hoc comparison. The frequency of finding metabolic syndrome in cases of IGR remained 47%. The insulin resistance demonstrated stepwise worsening from control population (mean=1.54, 95 % CI: 1.77 - 2.37) to subjects suffering from only IGR (mean=2.07, 95 % CI: 1.77- 2.37) to metabolic syndrome (mean=2.67, 95 %, CI: 2.34 - 3.00) (p < 0.001). Patients with impaired glucose regulation may have significant insulin resistance. It is, thus, recommended that a vigorous search be made to measure insulin resistance in all cases diagnosed to have impaired glucose regulation. (author)

  12. Trends in Medicaid Reimbursements for Insulin From 1991 Through 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2015-10-01

    Insulin is a vital medicine for patients with diabetes mellitus. Newer, more expensive insulin products and the lack of generic insulins in the United States have increased costs for patients and insurers. To examine Medicaid payment trends for insulin products. Cost information is available for all 50 states and has been recorded since the 1990s. A time-series analysis comparing reimbursements and prices. Using state- and national-level Medicaid data from 1991 to 2014, we identified all patients who used 1 or more of the 16 insulin products that were continuously available in the United States between 2006 and 2014. Insulin products were classified into rapid-acting and long-acting analogs, short-acting, intermediate, and premixed insulins based on American Diabetes Association Guidelines. Inflation-adjusted payments made to pharmacies by Medicaid per 1 mL (100 IU) of insulin in 2014 US dollars. Since 1991, Medicaid reimbursement per unit (1 mL) of insulin dispensed has risen steadily. In the 1990s, Medicaid reimbursed pharmacies between $2.36 and $4.43 per unit. By 2014, reimbursement for short-acting insulins increased to $9.64 per unit; intermediate, $9.22; premixed, $14.79; and long-acting, $19.78. Medicaid reimbursement for rapid-acting insulin analogs rose to $19.81 per unit. The rate of increase in reimbursement was higher for insulins with patent protection ($0.20 per quarter) than without ($0.05 per quarter) (Preimbursements peaked at $407.4 million dollars in quarter 2 of 2014. Total volume peaked at 29.9 million units in quarter 4 of 2005 and was 21.2 million units in quarter 2 of 2014. Between 1991 and 2014, there was a near-exponential upward trend in Medicaid payments on a per-unit basis for a wide variety of insulin products regardless of formulation, duration of action, and whether the product was patented. Although reimbursements for newer, patent-protected insulin analogs increased at a faster rate than reimbursements for older insulins, payments

  13. Insulin Resistance in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Jahrling, Jordan B; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is a key hormone regulating metabolism. Insulin binding to cell surface insulin receptors engages many signaling intermediates operating in parallel and in series to control glucose, energy, and lipids while also regulating mitogenesis and development. Perturbations in the function of any of these intermediates, which occur in a variety of diseases, cause reduced sensitivity to insulin and insulin resistance with consequent metabolic dysfunction. Chronic inflammation ensues which exacerbates compromised metabolic homeostasis. Since insulin has a key role in learning and memory as well as directly regulating ERK, a kinase required for the type of learning and memory compromised in early Alzheimer's disease (AD), insulin resistance has been identified as a major risk factor for the onset of AD. Animal models of AD or insulin resistance or both demonstrate that AD pathology and impaired insulin signaling form a reciprocal relationship. Of note are human and animal model studies geared toward improving insulin resistance that have led to the identification of the nuclear receptor and transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) as an intervention tool for early AD. Strategic targeting of alternate nodes within the insulin signaling network has revealed disease-stage therapeutic windows in animal models that coalesce with previous and ongoing clinical trial approaches. Thus, exploiting the connection between insulin resistance and AD provides powerful opportunities to delineate therapeutic interventions that slow or block the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:25237037

  14. Molecular mechanism of insulin resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Free fatty acids are known to play a key role in promoting loss of insulin sensitivity, thereby causing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism involved is still unclear. In searching for the cause of the mechanism, it has been found that palmitate inhibits insulin receptor (IR) gene expression, ...

  15. New daily persistent headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Tyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available New daily persistent headache (NDPH is a chronic headache developing in a person who does not have a past history of headaches. The headache begins acutely and reaches its peak within 3 days. It is important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure and volume. A significant proportion of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment. The condition is best viewed as a syndrome rather than a diagnosis. The headache can mimic chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache, and it is also important to exclude secondary causes, particularly headaches due to alterations in CSF pressure and volume. A large proportion of NDPH sufferers have migrainous features to their headache and should be managed with treatments used for treating migraine. A small group of NDPH sufferers may have intractable headaches that are refractory to treatment.

  16. Making Daily Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Wind, Simon

    elucidate aspects of urban everyday mobility that can be utilized in policy and planning perspectives. This knowledge can aid construction of generalized qualitative scenarios that together with quantitative transport models can serve as wider knowledge foundation in decision making process.......In 2012 the average daily transportation distance for every Dane were 40 km (TU Data). Realising how much of life is spend thinking about, planning and performing mobility practices it becomes evident that it is much more than an instrumental physical phenomenon – it has great repercussions on life......, social networks, understanding of places and ultimately ourselves and others. To successfully accomplish everyday life, households have to cope with large number of different activities and mobility in relation to their children, work, social life, obligations, expectations, needs and wishes. Drawing...

  17. Physics in daily life

    CERN Document Server

    Hermans, Jo

    2012-01-01

    This book provides answers to everyday questions that any curious mind would ask, like : Why is water blue ? What makes ice so slippery ? How do we localize sound ? How do we keep our body temperature so nice and constant ? How do we survive the sauna at 90 C ? Why do large raindrops fall faster than small ones, and what exactly is their speed ? The answers are given in an accessible and playful way, and are illustrated with funny cartoons. In this book forty "Physics in Daily Life" columns, which appeared earlier in Europhysics News, are brought together in one inspiring volume. As well as being a source of enjoyment and satisfying insights for anyone with some physics background, it also serves as a very good teaching tool for science students. This booklet is a feast of erudition and humour.

  18. Initiating insulin therapy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash Kumar Wangnoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary clinical goals to be achieved with insulin initiation are elimination of ketosis and hyperglycemia with prevention of chronic complications. Insulin therapy is the mainstay in management of type 1 diabetes, which should be aimed at achieving good glycemic control, with achievement of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c <7.5%, pre-meal self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG of 90-130 mg/dL, bed time SMBG of 100-140 mg/dL, mean blood glucose level of 120-160 mg/dL and no ketonuria. Two classes of insulin are available for use in T1DM viz. bolus/prandial insulins (rapid-acting insulins and short-acting insulins and basal insulins (intermediate-acting insulin and long-acting insulin. Insulin glargine and glulisine can be used in children above 6 years, lispro in children above 3 years and detemir and aspart in children above 2 years. The caution for hypoglycemia should be exercised while prescribing them. Degludec is currently not approved for pediatric use. The initial insulin regimen should comprise of ≥2 daily bolus and ≥1 basal insulin injections. Insulin intensification would be required if the initial regimen fails, which can be achieved by increasing frequency of long and rapid acting insulin analogues. The American Diabetes Association guidelines recommend HbA1c targets of <8.0% for children <6 years of age, ≤7.5% for children 6 to 12 years of age, and ≤7.0% for adolescents, 12-18 years of age. However, the evidence is now in favor of a single target HbA1c of ≤7.5% for all children and adolescents <19 years of age.

  19. Clinical experience with insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with type 2 diabetes: Results from the Northern Tunisia cohort of the A1chieve study

    OpenAIRE

    Blouza, Samira; Jamoussi, Henda

    2013-01-01

    Background: The A 1 chieve, a multicentric (28 countries), 24-week, non-interventional study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of insulin detemir, biphasic insulin aspart and insulin aspart in people with T2DM (n = 66,726) in routine clinical care across four continents. Materials and Methods: Data was collected at baseline, at 12 weeks and at 24 weeks. This short communication presents the results for patients enrolled from Northern Tunisia. Results: A total of 443 patients were enrolle...

  20. One week treatment with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra leads to a sustained improvement in insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asseldonk, Edwin J P; van Poppel, Pleun C M; Ballak, Dov B; Stienstra, Rinke; Netea, Mihai G; Tack, Cees J

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation associated with obesity is involved in the development of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory treatment with the Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra would improve insulin sensitivity. In an open label proof-of-concept study, we included overweight patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with an HbA1c level over 7.5%. Selecting insulin resistant patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes allowed us to study the effects of anakinra on insulin sensitivity. Patients were treated with 100mg anakinra daily for one week. Insulin sensitivity, insulin need and blood glucose profiles were measured before, after one week and after four weeks of follow-up. Fourteen patients completed the study. One week of anakinra treatment led to an improvement of insulin sensitivity, an effect that was sustained for four weeks. Similarly, glucose profiles, HbA1c levels and insulin needs improved. In conclusion, one week of treatment with anakinra improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Insulin som trickster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2011-01-01

    grænser nedbrydes i en konstant penetrering af huden, når blodsukkeret måles eller insulinen indsprøjtes. Insulin analyseres som en tricksterfigur, der udøver et grænsearbejde på kroppen, leger med dens kategorier og vender forholdet mellem gift og medicin, frihed og ufrihed, kunstighed og naturlighed...

  2. Polyethyleneglycol RIA (radioimmunoassay) insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Insulin is a polypeptide hormone of M.W. 6,000 composed of two peptide chains, A and B, jointed by two cross-linked disulphide bonds and synthesized by the beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas. Insulin influences most of the metabolic functions of the body. Its best known action is to lower the blood glucose concentration by increasing the rate at which glucose is converted to glycogen in the liver and muscles and to fat in adipose tissue, by stimulating the rate of glucose metabolism and by depressing gluconeogenesis. Insulin stimulates the synthesis of proteins, DNA and RNA in cells generally, and promotes the uptake of aminoacids and their incorporation into muscle protein. It increases the uptake of glucose in adipose tissue and its conversion into fat and inhibits lipolysis. Insulin primary action is on the cell membrane, where it probably facilitates the transport of glucose and aminoacids into the cells. At the same time it may activate intracellular enzymes such as glycogen synthetase, concerned with glycogen synthesis. (Author) [es

  3. Insulin gene therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handorf, Andrew M; Sollinger, Hans W; Alam, Tausif

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an autoimmune disease resulting from the destruction of pancreatic β cells. Current treatments for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus include daily insulin injections or whole pancreas transplant, each of which are associated with profound drawbacks. Insulin gene therapy, which has shown great efficacy in correcting hyperglycemia in animal models, holds great promise as an alternative strategy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus in humans. Insulin gene therapy refers to the targeted expression of insulin in non-β cells, with hepatocytes emerging as the primary therapeutic target. In this review, we present an overview of the current state of insulin gene therapy to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus, including the need for an alternative therapy, important features dictating the success of the therapy, and current obstacles preventing the translation of this treatment option to a clinical setting. In so doing, we hope to shed light on insulin gene therapy as a viable option to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart and biphasic insulin lispro mix in patients with type 2 diabetes: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D represents an escalating burden worldwide, particularly in China and India. Compared with Caucasians, Asian people with diabetes have lower body mass index, increased visceral adiposity, and postprandial glucose (PPG/insulin resistance. Since postprandial hyperglycemia contributes significantly to total glycemic burden and is associated with heightened cardiovascular risk, targeting PPG early in T2D is paramount. Premixed insulin regimens are widely used in Asia due to their convenience and effectiveness. Data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing efficacy and safety of biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30 with biphasic insulin lispro mix (LM 25/50 and versus other insulin therapies or oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs in T2D demonstrated that BIAsp 30 and LM 25/50 were associated with similar or greater improvements in glycemic control versus comparator regimens, such as basal–bolus insulin, in insulin-naÏve, and prior insulin users. Studies directly comparing BIAsp 30 and LM 25 provided conflicting glycemic control results. Safety data generally showed increased hypoglycemia and weight gain with premixed insulins versus basal–bolus insulin or OADs. However, large observational trials documented improvements in glycated hemoglobin, PPG, and hypoglycemia with BIAsp 30 in multi-ethnic patient populations. In summary, this literature review demonstrates that premixed insulin regimens are an appropriate and effective treatment choice in T2D.

  5. [Insulin and diabetes control in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardino, Juan J; Costa Gil, José E; Faingold, María C; Litwak, León; Fuente, Graciela V

    2013-01-01

    As in the rest of the world, there is a significant gap between scientific knowledge regarding diabetes mellitus and the daily practice outcome, in Argentina. Inadequate diabetes control combined with associated cardiovascular risk factors are responsible for an elevated morbid-mortality incidence and the consequent raise in the socioeconomic burden. Some of the factors leading to this situation are the late diagnosis of the disease, the clinical "inertia" (reluctance to prescribe insulin) and the poor education given to the health care team as well as the persons with diabetes. The implementation of a national diabetologic education program targeting health care providers, the persons with diabetes and their families, could contribute to optimize the appropriate insulin prescription, and consequently improve their life quality, while reducing the disease socioeconomic burden. In order to optimize the education program's strategy outcome, insulinization cabinets should be incorporated, the participation of all health systems (public health, social security and private health insurance companies), the media, health sciences, schools and the pharmaceutical industry are needed.

  6. INSULIN DETEMIR IMPROVES GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND IS WEIGHT NEUTRALIN THE SLOVENIAN COHORT OF THE PREDICTIVE™ STUDY – CLINICALEXPERIENCE IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Mrevlje

    2008-10-01

    The Slovenian cohort data thus support the short-term safety and efficacy of insulin detemir in daily clinical practice. These results are consistent with the findings of controlledclinical trials, including essentially no effect on body weight gain

  7. Heterogeneity and compartmental properties of insulin storage and secretion in rat islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, G.; Landahl, H.D.; Gishizky, M.L.; Grodsky, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    To investigate compartmental properties of insulin storage and secretion, isolated rat islets were used for pulse-labeling experiments, after which proinsulin and insulin were purified rigorously. Processing of proinsulin to insulin neared completion by 3 h without additional loss of either radioactive peptide by cellular or extracellular proteolysis. The amount of labeled hormone rapidly diminished in islets; it was secreted at a higher fractional rate than immunoreactive insulin, resulting in secreted insulin's having a higher specific activity than the average cellular insulin. Newly synthesized insulin, therefore, was secreted preferentially. Changes in the specific activity of secreted and cellular insulin with time were consistent with changes predicted for islets containing 33% of their total insulin in a glucose-labile compartment. Predictions were based on steady-state analysis of a simple storage-limited representation of B cell function. Islets from either the dorsal or ventral part of the pancreas also contained 33% of their total insulin in a glucose-labile compartment. The same compartment was mobilized by 20 mM glucose, 50 mM potassium + 2 mM glucose, or 20 MM glucose + 1 mM 3-isobutylmethylxanthine as indicated by the specific activity ratio of secreted vs. cellular insulin, even though average secretion rates with these stimuli differed by more than threefold. In the absence of calcium, the effectiveness of 20 mM glucose as a secretagogue declined markedly, and the older stored insulin was preferentially mobilized because secreted insulin had a lower rather than a higher specific activity than cellular insulin. Results provide insight into the mechanisms of nonrandom mobilization and secretion of insulin form the B cell

  8. Effects of insulin on messenger RNA activities in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.E.; Lee, K.L.; Kenney, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Liver poly(A) RNA, isolated from adrenalectomized rats after insulin treatment, was translated in a nuclease-treated lysate of rabbit reticulocytes and quantitated for both total activity and the capacity to synthesize the insulin-inducible enzyme tyrosine amino-transferase. Analysis of the translated products from poly(A) RNA isolated 1 h after insulin treatment showed a 2.7-fold increase in activity of tyrosine aminotransferase mRNA. During the same interval, the capacity of poly(A) RNA to direct the synthesis of total protein in lysates also changed, showing a 30 to 40% increase in translational activity/unit of RNA. Increased translatability was apparent in all fractions of poly(A) RNA separated by centrifugation on sucrose gradients. Insulin thus appears to mediated a generalized changed in mRNAs leading to increased capacity for translation; induction of tyrosine aminotransferase may reflect unusual sensitivity to this effect of the hormone

  9. Adipokines and Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adipose tissue is now considered to be an active endocrine organ that secretes various adipokines such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, tumour necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Recent studies have shown that these factors might provide a molecular link between increased adiposity and impaired insulin sensitivity. Since hepatic insulin resistance plays the key role in the whole body insulin resistance, clarification of the regulatory processes about hepatic insulin resistance by adipokines in rodents and human would seem essential in order to understand the mechanism of type 2 diabetes and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat it. PMID:23762871

  10. Short-term antidiabetic treatment with insulin or metformin has a similar impact on the components of metabolic syndrome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus requiring antidiabetic agents: results of a prospective, randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawiejska, A; Wender-Ozegowska, E; Grewling-Szmit, K; Brazert, M; Brazert, J

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an increased prevalence of fetal and maternal complications primarily caused by maternal hyperglycemia, which results in abnormal fetal growth. Diet modification is a common first step in the treatment of GDM, followed by antidiabetic pharmacotherapy if this approach fails. Insulin therapy is generally accepted; however, oral hypoglycemic agents have been used in this population. In this prospective, randomised study, we compared maternal metabolic status after treatment with insulin or metformin. Pregnant women (gestational age: ≥ 20 weeks) with GDM requiring medical hypoglycemic treatment were randomly allocated to the Metformin (n = 35) or Insulin (n = 43) Groups. Maternal metabolic status - assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) level, glycemic profile, insulin concentration, Homeostatic Model Assessment - Insulin Resistance index, and lipids - was recorded at booking and throughout pregnancy. The characteristics of the study group were: maternal age 33.5 ± 5.9 years, gestational age at baseline 28.5 ± 3.5 weeks, prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) 32.2 ± 3.5 kg/m(2), HbA1c at baseline 5.6 ± 0.6%, and average daily glycemia 5.9 ± 0.6 mmol/dl. Fasting glycemia at term was significantly lower in the Insulin Group but there were no significant differences in mean daily glycemia, HbA1c and BMI at term between the groups. Longitudinally, there was a small but significant increase in BMI and a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the Insulin Group and a significant increase in the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and a trend towards higher triglycerides in the Metformin Group. Both fasting and average daily glycemia were significantly reduced following treatment in both groups. No such change was evident for HbA1c. In a relative risk analysis, metformin treatment was associated with an insignificant elevated risk of HbA1c, triglycerides and lipid indices falling within the

  11. Light-intensity physical activity is associated with insulin resistance in elderly Japanese women independent of moderate-to vigorous-intensity physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gando, Yuko; Murakami, Haruka; Kawakami, Ryoko; Tanaka, Noriko; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Tabata, Izumi; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2014-02-01

    It is unclear whether light physical activity is beneficially associated with insulin resistance, similar to moderate and/or vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study was performed to determine the relationship between the amount of light physical activity, as determined with a triaxial accelerometer, and insulin resistance. A total of 807 healthy men and women participated in this study. Physical activity was measured using a triaxial accelerometer worn for 28 days and summarized as light intensity (1.1-2.9 METs) or moderate to vigorous intensity (≥ 3.0 METs). Insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA_R (FPG [mg/dL] × IRI [μU/mL]/405). The daily time spent in light physical activity was inversely associated with HOMA_R (r = -0.173, P physical activity and HOMA_R remained statistically significant (β = -0.119, P physical activity remained significantly associated with HOMA_R following further adjustment for moderate to vigorous intensity activity (β = -0.125, P physical activity was modeled as quartiles, especially in elderly women. These cross-sectional data suggest that light-intensity physical activity is beneficially associated with insulin resistance in elderly Japanese women.

  12. Edificio Daily Mirror

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams, Owen

    1963-07-01

    Full Text Available The building has 18 levels. The Press occupies the 4 basement floors. The ground floor is taken up with the entrance hall, and an indoor carriage way. A snack bar and the telephone operators are situated on the second floor. The production department and the medical services are located on the third storey, whilst the fourth is occupied by the offices and library. The fifth floor is the beginning of the higher section of the building. This floor and up to including the 11th floor are devoted to office space, except for the 10th storey, which contains the office apartments of the directors and the Council Chamber. Equipment related to various services of the building is housed on the 12th storey. Finally, this tall building constitutes a fine landmark in the London skyline. The Daily Mirror building is outstanding for the appropriate nature, the completeness and the quality of its installations, which thus provide the most widely read paper in the world with outstandingly efficient offices.Este edificio consta de 18 plantas. El cuerpo de Prensa se aloja en los cuatro sótanos; los vestíbulos de entrada y una calzada interior para vehículos se hallan en la planta baja; la primera alberga un snack-bar y centralita telefónica; la segunda, el departamento de producción y centro de asistencia médica, y la tercera, las oficinas y biblioteca principales. La cuarta planta señala el comienzo del bloque alto; esta planta, junto con las quinta, sexta, séptima, octava y décima, están dedicadas a oficinas. La novena contiene las oficinas-apartamentos de los directores y salas de Consejo, y la undécima, la maquinaria para las diversas instalaciones del edificio. La elevada torre constituye un grandioso hito de referencia en esta zona de Londres. El «Daily Mirror» se distingue por el acierto, número y perfección de sus instalaciones, que proporcionan, al periódico de mayor actualidad mundial, las más adecuadas y amplias oficinas modernas.

  13. Effects of 7 days of exercise training on insulin sensitivity and responsiveness in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirwan, John P; Solomon, Thomas; Wojta, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    sensitivity and responsiveness and 2) short-term exercise training results in improved suppression of hepatic glucose production by insulin. Fourteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes, age 64 +/- 2 yr, underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp procedure, first stage 40 mU.m(-2).min(-1) insulin......The objectives of this study were to determine whether 1) the improvement in insulin action induced by short-term exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes is due to an improvement in insulin sensitivity, an improvement in insulin responsiveness, or a combination of improved insulin...... infusion, second stage 1,000 mU.m(-2).min(-1) insulin infusion, together with a [3-(3)H]glucose infusion, before and after 7 days of exercise. The training consisted of 30 min of cycling and 30 min of treadmill walking at approximately 70% of maximal aerobic capacity daily for 7 days. The exercise program...

  14. Selective Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Ng, Yvonne; Pant, Himani; Li, Jia; Meoli, Christopher C.; Coster, Adelle C. F.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; James, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Aside from glucose metabolism, insulin regulates a variety of pathways in peripheral tissues. Under insulin-resistant conditions, it is well known that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is impaired, and many studies attribute this to a defect in Akt signaling. Here we make use of several insulin resistance models, including insulin-resistant 3T3-L1 adipocytes and fat explants prepared from high fat-fed C57BL/6J and ob/ob mice, to comprehensively distinguish defective from unaffected aspects of insulin signaling and its downstream consequences in adipocytes. Defective regulation of glucose uptake was observed in all models of insulin resistance, whereas other major actions of insulin such as protein synthesis and anti-lipolysis were normal. This defect corresponded to a reduction in the maximum response to insulin. The pattern of change observed for phosphorylation in the Akt pathway was inconsistent with a simple defect at the level of Akt. The only Akt substrate that showed consistently reduced phosphorylation was the RabGAP AS160 that regulates GLUT4 translocation. We conclude that insulin resistance in adipose tissue is highly selective for glucose metabolism and likely involves a defect in one of the components regulating GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface in response to insulin. PMID:25720492

  15. Evaluation of organ-specific glucose metabolism by 18F-FDG in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice as a model of insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Chao; Nakamura, Akinobu; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Shinoda, Kazuaki; Tateishi, Ukihide; Terauchi, Yasuo; Inoue, Tomio; Goto, Atsuhi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a physiological condition in which the body produces insulin but does not result in a sufficient biological effect. Insulin resistance is usually asymptomatic but is associated with health problems and is a factor in the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to clarify organ-specific insulin resistance in normal daily conditions using [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]-FDG). The biodistribution of [ 18 F]-FDG was examined in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) knockout mice, an animal model of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and C57BL/6J (wild-type) mice with and without insulin loading. Mice received 0.5 MBq of [ 18 F]-FDG injected into the tail vein, immediately followed by nothing (control cohorts) or an intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 mU/g body weight of human insulin as an insulin loading test. Blood glucose concentrations for all of the experimental animals were assessed at 0, 20, 40, and 60 min post-injection. The mice were subsequently killed, and tissue was collected for evaluation of [ 18 F]-FDG biodistribution. The radioactivity of each organ was measured using a gamma counter. In the absence of insulin, the blood glucose concentrations of wild-type mice (132±26 mg/dl) and IRS-1 knockout mice (134±18 mg/dl) were not significantly different. Blood glucose concentrations decreased following insulin administration, with lower concentrations in wild-type mice than in knockout mice at 20, 40, and 60 min. A statistically significant difference in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake between wild-type mice and IRS-1 knockout mice was confirmed in the heart, abdominal muscle, and femoral muscle. With insulin loading, [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart, back muscle, and abdominal muscle was significantly increased compared to without insulin loading in both wild-type mice and knockout mice. Our results showed that IR significantly affected [ 18 F]-FDG uptake in the heart in normal daily conditions. IR was associated with

  16. Dissimilar association of conventional immune-reactive versus specific insulin with cardiovascular risk factors: a consequence of proinsulinaemia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, P.A.; Mooy, J.M.; Kostense, P.J.; Popp-Snijders, C.; Bouter, L.M.; Heine, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study involving 365 non-diabetic elderly Caucasians, we examined the relationship of immuno-specific insulin (ISI), total immuno-reactive insulin (IRI), proinsulin (PI) and proinsulin-insulin ratio (PI:ISI) to serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), systolic

  17. Dissimilar association of conventional immuno-reactive versus specific insulin with cardiovascular risk factors : a consequence of proinsulinaemia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, P A; Mooy, J M; Kostense, P J; Popp-Snijders, C; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J

    In this study involving 365 non-diabetic elderly Caucasians, we examined the relationship of immuno-specific insulin (ISI), total immuno-reactive insulin (IRI), proinsulin (PI) and proinsulin-insulin ratio (PI:ISI) to serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), systolic

  18. Insulin resistance and chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Matulewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a condition of reduced biological response to insulin. Growing evidence indicates the role of the chronic low-grade inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Adipose tissue in obesity is characterized by increased lipolysis with the excessive release of free fatty acids, and is also a source of proinflammatory cytokines. Both these factors may inhibit insulin action. Proinflammatory cytokines exert their effect by stimulating major inflammatory NFκB and JNK pathways within the cells. Inflammatory processes in other insulin responsive tissues may also play a role in inducing insulin resistance. This paper is an overview of the chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and endothelial cells during the development of insulin resistance.

  19. Prospective randomized study for optimal insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tojo Katsuyoshi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large clinical trials proved that Basal-Bolus (BB insulin therapy was effective in the prevention of diabetic complications and their progression. However, BB therapy needs multiple insulin injections per a day. In this regard, a biphasic insulin analogue needs only twice-daily injections, and is able to correct postprandial hyperglycemia. Therefore it may achieve the blood glucose control as same as that of BB therapy and prevent the diabetic complications including macroangiopathy. Methods In PROBE (Prospective, Randomized, Open, Blinded-Endpoint design, forty-two type 2 diabetic patients (male: 73.8%, median(inter quartile range age: 64.5(56.8~71.0years with secondary failure of sulfonylurea (SU were randomly assigned to BB therapy with a thrice-daily insulin aspart and once-daily basal insulin (BB group or to conventional therapy with a twice-daily biphasic insulin analogue (30 Mix group, and were followed up for 6 months to compare changes in HbA1c, daily glycemic profile, intima-media thickness (IMT of carotid artery, adiponectin levels, amounts of insulin used, and QOL between the two groups. Results After 6 months, HbA1c was significantly reduced in both groups compared to baseline (30 Mix; 9.3(8.1~11.3 → 7.4(6.9~8.7%, p Conclusion Both BB and 30 mix group produced comparable reductions in HbA1c in type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure. There was no significant change in IMT as an indicator of early atherosclerotic changes between the two groups. The basal-bolus insulin therapy may not be necessarily needed if the type 2 diabetic patients have become secondary failure. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials number, NCT00348231

  20. Simulation-Based Evaluation of Dose-Titration Algorithms for Rapid-Acting Insulin in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Controlled on Basal Insulin and Oral Antihyperglycemic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaosu; Chien, Jenny Y; Johnson, Jennal; Malone, James; Sinha, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, model-based simulation approach was to evaluate the impact of various rapid-acting mealtime insulin dose-titration algorithms on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c]). Seven stepwise, glucose-driven insulin dose-titration algorithms were evaluated with a model-based simulation approach by using insulin lispro. Pre-meal blood glucose readings were used to adjust insulin lispro doses. Two control dosing algorithms were included for comparison: no insulin lispro (basal insulin+metformin only) or insulin lispro with fixed doses without titration. Of the seven dosing algorithms assessed, daily adjustment of insulin lispro dose, when glucose targets were met at pre-breakfast, pre-lunch, and pre-dinner, sequentially, demonstrated greater HbA1c reduction at 24 weeks, compared with the other dosing algorithms. Hypoglycemic rates were comparable among the dosing algorithms except for higher rates with the insulin lispro fixed-dose scenario (no titration), as expected. The inferior HbA1c response for the "basal plus metformin only" arm supports the additional glycemic benefit with prandial insulin lispro. Our model-based simulations support a simplified dosing algorithm that does not include carbohydrate counting, but that includes glucose targets for daily dose adjustment to maintain glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia.

  1. Rapid internalization of the insulin receptor in rat hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, J.M.; White, M.F.; Kahn, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied the internalization of the insulin receptor (IR) in rat hepatoma cells (Fao). The cells were surface-iodinated at 4 0 C, stimulated with insulin at 37 0 C, and then cooled rapidly, trypsinized at 4 0 C and solubilized. The IR was immunoprecipitated with a specific antibody, and internalization of the IR was assessed by the appearance of trypsin-resistant bands on SDS-PAGE. Insulin induced the internalization of surface receptors with a t 1/2 of 9-10 mins; cells not exposed to insulin internalized less than 20% of the IR during 1 h at 37 0 C. Further experiments demonstrated that the accumulation of trypsin-resistant IR paralleled a loss of receptor from the cell surface. Insulin-stimulated cells were chilled and iodinated at 4 0 C, followed by solubilization, immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE; alternatively, insulin-stimulated cells were chilled, surface-bound ligand removed by washing the cells at pH 4.2, and specific [ 125 I]insulin binding measured at 4 0 C. Both techniques confirmed the disappearance of IR from the cell surface at rates comparable to the insulin-stimulated internalization described above. The total amount of phosphotyrosine-containing IR, as assessed by immunoprecipitation with an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, remained constant during this time interval, suggesting that active kinase is translocated into the cell. In summary, the authors data indicate that insulin binding increases the rate of IR internalization of Fao cells. This relocation may facilitate the interaction of the activated tyrosine kinase in the IR with intracellular substrates, thus transmitting the insulin signal to metabolic pathways

  2. Combining Radar and Daily Precipitation Data to Estimate Meaningful Sub-daily Precipitation Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, G. G. S.; Bardossy, A.

    2016-12-01

    Short duration extreme rainfalls are important for design. The purpose of this presentation is not to improve the day by day estimation of precipitation, but to obtain reasonable statistics for the subdaily extremes at gauge locations. We are interested specifically in daily and sub-daily extreme values of precipitation at gauge locations. We do not employ the common procedure of using time series of control station to determine the missing data values in a target. We are interested in individual rare events, not sequences. The idea is to use radar to disaggregate daily totals to sub-daily amounts. In South Arica, an S-band radar operated relatively continuously at Bethlehem from 1998 to 2003, whose scan at 1.5 km above ground [CAPPI] overlapped a dense (10 km spacing) set of 45 pluviometers recording in the same 6-year period. Using this valuable set of data, we are only interested in rare extremes, therefore small to medium values of rainfall depth were neglected, leaving 12 days of ranked daily maxima in each set per year, whose sum typically comprised about 50% of each annual rainfall total. The method presented here uses radar for disaggregating daily gauge totals in subdaily intervals down to 15 minutes in order to extract the maxima of sub-hourly through to daily rainfall at each of 37 selected radar pixels [1 km square in plan] which contained one of the 45 pluviometers not masked out by the radar foot-print. The pluviometer data were aggregated to daily totals, to act as if they were daily read gauges; their only other task was to help in the cross-validation exercise. The extrema were obtained as quantiles by ordering the 12 daily maxima of each interval per year. The unusual and novel goal was not to obtain the reproduction of the precipitation matching in space and time, but to obtain frequency distributions of the gauge and radar extremes, by matching their ranks, which we found to be stable and meaningful in cross-validation tests. We provide and

  3. Gestational diabetes mellitus: Non-insulin management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Magon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM complicates a substantial number of pregnancies. There is consensus that in patients of GDM, excellent blood glucose control, with diet and, when necessary, oral hypoglycemics and insulin results in improved perinatal outcomes, and appreciably reduces the probability of serious neonatal morbidity compared with routine prenatal care. Goals of metabolic management of a pregnancy complicated with GDM have to balance the needs of a healthy pregnancy with the requirements to control glucose level. Medical nutrition therapy is the cornerstone of therapy for women with GDM. Surveillance with daily self-monitoring of blood glucose has been found to help guide management in a much better way than blood glucose checking in labs and clinics, which tends to be less frequent. Historically, insulin has been the therapeutic agent of choice for controlling hyperglycemia in pregnant women. However, difficulty in medication administration with multiple daily injections, potential for hypoglycemia, and increase in appetite and weight make this therapeutic option cumbersome for many pregnant patients. Use of oral hypogycemic agents (OHAs in pregnancy has opened new vistas for GDM management. At present, there is a growing acceptance of glyburide (glibenclamide use as the primary therapy for GDM. Glyburide and metformin have been found to be safe, effective and economical for the treatment of gestational diabetes. Insulin, however, still has an important role to play in GDM. GDM is a window of opportunity, which needs to be seized, for prevention of diabetes in future life. Goal of our educational programs should be not only to improve pregnancy outcomes but also to promote healthy lifestyle changes for the mother that will last long after delivery. Team effort on part of obstetricians and endocrinologists is required to make " the diabetes capital of the world" into " the diabetes care capital of the world".

  4. Intracellular insulin processing is altered in monocytes from patients with type II diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trischitta, V.; Benzi, L.; Brunetti, A.; Cecchetti, P.; Marchetti, P.; Vigneri, R.; Navalesi, R.

    1987-01-01

    We studied total cell-associated A14-[ 125 I]insulin radioactivity (including surface-bound and internalized radioactivity), insulin internalization, and its intracellular degradation at 37 C in monocytes from nonobese type II untreated diabetic patients (n = 9) and normal subjects (n = 7). Total cell-associated radioactivity was decreased in diabetic patients [2.65 +/- 1.21% (+/- SD) vs. 4.47 +/- 1.04% of total radioactivity. Insulin internalization was also reduced in diabetic patients (34.0 +/- 6.8% vs. 59.0 +/- 11.3% of cell-associated radioactivity. Using high performance liquid chromatography six intracellular forms of radioactivity derived from A14-[ 125 I] insulin were identified; 10-20% of intracellular radioactivity had approximately 300,000 mol wt and was identified as radioactivity bound to the insulin receptor, and the remaining intracellular radioactivity included intact A14-[ 125 I]insulin, [ 125 I]iodide, or [ 125 I]tyrosine, and three intermediate compounds. A progressive reduction of intact insulin and a corresponding increase in iodine were found when the incubation time was prolonged. Intracellular insulin degradation was reduced in monocytes from diabetic patients; intracellular intact insulin was 65.6 +/- 18.1% vs. 37.4 +/- 18.0% of intracellular radioactivity after 2 min and 23.6 +/- 22.3% vs. 3.9 +/- 2.3% after 60 min in diabetic patients vs. normal subjects, respectively. In conclusion, 1) human monocytes internalize and degrade insulin in the intracellular compartment in a stepwise time-dependent manner; and 2) in monocytes from type II diabetic patients total cell-associated radioactivity, insulin internalization, and insulin degradation are significantly reduced. These defects may be related to the cellular insulin resistance present in these patients

  5. A novel insulin resistance index to monitor changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance: the ACT NOW study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Devjit; Cobb, Jeff E; Gall, Walter; Adam, Klaus-Peter; George, Tabitha; Schwenke, Dawn C; Banerji, MaryAnn; Bray, George A; Buchanan, Thomas A; Clement, Stephen C; Henry, Robert R; Kitabchi, Abbas E; Mudaliar, Sunder; Ratner, Robert E; Stentz, Frankie B; Reaven, Peter D; Musi, Nicolas; Ferrannini, Ele; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to test the clinical utility of Quantose M(Q) to monitor changes in insulin sensitivity after pioglitazone therapy in prediabetic subjects. Quantose M(Q) is derived from fasting measurements of insulin, α-hydroxybutyrate, linoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, and oleate, three nonglucose metabolites shown to correlate with insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Participants were 428 of the total of 602 ACT NOW impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) subjects randomized to pioglitazone (45 mg/d) or placebo and followed for 2.4 years. At baseline and study end, fasting plasma metabolites required for determination of Quantose, glycated hemoglobin, and oral glucose tolerance test with frequent plasma insulin and glucose measurements to calculate the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity were obtained. Pioglitazone treatment lowered IGT conversion to diabetes (hazard ratio = 0.25; 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.50; P < .0001). Although glycated hemoglobin did not track with insulin sensitivity, Quantose M(Q) increased in pioglitazone-treated subjects (by 1.45 [3.45] mg·min(-1)·kgwbm(-1)) (median [interquartile range]) (P < .001 vs placebo), as did the Matsuda index (by 3.05 [4.77] units; P < .0001). Quantose M(Q) correlated with the Matsuda index at baseline and change in the Matsuda index from baseline (rho, 0.85 and 0.79, respectively; P < .0001) and was progressively higher across closeout glucose tolerance status (diabetes, IGT, normal glucose tolerance). In logistic models including only anthropometric and fasting measurements, Quantose M(Q) outperformed both Matsuda and fasting insulin in predicting incident diabetes. In IGT subjects, Quantose M(Q) parallels changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance with pioglitazone therapy. Due to its strong correlation with improved insulin sensitivity and its ease of use, Quantose M(Q) may serve as a useful clinical test to identify and monitor therapy in insulin-resistant patients.

  6. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Insulin pump therapy in children with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szypowska, Agnieszka; Schwandt, Anke; Svensson, Jannet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intensified insulin delivery using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is recommended in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) to achieve good metabolic control. OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency of pump usage in T1D children treated...... in SWEET (Better control in Paediatric and Adolescent diabeteS: Working to crEate CEnTers of Reference) centers and to compare metabolic control between patients treated with CSII vs MDI. METHODS: This study included 16 570 T1D children participating in the SWEET prospective, multicenter, standardized...... is offered by most Sweet centers. The differences between centers affect the frequency of use of modern technology. Despite the heterogeneity of centers, T1D children achieve relatively good metabolic control, especially those treated with insulin pumps and those of younger age....

  8. Insulin resistance: definition and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovitz, H E

    2001-01-01

    Insulin resistance is defined clinically as the inability of a known quantity of exogenous or endogenous insulin to increase glucose uptake and utilization in an individual as much as it does in a normal population. Insulin action is the consequence of insulin binding to its plasma membrane receptor and is transmitted through the cell by a series of protein-protein interactions. Two major cascades of protein-protein interactions mediate intracellular insulin action: one pathway is involved in regulating intermediary metabolism and the other plays a role in controlling growth processes and mitoses. The regulation of these two distinct pathways can be dissociated. Indeed, some data suggest that the pathway regulating intermediary metabolism is diminished in type 2 diabetes while that regulating growth processes and mitoses is normal.--Several mechanisms have been proposed as possible causes underlying the development of insulin resistance and the insulin resistance syndrome. These include: (1) genetic abnormalities of one or more proteins of the insulin action cascade (2) fetal malnutrition (3) increases in visceral adiposity. Insulin resistance occurs as part of a cluster of cardiovascular-metabolic abnormalities commonly referred to as "The Insulin Resistance Syndrome" or "The Metabolic Syndrome". This cluster of abnormalities may lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, accelerated atherosclerosis, hypertension or polycystic ovarian syndrome depending on the genetic background of the individual developing the insulin resistance.--In this context, we need to consider whether insulin resistance should be defined as a disease entity which needs to be diagnosed and treated with specific drugs to improve insulin action.

  9. Pitfalls of Insulin Pump Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Amy J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to raise awareness about the importance of ensuring that insulin pumps internal clocks are set up correctly at all times. This is a very important safety issue because all commercially available insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled (though this is controversial), nor equipped with automatically adjusting internal clocks. Special attention is paid to how basal and bolus dose errors can be introduced by daylight savings time changes, travel across time zones, and am-pm clock errors. Correct setting of insulin pump internal clock is crucial for appropriate insulin delivery. A comprehensive literature review is provided, as are illustrative cases. Incorrect setting can potentially result in incorrect insulin delivery, with potential harmful consequences, if too much or too little insulin is delivered. Daylight saving time changes may not significantly affect basal insulin delivery, given the triviality of the time difference. However, bolus insulin doses can be dramatically affected. Such problems may occur when pump wearers have large variations in their insulin to carb ratio, especially if they forget to change their pump clock in the spring. More worrisome than daylight saving time change is the am-pm clock setting. If this setting is set up incorrectly, both basal rates and bolus doses will be affected. Appropriate insulin delivery through insulin pumps requires correct correlation between dose settings and internal clock time settings. Because insulin pumps are not GPS-enabled or automatically time-adjusting, extra caution should be practiced by patients to ensure correct time settings at all times. Clinicians and diabetes educators should verify the date/time of insulin pumps during patients’ visits, and should remind their patients to always verify these settings. PMID:25355713

  10. Whole-blood viscosity and the insulin-resistance syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høieggen, A; Fossum, E; Moan, A; Enger, E; Kjeldsen, S E

    1998-02-01

    In a previous study we found that elevated blood viscosity was linked to the insulin resistance syndrome, and we proposed that high blood viscosity may increase insulin resistance. That study was based on calculated viscosity. To determine whether directly measured whole-blood viscosity was related to the insulin-resistance syndrome in the same way as calculated viscosity had been found to be. Healthy young men were examined with the hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic glucose clamp technique, and we related insulin sensitivity (glucose disposal rate) to other metabolic parameters and to blood viscosity. We established a technique for direct measurement of whole-blood viscosity. There were statistically significant negative correlations between glucose disposal rate and whole-blood viscosity at low and high shear rates (r = -0.41, P = 0.007 for both, n = 42). Whole-blood viscosity was correlated positively (n = 15) to serum triglyceride (r = 0.54, P = 0.04) and total cholesterol (r = 0.52, P = 0.05), and negatively with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = -0.53, P = 0.04) concentrations. Insulin sensitivity index was correlated positively to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r = 0.54, P = 0.04) and negatively to serum triglyceride (r = -0.69, P = 0.005) and to total cholesterol (r = -0.81, P = 0.0003) concentrations. The present results demonstrate for the first time that there is a negative relationship between directly measured whole-blood viscosity and insulin sensitivity as a part of the insulin-resistance syndrome. Whole-blood viscosity contributes to the total peripheral resistance, and these results support the hypothesis that insulin resistance has a hemodynamic basis.

  11. Insulin pumps and insulin quality--requirements and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Havelund, S

    1983-01-01

    In developing insulin solution suitable for delivery devices the chemical and biological stability, as well as the physical stability, must be taken into consideration. Addition of certain mono- and disaccharides increases the physical stability of neutral insulin solutions, but concurrently the chemical and biological stability decrease to an unacceptable degree. Addition of Ca-ions in low concentrations offers a physiologically acceptable method for stabilizing neutral insulin solutions against heat precipitation without affecting the quality, including the chemical and biological stability.

  12. Anabolic regulation of gluconeogenesis by insulin in isolated rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, C.; Bessman, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    The role of substrate availability in the regulation of gluconeogenesis in isolated rat hepatocytes was studied using [U- 14 C]alanine as a tracer in the presence of different concentrations of L-alanine in the incubation medium. At low alanine concentrations (0.5 mM) insulin decreased the 14 C incorporation into the glucose pool and increased the incorporation of tracer carbons into the protein and lipid pools and into CO 2 . The net radioactivity lost from the glucose pool was only a small percentage of the total increase in the activity of the protein, lipid, CO 2 , or glycogen pools, supporting the notion that the effect of insulin in diminishing gluconeogenesis is secondary to its effects on pathways using pyruvate. At higher concentrations of alanine (2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mM) in the incubation medium insulin increased the movement of alanine carbons into protein and glucose. These results were further confirmed by using [U- 14 C]lactate. The increases in observed specific activity of glucose following insulin administration would not be possible if insulin acted by affecting the activity of any enzyme directly involved in the formation or utilization of pyruvate, most of which have been proposed as sites of insulin action. Data presented show that insulin inhibits gluconeogenesis by affecting a change in substrate availability

  13. Influence of orlistat therapy on serum insulin level and morphological and functional parameters of peripheral arterial circulation in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajduković Zoran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin resistance is related to accelerated atherosclerosis, whereas weight loss is associated with the increasing insulin sensitivity, the improvement of functional and the morphological parameters of arterial circulation, and the reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of orlistat treatment on serum insulin level and functional and morphologic parameters of peripheral arterial circulation. Methods. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double − blind, placebo − controlled study. Thirty patients with body mass index over 30 kg/m2 normotensive, nonsmokers, without clinically manifested cardiovascular disease or diabetes were randomly assigned either orlistat (120 mg, 3 times daily; n = 20 or placebo (n = 10 in a double − blind manner. All of the patients were on individually calculated hypocaloric diet. The follow-up period was 24 weeks. Arterial pressure, fasting serum glucose and insulin level, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol were determined at the beginning, following 3 and 6 months. Also, the intima − media thickness of right superficial femoral artery and the mean blood flow velocity were determined with ultrasonography. Results. Inside the period of 3 and 6 months, there were the greater reductions of body mass index, arterial pressure, fasting glucose and insulin level, total cholesterol, low density lipoproteins, as well as the greater reductions of mean velocity blood flow and peripheral pulse pressure in the orlistat group vs the placebo group (p < 0.01. Greater reductions in the waist circumference and intima − media thickness were registered following 6 months in the orlistat vs the placebo group (p < 0.01. Conclusion. In the group of obese patients orlistat therapy reduced risk factors, serum insulin level and improved early arterial functional changes as assessed with the reductions of the mean

  14. Comparison of Insulin Detemir and Insulin Glargine for Hospitalized Patients on a Basal-Bolus Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sondra Davis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether insulin detemir is equivalent to insulin glargine in controlling hyperglycemia for the adult hospitalized patient on a basal-bolus treatment regimen. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at two acute care hospitals within the same health system. Patients from both facilities who were initiated on a basal-bolus subcutaneous insulin regimen were included in the study. The basal-bolus regimen consisted of three components: basal, bolus, and corrective insulin with only the data from the first seven days analyzed. Once the basal-bolus protocol was initiated, all previous glycemic agents were discontinued. The target glycemic goal of the study was 100–180 mg/dL. RESULTS: In both groups, 50% of the patients had achieved the target glycemic control goal (100–180 mg/dL by day 2 (p = 0.3. However, on the seventh or last day of basal-bolus treatment, whichever came first, 36.36% of patients receiving insulin detemir (n = 88 achieved the blood glucose reading goal compared to 52.00% in patients receiving insulin glargine (n = 100 (p = 0.03. This corresponded to an adjusted odds ratio of 2.12 (1.08 to 4.15, p = 0.03. The adjusting variables were provider type, whether the patient was hospitalized within 30 days prior and diagnosis of stroke. The mean blood glucose readings for the insulin glargine and the insulin detemir groups while on basal-bolus therapy were 200 mg/dL and 215 mg/dL, respectively (p = 0.05. The total number of blood glucose readings less than 70 mg/dL and less than 45 mg/dL was very low and there were no differences in number of episodes with hypoglycemia between the two groups. CONCLUSION: There was not a statistical difference between the two groups at 2 days, however there was on the seventh day or the last day of basal-bolus treatment. There were nonsignificant hypoglycemia events between basal insulin groups and the results for the last or seventh day

  15. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  16. Physical capacity influences the response of insulin-like growth factor and its binding proteins to training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2002-01-01

    The influence of initial training status on the response of circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and its binding proteins (IGFBP) to prolonged physical training was studied in young men. It was hypothesized that highly standardized training would result in more extensive changes...... in the circulating IGF system in untrained subjects because of lower fitness level. Seven untrained (UT) and 12 well-trained (WT) individuals performed 11 wk of intense physical training (2-4 h daily). Fasting serum samples were analyzed for total and free IGF-I and -II, for IGFBP-1 to -4, as well as for IGFBP-3...... proteolysis. Eleven weeks of physical training resulted in decreased levels of total IGF-I, free IGF-I, and IGFBP-4 in both the UT and WT groups. In the UT group, IGFBP-2 increased, IGFBP-3 decreased [from 4,255 +/- 410 (baseline) to 3,896 +/- 465 (SD) microg/l (week 4); P

  17. Short-acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin for adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Birgit; Siebenhofer, Andrea; Jeitler, Klaus; Horvath, Karl; Semlitsch, Thomas; Berghold, Andrea; Plank, Johannes; Pieber, Thomas R; Gerlach, Ferdinand M

    2016-06-30

    Short-acting insulin analogue use for people with diabetes is still controversial, as reflected in many scientific debates. To assess the effects of short-acting insulin analogues versus regular human insulin in adults with type 1 diabetes. We carried out the electronic searches through Ovid simultaneously searching the following databases: Ovid MEDLINE(R), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R) (1946 to 14 April 2015), EMBASE (1988 to 2015, week 15), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the European (EU) Clinical Trials register (both March 2015). We included all randomised controlled trials with an intervention duration of at least 24 weeks that compared short-acting insulin analogues with regular human insulins in the treatment of adults with type 1 diabetes who were not pregnant. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trials for risk of bias, and resolved differences by consensus. We graded overall study quality using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) instrument. We used random-effects models for the main analyses and presented the results as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes. We identified nine trials that fulfilled the inclusion criteria including 2693 participants. The duration of interventions ranged from 24 to 52 weeks with a mean of about 37 weeks. The participants showed some diversity, mainly with regard to diabetes duration and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The majority of the trials were carried out in the 1990s and participants were recruited from Europe, North America, Africa and Asia. None of the trials was carried out in a blinded manner so that the risk of performance bias, especially for subjective outcomes such as hypoglycaemia, was present in all of the trials. Furthermore, several trials showed inconsistencies in

  18. Diurnal Variations in Serum Glucose, Insulin and C-Peptide of Normal Korean Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Du Hyok; Chung, June Key; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Hong, Kee Suk

    1983-01-01

    It is already well known that many factors are involved in maintaining normal blood glucose level. The amount and components of meal are also thought to be some of the factors which affect the blood glucose and insulin levels. It is reported that as for Koreans sugar takes up over 75% out of 2,098 kcal, the average daily calorie intake per adult. It implies that Koreans take a high-sugar diet compared with Westerners who take 40-50% of sugar out of their total average daily calorie. For the purpose of studying diurnal variations in serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide of normal Koreans adults based on ordinary Korean diet, we selected 13 normal Korean male adults and divided them into two groups, Group I (7 persons) and Group II (6 persons). We put Group I on 3,100 kcal and 75% sugar diet, and Group II on 2,100 kcal and 69% sugar diet per day for over 4 days. Serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide were checked every 30 minutes or every hour throughout 2 hour. Results are as follows: 1. As for serum glucose level, in the preprandial fasting state in the morning, mean±S.D. of Group I was 91.1±3.2 mg%, while that of Group II is 82.5±4.4 mg%. Both groups showed peaks of increased glucose level t postprandial 1 hour after each meal. The peak returned to the level shown during the fasting state at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast while the relatively high glucose levels were maintained respectively even for 2 or 3 hours after lunch and dinner. 2. As for serum insults level, Group I showed mean±S.D. of 14.7±3.0 μU/ml while Group II shows that of 7.0±2.6 μU/ml in the fasting state. Group I particularly showed the largest peak from preprandial a half or one and half an hour to postprandial one hour of lunch, and made relatively small peaks (47.7±10.8 μU/ml) at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast and dinner. No such large peak was marked in Group II, though it showed relatively similar patterns of peak after each meal. 3. As for C-peptide, in the fasting state

  19. Diurnal Variations in Serum Glucose, Insulin and C-Peptide of Normal Korean Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Du Hyok; Chung, June Key; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Kee Suk [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    It is already well known that many factors are involved in maintaining normal blood glucose level. The amount and components of meal are also thought to be some of the factors which affect the blood glucose and insulin levels. It is reported that as for Koreans sugar takes up over 75% out of 2,098 kcal, the average daily calorie intake per adult. It implies that Koreans take a high-sugar diet compared with Westerners who take 40-50% of sugar out of their total average daily calorie. For the purpose of studying diurnal variations in serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide of normal Koreans adults based on ordinary Korean diet, we selected 13 normal Korean male adults and divided them into two groups, Group I (7 persons) and Group II (6 persons). We put Group I on 3,100 kcal and 75% sugar diet, and Group II on 2,100 kcal and 69% sugar diet per day for over 4 days. Serum glucose, insulin and C-peptide were checked every 30 minutes or every hour throughout 2 hour. Results are as follows: 1. As for serum glucose level, in the preprandial fasting state in the morning, mean+-S.D. of Group I was 91.1+-3.2 mg%, while that of Group II is 82.5+-4.4 mg%. Both groups showed peaks of increased glucose level t postprandial 1 hour after each meal. The peak returned to the level shown during the fasting state at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast while the relatively high glucose levels were maintained respectively even for 2 or 3 hours after lunch and dinner. 2. As for serum insults level, Group I showed mean+-S.D. of 14.7+-3.0 muU/ml while Group II shows that of 7.0+-2.6 muU/ml in the fasting state. Group I particularly showed the largest peak from preprandial a half or one and half an hour to postprandial one hour of lunch, and made relatively small peaks (47.7+-10.8 muU/ml) at postprandial 1 hour after breakfast and dinner. No such large peak was marked in Group II, though it showed relatively similar patterns of peak after each meal. 3. As for C-peptide, in the fasting state

  20. Insulin autoimmune syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Oliveira Moreira

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, Hirata disease is a rare cause of hypoglycemia in Western countries. It is characterized by hypoglycemic episodes, elevated insulin levels, and positive insulin antibodies. Our objective is to report a case of IAS identified in South America. CASE REPORT: A 56-year-old Caucasian male patient started presenting neuroglycopenic symptoms during hospitalization due to severe trauma. Biochemical evaluation confirmed hypoglycemia and abnormally high levels of insulin. Conventional imaging examinations were negative for pancreatic tumor. Insulin antibodies were above the normal range. Clinical remission of the episodes was not achieved with verapamil and steroids. Thus, a subtotal pancreatectomy was performed due to the lack of response to conservative treatment and because immunosuppressants were contraindicated due to bacteremia. Histopathological examination revealed diffuse hypertrophy of beta cells. The patient continues to have high insulin levels but is almost free of hypoglycemic episodes.

  1. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  2. Comparing effects of insulin analogues and human insulin on nocturnal glycaemia in hypoglycaemia-prone people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P. L.; Tarnow, L.; Bay, C.

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Treatment with insulin analogue reduces the occurrence of nocturnal hypoglycaemia assessed by nocturnal glucose profiles in people with Type 1 diabetes prone to severe hypoglycaemia. Nocturnal glucose profiles provide a more comprehensive assessment of clinical benefit of insulin regimens......Aims: To assess the difference between analogue and human insulin with regard to nocturnal glucose profiles and risk of hypoglycaemia in people with recurrent severe hypoglycaemia. Methods: A total of 72 people [46 men, mean ± sd age 54 ± 12 years, mean ± sd HbA1c 65 ± 12 mmol/mol (8.1 ± 1.1......%), mean ± sd duration of diabetes 30 ± 14 years], who participated in a 2-year randomized, crossover trial of basal-bolus therapy with insulin detemir/insulin aspart or human NPH insulin/human regular insulin (the HypoAna trial) were studied for 2 nights during each treatment. Venous blood was drawn...

  3. Daily transactional and transformational leadership and daily employee engament

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breevaart, K.; Bakker, A.B.; Hetland, Jorn; Demerouti, E.; Olsen, O.K.; Espevik, R.

    2014-01-01

    This diary study adds to the leadership literature by examining the daily influence of transformational leadership, contingent reward, and active management-by-exception (MBE active) on followers' daily work engagement. We compare the unique contribution of these leadership behaviours and focus on

  4. Lixisenatide as add-on therapy to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown DX

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Xavier Brown, Emma Louise Butler, Marc Evans Diabetes Department, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus do not achieve target glycosylated hemoglobin A1c levels despite optimally titrated basal insulin and satisfactory fasting plasma glucose levels. Current evidence suggests that HbA1c levels are dictated by both basal glucose and postprandial glucose levels. This has led to a consensus that postprandial glucose excursions contribute to poor glycemic control in these patients. Lixisenatide is a once-daily, prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist with a four-fold affinity for the GLP-1 receptor compared with native GLP-1. Importantly, lixisenatide causes a significant delay in gastric emptying time, an important determinant of the once-daily dosing regimen. An exendin-4 mimetic with six lysine residues removed at the C-terminal, lixisenatide has pronounced postprandial glucose-lowering effects, making it a novel incretin agent for use in combination with optimally titrated basal insulin. Lixisenatide exerts profound effects on postprandial glucose through established mechanisms of glucose-dependent insulin secretion and glucagon suppression in combination with delayed gastric emptying. This review discusses the likely place that lixisenatide will occupy in clinical practice, given its profound effects on postprandial glucose and potential to reduce glycemic variability. Keywords: lixisenatide, add-on therapy, insulin, GLP-1 receptor agonist, postprandial glucose, pharmacodynamics

  5. Forcasting Philippine daily stock exchange index | Urrutia | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study is to produce a model that can estimate a three-year forecast of the Philippine Daily Stock Exchange Index. Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) model is applied ona total of 4,927 daily data observations from 1995 to 2014. By then, actual and predicted values was ...

  6. Satisfaction with daily occupations amongst asylum seekers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Anne-Le; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    to their satisfaction with daily occupations and activity level. METHODS: A total of 43 asylum seekers at baseline and 17 at follow-up were included. The questionnaires Satisfaction with Daily Occupations, Major Depression Inventory, WHO-5 Wellbeing, Pain Detect, a questionnaire covering torture, and basic social...

  7. Analysis of insulin pump settings in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yu Ning; Korula, Sophy; Chan, Albert K; Heels, Kristine; Krass, Ines; Ambler, Geoffrey

    2016-08-01

    To characterize current insulin pump settings used in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and to assess their relationship to glycemic control. This retrospective study included patients aged 18 yr old with T1DM >1 yr using a Medtronic pump device. Pump data including number of blood glucose (BG) tests per day, basal and bolus insulin parameters, carbohydrate ratio (CR), and insulin sensitivity factors (ISFs) were averaged over 14 d for statistical analyses. Anthropometric data and recent glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were recorded. A total of 292 patients (144 males and 148 females) were included in the study. Participants had a median age (interquartile range, IQR) of 12.9 yr (10.0-15.1 yr) and pump duration of 2.8 yr (1.5-4.2 yr). No significant differences in median HbA1c (IQR) were observed in preschool [n = 14; HbA1c 7.8% (7.3-8.3%)], prepubertal [n = 105; HbA1c 8.1% (7.7-8.9%)], and adolescent subjects [n = 173; HbA1c 8.4% (7.7-9.0%)]. Adolescents took significantly fewer boluses and BG tests per day compared with younger children (p insulin delivery was noted. Additionally, stronger carbohydrate cover and weaker corrections were used in real-life compared with theoretical 500 and 100 rules, respectively. Lower HbA1c was associated with higher number of daily boluses, greater number of BG tests per day, lower average CR/500 rule ratio, and higher average ISF/100 rule ratio adjusted for age (R(2) = 0.22; p 1). Insulin pump therapy requires continuous adjustments and glycemic targets are achieved by a minority. We believe this is the first study in pediatric cohort looking at association between CR and ISF with glycemic control. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Studies on insulin receptor, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study was designed for the purpose of establishing a method of insulin radioreceptor assay using plasma membranes of guinea pigs as receptor sites. The results obtained are as follows: 1) Insulin receptor in the renal plasma membranes of guinea pigs showed a significantly high affinity to porcine insulin compared with that in the plasma membranes of guinea pig liver or rat kidney and liver. 2) In the insulin radioreceptor assay, an optimum condition was observed by the incubation at 4 0 C for 24 - 48 hours with 100 μg membrane protein of guinea pig kidney and 0.08 ng of 125 I-insulin. This assay method was specific for insulin and showed an accurate biological activity of insulin. 3) The recovery rate of insulin radioreceptor assay was 98.4% and dilution check up to 16 times did not influence on the result. An average of coefficient variation was 3.92% within assay. All of these results indicated the method to be satisfactory. 4) Glucose induced insulin release by perfusion method in isolated Langerhans islets of rats showed an identical pattern of reaction curves between radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay, although the values of radioreceptor assay was slightly low. 5) Insulin free serum produced by ultra filtration method was added to the standard assay medium. By this procedure, direct measurement of human serum by radioreceptor assay became possible. 6) The value of human serum insulin receptor binding activity by the radioreceptor assay showed a high correlation with that of insulin radioimmunoassay in sera of normal, borderline or diabetic type defined by glucose tolerance test. (author)

  9. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  10. Association of insulin resistance with obesity in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, S.A.; Bashir, S.; Shabbir, I.; Sherwani, M.K.; Aasim, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance is the primary metabolic disorder associated with obesity. Little is known about its role as a determinant of the metabolic syndrome in obese children. Objectives: To assess the association of insulin resistance with metabolic syndrome in obese and non obese children. Study type and settings: Cross sectional analytical study conducted among children of ten Municipal Corporation high schools of Data Ganj Buksh Town Lahore. Subjects and Methods: A total of 46 obese and 49 non obese children with consent were recruited for the study. Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, high density lipoprotein in cholesterol, triglycerides, cholesterol, non HDL-cholesterol LDL-cholesterol were measured using standard methods. Data were analyzed by using statistical software SPSS-Version 15. Results: A total of 95 children 49 obese and 46 non obese were recruited for the study. A significant association of serum triglyceride(p<0.001), high density lipoprotein cholesterol(p<0.001), fasting blood glucose(p<0.001), and insulin levels (p<0.001) , was seen between the two groups. For each component of metabolic syndrome, when insulin resistance increased so did odds ratios for cardio metabolic risk factors. Conclusions: Insulin resistance was seen in 34.7% children. Metabolic syndrome was found in 31.6% children reflecting that obese children are at high risk for metabolic syndrome and have low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides levels. (author)

  11. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    suppressed lipid oxidation in the controls. It is concluded that patients with congenital generalized lipodystrophy may present severe insulin resistance with regard to hepatic glucose production as well as muscle glycogen synthesis and lipid oxidation. The results suggest a postreceptor defect in the action......, immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels. The patients had fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and the rate of total glucose disposal was severely impaired, primarily due to a decreased non-oxidative glucose metabolism. In the patient studied with muscle biopsy, the expected activation of glycogen synthase by insulin did...... not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  12. Effect of rosiglitazone on insulin resistance, growth factors, and reproductive disturbances in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Susana H; Graffigna, Mabel N; Oneto, Adriana; Otero, Patricia; Schurman, Leon; Levalle, Oscar A

    2004-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of rosiglitazone on insulin resistance, growth factors, and reproductive disturbances in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Prospective study. Women with PCOS attending as outpatients of the Endocrine Division, Hospital Durand, Buenos Aires. Twenty-four insulin-resistant women with PCOS. Hormonal evaluations and a standardized oral glucose tolerance test before and after a 3-month trial of 4 mg of rosiglitazone daily. Serum LH, FSH, T, IGF-1, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, leptin, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, insulin, and glucose concentrations. The area under insulin curve (AUC-insulin), the HOMA index (insulin resistance), the QUICKI index (insulin sensitivity), and the beta-cell function were calculated. Body mass index (BMI) and the waist/hip ratio were evaluated. A significant decrease was observed in serum fasting insulin, AUC insulin, HOMA index, beta-cell function, IGF-1, LH, and waist/hip ratio. The QUICKI index and IGFBP-1 increased significantly. Serum sex hormone-binding globulin, androgens, leptin, IGFBP-3, and BMI remained unchanged. Twenty-two of 23 females had their menses restored, and three patients became pregnant. One patient was excluded because she became pregnant at the second month. Associated with the decrease in LH, rosiglitazone improved insulin-resistance parameters and normalized the menstrual cycle, which suggests that this drug could improve the endocrine-reproductive condition in insulin-resistant women with PCOS.

  13. Insulin Resistance and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance precedes and predicts the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in susceptible humans, underscoring its important role in the complex pathogenesis of this disease. Insulin resistance contributes to multiple tissue defects characteristic of T2D, including reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive tissues, increased hepatic glucose production, increased lipolysis in adipose tissue, and altered insulin secretion. Studies of individuals with insulin resistance, both with established T2D and high-risk individuals, have consistently demonstrated a diverse array of defects in mitochondrial function (i.e., bioenergetics, biogenesis and dynamics). However, it remains uncertain whether mitochondrial dysfunction is primary (critical initiating defect) or secondary to the subtle derangements in glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and defective insulin secretion present early in the course of disease development. In this chapter, we will present the evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance, and review the potential for mitochondrial targets as a therapeutic approach for T2D.

  14. TLR4 and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane J. Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a key feature of insulin resistance and obesity. Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4, involved in modulating innate immunity, is an important mediator of insulin resistance and its comorbidities. TLR4 contributes to the development of insulin resistance and inflammation through its activation by elevated exogenous ligands (e.g., dietary fatty acids and enteric lipopolysaccharide and endogenous ligands (e.g., free fatty acids which are elevated in obese states. TLR4, expressed in insulin target tissues, activates proinflammatory kinases JNK, IKK, and p38 that impair insulin signal transduction directly through inhibitory phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS on serine residues. TLR4 activation also leads to increased transcription of pro-inflammatory genes, resulting in elevation of cytokine, chemokine, reactive oxygen species, and eicosanoid levels that promote further insulin-desensitization within the target cell itself and in other cells via paracrine and systemic effects. Increased understanding of cell type-specific TLR4-mediated effects on insulin action present the opportunity and challenge of developing related therapeutic approaches for improving insulin sensitivity while preserving innate immunity.

  15. Lower dietary vitamin E intake during the second trimester is associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia later in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, S H; Hanley, A J; Sermer, M; Zinman, B; O'Connor, D L

    2013-11-01

    Beneficial effects of vitamin E on insulin sensitivity have been reported in observational and short-term intervention studies in non-pregnant populations. We aimed to investigate whether dietary vitamin E intake during the second trimester would be associated with glucose metabolism later in pregnancy and whether this association would be influenced by an insulin-sensitizing hormone adiponectin. Women with singleton pregnancies (n=205) underwent a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test at 30 weeks gestation and were asked to recall second trimester dietary intake. Higher dietary vitamin E intake was associated with lower fasting glucose, lower HOMA insulin resistance, and higher Matsuda insulin sensitivity index after covariate adjustment including serum adiponectin among women consuming daily multivitamin supplements (all P≤0.03). Lower dietary vitamin E intake during the second trimester is associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance later in pregnancy among women consuming daily multivitamin supplementations. Further, these associations are not influenced by adiponectin.

  16. Insulin-receptors in diabetes and altered thyroidal status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaujar, Meena; Subramanian, G.B.V.; Yadav, H.S.; Chauhan, U.P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Rats were made hypothyroid by treating with a single dose of 800 μCi of 131 I and hyperthyroid condition was created by administering 90 μg of thyroxine daily for 2 weeks. Diabetes was produced by administering single dose of alloxan monohydrate. Hypothyroid rats showed significant increase in 125 I-insulin binding with its liver plasma membrane receptors with respect to normal rats. In the case of hypothyroid diabetic rats such binding was greater as compared to hypothyroid rats without diabetes. Hyperthyroid rats with respect to normal control rats showed a decrease in 125 I-insulin binding to its liver plasma membrane receptors. When hyperthyroid rats were made diabetic, 125 I-insulin binding to its receptors was further decreased. The study infers that hyper-thyrodism further decreases insulin binding to its receptors which has already been decreased in diabetes. Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, improves upon the decreased insulin binding to its receptors in diabetes. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Absence of down-regulation of the insulin receptor by insulin. A possible mechanism of insulin resistance in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, A P; Flint, D J

    1983-01-01

    Insulin resistance occurs in rat adipocytes during pregnancy and lactation despite increased or normal insulin binding respectively; this suggests that a post-receptor defect exists. The possibility has been examined that, although insulin binding occurs normally, internalization of insulin or its receptor may be impaired in these states. Insulin produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of insulin receptors on adipocytes from virgin rats maintained in culture medium, probably due to ...

  18. Will availability of inhaled human insulin (Exubera® improve management of type 2 diabetes? The design of the Real World trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freemantle Nick

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common deterrents to insulin therapy for both physicians and patients are the complexity and burden of daily injections. In January 2006, the first inhaled human insulin (INH, Exubera® (insulinhuman [rDNA origin]InhalationPowder was approved for use in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in the United States and European Union. Results from the INH clinical trial program have shown comparable efficacy of INH to subcutaneous (SC insulin and superior efficacy versus oral antidiabetic agents; thus providing effective glycemic control in adult patients with T2DM without the requirement for preprandial injections. However, because subjects in those trials were randomized to either INH or an alternative, the studies could not estimate the effect of INH on patient acceptance of insulin therapy. Therefore, traditional study designs cannot provide answers to important and practical questions regarding real world effectiveness, which is influenced by psychological and other access barriers. Methods To overcome these limitations, the Real World Trial was designed to estimate the effect of the availability of INH as a treatment option for glycemic control. A total of approximately 700 patients from Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, and the United States with T2DM poorly controlled by oral agent therapy will be randomized to two different treatment settings. Patients and clinicians in both groups (A & B may choose from all licensed therapies for diabetes including SC insulin delivered by pens; INH will be an additional treatment option only available in Group A. The Real World Trial (Protocol A2171018 has been registered with ClincalTrials.gov, registration id NCT00134147. Results The primary outcome for the trial will be the difference in mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c at 6 months between groups. The design was based on a preceding feasibility study examining the

  19. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulger, David A.; Conley, Jermaine; Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy; Solomon, Solomon S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2

  20. Role of PTEN in TNFα induced insulin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulger, David A. [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Wellcome Trust Medical Research Council Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Disease, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Conley, Jermaine [Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Conner, Spencer H.; Majumdar, Gipsy [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States); Solomon, Solomon S., E-mail: ssolomon@uthsc.edu [Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Medicine and Research Services, Veterans Association Medical Center, Memphis, TN 38104 (United States)

    2015-06-05

    Aims/hypothesis: PTEN may play a reversible role in TNFα induced insulin resistance, which has been linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Methods: Western blots for PTEN and p-Akt were performed on H-411E liver cells incubated with insulin, TNFα, and in selected experiments VO-OHpic vanadium complex in the presence and absence of PTEN siRNA. Total PTEN was compared to β-actin loading control and p-Akt was compared to total Akt. Results: Western blot and Real Time RT-PCR experiments showed increased PTEN after TNFα treatment (p = 0.04); slightly decreased PTEN after insulin treatment; and slightly increased PTEN after insulin + TNFα treatment. PTEN siRNA markedly inhibited the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN (p < 0.01) without significantly changing the p-Akt levels. The vanadium complex, exhibiting insulin-like effects, also significantly prevented the TNFα-induced increase in PTEN. Combining insulin and VO-OHpic was additive, providing both proof of concept and insight into mechanism. Discussion: The PTEN increase due to TNFα treatment was reversible by both PTEN siRNA knockdown and VO-OHpic treatment. Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential new therapeutic target for reducing IR in Type 2 DM. - Highlights: • TNFα treatment induced a significant increase in PTEN in H-411E liver cells. • PTEN siRNA knockdown prevented this effect. • VO-OHpic (vanadium complex) treatment, like insulin, decreased PTEN protein levels. • Thus, PTEN is identified as a potential therapeutic target in DM Type 2.

  1. Logistiline Daily Service / Paavo Kangur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kangur, Paavo, 1966-

    2005-01-01

    Sügisel ostis Leedu endise majandusministri Valetntinas Milaknise firma Daily Service ära kõik bürootarvetemüüja Reval Impexi aktsiad. 300 miljoni kroonise aastakäibega firma Eesti tütarettevõte prognoosib oma tänavuseks käibeks 31,2 miljonit krooni. Lisa: Daily Service'i struktuur

  2. Endocrine determinants of changes in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion during a weight cycle in healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Karschin

    Full Text Available Changes in insulin sensitivity (IS and insulin secretion occur with perturbations in energy balance and glycemic load (GL of the diet that may precede the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Determinants of changes in IS and insulin secretion with weight cycling in non-obese healthy subjects remain unclear.In a 6wk controlled 2-stage randomized dietary intervention 32 healthy men (26±4y, BMI: 24±2kg/m2 followed 1wk of overfeeding (OF, 3wks of caloric restriction (CR containing either 50% or 65% carbohydrate (CHO and 2wks of refeeding (RF with the same amount of CHO but either low or high glycaemic index at ±50% energy requirement. Measures of IS (basal: HOMA-index, postprandial: Matsuda-ISI, insulin secretion (early: Stumvoll-index, total: tAUC-insulin/tAUC-glucose and potential endocrine determinants (ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, thyroid hormone levels, 24h-urinary catecholamine excretion were assessed.IS improved and insulin secretion decreased due to CR and normalized upon RF. Weight loss-induced improvements in basal and postprandial IS were associated with decreases in leptin and increases in ghrelin levels, respectively (r = 0.36 and r = 0.62, p<0.05. Weight regain-induced decrease in postprandial IS correlated with increases in adiponectin, fT3, TSH, GL of the diet and a decrease in ghrelin levels (r-values between -0.40 and 0.83, p<0.05 whereas increases in early and total insulin secretion were associated with a decrease in leptin/adiponectin-ratio (r = -0.52 and r = -0.46, p<0.05 and a decrease in fT4 (r = -0.38, p<0.05 for total insulin secretion only. After controlling for GL associations between RF-induced decrease in postprandial IS and increases in fT3 and TSH levels were no longer significant.Weight cycling induced changes in IS and insulin secretion were associated with changes in all measured hormones, except for catecholamine excretion. While leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin seem to be the major

  3. Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) - Daily, Version 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) comprises a total of 27 products. The Version 1.2 Daily product covers the period October 1998 to the present,...

  4. Total Thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Moris E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Total thyroidectomy is a surgery that removes all the thyroid tissue from the patient. The suspect of cancer in a thyroid nodule is the most frequent indication and it is presume when previous fine needle puncture is positive or a goiter has significant volume increase or symptomes. Less frequent indications are hyperthyroidism when it is refractory to treatment with Iodine 131 or it is contraindicated, and in cases of symptomatic thyroiditis. The thyroid gland has an important anatomic relation whith the inferior laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands, for this reason it is imperative to perform extremely meticulous dissection to recognize each one of these elements and ensure their preservation. It is also essential to maintain strict hemostasis, in order to avoid any postoperative bleeding that could lead to a suffocating neck hematoma, feared complication that represents a surgical emergency and endangers the patient’s life.It is essential to run a formal technique, without skipping steps, and maintain prudence and patience that should rule any surgical act.

  5. Total volume versus bouts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinapaw, Mai; Klakk, Heidi; Møller, Niels Christian

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Examine the prospective relationship of total volume versus bouts of sedentary behaviour (SB) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with cardiometabolic risk in children. In addition, the moderating effects of weight status and MVPA were explored. SUBJECTS....../METHODS: Longitudinal study including 454 primary school children (mean age 10.3 years). Total volume and bouts (i.e. ≥10 min consecutive minutes) of MVPA and SB were assessed by accelerometry in Nov 2009/Jan 2010 (T1) and Aug/Oct 2010 (T2). Triglycerides, total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio (TC:HDLC ratio......, with or without mutual adjustments between MVPA and SB. The moderating effects of weight status and MVPA (for SB only) were examined by adding interaction terms. RESULTS: Children engaged daily in about 60 min of total MVPA and 0-15 min/week in MVPA bouts. Mean total sedentary time was around 7 h/day with over 3...

  6. Lack of effect of long-term amlodipine on insulin sensitivity and plasma insulin in obese patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Maximilian; Ferrari, P; Schneider, M

    1993-01-01

    Method of Bergman, fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations, serum total triglyceride and lipoprotein cholesterol fractions, and blood pressure in 20 obese, non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension before and after 6 weeks of placebo and again after 6 months of amlodipine. Ten patients......To evaluate the effects of long-term treatment antihypertensive with the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist amlodipine on insulin sensitivity, plasma insulin, and lipoprotein metabolism in obese hypertensive patients. We measured the insulin sensitivity index (SI), determined by the Minimal Model...... [mean body mass index (BMI) 30.2 kg.m-2] had been on prior treatment with a thiazide diuretic in low dosage and/or a beta-adrenoceptor blocker (group A), and 10 matched patients [BMI 31.8 kg.m-2] had been previously untreated (group B). Amlodipine was started in a dose of 5 mg and was increased to 10 mg...

  7. Cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and brain angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi; Zhang, Le; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-01-01

    Insulin performs unique non-metabolic functions within the brain. Broadly speaking, two major areas of these functions are those related to brain endothelial cells and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, and those related to behavioral effects, like cognition in disease states (Alzheimer's disease, AD) and in health. Recent studies showed that both these functions are associated with brain angiogenesis. These findings raise interesting questions such as how they are linked to each other and whether modifying brain angiogenesis by targeting certain insulin signaling pathways could be an effective strategy to treat dementia as in AD, or even to help secure healthy longevity. The two canonical downstream pathways involved in mediating the insulin signaling pathway, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, in the brain are supposed to be similar to those in the periphery. PI3K and MAPK pathways play important roles in angiogenesis. Both are involved in stimulating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in angiogenesis and could be activated by the insulin signaling pathway. This suggests that PI3K and MAPK pathways might act as cross-talk between the insulin signaling pathway and the angiogenesis pathway in brain. But the cerebral insulin, insulin signaling pathway, and the detailed mechanism in the connection of insulin signaling pathway, brain angiogenesis pathway, and healthy aging or dementias are still mostly not clear and need further studies.

  8. Effects of Basal Insulin Analog and Metformin on Glycaemia Control and Weight as Risk Factors for Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belma Aščić – Buturović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Obese patients with type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are at increased risk of development of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial dysfunction may be a reason for development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Lifestyle modification, increased physical activity, weight reduction, energy restricted diet and good glycaemia control can be useful for the endothelial function improvement and may decrease the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of basal insulin analog and metformin on glycaemia control and weight as risk factors of endothelial dysfunction. Total of 15 patients (9 male and 6 female with type 2 diabetes were studied. The patients were monitored over six months period. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG, postprandial plasma glucose (PPG, and body mass index (BMI were observed. Mean age of the subjects was 53,4 ± 6,27 years. Mean diabetes duration was 3,71 ± 1,89 years. At the end of the study mean body mass index decreased from 27,5 ± 1,45 kg/m2 to 25,7 ±1,22 kg/m2. In this study we included diabetic patients with fasting glycaemia over 7 mmol/ dm3, postmeal glycaemia over 7,8 mmol/dm3 and glycated hemoglobin over 7%. Prior to the study, the patients were treated with premix insulin divided in two daily doses and metformin after the lunch, which did not result in sufficient regulation of glycaemia. We started treatment with one daily insulin basal analog and three daily doses of metformin and monitored the above mentioned parameters. We advised patients to change their lifestyle, to practice energy restricted diet and to increase their daily physical activity. Insulin doses were titrated separately for each patient (0,7-1 IU/kg. Weight reduction was recorded after the study. Mean fasting glycaemia decreased from 8,6±0,49 mmol/dm3 to 7,04±0,19 mmol/dm3 (p < 0,05. Mean postmeal glycaemia decreased from 9,74 ± 0,79 mmol/dm3 to 7,6 ± 0

  9. The evolutionary benefit of insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Maarten R.; Soeters, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is perceived as deleterious, associated with conditions as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and critical illness. However, insulin resistance is evolutionarily well preserved and its persistence suggests that it benefits survival. Insulin resistance is important in

  10. A method to determine insulin responsiveness in synaptosomes isolated from frozen brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Whitney; Taglialatela, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Studying the insulin signaling response at the synapse is an important approach to understand molecular mechanisms involved in disease-related neurodegenerative processes. We developed a method for studying the insulin responsiveness at the synaptic level by isolating functional synaptosomes from fresh or frozen tissue and exposing them to insulin in the presence of ATP (a critical step) to detect insulin receptor (IR) activation. We performed an ATP dose-response curve, insulin dose-response curve, and insulin response time course to optimize this method. We also demonstrated that our protocol reflects the degree of insulin responsiveness in vivo by using an animal model of known insulin resistance, AtENPP1-Tg mice. This method is advantageous over other methods detecting IR in total brain homogenates due to the ability to detect IR response without confounding contributions from other cell areas and cell types also expressing IR. Furthermore, ex vivo insulin stimulation can be compared to baseline synaptosomes obtained from the same animal which improves reliability and statistical power while decreasing the number of animals required to perform individual experiments. We have developed a reliable, efficient method to measure insulin-driven ex vivo phosphorylation of the synaptosomal insulin receptor that can reliably reflect the pre-existing insulin responsiveness status in the CNS of the animal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence of stimulation of isolated synaptosomes with insulin and a promising new technique to study the synaptic CNS insulin responsiveness under physiological or disease conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Administration technique and storage of disposable insulin pens reported by patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Virginia D; Porter, Kyle; Beatty, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate insulin injection technique and storage of insulin pens as reported by patients with diabetes and to compare correct pen use to initial education on injection technique, hemoglobin A1C, duration of insulin therapy, and duration of insulin pen. Cross-sectional questionnaire orally administered to patients at a university-affiliated primary care practice. Subjects were patients with diabetes who were 18 years or older and prescribed a disposable insulin pen for at least 4 weeks. A correct usage score was calculated for each patient based on manufacturer recommendations for disposable insulin pen use. Associations were made between the correct usage score and certainty in technique, initial education, years of insulin therapy, duration of pen use, and hemoglobin A1C. Sixty-seven patients completed the questionnaire, reporting total use of 94 insulin pens. The 3 components most often neglected by patients were priming pen needle, holding for specific count time before withdrawal of pen needle from skin, and storing an in-use pen. For three-fourths of the insulin pens being used, users did not follow the manufacturer's instructions for proper administration and storage of insulin pens. Correct usage scores were significantly higher if initial education on insulin pens was performed by a pharmacist or nurse. The majority of patients may be ignoring or unaware of key components for consistent insulin dosing using disposable insulin pens; therefore, initial education and reeducation on correct use of disposable insulin pens by health care professionals are needed.

  12. Insulin therapy for type 2 diabetes - are we there yet? The d-Nav® story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodish, I

    2018-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is mostly used by patients with type 2 diabetes who become insulin deficient and have failed other therapeutic options. They comprise about a quarter of those with diabetes, endures the majority of the complications and consumes the majority of the resources. Adequate insulin replacement therapy can prevent complications and reduce expenses, as long as therapy goals are achieved and maintained. Sadly, these therapy goals are seldom achieved and outcomes have not improved for decades despite advances in pharmacotherapy and technology. There is a growing recognition that the low success rate of insulin therapy results from intra-individual and inter-individual variations in insulin requirements. Total insulin requirements per day vary considerably between patients and constantly change without achieving a steady state. Thus, the key element in effective insulin therapy is unremitting and frequent dosage adjustments that can overcome those dynamics. In practice, insulin adjustments are done sporadically during outpatient clinic. Due to time constraints, providers are not able to deliver appropriate insulin dosage optimization. The d-Nav® Insulin Guidance Service has been developed to provide appropriate insulinization in insulin users without increasing the burden on healthcare systems. It relies on dedicated clinicians and a spectrum of technological solutions. Patients are provided with a handheld device called d-Nav® which advises them what dose of insulin to administer during each injection and automatically adjust insulin dosage when needed. The d-Nav care specialists periodically follow-up with users through telephone calls and in-person consultations to bestow user confidence, correct usage errors, triage, and identify uncharacteristic clinical courses. The following review provide details about the service and its clinical outcomes.

  13. Paediatrics, insulin resistance and the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlais, Matko; Coward, Richard J

    2015-08-01

    Systemic insulin resistance is becoming more prevalent in the young due to modern lifestyles predisposing to the metabolic syndrome and obesity. There is also evidence that there are critical insulin-resistant phases for the developing child, including puberty, and that renal disease per se causes systemic insulin resistance. This review considers the factors that render children insulin resistant, as well as the accumulating evidence that the kidney is an insulin-responsive organ and could be affected by insulin resistance.

  14. Outgoing Longwave Radiation Daily Climate Data Record (OLR Daily CDR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The product contains the 1-degree by 1-degree daily mean outgoing longwave radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere derived from HIRS radiance observations...

  15. Daily and Sub-daily Precipitation for the Former USSR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a compilation of in situ daily and hourly meteorological observations for the former USSR initially obtained within the framework of several joint...

  16. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E. Dale

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead (FOXO) transcriptional signaling or glucose transport which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  17. Daily mineral intakes for Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Kunio

    1990-01-01

    Recently it became necessary to assess the dietary intake of both stable and radioactive elements for non-radiation workers. But data of mineral intake in the literature are not good enough for this assessment. ICRP Pub. 23 in 'Reference Man' is one of the best references in this field. ICRP Reference Man was selected as the standard for Caucasian by using values reported during early 1970s or before. Moreover it seems not to be suitable for Japanese (Mongolian). In this report, analytical methods of minerals in total diet samples for Japanese were described. Furthermore, daily intakes for Japanese (Reference Japanese Man) and ICRP Reference Man were compared. After collected by a duplicate portion study and a model diet study, diet samples were dry-ashed followed by wet-digestion with a mixture of HNO 3 and HClO 4 . Diet sample solutions thus prepared were analysed by using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), inductively-coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Matrix effects of major elements (Na, K, P, Ca and Mg) in diet samples were compensated by a matrix-matching method. About 20 elements were simultaneously determined by ICP-AES and ICP-MS, more easily than by AAS. Most of dietary mineral intakes, except for Na, Mn, and Sr, for Japanese were lower than those of ICRP Reference Man. But, dietary intakes were found to be different depending on countries, even among European and American countries. New representative data for as many elements as possible are necessary now. (author)

  18. Awake, long-term intranasal insulin treatment does not affect object memory, odor discrimination, or reversal learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Genevieve A; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2017-05-15

    Intranasal insulin delivery is currently being used in clinical trials to test for improvement in human memory and cognition, and in particular, for lessening memory loss attributed to neurodegenerative diseases. Studies have reported the effects of short-term intranasal insulin treatment on various behaviors, but less have examined long-term effects. The olfactory bulb contains the highest density of insulin receptors in conjunction with the highest level of insulin transport within the brain. Previous research from our laboratory has demonstrated that acute insulin intranasal delivery (IND) enhanced both short- and long-term memory as well as increased two-odor discrimination in a two-choice paradigm. Herein, we investigated the behavioral and physiological effects of chronic insulin IND. Adult, male C57BL6/J mice were intranasally treated with 5μg/μl of insulin twice daily for 30 and 60days. Metabolic assessment indicated no change in body weight, caloric intake, or energy expenditure following chronic insulin IND, but an increase in the frequency of meal bouts selectively in the dark cycle. Unlike acute insulin IND, which has been shown to cause enhanced performance in odor habituation/dishabituation and two-odor discrimination tasks in mice, chronic insulin IND did not enhance olfactometry-based odorant discrimination or olfactory reversal learning. In an object memory recognition task, insulin IND-treated mice did not perform differently than controls, regardless of task duration. Biochemical analyses of the olfactory bulb revealed a modest 1.3 fold increase in IR kinase phosphorylation but no significant increase in Kv1.3 phosphorylation. Substrate phosphorylation of IR kinase downstream effectors (MAPK/ERK and Akt signaling) proved to be highly variable. These data indicate that chronic administration of insulin IND in mice fails to enhance olfactory ability, object memory recognition, or a majority of systems physiology metabolic factors - as reported to

  19. A Study of the Carbohydrate-to-Insulin Ratio in Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes on Pump Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Marzia; Fresa, Raffaella; Visalli, Natalia; Bitterman, Olimpia; Suraci, Concetta; Napoli, Angela

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess carbohydrate (CHO)-to-insulin ratio (CHO/IR) values in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and to describe differences in CHO/IR across each week of pregnancy. This was a multicenter, retrospective, observational study (2006-2012) of 101 white pregnant women with a mean age of 32 (range, 18-43) years who had type 1 diabetes and were under continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy. These patients had the following characteristics: type 1 diabetes duration was 1 year (range, 1-31 years), the pregestational glycosylated hemoglobin level was 6.9% (range, 6.8-12.1%), the median weight gain during pregnancy was 14 kg (-3; 25 kg), with delivery at 37 weeks (range, 30-40 weeks), and the child had a birth weight of 3.530 kg (range, 1.480-5.250 kg). The CHO/IR was measured by dividing the CHO (in g) of each meal by insulin unit injected to acquire and maintain the following glycemic targets: fasting insulin and 300/total daily doses of insulin. Education and management before and during pregnancy were in agreement with Italian Association of Dietitians, Association of Medical Diabetologists, and Italian Society of Diabetology recommendations. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 20.0; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL). The CHO/IR decreased on average from 9.6 (5-18) to 5.4 (2.3-8) at breakfast, from 10 (3.5-16) to 8.4 (3.0-17.8) at lunch, and from 12.5 (8-20) to 6.1 (4.2-12) at dinner. The CHO/IR calculated using the "500 rule" decreased from 14.3 (10-20.3) to 8.6 (4.1-15.9). Using the "300 rule," the ratios decreased from 8.5 (6-12.1) to 5.2 (2.4-9.5). The bivariate correlation between the values calculated more appropriate values using the "300 rule" for breakfast and the "500 rule" for lunch and dinner across all weeks of pregnancy. CHO/IR reduction in pregnancy is likely due to an increase in insulin resistance.

  20. Cancer risk among insulin users: comparing analogues with human insulin in the CARING five-country cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, Anna; De Bruin, Marie L; Bazelier, Marloes T; Hjellvik, Vidar; Andersen, Morten; Auvinen, Anssi; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Furu, Kari; de Vries, Frank; Karlstad, Øystein; Ekström, Nils; Haukka, Jari

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship between use of certain insulins and risk for cancer, when addressing the limitations and biases involved in previous studies. National Health Registries from Denmark (1996-2010), Finland (1996-2011), Norway (2005-2010) and Sweden (2007-2012) and the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database (1987-2013) were used to conduct a cohort study on new insulin users (N = 327,112). By using a common data model and semi-aggregate approach, we pooled individual-level records from five cohorts and applied Poisson regression models. For each of ten cancer sites studied, we estimated the rate ratios (RRs) by duration (≤0.5, 0.5-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, 4-5, 5-6 and >6 years) of cumulative exposure to insulin glargine or insulin detemir relative to that of human insulin. A total of 21,390 cancer cases occurred during a mean follow-up of 4.6 years. No trend with cumulative treatment time for insulin glargine relative to human insulin was observed in risk for any of the ten studied cancer types. Of the 136 associations tested in the main analysis, only a few increased and decreased risks were found: among women, a higher risk was observed for colorectal (RR 1.54, 95% CI 1.06, 2.25) and endometrial cancer (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.07, 2.94) for ≤0.5 years of treatment and for malignant melanoma for 2-3 years (RR 1.92, 95% CI 1.02, 3.61) and 4-5 years (RR 3.55, 95% CI 1.68, 7.47]); among men, a lower risk was observed for pancreatic cancer for 2-3 years (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.17, 0.66) and for liver cancer for 3-4 years (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.14, 0.94) and >6 years (RR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05, 0.92). Comparisons of insulin detemir with human insulin also showed no consistent differences. The present multi-country study found no evidence of consistent differences in risk for ten cancers for insulin glargine or insulin detemir use compared with human insulin, at follow-up exceeding 5 years.

  1. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125 I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  2. Association Between Insulin Resistance and Bone Structure in Nondiabetic Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Finkelstein, Joel S; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    computed tomography was used to assess bone density and microstructure at the distal radius and tibia. Fasting insulin and glucose was measured and insulin resistance was estimated using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with higher values indicating greater insulin resistance....... RESULTS: There was a negative association between HOMA-IR and bone size and a positive association between HOMA-IR and total vBMD, trabecular vBMD, trabecular thickness and cortical thickness at the radius and tibia. These relationships remained even after adjusting for body weight and other potential...

  3. Effect of ionizing radiation on aqueous solution of insulin. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopoldova, J [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Isotopova Laborator Biologickych Ustavu; Nobilis, M [Vyzkumny Ustav pro Farmacii a Biochemii, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1977-02-01

    A 3.1x10/sup -4/ M aqueous solution of insulin was irradiated with /sup 60/Co in oxygenated, oxygen-limited, and oxygen-free atmosphere. The irradiated solutions were separated on a Sephadex G-75 column, and the eluates were determined spectrophotometrically at 280 nm. The decrease in the original content of insulin and the formation of radiation aggregates of insulin in dependence on radiation doses were studied. The total amount and molecular weights of radiation aggregates of insulin increased with increasing radiation dose while their biological activity and content of cys/2 residues decreased.

  4. Effect of insulin on the mitotic activity of bone marrow cells after irradiation. [Gamma radiation, rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkalaya, A I

    1976-02-01

    A total of 236 white rats were given a whole-body gamma dose of 750 R. Part of the rats were given a subcutaneous insulin injection of 0.2 units/kg. After 10, 20, 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 hours the mitotic index was determined in both groups of rats in the bone marrow of the femur. The content of glucose and insulin in the blood was determined. The mitotic index was found to be higher on administering insulin. The use of insulin in radiation sickness intensifies the mitotic activity of bone marrow cells and stimulates the recovery of bone marrow hematopoiesis. 5 references.

  5. MOPITT Gridded Daily CO Retrievals (Near and Thermal Infrared Radiances) V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MOPITT L3 files contain daily and monthly mean gridded versions of the daily L2 CO profile and total column retrievals. The averaging kernels associated with...

  6. Determinants of intensive insulin therapeutic regimens in patients with type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the determinants of intensive insulin regimens (ITs) in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods This multicenter study was conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. Data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% female, 57.1% Caucasian). Insulin regimens were classified as follows: group 1, conventional therapy (CT) (intermediate human insulin, one to two injections daily); group 2 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate plus regular human insulin); group 3 (three or more insulin injections of intermediate human insulin plus short-acting insulin analogues); group 4, basal-bolus (one or two insulin injections of long-acting plus short-acting insulin analogues or regular insulin); and group 5, basal-bolus with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Groups 2 to 5 were considered IT groups. Results We obtained complete data from 2,961 patients. Combined intermediate plus regular human insulin was the most used therapeutic regimen. CSII was used by 37 (1.2%) patients and IT by 2,669 (90.2%) patients. More patients on IT performed self-monitoring of blood glucose and were treated at the tertiary care level compared to CT patients (p < 0.001). The majority of patients from all groups had HbA1c levels above the target. Overweight or obesity was not associated with insulin regimen. Logistic regression analysis showed that economic status, age, ethnicity, and level of care were associated with IT (p < 0.001). Conclusions Given the prevalence of intensive treatment for T1D in Brazil, more effective therapeutic strategies are needed for long term-health benefits. PMID:24920963

  7. Parasympathetic blockade attenuates augmented pancreatic polypeptide but not insulin secretion in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Stefan, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    was administered for 120 min at the following doses: 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 micro g. kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1). h(-1). Areas under the curve for early (AUC(0-30 min)) and total (AUC(0-120 min)) postprandial insulin and PP secretory responses were calculated. Early postprandial insulin and PP secretory responses were...

  8. IGF-1 and insulin as growth hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2004-01-01

    IGF-1 generated in the liver is the anabolic effector and linear growth promoting hormone of the pituitary growth hormone (GH). This is evidenced by dwarfism in states of congenital IGF-1 deficiency, Igf1 gene mutation/deletions or knockouts, and in Laron syndrome (LS), due to GH receptor gene mutations/deletions or IGF-1 receptor blocking. In a positive way, daily IGF-1 administration to stunted patients with LS or hGH gene deletion accelerates linear growth velocity. IGF-1 acts on the proliferative cells of the epiphyseal cartilage. IGF-1 also induces organ and tissue growth; its absence causing organomicria. Insulin shares a common ancestry with IGF-1 and with 45% amino acid homology, as well as very close relationships in the structure of its receptors and post-receptor cascade, also acts as a growth hormone. It has protein anabolic activity and stimulates IGF-1 synthesis. Pancreas agenesis causes short babies, and obese children with hyperinsulinism, with or without pituitary GH, have an accelerated growth rate and skeletal maturation; so do babies with macrosomia. Whether the insulin growth effect is direct, or mediated by IGF-1 or leptin is controversial.

  9. Insulin resistance and serum parameters of iron status in type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, U.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a predominant public health concern worldwide, accounting for 90% of the cases of diabetes globally. Pathogenesis of T2DM involves insulin resistance, defective insulin secretion and increased glucose production by the liver. Subclinical haemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to determine and correlate insulin resistance and serum parameters of iron status (serum ferritin and transferrin saturation) in type 2 diabetics. Methods: It was a correlational study. This study was conducted on sixty male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fasting blood sample was taken from each subject and analysed for glucose, haemoglobin, insulin, iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) and ferritin. Insulin resistance was determined by HOMA-IR index. Transferrin saturation was calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data was analysed using SPSS-17. Results: There was significant positive correlation between insulin resistance and transferrin saturation, but there was no significant correlation of insulin resistance with blood haemoglobin, serum iron and serum ferritin in type 2 diabetics. Conclusion: Correlation between insulin resistance and transferrin saturation reveals that iron has negative impact on insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetics. (author)

  10. Serum acylated ghrelin is negatively correlated with the insulin resistance in the CODING study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyvand Amini

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid orexigenic peptide synthesized mainly in the stomach. Acute administration of ghrelin has been found to decrease insulin secretion. However, little data is available regarding whether ghrelin contributes to the long-term regulation of insulin resistance at the population level. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between circulating ghrelin and insulin resistance in a large population based study.A total of 2082 CODING study (Complex Diseases in the Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics subjects were assessed. Subjects were of at least third generation Newfoundland descent, between the ages of 20 and 79 years, and had no serious metabolic, cardiovascular, or endocrine diseases. Ghrelin was measured with an Enzyme Immunoassay method. Insulin and fasting glucose were measured by Immulite 2500 autoanalyzer and Lx20 clinical chemistry analyzer, respectively. Homeostatic Model Assessment of β cell function (HOMA-β and Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR and Quantitative Insulin-sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI were used for measurement of insulin resistance.Partial correlation analyses showed a significant negative correlation between circulating ghrelin and insulin level and insulin resistance in the entire cohort and also in men and women separately. The aforementioned correlation was independent of age, percentage of trunk fat and HDL-cholesterol. According to menopausal status, only pre-menopausal women revealed negative correlations.Our results suggest that except for postmenopausal women, high circulating ghrelin level is associated with lower insulin resistance in the general population.

  11. Evaluation of immunogenicity of LY2963016 insulin glargine compared with Lantus® insulin glargine in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilag, L L; Deeg, M A; Costigan, T; Hollander, P; Blevins, T C; Edelman, S V; Konrad, R J; Ortmann, R A; Pollom, R K; Huster, W J; Zielonka, J S; Prince, M J

    2016-02-01

    To compare the immunogenicity profiles and the potential effects on clinical outcomes of LY2963016 insulin glargine (LY IGlar) and Lantus® insulin glargine (IGlar), products with identical primary amino acid sequences, in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM or T2DM). To assess immunogenicity, anti-insulin glargine antibodies (measured as percent binding) were compared between treatments in 52-week (open-label) and 24-week (double-blind) randomized studies in total study populations of patients with T1DM (N = 535) and T2DM (N = 756), respectively, and two subgroups of patients with T2DM: insulin-naïve patients and those reporting prestudy IGlar treatment (prior IGlar). Relationships between insulin antibody levels and clinical outcomes were assessed using analysis of covariance and partial correlations. Insulin antibody levels were assessed using Wilcoxon rank sum. Treatment comparisons for treatment-emergent antibody response (TEAR) and incidence of detectable antibodies were analysed using Fisher's exact test. No significant treatment differences were observed for insulin antibody levels, incidence of detectable anti-insulin glargine antibodies, or incidence of TEAR [overall and endpoint, by last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF)] in patients with T1DM or patients with T2DM, including the insulin-naïve subgroup. A statistically significant difference was noted in the overall incidence of detectable antibodies but not at endpoint (LOCF) nor in TEAR for the prior IGlar subgroup of patients with T2DM. Insulin antibody levels were low (Insulin antibody levels or developing TEAR was not associated with clinical outcomes. LY IGlar and IGlar have similar immunogenicity profiles; anti-insulin glargine antibody levels were low for both treatments, with no observed effect on efficacy and safety outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. 2-deoxyglucose tissue levels and insulin levels following tolazamide dosing in normal and obese mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillman, C.A.; Fletcher, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of tolazamide (TZ), a sulfonylurea, on 14 C-2-deoxyglucose ( 14 C-2DG) tissue distribution and insulin levels of normal and obese mice was investigated using an in vivo physiological method. Acute doses of TZ (50 mg/kg ip) increased 14 C-2DG levels in gastrocnemius muscle and retroperitoneal fat and produced a transient elevation of insulin which most likely accounts for the increased 14 C-2DG levels in muscle and fat. The results demonstrate that the in vivo 14 C-2DG method produced results consistent with known actions of sulfonylureas on in vitro hexose assimilation in muscle and fat. Subchronic treatment (7 days) with TZ 50 mg/kg ip twice daily did not result in increased insulin-stimulated 14 C-2DG tissue levels in normal mice when compared to saline treated controls. However, insulin levels were lower in mice treated subchronically with TZ compared to saline controls suggesting an enhancement of insulin action. Viable yellow obese mice represent a model of maturity onset obesity presenting with insulin resistance. The insulin resistance of this obese strain appears to reside in the fat tissue as assessed by comparing 14 C-2DG tissue levels of obese mice with lean littermate controls. Subchronic TZ treatment had no effect on 14 C-2DG uptake in fat or muscle tissue of viable yellow obese mice and did not alter their plasma insulin levels. It appears that genetically obese viable mice may be resistant to subchronic treatment with TZ. (author)

  13. [Concept Analysis for Psychological Insulin Resistance in Korean People with Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youngshin

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the concept for psychological insulin resistance in the Korean population with diabetes. The Hybrid model was used to perform the concept analysis of psychological insulin resistance. Results from both the theoretical review with 26 studies and a field study including 19 participants with diabetes were included in final process. The preceding factors of psychological insulin resistance were uncontrolled blood glucose and change in daily life. The concept of psychological insulin resistance was found to have three categories with 8 attributes such as emotional factors (negative feeling), cognitive factors (low awareness and knowledge, low confidence for self-injection) and supportive factors (economic burden, dependency life, embarrassing, feeling about supporters, feeling of trust in, vs mistrust of health care providers). The 8 attributes included 30 indicators. The psychological insulin resistance of population with diabetes in Korea was defined as a complex phenomenon associated with insulin therapy that can be affected by emotional factors, cognitive factors, and supportive relational factors. Based on the results, a tool for measuring psychological insulin resistance of Koreans with diabetes and effective programs for enhancing insulin adherence should be developed in future studies.

  14. Comparing the quality of life in insulin recipient and refusal patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mitra; Sabouhi, Fakhri; Abazari, Parvaneh; Aminorroaya, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Better control of blood sugar and reduction of diabetes complications through insulin therapy could convince people to choose this method. However, patients might refuse insulin therapy due to its painful injection, limitations in daily activities, and hypoglycemia. Thus, insulin therapy could have both positive and negative effects on patients' quality of life (QOL). Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the QOL of insulin recipient and insulin refusal patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was a descriptive and comparative research conducted on 126 patients; 63 were insulin recipients and 63 had refused insulin therapy. Participants were under the care of the Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center of Isfahan, Iran. Data were gathered using the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL) questionnaire. In this tool, higher scores indicated lower QOL in patients. Data were analyzed using independent t-test, analysis of covariance, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, and Pearson and Spearman's correlation. There was a significant difference (P refusal patients (mean = 1.74, SD = 0.41) in terms of mean QOL score. In addition, men and participants with higher educational levels reported a better QOL (P refusal patients had a better QOL. It seems that QOL is associated with the acceptance or refusal of insulin therapy. Therefore, enhancement of QOL could be related to all aspects of the disease, especially its treatment method and solving the therapeutic problems.

  15. Injection related anxiety in insulin-treated diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambanini, A; Newson, R B; Maisey, M; Feher, M D

    1999-12-01

    The presence of injection related anxiety and phobia may influence compliance, glycaemic control and quality of life in patients with insulin-treated diabetes. Unselected consecutive, insulin-treated patients attending a diabetes clinic for follow-up, completed a standardised questionnaire providing an injection anxiety score (IAS) and general anxiety score (GAS). A total of 115 insulin-treated (80 Type 1 and 35 Type 2) diabetic patients completed the questionnaire. Injections had been avoided secondary to anxiety in 14% of cases and 42% expressed concern at having to inject more frequently. An IAS > or = 3 was seen in 28% of patients and of these, 66% injected insulin one to two times/day, 45% had avoided injections, and 70% would be bothered by more frequent injections. A significant correlation between IAS and GAS was seen (Kendall's tau-a 0.30, 95% CI 0.19-0.41, P < 0.001). GAS was significantly associated with both previous injection avoidance and expressed concern at increased injection frequency. No significant correlation was seen with HbA1c and injection or general anxiety scores. Symptoms relating to insulin injection anxiety and phobia have a high prevalence in an unselected group of diabetic patients requiring insulin injections and are associated with higher levels of general anxiety.

  16. [News and perspectives in insulin treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluzík, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Insulin therapy is a therapeutic cornerstone in patients with type 1 diabetes and also in numerous patients with type 2 diabetes especially with longer history of diabetes. The initiation of insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes patients is often delayed which is at least partially due to suboptimal pharmacokinetic characteristics of available insulins. The development of novel insulins with more favorable characteristics than those of current insulins is therefore still ongoing. The aim of this paper is to review current knowledge of novel insulins that have been recently introduced to the market or are getting close to routine clinical use. We will also focus on the perspectives of insulin therapy in the long-term run including the alternative routes of insulin administration beyond its classical subcutaneous injection treatment.Key words: alternative routes of insulin administration - diabetes mellitus - hypoglycemia - insulin - insulin analogues.

  17. Lightship Daily Observations - NARA Collection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations taken on board lightships along the United States coasts from 1893 - 1943. Generally 4-6 observations daily. Also includes deck logs, which give...

  18. Allegheny County Jail Daily Census

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A daily census of the inmates at the Allegheny County Jail (ACJ). Includes gender, race, age at booking, and current age. The records for each month contain a...

  19. Exercise Increases Insulin Content and Basal Secretion in Pancreatic Islets in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Hung Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise appears to improve glycemic control for people with type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, the mechanism responsible for this improvement is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise has a direct effect on the insulin-producing islets. Eight-week-old mice were divided into four groups: sedentary diabetic, exercised diabetic, sedentary control, and exercised control. The exercised groups participated in voluntary wheel running for 6 weeks. When compared to the control groups, the islet density, islet diameter, and β-cell proportion per islet were significantly lower in both sedentary and exercised diabetic groups and these alterations were not improved with exercise. The total insulin content and insulin secretion were significantly lower in sedentary diabetics compared to controls. Exercise significantly improved insulin content and insulin secretion in islets in basal conditions. Thus, some improvements in exercise-induced glycemic control in T1D mice may be due to enhancement of insulin content and secretion in islets.

  20. Childhood obesity and insulin resistance: how should it be managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mandy; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A

    2014-12-01

    Concomitant with the rise in global pediatric obesity in the past decades, there has been a significant increase in the number of children and adolescents with clinical signs of insulin resistance. Given insulin resistance is the important link between obesity and the associated metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk, clinicians should be aware of high risk groups and treatment options. As there is no universally accepted biochemical definition of insulin resistance in children and adolescents, identification and diagnosis of insulin resistance usually relies on clinical features such as acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Treatment for reducing insulin resistance and other obesity-associated comorbidities should focus on changes in health behaviors to achieve effective weight management. Lifestyle interventions incorporating dietary change, increased physical activity, and decreased sedentary behaviors, with the involvement of family and adoption of a developmentally appropriate approach, should be used as the first line treatment. Current evidence suggests that the primary objective of dietary interventions should be to reduce total energy intake and a combination of aerobic and resistance training should be encouraged. Metformin can be used in conjunction with a lifestyle intervention program in obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance to achieve weight loss and to improve insulin sensitivity. Ongoing evaluation and research are required to explore optimal protocol and long-term effectiveness of lifestyle interventions, as well as to determine whether the improvements in insulin sensitivity induced by lifestyle interventions and weight loss will lead to a clinical benefit including reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  1. Stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake by muscle involves the central nervous system in insulin-sensitive mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, Claudia P.; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Geerling, Janine J.; Guigas, Bruno; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Havekes, Louis M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin inhibits endogenous glucose production (EGP) and stimulates glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Hypothalamic insulin signaling is required for the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. We examined the contribution of central insulin signaling on circulating insulin-stimulated

  2. Stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake by muscle involves the central nervous system in insulin-sensitive mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C.P.; Biermasz, N.R.; Geerling, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Insulin inhibits endogenous glucose production (EGP) and stimulates glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Hypothalamic insulin signaling is required for the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. We examined the contribution of central insulin signaling on circulating insulin-stimulated

  3. The Type 2 Diabetes Associated Minor Allele of rs2237895 KCNQ1 Associates with Reduced Insulin Release Following an Oral Glucose Load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Holmkvist, J; Banasik, K

    2009-01-01

    , and rs2237897) on estimates of glucose stimulated insulin release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genotypes were examined for associations with serum insulin levels following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in a population-based sample of 6,039 middle-aged and treatment-naïve individuals. Insulin...... release indices estimated from the OGTT and the interplay between insulin sensitivity and insulin release were investigated using linear regression and Hotelling T2 analyses. Applying an additive genetic model the minor C-allele of rs2237895 was associated with reduced serum insulin levels 30 min (mean......,568 individuals who were glucose tolerant. Adjustment for the degree of insulin sensitivity had no effect on the measures of reduced insulin release. The rs2237895 genotype had a similar impact in the total sample of treatment-naïve individuals. No association with measures of insulin release were identified...

  4. Relationships Among Nightly Sleep Quality, Daily Stress, and Daily Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaxton, Jessica M; Bergeman, Cindy S; Whitehead, Brenda R; Braun, Marcia E; Payne, Jessic D

    2017-05-01

    We explored the prospective, microlevel relationship between nightly sleep quality (SQ) and the subsequent day's stress on positive (PA) and negative affect (NA) as well as the moderating relationships between nightly SQ, subsequent stress, and subsequent PA on NA. We investigated whether age moderated these relationships. We collected 56 days of sleep, stress, and affect data using daily diary questionnaires (N = 552). We used multilevel modeling to assess relationships at the between- and within-person levels. Daily increases in SQ and decreases in stress interacted to predict higher daily PA and lower daily NA. Better SQ in older adults enhanced the benefits of PA on the stress-NA relationship more during times of low stress, whereas better sleep in younger adults enhanced the benefits of PA more during times of high stress. Between-person effects were stronger predictors of well-being outcomes than within-person variability. The combination of good SQ and higher PA buffered the impact of stress on NA. The moderating impact of age suggests that sleep and stress play different roles across adulthood. Targeting intervention and prevention strategies to improve SQ and enhance PA could disrupt the detrimental relationship between daily stress and NA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A model of insulin fibrils derived from the x-ray crystal structure of a monomeric insulin (despentapeptide insulin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Dodson, G G; Edwards, D J; Holden, P H; Whittingham, J L

    1997-04-01

    The crystal structure of despentapeptide insulin, a monomeric insulin, has been refined at 1.3 A spacing and subsequently used to predict and model the organization in the insulin fibril. The model makes use of the contacts in the densely packed despentapeptide insulin crystal, and takes into account other experimental evidence, including binding studies with Congo red. The dimensions of this model fibril correspond well with those measured experimentally, and the monomer-monomer contacts within the fibril are in accordance with the known physical chemistry of insulin fibrils. Using this model, it may be possible to predict mutations in insulin that might alleviate problems associated with fibril formation during insulin therapy.

  6. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Ricardo K; Brito, Gleisson A P; Coelho, Isabela; Pequitto, Danielle C T; Yamaguchi, Adriana A; Borghetti, Gina; Schiessel, Dalton Luiz; Kryczyk, Marcelo; Machado, Juliano; Rocha, Ricelli E R; Aikawa, Julia; Iagher, Fabiola; Naliwaiko, Katya; Tanhoffer, Ricardo A; Nunes, Everson A; Fernandes, Luiz Claudio

    2011-04-28

    Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  7. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iagher Fabiola

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG (4 mg/g body weight was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C, coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO, fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO, obese control group (Ob, coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO. Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30% and triacylglycerol (TG; 33% compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  8. Insulin is essential for in vitro chondrogenesis of mesenchymal progenitor cells and influences chondrogenesis in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael B; Blunk, Torsten; Appel, Bernhard; Maschke, Angelika; Goepferich, Achim; Zellner, Johannes; Englert, Carsten; Prantl, Lukas; Kujat, Richard; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a commonly used additive in chondrogenic media for differentiating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The indispensability of other bioactive factors like TGF-β or dexamethasone in these medium formulations has been shown, but the role of insulin is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether insulin is essential for MSC chondrogenesis and if there is a dose-dependent effect of insulin on MSC chondrogenesis. We cultivated human MSCs in pellet culture in serum-free chondrogenic medium with insulin concentrations between 0 and 50 μg/ml and assessed the grade of chondrogenic differentiation by histological evaluation and determination of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), total collagen and DNA content. We further tested whether insulin can be delivered in an amount sufficient for MSC chondrogenesis via a drug delivery system in insulin-free medium. Chondrogenesis was not induced by standard chondrogenic medium without insulin and the expression of cartilage differentiation markers was dose-dependent at insulin concentrations between 0 and 10 μg/ml. An insulin concentration of 50 μg/ml had no additional effect compared with 10 μg/ml. Insulin was delivered by a release system into the cell culture under insulin-free conditions in an amount sufficient to induce chondrogenesis. Insulin is essential for MSC chondrogenesis in this system and chondrogenic differentiation is influenced by insulin in a dose-dependent manner. Insulin can be provided in a sufficient amount by a drug delivery system. Therefore, insulin is a suitable and inexpensive indicator substance for testing drug release systems in vitro.

  9. Budget impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes who experience severe recurrent hypoglycemic episodes in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Marga; Elías, Isabel; Álvarez, María; Quirós, Carmen; Conget, Ignacio

    Hypoglycemia is one of the most common complications to achieve a good metabolic control, and has been listed by several scientific associations as a common indication to start treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Use of CSII is still residual in Spain as compared to neighbouring countries, and cost of acquisition cost is one of the main reasons. This study estimates the budget impact of treatment with CSII, as compared to multiple daily insulin injections, of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who experience recurrent severe hypoglycemia episodes from the National Healthcare System perspective. Budget impact was based on a retrospective, observational study evaluating the efficacy of CSII in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus conducted at Hospital Clínic i Universitari in Barcelona, where one of the main indications for switching to CSII were recurrent severe hypoglycemia episodes. The mean number of annual episodes was 1.33 in the two years prior to CSII start and 0.08 in the last two years of follow up (p=0.003). Costs of treatment and major hypoglycemic events over a four-year period were considered. Costs were taken from different Spanish data sources and expressed in € of 2016. Treatment with CSII increased costs by €9,509 per patient as compared to multiple daily insulin injections (€11,902-€2,393). Cost associated to severe hypoglycemic events decreased by €19,330 per patient treated with CSIII (€1,371-€20,701). Results suggest mean total savings of €9,821 per patient during the four-year study period. The higher costs associated to CSII therapy may be totally offset by the severe hypoglycemic events prevented. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. New ways of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, L

    2010-02-01

    When Exubera (EXU), the first inhaled insulin formulation to make it through the clinical development process, was introduced to the market some years ago it was hoped that this would be the first in a series of novel insulin formulations applied by this route. In addition, it was hoped that inhaled insulin would pave the way for other alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA), i.e. oral insulin, nasal insulin or transdermal insulin to mention only some of the different attempts that have been studied in the last 90 years. The failure of EXU, i.e. its withdrawal from the market due to insufficient market success, was followed by the cessation of nearly all other attempts to develop inhaled insulin formulations. Currently there is only one company (MannKind) which moves sturdily ahead with their Technosphere insulin. This company has submitted an NDA for their product recently and hopes to bring it to the market by the end of 2010 or early 2011. Even if the product is able to pass the approval hurdles in the USA and Europe, this does not guarantee that it will become a market success. Many diabetologists were sceptical about the need/advantages of inhaled insulin/EXU from the start and the introduction of this product has raised even more scepticism. Reports about 'side effects' (development of lung cancer in patients treated with EXU) of inhaled insulin are also not helpful, even if the causality of the appearance of cancer with this type of insulin therapy is not proven. One of the very negative consequences of stopping EXU are the huge financial losses to Pfizer. The managers in charge in other pharmaceutical companies and also most venture capitalists are reluctant to invest in ARIA nowadays. This in turn means that many of the small companies that try to develop new forms of insulin administration have issues when they try to find a big brother and/or sufficient financial support. Clearly the economic crisis has further aggravated this issue. One can

  11. Liuwei Dihuang Lowers Body Weight and Improves Insulin and Leptin Sensitivity in Obese Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Perry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at investigating the efficacy and mechanism(s of action of a Chinese herbal formulation, Liuwei Dihuang (LWDH, as a prospective natural weight-lowering product. Following a 2-week acclimation period, 48 obesity-prone (OP-CD rats were divided into 4 groups (n=12 each. One group served as a positive control for obesity (OP, while the other 3 were challenged twice daily by oral gavage with total daily dosages of 500, 1500, or 3500 mg/kg BW LWDH, respectively, for 10 weeks. One group (n=12 of obesity-resistant (OR-CD rats served as the normal control group. All rats were fed the same AIN-93G diet modified to contain 60% energy from fat. The highest LWDH dose significantly reduced body weight during the last 4 weeks of treatment. Food intake was reduced beginning in week 2. The high LWDH dose lowered serum triglyceride (TG and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA levels and body fat. Both the high and medium doses also lowered serum leptin and insulin levels. Liver function testing revealed no adverse side effects under the current experimental conditions. The results of the present study suggest that LWDH has potential as a preventive or therapeutic natural product against overweight and obesity.

  12. Ultra-long-acting insulin degludec has a flat and stable glucose-lowering effect in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, T; Nosek, L; Bøttcher, S G; Hastrup, H; Haahr, H

    2012-10-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is a new-generation, ultra-long-acting basal insulin that forms soluble multihexamers upon subcutaneous injection, resulting in a depot from which IDeg is absorbed slowly and continuously into circulation. This double-blind, two-period, incomplete block cross-over trial investigated the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of IDeg at steady state (SS) in people with type 2 diabetes. Forty-nine subjects treated with insulin without concomitant oral anti-diabetic drugs were given IDeg (0.4, 0.6 and/or 0.8 U/kg) once daily for two 6-day periods, separated by an interval of 13-21 days. Following dosing on Day 6, subjects underwent a 26-h euglycaemic glucose clamp (Biostator®; clamp blood glucose level: 90 mg/dl; 5.0 mmol/l). Pharmacokinetic samples were taken until 120 h after last dosing. For all dose levels, the mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) profiles were flat and stable. The glucose-lowering effect of IDeg was evenly distributed over the dosing interval τ, with area under the curve (AUC) for each of the four 6-h intervals being approximately 25% of the total AUC (AUC(GIR) (,τ,) (SS) ). Total glucose-lowering effect increased linearly with increasing dose. The blood glucose levels of all subjects stayed very close to the clamp target until end of clamp. The terminal half-life of IDeg was approximately 25 h at steady state. IDeg was well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. No injection site reactions were reported. IDeg has a flat and consistent glucose-lowering effect in people with type 2 diabetes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Structural Perspectives of Insulin Receptor Isoform-Selective Insulin Analogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiráček, Jiří; Žáková, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, Jul 27 (2017), č. článku 167. ISSN 1664-2392 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19018S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : insulin receptor * insulin binding * analog * diabetes * glucose Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.675, year: 2016 http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fendo.2017.00167/full

  14. Effect of Scoparia dulcis extract on insulin receptors in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: studies on insulin binding to erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pari, Leelavinothan; Latha, Muniappan; Rao, Chippada Appa

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the insulin-receptor-binding effect of Scoparia dulcis plant extract in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced male Wistar rats, using circulating erythrocytes (ER) as a model system. An aqueous extract of S dulcis plant (SPEt) (200 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally. We measured blood levels of glucose and plasma insulin and the binding of insulin to cell-membrane ER receptors. Glibenclamide was used as standard reference drug. The mean specific binding of insulin to ER was significantly lower in diabetic control rats (DC) (55.0 +/- 2.8%) than in SPEt-treated (70.0 +/- 3.5%)- and glibenclamide-treated (65.0 +/- 3.3%) diabetic rats, resulting in a significant decrease in plasma insulin. Scatchard plot analysis demonstrated that the decrease in insulin binding was accounted for by a lower number of insulin receptor sites per cell in DC rats when compared with SPEt- and glibenclamide-treated rats. High-affinity (Kd1), low-affinity (Kd2), and kinetic analysis revealed an increase in the average receptor affinity in ER from SPEt and glibenclamide treated diabetic rats having 2.5 +/- 0.15 x 10(10) M(-1) (Kd1); 17.0 +/- 1.0 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2), and 2.0 +/- 0.1 x 10(-10) M(-1) (Kd1); 12.3 +/- 0.9 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2) compared with 1.0 +/- 0.08 x 10(-10) M(-1) (Kd1); 2.7 +/- 0.25 x 10(-8) M(-1) (Kd2) in DC rats. The results suggest an acute alteration in the number of insulin receptors on ER membranes in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Treatment with SPEt and glibenclamide significantly improved specific insulin binding, with receptor number and affinity binding (p < 0.001) reaching almost normal non-diabetic levels. The data presented here show that SPEt and glibenclamide increase total ER membrane insulin binding sites with a concomitant significant increase in plasma insulin.

  15. Continuation versus discontinuation of insulin secretagogues when initiating insulin in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, S. G.; Dain, M.-P.; Mauricio, D.; DeVries, J. H.; Hoekstra, J. B.; Holleman, F.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the combined use of basal insulin, metformin and insulin secretagogues with a combination of basal insulin and metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes starting basal insulin analogue therapy. This analysis was part of a 24-week trial, in which 964 insulin-naive patients with type 2

  16. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Tong, Jenny; Montgomery, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 22 subjects with IFG (11 female and 11 male, mean +/- SD...... age 59.6 +/- 11.5 years) were treated orally with 100 mg vildagliptin once daily in a single-blind study. Subjects received placebo for 2 weeks (run-in) followed by vildagliptin for 6 weeks (treatment) and then placebo for 2 weeks (washout). A frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test....... RESULTS: Fasting plasma glucose did not change after 6 weeks of vildagliptin treatment. With treatment, mean +/- SEM AIR(g) increased from 224 +/- 44 to 286 +/- 52 pmol/l (P

  17. The effect of insulin glargine and nutritional model on metabolic control, quality of life and behavior in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksen, Damla; Darcan, Sukran; Buyukinan, Muammer; Köse, Timur; Erermis, Serpil; Coker, Mahmut

    2008-03-01

    To determine the impact of glargine insulin therapy with different nutritional models on key parameters of diabetes including quality of life, behavior in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Age, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, anthropometric data and episodes of severe hypoglycemia were taken from patients' charts. Diabetes quality of life scale and childhood behavior checklist questionnaires were given to each child at the start and at the end of 6 months. Mean age when starting on glargine insulin was 15.5 +/- 3. 8 years. Duration of diabetes was 7.1 +/- 4.3 years. About 14 of the patients chose to be in the carbohydrate counting group, whereas 24 of them continued with exchange meal plan as nutritional model. There was a reduction in HbA1c levels from 7.86 to 7.1% in the carbohydrate group and 8.8 to 8.0% in the exchange meal plan group. Total daily insulin dose did not change in both of the groups. BMI did not change in both of the groups. Diabetes-related worries decreased in carbohydrate group. No change was found in the behavior scores in both of the groups at the end of the study period. The use of glargine therapy among adolescents with type 1 diabetes was associated with improved overall glycemic control.

  18. Artemisia Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus by Up-Regulating Adiponectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Xianghong

    2016-12-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has affected a great number of pregnant women worldwide. Artemisia extracts have been found to exhibit a potent antidiabetic effect in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to examine the effects of Artemisia extract on insulin resistance and lipid profiles in pregnant GDM patients. Patients in their second trimester were randomly assigned to the Artemisia extract group (AE) or to a placebo group (PO). They were instructed to consume either AE or PO daily for a period of 10 weeks. Glucose and insulin profiles and adiponectin level were assessed at baseline (week 0) and after the treatment (week 10). Compared to the PO group, fasting plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and β-cell function (HOMA-B) were significantly reduced in the AE group participants. Moreover, levels of circulating adiponectin were also significantly up-regulated in the AE group, which also positively contributed to improved insulin sensitivity. Daily administration of Artemisia extract improves insulin sensitivity by up-regulating adiponectin in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  19. New ways of insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, L

    2011-02-01

    The predominant number of papers published from the middle of 2009 to the middle of 2010 about alternative routes of insulin administration (ARIA) were still about inhaled insulin. Long-term experience with Exubera was the topic of a number of publications that are also of relevance for inhaled insulin in general. The clinical trials performed with AIR insulin by Eli Lilly were published in a supplement issue of one diabetes technology journal and most of these will be presented. A number of other publications (also one in a high ranked journal) about their inhaled insulin were from another company: MannKind. The driving force behind Technosphere insulin (TI) - which is the only one still in clinical development - is Al Mann; he has put a lot of his personal fortune in this development. We will know the opinion of the regulatory authorities about TI in the near future; however, I am personally relatively confident that the Food and Drug Administration will provide TI with market approval. The more critical question for me is: will diabetologists and patients jump on this product once it becomes commercially available? Will it become a commercial success? In view of many negative feelings in the scientific community about inhaled insulin, it might be of help that MannKind publish their studies with TI systematically. Acknowledging being a believer in this route of insulin administration myself, one has to state that Exubera and AIR insulin had not offered profound advantages in terms of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties in comparison with subcutaneously (SC) applied regular human insulin (RHI) and rapid-acting insulin analogues. The time-action profiles of these inhaled insulins were more or less comparable with that of rapid-acting insulin analogues. This is clearly different with TI which exhibits a strong metabolic effect shortly after application and a rapid decline in the metabolic effect thereafter; probably the duration of action is

  20. Single-donor islet transplantation and long-term insulin independence in select patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Adra, David P; Gill, Richdeep S; Imes, Sharleen; O'Gorman, Doug; Kin, Tatsuya; Axford, Sara J; Shi, Xinzhe; Senior, Peter A; Shapiro, A M James

    2014-11-15

    Islet transplantation is a recognized treatment option for select patients with type I diabetes mellitus. However, islet infusions from multiple donors are often required to achieve insulin independence. Ideally, insulin independence would be achieved routinely with only a single donor. Identification of factors associated with insulin independence after single-donor islet transplantation may help to select recipient-donor combinations with the highest probability of success. Subjects undergoing islet transplantation at a single center (Edmonton, Canada) between March 1999 and August 2013 were included. Recipient, donor, and transplant characteristics were collected and compared between recipients who became insulin independent after one islet transplantation and those who did not. Thirty-one patients achieved insulin independence after a single-donor islet transplantation, and 149 did not. Long-term insulin-free survival was not different between the groups. Factors significantly associated with single-donor success included recipient age, insulin requirement at baseline, donor weight, donor body mass index, islet transplant mass, and peritransplant heparin and insulin administration. On multivariate analysis, pretransplantation daily insulin requirements, the use of peritransplantation heparin and insulin infusions, and islet transplant mass remained significant. We have identified clinically relevant differences defining the achievement of insulin independence after single-donor transplantation. Based on these differences, a preoperative insulin requirement of less than 0.6 U/kg per day and receiving more than 5,646 islet equivalents (IEQ)/kg have a sensitivity of 84% and 71% and specificity of 50% and 50%, respectively, for insulin independence after single-donor islet transplantation. With ideal patient selection, this finding could potentially increase single-donor transplantation success and may be especially relevant for presensitized subjects or those who

  1. Mathematical modeling of the glucose-insulin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palumbo, Pasquale; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Bertuzzi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    of pancreatic insulin production, with a oarser/finer level of detail ranging over cellular and subcellular scales, to short-term organ/tissue models accounting for the intra-venous and the oral glucose tolerance tests as well as for the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, to total-body, long-term diabetes...

  2. Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and lipids in African women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... high‑density lipoprotein (TG/HDL), total cholesterol (TC)/HDL, and atherogenic index of ... Key words: Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, triglycerides, women ... been reported that a TG/HDL ratio of >3.0 is predictive of.

  3. Lipid Profile and Insulin Resistance in Pregnant Women with Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methos: Glucose, insulin and lipids (total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein and low density lipoproteins) were measured at 26 to 32 weeks of pregnancy in fasting blood samples obtained from 75 pregnant non diabetic women (Twenty five with a history of first degree relative with DM and fifty women without ...

  4. Time and Costs of Insulin Treatment in the Care of Newly Registered Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Diabetes Clinics across Japan (JDDM 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Oishi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims To study the time and costs of insulin treatment of newly registered outpatients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods In total, 355 patients with T2DM were registered on their first visit to one of 11 diabetes clinics across Japan. Of these, 313 were not being treated with insulin (the non-insulin group, whereas 42 were (the insulin group. In the insulin group, 26 were already on insulin at the first visit, whereas 16 were started on insulin after their first visit. The time and costs involved in the care were recorded over the following 5 months. Results In the first 3 months, considerable time was expended in both groups, with the time spent by physicians a little (but significantly longer for the insulin group. The total time expended by all care providers was approximately 1.3-fold greater for the insulin compared with the non-insulin group. The total cost and total cost/min for the insulin group was almost twice that for the non-insulin group. Over the 5-month period, mean HbA 1c in the non-insulin group improved from 8.0% to 6.5%, with 72% achieving a glycemic target of HbA 1c ≤ 6.5%. In contrast, in the insulin group, mean HbA 1c improved from 9.4% to 7.6%, with only 39% achieving the target. There were no reports of major hypoglycemic events in either group and body mass index remained stable. Conclusions The insulin therapy for T2DM can be achieved safely and effectively at outpatient clinics, even though it requires considerably more time and resources than non-insulin therapy.

  5. Oral Insulin - Fact or Fiction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    attempts have explored the following options, either singly, or together: • Protecting ... derivative of insulin has been seen to maintain its biological activity and also have .... that in the short future any oral preparation that can achieve consistent ...

  6. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals that limited daily carbohydrate intake to

  7. [New insulin types in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Jordi

    2015-07-20

    Since its discovery almost a century ago, insulin remains the mainstay of treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although progress in the synthesis of new formulations has been remarkable, the physiological profile of insulin is still different from that observed with preparations available nowadays. In the last decade, the introduction into clinical practice of insulin analogues has allowed significantly improvement in glycemic control and has facilitated the spread of basal/bolus patterns, the most physiological ones until now. Despite the benefits of basal analogues, glycemia often varies considerably when used as a single daily injection and this is why new molecules have been further investigated. Improvement has been achieved especially in terms of duration and rate of hypoglycemia, the main limiting factor of intensive therapy. This article reviews the available data concerning the new basal insulin analogues, degludec, pegylated lispro and glargine U300, and new formulations currently under development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Common Standards of Basal Insulin Titration in T2DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnolds, Sabine; Heise, Tim; Flacke, Frank; Sieber, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has become a worldwide major health problem, and the number of people affected is steadily increasing. Thus, not all patients suffering from the disease can be treated by specialized diabetes centers or outpatient clinics, but by primary care physicians. The latter, however, might have time constraints and have to deal with many kinds of diseases or with multimorbid patients, so their focus is not so much on lowering high blood glucose values. Thus, the physicians, as well as the patients themselves, are often reluctant to initiate and adjust insulin therapy, although basal insulin therapy is considered the appropriate strategy after oral antidiabetic drug failure, according to the latest international guidelines. A substantial number of clinical studies have shown that insulin initiation and optimization can be managed successfully by using titration algorithms—even in cases where patients themselves are the drivers of insulin titration. Nevertheless, tools and strategies are needed to facilitate this process in the daily life of both primary health care professionals and patients with diabetes. PMID:23759411

  9. Increased CD19+CD24+CD27+ B regulatory cells are associated with insulin resistance in patients with type I Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Du, Changji; Wang, Yinping; Liu, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is characterized by dysregulated immune responses and is commonly associated with insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of insulin resistance in HT remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the percentage of B regulatory lymphocytes (Bregs) and insulin resistance in patients with HT but with normal thyroid function (type I). A total of 59 patients with type I HT and 38 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed to measure insulin secretion and assess β‑cell functions. Flow cytometry was performed to examine the percentages of lymphocyte populations. The patients with HT exhibited normal fasting and postprandial glucose and fasting insulin secretion, but increased secretion of early‑phase and total insulin. The patients with HT also had insufficient β‑cell compensation for insulin resistance, indicated by a reduced disposition index, in the fasting state. An elevation in the percentage of CD19+CD24+CD27+ Bregs was also observed, which correlated positively with insulin secretion and insulin resistance in the fasting state. The patients with type I HT had postprandial insulin resistance and insufficient β‑cell compensation for fasting insulin resistance. Therefore, the increase in CD19+CD24+CD27+ Bregs was closely associated with fasting insulin secretion. These results provide novel insight into the mechanism of insulin resistance in HT.

  10. Qualità totale e mobilità totale Total Quality and Total Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Trieste

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available FIABA ONLUS (Italian Fund for Elimination of Architectural Barriers was founded in 2000 with the aim of promoting a culture of equal opportunities and, above all, it has as its main goal to involve public and private institutions to create a really accessible and usable environment for everyone. Total accessibility, Total usability and Total mobility are key indicators to define quality of life within cities. A supportive environment that is free of architectural, cultural and psychological barriers allows everyone to live with ease and universality. In fact, people who access to goods and services in the urban context can use to their advantage time and space, so they can do their activities and can maintain relationships that are deemed significant for their social life. The main aim of urban accessibility is to raise the comfort of space for citizens, eliminating all barriers that discriminate people, and prevent from an equality of opportunity. “FIABA FUND - City of ... for the removal of architectural barriers” is an idea of FIABA that has already affected many regions of Italy as Lazio, Lombardy, Campania, Abruzzi and Calabria. It is a National project which provides for opening a bank account in the cities of referring, in which for the first time, all together, individuals and private and public institutions can make a donation to fund initiatives for the removal of architectural barriers within its own territory for a real and effective total accessibility. Last February the fund was launched in Rome with the aim of achieving a Capital without barriers and a Town European model of accessibility and usability. Urban mobility is a prerequisite to access to goods and services, and to organize activities related to daily life. FIABA promotes the concept of sustainable mobility for all, supported by the European Commission’s White Paper. We need a cultural change in management and organization of public means, which might focus on

  11. Insulin resistance in therapeutic clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Pashentseva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Today an obesity became the global epidemic striking both children, and adults and represents one of the most important problems of health care worldwide. Excess accumulation of fatty tissue is resulted by insulin resistance and a compensatory hyperinsulinaemia which are the main predictors of development of a diabetes mellitus type 2. Insulin resistance is also one of key links of a pathogenesis of such diseases as cardiovascular pathology, not-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a polycystic ovary syndrome, gestational diabetes and many others. Depression of sensitivity of tissues to insulin can be physiological reaction of an organism to stress factors and pathological process. The endogenic reasons also take part in development of insulin resistance besides factors of the external environment. The role of genetic predisposition, a subclinical inflammation of fatty tissue, thyroid hormones, adipokines and vitamin D in formation of this pathological process is studied. As insulin resistance takes part in a pathogenesis of various diseases, methods of its diagnostics and correction are of great importance in therapeutic practice. At purpose of treatment it is worth giving preference to the drugs which are positively influencing sensitivity of tissues to insulin.

  12. Classifying insulin regimens--difficulties and proposal for comprehensive new definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T; Cameron, F; Dorchy, H; Hoey, H; Jarosz-Chobot, P; Mortensen, H B; Robert, J-J; Robertson, K; de Beaufort, C

    2015-09-01

    Modern insulin regimens for the treatment of type 1 diabetes are highly individualized. The concept of an individually tailored medicine accounts for a broad variety of different insulin regimens applied. Despite clear recommendations for insulin management in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes there is little distinctiveness about concepts and the nomenclature is confusing. Even among experts similar terms are used for different strategies. The aim of our review--based on the experiences of the Hvidoere Study Group (HSG)--is to propose comprehensive definitions for current insulin regimens reflecting current diabetes management in childhood and adolescence. The HSG--founded in 1994--is an international group representing 24 highly experienced pediatric diabetes centers, from Europe, Japan, North America and Australia. Different benchmarking studies of the HSG revealed a broad variety of insulin regimens applied in each center, respectively. Furthermore, the understanding of insulin regimens has been persistently different between the centers since more than 20 yr. Not even the terms 'conventional' and 'intensified therapy' were used consistently among all members. Besides the concepts 'conventional' and 'intensified', several other terms for the characterization of insulin regimens are in use: Basal Bolus Concept (BBC), multiple daily injections (MDI), and flexible insulin therapy (FIT) are most frequently used, although none of these expressions is clearly or consistently defined. The proposed new classification for insulin management will be comprehensive, simple, and catchy. Currently available terms were included. This classification may offer the opportunity to compare therapeutic strategies without the currently existing confusion on the insulin regimen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-I (lGF-l): safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi

    2004-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a peptide synthesized mainly in the liver by stimulation by pituitary growth hormone (GH). It circulates almost entirely bound to its binding proteins. It is the anabolic effector hormone of GH. I