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Sample records for total cellular rna

  1. From "Cellular" RNA to "Smart" RNA: Multiple Roles of RNA in Genome Stability and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Flavia; Jalihal, Ameya P; Francia, Sofia; Meers, Chance; Neeb, Zachary T; Rossiello, Francesca; Gioia, Ubaldo; Aguado, Julio; Jones-Weinert, Corey; Luke, Brian; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Nowacki, Mariusz; Storici, Francesca; Carninci, Piero; Walter, Nils G; Fagagna, Fabrizio d'Adda di

    2018-03-30

    Coding for proteins has been considered the main function of RNA since the "central dogma" of biology was proposed. The discovery of noncoding transcripts shed light on additional roles of RNA, ranging from the support of polypeptide synthesis, to the assembly of subnuclear structures, to gene expression modulation. Cellular RNA has therefore been recognized as a central player in often unanticipated biological processes, including genomic stability. This ever-expanding list of functions inspired us to think of RNA as a "smart" phone, which has replaced the older obsolete "cellular" phone. In this review, we summarize the last two decades of advances in research on the interface between RNA biology and genome stability. We start with an account of the emergence of noncoding RNA, and then we discuss the involvement of RNA in DNA damage signaling and repair, telomere maintenance, and genomic rearrangements. We continue with the depiction of single-molecule RNA detection techniques, and we conclude by illustrating the possibilities of RNA modulation in hopes of creating or improving new therapies. The widespread biological functions of RNA have made this molecule a reoccurring theme in basic and translational research, warranting it the transcendence from classically studied "cellular" RNA to "smart" RNA.

  2. Changes in rRNA levels during stress invalidates results from mRNA blotting: Fluorescence in situ rRNA hybridization permits renormalization for estimation of cellular mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.C.; Nielsen, A.K.; Molin, Søren

    2001-01-01

    obtained by these techniques are compared between experiments in which differences in growth rates, strains, or stress treatments occur, the normalization procedure may have a significant impact on the results. In this report we present a solution to the normalization problem in RNA slot blotting...... the relative level of rRNA per cell, and slot blotting to rRNA probes, which estimates the level of rRNA per extracted total RNA, the amount of RNA per cell was calculated in a series of heat shock experiments with the gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. It was found that the level of rRNA per cell...... decreased to 30% in the course of the heat shock. This lowered ribosome level led to a decrease in the total RNA content, resulting in a gradually increasing overestimation of the mRNA levels throughout the experiment. Using renormalized cellular mRNA levels, the HrcA-mediated regulation of the genes...

  3. Human Milk MicroRNA and Total RNA Differ Depending on Milk Fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Hepworth, Anna R; Lefèvre, Christophe; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T; Hassiotou, Foteini

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNA have been recently discovered in human milk signifying potentially important functions for both the lactating breast and the infant. Whilst human milk microRNA have started to be explored, little data exist on the evaluation of sample processing, and analysis to ensure that a full spectrum of microRNA can be obtained. Human milk comprises three main fractions: cells, skim milk, and lipids. Typically, the skim milk fraction has been measured in isolation despite evidence that the lipid fraction may contain more microRNA. This study aimed to standardize isolation of microRNA and total RNA from all three fractions of human milk to determine the most appropriate sampling and analysis procedure for future studies. Three different methods from eight commercially available kits were tested for their efficacy in extracting total RNA and microRNA from the lipid, skim, and cell fractions of human milk. Each fraction yielded different concentrations of RNA and microRNA, with the highest quantities found in the cell and lipid fractions, and the lowest in skim milk. The column-based phenol-free method was the most efficient extraction method for all three milk fractions. Two microRNAs were expressed and validated in the three milk fractions by qPCR using the three recommended extraction kits for each fraction. High expression levels were identified in the skim and lipid milk factions for these microRNAs. These results suggest that careful consideration of both the human milk sample preparation and extraction protocols should be made prior to embarking upon research in this area. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Radiation-induced alternative transcripts as detected in total and polysome-bound mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Amy; Ryan, Michael C; Shankavaram, Uma T; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2018-01-02

    Alternative splicing is a critical event in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. To investigate whether this process influences radiation-induced gene expression we defined the effects of ionizing radiation on the generation of alternative transcripts in total cellular mRNA (the transcriptome) and polysome-bound mRNA (the translatome) of the human glioblastoma stem-like cell line NSC11. For these studies, RNA-Seq profiles from control and irradiated cells were compared using the program SpliceSeq to identify transcripts and splice variations induced by radiation. As compared to the transcriptome (total RNA) of untreated cells, the radiation-induced transcriptome contained 92 splice events suggesting that radiation induced alternative splicing. As compared to the translatome (polysome-bound RNA) of untreated cells, the radiation-induced translatome contained 280 splice events of which only 24 were overlapping with the radiation-induced transcriptome. These results suggest that radiation not only modifies alternative splicing of precursor mRNA, but also results in the selective association of existing mRNA isoforms with polysomes. Comparison of radiation-induced alternative transcripts to radiation-induced gene expression in total RNA revealed little overlap (about 3%). In contrast, in the radiation-induced translatome, about 38% of the induced alternative transcripts corresponded to genes whose expression level was affected in the translatome. This study suggests that whereas radiation induces alternate splicing, the alternative transcripts present at the time of irradiation may play a role in the radiation-induced translational control of gene expression and thus cellular radioresponse.

  5. Pathways of cellular internalisation of liposomes delivered siRNA and effects on siRNA engagement with target mRNA and silencing in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Grabowska, Anna; Stolnik, Snow

    2018-02-28

    Design of an efficient delivery system is a generally recognised bottleneck in translation of siRNA technology into clinic. Despite research efforts, cellular processes that determine efficiency of siRNA silencing achieved by different delivery formulations remain unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) of cellular internalisation of a model siRNA-loaded liposome system in a correlation to the engagement of delivered siRNA with its target and consequent silencing by adopting siRNA molecular beacon technology. Probing of cellular internalisation pathways by a panel of pharmacological inhibitors indicated that clathrin-mediated (dynamin-dependent) endocytosis, macropinocytosis (dynamine independent), and cell membrane cholesterol dependent process(es) (clathrin and caveolea-independent) all play a role in the siRNA-liposomes internalization. The inhibition of either of these entry routes was, in general, mirrored by a reduction in the level of siRNA engagement with its target mRNA, as well as in a reduction of the target gene silencing. A dramatic increase in siRNA engagement with its target RNA was observed on disruption of endosomal membrane (by chloroquine), accompanied with an increased silencing. The work thus illustrates that employing molecular beacon siRNA technology one can start to assess the target RNA engagement - a stage between initial cellular internalization and final gene silencing of siRNA delivery systems.

  6. Cellular Response to Ionizing Radiation: A MicroRNA Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Mohammad; Asghari, S. Mohsen; Sariri, Reyhaneh; Moslemi, Dariush; Parsian, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. They play a crucial role in diverse cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) is one of the most important treatment protocols for patients that suffer from cancer and affects directly or indirectly cellular integration. Recently it has been discovered that microRNA-mediated gene regulation interferes with radio-related pathways in ionizing radiation. Here, we review the recent discoveries about miRNAs in cellular response to IR. Thoroughly understanding the mechanism of miRNAs in radiation response, it will be possible to design new strategies for improving radiotherapy efficiency and ultimately cancer treatment. PMID:24551775

  7. The cellular receptors of exogenous RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patryk Reniewicz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the key determinants of survival for organisms is proper recognition of exogenous and endogenous nucleic acids. Therefore, high eukaryotes developed a number of receptors that allow for discrimination between friend or foe DNA and RNA. Appearance of exogenous RNA in cytoplasm provides a signal of danger and triggers cellular responses that facilitate eradication of a pathogen. Recognition of exogenous RNA is additionally complicated by fact that large amount of endogenous RNA is present in cytoplasm Thus, number of different receptors, found in eukaryotic cells, is able to recognize that nucleic acid. First group of those receptors consist endosomal Toll like receptors, namely TLR3, TLR7, TLR8 and TLR13. Those receptors recognize RNA released from pathogens that enter the cell by endocytosis. The second group includes cytoplasmic sensors like PKR and the family of RLRs comprised of RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2. Cytoplasmic receptors recognize RNA from pathogens invading the cell by non-endocytic pathway. In both cases binding of RNA by its receptors results in activation of the signalling cascades that lead to the production of interferon and other cytokines.

  8. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  9. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Cellular mRNA decay factors involved in the hepatitis C virus life cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Ibarra, Leonardo Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The group of positive strand RNA ((+)RNA) viruses includes numerous plant, animal and human pathogens such as the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Their viral genomes mimic cellular mRNAs, however, besides acting as messengers for translation of viral proteins, they also act as templates for viral replication. Since these two functions are mutually exclusive, a key step in the replication of all (+) RNA viruses is the regulated exit of the genomic RNAs from the cellular translation machinery to the v...

  11. Delivery of kinesin spindle protein targeting siRNA in solid lipid nanoparticles to cellular models of tumor vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Bo; Campbell, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • siRNA-lipid nanoparticles are solid particles not lipid bilayers with aqueous core. • High, but not low, PEG content can prevent nanoparticle encapsulation of siRNA. • PEG reduces cellular toxicity of cationic nanoparticles in vitro. • PEG reduces zeta potential while improving gene silencing of siRNA nanoparticles. • Kinesin spindle protein can be an effective target for tumor vascular targeting. - Abstract: The ideal siRNA delivery system should selectively deliver the construct to the target cell, avoid enzymatic degradation, and evade uptake by phagocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the importance of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on lipid-based carrier systems for encapsulating, and delivering, siRNA to tumor vessels using cellular models. Lipid nanoparticles containing different percentage of PEG were evaluated based on their physical chemical properties, density compared to water, siRNA encapsulation, toxicity, targeting efficiency and gene silencing in vitro. siRNA can be efficiently loaded into lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) when DOTAP is included in the formulation mixture. However, the total amount encapsulated decreased with increase in PEG content. In the presence of siRNA, the final formulations contained a mixed population of particles based on density. The major population which contains the majority of siRNA exhibited a density of 4% glucose, and the minor fraction associated with a decreased amount of siRNA had a density less than PBS. The inclusion of 10 mol% PEG resulted in a greater amount of siRNA associated with the minor fraction. Finally, when kinesin spindle protein (KSP) siRNA was encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles containing a modest amount of PEG, the proliferation of endothelial cells was inhibited due to the efficient knock down of KSP mRNA. The presence of siRNA resulted in the formation of solid lipid nanoparticles when prepared using the thin film and hydration method. LNPs with a relatively modest amount of

  12. Isolation of Microarray-Grade Total RNA, MicroRNA, and DNA from a Single PAXgene Blood RNA Tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, Mogens; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Voss, Thorsten

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a procedure for isolation of microRNA and genomic DNA in addition to total RNA from whole blood stabilized in PAXgene Blood RNA tubes. The procedure is based on automatic extraction on a BioRobot MDx and includes isolation of DNA from a fraction of the stabilized blood...... and recovery of small RNA species that are otherwise lost. The procedure presented here is suitable for large-scale experiments and is amenable to further automation. Procured total RNA and DNA was tested using Affymetrix Expression and single-nucleotide polymorphism GeneChips, respectively, and isolated micro......RNA was tested using spotted locked nucleic acid-based microarrays. We conclude that the yield and quality of total RNA, microRNA, and DNA from a single PAXgene blood RNA tube is sufficient for downstream microarray analysis....

  13. Bacterial RNA induces myocyte cellular dysfunction through the activation of PKR

    OpenAIRE

    Bleiblo, Farag; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Tai, TC; Saleh, Mazen; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Kumar, Anand; Kumar, Aseem

    2012-01-01

    Severe sepsis and the ensuing septic shock are serious life threatening conditions. These diseases are triggered by the host's over exuberant systemic response to the infecting pathogen. Several surveillance mechanisms have evolved to discriminate self from foreign RNA and accordingly trigger effective cellular responses to target the pathogenic threats. The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a key component of the cytoplasmic RNA sensors involved in the recognition of viral double-strande...

  14. Bacterial RNA induces myocyte cellular dysfunction through the activation of PKR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiblo, Farag; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Tai, TC; Saleh, Mazen; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Kumar, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Severe sepsis and the ensuing septic shock are serious life threatening conditions. These diseases are triggered by the host's over exuberant systemic response to the infecting pathogen. Several surveillance mechanisms have evolved to discriminate self from foreign RNA and accordingly trigger effective cellular responses to target the pathogenic threats. The RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is a key component of the cytoplasmic RNA sensors involved in the recognition of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Here, we identify bacterial RNA as a distinct pathogenic pattern recognized by PKR. Our results indicate that natural RNA derived from bacteria directly binds to and activates PKR. We further show that bacterial RNA induces human cardiac myocyte apoptosis and identify the requirement for PKR in mediating this response. In addition to bacterial immunity, the results presented here may also have implications in cardiac pathophysiology. PMID:22833816

  15. Changes in Cellular mRNA Stability, Splicing, and Polyadenylation through HuR Protein Sequestration by a Cytoplasmic RNA Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Barnhart

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The impact of RNA viruses on the posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression is unclear. Sindbis virus causes a dramatic relocalization of the cellular HuR protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in infected cells. This is to the result of the expression of large amounts of viral RNAs that contain high-affinity HuR binding sites in their 3′ UTRs effectively serving as a sponge for the HuR protein. Sequestration of HuR by Sindbis virus is associated with destabilization of cellular mRNAs that normally bind HuR and rely on it to regulate their expression. Furthermore, significant changes can be observed in nuclear alternative polyadenylation and splicing events on cellular pre-mRNAs as a result of sequestration of HuR protein by the 3′ UTR of transcripts of this cytoplasmic RNA virus. These studies suggest a molecular mechanism of virus-host interaction that probably has a significant impact on virus replication, cytopathology, and pathogenesis.

  16. Cellular La protein shields nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viral leader RNA from RIG-I and enhances virus growth by diverse mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitko, Vira; Musiyenko, Alla; Bayfield, Mark A; Maraia, Richard J; Barik, Sailen

    2008-08-01

    The La antigen (SS-B) associates with a wide variety of cellular and viral RNAs to affect gene expression in multiple systems. We show that La is the major cellular protein found to be associated with the abundant 44-nucleotide viral leader RNA (leRNA) early after infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. Consistent with this, La redistributes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in RSV-infected cells. Upon RNA interference knockdown of La, leRNA is redirected to associate with the RNA-binding protein RIG-I, a known activator of interferon (IFN) gene expression, and this is accompanied by the early induction of IFN mRNA. These results suggest that La shields leRNA from RIG-I, abrogating the early viral activation of type I IFN. We mapped the leRNA binding function to RNA recognition motif 1 of La and showed that while wild-type La greatly enhanced RSV growth, a La mutant defective in RSV leRNA binding also did not support RSV growth. Comparative studies of RSV and Sendai virus and the use of IFN-negative Vero cells indicated that La supports the growth of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses by both IFN suppression and a potentially novel IFN-independent mechanism.

  17. Community structure, cellular rRNA content, and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenschlag, K.; Sahm, K.; Knoblauch, C.

    2000-01-01

    The community structure of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) of a marine Arctic sediment (Smeerenburg-fjorden, Svalbard) a-as characterized by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rRNA slot blot hybridization by using group- and genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes...... that FISH and rRNA slot blot hybridization gave comparable results. Furthermore, a combination of the two methods allowed us to calculate specific cellular rRNA contents with respect to localization in the sediment profile. The rRNA contents of Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cells were highest in the first 5...... mm of the sediment (0.9 and 1.4 fg, respectively) and decreased steeply with depth, indicating that maximal metabolic activity occurred close to the surface, Based on SRB cell numbers, cellular sulfate reduction rates were calculated. The rates were highest in the surface layer (0.14 fmol cell(-1...

  18. RNA precursor pool metabolism and RNA synthesis in X-irradiated Tetrahymena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, R.E.; Paul, I.J.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The incorporation of a radioactive RNA precursor ( 3 H-uridine) has been used in many studies as an index for measuring the synthesis of RNA, yet there is a distinct possibility that the results so obtained were significantly influenced by radiation-induced effects on the metabolism of this precursor into UTP (the primary immediate precursor of RNA) before its incorporation into RNA. A direct examination was therefore undertaken of the effects of X-irradiation on the metabolism of 3 H-uridine and its relationship to RNA synthesis as determined by incorporation. X-irradiation of logarithmically growing Tetrahymena pyriformis caused a dose-dependent depression of total cellular RNA synthesis. Ribosomal RNA (which comprises about 80 per cent of total cellular RNA) synthesis was also depressed by X-irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Measurements of the levels of radioactivity present in the UTP precursor pool of both irradiated and unirradiated cells were obtained by means of DEAE-cellulose column chromatography of the extracted free nucleotides. Metabolism of 3 H-uridine into UMP, UDP and UTP was depressed by 40%, 26% and 27% respectively, whereas incorporation of 3 H-uridine into RNA was depressed by 77%. The results show that about one-third of the observed (apparent) depression in RNA synthesis was due to radiation-induced effects on the precursor pool, and the remaining two-thirds due to some definite effect of radiation at the transcription level leading to depressed synthesis of RNA. (U.K.)

  19. A viral microRNA functions as an ortholog of cellular miR-155

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwein, Eva; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Sachse, Christoph; Frenzel, Corina; Majoros, William H.; Chi, Jen-Tsan A.; Braich, Ravi; Manoharan, Muthiah; Soutschek, Jürgen; Ohler, Uwe; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2008-01-01

    All metazoan eukaryotes express microRNAs (miRNAs), ∼22 nt regulatory RNAs that can repress the expression of mRNAs bearing complementary sequences1. Several DNA viruses also express miRNAs in infected cells, suggesting a role in viral replication and pathogenesis2. While specific viral miRNAs have been shown to autoregulate viral mRNAs3,4 or downregulate cellular mRNAs5,6, the function of the majority of viral miRNAs remains unknown. Here, we report that the miR-K12−11 miRNA encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) shows significant homology to cellular miR-155, including the entire miRNA “seed” region7. Using a range of assays, we demonstrate that expression of physiological levels of miR-K12−11 or miR-155 results in the downregulation of an extensive set of common mRNA targets, including genes with known roles in cell growth regulation. Our findings indicate that viral miR-K12−11 functions as an ortholog of cellular miR-155 and has likely evolved to exploit a pre-existing gene regulatory pathway in B-cells. Moreover, the known etiological role of miR-155 in B-cell transformation8-10 suggests that miR-K12−11 may contribute to the induction of KSHV-positive B-cell tumors in infected patients. PMID:18075594

  20. Modelling the structure of a ceRNA-theoretical, bipartite microRNA-mRNA interaction network regulating intestinal epithelial cellular pathways using R programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J M; Henderson, W A

    2018-01-12

    We report a method using functional-molecular databases and network modelling to identify hypothetical mRNA-miRNA interaction networks regulating intestinal epithelial barrier function. The model forms a data-analysis component of our cell culture experiments, which produce RNA expression data from Nanostring Technologies nCounter ® system. The epithelial tight-junction (TJ) and actin cytoskeleton interact as molecular components of the intestinal epithelial barrier. Upstream regulation of TJ-cytoskeleton interaction is effected by the Rac/Rock/Rho signaling pathway and other associated pathways which may be activated or suppressed by extracellular signaling from growth factors, hormones, and immune receptors. Pathway activations affect epithelial homeostasis, contributing to degradation of the epithelial barrier associated with osmotic dysregulation, inflammation, and tumor development. The complexity underlying miRNA-mRNA interaction networks represents a roadblock for prediction and validation of competing-endogenous RNA network function. We developed a network model to identify hypothetical co-regulatory motifs in a miRNA-mRNA interaction network related to epithelial function. A mRNA-miRNA interaction list was generated using KEGG and miRWalk2.0 databases. R-code was developed to quantify and visualize inherent network structures. We identified a sub-network with a high number of shared, targeting miRNAs, of genes associated with cellular proliferation and cancer, including c-MYC and Cyclin D.

  1. Discovery of centrosomal RNA and centrosomal hypothesis of cellular ageing and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichinadze, Konstantin; Tkemaladze, Jaba; Lazarashvili, Ann

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, a group of scientists studying centrosomes of Spisula solidissima mollusc oocytes under the leadership of Alliegro (Alliegro, M.C.; Alliegro, M.A.; Palazzo, R.E. Centrosome-associated RNA in surf clam oocytes. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2006, 103(24), 9034-9038) reliably demonstrated the existence of specific RNA in centrosome, called centrosomal RNA (cnRNA). In their first article, five different RNAs (cnRNAs 11, 102, 113, 170, and 184) were described. During the process of full sequencing of the first transcript (cnRNA 11), it was discovered that the transcript contained a conserved structure-a reverse transcriptase domain located together with the most important centrosomal protein, γ-tubulin. In an article published in 2005, we made assumptions about several possible mechanisms for determining the most important functions of centrosomal structures and referred to one of them as a "RNA-dependent mechanism." This idea about participation of hypothetic centrosomal small interference RNA and/or microRNA in the process was made one year prior to the discovery of cnRNA by Alliegro's group. The discovery of specific RNA in a centrosome is indirect evidence of a centrosomal hypothesis of cellular ageing and differentiation. The presence of a reverse transcriptase domain in this type of RNA, together with its uniqueness and specificity, makes the centrosome a place of information storage and reproduction.

  2. Phenotypic characterization of neurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells in the neuroleptic-treated rat striatum: a detailed cellular co-expression study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emson, P C; Westmore, K; Augood, S J [MRC Molecular Neuroscience Group, The Department of Neurobiology, The Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-11

    The chemical phenotype of proneurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells was determined in the acute haloperidol-treated rat striatum using a combination of [{sup 35}S]-labelled and alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides. Cellular sites of proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were visualized simultaneously on tissue sections processed to reveal cellular sites of preproenkephalin A messenger RNA or the dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32, messenger RNA. The cellular co-expression of preproenkepahlin A and preprotachykinin messenger RNA was also examined within forebrain structures. Cellular sites of preproenkephalin A and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNAs were visualized using alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides whilst sites of preprotachykinin and proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were detected using [{sup 35}S]-labelled oligos. Cellular sites of enkephalin and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 gene expression were identified microscopically by the concentration of purple alkaline phosphatase reaction product within the cell cytoplasm, whereas sites of substance P and proneurotensin gene expression were identified by the dense clustering of silver grains overlying cells.An intense hybridization signal was detected for all three neuropeptide messenger RNAs in the striatum, the nucleus accumbens and septum. Dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNA was detected within the neostriatum but not within the septum. In all forebrain regions examined, with the exception of the islands of Cajella, the cellular expression of enkephalin messenger RNA and substance P messenger RNA was discordant; the two neuropeptide messenger RNAs were detected essentially in different cells, although in the striatum and nucleus accumbens occasional isolated cells were detected which contained both hybridization signals; dense clusters of silver grains overlay alkaline phosphatase

  3. Phenotypic characterization of neurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells in the neuroleptic-treated rat striatum: a detailed cellular co-expression study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emson, P.C.; Westmore, K.; Augood, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical phenotype of proneurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells was determined in the acute haloperidol-treated rat striatum using a combination of [ 35 S]-labelled and alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides. Cellular sites of proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were visualized simultaneously on tissue sections processed to reveal cellular sites of preproenkephalin A messenger RNA or the dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32, messenger RNA. The cellular co-expression of preproenkepahlin A and preprotachykinin messenger RNA was also examined within forebrain structures. Cellular sites of preproenkephalin A and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNAs were visualized using alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides whilst sites of preprotachykinin and proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were detected using [ 35 S]-labelled oligos. Cellular sites of enkephalin and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 gene expression were identified microscopically by the concentration of purple alkaline phosphatase reaction product within the cell cytoplasm, whereas sites of substance P and proneurotensin gene expression were identified by the dense clustering of silver grains overlying cells.An intense hybridization signal was detected for all three neuropeptide messenger RNAs in the striatum, the nucleus accumbens and septum. Dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNA was detected within the neostriatum but not within the septum. In all forebrain regions examined, with the exception of the islands of Cajella, the cellular expression of enkephalin messenger RNA and substance P messenger RNA was discordant; the two neuropeptide messenger RNAs were detected essentially in different cells, although in the striatum and nucleus accumbens occasional isolated cells were detected which contained both hybridization signals; dense clusters of silver grains overlay alkaline phosphatase-positive cells

  4. Sub-cellular mRNA localization modulates the regulation of gene expression by small RNAs in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Korkmazhan, Elgin; Stavans, Joel; Levine, Erel

    2017-10-01

    Small non-coding RNAs can exert significant regulatory activity on gene expression in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in understanding bacterial gene expression by sRNAs. However, recent findings that demonstrate that families of mRNAs show non-trivial sub-cellular distributions raise the question of how localization may affect the regulatory activity of sRNAs. Here we address this question within a simple mathematical model. We show that the non-uniform spatial distributions of mRNA can alter the threshold-linear response that characterizes sRNAs that act stoichiometrically, and modulate the hierarchy among targets co-regulated by the same sRNA. We also identify conditions where the sub-cellular organization of cofactors in the sRNA pathway can induce spatial heterogeneity on sRNA targets. Our results suggest that under certain conditions, interpretation and modeling of natural and synthetic gene regulatory circuits need to take into account the spatial organization of the transcripts of participating genes.

  5. Persistence of ZIKV-RNA in the cellular fraction of semen is accompanied by a surrogate-marker of viral replication. Diagnostic implications for sexual transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biava, Mirella; Caglioti, Claudia; Castilletti, Concetta; Bordi, Licia; Carletti, Fabrizio; Colavita, Francesca; Quartu, Serena; Nicastri, Emanuele; Iannetta, Marco; Vairo, Francesco; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; Taglietti, Fabrizio; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Lalle, Eleonora

    2018-01-01

    As asymptomatic infections represent 80% of ZIKV-infected individuals, sexual transmission is a rising concern. Recent studies highlighted a preferential association of ZIKV with the cellular fraction (CF) of different specimen types. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of ZIKV-RNA in different body fluids, focusing on semen specimens to assess the ZIKV-RNA content in either the unfractionated sample, its CF or seminal plasma (SP). In addition, to establish if the presence of ZIKV genome was associated with active virus replication, we measured the levels of negative-strand ZIKV-RNA. ZIKV total-RNA was detected in blood, urine and unfractionated semen, and neg-RNA in semen CF and SP samples longitudinally collected from two ZIKV-positive men followed at the National Institute for Infectious Diseases "L. Spallanzani", Italy. In both patients, ZIKV total-RNA was detected in CF with ct values always lower than in the corresponding unfractionated samples, and was observed even in the CF from negative unfractionated semen samples. In Patient 2, neg-RNA was also detected in CF, suggesting ongoing viral replication. Our results demonstrate higher clinical sensitivity of CF as compared to whole semen testing, emphasizing the need to extend ZIKV-RNA testing to CF, to rule out virus presence and the possible risk of sexual transmission.

  6. Isolation of high-quality total RNA from leaves of Myrciaria dubia "CAMU CAMU".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Juan Carlos Castro; Reátegui, Alina Del Carmen Egoavil; Flores, Julián Torres; Saavedra, Roberson Ramírez; Ruiz, Marianela Cobos; Correa, Sixto Alfredo Imán

    2013-01-01

    Myrciaria dubia is a main source of vitamin C for people in the Amazon region. Molecular studies of M. dubia require high-quality total RNA from different tissues. So far, no protocols have been reported for total RNA isolation from leaves of this species. The objective of this research was to develop protocols for extracting high-quality total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. Total RNA was purified following two modified protocols developed for leaves of other species (by Zeng and Yang, and by Reid et al.) and one modified protocol developed for fruits of the studied species (by Silva). Quantity and quality of purified total RNA were assessed by spectrophotometric and electrophoretic analysis. Additionally, quality of total RNA was evaluated with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). With these three modified protocols we were able to isolate high-quality RNA (A260nm/A280nm >1.9 and A260nm/A230nm >2.0). Highest yield was produced with the Zeng and Yang modified protocol (384±46µg ARN/g fresh weight). Furthermore, electrophoretic analysis showed the integrity of isolated RNA and the absence of DNA. Another proof of the high quality of our purified RNA was the successful cDNA synthesis and amplification of a segment of the M. dubia actin 1 gene. We report three modified protocols for isolation total RNA from leaves of M. dubia. The modified protocols are easy, rapid, low in cost, and effective for high-quality and quantity total RNA isolation suitable for cDNA synthesis and polymerase chain reaction.

  7. Cockayne's syndrome: correlation of clinical features with cellular sensitivity of RNA synthesis to UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with dwarfism, mental retardation, and otherwise clinically heterogeneous features. In cultured CS fibroblasts, the failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal rates after UV-C irradiation provides a useful and relatively simple diagnostic test. We have measured post-UV-C RNA synthesis in 52 patients for whom a clinical diagnosis of CS was considered a possibility. Twenty-nine patients showed the defect characteristic of CS cells, and 23 had a normal response. We have attempted to correlate the cellular diagnosis with the different clinical features of the disorder. Clinical details of the patients were obtained from referring clinicians in the form of a questionnaire. Our results show that, apart from the cardinal features of dwarfism and mental retardation, sun sensitivity correlated best with a positive cellular diagnosis. Pigmentary retinopathy, gait defects, and dental caries were also good positive indicators, although several patients with a positive cellular diagnosis did not have these features. (Author)

  8. EBER2 RNA-induced transcriptome changes identify cellular processes likely targeted during Epstein Barr Virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benecke Bernd-Joachim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the physiological role of the EBER1 and 2 nuclear RNAs during Epstein Barr viral infection. The EBERs are transcribed by cellular RNA Polymerase III and their strong expression results in 106 to 107 copies per EBV infected cell, making them reliable diagnostic markers for the presence of EBV. Although the functions of most of the proteins targeted by EBER RNAs have been studied, the role of EBERs themselves still remains elusive. Findings The cellular transcription response to EBER2 expression using the wild-type and an internal deletion mutant was determined. Significant changes in gene expression patterns were observed. A functional meta-analysis of the regulated genes points to inhibition of stress and immune responses, as well as activation of cellular growth and cytoskeletal reorganization as potential targets for EBER2 RNA. Different functions can be assigned to different parts of the RNA. Conclusion These results provide new avenues to the understanding of EBER2 and EBV biology, and set the grounds for a more in depth functional analysis of EBER2 using transcriptome activity measurements.

  9. A critical role of a cellular membrane traffic protein in poliovirus RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A Belov

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of many RNA viruses is accompanied by extensive remodeling of intracellular membranes. In poliovirus-infected cells, ER and Golgi stacks disappear, while new clusters of vesicle-like structures form sites for viral RNA synthesis. Virus replication is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA, implicating some components(s of the cellular secretory pathway in virus growth. Formation of characteristic vesicles induced by expression of viral proteins was not inhibited by BFA, but they were functionally deficient. GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPases, Arf, is responsible for the sensitivity of virus infection to BFA, and is required for virus replication. Knockdown of GBF1 expression inhibited virus replication, which was rescued by catalytically active protein with an intact N-terminal sequence. We identified a mutation in GBF1 that allows growth of poliovirus in the presence of BFA. Interaction between GBF1 and viral protein 3A determined the outcome of infection in the presence of BFA.

  10. The cellular RNA-binding protein EAP recognizes a conserved stem-loop in the Epstein-Barr virus small RNA EBER 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toczyski, D P; Steitz, J A

    1993-01-01

    EAP (EBER-associated protein) is an abundant, 15-kDa cellular RNA-binding protein which associates with certain herpesvirus small RNAs. We have raised polyclonal anti-EAP antibodies against a glutathione S-transferase-EAP fusion protein. Analysis of the RNA precipitated by these antibodies from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- or herpesvirus papio (HVP)-infected cells shows that > 95% of EBER 1 (EBV-encoded RNA 1) and the majority of HVP 1 (an HVP small RNA homologous to EBER 1) are associated with EAP. RNase protection experiments performed on native EBER 1 particles with affinity-purified anti-EAP antibodies demonstrate that EAP binds a stem-loop structure (stem-loop 3) of EBER 1. Since bacterially expressed glutathione S-transferase-EAP fusion protein binds EBER 1, we conclude that EAP binding is independent of any other cellular or viral protein. Detailed mutational analyses of stem-loop 3 suggest that EAP recognizes the majority of the nucleotides in this hairpin, interacting with both single-stranded and double-stranded regions in a sequence-specific manner. Binding studies utilizing EBER 1 deletion mutants suggest that there may also be a second, weaker EAP-binding site on stem-loop 4 of EBER 1. These data and the fact that stem-loop 3 represents the most highly conserved region between EBER 1 and HVP 1 suggest that EAP binding is a critical aspect of EBER 1 and HVP 1 function. Images PMID:8380232

  11. Lysosomal putative RNA transporter SIDT2 mediates direct uptake of RNA by lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Shu; Fujiwara, Yuuki; Contu, Viorica Raluca; Hase, Katsunori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Hisae; Kabuta, Chihana; Wada, Keiji; Kabuta, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are thought to be the major intracellular compartment for the degradation of macromolecules. We recently identified a novel type of autophagy, RNautophagy, where RNA is directly taken up by lysosomes in an ATP-dependent manner and degraded. However, the mechanism of RNA translocation across the lysosomal membrane and the physiological role of RNautophagy remain unclear. In the present study, we performed gain- and loss-of-function studies with isolated lysosomes, and found that SIDT2 (SID1 transmembrane family, member 2), an ortholog of the Caenorhabditis elegans putative RNA transporter SID-1 (systemic RNA interference deficient-1), mediates RNA translocation during RNautophagy. We also observed that SIDT2 is a transmembrane protein, which predominantly localizes to lysosomes. Strikingly, knockdown of Sidt2 inhibited up to ˜50% of total RNA degradation at the cellular level, independently of macroautophagy. Moreover, we showed that this impairment is mainly due to inhibition of lysosomal RNA degradation, strongly suggesting that RNautophagy plays a significant role in constitutive cellular RNA degradation. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanisms of RNA metabolism, intracellular RNA transport, and atypical types of autophagy.

  12. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA in rat forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroogy, K B; Lundgren, K H; Lee, D C; Guthrie, K M; Gall, C M

    1993-05-01

    The cellular localization of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha) mRNA in juvenile and adult rat forebrain was examined using in situ hybridization with a 35S-labeled cRNA probe. TGF alpha cRNA-labeled neuronal perikarya were distributed across many forebrain regions including the olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, ventral pallidum, amygdala, hippocampal stratum granulosum and CA3 stratum pyramidale, and piriform, entorhinal, and retrosplenial cortices. TGF alpha cRNA-hybridizing cells were also localized to several thalamic nuclei and to the suprachiasmatic, dorsomedial, and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus. In addition, labeled cells were present in regions of white matter including the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, internal and external capsules, optic tract, and lateral olfactory tract. Thus, both neurons and glia appear to synthesize TGF alpha in normal brain. Hybridization densities were greater in neuronal fields at 2 weeks of age compared with the adult, suggesting a role for TGF alpha in the development of several forebrain systems. Our results demonstrating the prominent and wide-spread expression of TGF alpha mRNA in forebrain, combined with the extremely low abundance of epidermal growth factor mRNA in brain, support the argument that TGF alpha is the principal endogenous ligand for the epidermal growth factor receptor in normal brain.

  13. Effect of the nanoformulation of siRNA-lipid assemblies on their cellular uptake and immune stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Kohei; Onishi, Kohei; Sawaki, Kazuaki; Li, Tianshu; Mitsuoka, Kaoru; Sato, Takaaki; Takeoka, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    Two lipid-based nanoformulations have been used to date in clinical studies: lipoplexes and lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). In this study, we prepared small interfering RNA (siRNA)-loaded carriers using lipid components of the same composition to form molecular assemblies of differing structures, and evaluated the impact of structure on cellular uptake and immune stimulation. Lipoplexes are electrostatic complexes formed by mixing preformed cationic lipid liposomes with anionic siRNA in an aqueous environment, whereas LNPs are nanoparticles embedding siRNA prepared by mixing an alcoholic lipid solution with an aqueous siRNA solution in one step. Although the physicochemical properties of lipoplexes and LNPs were similar except for small increases in apparent size of lipoplexes and zeta potential of LNPs, siRNA uptake efficiency of LNPs was significantly higher than that of lipoplexes. Furthermore, in the case of LNPs, both siRNA and lipid were effectively incorporated into cells in a co-assembled state; however, in the case of lipoplexes, the amount of siRNA internalized into cells was small in comparison with lipid. siRNAs in lipoplexes were thought to be more likely to localize on the particle surface and thereby undergo dissociation into the medium. Inflammatory cytokine responses also appeared to differ between lipoplexes and LNPs. For tumor necrosis factor-α, release was mainly caused by siRNA. On the other hand, the release of interleukin-1β was mainly due to the cationic nature of particles. LNPs released lower amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β than lipoplexes and were thus considered to be better tolerated with respect to cytokine release. In conclusion, siRNA-loaded nanoformulations effect their cellular uptake and immune stimulation in a manner that depends on the structure of the molecular assembly; therefore, nanoformulations should be optimized before extending studies into the in vivo environment. PMID:28790820

  14. Extraction of total RNA in the developing chicken forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Rasoul Zaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gene expression of Gama-Aminobutyric acid (GABA A receptor subunits may change during development. Procedures in molecular biology are required to understand the gene expression profile GABA A R in chicken. The outcome of the results depends on good-quality high-molecular-weight RNA. Several procedures can be used to isolate RNA from the brain of chicken; however, most of them are time-consuming and require disruption of cells or freeze and thaw in the presence of RNase inhibitors. The aim of this experiment was isolation of RNA from chicken embryonic brain tissues using appropriate RNA extraction kit. Materials and Methods: Fertilized eggs from Ross breed (Gallus gallus were incubated at 38°C and 60% relative humidity in a forced-draft incubator and were turned every 3 h. After 3, 7, 14 and 20 days of incubation, eggs were cooled on ice to induce deep anesthesia. Then whole brains were dissected out. As brains could not be excised in a reproducible way from earlier embryos (embryonic days 4 and 6, whole heads were collected. Chicken embryos between day 7 to 20 and 1 day after birth were decapitated, and their brains removed. Samples were immediately inserted into lysis buffer and stored at −70°C. Total RNA was isolated and a contaminating genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was digested. RNA quality was checked using gel electrophoresis. Results: We obtained 52 mg/ml to 745 mg/ml with A260/280 1.7-2.2. Only high-quality RNA, with no signs of degradation, was used for further experiments. Conclusion: In conclusion, protocol was found to be suitable for the isolation of total RNA from embryonic chicken cells.

  15. Selective mRNA translation coordinates energetic and metabolic adjustments to cellular oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco-Price, Cristina; Kaiser, Kayla A; Jang, Charles J H; Larive, Cynthia K; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2008-12-01

    Cellular oxygen deprivation (hypoxia/anoxia) requires an acclimation response that enables survival during an energy crisis. To gain new insights into the processes that facilitate the endurance of transient oxygen deprivation, the dynamics of the mRNA translation state and metabolites were quantitatively monitored in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to a short (2 h) or prolonged (9 h) period of oxygen and carbon dioxide deprivation and following 1 h of re-aeration. Hypoxia stress and reoxygenation promoted adjustments in the levels of polyribosomes (polysomes) that were highly coordinated with cellular ATP content. A quantitative comparison of steady-state and polysomal mRNA populations revealed that over half of the cellular mRNAs were restricted from polysome complexes during the stress, with little or no change in abundance. This selective repression of translation was rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. Comparison of the adjustment in gene transcripts and metabolites demonstrated that profiling of polysomal mRNAs strongly augments the prediction of cellular processes that are altered during cellular oxygen deprivation. The selective translation of a subset of mRNAs promotes the conservation of ATP and facilitates the transition to anaerobic metabolism during low-oxygen stress.

  16. Cockayne's syndrome: correlation of clinical features with cellular sensitivity of RNA synthesis to UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A. (Medical Research Council, Brighton (United Kingdom). Cell Mutation Unit); Stefanini, Miria (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia (Italy). Ist. di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica); Norris, P.G. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-08-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with dwarfism, mental retardation, and otherwise clinically heterogeneous features. In cultured CS fibroblasts, the failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal rates after UV-C irradiation provides a useful and relatively simple diagnostic test. We have measured post-UV-C RNA synthesis in 52 patients for whom a clinical diagnosis of CS was considered a possibility. Twenty-nine patients showed the defect characteristic of CS cells, and 23 had a normal response. We have attempted to correlate the cellular diagnosis with the different clinical features of the disorder. Clinical details of the patients were obtained from referring clinicians in the form of a questionnaire. Our results show that, apart from the cardinal features of dwarfism and mental retardation, sun sensitivity correlated best with a positive cellular diagnosis. Pigmentary retinopathy, gait defects, and dental caries were also good positive indicators, although several patients with a positive cellular diagnosis did not have these features. (Author).

  17. Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0080 TITLE: Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer . PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Total RNA Sequencing Analysis of DCIS Progressing to Invasive Breast Cancer . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER GRANT11489...institutional, NIH-funded study of genetic and epigenetic alterations of pre-invasive DCIS that did or did not progress to invasive breast cancer , with an

  18. Down-regulation of viral replication by adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNA against cellular cofactors for hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iwai, Takahiro; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Shimamura, Hideo; Araki, Hiromasa; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2004-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently being evaluated not only as a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory effect of siRNA on viral replication has been demonstrated in multiple pathogenic viruses. However, because of the high sequence specificity of siRNA-mediated RNA degradation, antiviral efficacy of siRNA directed to viral genome will be largely limited by emergence of escape variants resistant to siRNA due to high mutation rates of virus, especially RNA viruses such as poliovirus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the therapeutic feasibility of siRNAs specific for the putative cellular cofactors for HCV, we constructed adenovirus vectors expressing siRNAs against La, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), subunit gamma of human eukaryotic initiation factors 2B (eIF2Bγ), and human VAMP-associated protein of 33 kDa (hVAP-33). Adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNAs markedly diminished expression of the endogenous genes, and silencing of La, PTB, and hVAP-33 by siRNAs substantially blocked HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Thus, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and potential of adenoviral-delivered siRNAs specific for cellular cofactors in combating HCV infection, which can be used either alone or in combination with siRNA against viral genome to prevent the escape of mutant variants and provide additive or synergistic anti-HCV effects

  19. Isolated total RNA and protein are preserved after thawing for more than twenty-four hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ivone Braga; Ramos, Débora Rothstein; Lopes, Karen Lucasechi; de Souza, Regiane Machado; Heimann, Joel Claudio; Furukawa, Luzia Naôko Shinohara

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The preservation of biological samples at a low temperature is important for later biochemical and/or histological analyses. However, the molecular viability of thawed samples has not been studied sufficiently in depth. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the viability of intact tissues, tissue homogenates, and isolated total RNA after defrosting for more than twenty-four hours. METHODS: The molecular viability of the thawed samples (n = 82) was assessed using the A260/A280 ratio, the RNA concentration, the RNA integrity, the level of intact mRNA determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, the protein level determined by Western blotting, and an examination of the histological structure. RESULTS: The integrity of the total RNA was not preserved in the thawed intact tissue, but the RNA integrity and level of mRNA were perfectly preserved in isolated defrosted samples of total RNA. Additionally, the level of β-actin protein was preserved in both thawed intact tissue and homogenates. CONCLUSION: Isolated total RNA does not undergo degradation due to thawing for at least 24 hours, and it is recommended to isolate the total RNA as soon as possible after tissue collection. Moreover, the protein level is preserved in defrosted tissues. PMID:22473407

  20. Cellular oncogene expression following exposure of mice to γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the effects of total body exposure of BCF1 mice to γ-rays (300 cGy) in modulating expression of cellular oncogenes in both gut and liver tissues. We selected specific cellular oncogenes (c-fos, c-myc, c-src, and c-H-ras), based on their normal expression in liver and gut tissues from untreated mice. As early as 5 min. following whole body exposure of BCF1 mice to γ-rays we detected induction of mRNA specific for c-src and c-H-ras in both liver and gut tissues. c-fos RNA was slightly decreased in accumulation in gut but was unaffected in liver tissue from irradiated mice relative to untreated controls. c-myc mRNA accumulation was unaffected in all tissues examined. These experiments document that modulation of cellular oncogene expression can occur as an early event in tissues following irradiation and suggest that this modulation may play a role in radiation-induced carcinogenesis

  1. Multifunctional PLGA Nanobubbles as Theranostic Agents: Combining Doxorubicin and P-gp siRNA Co-Delivery Into Human Breast Cancer Cells and Ultrasound Cellular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Deng, Liwei; Li, Tingting; Shen, Xue; Yan, Jie; Zuo, Liangming; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major impediment to the success of cancer chemotherapy. One of the effective approaches to overcome MDR is to use nanoparticle-mediated the gene silence of chemotherapeutic export proteins by RNA interference to increase drug accumulation in drug resistant cancer cells. In this work, a new co-delivery system, DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA nanobubbles (NBs) around 327 nm, to overcome doxorubicin (DOX) resistance in MCF-7 human breast cancer was designed and developed. Positively charged polyethylenimine (PEI) were modified onto the surface of DOX-PLGA NBs through DCC/NHS crosslinking, and could efficiently condense P-gp shRNA into DOX-PLGA/PEI NBs at vector/shRNA weight ratios of 70:1 and above. An in vitro release profile demonstrated an efficient DOX release (more than 80%) from DOX-PLGA/PEI NBs at pH 4.4, suggesting a pH-responsive drug release for the multifunctionalized NBs. Cellular experimental results further showed that DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs could facilitate cellular uptake of DOX into cells and increase the cell proliferation suppression effect of DOX against MCF-7/ADR cells (a DOX-resistant and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-expression cancer cell line). The IC50 of DOX-PLGA NBs against MCF-7/ADR cells was 2-fold lower than that of free DOX. The increased cellular uptake and nuclear accumulation of DOX delivered by DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs in MCF-7/ADR cells was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectrophotometry, and might be owning to the down-regulation of P-gp and reduced the efflux of DOX. The cellular uptake mechanism of DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs indicated that the macropinocytosis was one of the pathways for the uptake of NBs by MCF-7/ADR cells, which was also an energy-dependent process. Furthermore, the in vitro cellular ultrasound imaging suggested that the employment of the DOX-PLGA/PEI/P-gp shRNA NBs could efficiently enhance ultrasound imaging of cancer cells. These results demonstrated

  2. CBFA1 and topoisomerase I mRNA levels decline during cellular aging of human trabecular osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Kveiborg, M.; Kassem, M.

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the reasons for age-related impairment of the function of bone forming osteoblasts, we have examined the steady-state mRNA levels of the transcription factor CBFA1 and topoisomerase I during cellular aging of normal human trabecular osteoblasts, by the use of semiquantitati...

  3. An Update on Cellular MicroRNA Expression in Human Papillomavirus-Associated Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Sarah; Whiteman, David C; Panizza, Benedict J; Antonsson, Annika

    2018-06-19

    Squamous cell carcinoma of mucosal sites in the head and neck (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cause of cancer worldwide, and despite advances in conventional management, it still has significant morbidity and mortality associated with both diagnosis and treatment. Advances in our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying this disease have demonstrated a significant difference between human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated, HPV and tobacco associated, and HPV-negative disease. It remains important to further elucidate the biologic and genetic differences between HPV-associated and tobacco-associated disease, with the aim of earlier diagnosis through screening, and advances in management including the development of novel therapeutic agents. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and have effects on almost every cellular function, and have potentially important applications to diagnosis, management and prognosis in HNSCC. Establishing a cellular miRNA expression profile for HPV-associated disease may therefore have important implications for the screening and treatment of this disease. This review summarises the current findings regarding miRNA expression in mucosal HNSCC, and focuses particularly on miRNA expression in HPV-associated tumours. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Radiolabeling small RNA with technetium-99m for visualizing cellular delivery and mouse biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ning; Ding Hongliu; Vanderheyden, Jean-Luc; Zhu Zhihong; Zhang Yumin

    2007-01-01

    To develop a noninvasive direct method for the in vivo tracking of small interfering RNA (siRNA) used in RNA interference, two 18-nucleotide oligoribonucleotides were radiolabeled with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc-RNA). The ability of 99m Tc-RNA to track delivery was tested in cultured cells and living mice. The cellular delivery of 99m Tc-RNAs could be quantified by gamma counting and could be visualized by microautoradiography. Radiolabeled RNAs can be efficiently delivered into cells by reaching up to 3x10 5 molecules of small RNAs per cell. Moreover, RNAs were internalized with homogeneous distribution throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. In tumor-bearing mice, whole-body images and biodistribution studies showed that 99m Tc-RNAs were delivered to almost all tissues after intravenous injection. The imaging of living animals allowed noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of the in vivo delivery of these small RNAs. In conclusion, using 99m Tc radiolabeling, the delivery of small RNAs could be measured quantitatively in cultured cells and could be noninvasively visualized in living animals using a gamma camera. The results of this study could open up a new approach for measuring the in vivo delivery of small RNAs that might further facilitate the development of siRNAs as targeted therapies

  5. Wig1 prevents cellular senescence by regulating p21 mRNA decay through control of RISC recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Cho; Lee, Hyung Chul; Lee, Je-Jung; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ko, Young-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2012-11-14

    Premature senescence, a key strategy used to suppress carcinogenesis, can be driven by p53/p21 proteins in response to various stresses. Here, we demonstrate that Wig1 plays a critical role in this process through regulation of p21 mRNA stability. Wig1 controls the association of Argonaute2 (Ago2), a central component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), with target p21 mRNA via binding of the stem-loop structure near the microRNA (miRNA) target site. Depletion of Wig1 prohibited miRNA-mediated p21 mRNA decay and resulted in premature senescence. Wig1 plays an essential role in cell proliferation, as demonstrated in tumour xenografts in mice, and Wig1 and p21 mRNA levels are inversely correlated in human normal and cancer tissues. Together, our data indicate a novel role of Wig1 in RISC target accessibility, which is a key step in RNA-mediated gene silencing. In addition, these findings indicate that fine-tuning of p21 levels by Wig1 is essential for the prevention of cellular senescence.

  6. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eFlather

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  7. Downregulation of microRNA-498 in colorectal cancers and its cellular effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A.; Lam, Alfred K.-Y., E-mail: a.lam@griffith.edu.au

    2015-01-15

    miR-498 is a non-coding RNA located intergenically in 19q13.41. Due to its predicted targeting of several genes involved in control of cellular growth, we examined the expression of miR-498 in colon cancer cell lines and a large cohort of patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Two colon cancer cancer cell lines (SW480 and SW48) and one normal colonic epithelial cell line (FHC) were recruited. The expression of miR-498 was tested in these cell lines by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Tissues from 80 patients with surgical resection of colorectum (60 adenocarcinomas and 20 non-neoplastic tissues) were tested for miR-498 expression by qRT-PCR. In addition, an exogenous miR-498 (mimic) was used to detect the miRNA's effects on cell proliferation and cell cycle events in SW480 using MTT calorimetric assay and flow cytometry respectively. The colon cancer cell lines showed reduced expression of miR-498 compared to a normal colonic epithelial cell line. Mimic driven over expression of miR-498 in the SW480 cell line resulted in reduced cell proliferation and increased proportions of G2-M phase cells. In tissues, miR-498 expression was too low to be detected in all colorectal adenocarcinoma compared to non-neoplastic tissues. This suggests that the down regulation of miR-498 in colorectal cancer tissues and the direct suppressive cellular effect noted in cancer cell lines implies that miR-498 has some direct or indirect role in the pathogenesis of colorectal adenocarcinomas. - Highlights: • miR-498 is a non-coding RNA located in 19q13.41. • Colon cancer cell lines showed reduced expression of miR-498. • Mimic driven over expression of miR-498 in colon cancer cells resulted in lower cell proliferation. • miR-498 expression was down regulated in all colorectal adenocarcinoma tissues.

  8. Intestinal cellular localization of PCNA protein and CYP1A mRNA in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. exposed to a model toxicant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsvik Pål A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to examine the intestinal cellular localization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA and cytochrome P450 A1 (CYP1A expression in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. exposed to a model toxicant. The stress response was induced by intraperitoneal injection of four salmon with a single dose (50 mg/kg of the CYP1A inducer β-naphthoflavone (BNF and intestinal tissue (mid and distal intestine; MI and DI was sampled seven days later. Samples for histology and gene transcription analysis were collected from four exposed fish and four control fish. PCNA was assessed by immunohistochemistry, CYP1A mRNA was studied by in situ hybridization (ISH and finally the transcription of five genes was quantified by real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time RT-PCR; two detoxifying genes (CYP1A and glutathione S-transferase; GST, a stress marker gene (heat shock protein 70; HSP70, PCNA and a gene marker of apoptosis (caspase 6A. Results PCNA protein and CYP1A mRNA were successfully localized in the intestinal cells (MI of both experimental groups. At the cellular level, BNF significantly lowered intestinal cell proliferation and increased the CYP1A mRNA levels compared to the control group. The real-time RT-PCR data, which showed an increased mRNA expression both in the MI and DI of 139- and 62-fold, respectively, confirmed the increased cellular CYP1A mRNA levels detected using ISH. HSP70 expression was also up-regulated in the exposed fish. The other examined genes did not show any differential regulation in the experimental fish group. Conclusion This study showed that CYP1A mRNA had a specific intestinal cellular transcription pattern in Atlantic salmon exposed to BNF. At the cellular level CYP1A mRNA expression was always observed at or around the cell nucleus close to the basolateral cell membrane and at the tissue level CYP1A mRNA expression was most frequently observed in the basal and apex area of the intestinal

  9. Generation and comprehensive analysis of an influenza virus polymerase cellular interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafforeau, Lionel; Chantier, Thibault; Pradezynski, Fabrine; Pellet, Johann; Mangeot, Philippe E; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Andre, Patrice; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The influenza virus transcribes and replicates its genome inside the nucleus of infected cells. Both activities are performed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that is composed of the three subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, and recent studies have shown that it requires host cell factors to transcribe and replicate the viral genome. To identify these cellular partners, we generated a comprehensive physical interaction map between each polymerase subunit and the host cellular proteome. A total of 109 human interactors were identified by yeast two-hybrid screens, whereas 90 were retrieved by literature mining. We built the FluPol interactome network composed of the influenza virus polymerase (PA, PB1, and PB2) and the nucleoprotein NP and 234 human proteins that are connected through 279 viral-cellular protein interactions. Analysis of this interactome map revealed enriched cellular functions associated with the influenza virus polymerase, including host factors involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and mRNA processing. We confirmed that eight influenza virus polymerase-interacting proteins are required for virus replication and transcriptional activity of the viral polymerase. These are involved in cellular transcription (C14orf166, COPS5, MNAT1, NMI, and POLR2A), translation (EIF3S6IP), nuclear transport (NUP54), and DNA repair (FANCG). Conversely, we identified PRKRA, which acts as an inhibitor of the viral polymerase transcriptional activity and thus is required for the cellular antiviral response.

  10. Next Generation Sequencing Analysis of Human Platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-Depleted Total RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissopoulou, Antheia; Jonasson, Jon; Lindahl, Tomas L.; Osman, Abdimajid

    2013-01-01

    Background Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. Materials and Methods We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT) isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. Results Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. Conclusion The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components compared with other cell and

  11. Next generation sequencing analysis of human platelet PolyA+ mRNAs and rRNA-depleted total RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antheia Kissopoulou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. RESULTS: Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. CONCLUSION: The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components

  12. Cyclosporin A associated helicase-like protein facilitates the association of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase with its cellular cyclophilin B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Morohashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cyclosporin A (CsA is well known as an immunosuppressive drug useful for allogeneic transplantation. It has been reported that CsA inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV genome replication, which indicates that cellular targets of CsA regulate the viral replication. However, the regulation mechanisms of HCV replication governed by CsA target proteins have not been fully understood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show a chemical biology approach that elucidates a novel mechanism of HCV replication. We developed a phage display screening to investigate compound-peptide interaction and identified a novel cellular target molecule of CsA. This protein, named CsA associated helicase-like protein (CAHL, possessed RNA-dependent ATPase activity that was negated by treatment with CsA. The downregulation of CAHL in the cells resulted in a decrease of HCV genome replication. CAHL formed a complex with HCV-derived RNA polymerase NS5B and host-derived cyclophilin B (CyPB, known as a cellular cofactor for HCV replication, to regulate NS5B-CyPB interaction. CONCLUSIONS: We found a cellular factor, CAHL, as CsA associated helicase-like protein, which would form trimer complex with CyPB and NS5B of HCV. The strategy using a chemical compound and identifying its target molecule by our phage display analysis is useful to reveal a novel mechanism underlying cellular and viral physiology.

  13. Cyclosporin A associated helicase-like protein facilitates the association of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase with its cellular cyclophilin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Kengo; Sahara, Hiroeki; Watashi, Koichi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sunoki, Takashi; Kuramochi, Kouji; Takakusagi, Kaori; Miyashita, Hiroki; Sato, Noriyuki; Tanabe, Atsushi; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Kobayashi, Susumu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Sugawara, Fumio

    2011-04-29

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is well known as an immunosuppressive drug useful for allogeneic transplantation. It has been reported that CsA inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome replication, which indicates that cellular targets of CsA regulate the viral replication. However, the regulation mechanisms of HCV replication governed by CsA target proteins have not been fully understood. Here we show a chemical biology approach that elucidates a novel mechanism of HCV replication. We developed a phage display screening to investigate compound-peptide interaction and identified a novel cellular target molecule of CsA. This protein, named CsA associated helicase-like protein (CAHL), possessed RNA-dependent ATPase activity that was negated by treatment with CsA. The downregulation of CAHL in the cells resulted in a decrease of HCV genome replication. CAHL formed a complex with HCV-derived RNA polymerase NS5B and host-derived cyclophilin B (CyPB), known as a cellular cofactor for HCV replication, to regulate NS5B-CyPB interaction. We found a cellular factor, CAHL, as CsA associated helicase-like protein, which would form trimer complex with CyPB and NS5B of HCV. The strategy using a chemical compound and identifying its target molecule by our phage display analysis is useful to reveal a novel mechanism underlying cellular and viral physiology.

  14. Effect of the nanoformulation of siRNA-lipid assemblies on their cellular uptake and immune stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubota K

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Kohei Kubota,1,2 Kohei Onishi,3 Kazuaki Sawaki,3 Tianshu Li,4 Kaoru Mitsuoka,5 Takaaki Sato,6 Shinji Takeoka1,3,4 1Cooperative Major in Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences and Engineering, Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan; 2Formulation Research and Phramaceutical Process Group, CMC R&D Center, Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd, Shizuoka, Japan; 3Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering,Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan; 4Research Organization for Nano and Life Innovation, Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan; 5Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan; 6Department of Chemistry and Materials, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan Abstract: Two lipid-based nanoformulations have been used to date in clinical studies: lipoplexes and lipid nanoparticles (LNPs. In this study, we prepared small interfering RNA (siRNA-loaded carriers using lipid components of the same composition to form molecular assemblies of differing structures, and evaluated the impact of structure on cellular uptake and immune stimulation. Lipoplexes are electrostatic complexes formed by mixing preformed cationic lipid liposomes with anionic siRNA in an aqueous environment, whereas LNPs are nanoparticles embedding siRNA prepared by mixing an alcoholic lipid solution with an aqueous siRNA solution in one step. Although the physicochemical properties of lipoplexes and LNPs were similar except for small increases in apparent size of lipoplexes and zeta potential of LNPs, siRNA uptake efficiency of LNPs was significantly higher than that of lipoplexes. Furthermore, in the case of LNPs, both siRNA and lipid were effectively incorporated into cells in a co-assembled state; however, in the case of lipoplexes, the amount of siRNA internalized into cells was small in comparison with lipid. siRNAs in

  15. Intragraft interleukin 2 mRNA expression during acute cellular rejection and left ventricular total wall thickness after heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot-Kruseman, H A; Baan, C C; Hagman, E M; Mol, W M; Niesters, H G; Maat, A P; Zondervan, P E; Weimar, W; Balk, A H

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether diastolic graft function is influenced by intragraft interleukin 2 (IL-2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in rejecting cardiac allografts. DESIGN: 16 recipients of cardiac allografts were monitored during the first three months after transplantation. The presence of IL-2

  16. Generation and Comprehensive Analysis of an Influenza Virus Polymerase Cellular Interaction Network▿†§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafforeau, Lionel; Chantier, Thibault; Pradezynski, Fabrine; Pellet, Johann; Mangeot, Philippe E.; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Andre, Patrice; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Lotteau, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The influenza virus transcribes and replicates its genome inside the nucleus of infected cells. Both activities are performed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that is composed of the three subunits PA, PB1, and PB2, and recent studies have shown that it requires host cell factors to transcribe and replicate the viral genome. To identify these cellular partners, we generated a comprehensive physical interaction map between each polymerase subunit and the host cellular proteome. A total of 109 human interactors were identified by yeast two-hybrid screens, whereas 90 were retrieved by literature mining. We built the FluPol interactome network composed of the influenza virus polymerase (PA, PB1, and PB2) and the nucleoprotein NP and 234 human proteins that are connected through 279 viral-cellular protein interactions. Analysis of this interactome map revealed enriched cellular functions associated with the influenza virus polymerase, including host factors involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and mRNA processing. We confirmed that eight influenza virus polymerase-interacting proteins are required for virus replication and transcriptional activity of the viral polymerase. These are involved in cellular transcription (C14orf166, COPS5, MNAT1, NMI, and POLR2A), translation (EIF3S6IP), nuclear transport (NUP54), and DNA repair (FANCG). Conversely, we identified PRKRA, which acts as an inhibitor of the viral polymerase transcriptional activity and thus is required for the cellular antiviral response. PMID:21994455

  17. Tracing carbon fixation in phytoplankton—compound specific and total

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grosse, J.; Van Breugel, P.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of total primary production using 13C incorporation is a widely established tool. However, these bulk measurements lack information about the fate of fixed carbon: the production of major cellular compounds (carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and DNA/RNA) is affected by for

  18. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Mäkinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and

  19. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Lõhmus, Andres; Pollari, Maija

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and their individual

  20. High-quality total RNA isolation from melon (Cucumis melo L. fruits rich in polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Silveira de Campos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Melon, a member of the family Cucurbitaceae, is the fourth most important fruit in the world market and, on a volume basis, is Brazil’s main fresh fruit export. Many molecular techniques used to understand the maturation of these fruits require high concentrations of highly purified RNA. However, melons are rich in polyphenolic compounds and polysaccharides, which interfere with RNA extraction. This study aimed to determine the most appropriate method for total RNA extraction from melon fruits. Six extraction buffers were tested: T1 guanidine thiocyanate/phenol/chloroform; T2 sodium azide/?-mercaptoethanol; T3 phenol/guanidine thiocyanate; T4 CTAB/PVP/?-mercaptoethanol; T5 SDS/sodium perchlorate/PVP/?-mercaptoethanol, and T6 sarkosyl/PVP/guanidine thiocyanate, using the AxyPrepTM Multisource Total RNA Miniprep Kit. The best method for extracting RNA from both mature and green fruit was based on the SDS/PVP/?-mercaptoethanol buffer, because it rapidly generated a high quality and quantity of material. In general, higher amounts of RNA were obtained from green than mature fruits, probably due to the lower concentration of polysaccharides and water. The purified material can be used as a template in molecular techniques, such as microarrays, RT-PCR, and in the construction of cDNA and RNA-seq data.

  1. siRNA - Mediated LRP/LR knock-down reduces cellular viability of malignant melanoma cells through the activation of apoptotic caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Thalia M; Vania, Leila; Ferreira, Eloise; Weiss, Stefan F T

    2018-07-01

    The 37 kDa/67 kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR) is over-expressed in tumor cells and has been implicated in several tumourigenic processes such as metastasis and telomerase activation, however, more importantly the focus of the present study is on the maintenance of cellular viability and the evasion of apoptosis. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of LRP/LR on the cellular viability of early (A375) and late stage (A375SM) malignant melanoma cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis revealed that A375SM cells contain more cell-surface and total LRP/LR levels in comparison to the A375 cells, respectively. In order to determine the effect of LRP/LR on cell viability and apoptosis, LRP was down-regulated via siRNA technology. MTT assays revealed that LRP knock-down led to significant reductions in the viability of A375 and A375SM cells. Confocal microscopy indicated nuclear morphological changes suggestive of apoptotic induction in both cell lines and Annexin-V FITC/PI assays confirmed this observation. Additionally, caspase-3 activity assays revealed that apoptosis was induced in both cell lines after siRNA-mediated down-regulation of LRP. Caspase-8 and -9 activity assays suggested that post LRP knock-down; A375 cells undergo apoptosis solely via the extrinsic pathway, while A375SM cells undergo apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway. siRNAs mediated LRP knock-down might represent a powerful alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant melanoma through the induction of apoptosis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Introduction of transplantation tolerance after total lymphoid irradiation: cellular mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strober, S.; King, D.P.; Gottlieb, M.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    High-dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is a safe, routine regimen used to treat patients with lymphoid malignancies. Although few side effects are associated with the regimen, a profound suppression of cell-mediated immunity is observed for several years after therapy, as judged by both in vivo and in vitro assays. A profound immunosuppression has also been observed in mice and rats given TLI. Recently, we have achieved similar results using TLI in nonmatched bone marrow transplantation in outbred dogs. The experimental work in animals and underlying cellular mechanisms are reviewed here

  3. The inhibitory effect of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) and its family members on the activity of cellular microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G or APOBEC3G) and its fellow cytidine deaminase family members are potent restrictive factors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and many other retroviruses. However, the cellular function of APOBEC3G remains to be further clarified. It has been reported that APOBEC3s can restrict the mobility of endogenous retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons, suggesting that they can maintain stability in host genomes. However, APOBEC3G is normally cytoplasmic. Further studies have demonstrated that it is associated with an RNase-sensitive high molecular mass (HMM) and located in processing bodies (P-bodies) of replicating T-cells, indicating that the major cellular function of APOBEC3G seems to be related to P-body-related RNA processing and metabolism. As the function of P-body is closely related to miRNA activity, APOBEC3G could affect the miRNA function. Recent studies have demonstrated that APOBEC3G and its family members counteract miRNA-mediated repression of protein translation. Further, APOBEC3G enhances the association of miRNA-targeted mRNA with polysomes, and facilitates the dissociation of miRNA-targeted mRNA from P-bodies. As such, APOBEC3G regulate the activity of cellular miRNAs. Whether this function is related to its potent antiviral activity remains to be further determined.

  4. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Interacts with Nsp9 and Cellular DHX9 To Regulate Viral RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Tian, Jiao; Nan, Hao; Tian, Mengmeng; Li, Yuan; Xu, Xiaodong; Huang, Baicheng; Zhou, Enmin; Hiscox, Julian A; Chen, Hongying

    2016-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein is the main component of the viral capsid to encapsulate viral RNA, and it is also a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of host cell processes. Nonstructural protein 9 (Nsp9) is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that plays a critical role in viral RNA transcription and replication. In this study, we demonstrate that PRRSV N protein is bound to Nsp9 by protein-protein interaction and that the contacting surface on Nsp9 is located in the two predicted α-helixes formed by 48 residues at the C-terminal end of the protein. Mutagenesis analyses identified E646, E608, and E611 on Nsp9 and Q85 on the N protein as the pivotal residues participating in the N-Nsp9 interaction. By overexpressing the N protein binding fragment of Nsp9 in infected Marc-145 cells, the synthesis of viral RNAs, as well as the production of infectious progeny viruses, was dramatically inhibited, suggesting that Nsp9-N protein association is involved in the process of viral RNA production. In addition, we show that PRRSV N interacts with cellular RNA helicase DHX9 and redistributes the protein into the cytoplasm. Knockdown of DHX9 increased the ratio of short subgenomic mRNAs (sgmRNAs); in contrast, DHX9 overexpression benefited the synthesis of longer sgmRNAs and the viral genomic RNA (gRNA). These results imply that DHX9 is recruited by the N protein in PRRSV infection to regulate viral RNA synthesis. We postulate that N and DHX9 may act as antiattenuation factors for the continuous elongation of nascent transcript during negative-strand RNA synthesis. It is unclear whether the N protein of PRRSV is involved in regulation of the viral RNA production process. In this report, we demonstrate that the N protein of the arterivirus PRRSV participates in viral RNA replication and transcription through interacting with Nsp9 and its RdRp and recruiting cellular RNA helicase to promote the production of

  5. Preparation of Total RNA from Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähler, Jürg; Wise, Jo Ann

    2017-04-03

    Treatment with hot phenol breaks open fission yeast cells and begins to strip away bound proteins from RNA. Deproteinization is completed by multiple extractions with chloroform/isoamyl alcohol and separation of the aqueous and organic phases using MaXtract gel, an inert material that acts as a physical barrier between the phases. The final step is concentration of the RNA by ethanol precipitation. The protocol can be used to prepare RNA from several cultures grown in parallel, but it is important not to process too many samples at once because delays can be detrimental to RNA quality. A reasonable number of samples to process at once would be three to four for microarray or RNA sequencing analyses and six for preliminary investigations of mutants implicated in RNA metabolism. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Application of TALE-Based Approach for Dissecting Functional MicroRNA-302/367 in Cellular Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhonghui; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2018-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small 18-24 nt single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules involved in many biological processes, including stemness maintenance and cellular reprogramming. Current methods used in loss-of-function studies of microRNAs have several limitations. Here, we describe a new approach for dissecting miR-302/367 functions by transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs), which are natural effector proteins secreted by Xanthomonas and Ralstonia bacteria. Knockdown of the miR-302/367 cluster uses the Kruppel-associated box repressor domain fused with specific TALEs designed to bind the miR-302/367 cluster promoter. Knockout of the miR-302/367 cluster uses two pairs of TALE nucleases (TALENs) to delete the miR-302/367 cluster in human primary cells. Together, both TALE-based transcriptional repressor and TALENs are two promising approaches for loss-of-function studies of microRNA cluster in human primary cells.

  7. 5S rRNA-derived and tRNA-derived SINEs in fruit bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolevsky, Konstantin P; Vassetzky, Nikita S; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2009-05-01

    Most short retroposons (SINEs) descend from cellular tRNA of 7SL RNA. Here, four new SINEs were found in megabats (Megachiroptera) but neither in microbats nor in other mammals. Two of them, MEG-RS and MEG-RL, descend from another cellular RNA, 5S rRNA; one (MEG-T2) is a tRNA-derived SINE; and MEG-TR is a hybrid tRNA/5S rRNA SINE. Insertion locus analysis suggests that these SINEs were active in the recent fruit bat evolution. Analysis of MEG-RS and MEG-RL in comparison with other few 5S rRNA-derived SINEs demonstrates that the internal RNA polymerase III promoter is their most invariant region, while the secondary structure is more variable. The mechanisms underlying the modular structure of these and other SINEs as well as their variation are discussed. The scenario of evolution of MEG SINEs is proposed.

  8. Comparative evaluation of total RNA extraction methods in Theobroma cacao using shoot apical meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D V; Branco, S M J; Holanda, I S A; Royaert, S; Motamayor, J C; Marelli, J P; Corrêa, R X

    2016-03-04

    Theobroma cacao is a species of great economic importance with its beans used for chocolate production. The tree has been a target of various molecular studies. It contains many polyphenols, which complicate the extraction of nucleic acids with the extraction protocols requiring a large amount of plant material. These issues, therefore, necessitate the optimization of the protocols. The aim of the present study was to evaluate different methods for extraction of total RNA from shoot apical meristems of T. cacao 'CCN 51' and to assess the influence of storage conditions for the meristems on the extraction. The study also aimed to identify the most efficient protocol for RNA extraction using a small amount of plant material. Four different protocols were evaluated for RNA extraction using one shoot apical meristem per sample. Among these protocols, one that was more efficient was then tested to extract RNA using four different numbers of shoot apical meristems, subjected to three different storage conditions. The best protocol was tested for cDNA amplification using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; the cDNA quality was determined to be satisfactory for molecular analyses. The study revealed that with the best RNA extraction protocol, one shoot apical meristem was sufficient for extraction of high-quality total RNA. The results obtained might enable advances in genetic analyses and molecular studies using reduced amount of plant material.

  9. Immunoprecipitation of Tri-methylated Capped RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Karen E; Barr, Jamie A; Xie, Mingyi; Steitz, Joan A; Martinez, Ivan

    2018-02-05

    Cellular quiescence (also known as G 0 arrest) is characterized by reduced DNA replication, increased autophagy, and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase p27 Kip1 . Quiescence is essential for wound healing, organ regeneration, and preventing neoplasia. Previous findings indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating cellular quiescence. Our recent publication demonstrated the existence of an alternative miRNA biogenesis pathway in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells during quiescence. Indeed, we have identified a group of pri-miRNAs (whose mature miRNAs were found induced during quiescence) modified with a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine (TMG)-cap by the trimethylguanosine synthase 1 (TGS1) protein and transported to the cytoplasm by the Exportin-1 (XPO1) protein. We used an antibody against (TMG)-caps (which does not cross-react with the (m 7 G)-caps that most pri-miRNAs or mRNAs contain [Luhrmann et al ., 1982]) to perform RNA immunoprecipitations from total RNA extracts of proliferating or quiescent HFFs. The novelty of this assay is the specific isolation of pri-miRNAs as well as other non-coding RNAs containing a TMG-cap modification.

  10. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA–RNA interactions and 1619 RNA–protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA–RNA/RNA–protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network. PMID:24803509

  11. Selective inhibition of precursor incorporation into ribosomal RNA in gamma-irradiated Tetrahymena pyriformis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, S.G.; Oleinick, N.L.; Rustad, R.C.; Greenblatt, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Sublethal doses of γ radiation are known to inhibit total RNA synthesis in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena. To determine if the synthesis of a particular class of RNA is preferentially inhibited, pulse-labeled RNA was isolated from normal exponentially growing cells, irradiated cells, and cells in which total RNA synthesis had recovered to the pre-irradiation level. The RNAs were analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrphoresis and oligo(dT)-cellulose column chromatography. Inhibition of RNA synthesis primarily involves ribosomal RNA. However, radiation does not cause a delay in the processing of precursor rRNA or a preferential loss of either of the mature rRNAs. Following irradiation, poly(A)-containing RNA [poly(A+)RNA] is synthesized at a rate up to three times greater than the control rate. The elevated poly(A+)RNA synthesis occurs during the period of depressed rRNA synthesis and even after rRNA synthesis has recovered to its pre-irradiation rate. While the sizes of the total cellular ribonucleoside triphosphate pools are depressed in the irradiated cells, these pools probably do not represent the actual compartments containing the precursors for RNA synthesis, and the observed changes cannot explain the modifications in macromolecular synthesis in irradiated Tetrahymena. (Auth.)

  12. Detection of HIV-RNA-positive monocytes in peripheral blood of HIV-positive patients by simultaneous flow cytometric analysis of intracellular HIV RNA and cellular immunophenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, B K; Mosiman, V L; Cantarero, L; Furtado, M; Bhattacharya, M; Goolsby, C

    1998-04-01

    Determinations of plasma HIV viral RNA copy numbers help to define the kinetics of HIV-1 infection in vivo and to monitor antiretroviral therapy. However, questions remain regarding the identity of various infected cell types contributing to this free virus pool and to the in vivo lifecycle of HIV during disease progression. Characterization of a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay employing a pool of labeled oligonucleotide probes directed against HIV RNA was done followed by coupling of the FISH assay with simultaneous surface immunophenotyping to address these questions. In vitro characterizations of this assay using tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated and unstimulated ACH-2 cells demonstrated the ability to detect < 5% HIV RNA positive cells with a sensitivity of < 30 RNA copies per cell. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 39 HIV-seropositive patients on no, single, combination, or triple drug therapy and 8 HIV-seronegative patients were examined. The majority of HIV-positive patients (24/39) harbored monocytes positive for HIV RNA and a significantly higher fraction of patients with high plasma viral load carried positive monocytes (13/16) than did patients in the low plasma viral load group (11/23). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel FISH assay for identifying and monitoring HIV-infected cell populations in the peripheral blood of HIV-positive patients. In addition, monocytes are a major source of cellular HIV virus in the peripheral blood of HIV patients, even with progression of disease.

  13. Evaluating Methods for Isolating Total RNA and Predicting the Success of Sequencing Phylogenetically Diverse Plant Transcriptomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskiewich, Richard; Burris, Jason N.; Carrigan, Charlotte T.; Chase, Mark W.; Clarke, Neil D.; Covshoff, Sarah; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Edger, Patrick P.; Goh, Falicia; Graham, Sean; Greiner, Stephan; Hibberd, Julian M.; Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid; Kutchan, Toni M.; Leebens-Mack, James; Melkonian, Michael; Miles, Nicholas; Myburg, Henrietta; Patterson, Jordan; Pires, J. Chris; Ralph, Paula; Rolf, Megan; Sage, Rowan F.; Soltis, Douglas; Soltis, Pamela; Stevenson, Dennis; Stewart, C. Neal; Surek, Barbara; Thomsen, Christina J. M.; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Wu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yong; Deyholos, Michael K.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing plays a central role in the characterization and quantification of transcriptomes. Although numerous metrics are purported to quantify the quality of RNA, there have been no large-scale empirical evaluations of the major determinants of sequencing success. We used a combination of existing and newly developed methods to isolate total RNA from 1115 samples from 695 plant species in 324 families, which represents >900 million years of phylogenetic diversity from green algae through flowering plants, including many plants of economic importance. We then sequenced 629 of these samples on Illumina GAIIx and HiSeq platforms and performed a large comparative analysis to identify predictors of RNA quality and the diversity of putative genes (scaffolds) expressed within samples. Tissue types (e.g., leaf vs. flower) varied in RNA quality, sequencing depth and the number of scaffolds. Tissue age also influenced RNA quality but not the number of scaffolds ≥1000 bp. Overall, 36% of the variation in the number of scaffolds was explained by metrics of RNA integrity (RIN score), RNA purity (OD 260/230), sequencing platform (GAIIx vs HiSeq) and the amount of total RNA used for sequencing. However, our results show that the most commonly used measures of RNA quality (e.g., RIN) are weak predictors of the number of scaffolds because Illumina sequencing is robust to variation in RNA quality. These results provide novel insight into the methods that are most important in isolating high quality RNA for sequencing and assembling plant transcriptomes. The methods and recommendations provided here could increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of RNA sequencing for individual labs and genome centers. PMID:23185583

  14. The nucleolus—guardian of cellular homeostasis and genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummt, Ingrid

    2013-12-01

    All organisms sense and respond to conditions that stress their homeostasis by downregulating the synthesis of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis, thus designating the nucleolus as the central hub in coordinating the cellular stress response. One of the most intriguing roles of the nucleolus, long regarded as a mere ribosome-producing factory, is its participation in monitoring cellular stress signals and transmitting them to the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription machinery. As rRNA synthesis is a most energy-consuming process, switching off transcription of rRNA genes is an effective way of saving the energy required to maintain cellular homeostasis during acute stress. The Pol I transcription machinery is the key convergence point that collects and integrates a vast array of information from cellular signaling cascades to regulate ribosome production which, in turn, guides cell growth and proliferation. This review focuses on the mechanisms that link cell physiology to rDNA silencing, a prerequisite for nucleolar integrity and cell survival.

  15. Functional interactions of nucleocapsid protein of feline immunodeficiency virus and cellular prion protein with the viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscardini, Mila; Pistello, Mauro; Bendinelli, M; Ficheux, Damien; Miller, Jennifer T; Gabus, Caroline; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Surewicz, Witold K; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    2002-04-19

    All lentiviruses and oncoretroviruses examined so far encode a major nucleic-acid binding protein (nucleocapsid or NC* protein), approximately 2500 molecules of which coat the dimeric RNA genome. Studies on HIV-1 and MoMuLV using in vitro model systems and in vivo have shown that NC protein is required to chaperone viral RNA dimerization and packaging during virus assembly, and proviral DNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase (RT) during infection. The human cellular prion protein (PrP), thought to be the major component of the agent causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), was recently found to possess a strong affinity for nucleic acids and to exhibit chaperone properties very similar to HIV-1 NC protein in the HIV-1 context in vitro. Tight binding of PrP to nucleic acids is proposed to participate directly in the prion disease process. To extend our understanding of lentiviruses and of the unexpected nucleic acid chaperone properties of the human prion protein, we set up an in vitro system to investigate replication of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), which is functionally and phylogenetically distant from HIV-1. The results show that in the FIV model system, NC protein chaperones viral RNA dimerization, primer tRNA(Lys,3) annealing to the genomic primer-binding site (PBS) and minus strand DNA synthesis by the homologous FIV RT. FIV NC protein is able to trigger specific viral DNA synthesis by inhibiting self-priming of reverse transcription. The human prion protein was found to mimic the properties of FIV NC with respect to primer tRNA annealing to the viral RNA and chaperoning minus strand DNA synthesis. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. RNA assemblages orchestrate complex cellular processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Heidi Theil; Christiansen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are monocistronic, and therefore mechanisms exist that coordinate the synthesis of multiprotein complexes in order to obtain proper stoichiometry at the appropriate intracellular locations. RNA-binding proteins containing low-complexity sequences are prone to generate liquid drop...

  17. MicroRNA and cellular targets profiling reveal miR-217 and miR-576-3p as proviral factors during Oropouche infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Emmanuel Viana Geddes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Oropouche Virus is the etiological agent of an arbovirus febrile disease that affects thousands of people and is widespread throughout Central and South American countries. Although isolated in 1950's, still there is scarce information regarding the virus biology and its prevalence is likely underestimated. In order to identify and elucidate interactions with host cells factors and increase the understanding about the Oropouche Virus biology, we performed microRNA (miRNA and target genes screening in human hepatocarcinoma cell line HuH-7. Cellular miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that regulates gene expression post-transcriptionally and play key roles in several steps of viral infections. The large scale RT-qPCR based screening found 13 differentially expressed miRNAs in Oropouche infected cells. Further validation confirmed that miR-217 and miR-576-3p were 5.5 fold up-regulated at early stages of virus infection (6 hours post-infection. Using bioinformatics and pathway enrichment analysis, we predicted the cellular targets genes for miR-217 and miR-576-3p. Differential expression analysis of RNA from 95 selected targets revealed genes involved in innate immunity modulation, viral release and neurological disorder outcomes. Further analysis revealed the gene of decapping protein 2 (DCP2, a previous known restriction factor for bunyaviruses transcription, as a miR-217 candidate target that is progressively down-regulated during Oropouche infection. Our analysis also showed that activators genes involved in innate immune response through IFN-β pathway, as STING (Stimulator of Interferon Genes and TRAF3 (TNF-Receptor Associated Factor 3, were down-regulated as the infection progress. Inhibition of miR-217 or miR-576-3p restricts OROV replication, decreasing viral RNA (up to 8.3 fold and virus titer (3 fold. Finally, we showed that virus escape IFN-β mediated immune response increasing the levels of cellular miR-576-3p resulting in a decreasing of

  18. Monocytic microRNA profile associated with coronary collateral artery function in chronic total occlusion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimzadeh, Nazanin; Elias, Joëlle; Wijntjens, Gilbert W M; Theunissen, Ruud; van Weert, Angela; Smulders, Martijn W; van den Akker, Nynke; Moerland, Perry D; Verberne, Hein J; Hoebers, Loes P; Henriques, Jose P S; van der Laan, Anja M; Ilhan, Mustafa; Post, Mark; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C A M; Piek, Jan J

    2017-05-08

    An expansive collateral artery network is correlated with improved survival in case of adverse cardiac episodes. We aimed to identify cellular microRNAs (miRNA; miR) important for collateral artery growth. Chronic total occlusion (CTO) patients (n = 26) were dichotomized using pressure-derived collateral flow index (CFI p ) measurements; high collateral capacity (CFI p  > 0.39; n = 14) and low collateral (CFI p  collateral capacity patients. Validation by real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated significantly decreased expression of miR339-5p in all stimulated monocyte phenotypes of low collateral capacity patients. MiR339-5p showed significant correlation with CFI p values in stimulated monocytes. Ingenuity pathway analysis of predicted gene targets of miR339-5p and differential gene expression data from high versus low CFI p patients (n = 20), revealed significant association with STAT3 pathway, and also suggested a possible regulatory role for this signaling pathway. These results identify a novel association between miR339-5p and coronary collateral function. Future work examining modulation of miR339-5p and downstream effects on the STAT3 pathway and subsequent collateral vessel growth are warranted.

  19. Polyadenylated mRNA from the photosynthetic procaryote Rhodospirillum rubrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, P.K.; McFadden, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Total cellular RNA extracted from Rhodospirillum rubrum cultured in butyrate-containing medium under strict photosynthetic conditions to the stationary phase of growth has been fractionated on an oligodeoxy-thymidylic acid-cellulose column into polyadenylated [poly(A) + ] RNA and poly(A) - RNA fractions. The poly(A) + fraction was 9 to 10% of the total bulk RNA isolated. Analysis of the poly(A) + RNA on a denaturing urea-polyacrylamide gel revealed four sharp bands of RNA distributed in heterodisperse fashion between 16S and 9S. Similar fractionation of the poly(A) - RNA resulted in the separation of 23, 16, and 5S rRNAs and 4S tRNA. Poly(A) + fragments isolated after combined digestion with pancreatic A and T 1 RNases and analysis by denaturing gel electrophoresis demonstrated two major components of 80 and 100 residues. Alkaline hydrolysis of the nuclease-resistant, purified residues showed AMP-rich nucleotides. Through the use of snake venom phosphodiesterase, poly(A) tracts were placed at the 3' end of poly(A) + RNA. Stimulation of [ 3 H]leucine incorporation into hot trichloroacetic acid-precipitable polypeptides in a cell-free system from wheat germ primed by the poly(A) + RNA mixture was found to be 220-fold higher than that for poly(A) - RNAs (on a unit mass basis), a finding which demonstrated that poly(A) + RNAs in R. rubrum are mRNAs. Gel electrophoretic analysis of the translation mixture revealed numerous 3 H-labeled products including a major band (M/sub r/, 52,000). The parent protein was precipitated by antibodies to ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and comprised 6.5% of the total translation products

  20. [Detection and clinical value of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) mRNA positive circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Cheng, Jian-ping; Di, Li-jun; Song, Guo-hong; Ren, Jun

    2012-04-18

    To test for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) relying on epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression in metastatic breast cancer by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. In the study,47 metastatic breast cancer patients were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR for detecting EpCAM mRNA. In addition, analyses were carried out for their correlation with patients' clinicopathologic features, response, and the time to progression (TTP). The sensitivity of EpCAM mRNA in the metastatic breast cancer patients was about 40%. However, the specificity of EpCAM mRNA for 20 healthy controls was 100%. TTP was calculated, and compared with that between EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative groups. For the retrospective study, the median TTP was 7.1 months and 11.1 months (P=0.013) for patients with EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative, respectively, after the first cycle chemotherapy. Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between EpCAM mRNA and TTP in patients who underwent the first or the second-line chemotherapy (P=0.018), but there was no significance in the patients pretreated with two or more previous chemotherapy lines (P=0.471). This study provides evidence of the presence of EpCAM mRNA in approximately 40% of patients with metastatic breast cancer. There is a strong correlation between EpCAM mRNA results after the first cycle therapy and TTP in metastatic breast cancer patients, and EpCAM mRNA positive after chemotherapy may predict shorter TTP.

  1. Integrated microRNA and mRNA signatures associated with survival in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascione, Luciano; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Lovat, Francesca; Carasi, Stefania; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Ferro, Alfredo; Alder, Hansjuerg; He, Gang; Vecchione, Andrea; Croce, Carlo M; Shapiro, Charles L; Huebner, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease at the molecular, pathologic and clinical levels. To stratify TNBCs, we determined microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles, as well as expression profiles of a cancer-focused mRNA panel, in tumor, adjacent non-tumor (normal) and lymph node metastatic lesion (mets) tissues, from 173 women with TNBCs; we linked specific miRNA signatures to patient survival and used miRNA/mRNA anti-correlations to identify clinically and genetically different TNBC subclasses. We also assessed miRNA signatures as potential regulators of TNBC subclass-specific gene expression networks defined by expression of canonical signal pathways.Tissue specific miRNAs and mRNAs were identified for normal vs tumor vs mets comparisons. miRNA signatures correlated with prognosis were identified and predicted anti-correlated targets within the mRNA profile were defined. Two miRNA signatures (miR-16, 155, 125b, 374a and miR-16, 125b, 374a, 374b, 421, 655, 497) predictive of overall survival (P = 0.05) and distant-disease free survival (P = 0.009), respectively, were identified for patients 50 yrs of age or younger. By multivariate analysis the risk signatures were independent predictors for overall survival and distant-disease free survival. mRNA expression profiling, using the cancer-focused mRNA panel, resulted in clustering of TNBCs into 4 molecular subclasses with different expression signatures anti-correlated with the prognostic miRNAs. Our findings suggest that miRNAs play a key role in triple negative breast cancer through their ability to regulate fundamental pathways such as: cellular growth and proliferation, cellular movement and migration, Extra Cellular Matrix degradation. The results define miRNA expression signatures that characterize and contribute to the phenotypic diversity of TNBC and its metastasis.

  2. Modulation of microRNA-mRNA Target Pairs by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory E. Harden

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The E6 and E7 proteins are the major oncogenic drivers encoded by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs. While many aspects of the transforming activities of these proteins have been extensively studied, there are fewer studies that have investigated how HPV E6/E7 expression affects the expression of cellular noncoding RNAs. The goal of our study was to investigate HPV16 E6/E7 modulation of cellular microRNA (miR levels and to determine the potential consequences for cellular gene expression. We performed deep sequencing of small and large cellular RNAs in primary undifferentiated cultures of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs with stable expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or a control vector. After integration of the two data sets, we identified 51 differentially expressed cellular miRs associated with the modulation of 1,456 potential target mRNAs in HPV16 E6/E7-expressing HFKs. We discovered that the degree of differential miR expression in HFKs expressing HPV16 E6/E7 was not necessarily predictive of the number of corresponding mRNA targets or the potential impact on gene expression. Additional analyses of the identified miR-mRNA pairs suggest modulation of specific biological activities and biochemical pathways. Overall, our study supports the model that perturbation of cellular miR expression by HPV16 E6/E7 importantly contributes to the rewiring of cellular regulatory circuits by the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins that contribute to oncogenic transformation.

  3. COMPARISON OF TWO TOTAL RNA EXTRACTION PROTOCOLS FROM CHO-K1 CELLS FOR RT-PCR: CUT-OFF COST FOR RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasila Packeer Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Various methods have been described to extract RNA from adherent mammalian cells. RNA isolation in conjunction with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR is a valuable tool used to study gene expression profiling. This approach is now being used in mammalian cell bioprocessing to help understand and improve the system. The objective of this study was to compare and determine the most suitable RNA extraction method for CHO-K1 cells in a setting where a relatively large amount of samples was involved. Total RNA was extracted using Total RNA purification kit (without DNase treatment; Norgen, Canada and RNeasy mini kit (with DNase treatment; Qiagen, USA respectively. The extracted RNA was then reverse transcribed, and the cDNA was subjected to PCR-amplifying 18S. Yield from RNeasy kit was significantly higher (0.316 ± 0.033 µg/µl; p=0.004 than Total RNA purification kit (0.177 ± 0.0243 µg/µl. However, RNA purity for both methods was close to 2.0 and there was no significant difference between the methods. Total RNA purification kit is less expensive than RNeasy kit. Since there is no DNase treatment step in the former, extraction time for RNA is shorter. When the extracted RNA was subjected to RT-PCR, both methods were able to show detection of 18S at 219 bp.   Therefore, this study demonstrates that both protocols are suitable for RNA extraction for CHO-K1 cells. RNeasy mini kit (Qiagen is recommended if higher yields is the primary concern and Total RNA Purification kit (Norgen is recommended if time and cost are concerned. ABSTRAK: Pelbagai kaedah telah digunakan untuk mengekstrak RNA daripada sel mamalia lekat.  Pemencilan RNA dengan menggunakan reaksi rantai polimerase transkripsi berbalik (RT-PCR merupakan kaedah penting yang digunakan dalam mengkaji pernyataan gen berprofil.  Pendekatan ini kini digunakan dalam pemprosesan bio sel mamalia untuk memahami dan menambah baik sistem.  Tujuan kajian dijalankan

  4. Emerging connections between RNA and autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lubas, Michal; Lund, Anders H

    2017-01-01

    in yeast, plants and animals, reviewing the molecular mechanisms and biological importance in normal physiology, stress and disease. In addition, we explore emerging evidence of core autophagy regulation mediated by RNA-binding proteins and noncoding RNAs, and point to gaps in our current knowledge......Macroautophagy/autophagy is a key catabolic process, essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival through the removal and recycling of unwanted cellular material. Emerging evidence has revealed intricate connections between the RNA and autophagy research fields. While a majority...... of the connection between RNA and autophagy. Finally, we discuss the pathological implications of RNA-protein aggregation, primarily in the context of neurodegenerative disease....

  5. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Levy, Hazel C; Sun, Eileen; Strauss, Mike; Nicol, Clare; Gold, Sarah; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Tuthill, Tobias J; Hogle, James M; Rowlands, David J

    2017-02-01

    Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus) acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  6. Picornavirus RNA is protected from cleavage by ribonuclease during virion uncoating and transfer across cellular and model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Groppelli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Picornaviruses are non-enveloped RNA viruses that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because they lack an envelope, picornaviruses face the challenge of delivering their RNA genomes across the membrane of the endocytic vesicle into the cytoplasm to initiate infection. Currently, the mechanism of genome release and translocation across membranes remains poorly understood. Within the enterovirus genus, poliovirus, rhinovirus 2, and rhinovirus 16 have been proposed to release their genomes across intact endosomal membranes through virally induced pores, whereas one study has proposed that rhinovirus 14 releases its RNA following disruption of endosomal membranes. For the more distantly related aphthovirus genus (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease viruses and equine rhinitis A virus acidification of endosomes results in the disassembly of the virion into pentamers and in the release of the viral RNA into the lumen of the endosome, but no details have been elucidated as how the RNA crosses the vesicle membrane. However, more recent studies suggest aphthovirus RNA is released from intact particles and the dissociation to pentamers may be a late event. In this study we have investigated the RNase A sensitivity of genome translocation of poliovirus using a receptor-decorated-liposome model and the sensitivity of infection of poliovirus and equine-rhinitis A virus to co-internalized RNase A. We show that poliovirus genome translocation is insensitive to RNase A and results in little or no release into the medium in the liposome model. We also show that infectivity is not reduced by co-internalized RNase A for poliovirus and equine rhinitis A virus. Additionally, we show that all poliovirus genomes that are internalized into cells, not just those resulting in infection, are protected from RNase A. These results support a finely coordinated, directional model of viral RNA delivery that involves viral proteins and cellular membranes.

  7. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E; Montgomery, Hugh E

    2016-07-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3-55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. © 2016 The Authors. BioEssays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin‐converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen‐Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J.; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R.; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E.; Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole‐body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3‐55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. PMID:27347560

  9. Isolation of high-quality total RNA from rumen anaerobic bacteria and fungi, and subsequent detection of glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Qi, Meng; Barboza, Perry; Leigh, Mary Beth; Ungerfeld, Emilio; Selinger, L Brent; McAllister, Tim A; Forster, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    The rumen is one of the most powerful fibrolytic fermentation systems known. Gene expression analyses, such as reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), microarrays, and metatranscriptomics, are techniques that could significantly expand our understanding of this ecosystem. The ability to isolate and stabilize representative RNA samples is critical to obtaining reliable results with these procedures. In this study, we successfully isolated high-quality total RNA from the solid phase of ruminal contents by using an improved RNA extraction method. This method is based on liquid nitrogen grinding of whole ruminal solids without microbial detachment and acid guanidinium - phenol - chloroform extraction combined with column purification. Yields of total RNA were as high as 150 µg per g of fresh ruminal content. The typical large subunit/small subunit rRNA ratio ranged from 1.8 to 2.0 with an RNA integrity number (Agilent Technologies) greater than 8.5. By eliminating the detachment step, the resulting RNA was more representative of the complete ecosystem. Our improved method removed a major barrier limiting analysis of rumen microbial function from a gene expression perspective. The polyA-tailed eukaryotic mRNAs obtained have successfully been applied to next-generation sequencing, and metatranscriptomic analysis of the solid fraction of rumen contents revealed abundant sequences related to rumen fungi.

  10. Microarray data analyses of yeast RNA Pol I subunit RPA12 deletion strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Kumar Yadav

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ribosomal RNA (rRNA biosynthesis is the most energy consuming process in all living cells and the majority of total transcription activity is dedicated for synthesizing rRNA. The cells may adjust the synthesis of rRNA with the availability of resources. rRNA is mainly synthesized by RNA polymerase I that is composed of 14 subunits. Deletion of RPA12, 14, 39 and 49 are viable. RPA12 is a very small protein (13.6 kDa, and the amount of protein in the cells is very high (12,000 molecules per cell, but the role of this protein is unknown in other cellular metabolic processes (Kulak et al., 2014 [1]. RPA12 consists of two zinc-binding domains and it is required for the termination of rRNA synthesis (Mullem et al., 2002 [2]. Deletions of RPA12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe cause a conditional growth defect (Nogi et al., 1993 [3]. In S. pombe, C-terminal deletion behaves like wild-type (Imazawa et al., 2001 [4]. This prompted us to investigate in detail the physiological role of RPA12 in S. cerevisiae, we performed the microarray of rpa12∆ strain and deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus under GSE68731. The analysis of microarray data revealed that the expression of major cellular metabolism genes is high. The amino acid biosynthesis, nonpolar lipid biosynthesis and glucose metabolic genes are highly expressed. The analyses also revealed that the rpa12∆ cells have an uncontrolled synthesis of cell metabolites, so RPA12 could be a master regulator for whole cellular metabolism.

  11. The microRNA and messengerRNA profile of the RNA-induced silencing complex in human primary astrocyte and astrocytoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Joanna J; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2010-10-18

    GW/P bodies are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein-rich foci involved in microRNA (miRNA)-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA) silencing and degradation. The mRNA regulatory functions within GW/P bodies are mediated by GW182 and its binding partner hAgo2 that bind miRNA in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). To date there are no published reports of the profile of miRNA and mRNA targeted to the RISC or a comparison of the RISC-specific miRNA/mRNA profile differences in malignant and non-malignant cells. RISC mRNA and miRNA components were profiled by microarray analysis of malignant human U-87 astrocytoma cells and its non-malignant counterpart, primary human astrocytes. Total cell RNA as well as RNA from immunoprecipitated RISC was analyzed. The novel findings were fourfold: (1) miRNAs were highly enriched in astrocyte RISC compared to U-87 astrocytoma RISC, (2) astrocytoma and primary astrocyte cells each contained unique RISC miRNA profiles as compared to their respective cellular miRNA profiles, (3) miR-195, 10b, 29b, 19b, 34a and 455-3p levels were increased and the miR-181b level was decreased in U-87 astrocytoma RISC as compared to astrocyte RISC, and (4) the RISC contained decreased levels of mRNAs in primary astrocyte and U-87 astrocytoma cells. The observation that miR-34a and miR-195 levels were increased in the RISC of U-87 astrocytoma cells suggests an oncogenic role for these miRNAs. Differential regulation of mRNAs by specific miRNAs is evidenced by the observation that three miR34a-targeted mRNAs and two miR-195-targeted mRNAs were downregulated while one miR-195-targeted mRNA was upregulated. Biological pathway analysis of RISC mRNA components suggests that the RISC plays a pivotal role in malignancy and other conditions. This study points to the importance of the RISC and ultimately GW/P body composition and function in miRNA and mRNA deregulation in astrocytoma cells and possibly in other malignancies.

  12. The microRNA and messengerRNA profile of the RNA-induced silencing complex in human primary astrocyte and astrocytoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna J Moser

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available GW/P bodies are cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein-rich foci involved in microRNA (miRNA-mediated messenger RNA (mRNA silencing and degradation. The mRNA regulatory functions within GW/P bodies are mediated by GW182 and its binding partner hAgo2 that bind miRNA in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. To date there are no published reports of the profile of miRNA and mRNA targeted to the RISC or a comparison of the RISC-specific miRNA/mRNA profile differences in malignant and non-malignant cells.RISC mRNA and miRNA components were profiled by microarray analysis of malignant human U-87 astrocytoma cells and its non-malignant counterpart, primary human astrocytes. Total cell RNA as well as RNA from immunoprecipitated RISC was analyzed. The novel findings were fourfold: (1 miRNAs were highly enriched in astrocyte RISC compared to U-87 astrocytoma RISC, (2 astrocytoma and primary astrocyte cells each contained unique RISC miRNA profiles as compared to their respective cellular miRNA profiles, (3 miR-195, 10b, 29b, 19b, 34a and 455-3p levels were increased and the miR-181b level was decreased in U-87 astrocytoma RISC as compared to astrocyte RISC, and (4 the RISC contained decreased levels of mRNAs in primary astrocyte and U-87 astrocytoma cells.The observation that miR-34a and miR-195 levels were increased in the RISC of U-87 astrocytoma cells suggests an oncogenic role for these miRNAs. Differential regulation of mRNAs by specific miRNAs is evidenced by the observation that three miR34a-targeted mRNAs and two miR-195-targeted mRNAs were downregulated while one miR-195-targeted mRNA was upregulated. Biological pathway analysis of RISC mRNA components suggests that the RISC plays a pivotal role in malignancy and other conditions. This study points to the importance of the RISC and ultimately GW/P body composition and function in miRNA and mRNA deregulation in astrocytoma cells and possibly in other malignancies.

  13. Re-inspection of small RNA sequence datasets reveals several novel human miRNA genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Birkballe Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: miRNAs are key players in gene expression regulation. To fully understand the complex nature of cellular differentiation or initiation and progression of disease, it is important to assess the expression patterns of as many miRNAs as possible. Thereby, identifying novel miRNAs is an essential prerequisite to make possible a comprehensive and coherent understanding of cellular biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on two extensive, but previously published, small RNA sequence datasets from human embryonic stem cells and human embroid bodies, respectively [1], we identified 112 novel miRNA-like structures and were able to validate miRNA processing in 12 out of 17 investigated cases. Several miRNA candidates were furthermore substantiated by including additional available small RNA datasets, thereby demonstrating the power of combining datasets to identify miRNAs that otherwise may be assigned as experimental noise. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis highlights that existing datasets are not yet exhaustedly studied and continuous re-analysis of the available data is important to uncover all features of small RNA sequencing.

  14. Use of Cellular Decapping Activators by Positive-Strand RNA Viruses

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    Jennifer Jungfleisch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses have evolved multiple strategies to not only circumvent the hostile decay machinery but to trick it into being a priceless collaborator supporting viral RNA translation and replication. In this review, we describe the versatile interaction of positive-strand RNA viruses and the 5′-3′ mRNA decay machinery with a focus on the viral subversion of decapping activators. This highly conserved viral trickery is exemplified with the plant Brome mosaic virus, the animal Flock house virus and the human hepatitis C virus.

  15. Nuclear imprisonment of host cellular mRNA by nsp1β protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Mingyuan; Ke, Hanzhong; Zhang, Qingzhan; Yoo, Dongwan

    2017-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA genomes function as mRNA for viral protein synthesis which is fully reliant on host cell translation machinery. Competing with cellular protein translation apparatus needs to ensure the production of viral proteins, but this also stifles host innate defense. In the present study, we showed that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), whose replication takes place in the cytoplasm, imprisoned host cell mRNA in the nucleus, which suggests a novel mechanism to enhance translation of PRRSV genome. PRRSV nonstructural protein (nsp) 1β was identified as the nuclear protein playing the role for host mRNA nuclear retention and subversion of host protein synthesis. A SAP (SAF-A/B, Acinus, and PIAS) motif was identified in nsp1β with the consensus sequence of 126 -LQxxLxxxGL- 135 . In situ hybridization unveiled that SAP mutants were unable to cause nuclear retention of host cell mRNAs and did not suppress host protein synthesis. In addition, these SAP mutants reverted PRRSV-nsp1β-mediated suppression of interferon (IFN) production, IFN signaling, and TNF-α production pathway. Using reverse genetics, a series of SAP mutant PRRS viruses, vK124A, vL126A, vG134A, and vL135A were generated. No mRNA nuclear retention was observed during vL126A and vL135A infections. Importantly, vL126A and vL135A did not suppress IFN production. For other arteriviruses, mRNA nuclear accumulation was also observed for LDV-nsp1β and SHFV-nsp1β. EAV-nsp1 was exceptional and did not block the host mRNA nuclear export. - Highlights: •PRRS virus blocks host mRNA nuclear export to the cytoplasm. •PRRSV nsp1β is the viral protein responsible for host mRNA nuclear retention. •SAP domain in nsp1β is essential for host mRNA nuclear retention and type I interferon suppression. •Mutation in the SAP domain of nsp1β causes the loss of function. •Host mRNA nuclear retention by nsp1β is common in the family Arteriviridae, except equine arteritis virus.

  16. Nuclear imprisonment of host cellular mRNA by nsp1β protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mingyuan, E-mail: hanming@umich.edu; Ke, Hanzhong; Zhang, Qingzhan; Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu

    2017-05-15

    Positive-strand RNA genomes function as mRNA for viral protein synthesis which is fully reliant on host cell translation machinery. Competing with cellular protein translation apparatus needs to ensure the production of viral proteins, but this also stifles host innate defense. In the present study, we showed that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), whose replication takes place in the cytoplasm, imprisoned host cell mRNA in the nucleus, which suggests a novel mechanism to enhance translation of PRRSV genome. PRRSV nonstructural protein (nsp) 1β was identified as the nuclear protein playing the role for host mRNA nuclear retention and subversion of host protein synthesis. A SAP (SAF-A/B, Acinus, and PIAS) motif was identified in nsp1β with the consensus sequence of {sub 126}-LQxxLxxxGL-{sub 135}. In situ hybridization unveiled that SAP mutants were unable to cause nuclear retention of host cell mRNAs and did not suppress host protein synthesis. In addition, these SAP mutants reverted PRRSV-nsp1β-mediated suppression of interferon (IFN) production, IFN signaling, and TNF-α production pathway. Using reverse genetics, a series of SAP mutant PRRS viruses, vK124A, vL126A, vG134A, and vL135A were generated. No mRNA nuclear retention was observed during vL126A and vL135A infections. Importantly, vL126A and vL135A did not suppress IFN production. For other arteriviruses, mRNA nuclear accumulation was also observed for LDV-nsp1β and SHFV-nsp1β. EAV-nsp1 was exceptional and did not block the host mRNA nuclear export. - Highlights: •PRRS virus blocks host mRNA nuclear export to the cytoplasm. •PRRSV nsp1β is the viral protein responsible for host mRNA nuclear retention. •SAP domain in nsp1β is essential for host mRNA nuclear retention and type I interferon suppression. •Mutation in the SAP domain of nsp1β causes the loss of function. •Host mRNA nuclear retention by nsp1β is common in the family Arteriviridae, except equine

  17. Nogo-receptor gene activity: cellular localization and developmental regulation of mRNA in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Anna; Trifunovski, Alexandra; Widmer, Hans Ruedi; Widenfalk, Johan; Olson, Lars; Spenger, Christian

    2002-11-18

    Nogo (reticulon-4) is a myelin-associated protein that is expressed in three different splice variants, Nogo-A, Nogo-B, and Nogo-C. Nogo-A inhibits neurite regeneration in the central nervous system. Messenger RNA encoding Nogo is expressed in oligodendrocytes and central and peripheral neurons, but not in astrocytes or Schwann cells. Nogo is a transmembraneous protein; the extracellular domain is termed Nogo-66, and a Nogo-66-receptor (Nogo-R) has been identified. We performed in situ hybridization in human and mouse nervous tissues to map the cellular distribution of Nogo-R gene activity patterns in fetal and adult human spinal cord and sensory ganglia, adult human brain, and the nervous systems of developing and adult mice. In the human fetus Nogo-R was transcribed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and in dorsal root ganglia. In adult human tissues Nogo-R gene activity was found in neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and a subset of large and medium-sized neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Nogo-R mRNA was not expressed in the adult human spinal cord at detectable levels. In the fetal mouse, Nogo-R was diffusely expressed in brain, brainstem, trigeminal ganglion, spinal cord, and dorsal root ganglia at all stages. In the adult mouse strong Nogo-R mRNA expression was found in neurons in neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, habenula, thalamic nuclei, brainstem, the granular cell layer of cerebellum, and the mitral cell layer of the olfactory bulb. Neurons in the adult mouse striatum, the medial septal nucleus, and spinal cord did not express Nogo-R mRNA at detectable levels. In summary, Nogo-66-R mRNA expression in humans and mice was observed in neurons of the developing nervous system Expression was downregulated in the adult spinal cord of both species, and specific expression patterns were seen in the adult brain. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. A viral microRNA down-regulates multiple cell cycle genes through mRNA 5'UTRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Grey

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Global gene expression data combined with bioinformatic analysis provides strong evidence that mammalian miRNAs mediate repression of gene expression primarily through binding sites within the 3' untranslated region (UTR. Using RNA induced silencing complex immunoprecipitation (RISC-IP techniques we have identified multiple cellular targets for a human cytomegalovirus (HCMV miRNA, miR-US25-1. Strikingly, this miRNA binds target sites primarily within 5'UTRs, mediating significant reduction in gene expression. Intriguingly, many of the genes targeted by miR-US25-1 are associated with cell cycle control, including cyclin E2, BRCC3, EID1, MAPRE2, and CD147, suggesting that miR-US25-1 is targeting genes within a related pathway. Deletion of miR-US25-1 from HCMV results in over expression of cyclin E2 in the context of viral infection. Our studies demonstrate that a viral miRNA mediates translational repression of multiple cellular genes by targeting mRNA 5'UTRs.

  19. Designing synthetic RNA for delivery by nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedrzejczyk, Dominika; Pawlowska, Roza; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Gendaszewska-Darmach, Edyta

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of synthetic biology and nanobiotechnology has led to the construction of various synthetic RNA nanoparticles of different functionalities and potential applications. As they occur naturally, nucleic acids are an attractive construction material for biocompatible nanoscaffold and nanomachine design. In this review, we provide an overview of the types of RNA and nucleic acid’s nanoparticle design, with the focus on relevant nanostructures utilized for gene-expression regulation in cellular models. Structural analysis and modeling is addressed along with the tools available for RNA structural prediction. The functionalization of RNA-based nanoparticles leading to prospective applications of such constructs in potential therapies is shown. The route from the nanoparticle design and modeling through synthesis and functionalization to cellular application is also described. For a better understanding of the fate of targeted RNA after delivery, an overview of RNA processing inside the cell is also provided. (topical review)

  20. RNA epitranscriptomics: Regulation of infection of RNA and DNA viruses by N6 -methyladenosine (m6 A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Brandon; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2018-04-26

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) was discovered 4 decades ago. However, the functions of m 6 A and the cellular machinery that regulates its changes have just been revealed in the last few years. m 6 A is an abundant internal mRNA modification on cellular RNA and is implicated in diverse cellular functions. Recent works have demonstrated the presence of m 6 A in the genomes of RNA viruses and transcripts of a DNA virus with either a proviral or antiviral role. Here, we first summarize what is known about the m 6 A "writers," "erasers," "readers," and "antireaders" as well as the role of m 6 A in mRNA metabolism. We then review how the replications of numerous viruses are enhanced and restricted by m 6 A with emphasis on the oncogenic DNA virus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), whose m 6 A epitranscriptome was recently mapped. In the context of KSHV, m 6 A and the reader protein YTHDF2 acts as an antiviral mechanism during viral lytic replication. During viral latency, KSHV alters m 6 A on genes that are implicated in cellular transformation and viral latency. Lastly, we discuss future studies that are important to further delineate the functions of m 6 A in KSHV latent and lytic replication and KSHV-induced oncogenesis. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to 32 P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K a for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 x 10 9 M -1 . The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3' end of the genome with a K a similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3' noncoding region

  2. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading and inva......Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......-mediated invadopodia formation. Taken together, our results indicate that RNA-binding proteins exert profound effects on cellular adhesion and invasion during development and cancer formation....

  3. Functional characterization of the Drosophila MRP (mitochondrial RNA processing) RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mary D; Bains, Anupinder K; Rajendra, T K; Dominski, Zbigniew; Matera, A Gregory; Simmonds, Andrew J

    2010-11-01

    MRP RNA is a noncoding RNA component of RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP), a multi-protein eukaryotic endoribonuclease reported to function in multiple cellular processes, including ribosomal RNA processing, mitochondrial DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. A recent study predicted a potential Drosophila ortholog of MRP RNA (CR33682) by computer-based genome analysis. We have confirmed the expression of this gene and characterized the phenotype associated with this locus. Flies with mutations that specifically affect MRP RNA show defects in growth and development that begin in the early larval period and end in larval death during the second instar stage. We present several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for Drosophila MRP RNA in rRNA processing. The nuclear fraction of Drosophila MRP RNA localizes to the nucleolus. Further, a mutant strain shows defects in rRNA processing that include a defect in 5.8S rRNA processing, typical of MRP RNA mutants in other species, as well as defects in early stages of rRNA processing.

  4. A Broad RNA Virus Survey Reveals Both miRNA Dependence and Functional Sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Luna, Joseph M; Liniger, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    , critically depended on the interaction of cellular miR-17 and let-7 with the viral 3' UTR. Unlike canonical miRNA interactions, miR-17 and let-7 binding enhanced pestivirus translation and RNA stability. miR-17 sequestration by pestiviruses conferred reduced AGO binding and functional de...... immunoprecipitation (CLIP) of the Argonaute (AGO) proteins to characterize strengths and specificities of miRNA interactions in the context of 15 different RNA virus infections, including several clinically relevant pathogens. Notably, replication of pestiviruses, a major threat to milk and meat industries...

  5. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  6. New windows into retroviral RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Dhivya; Kenyon, Julia Claire

    2018-01-25

    The multiple roles of both viral and cellular RNAs have become increasingly apparent in recent years, and techniques to model them have become significantly more powerful, enabling faster and more accurate visualization of RNA structures. Techniques such as SHAPE (selective 2'OH acylation analysed by primer extension) have revolutionized the field, and have been used to examine RNAs belonging to many and diverse retroviruses. Secondary structure probing reagents such as these have been aided by the development of faster methods of analysis either via capillary or next-generation sequencing, allowing the analysis of entire genomes, and of retroviral RNA structures within virions. Techniques to model the three-dimensional structures of these large RNAs have also recently developed. The flexibility of retroviral RNAs, both structural and functional, is clear from the results of these new experimental techniques. Retroviral RNA structures and structural changes control many stages of the lifecycle, and both the RNA structures themselves and their interactions with ligands are potential new drug targets. In addition, our growing understanding of retroviral RNA structures is aiding our knowledge of cellular RNA form and function.

  7. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine

    2015-01-01

    ) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer...

  8. Autophagy in Negative-Strand RNA Virus Infection

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    Yupeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a homoeostatic process by which cytoplasmic material is targeted for degradation by the cell. Viruses have learned to manipulate the autophagic pathway to ensure their own replication and survival. Although much progress has been achieved in dissecting the interplay between viruses and cellular autophagic machinery, it is not well understood how the cellular autophagic pathway is utilized by viruses and manipulated to their own advantage. In this review, we briefly introduce autophagy, viral xenophagy and the interaction among autophagy, virus and immune response, then focus on the interplay between NS-RNA viruses and autophagy during virus infection. We have selected some exemplary NS-RNA viruses and will describe how these NS-RNA viruses regulate autophagy and the role of autophagy in NS-RNA viral replication and in immune responses to virus infection. We also review recent advances in understanding how NS-RNA viral proteins perturb autophagy and how autophagy-related proteins contribute to NS-RNA virus replication, pathogenesis and antiviral immunity.

  9. Long noncoding RNA HOTAIR is relevant to cellular proliferation, invasiveness, and clinical relapse in small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Motoi, Noriko; Nagano, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Eisaku; Ushijima, Masaru; Matsuura, Masaaki; Okumura, Sakae; Nishio, Makoto; Hirose, Tetsuro; Inase, Naohiko; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a subtype of lung cancer with poor prognosis. To identify accurate predictive biomarkers and effective therapeutic modalities, we focus on a long noncoding RNA, Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR), and investigated its expression, cellular functions, and clinical relevance in SCLC. In this study, HOTAIR expression was assessed in 35 surgical SCLC samples and 10 SCLC cell lines. The efficacy of knockdown of HOTAIR by siRNA transfection was evaluated in SBC-3 cells in vitro, and the gene expression was analyzed using microarray. HOTAIR was expressed highly in pure, rather than combined, SCLC (P = 0.012), that the subgroup with high expression had significantly more pure SCLC (P = 0.04), more lymphatic invasion (P = 0.03) and more relapse (P = 0.04) than the low-expression subgroup. The knockdown of HOTAIR in SBC-3 cells led to decreased proliferation activity and decreased invasiveness in vitro. Gene expression analysis indicated that depletion of HOTAIR resulted in upregulation of cell adhesion-related genes such as ASTN1, PCDHA1, and mucin production-related genes such as MUC5AC, and downregulation of genes involved in neuronal growth and signal transduction including NTM and PTK2B. Our results suggest that HOTAIR has an oncogenic role in SCLC and could be a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target

  10. Northern blots: capillary transfer of RNA from agarose gels and filter hybridization using standard stringency conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Donald C

    2015-03-02

    In this protocol, an RNA sample, fractionated by gel electrophoresis, is transferred from the gel onto a membrane by capillary transfer. Short-wave UV light is used to fix the transferred RNA to the membrane. The membrane is then pretreated to block nonspecific probe-binding sites, and hybridization of the immobilized RNA to a (32)P-labeled DNA or RNA probe specific for the mRNA of interest is performed. Finally, the membrane is washed and subjected to autoradiography or phosphorimaging. Because exposure to UV cross-links the RNA to the membrane, the membrane can be stripped and hybridized with other probes. The procedure is suitable for detecting poly(A)(+)-selected mRNA or mRNA in total cellular RNA if the target transcript is relatively abundant. Using DNA or RNA probes labeled to 1 × 10(8)-10 × 10(8) cpm/µg, it should be possible to detect ∼5 pg of a specific RNA. © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by which Total Saponin Extracted from Tribulus Terrestris Protects Against Artherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengquan Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Total saponin extracted from Tribulus terrestris (TSETT has been reported to protect against atherosclerosis. We here investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TSETT underlying protection against atherosclerosis. Methods: Cell proliferation was measured with Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT; Intracellular H2O2 was measured with DCFH-DA, a fluorescent dye; Intracellular free Ca2+ was measured with a confocal laser scanning microscopy; Genes expression was measured with gene array and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2 was measured with cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and western blotting. Results: TSETT significantly suppressed the increase in cells proliferation induced by angiotensin II, significantly suppressed the increase in the intracellular production of H2O2 induced by angiotensin II, significantly inhibited the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ induced by H2O2, significantly inhibited the increase in phospho-ERK1/2 induced by angiotensin II; significantly inhibited the increase in mRNA expression of c-fos, c-jun and pkc-α induced by angiotensin II. Conclusion: These findings provide a new insight into the antiatherosclerotic properties of TSETT and provide a pharmacological basis for the clinical application of TSETT in anti-atherosclerosis.

  12. Cellular and molecular mechanisms in vascular smooth muscle cells by which total saponin extracted from Tribulus terrestris protects against artherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengquan; Guan, Yue; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhai, Fengguo; Zhang, Xiuping; Guan, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Total saponin extracted from Tribulus terrestris (TSETT) has been reported to protect against atherosclerosis. We here investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of TSETT underlying protection against atherosclerosis. Cell proliferation was measured with Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT); Intracellular H2O2 was measured with DCFH-DA, a fluorescent dye; Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured with a confocal laser scanning microscopy; Genes expression was measured with gene array and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (phospho-ERK1/2) was measured with cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. TSETT significantly suppressed the increase in cells proliferation induced by angiotensin II, significantly suppressed the increase in the intracellular production of H2O2 induced by angiotensin II, significantly inhibited the increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) induced by H2O2, significantly inhibited the increase in phospho-ERK1/2 induced by angiotensin II; significantly inhibited the increase in mRNA expression of c-fos, c-jun and pkc-α induced by angiotensin II. These findings provide a new insight into the antiatherosclerotic properties of TSETT and provide a pharmacological basis for the clinical application of TSETT in anti-atherosclerosis. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ngl3p is an active 3′–5′ exonuclease with a specificity towards poly-A RNA reminiscent of cellular deadenylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Dedic, Emil; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    2012-01-01

    RNAs that yeast Ngl3p is a functional 3′–5′ exonuclease most active at slightly acidic conditions. We further show that the enzyme depends on divalent metal ions for activity and possesses specificity towards poly-A RNA similar to what has been observed for cellular deadenylases. The results suggest that Ngl3p...

  14. The successes and future prospects of the linear antisense RNA amplification methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jifen; Eberwine, James

    2018-05-01

    It has been over a quarter of a century since the introduction of the linear RNA amplification methodology known as antisense RNA (aRNA) amplification. Whereas most molecular biology techniques are rapidly replaced owing to the fast-moving nature of development in the field, the aRNA procedure has become a base that can be built upon through varied uses of the technology. The technique was originally developed to assess RNA populations from small amounts of starting material, including single cells, but over time its use has evolved to include the detection of various cellular entities such as proteins, RNA-binding-protein-associated cargoes, and genomic DNA. In this Perspective we detail the linear aRNA amplification procedure and its use in assessing various components of a cell's chemical phenotype. This procedure is particularly useful in efforts to multiplex the simultaneous detection of various cellular processes. These efforts are necessary to identify the quantitative chemical phenotype of cells that underlies cellular function.

  15. Efficient Inhibition of wear debris-induced inflammation by locally delivered siRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaochun; Tao Kun; Cheng Tao; Zhu Junfeng; Zhang Xianlong

    2008-01-01

    Aseptic loosening is the most common long-term complication of total joint replacement, which is associated with the generation of wear debris. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) on wear debris-induced inflammation. A local delivery of lentivirus-mediated TNF-α siRNA into the modified murine air pouch, which was stimulated by polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles, resulted in significant blockage of TNF-α both in mRNA and protein levels for up to 4 weeks. In addition, significant down-regulation of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) was observed in TNF-α siRNA-treated pouches. The safety profile of gene therapy was proven by Bioluminescent assay and quantitative fluorescent flux. Histological analysis revealed less inflammatory responses (thinner pouch membrane and decreased cellular infiltration) in TNF-α siRNA-treated pouches. These findings suggest that local delivery of TNF-α siRNA might be an excellent therapeutic candidate to inhibit particle-induced inflammation.

  16. Matrin 3 binds and stabilizes mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maayan Salton

    Full Text Available Matrin 3 (MATR3 is a highly conserved, inner nuclear matrix protein with two zinc finger domains and two RNA recognition motifs (RRM, whose function is largely unknown. Recently we found MATR3 to be phosphorylated by the protein kinase ATM, which activates the cellular response to double strand breaks in the DNA. Here, we show that MATR3 interacts in an RNA-dependent manner with several proteins with established roles in RNA processing, and maintains its interaction with RNA via its RRM2 domain. Deep sequencing of the bound RNA (RIP-seq identified several small noncoding RNA species. Using microarray analysis to explore MATR3's role in transcription, we identified 77 transcripts whose amounts depended on the presence of MATR3. We validated this finding with nine transcripts which were also bound to the MATR3 complex. Finally, we demonstrated the importance of MATR3 for maintaining the stability of several of these mRNA species and conclude that it has a role in mRNA stabilization. The data suggest that the cellular level of MATR3, known to be highly regulated, modulates the stability of a group of gene transcripts.

  17. Graphene Oxide Conjugated Magnetic Beads for RNA Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Xuan-Hung; Baek, Ahruem; Kim, Tae Han; Lee, Sang Hun; Rho, Won-Yeop; Chung, Woo-Jae; Kim, Dong-Eun; Jun, Bong-Hyun

    2017-08-04

    A magnetic material that consists of silica-coated magnetic beads conjugated with graphene oxide (GO) was successfully prepared for facile ribonucleic acid (RNA) extraction. When the GO-modified magnetic beads were applied to separate the RNA from the lysed cell, the cellular RNAs were readily adsorbed to and readily desorbed from the surface of the GO-modified magnetic beads by urea. The amount of RNA extracted by the GO-modified magnetic beads was ≈170 % as much as those of the control extracted by a conventional phenol-based chaotropic solution. These results demonstrate that the facile method of RNA separation by using GO-modified magnetic beads as an adsorbent is an efficient and simple way to purify intact cellular RNAs and/or microRNA from cell lysates. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Viktorovskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses replication.Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated.The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with DENV and reveals how DENV modulates and usurps

  19. Cellular metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: chromatin structure; the use of circular synthetic polydeoxynucleotides as substrates for the study of DNA repair enzymes; human cellular kinetic response following exposure to DNA-interactive compounds; histone phosphorylation and chromatin structure in cell proliferation; photoaddition products induced in chromatin by uv light; pollutants and genetic information transfer; altered RNA metabolism as a function of cadmium accumulation and intracellular distribution in cultured cells; and thymidylate chromophore destruction by water free radicals

  20. Cyclophilin B stimulates RNA synthesis by the HCV RNA dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Julie A; Meng, Xiao; Frick, David N

    2009-04-01

    Cyclophilins are cellular peptidyl isomerases that have been implicated in regulating hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Cyclophilin B (CypB) is a target of cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressive drug recently shown to suppress HCV replication in cell culture. Watashi et al. recently demonstrated that CypB is important for efficient HCV replication, and proposed that it mediates the anti-HCV effects of CsA through an interaction with NS5B [Watashi K, Ishii N, Hijikata M, Inoue D, Murata T, Miyanari Y, et al. Cyclophilin B is a functional regulator of hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase. Mol Cell 2005;19:111-22]. We examined the effects of purified CypB proteins on the enzymatic activity of NS5B. Recombinant CypB purified from insect cells directly stimulated NS5B-catalyzed RNA synthesis. CypB increased RNA synthesis by NS5B derived from genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a HCV strains. Stimulation appears to arise from an increase in productive RNA binding. NS5B residue Pro540, a previously proposed target of CypB peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity, is not required for stimulation of RNA synthesis.

  1. A Rapid and Efficient Method for Purifying High Quality Total RNA from Peaches (Prunus persica for Functional Genomics Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE MEISEL

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Prunus persica has been proposed as a genomic model for deciduous trees and the Rosaceae family. Optimized protocols for RNA isolation are necessary to further advance studies in this model species such that functional genomics analyses may be performed. Here we present an optimized protocol to rapidly and efficiently purify high quality total RNA from peach fruits (Prunus persica. Isolating high-quality RNA from fruit tissue is often difficult due to large quantities of polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds that accumulate in this tissue and co-purify with the RNA. Here we demonstrate that a modified version of the method used to isolate RNA from pine trees and the woody plant Cinnamomun tenuipilum is ideal for isolating high quality RNA from the fruits of Prunus persica. This RNA may be used for many functional genomic based experiments such as RT-PCR and the construction of large-insert cDNA libraries.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Jennifer E.; Fewell, Claire; Yin, Qinyan; McBride, Jane; Wang Xia; Lin Zhen

    2008-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers

  3. Recoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases for synthetic biology by rational protein-RNA engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadd, Andrew; Perona, John J

    2014-12-19

    We have taken a rational approach to redesigning the amino acid binding and aminoacyl-tRNA pairing specificities of bacterial glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. The four-stage engineering incorporates generalizable design principles and improves the pairing efficiency of noncognate glutamate with tRNA(Gln) by over 10(5)-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. Better optimized designs of the protein-RNA complex include substantial reengineering of the globular core region of the tRNA, demonstrating a role for specific tRNA nucleotides in specifying the identity of the genetically encoded amino acid. Principles emerging from this engineering effort open new prospects for combining rational and genetic selection approaches to design novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that ligate noncanonical amino acids onto tRNAs. This will facilitate reconstruction of the cellular translation apparatus for applications in synthetic biology.

  4. Comparison of Total RNA Isolation Methods for Analysis of Immune-Related microRNAs in Market Milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sangnam; Park, Mi Ri; Son, Seok Jun; Kim, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Bovine milk provides essential nutrients, including immunologically important molecules, as the primary source of nutrition to newborns. Recent studies showed that RNAs from bovine milk contain immune-related microRNAs (miRNA) that regulate various immune systems. To evaluate the biological and immunological activity of miRNAs from milk products, isolation methods need to be established. Six methods for extracting total RNAs from bovine colostrums were adopted to evaluate the isolating efficiency and expression of miRNAs. Total RNA from milk was presented in formulation of small RNAs, rather than ribosomal RNAs. Column-combined phenol isolating methods showed high recovery of total RNAs, especially the commercial columns for biofluid samples, which demonstrated outstanding efficiency for recovering miRNAs. We also evaluated the quantity of five immune-related miRNAs (miR-93, miR-106a, miR-155, miR-181a, miR-451) in milk processed by temperature treatments including low temperature for long time (LTLT, 63℃ for 30 min)-, high temperature for short time (HTST, 75℃ for 15 s)-, and ultra heat treatment (UHT, 120-130℃ for 0.5-4 s). All targeted miRNAs had significantly reduced levels in processed milks compared to colostrum and raw mature milk. Interestingly, the amount of immune-related miRNAs from HTST milk was more resistant than those of LTLT and UHT milks. Our present study examined defined methods of RNA isolation and quantification of immune-specific miRNAs from small volumes of milk for use in further analysis.

  5. A Two-Way Street: Regulatory Interplay between RNA Polymerase and Nascent RNA Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwei; Landick, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The vectorial (5'-to-3' at varying velocity) synthesis of RNA by cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs) creates a rugged kinetic landscape, demarcated by frequent, sometimes long-lived, pauses. In addition to myriad gene-regulatory roles, these pauses temporally and spatially program the co-transcriptional, hierarchical folding of biologically active RNAs. Conversely, these RNA structures, which form inside or near the RNA exit channel, interact with the polymerase and adjacent protein factors to influence RNA synthesis by modulating pausing, termination, antitermination, and slippage. Here, we review the evolutionary origin, mechanistic underpinnings, and regulatory consequences of this interplay between RNAP and nascent RNA structure. We categorize and rationalize the extensive linkage between the transcriptional machinery and its product, and provide a framework for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An Interaction between KSHV ORF57 and UIF Provides mRNA-Adaptor Redundancy in Herpesvirus Intronless mRNA Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian R.; Boyne, James R.; Noerenberg, Marko; Taylor, Adam; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Walsh, Matthew J.; Wheat, Rachel; Blackbourn, David J.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The hTREX complex mediates cellular bulk mRNA nuclear export by recruiting the nuclear export factor, TAP, via a direct interaction with the export adaptor, Aly. Intriguingly however, depletion of Aly only leads to a modest reduction in cellular mRNA nuclear export, suggesting the existence of additional mRNA nuclear export adaptor proteins. In order to efficiently export Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) intronless mRNAs from the nucleus, the KSHV ORF57 protein recruits hTREX onto viral intronless mRNAs allowing access to the TAP-mediated export pathway. Similarly however, depletion of Aly only leads to a modest reduction in the nuclear export of KSHV intronless mRNAs. Herein, we identify a novel interaction between ORF57 and the cellular protein, UIF. We provide the first evidence that the ORF57-UIF interaction enables the recruitment of hTREX and TAP to KSHV intronless mRNAs in Aly-depleted cells. Strikingly, depletion of both Aly and UIF inhibits the formation of an ORF57-mediated nuclear export competent ribonucleoprotein particle and consequently prevents ORF57-mediated mRNA nuclear export and KSHV protein production. Importantly, these findings highlight that redundancy exists in the eukaryotic system for certain hTREX components involved in the mRNA nuclear export of intronless KSHV mRNAs. PMID:21814512

  7. 34A, miRNA-944, miRNA-101 and miRNA-218 in cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNAs (21 - 24 nucleotides in length) that are critical for many important processes such as development, ... RNA extraction and reverse transcription. Total RNA was extracted from each of the experimental groups using ... used as an endogenous control to normalize the expression of miRNA-143, miRNA-34A, miRNA-.

  8. Using RNA Interference to Study Protein Function

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Carol D.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference can be extremely useful in determining the function of an endogenously-expressed protein in its normal cellular environment. In this chapter, we describe a method that uses small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knock down mRNA and protein expression in cultured cells so that the effect of a putative regulatory protein on gene expression can be delineated. Methods of assessing the effectiveness of the siRNA procedure using real time quantitative PCR and Western analysis are also in...

  9. Identification of high-confidence RNA regulatory elements by combinatorial classification of RNA-protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang Eric; Xiao, Mu; Shi, Binbin; Yang, Yu-Cheng T; Wang, Dong; Wang, Fei; Marcia, Marco; Lu, Zhi John

    2017-09-08

    Crosslinking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) technologies have enabled researchers to characterize transcriptome-wide binding sites of RNA-binding protein (RBP) with high resolution. We apply a soft-clustering method, RBPgroup, to various CLIP-seq datasets to group together RBPs that specifically bind the same RNA sites. Such combinatorial clustering of RBPs helps interpret CLIP-seq data and suggests functional RNA regulatory elements. Furthermore, we validate two RBP-RBP interactions in cell lines. Our approach links proteins and RNA motifs known to possess similar biochemical and cellular properties and can, when used in conjunction with additional experimental data, identify high-confidence RBP groups and their associated RNA regulatory elements.

  10. siRNA delivery with lipid-based systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    A key hurdle for the further development of RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics like small interfering RNA (siRNA) is their safe and effective delivery. Lipids are promising and versatile carriers because they are based on Nature's own building blocks and can be provided with properties which......RNA into more hydrophobic lipoplexes, which promote passage of the siRNA across cellular membrane barriers, especially when lipids are added that facilitate membrane fusion. Despite these attractive features, siRNA delivery vehicles are facing a number of challenges such as the limited delivery efficiency...

  11. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA decay: half-life of Beta-actin mRNA in human leukemia CCRF-CEM and Nalm-6 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barredo Julio C

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe an alternative method to determine mRNA half-life (t1/2 based on the Real-Time RT-PCR procedure. This approach was evaluated by using the β-actin gene as a reference molecule for measuring of mRNA stability. Results Human leukemia Nalm-6 and CCRF-CEM cells were treated with various concentrations of Actinomycin D to block transcription and aliquots were removed periodically. Total RNA was isolated and quantified using the RiboGreen® fluorescent dye with the VersaFluor Fluorometer System. One μg of total RNA was reverse transcribed and used as template for the amplification of a region of the β-actin gene (231 bp. To generate the standard curve, serial ten-fold dilutions of the pBactin-231 vector containing the cDNA amplified fragment were employed, β-actin mRNAs were quantified by Real-Time RT-PCR using the SYBR® Green I fluorogenic dye and data analyzed using the iCycle iQ system software. Using this method, the β-actin mRNA exhibited a half-life of 6.6 h and 13.5 h in Nalm-6 and CCRF-CEM cells, respectively. The t1/2 value obtained for Nalm-6 is comparable to those estimated from Northern blot studies, using normal human leukocytes (5.5 h. Conclusions We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reliable method based on Real-Time RT-PCR for measuring mRNA half-life. Our results confirm that β-actin mRNA half-life can be affected by the cellular growth rate.

  12. Viral tRNA Mimicry from a Biocommunicative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascensión Ariza-Mateos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses have very small genomes which limits the functions they can encode. One of the strategies employed by these viruses is to mimic key factors of the host cell so they can take advantage of the interactions and activities these factors typically participate in. The viral RNA genome itself was first observed to mimic cellular tRNA over 40 years ago. Since then researchers have confirmed that distinct families of RNA viruses are accessible to a battery of cellular factors involved in tRNA-related activities. Recently, potential tRNA-like structures have been detected within the sequences of a 100 mRNAs taken from human cells, one of these being the host defense interferon-alpha mRNA; these are then additional to the examples found in bacterial and yeast mRNAs. The mimetic relationship between tRNA, cellular mRNA, and viral RNA is the central focus of two considerations described below. These are subsequently used as a preface for a final hypothesis drawing on concepts relating to mimicry from the social sciences and humanities, such as power relations and creativity. Firstly, the presence of tRNA-like structures in mRNAs indicates that the viral tRNA-like signal could be mimicking tRNA-like elements that are contextualized by the specific carrier mRNAs, rather than, or in addition to, the tRNA itself, which would significantly increase the number of potential semiotic relations mediated by the viral signals. Secondly, and in particular, mimicking a host defense mRNA could be considered a potential new viral strategy for survival. Finally, we propose that mRNA’s mimicry of tRNA could be indicative of an ancestral intracellular conflict in which species of mRNAs invaded the cell, but from within. As the meaning of the mimetic signal depends on the context, in this case, the conflict that arises when the viral signal enters the cell can change the meaning of the mRNAs’ internal tRNA-like signals, from their current significance to that

  13. New RNA playgrounds : non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins control cellular processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kedde, Martijn

    2009-01-01

    Het eiwit Dead End noodzakelijk is voor het overleven van geslachtscellen. Het beschermt enkele genen tegen blokkades door microRNA’s. Dat stelt onderzoeker Martijn Kedde van het NKI-AVL in zijn proefschrift. Kedde promoveert donderdag 22 januari. MicroRNA’s, kleine stukjes RNA, blokkeren de

  14. Combinatorial Control of mRNA Fates by RNA-Binding Proteins and Non-Coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Iadevaia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is mediated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and small non-coding RNAs (e.g., microRNAs that bind to distinct elements in their mRNA targets. Here, we review recent examples describing the synergistic and/or antagonistic effects mediated by RBPs and miRNAs to determine the localisation, stability and translation of mRNAs in mammalian cells. From these studies, it is becoming increasingly apparent that dynamic rearrangements of RNA-protein complexes could have profound implications in human cancer, in synaptic plasticity, and in cellular differentiation.

  15. RNase-assisted RNA chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlewski, Gracjan; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2010-01-01

    RNA chromatography combined with mass spectrometry represents a widely used experimental approach to identify RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific RNA targets. An important drawback of most of these protocols is the high background due to direct or indirect nonspecific binding of cellular proteins to the beads. In many cases this can hamper the detection of individual proteins due to their low levels and/or comigration with contaminating proteins. Increasing the salt concentration during washing steps can reduce background, but at the cost of using less physiological salt concentrations and the likely loss of important RNA-binding proteins that are less stringently bound to a given RNA, as well as the disassembly of protein or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Here, we describe an improved RNA chromatography method that relies on the use of a cocktail of RNases in the elution step. This results in the release of proteins specifically associated with the RNA ligand and almost complete elimination of background noise, allowing a more sensitive and thorough detection of RNA-binding proteins recognizing a specific RNA transcript. PMID:20571124

  16. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear Imprisonment: Viral Strategies to Arrest Host mRNA Nuclear Export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz M. A. Fontoura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses possess many strategies to impair host cellular responses to infection. Nuclear export of host messenger RNAs (mRNA that encode antiviral factors is critical for antiviral protein production and control of viral infections. Several viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to inhibit nuclear export of host mRNAs, including targeting mRNA export factors and nucleoporins to compromise their roles in nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of cellular mRNA. Here, we present a review of research focused on suppression of host mRNA nuclear export by viruses, including influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, and the impact of this viral suppression on host antiviral responses.

  18. Nuclear Imprisonment: Viral Strategies to Arrest Host mRNA Nuclear Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Sharon K.; Mata, Miguel A.; Zhang, Liang; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses possess many strategies to impair host cellular responses to infection. Nuclear export of host messenger RNAs (mRNA) that encode antiviral factors is critical for antiviral protein production and control of viral infections. Several viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to inhibit nuclear export of host mRNAs, including targeting mRNA export factors and nucleoporins to compromise their roles in nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of cellular mRNA. Here, we present a review of research focused on suppression of host mRNA nuclear export by viruses, including influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, and the impact of this viral suppression on host antiviral responses. PMID:23872491

  19. MicroRNA-363 targets myosin 1B to reduce cellular migration in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, Bhavana V.; Wald, Abigail I.; Akhtar, Parvez; Munko, Ana C.; Xu, Jingjing; Gibson, Sandra P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Ferris, Robert L.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) remains a prevalent and devastating disease. Recently, there has been an increase in SCCHN cases that are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The clinical characteristics of HPV-positive and HPV-negative SCCHN are known to be different but their molecular features are only recently beginning to emerge. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are small, non-coding RNAs that are likely to play significant roles in cancer initiation and progression where they may act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Previous studies in our laboratory showed that miR-363 is overexpressed in HPV-positive compared to HPV-negative SCCHN cell lines, and the HPV type 16-E6 oncoprotein upregulates miR-363 in SCCHN cell lines. However, the functional role of miR-363 in SCCHN in the context of HPV infection remains to be elucidated. We analyzed miR-363 levels in SCCHN tumors with known HPV-status from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and an independent cohort from our institution. Cell migration studies were conducted following the overexpression of miR-363 in HPV-negative cell lines. Bioinformatic tools and a luciferase reporter assay were utilized to confirm that miR-363 targets the 3’-UTR of myosin 1B (MYO1B). MYO1B mRNA and protein expression levels were evaluated following miR-363 overexpression in HPV-negative SCCHN cell lines. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of MYO1B was performed to assess the phenotypic implication of reduced MYO1B expression in SCCHN cell lines. MiR-363 was found to be overexpressed in HPV-16-positive compared to the HPV-negative SCCHN tumors. Luciferase reporter assays performed in HPV-negative JHU028 cells confirmed that miR-363 targets one of its two potential binding sites in the 3’UTR of MYO1B. MYO1B mRNA and protein levels were reduced upon miR-363 overexpression in four HPV-negative SCCHN cell lines. Increased miR-363 expression or siRNA knockdown of MYO1B expression reduced

  20. RNA-SeQC: RNA-seq metrics for quality control and process optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, David S; Levin, Joshua Z; Sivachenko, Andrey; Fennell, Timothy; Nazaire, Marc-Danie; Williams, Chris; Reich, Michael; Winckler, Wendy; Getz, Gad

    2012-06-01

    RNA-seq, the application of next-generation sequencing to RNA, provides transcriptome-wide characterization of cellular activity. Assessment of sequencing performance and library quality is critical to the interpretation of RNA-seq data, yet few tools exist to address this issue. We introduce RNA-SeQC, a program which provides key measures of data quality. These metrics include yield, alignment and duplication rates; GC bias, rRNA content, regions of alignment (exon, intron and intragenic), continuity of coverage, 3'/5' bias and count of detectable transcripts, among others. The software provides multi-sample evaluation of library construction protocols, input materials and other experimental parameters. The modularity of the software enables pipeline integration and the routine monitoring of key measures of data quality such as the number of alignable reads, duplication rates and rRNA contamination. RNA-SeQC allows investigators to make informed decisions about sample inclusion in downstream analysis. In summary, RNA-SeQC provides quality control measures critical to experiment design, process optimization and downstream computational analysis. See www.genepattern.org to run online, or www.broadinstitute.org/rna-seqc/ for a command line tool.

  1. Regulation of ARE-mRNA Stability by Cellular Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Lykke-Andersen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    but as a response to different cellular cues they can become either stabilized, allowing expression of a given gene, or further destabilized to silence their expression. These tightly regulated mRNAs include many that encode growth factors, proto-oncogenes, cytokines, and cell cycle regulators. Failure to properly...

  2. Cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase disrupts the intracellular splicing machinery by entering the nucleus and interfering with Prp8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chin Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary role of cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is viral genome replication in the cellular cytoplasm. However, picornaviral RdRp denoted 3D polymerase (3D(pol also enters the host nucleus, where its function remains unclear. In this study, we describe a novel mechanism of viral attack in which 3D(pol enters the nucleus through the nuclear localization signal (NLS and targets the pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8 to block pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA synthesis. The fingers domain of 3D(pol associates with the C-terminal region of Prp8, which contains the Jab1/MPN domain, and interferes in the second catalytic step, resulting in the accumulation of the lariat form of the splicing intermediate. Endogenous pre-mRNAs trapped by the Prp8-3D(pol complex in enterovirus-infected cells were identified and classed into groups associated with cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Our results suggest that picornaviral RdRp disrupts pre-mRNA splicing processes, that differs from viral protease shutting off cellular transcription and translation which contributes to the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  3. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujarski, Jozef J

    2013-01-01

    RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+)-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings) along with non-replicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (1) How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (2) What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (3) Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (4) Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (5) What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  4. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Julian Bujarski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings along with nonreplicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (i How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (ii What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (iii Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (iv Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (v What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  5. Stochastic fluctuations and distributed control of gene expression impact cellular memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Corre

    Full Text Available Despite the stochastic noise that characterizes all cellular processes the cells are able to maintain and transmit to their daughter cells the stable level of gene expression. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we investigated the temporal dynamics of gene expression variation using a double reporter gene model. We compared cell clones with transgenes coding for highly stable mRNA and fluorescent proteins with clones expressing destabilized mRNA-s and proteins. Both types of clones displayed strong heterogeneity of reporter gene expression levels. However, cells expressing stable gene products produced daughter cells with similar level of reporter proteins, while in cell clones with short mRNA and protein half-lives the epigenetic memory of the gene expression level was completely suppressed. Computer simulations also confirmed the role of mRNA and protein stability in the conservation of constant gene expression levels over several cell generations. These data indicate that the conservation of a stable phenotype in a cellular lineage may largely depend on the slow turnover of mRNA-s and proteins.

  6. Theranostic Niosomes for Efficient siRNA/microRNA Delivery and Activatable Near-Infrared Fluorescent Tracking of Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Chuanxu; Shan, Gao; Song, Ping

    2018-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated gene regulation in stem cells offers great potential in regenerative medicine. In this study, we developed a theranostic platform for efficient delivery of small RNAs (siRNA/miRNA) to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to promote differentiation, and meanwhile...... OFF/ON activatable fluorescence upon cellular internalization, resulting in efficient NIR labeling and the capability to dynamically monitor stem cells in mice. In addition, iSPN/siRNA achieved simultaneous long-term cell tracking and in vivo gene silencing after implantation in mice. These results...

  7. Serum microRNA signatures as "liquid biopsies" for interrogating hepatotoxic mechanisms and liver pathogenesis in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauskopf, Julian; de Kok, Theo M; Schomaker, Shelli J; Gosink, Mark; Burt, Deborah A; Chandler, Patricia; Warner, Roscoe L; Johnson, Kent J; Caiment, Florian; Kleinjans, Jos C; Aubrecht, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) released into the peripheral circulation upon cellular injury have shown a promise as a new class of tissue-specific biomarkers. We were first to demonstrate that next-generation sequencing analysis of serum from human subjects with acetaminophen-induced liver injury revealed a specific signature of circulating miRNAs. We consequently hypothesized that different types of hepatic liver impairments might feature distinct signatures of circulating miRNAs and that this approach might be useful as minimally invasive diagnostic "liquid biopsies" enabling the interrogation of underlying molecular mechanisms of injury in distant tissues. Therefore we examined serum circulating miRNAs in a total of 72 serum samples from a group of 53 subjects that included patients with accidental acetaminophen overdose, hepatitis B infection, liver cirrhosis and type 2 diabetes as well as gender- and age-matched healthy subjects with no evidence of liver disease. The miRNA signatures were identified using next-generation sequencing that provided analysis for the whole miRNome, including miRNA isoforms. Compared to the healthy subjects, a total of 179 miRNAs showed altered serum levels across the diseased subjects. Although many subjects have elevated alanine aminotransferase suggesting liver impairments, we identified distinct miRNA signatures for different impairments with minimum overlap. Furthermore, the bioinformatics analysis of miRNA signatures revealed relevant molecular pathways associated with the mechanisms of toxicity and or pathogenesis of disease. Interestingly, the high proportion of miRNA isoforms present in the respective signatures indicated a new level of complexity in cellular response to stress or disease. Our study demonstrates for the first time that signatures of circulating miRNAs show specificity for liver injury phenotypes and, once validated, might become useful for diagnosis of organ pathologies as "liquid biopsies".

  8. Serum microRNA signatures as "liquid biopsies" for interrogating hepatotoxic mechanisms and liver pathogenesis in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Krauskopf

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs released into the peripheral circulation upon cellular injury have shown a promise as a new class of tissue-specific biomarkers. We were first to demonstrate that next-generation sequencing analysis of serum from human subjects with acetaminophen-induced liver injury revealed a specific signature of circulating miRNAs. We consequently hypothesized that different types of hepatic liver impairments might feature distinct signatures of circulating miRNAs and that this approach might be useful as minimally invasive diagnostic "liquid biopsies" enabling the interrogation of underlying molecular mechanisms of injury in distant tissues. Therefore we examined serum circulating miRNAs in a total of 72 serum samples from a group of 53 subjects that included patients with accidental acetaminophen overdose, hepatitis B infection, liver cirrhosis and type 2 diabetes as well as gender- and age-matched healthy subjects with no evidence of liver disease. The miRNA signatures were identified using next-generation sequencing that provided analysis for the whole miRNome, including miRNA isoforms. Compared to the healthy subjects, a total of 179 miRNAs showed altered serum levels across the diseased subjects. Although many subjects have elevated alanine aminotransferase suggesting liver impairments, we identified distinct miRNA signatures for different impairments with minimum overlap. Furthermore, the bioinformatics analysis of miRNA signatures revealed relevant molecular pathways associated with the mechanisms of toxicity and or pathogenesis of disease. Interestingly, the high proportion of miRNA isoforms present in the respective signatures indicated a new level of complexity in cellular response to stress or disease. Our study demonstrates for the first time that signatures of circulating miRNAs show specificity for liver injury phenotypes and, once validated, might become useful for diagnosis of organ pathologies as "liquid biopsies".

  9. Translation of a nonpolyadenylated viral RNA is enhanced by binding of viral coat protein or polyadenylation of the RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeleman, L; Olsthoorn, R C; Linthorst, H J; Bol, J F

    2001-12-04

    On entering a host cell, positive-strand RNA virus genomes have to serve as messenger for the translation of viral proteins. Efficient translation of cellular messengers requires interactions between initiation factors bound to the 5'-cap structure and the poly(A) binding protein bound to the 3'-poly(A) tail. Initiation of infection with the tripartite RNA genomes of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and viruses from the genus Ilarvirus requires binding of a few molecules of coat protein (CP) to the 3' end of the nonpolyadenylated viral RNAs. Moreover, infection with the genomic RNAs can be initiated by addition of the subgenomic messenger for CP, RNA 4. We report here that extension of the AMV RNAs with a poly(A) tail of 40 to 80 A-residues permitted initiation of infection independently of CP or RNA 4 in the inoculum. Specifically, polyadenylation of RNA 1 relieved an apparent bottleneck in the translation of the viral RNAs. Translation of RNA 4 in plant protoplasts was autocatalytically stimulated by its encoded CP. Mutations that interfered with CP binding to the 3' end of viral RNAs reduced translation of RNA 4 to undetectable levels. Possibly, CP of AMV and ilarviruses stimulates translation of viral RNAs by acting as a functional analogue of poly(A) binding protein or other cellular proteins.

  10. Protein-driven inference of miRNA-disease associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Søren; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Palleja, Albert

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly abundant class of non-coding RNA genes involved in cellular regulation and thus also diseases. Despite miRNAs being important disease factors, miRNA-disease associations remain low in number and of variable reliability. Furthermore, existing databases and prediction...

  11. Advances in RNA Structure Determination | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent years have witnessed a revolution in the field of RNA structure and function. Until recently the main contribution of RNA in cellular and disease functions was considered to be a role defined by the central dogma, namely DNA codes for mRNAs, which in turn encode for proteins, a notion facilitated by non-coding ribosomal RNA and tRNA. It was also assumed at the time

  12. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based...... on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...

  13. The Persistent Contributions of RNA to Eukaryotic Gen(om)e Architecture and Cellular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the best scenario for earliest forms of life is based on RNA molecules as they have the proven ability to catalyze enzymatic reactions and harbor genetic information. Evolutionary principles valid today become apparent in such models already. Furthermore, many features of eukaryotic genome architecture might have their origins in an RNA or RNA/protein (RNP) world, including the onset of a further transition, when DNA replaced RNA as the genetic bookkeeper of the cell. Chromosome maintenance, splicing, and regulatory function via RNA may be deeply rooted in the RNA/RNP worlds. Mostly in eukaryotes, conversion from RNA to DNA is still ongoing, which greatly impacts the plasticity of extant genomes. Raw material for novel genes encoding protein or RNA, or parts of genes including regulatory elements that selection can act on, continues to enter the evolutionary lottery. PMID:25081515

  14. Using Electromagnetic Algorithm for Total Costs of Sub-contractor Optimization in the Cellular Manufacturing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahriari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a non-linear binary programing for optimizing a specific cost in cellular manufacturing system in a controlled production condition. The system parameters are determined by the continuous distribution functions. The aim of the presented model is to optimize the total cost of imposed sub-contractors to the manufacturing system by determining how to allocate the machines and parts to each seller. In this system, DM could control the occupation level of each machine in the system. For solving the presented model, we used the electromagnetic meta-heuristic algorithm and Taguchi method for determining the optimal algorithm parameters.

  15. Human cellular restriction factors that target HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent findings have highlighted roles played by innate cellular factors in restricting intracellular viral replication. In this review, we discuss in brief the activities of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G, bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2, cyclophilin A, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha (Trim5α, and cellular microRNAs as examples of host restriction factors that target HIV-1. We point to countermeasures encoded by HIV-1 for moderating the potency of these cellular restriction functions.

  16. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1-based human RNA quantification to enhance mRNA profiling in forensic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA analysis offers many potential applications in forensic science, and molecular identification of body fluids by analysis of cell-specific RNA markers represents a new technique for use in forensic cases. However, due to the nature of forensic materials that often admixed with nonhuman cellular components, human-specific RNA quantification is required for the forensic RNA assays. Quantification assay for human RNA has been developed in the present study with respect to body fluid samples in forensic biology. The quantitative assay is based on real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial RNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and capable of RNA quantification with high reproducibility and a wide dynamic range. The human RNA quantification improves the quality of mRNA profiling in the identification of body fluids of saliva and semen because the quantification assay can exclude the influence of nonhuman components and reduce the adverse affection from degraded RNA fragments.

  17. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication

  18. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  19. The small delta antigen of hepatitis delta virus is an acetylated protein and acetylation of lysine 72 may influence its cellular localization and viral RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, J.-J.; Tsay, Y.-G.; Juan, L.-J.; Fu, T.-F.; Huang, W.-H.; Chen, D.-S.; Chen, P.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that encodes two viral nucleocapsid proteins named small and large form hepatitis delta antigen (S-HDAg and L-HDAg). The S-HDAg is essential for viral RNA replication while the L-HDAg is required for viral assembly. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAg are acetylated proteins. Metabolic labeling with [ 3 H]acetate revealed that both forms of HDAg could be acetylated in vivo. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of cellular acetyltransferase p300 could acetylate the full-length and the N-terminal 88 amino acids of S-HDAg in vitro. By mass spectrometric analysis of the modified protein, Lys-72 of S-HDAg was identified as one of the acetylation sites. Substitution of Lys-72 to Arg caused the mutant S-HDAg to redistribute from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The mutant reduced viral RNA accumulation and resulted in the earlier appearance of L-HDAg. These results demonstrated that HDAg is an acetylated protein and mutation of HDAg at Lys-72 modulates HDAg subcellular localization and may participate in viral RNA nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and replication

  20. Polyethylenimine-based polyplex delivery of self-replicating RNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démoulins, Thomas; Milona, Panagiota; Englezou, Pavlos C; Ebensen, Thomas; Schulze, Kai; Suter, Rolf; Pichon, Chantal; Midoux, Patrick; Guzmán, Carlos A; Ruggli, Nicolas; McCullough, Kenneth C

    2016-04-01

    Self-amplifying replicon RNA (RepRNA) are large molecules (12-14 kb); their self-replication amplifies mRNA template numbers, affording several rounds of antigen production, effectively increasing vaccine antigen payloads. Their sensitivity to RNase-sensitivity and inefficient uptake by dendritic cells (DCs) - absolute requirements for vaccine design - were tackled by condensing RepRNA into synthetic, nanoparticulate, polyethylenimine (PEI)-polyplex delivery vehicles. Polyplex-delivery formulations for small RNA molecules cannot be transferred to RepRNA due to its greater size and complexity; the N:P charge ratio and impact of RepRNA folding would influence polyplex condensation, post-delivery decompaction and the cytosolic release essential for RepRNA translation. Polyplex-formulations proved successful for delivery of RepRNA encoding influenza virus hemagglutinin and nucleocapsid to DCs. Cytosolic translocation was facilitated, leading to RepRNA translation. This efficacy was confirmed in vivo, inducing both humoral and cellular immune responses. Accordingly, this paper describes the first PEI-polyplexes providing efficient delivery of the complex and large, self-amplifying RepRNA vaccines. The use of self-amplifying replicon RNA (RepRNA) to increase vaccine antigen payloads can potentially be useful in effective vaccine design. Nonetheless, its use is limited by the degradation during the uptake process. Here, the authors attempted to solve this problem by packaging RepRNA using polyethylenimine (PEI)-polyplex delivery vehicles. The efficacy was confirmed in vivo by the appropriate humoral and cellular immune responses. This novel delivery method may prove to be very useful for future vaccine design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  2. Pseudogenes regulate parental gene expression via ceRNA network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yang; Furber, Kendra L; Ji, Shaoping

    2017-01-01

    The concept of competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) was first proposed by Salmena and colleagues. Evidence suggests that pseudogene RNAs can act as a 'sponge' through competitive binding of common miRNA, releasing or attenuating repression through sequestering miRNAs away from parental mRNA. In theory, ceRNAs refer to all transcripts such as mRNA, tRNA, rRNA, long non-coding RNA, pseudogene RNA and circular RNA, because all of them may become the targets of miRNA depending on spatiotemporal situation. As binding of miRNA to the target RNA is not 100% complementary, it is possible that one miRNA can bind to multiple target RNAs and vice versa. All RNAs crosstalk through competitively binding to miRNAvia miRNA response elements (MREs) contained within the RNA sequences, thus forming a complex regulatory network. The ratio of a subset of miRNAs to the corresponding number of MREs determines repression strength on a given mRNA translation or stability. An increase in pseudogene RNA level can sequester miRNA and release repression on the parental gene, leading to an increase in parental gene expression. A massive number of transcripts constitute a complicated network that regulates each other through this proposed mechanism, though some regulatory significance may be mild or even undetectable. It is possible that the regulation of gene and pseudogene expression occurring in this manor involves all RNAs bearing common MREs. In this review, we will primarily discuss how pseudogene transcripts regulate expression of parental genes via ceRNA network and biological significance of regulation. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Distinct temporal changes in host cell lncRNA expression during the course of an adenovirus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hongxing, E-mail: Hongxing.Zhao@igp.uu.se [The Beijer Laboratory, Dept. of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden); Chen, Maoshan [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Lind, Sara Bergström [Department of Chemistry-BMC, Analytical Chemistry, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 599, SE-751 24 Uppsala (Sweden); Pettersson, Ulf [The Beijer Laboratory, Dept. of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, S-751 85 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    The deregulation of cellular long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression during a human adenovirus infection was studied by deep sequencing. Expression of lncRNAs increased substantially following the progression of the infection. Among 645 significantly expressed lncRNAs, the expression of 398 was changed more than 2-fold. More than 80% of them were up-regulated and 80% of them were detected during the late phase. Based on the genomic locations of the deregulated lncRNAs in relation to known mRNAs and miRNAs, they were predicted to be involved in growth, structure, apoptosis and wound healing in the early phase, cell proliferation in the intermediate phase and protein synthesis, modification and transport in the late phase. The most significant functions of cellular RNA-binding proteins, previously shown to interact with the deregulated lncRNAs identified here, are involved in RNA splicing, nuclear export and translation events. We hypothesize that adenoviruses exploit the lncRNA network to optimize their reproduction. - Highlights: • The expression of 398 lncRNAs showed a distinct temporal pattern during Ad2 infection. • 80% of the deregulated lncRNAs were up-regulated during the late phase of infection. • The deregulated lncRNAs potentiallyinteract with 33 cellular RNA binding proteins. • These RBPs are involved in RNA splicing, nuclear export and translation. • Adenovirus exploits the cellular lncRNA network to optimize its replication.

  4. RNA FISH for detecting expanded repeats in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2016-04-01

    RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a widely used technique for detecting transcripts in fixed cells and tissues. Many variants of RNA FISH have been proposed to increase signal strength, resolution and target specificity. The current variants of this technique facilitate the detection of the subcellular localization of transcripts at a single molecule level. Among the applications of RNA FISH are studies on nuclear RNA foci in diseases resulting from the expansion of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats present in different single genes. The partial or complete retention of mutant transcripts forming RNA aggregates within the nucleoplasm has been shown in multiple cellular disease models and in the tissues of patients affected with these atypical mutations. Relevant diseases include, among others, myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) with CUG repeats, Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) with CAG repeats, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) with CGG repeats, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) with CCUG repeats, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) with GGGGCC repeats and spinocerebellar ataxia type 32 (SCA32) with GGCCUG. In this article, we summarize the results obtained with FISH to examine RNA nuclear inclusions. We provide a detailed protocol for detecting RNAs containing expanded CAG and CUG repeats in different cellular models, including fibroblasts, lymphoblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells and murine and human neuronal progenitors. We also present the results of the first single-molecule FISH application in a cellular model of polyglutamine disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary induction of vitellogenin mRNA in the rooster by 17beta-estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A T; Deeley, R G; Gordon, J I; Udell, D S; Mullinix, K P; Goldberger, R F

    1978-01-01

    We have studied the kinetics of vitellogenin mRNA accumulation in rooster liver after a primary injection of 17beta-estradiol. The levels of vitellogenin mRNA have been determined both by hybridization of total cellular RNA to vitellogenin cDNA and by translation of vitellogenin mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system. The results obtained by both methods of analysis are in good agreement and indicate that vitellogenin mRNA is present in the liver of normal roosters at a level of 0-5 molecules per liver cell and increases in amount during the 3 days following injection of estrogen, reaching a level of almost 6000 molecules per cell at the peak of the response. The level of vitellogenin mRNA declined exponentially during the next 14 days with a half-life of 29 hr, reaching a level of less than 10 molecules per cell at 17 days after injection of the hormone. The levels of vitellogenin mRNA after stimulation with estrogen have been correlated with the in vivo rate of synthesis of the vitellogenin polypeptide. The results indicate that the rate of vitellogenin synthesis is closely correlated with the level of vitellogenin mRNA. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that vitellogenin mRNA does not exist in the liver in an untranslated form after withdrawal from estrogen. PMID:273910

  6. Tipping the balance of RNA stability by 3' editing of the transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Christina Z; Seidl, Lauren E; Mann, Mitchell R; Heinemann, Ilka U

    2017-11-01

    The regulation of active microRNAs (miRNAs) and maturation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that are competent for translation is a crucial point in the control of all cellular processes, with established roles in development and differentiation. Terminal nucleotidyltransferases (TNTases) are potent regulators of RNA metabolism. TNTases promote the addition of single or multiple nucleotides to an RNA transcript that can rapidly alter transcript stability. The well-known polyadenylation promotes transcript stability while the newly discovered but ubiquitious 3'-end polyuridylation marks RNA for degradation. Monoadenylation and uridylation are essential control mechanisms balancing mRNA and miRNA homeostasis. This review discusses the multiple functions of non-canonical TNTases, focusing on their substrate range, biological functions, and evolution. TNTases directly control mRNA and miRNA levels, with diverse roles in transcriptome stabilization, maturation, silencing, or degradation. We will summarize the current state of knowledge on non-canonical nucleotidyltransferases and their function in regulating miRNA and mRNA metabolism. We will review the discovery of uridylation as an RNA degradation pathway and discuss the evolution of nucleotidyltransferases along with their use in RNA labeling and future applications as therapeutic targets. The biochemically and evolutionarily highly related adenylyl- and uridylyltransferases play antagonizing roles in the cell. In general, RNA adenylation promotes stability, while uridylation marks RNA for degradation. Uridylyltransferases evolved from adenylyltransferases in multiple independent evolutionary events by the insertion of a histidine residue into the active site, altering nucleotide, but not RNA specificity. Understanding the mechanisms regulating RNA stability in the cell and controlling the transcriptome is essential for efforts aiming to influence cellular fate. Selectively enhancing or reducing RNA stability allows for

  7. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Lydia J R; Brockington, Samuel F; Murphy, Alex M; Pate, Adrienne E; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P

    2016-03-16

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7.

  8. Discovering cancer vulnerabilities using high-throughput micro-RNA screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Iva; Elsworth, Benjamin; Dodson, Eoin; Wu, Sunny Z; Gould, Cathryn M; Mestdagh, Pieter; Marshall, Glenn M; Horvath, Lisa G; Simpson, Kaylene J; Swarbrick, Alexander

    2017-12-15

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are potent regulators of gene expression and cellular phenotype. Each miRNA has the potential to target hundreds of transcripts within the cell thus controlling fundamental cellular processes such as survival and proliferation. Here, we exploit this important feature of miRNA networks to discover vulnerabilities in cancer phenotype, and map miRNA-target relationships across different cancer types. More specifically, we report the results of a functional genomics screen of 1280 miRNA mimics and inhibitors in eight cancer cell lines, and its presentation in a sophisticated interactive data portal. This resource represents the most comprehensive survey of miRNA function in oncology, incorporating breast cancer, prostate cancer and neuroblastoma. A user-friendly web portal couples this experimental data with multiple tools for miRNA target prediction, pathway enrichment analysis and visualization. In addition, the database integrates publicly available gene expression and perturbation data enabling tailored and context-specific analysis of miRNA function in a particular disease. As a proof-of-principle, we use the database and its innovative features to uncover novel determinants of the neuroblastoma malignant phenotype. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Structural basis of RNA folding and recognition in an AMP-RNA aptamer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F; Kumar, R A; Jones, R A; Patel, D J

    1996-07-11

    The catalytic properties of RNA and its well known role in gene expression and regulation are the consequence of its unique solution structures. Identification of the structural determinants of ligand recognition by RNA molecules is of fundamental importance for understanding the biological functions of RNA, as well as for the rational design of RNA Sequences with specific catalytic activities. Towards this latter end, Szostak et al. used in vitro selection techniques to isolate RNA sequences ('aptamers') containing a high-affinity binding site for ATP, the universal currency of cellular energy, and then used this motif to engineer ribozymes with polynucleotide kinase activity. Here we present the solution structure, as determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations, of both uniformly and specifically 13C-, 15N-labelled 40-mer RNA containing the ATP-binding motif complexed with AMP. The aptamer adopts an L-shaped structure with two nearly orthogonal stems, each capped proximally by a G x G mismatch pair, binding the AMP ligand at their junction in a GNRA-like motif.

  10. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-ling [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang (China); Liu, Xinguang, E-mail: xgliu64@126.com [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang (China)

    2016-05-13

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. -- Highlights: •MicroRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEF cells. •Altered expression of microRNA-33 exerted a critical role in MEFs senescence. •MicroRNA-33 promoted the replicative senescence of MEFs via targeting of CDK6.

  11. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-ling; Liu, Xinguang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. -- Highlights: •MicroRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEF cells. •Altered expression of microRNA-33 exerted a critical role in MEFs senescence. •MicroRNA-33 promoted the replicative senescence of MEFs via targeting of CDK6.

  12. Ribogenomics: the Science and Knowledge of RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayan Wu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ribonucleic acid (RNA deserves not only a dedicated field of biological research — a discipline or branch of knowledge — but also explicit definitions of its roles in cellular processes and molecular mechanisms. Ribogenomics is to study the biology of cellular RNAs, including their origin, biogenesis, structure and function. On the informational track, messenger RNAs (mRNAs are the major component of ribogenomes, which encode proteins and serve as one of the four major components of the translation machinery and whose expression is regulated at multiple levels by other operational RNAs. On the operational track, there are several diverse types of RNAs — their length distribution is perhaps the most simplistic stratification — involving in major cellular activities, such as chromosomal structure and organization, DNA replication and repair, transcriptional/post-transcriptional regulation, RNA processing and routing, translation and cellular energy/metabolism regulation. An all-out effort exceeding the magnitude of the Human Genome Project is of essence to construct just mammalian transcriptomes in multiple contexts including embryonic development, circadian and seasonal rhythms, defined life-span stages, pathological conditions and anatomy-driven tissue/organ/cell types.

  13. ARMOUR - A Rice miRNA: mRNA Interaction Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Tripathi, Anita; Goswami, Kavita; Shukla, Rohit N; Vasudevan, Madavan; Goswami, Hitesh

    2018-01-01

    ARMOUR was developed as A Rice miRNA:mRNA interaction resource. This informative and interactive database includes the experimentally validated expression profiles of miRNAs under different developmental and abiotic stress conditions across seven Indian rice cultivars. This comprehensive database covers 689 known and 1664 predicted novel miRNAs and their expression profiles in more than 38 different tissues or conditions along with their predicted/known target transcripts. The understanding of miRNA:mRNA interactome in regulation of functional cellular machinery is supported by the sequence information of the mature and hairpin structures. ARMOUR provides flexibility to users in querying the database using multiple ways like known gene identifiers, gene ontology identifiers, KEGG identifiers and also allows on the fly fold change analysis and sequence search query with inbuilt BLAST algorithm. ARMOUR database provides a cohesive platform for novel and mature miRNAs and their expression in different experimental conditions and allows searching for their interacting mRNA targets, GO annotation and their involvement in various biological pathways. The ARMOUR database includes a provision for adding more experimental data from users, with an aim to develop it as a platform for sharing and comparing experimental data contributed by research groups working on rice.

  14. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  15. Oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in psychological stress states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    age-related somatic disorders. The overall aim of the PhD project was to investigate the relation between psychopathology, psychological stress, stress hormone secretion and oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, as measured by the urinary excretion of markers of whole-body DNA/RNA oxidation (8...... between the 24 h urinary cortisol excretion and the excretion of 8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo, determined in the same samples. Collectively, the studies could not confirm an association between psychological stress and oxidative stress on nucleic acids. Systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage was increased......Both non-pathological psychological stress states and mental disorders are associated with molecular, cellular and epidemiological signs of accelerated aging. Oxidative stress on nucleic acids is a critical component of cellular and organismal aging, and a suggested pathogenic mechanism in several...

  16. RNA as a small molecule druggable target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Smith, Graham F

    2017-12-01

    Small molecule drugs have readily been developed against many proteins in the human proteome, but RNA has remained an elusive target for drug discovery. Increasingly, we see that RNA, and to a lesser extent DNA elements, show a persistent tertiary structure responsible for many diverse and complex cellular functions. In this digest, we have summarized recent advances in screening approaches for RNA targets and outlined the discovery of novel, drug-like small molecules against RNA targets from various classes and therapeutic areas. The link of structure, function, and small-molecule Druggability validates now for the first time that RNA can be the targets of therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Downregulation of rRNA transcription triggers cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Responding to various stimuli is indispensable for the maintenance of homeostasis. The downregulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA transcription is one of the mechanisms involved in the response to stimuli by various cellular processes, such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell differentiation is caused by intra- and extracellular stimuli and is associated with the downregulation of rRNA transcription as well as reduced cell growth. The downregulation of rRNA transcription during differentiation is considered to contribute to reduced cell growth. However, the downregulation of rRNA transcription can induce various cellular processes; therefore, it may positively regulate cell differentiation. To test this possibility, we specifically downregulated rRNA transcription using actinomycin D or a siRNA for Pol I-specific transcription factor IA (TIF-IA in HL-60 and THP-1 cells, both of which have differentiation potential. The inhibition of rRNA transcription induced cell differentiation in both cell lines, which was demonstrated by the expression of the common differentiation marker CD11b. Furthermore, TIF-IA knockdown in an ex vivo culture of mouse hematopoietic stem cells increased the percentage of myeloid cells and reduced the percentage of immature cells. We also evaluated whether differentiation was induced via the inhibition of cell cycle progression because rRNA transcription is tightly coupled to cell growth. We found that cell cycle arrest without affecting rRNA transcription did not induce differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, our results demonstrate the first time that the downregulation of rRNA levels could be a trigger for the induction of differentiation in mammalian cells. Furthermore, this phenomenon was not simply a reflection of cell cycle arrest. Our results provide a novel insight into the relationship between rRNA transcription and cell differentiation.

  18. Molecular Beacon-Based MicroRNA Imaging During Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescence monitoring system for examining endogenous microRNA (miRNA) activity in cellular level provides crucial information on not only understanding a critical role of miRNA involving a variety of biological processes, but also evaluating miRNA expression patterns in a noninvasive manner. In this protocol, we report the details of a new procedure for a molecular beacon-based miRNA monitoring system, which includes the illustration scheme for miRNA detection strategy, exogenous miRNA detection, and measurement of endogenous miRNA expression level during neurogenesis. The fluorescence signal of miR-124a beacon quenched by BHQ2 was gradually recovered as increasing concentration of the miR-124a in tube. The functional work of miR-124a beacon was examined in intracellular environment, allowing for the internalization of the miR-124a beacon by lipofectamine, which resulted in activated fluorescent signals of the miR-124a beacon in the HeLa cells after the addition of synthetic miR-124a. The endogenous miR-124a expression level was detected by miR-124a beacon system during neurogenesis, showing brighter fluorescence intensity in cytoplasmic area of P19 cells after induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. The molecular beacon based-miRNA detection technique could be applicable to the simultaneous visualization of a variety of miRNA expression patterns using different fluorescence dyes. For the study of examining endogenous miRNA expression level using miRNA-beacon system, if cellular differentiation step is already prepared, transfection step of miR-124a beacon into P19 cells, and acquisition of activated fluorescence signal measured by confocal microscope can be conducted approximately within 6 h.

  19. siRNA and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Marjorie; Judge, Adam; MacLachlan, Ian

    2009-06-01

    Canonical small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes are potent activators of the mammalian innate immune system. The induction of innate immunity by siRNA is dependent on siRNA structure and sequence, method of delivery, and cell type. Synthetic siRNA in delivery vehicles that facilitate cellular uptake can induce high levels of inflammatory cytokines and interferons after systemic administration in mammals and in primary human blood cell cultures. This activation is predominantly mediated by immune cells, normally via a Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway. The siRNA sequence dependency of these pathways varies with the type and location of the TLR involved. Alternatively nonimmune cell activation may also occur, typically resulting from siRNA interaction with cytoplasmic RNA sensors such as RIG1. As immune activation by siRNA-based drugs represents an undesirable side effect due to the considerable toxicities associated with excessive cytokine release in humans, understanding and abrogating this activity will be a critical component in the development of safe and effective therapeutics. This review describes the intracellular mechanisms of innate immune activation by siRNA, the design of appropriate sequences and chemical modification approaches, and suitable experimental methods for studying their effects, with a view toward reducing siRNA-mediated off-target effects.

  20. Matrix proteins as centralized organizers of negative-sense RNA virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeroos, Lassi; Butcher, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    Matrix proteins are essential components of most negative-sense RNA, enveloped viruses. They serve a wide range of duties ranging from self-driven membrane budding and coordination of other viral components to modulation of viral transcription. The functional similarity between these proteins is striking, despite major differences in their structures. Whereas biochemical and structural studies have partly been hindered by the inherent aggregation properties of these proteins, their cellular functions are beginning to be understood. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on negative-sense RNA virus matrix proteins and their interactions with other viral and cellular proteins. We also discuss the similarities and differences in matrix protein functions between the different families within the negative-sense RNA viruses.

  1. The RNA helicase DDX1 is involved in restricted HIV-1 Rev function in human astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Jianhua; Acheampong, Edward; Dave, Rajnish; Wang Fengxiang; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Pomerantz, Roger J.

    2005-01-01

    Productive infection by human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS) involves mainly macrophages and microglial cells. A frequency of less than 10% of human astrocytes is estimated to be infectable with HIV-1. Nonetheless, this relatively low percentage of infected astrocytes, but associated with a large total number of astrocytic cells in the CNS, makes human astrocytes a critical part in the analyses of potential HIV-1 reservoirs in vivo. Investigations in astrocytic cell lines and primary human fetal astrocytes revealed that limited HIV-1 replication in these cells resulted from low-level viral entry, transcription, viral protein processing, and virion maturation. Of note, a low ratio of unspliced versus spliced HIV-1-specific RNA was also investigated, as Rev appeared to act aberrantly in astrocytes, via loss of nuclear and/or nucleolar localization and diminished Rev-mediated function. Host cellular machinery enabling Rev function has become critical for elucidation of diminished Rev activity, especially for those factors leading to RNA metabolism. We have recently identified a DEAD-box protein, DDX1, as a Rev cellular co-factor and now have explored its potential importance in astrocytes. Cells were infected with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoproteins of amphotropic murine leukemia viruses (MLV). Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) for unspliced, singly-spliced, and multiply-spliced RNA clearly showed a lower ratio of unspliced/singly-spliced over multiply-spliced HIV-1-specific RNA in human astrocytes as compared to Rev-permissive, non-glial control cells. As well, the cellular localization of Rev in astrocytes was cytoplasmically dominant as compared to that of Rev-permissive, non-glial controls. This endogenous level of DDX1 expression in astrocytes was demonstrated directly to lead to a shift of Rev sub-cellular distribution dominance from nuclear and/or nucleolar to

  2. A Comprehensive tRNA Deletion Library Unravels the Genetic Architecture of the tRNA Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Navon, Sivan; Gingold, Hila; Towers, Ruth; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Dahan, Orna

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the architecture of the tRNA pool is a prime challenge in translation research, as tRNAs govern the efficiency and accuracy of the process. Towards this challenge, we created a systematic tRNA deletion library in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aimed at dissecting the specific contribution of each tRNA gene to the tRNA pool and to the cell's fitness. By harnessing this resource, we observed that the majority of tRNA deletions show no appreciable phenotype in rich medium, yet under more challenging conditions, additional phenotypes were observed. Robustness to tRNA gene deletion was often facilitated through extensive backup compensation within and between tRNA families. Interestingly, we found that within tRNA families, genes carrying identical anti-codons can contribute differently to the cellular fitness, suggesting the importance of the genomic surrounding to tRNA expression. Characterization of the transcriptome response to deletions of tRNA genes exposed two disparate patterns: in single-copy families, deletions elicited a stress response; in deletions of genes from multi-copy families, expression of the translation machinery increased. Our results uncover the complex architecture of the tRNA pool and pave the way towards complete understanding of their role in cell physiology. PMID:24453985

  3. Viral unmasking of cellular 5S rRNA pseudogene transcripts induces RIG-I-mediated immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jessica J; Sparrer, Konstantin M J; van Gent, Michiel; Lässig, Charlotte; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Gack, Michaela U

    2018-01-01

    The sensor RIG-I detects double-stranded RNA derived from RNA viruses. Although RIG-I is also known to have a role in the antiviral response to DNA viruses, physiological RNA species recognized by RIG-I during infection with a DNA virus are largely unknown. Using next-generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq), we found that host-derived RNAs, most prominently 5S ribosomal RNA pseudogene 141 (RNA5SP141), bound to RIG-I during infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Infection with HSV-1 induced relocalization of RNA5SP141 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and virus-induced shutoff of host protein synthesis downregulated the abundance of RNA5SP141-interacting proteins, which allowed RNA5SP141 to bind RIG-I and induce the expression of type I interferons. Silencing of RNA5SP141 strongly dampened the antiviral response to HSV-1 and the related virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), as well as influenza A virus (IAV). Our findings reveal that antiviral immunity can be triggered by host RNAs that are unshielded following depletion of their respective binding proteins by the virus.

  4. A glimpse at mRNA dynamics reveals cellular domains and rapid trafficking through granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, Alice Myriam Christi van

    2011-01-01

    mRNA transport and targeting are essential to gene expression regulation. Specific mRNA sequences can bind several proteins and together form RiboNucleoProtein particles (RNP). The various proteins within the RNP determine mRNA fate: translation, transport or decay. RNP composition varies with

  5. Establishment of the total RNA extraction system for lily bulbs with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... The brightness of. CTAB was higher than that of SDS, which indicated that only improved CTAB method can extract biologically active. RNA from lily bulbs. DISCUSSION. The presence of RNase, which can be classified into endogenous and exogenous, is the major cause for the failure of RNA extraction.

  6. Retroviral Gag protein-RNA interactions: Implications for specific genomic RNA packaging and virion assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik D; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2018-03-31

    Retroviral Gag proteins are responsible for coordinating many aspects of virion assembly. Gag possesses two distinct nucleic acid binding domains, matrix (MA) and nucleocapsid (NC). One of the critical functions of Gag is to specifically recognize, bind, and package the retroviral genomic RNA (gRNA) into assembling virions. Gag interactions with cellular RNAs have also been shown to regulate aspects of assembly. Recent results have shed light on the role of MA and NC domain interactions with nucleic acids, and how they jointly function to ensure packaging of the retroviral gRNA. Here, we will review the literature regarding RNA interactions with NC, MA, as well as overall mechanisms employed by Gag to interact with RNA. The discussion focuses on human immunodeficiency virus type-1, but other retroviruses will also be discussed. A model is presented combining all of the available data summarizing the various factors and layers of selection Gag employs to ensure specific gRNA packaging and correct virion assembly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of human histone gene expression: transcriptional and posttranscriptional control in the coupling of histone messenger RNA stability with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, L.L.; Stein, G.S.; Stein, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The extent to which transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation contributes to the coupling of histone gene expression and DNA replication was examined during the cell cycle in synchronized HeLa S3 cells. Rates of transcription were determined in vitro in isolated nuclei. A 3-5-fold increase in cell cycle dependent histone gene transcription was observed in early S phase, prior to the peak of DNA synthesis. This result is consistent with a previous determination of histone mRNA synthesis in intact cells. The transcription of these genes did not change appreciably after inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea treatment, although Northern blot analysis indicated that cellular levels of histone mRNA decreased rapidly in the presence of the drug. Total cellular levels of histone mRNA closely parallel the rate of DNA synthesis as a function of cell cycle progression, reaching a maximal 20-fold increase as compared with non S phase levels. This DNA synthesis dependent accumulation of histone mRNA occurs predominantly in the cytoplasm and appears to be mediated primarily by control of histone mRNA stability. Changes in nuclear histone mRNA levels were less pronounced. These combined observations suggest that both transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional regulation contribute toward control of the cell cycle dependent accumulation of histone mRNA during S phase, while the stability of histone mRNA throughout S phase and the selective turnover of histone mRNAs, either at the natural termination of S phase or following inhibition of DNA synthesis, are posttranscriptionally regulated

  8. Approaches to Validate and Manipulate RNA Targets with Small Molecules in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    RNA has become an increasingly important target for therapeutic interventions and for chemical probes that dissect and manipulate its cellular function. Emerging targets include human RNAs that have been shown to directly cause cancer, metabolic disorders, and genetic disease. In this review, we describe various routes to obtain bioactive compounds that target RNA, with a particular emphasis on the development of small molecules. We use these cases to describe approaches that are being developed for target validation, which include target-directed cleavage, classic pull-down experiments, and covalent cross-linking. Thus, tools are available to design small molecules to target RNA and to identify the cellular RNAs that are their targets.

  9. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Adams, Matthew [BioScreening Technology Group, Biomedical Health Research Center, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); High, Alec S. [Department of Histopathology, Bexley Wing, St. James' s University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Johnson, Colin A., E-mail: c.johnson@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Robinson, Philip A. [Division of Clinical Sciences, Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, Level 8, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS9 7TF West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  10. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  11. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  12. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  13. ARMOUR – A Rice miRNA: mRNA Interaction Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeti Sanan-Mishra

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ARMOUR was developed as ARice miRNA:mRNA interaction resource. This informative and interactive database includes the experimentally validated expression profiles of miRNAs under different developmental and abiotic stress conditions across seven Indian rice cultivars. This comprehensive database covers 689 known and 1664 predicted novel miRNAs and their expression profiles in more than 38 different tissues or conditions along with their predicted/known target transcripts. The understanding of miRNA:mRNA interactome in regulation of functional cellular machinery is supported by the sequence information of the mature and hairpin structures. ARMOUR provides flexibility to users in querying the database using multiple ways like known gene identifiers, gene ontology identifiers, KEGG identifiers and also allows on the fly fold change analysis and sequence search query with inbuilt BLAST algorithm. ARMOUR database provides a cohesive platform for novel and mature miRNAs and their expression in different experimental conditions and allows searching for their interacting mRNA targets, GO annotation and their involvement in various biological pathways. The ARMOUR database includes a provision for adding more experimental data from users, with an aim to develop it as a platform for sharing and comparing experimental data contributed by research groups working on rice.

  14. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  15. Nucleolin Mediates MicroRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA Deadenylation but Increases Translation of CSF-1 mRNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Baker, Terri; Laszlo, Csaba; Chambers, Setsuko K.

    2013-01-01

    CSF-1 mRNA 3′UTR contains multiple unique motifs, including a common microRNA (miRNA) target in close proximity to a noncanonical G-quadruplex and AU-rich elements (AREs). Using a luciferase reporter system fused to CSF-1 mRNA 3′UTR, disruption of the miRNA target region, G-quadruplex, and AREs together dramatically increased reporter RNA levels, suggesting important roles for these cis-acting regulatory elements in the down-regulation of CSF-1 mRNA. We find that nucleolin, which binds both G-quadruplex and AREs, enhances deadenylation of CSF-1 mRNA, promoting CSF-1 mRNA decay, while having the capacity to increase translation of CSF-1 mRNA. Through interaction with the CSF-1 3′UTR miRNA common target, we find that miR-130a and miR-301a inhibit CSF-1 expression by enhancing mRNA decay. Silencing of nucleolin prevents the miRNA-directed mRNA decay, indicating a requirement for nucleolin in miRNA activity on CSF-1 mRNA. Downstream effects followed by miR-130a and miR-301a inhibition of directed cellular motility of ovarian cancer cells were found to be dependent on nucleolin. The paradoxical effects of nucleolin on miRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA deadenylation and on translational activation were explored further. The nucleolin protein contains four acidic stretches, four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), and nine RGG repeats. All three domains in nucleolin regulate CSF-1 mRNA and protein levels. RRMs increase CSF-1 mRNA, whereas the acidic and RGG domains decrease CSF-1 protein levels. This suggests that nucleolin has the capacity to differentially regulate both CSF-1 RNA and protein levels. Our finding that nucleolin interacts with Ago2 indirectly via RNA and with poly(A)-binding protein C (PABPC) directly suggests a nucleolin-Ago2-PABPC complex formation on mRNA. This complex is in keeping with our suggestion that nucleolin may work with PABPC as a double-edged sword on both mRNA deadenylation and translational activation. Our findings underscore the complexity of

  16. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...only allow entirely new investigations into the replication of these viruses, but also how this method can be applied to any virus with a known...localization, TurboFISH, hemorrhagic fever virus replication 1. Introduction RNA FISH was developed as a method to visualize cellular RNA by binding a

  17. Imaging of RNA in situ hybridization by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalle, W.H.J.; Macville, M.V.E.; van de Corput, M.P.C.; de Grooth, B.G.; Tanke, H.J.; Raap, A.K.

    In this study we investigated the possibility of imaging internal cellular molecules after cytochemical detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). To this end, rat 9G and HeLa cells were hybridized with haptenized probes for 28S ribosomal RNA, human elongation factor mRNA and cytomegalovirus

  18. Expression of calmodulin mRNA in rat olfactory neuroepithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffo, S; Goren, T; Khew-Goodall, Y S; Miara, J; Margolis, F L

    1991-04-01

    A calmodulin (CaM) cDNA was isolated by differential hybridization screening of a lambda gt10 library prepared from rat olfactory mucosa. This cDNA fragment, containing most of the open reading frame of the rat CaMI gene, was subcloned and used to characterize steady-state expression of CaM mRNA in rat olfactory neuroepithelium and bulb. Within the bulb mitral cells are the primary neuronal population expressing CaM mRNA. The major CaM mRNA expressed in the olfactory mucosa is 1.7 kb with smaller contributions from mRNAs of 4.0 and 1.4 kb. CaM mRNA was primarily associated with the olfactory neurons and, despite the cellular complexity of the tissue and the known involvement of CaM in diverse cellular processes, was only minimally evident in sustentacular cells, gland cells or respiratory epithelium. Following bulbectomy CaM mRNA declines in the olfactory neuroepithelium as does olfactory marker protein (OMP) mRNA. In contrast to the latter, CaM mRNA makes a partial recovery by one month after surgery. These results, coupled with those from in situ hybridization, indicate that CaM mRNA is expressed in both mature and immature olfactory neurons. The program regulating CaM gene expression in olfactory neurons is distinct from those controlling expression of B50/GAP43 in immature, or OMP in mature, neurons respectively.

  19. Correlation of mRNA Profiles, miRNA Profiles, and Functional Immune Response in Rainbow Trout (Oncorrhynkus Mykiss) Infected With Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and in Fish Vaccinated With a DNA Vaccine Against VHSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Jørgensen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    and are incorporated into the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC), which target specific mRNA sequences, causing either mRNA degradation or translation repression. This results in altered mRNA and protein profiles characteristic of a particular cellular phenotype or physiological state. By targeting immune relevant m...

  20. Extracellular and circulating redox- and metalloregulated eRNA and eRNP: copper ion-structured RNA cytokines (angiotropin ribokines) and bioaptamer targets imparting RNA chaperone and novel biofunctions to S100-EF-hand and disease-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissler, Josef H

    2004-06-01

    Bioassays for cellular differentiation and tissue morphogenesis were used to design methods for isolation of bioactive redox- and metalloregulated nucleic acids and copper ion complexes with proteins from extracellular, circulating, wound, and supernatant fluids of cultured cells. In extracellular biospheres, diversities of nucleic acids were found to be secreted by cells upon activation. They may reflect nucleic acid biolibraries with molecular imprints of cellular history. After removal of protein components, eRNA prototypes exuded by activated cells were sequenced. They are small, endogenous, highly modified and edited, redox- and metalloregulated 5'-end phosphorylated extracellular eRNA (approximately 2-200 bases) with cellular, enzymic, and bioaptamer functions. Fenton-type OH* radical redox reactions may form modified nucleotides in RNA as wobbles eRNA per se, or as copper ion-complex with protein (e.g., S100A12-EF-hand protein, angiotropin-related protein, calgranulin-C, hippocampal neurite differentiation factor) are shown to be bioactive in vivo and in vitro as cytokines (ribokines) and as nonmitogenic angiomorphogens for endothelial cell differentiation in the formation of organoid supracellular capillary structures. As bioaptamers, copper ion-structured eRNA imparts novel biofunctions to proteins that they do not have on their own. The origin of extracellular RNA and intermediate precursors (up to 500 bases) was traced to intracellular parent nucleic acids. Intermediate precursors with and without partial homology were found. This suggests that bioaptamers are not directly retranslatable gene products. Metalloregulated eRNA bioaptamer function was investigated by domains (e.g. 5'...CUG...3' hairpin loop) for folding, bioactivity, and binding of protein with copper, calcium, and alkali metal ion affinity. Vice versa, metalloregulated nucleic acid-binding domains (K3H, R3H) in proteins were identified. Interaction of protein and eRNA docking potentials

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of RNA synthesis by detection of bromouridine incorporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J K; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Larsen, J

    2001-01-01

    RNA synthesis has traditionally been investigated by a laborious and time-consuming radiographic method involving incorporation of tritiated uridine. Now a faster non-radioactive alternative has emerged, based on immunocytochemical detection. This method utilizes the brominated RNA precursor...... bromouridine, which is taken into a cell, phosphorylated, and incorporated into nascent RNA. The BrU-substituted RNA is detected by permeabilizing the cells and staining with certain anti-BrdU antibodies. This dynamic approach yields information complementing that provided by cellular RNA content analysis...

  2. Over-expression of the miRNA cluster at chromosome 14q32 in the alcoholic brain correlates with suppression of predicted target mRNA required for oligodendrocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzardo, A M; Gunewardena, S; Butler, M G

    2013-09-10

    We examined miRNA expression from RNA isolated from the frontal cortex (Broadman area 9) of 9 alcoholics (6 males, 3 females, mean age 48 years) and 9 matched controls using both the Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA 2.0 and Human Exon 1.0 ST Arrays to further characterize genetic influences in alcoholism and the effects of alcohol consumption on predicted target mRNA expression. A total of 12 human miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in alcohol dependent subjects (fold change≥1.5, false discovery rate (FDR)≤0.3; p<0.05) compared with controls including a cluster of 4 miRNAs (e.g., miR-377, miR-379) from the maternally expressed 14q32 chromosome region. The status of the up-regulated miRNAs was supported using the high-throughput method of exon microarrays showing decreased predicted mRNA gene target expression as anticipated from the same RNA aliquot. Predicted mRNA targets were involved in cellular adhesion (e.g., THBS2), tissue differentiation (e.g., CHN2), neuronal migration (e.g., NDE1), myelination (e.g., UGT8, CNP) and oligodendrocyte proliferation (e.g., ENPP2, SEMA4D1). Our data support an association of alcoholism with up-regulation of a cluster of miRNAs located in the genomic imprinted domain on chromosome 14q32 with their predicted gene targets involved with oligodendrocyte growth, differentiation and signaling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Macromolecular Biosynthesis on Cellular Autolysis in Streptococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayare, Mitchel; Daneo-Moore, Lolita; Shockman, Gerald D.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of several different antibiotics to growing cultures of Streptococcus faecalis, ATCC 9790, was found to inhibit autolysis of cells in sodium phosphate buffer. When added to exponential-phase cultures, mitomycin C (0.4 μg/ml) or phenethyl alcohol (3 mg/ml) inhibited deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, but did not appreciably affect the rate of cellular autolysis. Addition of chloramphenicol (10 μg/ml), tetracycline (0.5 μg/ml), puromycin (25 μg/ml), or 5-azacytidine (5 μg/ml) to exponential-phase cultures inhibited protein synthesis and profoundly decreased the rate of cellular autolysis. Actinomycin D (0.075 μg/ml) and rifampin (0.01 μg/ml), both inhibitors of ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis, also reduced the rate of cellular autolysis. However, the inhibitory effect of actinomycin D and rifampin on cellular autolysis was more closely correlated with their concomitant secondary inhibition of protein synthesis than with the more severe inhibition of RNA synthesis. The dose-dependent inhibition of protein synthesis by 5-azacytidine was quickly diluted out of a growing culture. Reversal of inhibition was accompanied by a disproportionately rapid increase in the ability of cells to autolyze. Thus, inhibition of the ability of cells to autolyze can be most closely related to inhibition of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the rapidity of the response of cellular autolysis to inhibitors of protein synthesis suggests that regulation is exerted at the level of autolytic enzyme activity and not enzyme synthesis. PMID:4116754

  4. Defining RNA-Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Luo, Yiling; Tran, Tuan; Haniff, Hafeez S; Nakai, Yoshio; Fallahi, Mohammad; Martinez, Gustavo J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-22

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif-small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule-RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  5. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes.

  6. Regulation of nucleolus assembly by non-coding RNA polymerase II transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Pankert, Teresa; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-05-03

    The nucleolus is a nuclear subcompartment for tightly regulated rRNA production and ribosome subunit biogenesis. It also acts as a cellular stress sensor and can release enriched factors in response to cellular stimuli. Accordingly, the content and structure of the nucleolus change dynamically, which is particularly evident during cell cycle progression: the nucleolus completely disassembles during mitosis and reassembles in interphase. Although the mechanisms that drive nucleolar (re)organization have been the subject of a number of studies, they are only partly understood. Recently, we identified Alu element-containing RNA polymerase II transcripts (aluRNAs) as important for nucleolar structure and rRNA synthesis. Integrating these findings with studies on the liquid droplet-like nature of the nucleolus leads us to propose a model on how RNA polymerase II transcripts could regulate the assembly of the nucleolus in response to external stimuli and during cell cycle progression.

  7. Ubiquitous expression of CUG or CAG trinucleotide repeat RNA causes common morphological defects in a Drosophila model of RNA-mediated pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kynan T Lawlor

    Full Text Available Expanded DNA repeat sequences are known to cause over 20 diseases, including Huntington's disease, several types of spinocerebellar ataxia and myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2. A shared genetic basis, and overlapping clinical features for some of these diseases, indicate that common pathways may contribute to pathology. Multiple mechanisms, mediated by both expanded homopolymeric proteins and expanded repeat RNA, have been identified by the use of model systems, that may account for shared pathology. The use of such animal models enables identification of distinct pathways and their 'molecular hallmarks' that can be used to determine the contribution of each pathway in human pathology. Here we characterise a tergite disruption phenotype in adult flies, caused by ubiquitous expression of either untranslated CUG or CAG expanded repeat RNA. Using the tergite phenotype as a quantitative trait we define a new genetic system in which to examine 'hairpin' repeat RNA-mediated cellular perturbation. Further experiments use this system to examine whether pathways involving Muscleblind sequestration or Dicer processing, which have been shown to mediate repeat RNA-mediated pathology in other model systems, contribute to cellular perturbation in this model.

  8. SimRNA: a coarse-grained method for RNA folding simulations and 3D structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniecki, Michal J; Lach, Grzegorz; Dawson, Wayne K; Tomala, Konrad; Lukasz, Pawel; Soltysinski, Tomasz; Rother, Kristian M; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-20

    RNA molecules play fundamental roles in cellular processes. Their function and interactions with other biomolecules are dependent on the ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is laborious and challenging, and therefore, the majority of known RNAs remain structurally uncharacterized. Here, we present SimRNA: a new method for computational RNA 3D structure prediction, which uses a coarse-grained representation, relies on the Monte Carlo method for sampling the conformational space, and employs a statistical potential to approximate the energy and identify conformations that correspond to biologically relevant structures. SimRNA can fold RNA molecules using only sequence information, and, on established test sequences, it recapitulates secondary structure with high accuracy, including correct prediction of pseudoknots. For modeling of complex 3D structures, it can use additional restraints, derived from experimental or computational analyses, including information about secondary structure and/or long-range contacts. SimRNA also can be used to analyze conformational landscapes and identify potential alternative structures. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Long noncoding RNA in hematopoiesis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpathy, Ansuman T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-05-19

    Dynamic gene expression during cellular differentiation is tightly coordinated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. An emerging theme is the central role of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the regulation of this specificity. Recent advances demonstrate that lncRNAs are expressed in a lineage-specific manner and control the development of several cell types in the hematopoietic system. Moreover, specific lncRNAs are induced to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. lncRNAs can function via RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA, and RNA-protein target interactions. As a result, they affect several stages of gene regulation, including chromatin modification, mRNA biogenesis, and protein signaling. We discuss recent advances, future prospects, and challenges in understanding the roles of lncRNAs in immunity and immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. How the RNA isolation method can affect microRNA microarray results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolska, Agnieszka; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Litman, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    RNA microarray analysis on porcine brain tissue. One method is a phenol-guanidine isothiocyanate-based procedure that permits isolation of total RNA. The second method, miRVana™ microRNA isolation, is column based and recovers the small RNA fraction alone. We found that microarray analyses give different results...... that depend on the RNA fraction used, in particular because some microRNAs appear very sensitive to the RNA isolation method. We conclude that precautions need to be taken when comparing microarray studies based on RNA isolated with different methods.......The quality of RNA is crucial in gene expression experiments. RNA degradation interferes in the measurement of gene expression, and in this context, microRNA quantification can lead to an incorrect estimation. In the present study, two different RNA isolation methods were used to perform micro...

  11. Conflict RNA modification, host-parasite co-evolution, and the origins of DNA and DNA-binding proteins1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Paul J; Keegan, Liam P

    2014-08-01

    Nearly 150 different enzymatically modified forms of the four canonical residues in RNA have been identified. For instance, enzymes of the ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) family convert adenosine residues into inosine in cellular dsRNAs. Recent findings show that DNA endonuclease V enzymes have undergone an evolutionary transition from cleaving 3' to deoxyinosine in DNA and ssDNA to cleaving 3' to inosine in dsRNA and ssRNA in humans. Recent work on dsRNA-binding domains of ADARs and other proteins also shows that a degree of sequence specificity is achieved by direct readout in the minor groove. However, the level of sequence specificity observed is much less than that of DNA major groove-binding helix-turn-helix proteins. We suggest that the evolution of DNA-binding proteins following the RNA to DNA genome transition represents the major advantage that DNA genomes have over RNA genomes. We propose that a hypothetical RNA modification, a RRAR (ribose reductase acting on genomic dsRNA) produced the first stretches of DNA in RNA genomes. We discuss why this is the most satisfactory explanation for the origin of DNA. The evolution of this RNA modification and later steps to DNA genomes are likely to have been driven by cellular genome co-evolution with viruses and intragenomic parasites. RNA modifications continue to be involved in host-virus conflicts; in vertebrates, edited cellular dsRNAs with inosine-uracil base pairs appear to be recognized as self RNA and to suppress activation of innate immune sensors that detect viral dsRNA.

  12. Short Hairpin RNA (shRNA): Design, Delivery, and Assessment of Gene Knockdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Chris B.; Guthrie, Elizabeth H.; Huang, Max Tze-Han; Taxman, Debra J.

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after the cellular mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi) was first described, scientists began using this powerful technique to study gene function. This included designing better methods for the successful delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) into mammalian cells. While the simplest method for RNAi is the cytosolic delivery of siRNA oligonucleotides, this technique is limited to cells capable of transfection and is primarily utilized during transient in vitro studies. The introduction of shRNA into mammalian cells through infection with viral vectors allows for stable integration of shRNA and long-term knockdown of the targeted gene; however, several challenges exist with the implementation of this technology. Here we describe some well-tested protocols which should increase the chances of successful design, delivery, and assessment of gene knockdown by shRNA. We provide suggestions for designing shRNA targets and controls, a protocol for sequencing through the secondary structure of the shRNA hairpin structure, and protocols for packaging and delivery of shRNA lentiviral particles. Using real-time PCR and functional assays we demonstrate the successful knockdown of ASC, an inflammatory adaptor molecule. These studies demonstrate the practicality of including two shRNAs with different efficacies of knockdown to provide an additional level of control and to verify dose dependency of functional effects. Along with the methods described here, as new techniques and algorithms are designed in the future, shRNA is likely to include further promising application and continue to be a critical component of gene discovery. PMID:20387148

  13. RBiomirGS: an all-in-one miRNA gene set analysis solution featuring target mRNA mapping and expression profile integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background With the continuous discovery of microRNA’s (miRNA association with a wide range of biological and cellular processes, expression profile-based functional characterization of such post-transcriptional regulation is crucial for revealing its significance behind particular phenotypes. Profound advancement in bioinformatics has been made to enable in depth investigation of miRNA’s role in regulating cellular and molecular events, resulting in a huge quantity of software packages covering different aspects of miRNA functional analysis. Therefore, an all-in-one software solution is in demand for a comprehensive yet highly efficient workflow. Here we present RBiomirGS, an R package for a miRNA gene set (GS analysis. Methods The package utilizes multiple databases for target mRNA mapping, estimates miRNA effect on the target mRNAs through miRNA expression profile and conducts a logistic regression-based GS enrichment. Additionally, human ortholog Entrez ID conversion functionality is included for target mRNAs. Results By incorporating all the core steps into one package, RBiomirGS eliminates the need for switching between different software packages. The modular structure of RBiomirGS enables various access points to the analysis, with which users can choose the most relevant functionalities for their workflow. Conclusions With RBiomirGS, users are able to assess the functional significance of the miRNA expression profile under the corresponding experimental condition by minimal input and intervention. Accordingly, RBiomirGS encompasses an all-in-one solution for miRNA GS analysis. RBiomirGS is available on GitHub (http://github.com/jzhangc/RBiomirGS. More information including instruction and examples can be found on website (http://kenstoreylab.com/?page_id=2865.

  14. Localization of foot-and-mouth disease - RNA synthesis on newly formed cellular smooth membranous vacuoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polatnick, J.; Wool, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    Viral RNA synthesis in foot-and-mouth disease infected bovine kidney cell cultures was associated throughout the infectious period with newly formed smooth membranous vacuoles. Membrane formation was measured by choline uptake. The site of RNA synthesis was determined by electron microscopic examination of autoradiograms of incorporated [ 3 H] uridine. Both membrane formation and RNA synthesis became signifcant at 2.5 hours postinfection, but membrane formation increased steadily to 4.5 hours while RNA synthesis peaked at 3.5 hours. Percent density distributions of developed silver grains on autoradiograms showed that almost all RNA synthesis was concentrated on the smooth vacuoles of infected cells. Histogram analysis of grain density distributions established that the site of RNA synthesis was the vacuolar membrane. The newly formed smooth membrane-bound vacuoles were not seen to coalesce into the large vacuolated areas typical of poliovirus cytopathogenicity. (Author)

  15. Localization of foot-and-mouth disease - RNA synthesis on newly formed cellular smooth membranous vacuoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polatnick, J.; Wool, S.H. (United States Department of Agriculture, Science and Education, Greenport, New York (USA). Agricultural Research, Plum Island Animal Disease Center)

    1982-01-01

    Viral RNA synthesis in foot-and-mouth disease infected bovine kidney cell cultures was associated throughout the infectious period with newly formed smooth membranous vacuoles. Membrane formation was measured by choline uptake. The site of RNA synthesis was determined by electron microscopic examination of autoradiograms of incorporated (/sup 3/H) uridine. Both membrane formation and RNA synthesis became signifcant at 2.5 hours postinfection, but membrane formation increased steadily to 4.5 hours while RNA synthesis peaked at 3.5 hours. Percent density distributions of developed silver grains on autoradiograms showed that almost all RNA synthesis was concentrated on the smooth vacuoles of infected cells. Histogram analysis of grain density distributions established that the site of RNA synthesis was the vacuolar membrane. The newly formed smooth membrane-bound vacuoles were not seen to coalesce into the large vacuolated areas typical of poliovirus cytopathogenicity.

  16. The major cellular sterol regulatory pathway is required for Andes virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiah Petersen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae comprise a large family of RNA viruses with worldwide distribution and includes the pathogenic New World hantavirus, Andes virus (ANDV. Host factors needed for hantavirus entry remain largely enigmatic and therapeutics are unavailable. To identify cellular requirements for ANDV infection, we performed two parallel genetic screens. Analysis of a large library of insertionally mutagenized human haploid cells and a siRNA genomic screen converged on components (SREBP-2, SCAP, S1P and S2P of the sterol regulatory pathway as critically important for infection by ANDV. The significance of this pathway was confirmed using functionally deficient cells, TALEN-mediated gene disruption, RNA interference and pharmacologic inhibition. Disruption of sterol regulatory complex function impaired ANDV internalization without affecting virus binding. Pharmacologic manipulation of cholesterol levels demonstrated that ANDV entry is sensitive to changes in cellular cholesterol and raises the possibility that clinically approved regulators of sterol synthesis may prove useful for combating ANDV infection.

  17. FARNA: knowledgebase of inferred functions of non-coding RNA transcripts

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2016-10-12

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes play a major role in control of heterogeneous cellular behavior. Yet, their functions are largely uncharacterized. Current available databases lack in-depth information of ncRNA functions across spectrum of various cells/tissues. Here, we present FARNA, a knowledgebase of inferred functions of 10,289 human ncRNA transcripts (2,734 microRNA and 7,555 long ncRNA) in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. Since transcription factors (TFs) and TF co-factors (TcoFs) are crucial components of regulatory machinery for activation of gene transcription, cellular processes and diseases in which TFs and TcoFs are involved suggest functions of the transcripts they regulate. In FARNA, functions of a transcript are inferred from TFs and TcoFs whose genes co-express with the transcript controlled by these TFs and TcoFs in a considered cell/tissue. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues based on guilt-by-association principle. Expression profiles across cells/tissues based on Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) are provided. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across widest spectrum of human cells/tissues, has a potential to greatly contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. FARNA can be accessed at: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/farna

  18. FARNA: knowledgebase of inferred functions of non-coding RNA transcripts

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir; Uludag, Mahmut; Essack, Magbubah; Salhi, Adil; Ashoor, Haitham; Hanks, John B.; Kapfer, Craig Eric; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes play a major role in control of heterogeneous cellular behavior. Yet, their functions are largely uncharacterized. Current available databases lack in-depth information of ncRNA functions across spectrum of various cells/tissues. Here, we present FARNA, a knowledgebase of inferred functions of 10,289 human ncRNA transcripts (2,734 microRNA and 7,555 long ncRNA) in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. Since transcription factors (TFs) and TF co-factors (TcoFs) are crucial components of regulatory machinery for activation of gene transcription, cellular processes and diseases in which TFs and TcoFs are involved suggest functions of the transcripts they regulate. In FARNA, functions of a transcript are inferred from TFs and TcoFs whose genes co-express with the transcript controlled by these TFs and TcoFs in a considered cell/tissue. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues based on guilt-by-association principle. Expression profiles across cells/tissues based on Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) are provided. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across widest spectrum of human cells/tissues, has a potential to greatly contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. FARNA can be accessed at: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/farna

  19. Analysis of the RNA Content of the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutch, Charles E.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an interconnected set of relatively simple laboratory experiments in which students determine the RNA content of yeast cells and use agarose gel electrophoresis to separate and analyze the major species of cellular RNA. This set of experiments focuses on RNAs from the yeast "Saccharomyces cerevisiae", a…

  20. Deep sequencing of cardiac microRNA-mRNA interactomes in clinical and experimental cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkovich, Scot J; Dorn, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a family of short (~21 nucleotide) noncoding RNAs that serve key roles in cellular growth and differentiation and the response of the heart to stress stimuli. As the sequence-specific recognition element of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs), microRNAs bind mRNAs and prevent their translation via mechanisms that may include transcript degradation and/or prevention of ribosome binding. Short microRNA sequences and the ability of microRNAs to bind to mRNA sites having only partial/imperfect sequence complementarity complicate purely computational analyses of microRNA-mRNA interactomes. Furthermore, computational microRNA target prediction programs typically ignore biological context, and therefore the principal determinants of microRNA-mRNA binding: the presence and quantity of each. To address these deficiencies we describe an empirical method, developed via studies of stressed and failing hearts, to determine disease-induced changes in microRNAs, mRNAs, and the mRNAs targeted to the RISC, without cross-linking mRNAs to RISC proteins. Deep sequencing methods are used to determine RNA abundances, delivering unbiased, quantitative RNA data limited only by their annotation in the genome of interest. We describe the laboratory bench steps required to perform these experiments, experimental design strategies to achieve an appropriate number of sequencing reads per biological replicate, and computer-based processing tools and procedures to convert large raw sequencing data files into gene expression measures useful for differential expression analyses.

  1. Correlation of microRNA levels during hypoxia with predicted target mRNAs through genome-wide microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Grier P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of oxygen in tissues, seen in situations such as chronic lung disease, necrotic tumors, and high altitude exposures, initiate a signaling pathway that results in active transcription of genes possessing a hypoxia response element (HRE. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a change in miRNA expression following hypoxia could account for changes in the cellular transcriptome based on currently available miRNA target prediction tools. Methods To identify changes induced by hypoxia, we conducted mRNA- and miRNA-array-based experiments in HT29 cells, and performed comparative analysis of the resulting data sets based on multiple target prediction algorithms. To date, few studies have investigated an environmental perturbation for effects on genome-wide miRNA levels, or their consequent influence on mRNA output. Results Comparison of miRNAs with predicted mRNA targets indicated a lower level of concordance than expected. We did, however, find preliminary evidence of combinatorial regulation of mRNA expression by miRNA. Conclusion Target prediction programs and expression profiling techniques do not yet adequately represent the complexity of miRNA-mediated gene repression, and new methods may be required to better elucidate these pathways. Our data suggest the physiologic impact of miRNAs on cellular transcription results from a multifaceted network of miRNA and mRNA relationships, working together in an interconnected system and in context of hundreds of RNA species. The methods described here for comparative analysis of cellular miRNA and mRNA will be useful for understanding genome wide regulatory responsiveness and refining miRNA predictive algorithms.

  2. Argonaute: The executor of small RNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azlan, Azali; Dzaki, Najat; Azzam, Ghows

    2016-08-20

    The discovery of small non-coding RNAs - microRNA (miRNA), short interfering RNA (siRNA) and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) - represents one of the most exciting frontiers in biology specifically on the mechanism of gene regulation. In order to execute their functions, these small RNAs require physical interactions with their protein partners, the Argonaute (AGO) family proteins. Over the years, numerous studies have made tremendous progress on understanding the roles of AGO in gene silencing in various organisms. In this review, we summarize recent progress of AGO-mediated gene silencing and other cellular processes in which AGO proteins have been implicated with a particular focus on progress made in flies, humans and other model organisms as compliment. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient cellular release of Rift Valley fever virus requires genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Piper

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Rift Valley fever virus is responsible for periodic, explosive epizootics throughout sub-Saharan Africa. The development of therapeutics targeting this virus is difficult due to a limited understanding of the viral replicative cycle. Utilizing a virus-like particle system, we have established roles for each of the viral structural components in assembly, release, and virus infectivity. The envelope glycoprotein, Gn, was discovered to be necessary and sufficient for packaging of the genome, nucleocapsid protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase into virus particles. Additionally, packaging of the genome was found to be necessary for the efficient release of particles, revealing a novel mechanism for the efficient generation of infectious virus. Our results identify possible conserved targets for development of anti-phlebovirus therapies.

  4. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. © 2015 Lama and Ryan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Exogenous mRNA encoding tetanus or botulinum neurotoxins expressed in Aplysia neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mochida, Sumiko; Poulain, Bernard; Eisel, Ulrich; Binz, Thomas; Kurazono, Hisao; Niemann, Heiner; Tauc, Ladislav; Bullock, Theodore H.

    1990-01-01

    Injection of exogenous mRNA purified from various tissue preparations into cellular translation systems such as Xenopus oocytes has allowed expression of complex proteins (e.g., receptors for neurotransmitters). No evidence for expression of injected exogenous mRNA, however, has been reported in

  6. miRNA delivery for skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhao; Zhou, Dezhong; Gao, Yongsheng; Zeng, Ming; Wang, Wenxin

    2017-12-19

    The wound healing has remained a worldwide challenge as one of significant public health problems. Pathological scars and chronic wounds caused by injury, aging or diabetes lead to impaired tissue repair and regeneration. Due to the unique biological wound environment, the wound healing is a highly complicated process, efficient and targeted treatments are still lacking. Hence, research-driven to discover more efficient therapeutics is a highly urgent demand. Recently, the research results have revealed that microRNA (miRNA) is a promising tool in therapeutic and diagnostic fields because miRNA is an essential regulator in cellular physiology and pathology. Therefore, new technologies for wound healing based on miRNA have been developed and miRNA delivery has become a significant research topic in the field of gene delivery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Hua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi, which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear, which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi

  8. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    of the stop codons, and RF3 is known to accelerate the overall termination process. Release factor RF4 is a protein involved in the release of the mRNA and tRNA from the ribosomal complex. Furthermore, RF4 is involved in the proofreading in the elongation step of protein biosynthesis. The cellular contents...... of RF1, RF2, and RF3 were determined earlier. Here we report the cellular content of RF4 in Escherichia coli to be approximately 16,500 molecules per cell. The cells were grown in a rich medium and harvested in the beginning of the exponential growth phase. The quantifications were performed by using...

  9. RNA-binding properties and RNA chaperone activity of human peroxiredoxin 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Lee, Hae Na; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Ha, Bin; Ahn, Sung-Min; Jang, Ho Hee; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► hPrx1 has RNA-binding properties. ► hPrx1 exhibits helix-destabilizing activity. ► Cold stress increases hPrx1 level in the nuclear fraction. ► hPrx1 enhances the viability of cells exposed to cold stress. -- Abstract: Human peroxiredoxin 1 (hPrx1), a member of the peroxiredoxin family, detoxifies peroxide substrates and has been implicated in numerous biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and redox signaling. To date, Prx1 has not been implicated in RNA metabolism. Here, we investigated the ability of hPrx1 to bind RNA and act as an RNA chaperone. In vitro, hPrx1 bound to RNA and DNA, and unwound nucleic acid duplexes. hPrx1 also acted as a transcription anti-terminator in an assay using an Escherichia coli strain containing a stem–loop structure upstream of the chloramphenicol resistance gene. The overall cellular level of hPrx1 expression was not increased at low temperatures, but the nuclear level of hPrx1 was increased. In addition, hPrx1 overexpression enhanced the survival of cells exposed to cold stress, whereas hPrx1 knockdown significantly reduced cell survival under the same conditions. These findings suggest that hPrx1 may perform biological functions as a RNA-binding protein, which are distinctive from known functions of hPrx1 as a reactive oxygen species scavenger.

  10. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism.

  11. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Morcillo, María [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Taylor, Nicholas M. I. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gruene, Tim [Georg-August-University, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Legrand, Pierre [SOLEIL Synchrotron, L’Orme de Merisiers, Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rashid, Umar J. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruiz, Federico M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  12. Cellular Angiofibroma of the Nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Zülküf Burak; Yener, Haydar Murat; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Karaaltin, Ayşegül Batioğlu; Inan, Hakki Caner; Alaskarov, Elvin; Gozen, Emine Deniz

    2017-11-01

    Angiofibroma is a common tumor of the nasopharynx region but cellular type is extremely rare in head and neck. A 13-year-old boy presented with frequent epistaxis and nasal obstruction persisting for 6 months. According to the clinical symptoms and imaging studies juvenile angiofibroma was suspected. Following angiographic embolization total excision of the lesion by midfacial degloving approach was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of staghorn blood vessels and irregular fibrous stroma. Stellate fibroblasts with small pyknotic to large vesicular nuclei were seen in a highly cellular stroma. These findings identified cellular angiofibroma mimicking juvenile angiofibroma. This article is about a very rare patient of cellular angiofibroma of nasopharynx.

  13. Evolution of the cellular communication system: An analysis in the Computational Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir Shah, K.

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the problem of the evolution of the cellular communication system from the RNA world to progenote to the modern cell. Our method analyses syntactical structure of molecular fossils in the non-coding regions of DNA within the information-processing gene model developed earlier. We concluded that sequence-specific binding is an ancient communication process with its origin in the RNA world. Moreover, we illustrate our viewpoint using four evolution snapshots from the first RNA segments, some 4.1. billion years ago, to the first cell, 3.8 billion years ago. (author). 31 refs

  14. Complex cellular logic computation using ribocomputing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alexander A; Kim, Jongmin; Ma, Duo; Silver, Pamela A; Collins, James J; Yin, Peng

    2017-08-03

    Synthetic biology aims to develop engineering-driven approaches to the programming of cellular functions that could yield transformative technologies. Synthetic gene circuits that combine DNA, protein, and RNA components have demonstrated a range of functions such as bistability, oscillation, feedback, and logic capabilities. However, it remains challenging to scale up these circuits owing to the limited number of designable, orthogonal, high-performance parts, the empirical and often tedious composition rules, and the requirements for substantial resources for encoding and operation. Here, we report a strategy for constructing RNA-only nanodevices to evaluate complex logic in living cells. Our 'ribocomputing' systems are composed of de-novo-designed parts and operate through predictable and designable base-pairing rules, allowing the effective in silico design of computing devices with prescribed configurations and functions in complex cellular environments. These devices operate at the post-transcriptional level and use an extended RNA transcript to co-localize all circuit sensing, computation, signal transduction, and output elements in the same self-assembled molecular complex, which reduces diffusion-mediated signal losses, lowers metabolic cost, and improves circuit reliability. We demonstrate that ribocomputing devices in Escherichia coli can evaluate two-input logic with a dynamic range up to 900-fold and scale them to four-input AND, six-input OR, and a complex 12-input expression (A1 AND A2 AND NOT A1*) OR (B1 AND B2 AND NOT B2*) OR (C1 AND C2) OR (D1 AND D2) OR (E1 AND E2). Successful operation of ribocomputing devices based on programmable RNA interactions suggests that systems employing the same design principles could be implemented in other host organisms or in extracellular settings.

  15. Multisubunit DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases from Vaccinia Virus and Other Nucleocytoplasmic Large-DNA Viruses: Impressions from the Age of Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Gershon, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    The past 17 years have been marked by a revolution in our understanding of cellular multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (MSDDRPs) at the structural level. A parallel development over the past 15 years has been the emerging story of the giant viruses, which encode MSDDRPs. Here we link the two in an attempt to understand the specialization of multisubunit RNA polymerases in the domain of life encompassing the large nucleocytoplasmic DNA viruses (NCLDV), a superclade that includes the giant viruses and the biochemically well-characterized poxvirus vaccinia virus. The first half of this review surveys the recently determined structural biology of cellular RNA polymerases for a microbiology readership. The second half discusses a reannotation of MSDDRP subunits from NCLDV families and the apparent specialization of these enzymes by virus family and by subunit with regard to subunit or domain loss, subunit dissociability, endogenous control of polymerase arrest, and the elimination/customization of regulatory interactions that would confer higher-order cellular control. Some themes are apparent in linking subunit function to structure in the viral world: as with cellular RNA polymerases I and III and unlike cellular RNA polymerase II, the viral enzymes seem to opt for speed and processivity and seem to have eliminated domains associated with higher-order regulation. The adoption/loss of viral RNA polymerase proofreading functions may have played a part in matching intrinsic mutability to genome size. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Plasmodium falciparum mitochondria import tRNAs along with an active phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Amit

    2015-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum protein translation enzymes aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are an emergent family of drug targets. The aaRS ensemble catalyses transfer of amino acids to cognate tRNAs, thus providing charged tRNAs for ribosomal consumption. P. falciparum proteome expression relies on a total of 36 aaRSs for the three translationally independent compartments of cytoplasm, apicoplast and mitochondria. In the present study, we show that, of this set of 36, a single genomic copy of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (mFRS) is targeted to the parasite mitochondria, and that the mFRS gene is exclusive to malaria parasites within the apicomplexan phyla. Our protein cellular localization studies based on immunofluorescence data show that, along with mFRS, P. falciparum harbours two more phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (FRS) assemblies that are localized to its apicoplast and cytoplasm. The 'extra' mFRS is found in mitochondria of all asexual blood stage parasites and is competent in aminoacylation. We show further that the parasite mitochondria import tRNAs from the cytoplasmic tRNA pool. Hence drug targeting of FRSs presents a unique opportunity to potentially stall protein production in all three parasite translational compartments.

  17. C. elegans ADARs antagonize silencing of cellular dsRNAs by the antiviral RNAi pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Daniel P; Tyc, Katarzyna M; Bass, Brenda L

    2018-02-01

    Cellular dsRNAs are edited by adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). While editing can alter mRNA-coding potential, most editing occurs in noncoding sequences, the function of which is poorly understood. Using dsRNA immunoprecipitation (dsRIP) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we identified 1523 regions of clustered A-to-I editing, termed editing-enriched regions (EERs), in four stages of Caenorhabditis elegans development, often with highest expression in embryos. Analyses of small RNA-seq data revealed 22- to 23-nucleotide (nt) siRNAs, reminiscent of viral siRNAs, that mapped to EERs and were abundant in adr-1;adr-2 mutant animals. Consistent with roles for these siRNAs in silencing, EER-associated genes (EAGs) were down-regulated in adr-1;adr-2 embryos, and this was dependent on associated EERs and the RNAi factor RDE-4. We observed that ADARs genetically interact with the 26G endogenous siRNA (endo-siRNA) pathway, which likely competes for RNAi components; deletion of factors required for this pathway ( rrf-3 or ergo-1 ) in adr-1;adr-2 mutant strains caused a synthetic phenotype that was rescued by deleting antiviral RNAi factors. Poly(A) + RNA-seq revealed EAG down-regulation and antiviral gene induction in adr-1;adr-2;rrf-3 embryos, and these expression changes were dependent on rde-1 and rde-4 Our data suggest that ADARs restrict antiviral silencing of cellular dsRNAs. © 2018 Reich et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Phenotypic silencing of cytoplasmic genes using sequence-specific double-stranded short interfering RNA and its application in the reverse genetics of wild type negative-strand RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS by short interfering RNA has opened up new directions in the phenotypic mutation of cellular genes. However, its efficacy on non-nuclear genes and its effect on the interferon pathway remain unexplored. Since directed mutation of RNA genomes is not possible through conventional mutagenesis, we have tested sequence-specific 21-nucleotide long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs for their ability to silence cytoplasmic RNA genomes. Results Short dsRNAs were generated against specific mRNAs of respiratory syncytial virus, a nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA virus with a cytoplasmic life cycle. At nanomolar concentrations, the dsRNAs specifically abrogated expression of the corresponding viral proteins, and produced the expected mutant phenotype ex vivo. The dsRNAs did not induce an interferon response, and did not inhibit cellular gene expression. The ablation of the viral proteins correlated with the loss of the specific mRNAs. In contrast, viral genomic and antigenomic RNA, which are encapsidated, were not directly affected. Conclusions Synthetic inhibitory dsRNAs are effective in specific silencing of RNA genomes that are exclusively cytoplasmic and transcribed by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. RNA-directed RNA gene silencing does not require cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of viral cDNA, and thus, will allow the generation of phenotypic null mutants of specific RNA viral genes under normal infection conditions and at any point in the infection cycle. This will, for the first time, permit functional genomic studies, attenuated infections, reverse genetic analysis, and studies of host-virus signaling pathways using a wild type RNA virus, unencumbered by any superinfecting virus.

  19. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  20. Paraspeckles: Where Long Noncoding RNA Meets Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Archa H; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Hirose, Tetsuro; Bond, Charles S

    2018-02-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecules are some of the newest and least understood players in gene regulation. Hence, we need good model systems with well-defined RNA and protein components. One such system is paraspeckles - protein-rich nuclear organelles built around a specific lncRNA scaffold. New discoveries show how paraspeckles are formed through multiple RNA-protein and protein-protein interactions, some of which involve extensive polymerization, and others with multivalent interactions driving phase separation. Once formed, paraspeckles influence gene regulation through sequestration of component proteins and RNAs, with subsequent depletion in other compartments. Here we focus on the dual aspects of paraspeckle structure and function, revealing an emerging role for these dynamic bodies in a multitude of cellular settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA-Seq analysis uncovers non-coding small RNA system of Mycobacterium neoaurum in the metabolism of sterols to accumulate steroid intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Zhu, Zhan-Tao; Tao, Xin-Yi; Wang, Feng-Qing; Wei, Dong-Zhi

    2016-04-25

    Understanding the metabolic mechanism of sterols to produce valuable steroid intermediates in mycobacterium by a noncoding small RNA (sRNA) view is still limited. In the work, RNA-seq was implemented to investigate the noncoding transcriptome of Mycobacterium neoaurum (Mn) in the transformation process of sterols to valuable steroid intermediates, including 9α-hydroxy-4-androstene-3,17-dione (9OHAD), 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD), and 22-hydroxy-23, 24-bisnorchola-1,4-dien-3-one (1,4-BNA). A total of 263 sRNA candidates were predicted from the intergenic regions in Mn. Differential expression of sRNA candidates was explored in the wide type Mn with vs without sterol addition, and the steroid intermediate producing Mn strains vs wide type Mn with sterol addition, respectively. Generally, sRNA candidates were differentially expressed in various strains, but there were still some shared candidates with outstandingly upregulated or downregulated expression in these steroid producing strains. Accordingly, four regulatory networks were constructed to reveal the direct and/or indirect interactions between sRNA candidates and their target genes in four groups, including wide type Mn with vs without sterol addition, 9OHAD, ADD, and BNA producing strains vs wide type Mn with sterol addition, respectively. Based on these constructed networks, several highly focused sRNA candidates were discovered to be prevalent in the networks, which showed comprehensive regulatory roles in various cellular processes, including lipid transport and metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, signal transduction, cell envelope biosynthesis and ATP synthesis. To explore the functional role of sRNA candidates in Mn cells, we manipulated the overexpression of candidates 131 and 138 in strain Mn-9OHAD, which led to enhanced production of 9OHAD from 1.5- to 2.3-fold during 6 d' fermentation and a slight effect on growth rate. This study revealed the complex and important regulatory

  2. Structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by dsRNA-binding domains of human RNA helicase A (DHX9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qinqin; Yuan, Y Adam

    2013-03-01

    Intensive research interest has focused on small RNA-processing machinery and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), key cellular machines in RNAi pathways. However, the structural mechanism regarding RISC assembly, the primary step linking small RNA processing and RNA-mediated gene silencing, is largely unknown. Human RNA helicase A (DHX9) was reported to function as an RISC-loading factor, and such function is mediated mainly by its dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Here, we report the crystal structures of human RNA helicase A (RHA) dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 domains in complex with dsRNAs, respectively. Structural analysis not only reveals higher siRNA duplex-binding affinity displayed by dsRBD1, but also identifies a crystallographic dsRBD1 pair of physiological significance in cooperatively recognizing dsRNAs. Structural observations are further validated by isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) assay. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assay coupled with mutagenesis demonstrated that both dsRBDs are required for RISC association, and such association is mediated by dsRNA. Hence, our structural and functional efforts have revealed a potential working model for siRNA recognition by RHA tandem dsRBDs, and together they provide direct structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by RHA.

  3. Controlling cellular P-TEFb activity by the HIV-1 transcriptional transactivator Tat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Muniz

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 transcriptional transactivator (Tat is essential for synthesis of full-length transcripts from the integrated viral genome by RNA polymerase II (Pol II. Tat recruits the host positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb to the HIV-1 promoter through binding to the transactivator RNA (TAR at the 5'-end of the nascent HIV transcript. P-TEFb is a general Pol II transcription factor; its cellular activity is controlled by the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA and the HEXIM1 protein, which sequester P-TEFb into transcriptionally inactive 7SK/HEXIM/P-TEFb snRNP. Besides targeting P-TEFb to HIV transcription, Tat also increases the nuclear level of active P-TEFb through promoting its dissociation from the 7SK/HEXIM/P-TEFb RNP by an unclear mechanism. In this study, by using in vitro and in vivo RNA-protein binding assays, we demonstrate that HIV-1 Tat binds with high specificity and efficiency to an evolutionarily highly conserved stem-bulge-stem motif of the 5'-hairpin of human 7SK snRNA. The newly discovered Tat-binding motif of 7SK is structurally and functionally indistinguishable from the extensively characterized Tat-binding site of HIV TAR and importantly, it is imbedded in the HEXIM-binding elements of 7SK snRNA. We show that Tat efficiently replaces HEXIM1 on the 7SK snRNA in vivo and therefore, it promotes the disassembly of the 7SK/HEXIM/P-TEFb negative transcriptional regulatory snRNP to augment the nuclear level of active P-TEFb. This is the first demonstration that HIV-1 specifically targets an important cellular regulatory RNA, most probably to promote viral transcription and replication. Demonstration that the human 7SK snRNA carries a TAR RNA-like Tat-binding element that is essential for the normal transcriptional regulatory function of 7SK questions the viability of HIV therapeutic approaches based on small drugs blocking the Tat-binding site of HIV TAR.

  4. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an .... form secondary structures such as stem-loop, hairpin, etc. ..... paired third strand of the triplex without affecting the stability.

  5. Supplementary data: Materials and methods RNA expression ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ritt8

    Supplementary data: Materials and methods. RNA expression analysis. Freshly collected tissue was taken in TRIzol reagent for total RNA isolation according to the manufacturer's protocol. The cDNA synthesis was carried out in 1 μg total RNA using Random hexamer (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, USA) and Superscript III ...

  6. Principles of mRNA transport in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heym, Roland Gerhard; Niessing, Dierk

    2012-06-01

    mRNA localization and localized translation is a common mechanism by which cellular asymmetry is achieved. In higher eukaryotes the mRNA transport machinery is required for such diverse processes as stem cell division and neuronal plasticity. Because mRNA localization in metazoans is highly complex, studies at the molecular level have proven to be cumbersome. However, active mRNA transport has also been reported in fungi including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ustilago maydis and Candida albicans, in which these events are less difficult to study. Amongst them, budding yeast S. cerevisiae has yielded mechanistic insights that exceed our understanding of other mRNA localization events to date. In contrast to most reviews, we refrain here from summarizing mRNA localization events from different organisms. Instead we give an in-depth account of ASH1 mRNA localization in budding yeast. This approach is particularly suited to providing a more holistic view of the interconnection between the individual steps of mRNA localization, from transcriptional events to cytoplasmic mRNA transport and localized translation. Because of our advanced mechanistic understanding of mRNA localization in yeast, the present review may also be informative for scientists working, for example, on mRNA localization in embryogenesis or in neurons.

  7. Control of Metastatic Progression by microRNA Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, Nora; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression is a defining feature of human malignancy. Specific miRNAs have been identified as promoters or suppressors of metastatic progression. These miRNAs control metastasis through divergent or convergent regulation of metastatic gene pathways. Some miRNA regulatory networks govern cell-autonomous cancer phenotypes, while others modulate the cell-extrinsic composition of the metastatic microenvironment. The use of small RNAs as probes into the molecular and cellular underpinnings of metastasis holds promise for the identification of candidate genes for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:23728460

  8. Annotating RNA motifs in sequences and alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Paul P; Eldai, Hisham

    2015-01-01

    RNA performs a diverse array of important functions across all cellular life. These functions include important roles in translation, building translational machinery and maturing messenger RNA. More recent discoveries include the miRNAs and bacterial sRNAs that regulate gene expression, the thermosensors, riboswitches and other cis-regulatory elements that help prokaryotes sense their environment and eukaryotic piRNAs that suppress transposition. However, there can be a long period between the initial discovery of a RNA and determining its function. We present a bioinformatic approach to characterize RNA motifs, which are critical components of many RNA structure-function relationships. These motifs can, in some instances, provide researchers with functional hypotheses for uncharacterized RNAs. Moreover, we introduce a new profile-based database of RNA motifs--RMfam--and illustrate some applications for investigating the evolution and functional characterization of RNA. All the data and scripts associated with this work are available from: https://github.com/ppgardne/RMfam. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  10. Inter-cellular transport of ran GTPase.

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    Deepak Khuperkar

    Full Text Available Ran, a member of the Ras-GTPase superfamily, has a well-established role in regulating the transport of macromolecules across the nuclear envelope (NE. Ran has also been implicated in mitosis, cell cycle progression, and NE formation. Over-expression of Ran is associated with various cancers, although the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unclear. Serendipitously, we found that Ran possesses the ability to move from cell-to-cell when transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Moreover, we show that the inter-cellular transport of Ran is GTP-dependent. Importantly, Ran displays a similar distribution pattern in the recipient cells as that in the donor cell and co-localizes with the Ran binding protein Nup358 (also called RanBP2. Interestingly, leptomycin B, an inhibitor of CRM1-mediated export, or siRNA mediated depletion of CRM1, significantly impaired the inter-cellular transport of Ran, suggesting a function for CRM1 in this process. These novel findings indicate a possible role for Ran beyond nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, with potential implications in inter-cellular communication and cancers.

  11. Association of microRNA-200c expression levels with clinicopathological factors and prognosis in endometrioid endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Milosz; Danielska, Justyna; Domanska-Senderowska, Daria; Dzieniecka, Monika; Szymanska, Bozena; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2018-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of gene expression, which play an important role in many critical cellular processes including apoptosis, proliferation and cell differentiation. Aberrant miRNA expression has been reported in a variety of human malignancies. Therefore, miRNAs may be potentially used as cancer biomarkers. miRNA-200c, which is a member of the miRNA-200 family, might play an essential role in tumor progression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic and clinical significance of miRNA-200c in women with endometrioid endometrial cancer. Total RNA extraction from 90 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of endometri-oid endometrial cancer and 10 normal endometrium samples was performed. After cDNA synthesis, real-time polymerase chain reaction was conducted and relative expression of miRNA-200c was assessed. Then, miRNA-200c expression levels were evaluated with regard to clinicopathological characteristics. The expression levels of miRNA-200c were significantly increased in endometrioid endometrial cancer samples. Expression of miRNA-200c maintained at significantly higher levels in the early stage endometrioid endometrial cancer compared with more advanced stages. In the Kaplan-Meier analysis, lower levels of miRNA-200c expression were associated with inferior survival. Expression levels of miRNA-200c might be associated with clinicopathological factors and survival in endometrioid endometrial cancer. © 2018 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  13. Fluorogenic RNA Mango aptamers for imaging small non-coding RNAs in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autour, Alexis; C Y Jeng, Sunny; D Cawte, Adam; Abdolahzadeh, Amir; Galli, Angela; Panchapakesan, Shanker S S; Rueda, David; Ryckelynck, Michael; Unrau, Peter J

    2018-02-13

    Despite having many key roles in cellular biology, directly imaging biologically important RNAs has been hindered by a lack of fluorescent tools equivalent to the fluorescent proteins available to study cellular proteins. Ideal RNA labelling systems must preserve biological function, have photophysical properties similar to existing fluorescent proteins, and be compatible with established live and fixed cell protein labelling strategies. Here, we report a microfluidics-based selection of three new high-affinity RNA Mango fluorogenic aptamers. Two of these are as bright or brighter than enhanced GFP when bound to TO1-Biotin. Furthermore, we show that the new Mangos can accurately image the subcellular localization of three small non-coding RNAs (5S, U6, and a box C/D scaRNA) in fixed and live mammalian cells. These new aptamers have many potential applications to study RNA function and dynamics both in vitro and in mammalian cells.

  14. Screening of Modified RNA duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen

    protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form......Because of sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... RNAs include the 2´-5´ oligoadenylate synthetase system, the protein kinase R, RIG-I and Toll-like receptor activated pathways all resulting in antiviral defence mechanism. We have previously shown that antiviral innate immune reactions against double stranded RNAs could be detected in vivo as partial...

  15. Cell-Specific Establishment of Poliovirus Resistance to an Inhibitor Targeting a Cellular Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorova, Ekaterina G.; Nchoutmboube, Jules; Ford-Siltz, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is hypothesized that targeting stable cellular factors involved in viral replication instead of virus-specific proteins may raise the barrier for development of resistant mutants, which is especially important for highly adaptable small (+)RNA viruses. However, contrary to this assumption, the accumulated evidence shows that these viruses easily generate mutants resistant to the inhibitors of cellular proteins at least in some systems. We investigated here the development of poliovirus resistance to brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of the cellular protein GBF1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small cellular GTPase Arf1. We found that while resistant viruses can be easily selected in HeLa cells, they do not emerge in Vero cells, in spite that in the absence of the drug both cultures support robust virus replication. Our data show that the viral replication is much more resilient to BFA than functioning of the cellular secretory pathway, suggesting that the role of GBF1 in the viral replication is independent of its Arf activating function. We demonstrate that the level of recruitment of GBF1 to the replication complexes limits the establishment and expression of a BFA resistance phenotype in both HeLa and Vero cells. Moreover, the BFA resistance phenotype of poliovirus mutants is also cell type dependent in different cells of human origin and results in a fitness loss in the form of reduced efficiency of RNA replication in the absence of the drug. Thus, a rational approach to the development of host-targeting antivirals may overcome the superior adaptability of (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Compared to the number of viral diseases, the number of available vaccines is miniscule. For some viruses vaccine development has not been successful after multiple attempts, and for many others vaccination is not a viable option. Antiviral drugs are needed for clinical practice and public health emergencies. However, viruses are highly adaptable and can

  16. Determination of in vivo RNA kinetics using RATE-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, Benjamin; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Gresham, David

    2014-10-01

    The abundance of a transcript is determined by its rate of synthesis and its rate of degradation; however, global methods for quantifying RNA abundance cannot distinguish variation in these two processes. Here, we introduce RNA approach to equilibrium sequencing (RATE-seq), which uses in vivo metabolic labeling of RNA and approach to equilibrium kinetics, to determine absolute RNA degradation and synthesis rates. RATE-seq does not disturb cellular physiology, uses straightforward normalization with exogenous spike-ins, and can be readily adapted for studies in most organisms. We demonstrate the use of RATE-seq to estimate genome-wide kinetic parameters for coding and noncoding transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2014 Neymotin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Systematic identification of novel, essential host genes affecting bromovirus RNA replication.

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    Brandi L Gancarz

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA virus replication involves viral proteins and cellular proteins at nearly every replication step. Brome mosaic virus (BMV is a well-established model for dissecting virus-host interactions and is one of very few viruses whose RNA replication, gene expression and encapsidation have been reproduced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previously, our laboratory identified ∼100 non-essential host genes whose loss inhibited or enhanced BMV replication at least 3-fold. However, our isolation of additional BMV-modulating host genes by classical genetics and other results underscore that genes essential for cell growth also contribute to BMV RNA replication at a frequency that may be greater than that of non-essential genes. To systematically identify novel, essential host genes affecting BMV RNA replication, we tested a collection of ∼900 yeast strains, each with a single essential gene promoter replaced by a doxycycline-repressible promoter, allowing repression of gene expression by adding doxycycline to the growth medium. Using this strain array of ∼81% of essential yeast genes, we identified 24 essential host genes whose depleted expression reproducibly inhibited or enhanced BMV RNA replication. Relevant host genes are involved in ribosome biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation and protein homeostasis, among other cellular processes. BMV 2a(Pol levels were significantly increased in strains depleted for a heat shock protein (HSF1 or proteasome components (PRE1 and RPT6, suggesting these genes may affect BMV RNA replication by directly or indirectly modulating 2a(Pol localization, post-translational modification or interacting partners. Investigating the diverse functions of these newly identified essential host genes should advance our understanding of BMV-host interactions and normal cellular pathways, and suggest new modes of virus control.

  18. Inhibition of Poliovirus-Induced Cleavage of Cellular Protein PCBP2 Reduces the Levels of Viral RNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Amanda J.; Daijogo, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to their small genome size, picornaviruses must utilize host proteins to mediate cap-independent translation and viral RNA replication. The host RNA-binding protein poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) is involved in both processes in poliovirus infected cells. It has been shown that the viral proteinase 3CD cleaves PCBP2 and contributes to viral translation inhibition. However, cleaved PCBP2 remains active in viral RNA replication. This would suggest that both cleaved and intact forms of PCBP2 have a role in the viral RNA replication cycle. The picornavirus genome must act as a template for both translation and RNA replication. However, a template that is actively being translated cannot function as a template for RNA replication, suggesting that there is a switch in template usage from translation to RNA replication. We demonstrate that the cleavage of PCBP2 by the poliovirus 3CD proteinase is a necessary step for efficient viral RNA replication and, as such, may be important for mediating a switch in template usage from translation to RNA replication. IMPORTANCE Poliovirus, like all positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, uses its genomic RNA as a template for both viral protein synthesis and RNA replication. Given that these processes cannot occur simultaneously on the same template, poliovirus has evolved a mechanism(s) to facilitate the switch from using templates for translation to using them for RNA synthesis. This study explores one possible scenario for how the virus alters the functions of a host cell RNA binding protein to mediate, in part, this important transition. PMID:24371074

  19. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  20. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  1. Parameter optimization for constructing competing endogenous RNA regulatory network in glioblastoma multiforme and other cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chen, Yidong; Chuang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    In addition to direct targeting and repressing mRNAs, recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs) can bridge up an alternative layer of post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks. The competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) regulation depicts the scenario where pairs of genes (ceRNAs) sharing, fully or partially, common binding miRNAs (miRNA program) can establish coexpression through competition for a limited pool of the miRNA program. While the dynamics of ceRNA regulation among cellular conditions have been verified based on in silico and in vitro experiments, comprehensive investigation into the strength of ceRNA regulation in human datasets remains largely unexplored. Furthermore, pan-cancer analysis of ceRNA regulation, to our knowledge, has not been systematically investigated. In the present study we explored optimal conditions for ceRNA regulation, investigated functions governed by ceRNA regulation, and evaluated pan-cancer effects. We started by investigating how essential factors, such as the size of miRNA programs, the number of miRNA program binding sites, and expression levels of miRNA programs and ceRNAs affect the ceRNA regulation capacity in tumors derived from glioblastoma multiforme patients captured by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We demonstrated that increased numbers of common targeting miRNAs as well as the abundance of binding sites enhance ceRNA regulation and strengthen coexpression of ceRNA pairs. Also, our investigation revealed that the strength of ceRNA regulation is dependent on expression levels of both miRNA programs and ceRNAs. Through functional annotation analysis, our results indicated that ceRNA regulation is highly associated with essential cellular functions and diseases including cancer. Furthermore, the highly intertwined ceRNA regulatory relationship enables constitutive and effective intra-function regulation of genes in diverse types of cancer. Using gene and microRNA expression datasets from TCGA, we successfully

  2. Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyang; Owens, James D; Shih, Joanna H; Li, Ming-Chung; Bonner, Robert F; Mushinski, J Frederic

    2006-04-27

    Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis of cells enriched by laser capture microdissection (LCM) faces several technical challenges. Frozen sections yield higher quality RNA than paraffin-imbedded sections, but even with frozen sections, the staining methods used for histological identification of cells of interest could still damage the mRNA in the cells. To study the contribution of staining methods to degradation of results from gene expression profiling of LCM samples, we subjected pellets of the mouse plasma cell tumor cell line TEPC 1165 to direct RNA extraction and to parallel frozen sectioning for LCM and subsequent RNA extraction. We used microarray hybridization analysis to compare gene expression profiles of RNA from cell pellets with gene expression profiles of RNA from frozen sections that had been stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Nissl Stain (NS), and for immunofluorescence (IF) as well as with the plasma cell-revealing methyl green pyronin (MGP) stain. All RNAs were amplified with two rounds of T7-based in vitro transcription and analyzed by two-color expression analysis on 10-K cDNA microarrays. The MGP-stained samples showed the least introduction of mRNA loss, followed by H&E and immunofluorescence. Nissl staining was significantly more detrimental to gene expression profiles, presumably owing to an aqueous step in which RNA may have been damaged by endogenous or exogenous RNAases. RNA damage can occur during the staining steps preparatory to laser capture microdissection, with the consequence of loss of representation of certain genes in microarray hybridization analysis. Inclusion of RNAase inhibitor in aqueous staining solutions appears to be important in protecting RNA from loss of gene transcripts.

  3. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  4. MicroRNA expression in a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour

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    Darrell Green

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumours are a heterogeneous set of bone and soft tissue neoplasms that can cause a number of paraneoplastic syndromes such as tumour induced osteomalacia. The term phosphaturic comes from the common finding that these tumours secrete high levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 which causes renal phosphate wasting leading to hypophosphatemia. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumours are rare and diagnosis is difficult. A very active 68 year old male presented with bone pain and muscle weakness. He was hypophosphataemic and total alkaline phosphatase was markedly elevated. The patient was placed on vitamin D supplementation but his condition progressed. In the fifth year of presentation the patient required the use of a wheelchair and described “explosive” bone pain on physical contact. Serum 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D was low and serum fibroblast growth factor 23 was significantly elevated, raising suspicion of a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour. A lesion was detected in his left femoral head and the patient underwent a total hip replacement. The patient displayed a rapid improvement to his condition and during a three year follow up period he returned to an active lifestyle. As molecular testing may help provide a robust diagnosis and is particularly useful in rare diseases we took a next generation sequencing approach to identify a differential expression of small RNAs in the resected tumour. Small RNAs are non-coding RNA molecules that play a key role in regulation of gene expression and can be used as specific biomarkers. We found an upregulation of miR-197. We also found a downregulation of miR-20b, miR-144 and miR-335 which is a small RNA profile typical of osteosarcoma. MiR-21, the most frequently upregulated microRNA in cancer, was downregulated. We conclude that the specific small RNA profile is typical of osteosarcoma except for the downregulation of oncogenic miR-21. Transcriptional plasticity of miR-197, which is

  5. Cellular and genetic effects and recovery of heat-damaged cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by low intensity electromagnetic radiation at 915 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, I.H.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were conducted on two genetically well known strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Wild Type) and repair deficient mutant (UVS). Results obtained showed clear genetic difference between normal and mutants based on UV sensitivity, percent survival at elevated temperatures and high intensity electromagnetic radiation. At the cellular level, both strains showed a consistent increase in the recovery rate of heat damaged cells when exposed to low intensity FMR as compared to sham (non irradiated cells) at 915 MHz. The percent recovery of wild type was higher than mutant. At the molecular level, the uptake of tritiated uridine into thermally damaged cells which were recovered by low level EMR was significantly higher than sham. Total RNA isolated from irradiated cells and sham showed visible differences in the intensity of RNA bands. Gross quantitative analyses suggest more RNA production in radiation recovered cells as compared to sham. Results presented in this dissertation provide conclusive evidence that low level microwave radiation can be used in the recovery of heat damaged cells

  6. Intake of branched-chain amino acids influences the levels of MAFbx mRNA and MuRF-1 total protein in resting and exercising human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgenvik, Marcus; Apró, William; Blomstrand, Eva

    2012-03-01

    Resistance exercise and amino acids are two major factors that influence muscle protein turnover. Here, we examined the effects of resistance exercise and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), individually and in combination, on the expression of anabolic and catabolic genes in human skeletal muscle. Seven subjects performed two sessions of unilateral leg press exercise with randomized supplementation with BCAA or flavored water. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the resting and exercising legs before and repeatedly after exercise to determine levels of mRNA, protein phosphorylation, and amino acid concentrations. Intake of BCAA reduced (P exercising legs, respectively. The level of MuRF-1 mRNA was elevated (P exercising leg two- and threefold under the placebo and BCAA conditions, respectively, whereas MuRF-1 total protein increased by 20% (P exercising muscle. In conclusion, BCAA ingestion reduced MAFbx mRNA and prevented the exercise-induced increase in MuRF-1 total protein in both resting and exercising leg. Further-more, resistance exercise differently influenced MAFbx and MuRF-1 mRNA expression, suggesting both common and divergent regulation of these two ubiquitin ligases.

  7. A lncRNA to repair DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Jiri; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as regulators of various biological processes, but to which extent lncRNAs play a role in genome integrity maintenance is not well understood. In this issue of EMBO Reports, Sharma et al [1] identify the DNA damage-induced lncRNA DDSR1 as an integral...... player of the DNA damage response (DDR). DDSR1 has both an early role by modulating repair pathway choices, and a later function when it regulates gene expression. Sharma et al [1] thus uncover a dual role for a hitherto uncharacterized lncRNA during the cellular response to DNA damage....

  8. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  9. Enterovirus Control of Translation and RNA Granule Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Richard E

    2016-03-30

    Enteroviruses such as poliovirus (PV) and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) have evolved several parallel strategies to regulate cellular gene expression and stress responses to ensure efficient expression of the viral genome. Enteroviruses utilize their encoded proteinases to take over the cellular translation apparatus and direct ribosomes to viral mRNAs. In addition, viral proteinases are used to control and repress the two main types of cytoplasmic RNA granules, stress granules (SGs) and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which are stress-responsive dynamic structures involved in repression of gene expression. This review discusses these processes and the current understanding of the underlying mechanisms with respect to enterovirus infections. In addition, the review discusses accumulating data suggesting linkage exists between RNA granule formation and innate immune sensing and activation.

  10. Comparison of miRNA quantitation by Nanostring in serum and plasma samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Foye

    Full Text Available Circulating microRNAs that are associated with specific diseases have garnered much attention for use in diagnostic assays. However, detection of disease-associated miRNA can be affected by several factors such as release of contaminating cellular miRNA during sample collection, variations due to amplification of transcript for detection, or controls used for normalization for accurate quantitation. We analyzed circulating miRNA in serum and plasma samples obtained concurrently from 28 patients, using a Nanostring quantitative assay platform. Total RNA concentration ranged from 32-125 μg/ml from serum and 30-220 μg/ml from plasma. Of 798 miRNAs, 371 miRNAs were not detected in either serum or plasma samples. 427 were detected in either serum or plasma but not both, whereas 151 miRNA were detected in both serum and plasma samples. The diversity of miRNA detected was greater in plasma than in serum samples. In serum samples, the number of detected miRNA ranged from 3 to 82 with a median of 17, whereas in plasma samples, the number of miRNA detected ranged from 25 to 221 with a median of 91. Several miRNA such as miR451a, miR 16-5p, miR-223-3p, and mir25-3p were highly abundant and differentially expressed between serum and plasma. The detection of endogenous and exogenous control miRNAs varied in serum and plasma, with higher levels observed in plasma. Gene expression stability identified candidate invariant microRNA that were highly stable across all samples, and could be used for normalization. In conclusion, there are significant differences in both the number of miRNA detected and the amount of miRNA detected between serum and plasma. Normalization using miRNA with constant expression is essential to minimize the impact of technical variations. Given the challenges involved, ideal candidates for blood based biomarkers would be those that are indifferent to type of body fluid, are detectable and can be reliably quantitated.

  11. Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA

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    Li Ming-Chung

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis of cells enriched by laser capture microdissection (LCM faces several technical challenges. Frozen sections yield higher quality RNA than paraffin-imbedded sections, but even with frozen sections, the staining methods used for histological identification of cells of interest could still damage the mRNA in the cells. To study the contribution of staining methods to degradation of results from gene expression profiling of LCM samples, we subjected pellets of the mouse plasma cell tumor cell line TEPC 1165 to direct RNA extraction and to parallel frozen sectioning for LCM and subsequent RNA extraction. We used microarray hybridization analysis to compare gene expression profiles of RNA from cell pellets with gene expression profiles of RNA from frozen sections that had been stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E, Nissl Stain (NS, and for immunofluorescence (IF as well as with the plasma cell-revealing methyl green pyronin (MGP stain. All RNAs were amplified with two rounds of T7-based in vitro transcription and analyzed by two-color expression analysis on 10-K cDNA microarrays. Results The MGP-stained samples showed the least introduction of mRNA loss, followed by H&E and immunofluorescence. Nissl staining was significantly more detrimental to gene expression profiles, presumably owing to an aqueous step in which RNA may have been damaged by endogenous or exogenous RNAases. Conclusion RNA damage can occur during the staining steps preparatory to laser capture microdissection, with the consequence of loss of representation of certain genes in microarray hybridization analysis. Inclusion of RNAase inhibitor in aqueous staining solutions appears to be important in protecting RNA from loss of gene transcripts.

  12. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

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    Kim Chan-Mi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV NS5 is a viral nonstructural protein that carries both methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp domains. It is a key component of the viral RNA replicase complex that presumably includes other viral nonstructural and cellular proteins. The biochemical properties of JEV NS5 have not been characterized due to the lack of a robust in vitro RdRp assay system, and the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of RNA synthesis by JEV NS5 remain to be elucidated. Results To characterize the biochemical properties of JEV RdRp, we expressed in Escherichia coli and purified an enzymatically active full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein with a hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus. The purified NS5 protein, but not the mutant NS5 protein with an Ala substitution at the first Asp of the RdRp-conserved GDD motif, exhibited template- and primer-dependent RNA synthesis activity using a poly(A RNA template. The NS5 protein was able to use both plus- and minus-strand 3'-untranslated regions of the JEV genome as templates in the absence of a primer, with the latter RNA being a better template. Analysis of the RNA synthesis initiation site using the 3'-end 83 nucleotides of the JEV genome as a minimal RNA template revealed that the NS5 protein specifically initiates RNA synthesis from an internal site, U81, at the two nucleotides upstream of the 3'-end of the template. Conclusion As a first step toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms for JEV RNA replication and ultimately for the in vitro reconstitution of viral RNA replicase complex, we for the first time established an in vitro JEV RdRp assay system with a functional full-length recombinant JEV NS5 protein and characterized the mechanisms of RNA synthesis from nonviral and viral RNA templates. The full-length recombinant JEV NS5 will be useful for the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme and for the

  13. miR-103 Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Suppresses Cells Apoptosis by Targeting Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthase 2 in Cellular Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Wang, Hongcai; Shu, Yongwei; Li, Xuling

    2018-01-01

    miR-103 has been reported to be decreased in brain of transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients, while the detailed mechanism of its effect on AD is obscure, thus this study aimed to investigate the effect of miR-103 expression on neurite outgrowth and cells apoptosis as well as its targets in cellular models of AD. Blank mimic (NC1-mimic), miR-103 mimic, blank inhibitor (NC2-mimic) and miR-103 inhibitor plasmids were transferred into PC12 cellular AD model and Cellular AD model of cerebral cortex neurons which were established by Aβ1-42 insult. Rescue experiment was subsequently performed by transferring Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) and miR-103 mimic plasmid. mRNA and protein expressions were detected by qPCR and Western Blot assays. Total neurite outgrowth was detected by microscope, cells apoptosis was determined by Hoechst/PI assay, and apoptotic markers Caspase 3 and p38 expressions were determined by Western Blot assay. In both PC12 and cerebral cortex neurons cellular AD models, miR-103 mimic increases the total neurite outgrowth compared with NC1-mimic, while miR-103 inhibitor decreases the total neurite outgrowth than NC2-inhibitor. The apoptosis rate was decreased in miR-103 mimic group than NC1-mimic group while increased in miR-103 inhibitor group than NC2-inhibitor group. PTGS2, Adisintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) and neprilysin (NEP) were selected as target genes of miR-103 by bioinformatics analysis. And PTGS2 was found to be conversely regulated by miR-103 expression while ADAM10 and NEP were not affected. After transfection by PTGS2 and miR-103 mimic plasmid in PC12 cellular AD model, the total neurite growth was shortened compared with miR-103 mimic group, and cells apoptosis was enhanced which indicated PTGS2 mimic attenuated the influence of miR-103 mimic on progression of AD. In conclusion, miR-103 promotes total neurite outgrowth and inhibits cells apoptosis

  14. Small RNA profiling of influenza A virus-infected cells identifies miR-449b as a regulator of histone deacetylase 1 and interferon beta.

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    William A Buggele

    Full Text Available The mammalian antiviral response relies on the alteration of cellular gene expression, to induce the production of antiviral effectors and regulate their activities. Recent research has indicated that virus infections can induce the accumulation of cellular microRNA (miRNA species that influence the stability of host mRNAs and their protein products. To determine the potential for miRNA regulation of cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, small RNA profiling was carried out using next generation sequencing. Comparison of miRNA expression profiles in uninfected human A549 cells to cells infected with influenza A virus strains A/Udorn/72 and A/WSN/33, revealed virus-induced changes in miRNA abundance. Gene expression analysis identified mRNA targets for a cohort of highly inducible miRNAs linked to diverse cellular functions. Experiments demonstrate that the histone deacetylase, HDAC1, can be regulated by influenza-inducible miR-449b, resulting in altered mRNA and protein levels. Expression of miR-449b enhances virus and poly(I:C activation of the IFNβ promoter, a process known to be negatively regulated by HDAC1. These findings demonstrate miRNA induction by influenza A virus infection and elucidate an example of miRNA control of antiviral gene expression in human cells, defining a role for miR-449b in regulation of HDAC1 and antiviral cytokine signaling.

  15. RNA and Proteins: Mutual Respect [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    Kathleen B. Hall

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA are often found in ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs, where they function in cellular processes to synthesize proteins (the ribosome, chemically modify RNAs (small nucleolar RNPs, splice pre-mRNAs (the spliceosome, and, on a larger scale, sequester RNAs, degrade them, or process them (P bodies, Cajal bodies, and nucleoli. Each RNA–protein interaction is a story in itself, as both molecules can change conformation, compete for binding sites, and regulate cellular functions. Recent studies of Xist long non-coding RNP, the U4/5/6 tri-small nuclear RNP complex, and an activated state of a spliceosome reveal new features of RNA interactions with proteins, and, although their stories are incomplete, they are already fascinating.

  16. Noncoding Subgenomic Flavivirus RNA: Multiple Functions in West Nile Virus Pathogenesis and Modulation of Host Responses

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    Justin A. Roby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are a large group of positive strand RNA viruses transmitted by arthropods that include many human pathogens such as West Nile virus (WNV, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. All members in this genus tested so far are shown to produce a unique subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA derived from the 3' untranslated region (UTR. sfRNA is a product of incomplete degradation of genomic RNA by the cell 5'–3' exoribonuclease XRN1 which stalls at highly ordered secondary RNA structures at the beginning of the 3'UTR. Generation of sfRNA results in inhibition of XRN1 activity leading to an increase in stability of many cellular mRNAs. Mutant WNV deficient in sfRNA generation was highly attenuated displaying a marked decrease in cytopathicity in cells and pathogenicity in mice. sfRNA has also been shown to inhibit the antiviral activity of IFN-α/β by yet unknown mechanism and of the RNAi pathway by likely serving as a decoy substrate for Dicer. Thus, sfRNA is involved in modulating multiple cellular pathways to facilitate viral pathogenicity; however the overlying mechanism linking all these multiple functions of sfRNA remains to be elucidated.

  17. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL SMALL TRANSCRIPTS FROM RNA-SEQ DATA: A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Castillo, Lourdes; Grüell, Marc; Mulligan, Martin E; Lang, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are regulatory RNA molecules that have been identified in a multitude of bacterial species and shown to control numerous cellular processes through various regulatory mechanisms. In the last decade, next generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has been used for the genome-wide detection of bacterial sRNAs. Here we describe sRNA-Detect, a novel approach to identify expressed small transcripts from prokaryotic RNA-seq data. Using RNA-seq data from three bacterial species and two sequencing platforms, we performed a comparative assessment of five computational approaches for the detection of small transcripts. We demonstrate that sRNA-Detect improves upon current standalone computational approaches for identifying novel small transcripts in bacteria.

  18. Bleomycin Can Cleave an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelbello, Alicia J; Disney, Matthew D

    2018-01-04

    Noncoding RNAs are pervasive in cells and contribute to diseases such as cancer. A question in biomedical research is whether noncoding RNAs are targets of medicines. Bleomycin is a natural product that cleaves DNA; however, it is known to cleave RNA in vitro. Herein, an in-depth analysis of the RNA cleavage preferences of bleomycin A5 is presented. Bleomycin A5 prefers to cleave RNAs with stretches of AU base pairs. Based on these preferences and bioinformatic analysis, the microRNA-10b hairpin precursor was identified as a potential substrate for bleomycin A5. Both in vitro and cellular experiments demonstrated cleavage. Importantly, chemical cleavage by bleomycin A5 in the microRNA-10b hairpin precursors occurred near the Drosha and Dicer enzymatic processing sites and led to destruction of the microRNA. Evidently, oncogenic noncoding RNAs can be considered targets of cancer medicines and might elicit their pharmacological effects by targeting noncoding RNA. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Infection and RNA recombination of Brome mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Bujarski, Jozef J.

    2004-01-01

    Ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana supported the replication and systemic spread of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. Infection was induced either by manual inoculation with viral RNA or by BMV virions, demonstrating that virus disassembly did not prevent infection. When in vitro-transcribed BMV RNAs 1-3 were used, production of subgenomic RNA4 was observed, showing that BMV RNA replication and transcription had occurred. Furthermore, inoculations of the transgenic Arabidopsis line that expressed a suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway markedly increased the BMV RNA concentrations. Inoculations with designed BMV RNA3 recombination vectors generated both homologous and nonhomologous BMV RNA-RNA recombinants. Thus, all cellular factors essential for BMV RNA replication, transcription, and RNA recombination were shown to be present in Arabidopsis. The current scope of understanding of the model Arabidopsis plant system should facilitate the identification of these factors governing the BMV life cycle

  20. Fluctuations and synchrony of RNA synthesis in nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V; Baev, Alexander; Berezney, Ronald; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-06-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences are synthesized at exceptionally high rates and, together with ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), are utilized as building blocks for the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles. Although it is widely acknowledged that tight regulation and coordination of rRNA and r-protein production are fundamentally important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, still little is known about the real-time kinetics of the ribosome component synthesis in individual cells. In this communication we introduce a label-free MicroRaman spectrometric approach for monitoring rRNA synthesis in live cultured cells. Remarkably high and rapid fluctuations of rRNA production rates were revealed by this technique. Strikingly, the changes in the rRNA output were synchronous for ribosomal genes located in separate nucleoli of the same cell. Our findings call for the development of new concepts to elucidate the coordination of ribosomal components production. In this regard, numerical modeling further demonstrated that the production of rRNA and r-proteins can be coordinated, regardless of the fluctuations in rRNA synthesis. Overall, our quantitative data reveal a spectacular interplay of inherently stochastic rates of RNA synthesis and the coordination of gene expression.

  1. Cellular Activation of the Self-Quenched Fluorescent Reporter Probe in Tumor Microenvironment

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    Alexei A. Bogdanov, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of intralysosomal proteolysis of near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF self-quenched macromolecular probe (PGC-Cy5.5 has been previously reported and used for tumor imaging. Here we demonstrate that proteolysis can be detected noninvasively in vivo at the cellular level. A codetection of GFP fluorescence (using two-photon excitation and NIRF was performed in tumor-bearing animals injected with PGC-Cy5.5. In vivo microscopy of tumor cells in subdermal tissue layers (up to 160 μm showed a strong Cy5.5 dequenching effect in GFP-negative cells. This observation was corroborated by flow cytometry, sorting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of tumor-isolated cells. Both GFP-positive (81% total and GFP-negative (19% total populations contained Cy5.5-positive cells. The GFP-negative cells were confirmed to be host mouse cells by the absence of rat cathepsin mRNA signal. The subfraction of GFPnegative cells (2.5-3.0% had seven times higher NIRF intensity than the majority of GFP-positive or GFPnegative cells (372 and 55 AU, respectively. Highly NIRF-positive, FP-negative cells were CD45-and MAC3-positive. Our results indicate that: 1 intracellular proteolysis can be imaged in vivo at the cellular level using cathepsin-sensitive probes; 2 tumor-recruited cells of hematopoetic origin participate most actively in uptake and degradation of long-circulating macromolecular probes.

  2. Histone gene expression remains coupled to DNA synthesis during in vitro cellular senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, G.; Stein, J.; Dell'Orco, R.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a decrease in the extent to which confluent monolayers of late compared to early passage CF3 human diploid fibroblasts can be stimulated to proliferate, the time course of DNA synthesis onset is similar regardless of the in vitro age of the cells. A parallel and stoichiometric relationship is maintained between the rate of DNA synthesis and the cellular levels of histone mRNA independent of the age of the cell cultures. Furthermore, DNA synthesis and cellular histone mRNA levels decline in a coordinate manner after inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea treatment. These results indicate that while the proliferative activity of human diploid fibroblasts decreases with passage in culture, those cells that retain the ability to proliferate continue to exhibit a tight coupling of DNA replication and histone gene expression

  3. RNA-Seq analysis of D. radiodurans find non coding RNAs expressed in response to radiation stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadewal, Nikhil; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria discovery of functional RNA molecules that are not translated into protein, noncoding RNAs, became possible with advent of Next Generation Sequencing technology. Bacterial non coding RNAs are typically 50-300 nucleotides long and work as internal signals controlling various levels of gene expression. Deep sequencing of total cellular RNA captures all coding and noncoding transcripts with their differential levels of expression in the transcriptome. It provides a powerful approach to study bacterial gene expression and mechanisms of gene regulation. We subjected the 3 h transcriptome of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 cells post exposure to 6 KGy gamma radiation to 100 x 2 cycles of deep sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 to look for ncRNA transcripts. Bioinformatics pipeline for analysis and interpretation of RNA Seq data was done in house using Softwares available in public domains. Our sequence data aligned with 21 putative ncRNAs expressed in the intergenic regions of annotated genome of D radiodurans. Verification of 2 ncRNA candidates and 3 transcription factor genes by Real Time PCR confirmed presence of these transcripts in the 3 h transcriptome sequenced by us. Any relationship between ncRNAs and control of radiation induced gene expression in D radiodurans can be proved only after specific gene knock outs in future. (author)

  4. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1974-01-01

    Work during the past year has been focused on three areas related to the cellular effects of radiation. Radiation effects on RNA and the regulation of gene expression and amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were studied. Studies on the radiation response of RNA in growing and confluent cells were continued. We have derived radiation survival curves and demonstrated repair of potentially lethal damage in 3T3 cells. Studies of giant cell formation and turnover of ribosomal RNA in irradiated cells has demonstrated differences in growing and confluent cells. We have sought evidence consistent with our hypothesis for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression with segments of RNA reutilized to prime new RNA synthesis. Data derived from the turnover of ribosomal RNA and the methylation pattern of ribosomal RNA during turnover are consistent with the possibility that a segment of 18s ribosomal RNA is being conserved during new RNA synthesis. We were unable to show reutilization of the 5' trinucleotide of 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA but did find a ribonuclease resistant oligonucleotide in 18s RNA which appeared to be reutilized. In studies of amino acid nucleic-acid interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy we have been able to successfully synthesize an amidate and begin an examination of the intramolecular interactions. We have also studied intermolecular interactions betweentryptophan and nucleoside monophosphates and found upfield shifts which provide evidence for preferential stacking of the 6-membered ring of tryptophan with adenine and evidence for specific geometry of interactions of tryptophan with cytosine. (U.S.)

  5. MicroRNA Regulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced Premature Senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Scheiber, Melissa N.; Neumann, Carola; Calin, George A.; Zhou Daohong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of many cellular pathways. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes DNA damage and induces premature senescence. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced senescence has not been well defined. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify and characterize senescence-associated miRNAs (SA-miRNAs) and to investigate the role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence. Methods and Materials: In human lung (WI-38) fibroblasts, premature senescence was induced either by IR or busulfan (BU) treatment, and replicative senescence was accomplished by serial passaging. MiRNA microarray were used to identify SA-miRNAs, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR validated the expression profiles of SA-miRNAs in various senescent cells. The role of SA-miRNAs in IR-induced senescence was characterized by knockdown of miRNA expression, using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides or by miRNA overexpression through the transfection of pre-miRNA mimics. Results: We identified eight SA-miRNAs, four of which were up-regulated (miR-152, -410, -431, and -493) and four which were down-regulated (miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a), that are differentially expressed in both prematurely senescent (induced by IR or BU) and replicatively senescent WI-38 cells. Validation of the expression of these SA-miRNAs indicated that down-regulation of miR-155, -20a, -25, and -15a is a characteristic miRNA expression signature of cellular senescence. Functional analyses revealed that knockdown of miR-155 or miR-20a, but not miR-25 or miR-15a, markedly enhanced IR-induced senescence, whereas ectopic overexpression of miR-155 or miR-20a significantly inhibited senescence induction. Furthermore, our studies indicate that miR-155 modulates IR-induced senescence by acting downstream of the p53 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and in part via regulating tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) expression. Conclusion: Our

  6. Is central dogma a global property of cellular information flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology has come under scrutiny in recent years. Here, we reviewed high-throughput mRNA and protein expression data of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and several mammalian cells. At both single cell and population scales, the statistical comparisons between the entire transcriptomes and proteomes show clear correlation structures. In contrast, the pair-wise correlations of single transcripts to proteins show nullity. These data suggest that the organizing structure guiding cellular processes is observed at omics-wide scale, and not at single molecule level. The central dogma, thus, globally emerges as an average integrated flow of cellular information.

  7. Role of G3BP1 in glucocorticoid receptor-mediated microRNA-15b and microRNA-23a biogenesis in endothelial cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Poon, Po-Ying; Mak, Kylie Hin-Man; Zhang, Lin-Yao; Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huoming; Mak, Nai-Ki; Yue, Patrick Ying-Kit; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in regulating various normal cellular responses. Recent studies revealed that the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway is subject to sophisticated regulation. Hormonal control

  8. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A) + RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G 2 phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  9. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhaohua, E-mail: ztang@jsd.claremont.edu [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse [W.M. Keck Science Center, The Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Lin, Ren-Jang [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony [Genome Damage and Stability Center, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  10. mRNA decay proteins are targeted to poly(A+ RNA and dsRNA-containing cytoplasmic foci that resemble P-bodies in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzel López-Rosas

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, mRNA degradation and RNA-based gene silencing occur in cytoplasmic foci referred to as processing bodies (P-bodies. In protozoan parasites, the presence of P-bodies and their putative role in mRNA decay have yet to be comprehensively addressed. Identification of P-bodies might provide information on how mRNA degradation machineries evolved in lower eukaryotes. Here, we used immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy assays to investigate the cellular localization of mRNA degradation proteins in the human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica and found evidence of the existence of P-bodies. Two mRNA decay factors, namely the EhXRN2 exoribonuclease and the EhDCP2 decapping enzyme, were localized in cytoplasmic foci in a pattern resembling P-body organization. Given that amoebic foci appear to be smaller and less rounded than those described in higher eukaryotes, we have named them "P-body-like structures". These foci contain additional mRNA degradation factors, including the EhCAF1 deadenylase and the EhAGO2-2 protein involved in RNA interference. Biochemical analysis revealed that EhCAF1 co-immunoprecipitated with EhXRN2 but not with EhDCP2 or EhAGO2-2, thus linking deadenylation to 5'-to-3' mRNA decay. The number of EhCAF1-containing foci significantly decreased after inhibition of transcription and translation with actinomycin D and cycloheximide, respectively. Furthermore, results of RNA-FISH assays showed that (i EhCAF1 colocalized with poly(A(+ RNA and (ii during silencing of the Ehpc4 gene by RNA interference, EhAGO2-2 colocalized with small interfering RNAs in cytoplasmic foci. Our observation of decapping, deadenylation and RNA interference proteins within P-body-like foci suggests that these structures have been conserved after originating in the early evolution of eukaryotic lineages. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the localization of mRNA decay proteins within P

  11. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  12. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Poliovirus RNA polymerase: in vitro enzymatic activities, fidelity of replication, and characterization of a temperature-sensitive RNA-negative mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, M.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase were investigated in this study. The polymerase was shown to be a strict RNA dependent RNA polymerase. It only copied RNA templates but used either a DNA or RNA primer to initiate RNA synthesis. Partially purified polymerase has some DNA polymerase activities. Additional purification of the enzyme and studies with a mutant poliovirus RNA polymerase indicated that the DNA polymerase activities were due to a cellular polymerase. The fidelity of RNA replication in vitro by the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase was studied by measuring the rate of misincorporation of noncomplementary ribonucleotide monophosphates on synthetic homopolymeric RNA templates. The results showed that the ratio of noncomplementary to complementary ribonucleotides incorporated was 1-5 x 10 -3 . The viral polymerase of a poliovirus temperature sensitive RNA-negative mutant, Ts 10, was isolated. This study confirmed that the mutant was viable 33 0 , but was RNA negative at 39 0 . Characterization of the Ts 10 polymerase showed it was significantly more sensitive to heat inactivation than was the old-type polymerase. Highly purified poliovirions were found to contain several noncapsid proteins. At least two of these proteins were labeled by [ 35 S]methionine infected cells and appeared to be virally encoded proteins. One of these proteins was immunoprecipitated by anti-3B/sup vpg/ antiserum. This protein had the approximate Mr = 50,000 and appeared to be one of the previously identified 3B/sup vpg/ precursor proteins

  14. Total rRNA-Seq Analysis Gives Insight into Bacterial, Fungal, Protozoal and Archaeal Communities in the Rumen Using an Optimized RNA Isolation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chijioke O. Elekwachi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high throughput, next generation sequencing technologies have allowed an in-depth examination of biological environments and phenomena, and are particularly useful for culture-independent microbial community studies. Recently the use of RNA for metatranscriptomic studies has been used to elucidate the role of active microbes in the environment. Extraction of RNA of appropriate quality is critical in these experiments and TRIzol reagent is often used for maintaining stability of RNA molecules during extraction. However, for studies using rumen content there is no consensus on (1 the amount of rumen digesta to use or (2 the amount of TRIzol reagent to be used in RNA extraction procedures. This study evaluated the effect of using various quantities of ground rumen digesta and of TRIzol reagent on the yield and quality of extracted RNA. It also investigated the possibility of using lower masses of solid-phase rumen digesta and lower amounts of TRIzol reagent than is used currently, for extraction of RNA for metatranscriptomic studies. We found that high quality RNA could be isolated from 2 g of ground rumen digesta sample, whilst using 0.6 g of ground matter for RNA extraction and using 3 mL (a 5:1 TRIzol : extraction mass ratio of TRIzol reagent. This represents a significant savings in the cost of RNA isolation. These lower masses and volumes were then applied in the RNA-Seq analysis of solid-phase rumen samples obtained from 6 Angus X Hereford beef heifers which had been fed a high forage diet (comprised of barley straw in a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 70:30 for 102 days. A bioinformatics analysis pipeline was developed in-house that generated relative abundance values of archaea, protozoa, fungi and bacteria in the rumen and also allowed the extraction of individual rRNA variable regions that could be analyzed in downstream molecular ecology programs. The average relative abundances of rRNA transcripts of archaea, bacteria

  15. Total rRNA-Seq Analysis Gives Insight into Bacterial, Fungal, Protozoal and Archaeal Communities in the Rumen Using an Optimized RNA Isolation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elekwachi, Chijioke O; Wang, Zuo; Wu, Xiaofeng; Rabee, Alaa; Forster, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Advances in high throughput, next generation sequencing technologies have allowed an in-depth examination of biological environments and phenomena, and are particularly useful for culture-independent microbial community studies. Recently the use of RNA for metatranscriptomic studies has been used to elucidate the role of active microbes in the environment. Extraction of RNA of appropriate quality is critical in these experiments and TRIzol reagent is often used for maintaining stability of RNA molecules during extraction. However, for studies using rumen content there is no consensus on (1) the amount of rumen digesta to use or (2) the amount of TRIzol reagent to be used in RNA extraction procedures. This study evaluated the effect of using various quantities of ground rumen digesta and of TRIzol reagent on the yield and quality of extracted RNA. It also investigated the possibility of using lower masses of solid-phase rumen digesta and lower amounts of TRIzol reagent than is used currently, for extraction of RNA for metatranscriptomic studies. We found that high quality RNA could be isolated from 2 g of ground rumen digesta sample, whilst using 0.6 g of ground matter for RNA extraction and using 3 mL (a 5:1 TRIzol : extraction mass ratio) of TRIzol reagent. This represents a significant savings in the cost of RNA isolation. These lower masses and volumes were then applied in the RNA-Seq analysis of solid-phase rumen samples obtained from 6 Angus X Hereford beef heifers which had been fed a high forage diet (comprised of barley straw in a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 70:30) for 102 days. A bioinformatics analysis pipeline was developed in-house that generated relative abundance values of archaea, protozoa, fungi and bacteria in the rumen and also allowed the extraction of individual rRNA variable regions that could be analyzed in downstream molecular ecology programs. The average relative abundances of rRNA transcripts of archaea, bacteria, protozoa and fungi in

  16. Engineered ribosomal RNA operon copy-number variants of E. coli reveal the evolutionary trade-offs shaping rRNA operon number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyorfy, Zsuzsanna; Draskovits, Gabor; Vernyik, Viktor; Blattner, Frederick F.; Gaal, Tamas; Posfai, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rrn) operons, characteristically present in several copies in bacterial genomes (7 in E. coli), play a central role in cellular physiology. We investigated the factors determining the optimal number of rrn operons in E. coli by constructing isogenic variants with 5–10 operons. We found that the total RNA and protein content, as well as the size of the cells reflected the number of rrn operons. While growth parameters showed only minor differences, competition experiments revealed a clear pattern: 7–8 copies were optimal under conditions of fluctuating, occasionally rich nutrient influx and lower numbers were favored in stable, nutrient-limited environments. We found that the advantages of quick adjustment to nutrient availability, rapid growth and economic regulation of ribosome number all contribute to the selection of the optimal rrn operon number. Our results suggest that the wt rrn operon number of E. coli reflects the natural, ‘feast and famine’ life-style of the bacterium, however, different copy numbers might be beneficial under different environmental conditions. Understanding the impact of the copy number of rrn operons on the fitness of the cell is an important step towards the creation of functional and robust genomes, the ultimate goal of synthetic biology. PMID:25618851

  17. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongjie; Wang, Peipei; Wang, Guang-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xianlin; Wu, Wenzhe; Qiu, Yang; Shu, Ting; Zhao, Xiaolu; Yin, Lei; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71), which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3′-to-5′ unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16), another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings increase our

  18. MicroRNA expression in melanocytic nevi: the usefulness of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material for miRNA microarray profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glud, Martin; Klausen, Mikkel; Gniadecki, Robert; Rossing, Maria; Hastrup, Nina; Nielsen, Finn C; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T

    2009-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate cellular differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. MiRNAs are expressed in a developmentally regulated and tissue-specific manner. Aberrant expression may contribute to pathological processes such as cancer, and miRNA may therefore serve as biomarkers that may be useful in a clinical environment for diagnosis of various diseases. Most miRNA profiling studies have used fresh tissue samples. However, in some types of cancer, including malignant melanoma, fresh material is difficult to obtain from primary tumors, and most surgical specimens are formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE). To explore whether FFPE material would be suitable for miRNA profiling in melanocytic lesions, we compared miRNA expression patterns in FFPE versus fresh frozen samples, obtained from 15 human melanocytic nevi. Out of microarray data, we identified 84 miRNAs that were expressed in both types of samples and represented an miRNA profile of melanocytic nevi. Our results showed a high correlation in miRNA expression (Spearman r-value of 0.80) between paired FFPE and fresh frozen material. The data were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In conclusion, FFPE specimens of melanocytic lesions are suitable as a source for miRNA microarray profiling.

  19. Cancer-targeting siRNA delivery from porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuan; Apostolou, Sinoula; Dronov, Roman; Kuss, Bryone; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-10-01

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNPs) with tunable pore size are biocompatible and biodegradable, suggesting that they are suitable biomaterials as vehicles for drug delivery. Loading of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the pores of pSiNPs can protect siRNA from degradation as well as improve the cellular uptake. We aimed to deliver MRP1 siRNA loaded into pSiNPs to glioblastoma cells, and to demonstrate downregulation of MRP1 at the mRNA and protein levels. 50-220 nm pSiNPs with an average pore size of 26 nm were prepared, followed by electrostatic adsorption of siRNA into pores. Oligonucleotide loading and release profiles were investigated; MRP1 mRNA and protein expression, cell viability and cell apoptosis were studied. Approximately 7.7 µg of siRNA was loaded per mg of pSiNPs. Cells readily took up nanoparticles after 30 min incubation. siRNA-loaded pSiNPs were able to effectively downregulate target mRNA (~40%) and protein expression (31%), and induced cell apoptosis and necrosis (33%). siRNA loaded pSiNPs downregulated mRNA and protein expression and induced cell death. This novel siRNA delivery system may pave the way towards developing more effective tumor therapies.

  20. Re-criticizing RNA-mediated cell evolution: a radical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotakis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Genetic inter-communication of the nucleic-organellar dual in eukaryotes is dominated by DNA-directed phenomena. RNA regulatory circuits have also been observed in artificial laboratory prototypes where gene transfer events are reconstructed, but they are excluded from the primary norm due to their rarity. Recent technical advances in organellar biotechnology, genome engineering and single-molecule tracking give novel experimental insights on RNA metabolism not only at cellular level, but also on organismal survival. Here, I put forward a hypothesis for RNA's involvement in gene piece transfer, taken together the current knowledge on the primitive RNA character as a biochemical modulator with model organisms from peculiar natural habitats. It is proposed that RNA molecules of special structural signature and functional identity can drive evolution, integrating the ecological pressure of environmental oscillations into genome imprinting by buffering-out epigenetic aberrancies.

  1. Poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro: structural elements and antibody inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semler, B.L.; Hanecak, R.; Dorner, L.F.; Anderson, C.W.; Wimmer, E.

    1983-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA polymerase complex has been analyzed by immunoautoradiography using antibody probes derived from purified replicase (P3) region viral polypeptides. Antibody preparations made against the polio RNA polymerase, P3-4b, detected a previously unreported cellular protein that copurifies with the RNA polymerase. An IgG fraction purified from rabbit antiserum to polypeptide P3-2, a precursor fo the RNA polymerase, specifically inhibits poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro. The authors have also immunoprecipitated a 60,000-dalton protein (P3-4a) with antiserum to protein P3-4b and have determined the precise genomic map position of this protein by automated Edman degradation. Protein P3-4a originates by cleavage of the RNA polymerase precursor at a glutamine-glucine amino acid pair not previously reported to be a viral cleavage site

  2. MysiRNA-designer: a workflow for efficient siRNA design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mysara

    Full Text Available The design of small interfering RNA (siRNA is a multi factorial problem that has gained the attention of many researchers in the area of therapeutic and functional genomics. MysiRNA score was previously introduced that improves the correlation of siRNA activity prediction considering state of the art algorithms. In this paper, a new program, MysiRNA-Designer, is described which integrates several factors in an automated work-flow considering mRNA transcripts variations, siRNA and mRNA target accessibility, and both near-perfect and partial off-target matches. It also features the MysiRNA score, a highly ranked correlated siRNA efficacy prediction score for ranking the designed siRNAs, in addition to top scoring models Biopredsi, DISR, Thermocomposition21 and i-Score, and integrates them in a unique siRNA score-filtration technique. This multi-score filtration layer filters siRNA that passes the 90% thresholds calculated from experimental dataset features. MysiRNA-Designer takes an accession, finds conserved regions among its transcript space, finds accessible regions within the mRNA, designs all possible siRNAs for these regions, filters them based on multi-scores thresholds, and then performs SNP and off-target filtration. These strict selection criteria were tested against human genes in which at least one active siRNA was designed from 95.7% of total genes. In addition, when tested against an experimental dataset, MysiRNA-Designer was found capable of rejecting 98% of the false positive siRNAs, showing superiority over three state of the art siRNA design programs. MysiRNA is a freely accessible (Microsoft Windows based desktop application that can be used to design siRNA with a high accuracy and specificity. We believe that MysiRNA-Designer has the potential to play an important role in this area.

  3. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  4. Understanding alcoholism through microRNA signatures in brains of human alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dayne eMayfield

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the fields of genomics and genetics in the last decade have identified a large number of genes that can potentially influence alcohol-drinking behavior in humans as well as animal models. Consequently, the task of identifying efficient molecular targets that could be used to develop effective therapeutics against the disease has become increasingly daunting. One of the reasons for this is the fact that each of the many alcohol-responsive genes only contributes a small effect to the overall mechanism and disease phenotype, as is characteristic of complex traits. Current research trends are hence shifting towards the analysis of gene networks rather than emphasizing individual genes. The discovery of microRNAs and their mechanisms of action on regulation of transcript level and protein translation have made evident the utility of these small non-coding RNA molecules that act as central coordinators of multiple cross-communicating cellular pathways. Cells exploit the fact that a single microRNA can target hundreds of mRNA transcripts and that a single mRNA transcript can be simultaneously targeted by distinct microRNAs, to ensure fine-tuned and/or redundant control over a large number of cellular functions. By the same token, we can use these properties of microRNAs to develop novel, targeted strategies to combat complex disorders. In this review, we will focus on recent discoveries of microRNA signatures in brain of human alcoholics supporting the hypothesis that changes in gene expression and regulation by microRNAs are responsible for long-term neuroadaptations occurring during development of alcoholism. We also discuss insights into the potential modulation of epigenetic regulators by a subset of microRNAs. Taken together, microRNA activity may be controlling many of the cellular mechanisms already known to be involved in the development of alcoholism, and suggests potential targets for the development of novel therapeutic

  5. Intracellular coordination of potyviral RNA functions in infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Hafrén, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of an infection cycle requires mechanisms to allocate the genomes of (+)-stranded RNA viruses in a balanced ratio to translation, replication, encapsidation, and movement, as well as mechanisms to prevent translocation of viral RNA (vRNA) to cellular RNA degradation pathways. The ratio of vRNA allocated to various functions is likely balanced by the availability of regulatory proteins or competition of the interaction sites within regulatory ribonucleoprotein complexes. Due to the transient nature of viral processes and the interdependency between vRNA pathways, it is technically demanding to work out the exact molecular mechanisms underlying vRNA regulation. A substantial number of viral and host proteins have been identified that facilitate the steps that lead to the assembly of a functional potyviral RNA replication complex and their fusion with chloroplasts. Simultaneously with on-going viral replication, part of the replicated potyviral RNA enters movement pathways. Although not much is known about the processes of potyviral RNA release from viral replication complexes, the molecular interactions involved in these processes determine the fate of the replicated vRNA. Some viral and host cell proteins have been described that direct replicated potyviral RNA to translation to enable potyviral gene expression and productive infection. The antiviral defense of the cell causes vRNA degradation by RNA silencing. We hypothesize that also plant pathways involved in mRNA decay may have a role in the coordination of potyviral RNA expression. In this review, we discuss the roles of different potyviral and host proteins in the coordination of various potyviral RNA functions.

  6. Curcumin Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Hepatic Lipid Metabolism Disorder by Modification of m6 A RNA Methylation in Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Na; Li, Xingmei; Yu, Jiayao; Li, Yi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian; Zhong, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) regulates gene expression and affects cellular metabolism. In this study, we checked whether the regulation of lipid metabolism by curcumin is associated with m 6 A RNA methylation. We investigated the effects of dietary curcumin supplementation on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury and lipid metabolism disorder, and on m 6 A RNA methylation in weaned piglets. A total of 24 Duroc × Large White × Landrace piglets were randomly assigned to control, LPS, and CurL (LPS challenge and 200 mg/kg dietary curcumin) groups (n = 8/group). The results showed that curcumin reduced the increase in relative liver weight as well as the concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase induced by LPS injection in the plasma and liver of weaning piglets (p < 0.05). The amounts of total cholesterol and triacylglycerols were decreased by curcumin compared to that by the LPS injection (p < 0.05). Additionally, curcumin reduced the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax mRNA, whereas it increased the p53 mRNA level in the liver (p < 0.05). Curcumin inhibited the enhancement of SREBP-1c and SCD-1 mRNA levels induced by LPS in the liver. Notably, dietary curcumin affected the expression of METTL3, METTL14, ALKBH5, FTO, and YTHDF2 mRNA, and increased the abundance of m 6 A in the liver of piglets. In conclusion, the protective effect of curcumin in LPS-induced liver injury and hepatic lipid metabolism disruption might be due to the increase in m 6 A RNA methylation. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the effect of curcumin in protecting against hepatic injury during inflammation and metabolic diseases. © 2018 AOCS.

  7. An epidermal microRNA regulates neuronal migration through control of the cellular glycosylation state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikael Egebjerg; Snieckute, Goda; Kagias, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    An appropriate balance in glycosylation of proteoglycans is crucial for their ability to regulate animal development. Here, we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans microRNA mir-79, an ortholog of mammalian miR-9, controls sugar-chain homeostasis by targeting two proteins in the proteoglycan bio...... that impinges on a LON-2/glypican pathway and disrupts neuronal migration. Our results identify a regulatory axis controlled by a conserved microRNA that maintains proteoglycan homeostasis in cells....

  8. Biomolecular condensates: organizers of cellular biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banani, Salman F; Lee, Hyun O; Hyman, Anthony A; Rosen, Michael K

    2017-05-01

    Biomolecular condensates are micron-scale compartments in eukaryotic cells that lack surrounding membranes but function to concentrate proteins and nucleic acids. These condensates are involved in diverse processes, including RNA metabolism, ribosome biogenesis, the DNA damage response and signal transduction. Recent studies have shown that liquid-liquid phase separation driven by multivalent macromolecular interactions is an important organizing principle for biomolecular condensates. With this physical framework, it is now possible to explain how the assembly, composition, physical properties and biochemical and cellular functions of these important structures are regulated.

  9. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  10. RNA Recognition and Stress Granule Formation by TIA Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waris, Saboora; Wilce, Matthew Charles James; Wilce, Jacqueline Anne

    2014-01-01

    Stress granule (SG) formation is a primary mechanism through which gene expression is rapidly modulated when the eukaryotic cell undergoes cellular stresses (including heat, oxidative, viral infection, starvation). In particular, the sequestration of specifically targeted translationally stalled mRNAs into SGs limits the expression of a subset of genes, but allows the expression of heatshock proteins that have a protective effect in the cell. The importance of SGs is seen in several disease states in which SG function is disrupted. Fundamental to SG formation are the T cell restricted intracellular antigen (TIA) proteins (TIA-1 and TIA-1 related protein (TIAR)), that both directly bind to target RNA and self-associate to seed the formation of SGs. Here a summary is provided of the current understanding of the way in which TIA proteins target specific mRNA, and how TIA self-association is triggered under conditions of cellular stress. PMID:25522169

  11. In vivo cellular imaging with microscopes enabled by MEMS scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Hyejun

    High-resolution optical imaging plays an important role in medical diagnosis and biomedical research. Confocal microscopy is a widely used imaging method for obtaining cellular and sub-cellular images of biological tissue in reflectance and fluorescence modes. Its characteristic optical sectioning capability also enables three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction. However, its use has mostly been limited to excised tissues due to the requirement of high numerical aperture (NA) lenses for cellular resolution. Microscope miniaturization can enable in vivo imaging to make possible early cancer diagnosis and biological studies in the innate environment. In this dissertation, microscope miniaturization for in vivo cellular imaging is presented. The dual-axes confocal (DAC) architecture overcomes limitations of the conventional single-axis confocal (SAC) architecture to allow for miniaturization with high resolution. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner is the central imaging component that is key in miniaturization of the DAC architecture. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the two-dimensional (2-D) MEMS scanner are presented. The gimbaled MEMS scanner is fabricated on a double silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is actuated by self-aligned vertical electrostatic combdrives. The imaging performance of the MEMS scanner in a DAC configuration is shown in a breadboard microscope setup, where reflectance and fluorescence imaging is demonstrated. Then, the MEMS scanner is integrated into a miniature DAC microscope. The whole imaging system is integrated into a portable unit for research in small animal models of human biology and disease. In vivo 3-D imaging is demonstrated on mouse skin models showing gene transfer and siRNA silencing. The siRNA silencing process is sequentially imaged in one mouse over time.

  12. Structural requirements for the binding of tRNA Lys3 to reverse transcriptase of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Essink, B. B.; Das, A. T.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is primed by the cellular tRNA Lys3 molecule. Packaging of this tRNA primer during virion assembly is thought to be mediated by specific interactions with the reverse transcriptase (RT) protein. Portions of the tRNA

  13. Structural imprints in vivo decode RNA regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Crisalli, Pete; Lee, Byron; Jung, Jong-Wha; Kuchelmeister, Hannes Y; Batista, Pedro J; Torre, Eduardo A; Kool, Eric T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-03-26

    Visualizing the physical basis for molecular behaviour inside living cells is a great challenge for biology. RNAs are central to biological regulation, and the ability of RNA to adopt specific structures intimately controls every step of the gene expression program. However, our understanding of physiological RNA structures is limited; current in vivo RNA structure profiles include only two of the four nucleotides that make up RNA. Here we present a novel biochemical approach, in vivo click selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment (icSHAPE), which enables the first global view, to our knowledge, of RNA secondary structures in living cells for all four bases. icSHAPE of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome versus purified RNA folded in vitro shows that the structural dynamics of RNA in the cellular environment distinguish different classes of RNAs and regulatory elements. Structural signatures at translational start sites and ribosome pause sites are conserved from in vitro conditions, suggesting that these RNA elements are programmed by sequence. In contrast, focal structural rearrangements in vivo reveal precise interfaces of RNA with RNA-binding proteins or RNA-modification sites that are consistent with atomic-resolution structural data. Such dynamic structural footprints enable accurate prediction of RNA-protein interactions and N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) modification genome wide. These results open the door for structural genomics of RNA in living cells and reveal key physiological structures controlling gene expression.

  14. Regulatory effects of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    RNAs, which play significant roles in many fundamental biological processes of life, fold into sophisticated and precise structures. RNA folding is a dynamic and intricate process, which conformation transition of coding and noncoding RNAs form the primary elements of genetic regulation. The cellular environment contains various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that potentially affect RNA folding in vivo, and experimental and theoretical evidence increasingly indicates that the highly flexible features of the RNA structure are affected by these factors, which include the flanking sequence context, physiochemical conditions, cis RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with other molecules. Furthermore, distinct RNA structures have been identified that govern almost all steps of biological processes in cells, including transcriptional activation and termination, transcriptional mutagenesis, 5'-capping, splicing, 3'-polyadenylation, mRNA export and localization, and translation. Here, we briefly summarize the dynamic and complex features of RNA folding along with a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect RNA folding. We then provide several examples to elaborate RNA structure-mediated regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we illustrate the regulatory roles of RNA structure and discuss advances pertaining to RNA structure in plants. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:562-574. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1350 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Parallel mRNA, proteomics and miRNA expression analysis in cell line models of the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Finbarr; Keenan, Joanne; Aherne, Sinead; O'Neill, Fiona; Clarke, Colin; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Breen, Laura; Barron, Niall; Clynes, Martin; Horgan, Karina; Doolan, Padraig; Murphy, Richard

    2017-11-07

    To identify miRNA-regulated proteins differentially expressed between Caco2 and HT-29: two principal cell line models of the intestine. Exponentially growing Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were harvested and prepared for mRNA, miRNA and proteomic profiling. mRNA microarray profiling analysis was carried out using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST array. miRNA microarray profiling analysis was carried out using the Affymetrix Genechip miRNA 3.0 array. Quantitative Label-free LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis was performed using a Dionex Ultimate 3000 RSLCnano system coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap/Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Peptide identities were validated in Proteome Discoverer 2.1 and were subsequently imported into Progenesis QI software for further analysis. Hierarchical cluster analysis for all three parallel datasets (miRNA, proteomics, mRNA) was conducted in the R software environment using the Euclidean distance measure and Ward's clustering algorithm. The prediction of miRNA and oppositely correlated protein/mRNA interactions was performed using TargetScan 6.1. GO biological process, molecular function and cellular component enrichment analysis was carried out for the DE miRNA, protein and mRNA lists via the Pathway Studio 11.3 Web interface using their Mammalian database. Differential expression (DE) profiling comparing the intestinal cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2 identified 1795 Genes, 168 Proteins and 160 miRNAs as DE between the two cell lines. At the gene level, 1084 genes were upregulated and 711 were downregulated in the Caco-2 cell line relative to the HT-29 cell line. At the protein level, 57 proteins were found to be upregulated and 111 downregulated in the Caco-2 cell line relative to the HT-29 cell line. Finally, at the miRNAs level, 104 were upregulated and 56 downregulated in the Caco-2 cell line relative to the HT-29 cell line. Gene ontology (GO) analysis of the DE mRNA identified cell adhesion, migration and ECM organization, cellular lipid

  16. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Tuomas; Jääskeläinen, Kirsi; Blot, Guillaume; Parviainen, Ville; Vaheri, Antti; Renkonen, Risto; Bouloy, Michele; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae) are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S) segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs). The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  17. The RNA silencing pathway: the bits and pieces that matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular pathways are generally proposed on the basis of available experimental knowledge. The proposed pathways, however, may be inadequate to describe the phenomena they are supposed to explain. For instance, by means of concise mathematical models we are able to reveal shortcomings in the current description of the pathway of RNA silencing. The silencing pathway operates by cleaving siRNAs from dsRNA. siRNAs can associate with RISC, leading to the degradation of the target mRNA. We propose and analyze a few small extensions to the pathway: a siRNA degrading RNase, primed amplification of aberrant RNA pieces, and cooperation between aberrant RNA to trigger amplification. These extensions allow for a consistent explanation for various types of silencing phenomena, such as virus induced silencing, transgene and transposon induced silencing, and avoidance of self-reactivity, as well as for differences found between species groups.

  18. Protein kinase A-alpha directly phosphorylates FoxO1 in vascular endothelial cells to regulate expression of vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Won; Chen, Hui; Pullikotil, Philomena; Quon, Michael J

    2011-02-25

    FoxO1, a forkhead box O class transcription factor, is abundant in insulin-responsive tissues. Akt, downstream from phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in insulin signaling, phosphorylates FoxO1 at Thr(24), Ser(256), and Ser(319), negatively regulating its function. We previously reported that dehydroepiandrosterone-stimulated phosphorylation of FoxO1 in endothelial cells requires cAMP-dependent protein kinase α (PKA-α). Therefore, we hypothesized that FoxO1 is a novel direct substrate for PKA-α. Using an immune complex kinase assay with [γ-(32)P]ATP, purified PKA-α directly phosphorylated wild-type FoxO1 but not FoxO1-AAA (mutant with alanine substitutions at known Akt phosphorylation sites). Phosphorylation of wild-type FoxO1 (but not FoxO1-AAA) was detectable using phospho-specific antibodies. Similar results were obtained using purified GST-FoxO1 protein as the substrate. Thus, FoxO1 is a direct substrate for PKA-α in vitro. In bovine aortic endothelial cells, interaction between endogenous PKA-α and endogenous FoxO1 was detected by co-immunoprecipitation. In human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), pretreatment with H89 (PKA inhibitor) or siRNA knockdown of PKA-α decreased forskolin- or prostaglandin E(2)-stimulated phosphorylation of FoxO1. In HAEC transfected with a FoxO-promoter luciferase reporter, co-expression of the catalytic domain of PKA-α, catalytically inactive mutant PKA-α, or siRNA against PKA-α caused corresponding increases or decreases in transactivation of the FoxO promoter. Expression of vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 mRNA, up-regulated by FoxO1 in endothelial cells, was enhanced by siRNA knockdown of PKA-α or treatment of HAEC with the PKA inhibitor H89. Adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells was enhanced by H89 treatment or overexpression of FoxO1-AAA, similar to effects of TNF-α treatment. We conclude that FoxO1 is a novel physiological substrate for PKA-α in vascular endothelial cells.

  19. Is central dogma a global property of cellular information flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent ePiras

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma of molecular biology has come under scrutiny in recent years. Here, we reviewed high-throughput mRNA and protein expression data of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and several mammalian cells. At both single cell and population scales, the statistical comparisons between the entire transcriptomes and proteomes show clear correlation structures. In contrast, the pair-wise correlations of single transcript to protein show nullity. These data suggest that the organizing structure guiding cellular processes is observed at omics-wide scale and not at single molecule level. The central dogma, thus, globally emerges as an average integrated flow of cellular information.

  20. Small regulatory RNAs control the multi-cellular adhesive lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Boysen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Small regulatory RNA molecules have recently been recognized as important regulatory elements of developmental processes in both eukaryotes and bacteria. We here describe a striking example in Escherichia coli that can switch between a single-cell motile lifestyle and a multi-cellular, sessile....... Our demonstration that basal expression of each of the three RNA species is sufficient to downregulate CsgD synthesis and prevent curli formation indicates that all play a prominent role in the curli regulatory network. Our findings provide the first clue as to how the Rcs signalling pathway...... negatively regulates curli synthesis and increase the number of small regulatory RNAs that act directly on the csgD mRNA to five....

  1. Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Promotes Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral M1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carina F; Read, Eliot K C; Wise, Helen M; Amorim, Maria J; Digard, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Influenza A virus mRNAs are transcribed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in the cell nucleus before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Segment 7 produces two major transcripts: an unspliced mRNA that encodes the M1 matrix protein and a spliced transcript that encodes the M2 ion channel. Export of both mRNAs is dependent on the cellular NXF1/TAP pathway, but it is unclear how they are recruited to the export machinery or how the intron-containing but unspliced M1 mRNA bypasses the normal quality-control checkpoints. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization to monitor segment 7 mRNA localization, we found that cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced M1 mRNA was inefficient in the absence of NS1, both in the context of segment 7 RNPs reconstituted by plasmid transfection and in mutant virus-infected cells. This effect was independent of any major effect on steady-state levels of segment 7 mRNA or splicing but corresponded to a ∼5-fold reduction in the accumulation of M1. A similar defect in intronless hemagglutinin (HA) mRNA nuclear export was seen with an NS1 mutant virus. Efficient export of M1 mRNA required both an intact NS1 RNA-binding domain and effector domain. Furthermore, while wild-type NS1 interacted with cellular NXF1 and also increased the interaction of segment 7 mRNA with NXF1, mutant NS1 polypeptides unable to promote mRNA export did neither. Thus, we propose that NS1 facilitates late viral gene expression by acting as an adaptor between viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery to promote their nuclear export. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of a wide variety of mammalian and avian species that threatens public health and food security. A fuller understanding of the virus life cycle is important to aid control strategies. The virus has a small genome that encodes relatively few proteins that are often multifunctional. Here, we characterize a new function for the NS1 protein, showing that, as well as

  2. Riboregulation of the bacterial actin-homolog MreB by DsrA small noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrol, Bastien; Fortas, Emilie; Martret, Claire; Cech, Grzegorz; Kloska, Anna; Caulet, Stephane; Barbet, Marion; Trépout, Sylvain; Marco, Sergio; Taghbalout, Aziz; Busi, Florent; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Arluison, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial actin-homolog MreB is a key player in bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis and is required for the maintenance of the rod-like morphology of Escherichia coli. However, how MreB cellular levels are adjusted to growth conditions is poorly understood. Here, we show that DsrA, an E. coli small noncoding RNA (sRNA), is involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mreB. DsrA is required for the downregulation of MreB cellular concentration during environmentally induced slow growth-rates, mainly growth at low temperature and during the stationary phase. DsrA interacts in an Hfq-dependent manner with the 5' region of mreB mRNA, which contains signals for translation initiation and thereby affects mreB translation and stability. Moreover, as DsrA is also involved in the regulation of two transcriptional regulators, σ(S) and the nucleoid associated protein H-NS, which negatively regulate mreB transcription, it also indirectly contributes to mreB transcriptional down-regulation. By using quantitative analyses, our results evidence the complexity of this regulation and the tangled interplay between transcriptional and post-transcriptional control. As transcription factors and sRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulators use different timescales, we propose that the sRNA pathway helps to adapt to changes in temperature, but also indirectly mediates long-term regulation of MreB concentration. The tight regulation and fine-tuning of mreB gene expression in response to cellular stresses is discussed in regard to the effect of the MreB protein on cell elongation.

  3. VapC toxins drive cellular dormancy under uranium stress for the extreme thermoacidophile Metallosphaera prunae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arpan; Wheaton, Garrett H; Counts, James A; Ijeomah, Brenda; Desai, Jigar; Kelly, Robert M

    2017-07-01

    When abruptly exposed to toxic levels of hexavalent uranium, the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Metallosphaera prunae, originally isolated from an abandoned uranium mine, ceased to grow, and concomitantly exhibited heightened levels of cytosolic ribonuclease activity that corresponded to substantial degradation of cellular RNA. The M. prunae transcriptome during 'uranium-shock' implicated VapC toxins as possible causative agents of the observed RNA degradation. Identifiable VapC toxins and PIN-domain proteins encoded in the M. prunae genome were produced and characterized, three of which (VapC4, VapC7, VapC8) substantially degraded M. prunae rRNA in vitro. RNA cleavage specificity for these VapCs mapped to motifs within M. prunae rRNA. Furthermore, based on frequency of cleavage sequences, putative target mRNAs for these VapCs were identified; these were closely associated with translation, transcription, and replication. It is interesting to note that Metallosphaera sedula, a member of the same genus and which has a nearly identical genome sequence but not isolated from a uranium-rich biotope, showed no evidence of dormancy when exposed to this metal. M. prunae utilizes VapC toxins for post-transcriptional regulation under uranium stress to enter a cellular dormant state, thereby providing an adaptive response to what would otherwise be a deleterious environmental perturbation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Synthesis of Polymer-Lipid Nanoparticles by Microfluidic Focusing for siRNA Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylenimine (PEI as a cationic polymer is commonly used as a carrier for gene delivery. PEI-800 is less toxic than PEI-25K but it is also less efficient. A novel nanocarrier was developed by combining PEI-800 with a pH-sensitive lipid to form polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (P/LNPs. They were synthesized by microfluidic focusing (MF. Two microfluidic devices were used to synthesize P/LNPs loaded with VEGF siRNA. A series of P/LNPs with different particle sizes and distributions were obtained by altering the flow rate and geometry of microfluidic chips, and introducing sonication. Furthermore, the P/LNPs can be loaded with VEGF siRNA efficiently and were stable in serum for 12 h. Finally, P/LNPs produced by the microfluidic chip showed greater cellular uptake as well as down-regulation of VEGF protein level in both A549 and MCF-7 with reduced cellular toxicity. All in all, the P/LNPs produced by MF method were shown to be a safe and efficient carrier for VEGF siRNA, with potential application for siRNA therapeutics.

  5. Exosomal and Non-Exosomal Transport of Extra-Cellular microRNAs in Follicular Fluid: Implications for Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mahmodul Hasan Sohel

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication within the follicle involves many signaling molecules, and this process may be mediated by secretion and uptake of exosomes that contain several bioactive molecules including extra-cellular miRNAs. Follicular fluid and cells from individual follicles of cattle were grouped based on Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB staining of the corresponding oocytes. Both Exoquick precipitation and differential ultracentrifugation were used to separate the exosome and non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid. Following miRNA isolation from both fractions, the human miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT miRNA PCR array system was used to profile miRNA expression. This analysis found that miRNAs were present in both exosomal and non-exosomal fraction of bovine follicular fluid. We found 25 miRNAs differentially expressed (16 up and 9 down in exosomes and 30 miRNAs differentially expressed (21 up and 9 down in non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid in comparison of BCB- versus BCB+ oocyte groups. Expression of selected miRNAs was detected in theca, granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex. To further explore the potential roles of these follicular fluid derived extra-cellular miRNAs, the potential target genes were predicted, and functional annotation and pathway analysis revealed most of these pathways are known regulators of follicular development and oocyte growth. In order to validate exosome mediated cell-cell communication within follicular microenvironment, we demonstrated uptake of exosomes and resulting increase of endogenous miRNA level and subsequent alteration of mRNA levels in follicular cells in vitro. This study demonstrates for the first time, the presence of exosome or non-exosome mediated transfer of miRNA in the bovine follicular fluid, and oocyte growth dependent variation in extra-cellular miRNA signatures in the follicular environment.

  6. Regulatory mechanisms of RNA function: emerging roles of DNA repair enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Laure; Nilsen, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    The acquisition of an appropriate set of chemical modifications is required in order to establish correct structure of RNA molecules, and essential for their function. Modification of RNA bases affects RNA maturation, RNA processing, RNA quality control, and protein translation. Some RNA modifications are directly involved in the regulation of these processes. RNA epigenetics is emerging as a mechanism to achieve dynamic regulation of RNA function. Other modifications may prevent or be a signal for degradation. All types of RNA species are subject to processing or degradation, and numerous cellular mechanisms are involved. Unexpectedly, several studies during the last decade have established a connection between DNA and RNA surveillance mechanisms in eukaryotes. Several proteins that respond to DNA damage, either to process or to signal the presence of damaged DNA, have been shown to participate in RNA quality control, turnover or processing. Some enzymes that repair DNA damage may also process modified RNA substrates. In this review, we give an overview of the DNA repair proteins that function in RNA metabolism. We also discuss the roles of two base excision repair enzymes, SMUG1 and APE1, in RNA quality control.

  7. Role of nitric oxide in cellular iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2003-03-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) which are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO*, a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO+ (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO+-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  8. Increased RNAi Efficacy in Spodoptera exigua via the Formulation of dsRNA With Guanylated Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Christiaens

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera comprise some of the most devastating herbivorous pest insects worldwide. One of the most promising novel pest control strategies is exploiting the RNA interference (RNAi mechanism to target essential genes for knockdown and incite toxic effects in the target species without harming other organisms in the ecosystem. However, many insects are refractory to oral RNAi, often due to rapid degradation of ingested dsRNA in their digestive system. This is the case for many lepidopteran insects, including the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua, which is characterized by a very alkaline gut environment (pH > 9.0 and a strong intestinal nucleolytic activity. In this research, guanidine-containing polymers were developed to protect dsRNA against nucleolytic degradation, specifically in high pH environments. First, their ability to protect dsRNA against nucleolytic degradation in gut juice of the beet armyworm S. exigua was investigated ex vivo. Polymers with high guanidine content provided a strong protection against nucleolytic degradation at pH 11, protecting the dsRNA for up to 30 h. Next, cellular uptake of the dsRNA and the polyplexes in lepidopteran CF203 midgut cells was investigated by confocal microscopy, showing that the polymer also enhanced cellular uptake of the dsRNA. Finally, in vivo feeding RNAi bioassays demonstrated that using these guanidine-containing polymer nanoparticles led to an increased RNAi efficiency in S. exigua. Targeting the essential gene chitin synthase B, we observed that the mortality increased to 53% in the polymer-protected dsRNA treatment compared to only 16% with the naked dsRNA and found that polymer-protected dsRNA completely halted the development of the caterpillars. These results show that using guanylated polymers as a formulation strategy can prevent degradation of dsRNA in the alkaline and strongly nucleolytic gut of lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, the polymer also enhances cellular uptake in

  9. EphA2 Is a Potential Player of Malignant Cellular Behavior in Non-Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells but Not in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Chul; Cho, Sung Yong; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Lee, Seung Bae; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Jeong, Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of EphA2 in malignant cellular behavior in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells and whether FAK/RhoA signaling can act as downstream effectors of EphA2 on RCC cells. Expression of EphA2 protein in non-metastatic RCC (Caki-2 and A498), metastatic RCC cells (Caki-1 and ACHN), HEK-293 cells and prostate cancer cells (PC-3 and DU-145; positive controls of EphA2 expression) was evaluated by Western blot. Changes in mRNA or protein expression of EphA2, FAK or membrane-bound RhoA following EphA2, FAK or RhoA small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or Western blot. The effect of siRNA treatment on cellular viability, apoptosis and invasion was analyzed by cell counting kit-8, Annexin-V and modified Matrigel-Boyden assays, respectively. In all RCC cell lines, the expression of EphA2 protein was detectable at variable levels; however, in HEK-293 cells, EphA2 expression was very low. Treatment with EphA2 siRNA significantly reduced the expression of EphA2 mRNA and protein in all RCC cell lines. For non-metastatic RCC cells (Caki-2 and A498) but not metastatic RCC cells (Caki-1 and ACHN), cellular viability, invasiveness, resistance to apoptosis, expression of membrane-bound RhoA protein and FAK phosphorylation were significantly decreased in EphA2 siRNA-treated cells compared to the control. In non-metastatic RCC cells, FAK siRNA significantly attenuated the invasiveness, resistance to apoptosis, as well as expression of membrane-bound RhoA protein without changing protein expression of EphA2. RhoA siRNA significantly decreased the malignant cellular behavior and expression of membrane-bound RhoA protein without changing EphA2 protein expression or FAK phosphorylation. Our data provide the first functional evidence that the EphA2/FAK/RhoA signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignant cellular behavior of RCC and appears to be functional particularly in the early stage of

  10. Low-level lasers alter mRNA levels from traditional reference genes used in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, A. F.; Canuto, K. S.; Rodrigues, J. A.; Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is among the leading causes of mortality worldwide, increasing the importance of treatment development. Low-level lasers are used in several diseases, but some concerns remains on cancers. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a technique used to understand cellular behavior through quantification of mRNA levels. Output data from target genes are commonly relative to a reference that cannot vary according to treatment. This study evaluated reference genes levels from MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to red or infrared lasers at different fluences. Cultures were exposed to red and infrared lasers, incubated (4 h, 37 °C), total RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesis was performed to evaluate mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB and TRFC genes by RT-qPCR. Specific amplification was verified by melting curves and agarose gel electrophoresis. RefFinder enabled data analysis by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Specific amplifications were obtained and, although mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB or TRFC genes presented no significant variation through traditional statistical analysis, Excel-based tools revealed that the use of these reference genes are dependent of laser characteristics. Our data showed that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences alter the mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB and TRFC in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  11. CORSEN, a new software dedicated to microscope-based 3D distance measurements: mRNA-mitochondria distance, from single-cell to population analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdren, Laurent; Delaveau, Thierry; Marquenet, Emelie; Jacq, Claude; Garcia, Mathilde

    2010-07-01

    Recent improvements in microscopy technology allow detection of single molecules of RNA, but tools for large-scale automatic analyses of particle distributions are lacking. An increasing number of imaging studies emphasize the importance of mRNA localization in the definition of cell territory or the biogenesis of cell compartments. CORSEN is a new tool dedicated to three-dimensional (3D) distance measurements from imaging experiments especially developed to access the minimal distance between RNA molecules and cellular compartment markers. CORSEN includes a 3D segmentation algorithm allowing the extraction and the characterization of the cellular objects to be processed--surface determination, aggregate decomposition--for minimal distance calculations. CORSEN's main contribution lies in exploratory statistical analysis, cell population characterization, and high-throughput assays that are made possible by the implementation of a batch process analysis. We highlighted CORSEN's utility for the study of relative positions of mRNA molecules and mitochondria: CORSEN clearly discriminates mRNA localized to the vicinity of mitochondria from those that are translated on free cytoplasmic polysomes. Moreover, it quantifies the cell-to-cell variations of mRNA localization and emphasizes the necessity for statistical approaches. This method can be extended to assess the evolution of the distance between specific mRNAs and other cellular structures in different cellular contexts. CORSEN was designed for the biologist community with the concern to provide an easy-to-use and highly flexible tool that can be applied for diverse distance quantification issues.

  12. Elongation Factor Tu Prevents Misediting of Gly-tRNA(Gly Caused by the Design Behind the Chiral Proofreading Site of D-Aminoacyl-tRNA Deacylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Brata Routh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available D-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase (DTD removes D-amino acids mischarged on tRNAs and is thus implicated in enforcing homochirality in proteins. Previously, we proposed that selective capture of D-aminoacyl-tRNA by DTD's invariant, cross-subunit Gly-cisPro motif forms the mechanistic basis for its enantioselectivity. We now show, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy-based binding studies followed by biochemical assays with both bacterial and eukaryotic systems, that DTD effectively misedits Gly-tRNAGly. High-resolution crystal structure reveals that the architecture of DTD's chiral proofreading site is completely porous to achiral glycine. Hence, L-chiral rejection is the only design principle on which DTD functions, unlike other chiral-specific enzymes such as D-amino acid oxidases, which are specific for D-enantiomers. Competition assays with elongation factor thermo unstable (EF-Tu and DTD demonstrate that EF-Tu precludes Gly-tRNAGly misediting at normal cellular concentrations. However, even slightly higher DTD levels overcome this protection conferred by EF-Tu, thus resulting in significant depletion of Gly-tRNAGly. Our in vitro observations are substantiated by cell-based studies in Escherichia coli that show that overexpression of DTD causes cellular toxicity, which is largely rescued upon glycine supplementation. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that DTD is an RNA-based catalyst, since it uses only the terminal 2'-OH of tRNA for catalysis without the involvement of protein side chains. The study therefore provides a unique paradigm of enzyme action for substrate selection/specificity by DTD, and thus explains the underlying cause of DTD's activity on Gly-tRNAGly. It also gives a molecular and functional basis for the necessity and the observed tight regulation of DTD levels, thereby preventing cellular toxicity due to misediting.

  13. Intracellular coordination of potyviral RNA functions in infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina eMäkinen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Establishment of an infection cycle requires mechanisms to allocate the genomes of (+-stranded RNA viruses in a balanced ratio to translation, replication, encapsidation, and movement, as well as mechanisms to prevent translocation of viral RNA (vRNA to cellular RNA degradation pathways. The ratio of vRNA allocated to various functions is likely balanced by the availability of regulatory proteins or competition of the interaction sites within regulatory ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. Due to the transient nature of viral processes and the interdependency between vRNA pathways, it is technically demanding to work out the exact molecular mechanisms underlying vRNA regulation. A substantial number of viral and host proteins have been identified that facilitate the steps that lead to the assembly of a functional potyviral RNA replication complex and their fusion with chloroplasts. Simultaneously with on-going viral replication, part of the replicated potyviral RNA enters movement pathways. Although not much is known about the processes of potyviral RNA release from viral replication complexes (VRCs, the molecular interactions involved in these processes determine the fate of the replicated vRNA. Some viral and host cell proteins have been described that direct replicated potyviral RNA to translation to enable potyviral gene expression and productive infection. The antiviral defense of the cell causes vRNA degradation by RNA silencing. We hypothesize that also plant pathways involved in mRNA decay may have a role in the coordination of potyviral RNA expression. In this review, we discuss the roles of different potyviral and host proteins in the coordination of various potyviral RNA functions.

  14. Biochemical studies of immune RNA using a cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.D.; Sellin, H.G.; Novelli, G.D.

    1980-01-01

    Immune RNA (iRNA), a subcellular macromolecular species usually prepared by phenol extraction of lymphoid tissue, can confer some manifestation(s) of cellular immunity on naive lymphocytes. Experiments were done to develop an assay system to detect activation of lymphocytes by iRNA to become cytotoxic toward tumor cells, and to study certain properties of iRNA using this system. Guinea pigs were immunized with human mammary carcinoma cells and the iRNA, prepared from spleens of animals shown by prior assay to have blood lymphocytes highly cytotoxic against the tumor cells, was assayed by ability of iRNA-activated lymphocytes to lyse /sup 51/Cr-labelled tumor cells. The ability of iRNA to activate lymphocytes to tumor cytotoxicity could only be differentiated from a cytotoxic activation by RNA preparations from unimmunized animals at very low doses of RNA. The most active iRNA preparations were from cytoplasmic subcellular fractions, extracted by a cold phenol procedure, while iRNA isolated by hot phenol methods was no more active than control RNA prepared by the same techniques. Attempts to demonstrate poly(A) sequences in iRNA were inconclusive.

  15. Bioinspired nanocomplex for spatiotemporal imaging of sequential mRNA expression in differentiating neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Ruili; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, He-Fang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Fu; Li, Weitao; Niu, Gang; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-12-23

    Messenger RNA plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular activities. The expression dynamics of specific mRNA contains substantial information on the intracellular milieu. Unlike the imaging of stationary mRNAs, real-time intracellular imaging of the dynamics of mRNA expression is of great value for investigating mRNA biology and exploring specific cellular cascades. In addition to advanced imaging methods, timely extracellular stimulation is another key factor in regulating the mRNA expression repertoire. The integration of effective stimulation and imaging into a single robust system would significantly improve stimulation efficiency and imaging accuracy, producing fewer unwanted artifacts. In this study, we developed a multifunctional nanocomplex to enable self-activating and spatiotemporal imaging of the dynamics of mRNA sequential expression during the neural stem cell differentiation process. This nanocomplex showed improved enzymatic stability, fast recognition kinetics, and high specificity. With a mechanism regulated by endogenous cell machinery, this nanocomplex realized the successive stimulating motif release and the dynamic imaging of chronological mRNA expression during neural stem cell differentiation without the use of transgenetic manipulation. The dynamic imaging montage of mRNA expression ultimately facilitated genetic heterogeneity analysis. In vivo lateral ventricle injection of this nanocomplex enabled endogenous neural stem cell activation and labeling at their specific differentiation stages. This nanocomplex is highly amenable as an alternative tool to explore the dynamics of intricate mRNA activities in various physiological and pathological conditions.

  16. Identification of phlebovirus and arenavirus RNA sequences that stall and repress the exoribonuclease XRN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charley, Phillida A; Wilusz, Carol J; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2018-01-05

    Regulated mRNA decay plays a vital role in determining both the level and quality of cellular gene expression. Viral RNAs must successfully evade this host RNA decay machinery to establish a productive infection. One way for RNA viruses to accomplish this is to target the cellular exoribonuclease XRN1, because this enzyme is accessible in the cytoplasm and plays a major role in mRNA decay. Members of the Flaviviridae use RNA structures in their 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions to stall and repress XRN1, effectively stabilizing viral RNAs while also causing significant dysregulation of host cell mRNA stability. Here, we use a series of biochemical assays to demonstrate that the 3'-terminal portion of the nucleocapsid (N) mRNA of Rift Valley fever virus, a phlebovirus of the Bunyaviridae family, also can effectively stall and repress XRN1. The region responsible for impeding XRN1 includes a G-rich portion that likely forms a G-quadruplex structure. The 3'-terminal portions of ambisense-derived transcripts of multiple arenaviruses also stalled XRN1. Therefore, we conclude that RNAs from two additional families of mammalian RNA viruses stall and repress XRN1. This observation. emphasizes the importance and commonality of this viral strategy to interfere with the 5'-to-3'-exoribonuclease component of the cytoplasmic RNA decay machinery. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The nuclear receptor ERβ engages AGO2 in regulation of gene transcription, RNA splicing and RISC loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarallo, Roberta; Giurato, Giorgio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Ravo, Maria; Rizzo, Francesca; Salvati, Annamaria; Ricciardi, Luca; Marchese, Giovanna; Cordella, Angela; Rocco, Teresa; Gigantino, Valerio; Pierri, Biancamaria; Cimmino, Giovanni; Milanesi, Luciano; Ambrosino, Concetta; Nyman, Tuula A; Nassa, Giovanni; Weisz, Alessandro

    2017-10-06

    The RNA-binding protein Argonaute 2 (AGO2) is a key effector of RNA-silencing pathways It exerts a pivotal role in microRNA maturation and activity and can modulate chromatin remodeling, transcriptional gene regulation and RNA splicing. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is endowed with oncosuppressive activities, antagonizing hormone-induced carcinogenesis and inhibiting growth and oncogenic functions in luminal-like breast cancers (BCs), where its expression correlates with a better prognosis of the disease. Applying interaction proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry to characterize nuclear factors cooperating with ERβ in gene regulation, we identify AGO2 as a novel partner of ERβ in human BC cells. ERβ-AGO2 association was confirmed in vitro and in vivo in both the nucleus and cytoplasm and is shown to be RNA-mediated. ChIP-Seq demonstrates AGO2 association with a large number of ERβ binding sites, and total and nascent RNA-Seq in ERβ + vs ERβ - cells, and before and after AGO2 knock-down in ERβ + cells, reveals a widespread involvement of this factor in ERβ-mediated regulation of gene transcription rate and RNA splicing. Moreover, isolation and sequencing by RIP-Seq of ERβ-associated long and small RNAs in the cytoplasm suggests involvement of the nuclear receptor in RISC loading, indicating that it may also be able to directly control mRNA translation efficiency and stability. These results demonstrate that AGO2 can act as a pleiotropic functional partner of ERβ, indicating that both factors are endowed with multiple roles in the control of key cellular functions.

  18. Selfish cellular networks and the evolution of complex organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourilsky, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    Human gametogenesis takes years and involves many cellular divisions, particularly in males. Consequently, gametogenesis provides the opportunity to acquire multiple de novo mutations. A significant portion of these is likely to impact the cellular networks linking genes, proteins, RNA and metabolites, which constitute the functional units of cells. A wealth of literature shows that these individual cellular networks are complex, robust and evolvable. To some extent, they are able to monitor their own performance, and display sufficient autonomy to be termed "selfish". Their robustness is linked to quality control mechanisms which are embedded in and act upon the individual networks, thereby providing a basis for selection during gametogenesis. These selective processes are equally likely to affect cellular functions that are not gamete-specific, and the evolution of the most complex organisms, including man, is therefore likely to occur via two pathways: essential housekeeping functions would be regulated and evolve during gametogenesis within the parents before being transmitted to their progeny, while classical selection would operate on other traits of the organisms that shape their fitness with respect to the environment. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Acrolein-exposed normal human lung fibroblasts in vitro: cellular senescence, enhanced telomere erosion, and degradation of Werner's syndrome protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-Ho; Bruse, Shannon; Huneidi, Salam; Schrader, Ronald M; Monick, Martha M; Lin, Yong; Carter, A Brent; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J; Nyunoya, Toru

    2014-09-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental hazard to human health. Acrolein has been reported to activate the DNA damage response and induce apoptosis. However, little is known about the effects of acrolein on cellular senescence. We examined whether acrolein induces cellular senescence in cultured normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF). We cultured NHLF in the presence or absence of acrolein and determined the effects of acrolein on cell proliferative capacity, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, the known senescence-inducing pathways (e.g., p53, p21), and telomere length. We found that acrolein induced cellular senescence by increasing both p53 and p21. The knockdown of p53 mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated acrolein-induced cellular senescence. Acrolein decreased Werner's syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family involved in DNA repair and telomere maintenance. Acrolein-induced down-regulation of WRN protein was rescued by p53 knockdown or proteasome inhibition. Finally, we found that acrolein accelerated p53-mediated telomere shortening. These results suggest that acrolein induces p53-mediated cellular senescence accompanied by enhanced telomere attrition and WRN protein down-regulation.

  20. Multicolor microRNA FISH effectively differentiates tumor types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Masry, Paul A.; McGeary, Sean E.; Miller, Jason B.; Hafner, Markus; Li, Zhen; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Morozov, Pavel; Brown, Miguel; Gogakos, Tasos; Mobin, Mehrpouya B.; Snorrason, Einar L.; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Zhang, Xiao; Perlis, Clifford S.; Wu, Hong; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Feng, Huichen; Shuda, Masahiro; Moore, Patrick S.; Tron, Victor A.; Chang, Yuan; Tuschl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are excellent tumor biomarkers because of their cell-type specificity and abundance. However, many miRNA detection methods, such as real-time PCR, obliterate valuable visuospatial information in tissue samples. To enable miRNA visualization in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, we developed multicolor miRNA FISH. As a proof of concept, we used this method to differentiate two skin tumors, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), with overlapping histologic features but distinct cellular origins. Using sequencing-based miRNA profiling and discriminant analysis, we identified the tumor-specific miRNAs miR-205 and miR-375 in BCC and MCC, respectively. We addressed three major shortcomings in miRNA FISH, identifying optimal conditions for miRNA fixation and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) retention using model compounds and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, enhancing signal amplification and detection by increasing probe-hapten linker lengths, and improving probe specificity using shortened probes with minimal rRNA sequence complementarity. We validated our method on 4 BCC and 12 MCC tumors. Amplified miR-205 and miR-375 signals were normalized against directly detectable reference rRNA signals. Tumors were classified using predefined cutoff values, and all were correctly identified in blinded analysis. Our study establishes a reliable miRNA FISH technique for parallel visualization of differentially expressed miRNAs in FFPE tumor tissues. PMID:23728175

  1. Cellular microRNA-miR-548g-3p modulates the replication of dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Weitao; He, Zhenjian; Jing, Qinlong; Hu, Yiwen; Lin, Cuiji; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Xiaoqun; Su, Yangfan; Yuan, Jiehao; Chen, Zhenxin; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Li, Mengfeng

    2015-06-01

    It has been well recognized that microRNA plays a role in the host-pathogen interaction network. The significance of microRNA in the regulation of dengue virus (DENV) replication, however, remains unknown. The objective of our study was to determine the biological function of miR-548g-3p in modulating the replication of dengue virus. Here we report that employment of a microRNA target search algorithm to analyze the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) consensus sequences of DENV (DENV serotypes 1-4) led to a discovery that miR-548g-3p directly targets the stem loop A promoter element within the 5'UTR, a region essential for DENV replication. Real-time PCR was used to measure the expression levels of miR-548g-3p under DENV infection. We performed overexpression and inhibition assays to test the role of miR-548g-3p on DENV replication. The protein and mRNA levels of interferon were measured by ELISA and real-time PCR respectively. We found that overexpression of miR-548g-3p suppressed multiplication of DENV 1, 2, 3 and 4, and that miR-548g-3p was also found to interfere with DENV translation, thereby suppressing the expression of viral proteins. Our results suggest that miR-548g-3p directly regulates DENV replication and warrant further study to investigate the feasibility of microRNA-based anti-DENV approaches. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Live Imaging of Cellular Internalization of Single Colloidal Particle by Combined Label-Free and Fluorescence Total Internal Reflection Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Gerard D; Vllasaliu, Driton; Falcone, Franco H; Somekh, Michael G; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2015-11-02

    In this work we utilize the combination of label-free total internal reflection microscopy and total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRM/TIRF) microscopy to achieve a simultaneous, live imaging of single, label-free colloidal particle endocytosis by individual cells. The TIRM arm of the microscope enables label free imaging of the colloid and cell membrane features, while the TIRF arm images the dynamics of fluorescent-labeled clathrin (protein involved in endocytosis via clathrin pathway), expressed in transfected 3T3 fibroblasts cells. Using a model polymeric colloid and cells with a fluorescently tagged clathrin endocytosis pathway, we demonstrate that wide field TIRM/TIRF coimaging enables live visualization of the process of colloidal particle interaction with the labeled cell structure, which is valuable for discerning the membrane events and route of colloid internalization by the cell. We further show that 500 nm in diameter model polystyrene colloid associates with clathrin, prior to and during its cellular internalization. This association is not apparent with larger, 1 μm in diameter colloids, indicating an upper particle size limit for clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  3. Dysregulation of RNA Mediated Gene Expression in Motor Neuron Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Inês do Carmo G; Rehorst, Wiebke A; Kye, Min Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an important role for RNA-mediated gene expression in motor neuron diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and SMA (spinal muscular atrophy). ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder, whereby SMA or "children's Lou Gehrig's disease" is considered a pediatric neurodevelopmental disorder. Despite the difference in genetic causes, both ALS and SMA share common phenotypes; dysfunction/loss of motor neurons that eventually leads to muscle weakness and atrophy. With advanced techniques in molecular genetics and cell biology, current data suggest that these two distinct motor neuron diseases share more than phenotypes; ALS and SMA have similar cellular pathological mechanisms including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and dysregulation in RNA-mediated gene expression. Here, we will discuss the current findings on these two diseases with specific focus on RNA-mediated gene regulation including miRNA expression, pre-mRNA processing and RNA binding proteins.

  4. Integrating miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiling Uncovers miRNAs Underlying Fat Deposition in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxian Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous, noncoding RNAs that regulate various biological processes including adipogenesis and fat metabolism. Here, we adopted a deep sequencing approach to determine the identity and abundance of miRNAs involved in fat deposition in adipose tissues from fat-tailed (Kazakhstan sheep, KS and thin-tailed (Tibetan sheep, TS sheep breeds. By comparing HiSeq data of these two breeds, 539 miRNAs were shared in both breeds, whereas 179 and 97 miRNAs were uniquely expressed in KS and TS, respectively. We also identified 35 miRNAs that are considered to be putative novel miRNAs. The integration of miRNA-mRNA analysis revealed that miRNA-associated targets were mainly involved in the gene ontology (GO biological processes concerning cellular process and metabolic process, and miRNAs play critical roles in fat deposition through their ability to regulate fundamental pathways. These pathways included the MAPK signaling pathway, FoxO and Wnt signaling pathway, and focal adhesion. Taken together, our results define miRNA expression signatures that may contribute to fat deposition and lipid metabolism in sheep.

  5. Improved cellular uptake of antisense Peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cell-penetrating Peptide and a lipid domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    based on a splicing correction of a mutated luciferase gene in HeLa pLuc705 cells by targeting antisense oligonucleotides to a cryptic splice site. Further improvement in the delivery of CatLip-PNA conjugates is achieved by using auxiliary agents/treatments (e.g., chloroquine, calcium ions......Unaided cellular uptake of RNA interference agents such as antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA is extremely poor, and in vivo bioavailability is also limited. Thus, effective delivery strategies for such potential drugs are in high demand. Recently, a novel approach using a class of short cationic....... We have found, however, that this low -bioavailability can be significantly improved by chemical conjugation to a lipid domain ("Lip," such as a fatty acid), thereby creating "CatLip"-conjugates. The cellular uptake of these conjugates is conveniently evaluated using a sensitive cellular assay system...

  6. Influenza Virus Mounts a Two-Pronged Attack on Host RNA Polymerase II Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, David L V; Tellier, Michael; Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Nojima, Takayuki; Proudfoot, Nick J; Murphy, Shona; Fodor, Ervin

    2018-05-15

    Influenza virus intimately associates with host RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and mRNA processing machinery. Here, we use mammalian native elongating transcript sequencing (mNET-seq) to examine Pol II behavior during viral infection. We show that influenza virus executes a two-pronged attack on host transcription. First, viral infection causes decreased Pol II gene occupancy downstream of transcription start sites. Second, virus-induced cellular stress leads to a catastrophic failure of Pol II termination at poly(A) sites, with transcription often continuing for tens of kilobases. Defective Pol II termination occurs independently of the ability of the viral NS1 protein to interfere with host mRNA processing. Instead, this termination defect is a common effect of diverse cellular stresses and underlies the production of previously reported downstream-of-gene transcripts (DoGs). Our work has implications for understanding not only host-virus interactions but also fundamental aspects of mammalian transcription. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. RNA and RNP as Building Blocks for Nanotechnology and Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hirohisa; Saito, Hirohide

    2016-01-01

    Recent technologies that aimed to elucidate cellular function have revealed essential roles for RNA molecules in living systems. Our knowledge concerning functional and structural information of naturally occurring RNA and RNA-protein (RNP) complexes is increasing rapidly. RNA and RNP interaction motifs are structural units that function as building blocks to constitute variety of complex structures. RNA-central synthetic biology and nanotechnology are constructive approaches that employ the accumulated information and build synthetic RNA (RNP)-based circuits and nanostructures. Here, we describe how to design and construct synthetic RNA (RNP)-based devices and structures at the nanometer-scale for biological and future therapeutic applications. RNA/RNP nanostructures can also be utilized as the molecular scaffold to control the localization or interactions of target molecule(s). Moreover, RNA motifs recognized by RNA-binding proteins can be applied to make protein-responsive translational "switches" that can turn gene expression "on" or "off" depending on the intracellular environment. This "synthetic RNA and RNP world" will expand tools for nanotechnology and synthetic biology. In addition, these reconstructive approaches would lead to a greater understanding of building principle in naturally occurring RNA/RNP molecules and systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. GIMDA: Graphlet interaction-based MiRNA-disease association prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Guan, Na-Na; Li, Jian-Qiang; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2018-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been confirmed to be closely related to various human complex diseases by many experimental studies. It is necessary and valuable to develop powerful and effective computational models to predict potential associations between miRNAs and diseases. In this work, we presented a prediction model of Graphlet Interaction for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (GIMDA) by integrating the disease semantic similarity, miRNA functional similarity, Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity and the experimentally confirmed miRNA-disease associations. The related score of a miRNA to a disease was calculated by measuring the graphlet interactions between two miRNAs or two diseases. The novelty of GIMDA lies in that we used graphlet interaction to analyse the complex relationships between two nodes in a graph. The AUCs of GIMDA in global and local leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) turned out to be 0.9006 and 0.8455, respectively. The average result of five-fold cross-validation reached to 0.8927 ± 0.0012. In case study for colon neoplasms, kidney neoplasms and prostate neoplasms based on the database of HMDD V2.0, 45, 45, 41 of the top 50 potential miRNAs predicted by GIMDA were validated by dbDEMC and miR2Disease. Additionally, in the case study of new diseases without any known associated miRNAs and the case study of predicting potential miRNA-disease associations using HMDD V1.0, there were also high percentages of top 50 miRNAs verified by the experimental literatures. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  9. The integrated analysis of RNA-seq and microRNA-seq depicts miRNA-mRNA networks involved in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na; Wang, Ruoqing; Wang, Renkai; Tian, Yongsheng; Shao, Changwei; Jia, Xiaodong; Chen, Songlin

    2017-01-01

    Albinism, a phenomenon characterized by pigmentation deficiency on the ocular side of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus), has caused significant damage. Limited mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) information is available on fish pigmentation deficiency. In this study, a high-throughput sequencing strategy was employed to identify the mRNA and miRNAs involved in P. olivaceus albinism. Based on P. olivaceus genome, RNA-seq identified 21,787 know genes and 711 new genes by transcripts assembly. Of those, 235 genes exhibited significantly different expression pattern (fold change ≥2 or ≤0.5 and q-value≤0.05), including 194 down-regulated genes and 41 up-regulated genes in albino versus normally pigmented individuals. These genes were enriched to 81 GO terms and 9 KEGG pathways (p≤0.05). Among those, the pigmentation related pathways-Melanogenesis and tyrosine metabolism were contained. High-throughput miRNA sequencing identified a total of 475 miRNAs, including 64 novel miRNAs. Furthermore, 33 differentially expressed miRNAs containing 13 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated miRNAs were identified in albino versus normally pigmented individuals (fold change ≥1.5 or ≤0.67 and p≤0.05). The next target prediction discovered a variety of putative target genes, of which, 134 genes including Tyrosinase (TYR), Tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1), Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were overlapped with differentially expressed genes derived from RNA-seq. These target genes were significantly enriched to 254 GO terms and 103 KEGG pathways (p<0.001). Of those, tyrosine metabolism, lysosomes, phototransduction pathways, etc., attracted considerable attention due to their involvement in regulating skin pigmentation. Expression patterns of differentially expressed mRNA and miRNAs were validated in 10 mRNA and 10 miRNAs by qRT-PCR. With high-throughput mRNA and miRNA sequencing and analysis, a series of interested mRNA and miRNAs involved in fish

  10. mRNA and microRNA transcriptomics analyses in a murine model of dystrophin loss and therapeutic restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Roberts

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a pediatric, X-linked, progressive muscle-wasting disorder caused by loss of function mutations affecting the gene encoding the dystrophin protein. While the primary genetic insult in DMD is well described, many details of the molecular and cellular pathologies that follow dystrophin loss are incompletely understood. To investigate gene expression in dystrophic muscle we have applied mRNA and microRNA (miRNA microarray technology to the mdx mouse model of DMD. This study was designed to generate a complete description of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology and the response to an experimental therapy which restores dystrophin protein function. These datasets have enabled (1 the determination of gene expression changes associated with dystrophic pathology, (2 identification of differentially expressed genes that are restored towards wild-type levels after therapeutic dystrophin rescue, (3 investigation of the correlation between mRNA and protein expression (determined by parallel mass spectrometry proteomics analysis, and (4 prediction of pathology associated miRNA-target interactions. Here we describe in detail how the data were generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in Human Molecular Genetics with PMID 26385637. The data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE64420.

  11. Evaluation of two main RNA-seq approaches for gene quantification in clinical RNA sequencing: polyA+ selection versus rRNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Zhang, Ying; Gamini, Ramya; Zhang, Baohong; von Schack, David

    2018-03-19

    To allow efficient transcript/gene detection, highly abundant ribosomal RNAs (rRNA) are generally removed from total RNA either by positive polyA+ selection or by rRNA depletion (negative selection) before sequencing. Comparisons between the two methods have been carried out by various groups, but the assessments have relied largely on non-clinical samples. In this study, we evaluated these two RNA sequencing approaches using human blood and colon tissue samples. Our analyses showed that rRNA depletion captured more unique transcriptome features, whereas polyA+ selection outperformed rRNA depletion with higher exonic coverage and better accuracy of gene quantification. For blood- and colon-derived RNAs, we found that 220% and 50% more reads, respectively, would have to be sequenced to achieve the same level of exonic coverage in the rRNA depletion method compared with the polyA+ selection method. Therefore, in most cases we strongly recommend polyA+ selection over rRNA depletion for gene quantification in clinical RNA sequencing. Our evaluation revealed that a small number of lncRNAs and small RNAs made up a large fraction of the reads in the rRNA depletion RNA sequencing data. Thus, we recommend that these RNAs are specifically depleted to improve the sequencing depth of the remaining RNAs.

  12. Phylogenetic and Functional Diversity of Total (DNA) and Expressed (RNA) Bacterial Communities in Urban Green Infrastructure Bioswale Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Aman S; Lee, Angela; McGuire, Krista L

    2017-08-15

    New York City (NYC) is pioneering green infrastructure with the use of bioswales and other engineered soil-based habitats to provide stormwater infiltration and other ecosystem functions. In addition to avoiding the environmental and financial costs of expanding traditional built infrastructure, green infrastructure is thought to generate cobenefits in the form of diverse ecological processes performed by its plant and microbial communities. Yet, although plant communities in these habitats are closely managed, we lack basic knowledge about how engineered ecosystems impact the distribution and functioning of soil bacteria. We sequenced amplicons of the 16S ribosomal subunit, as well as seven genes associated with functional pathways, generated from both total (DNA-based) and expressed (RNA) soil communities in the Bronx, NYC, NY, in order to test whether bioswale soils host characteristic bacterial communities with evidence for enriched microbial functioning, compared to nonengineered soils in park lawns and tree pits. Bioswales had distinct, phylogenetically diverse bacterial communities, including taxa associated with nutrient cycling and metabolism of hydrocarbons and other pollutants. Bioswale soils also had a significantly greater diversity of genes involved in several functional pathways, including carbon fixation ( cbbL-R [ cbbL gene, red-like subunit] and apsA ), nitrogen cycling ( noxZ and amoA ), and contaminant degradation ( bphA ); conversely, no functional genes were significantly more abundant in nonengineered soils. These results provide preliminary evidence that urban land management can shape the diversity and activity of soil communities, with positive consequences for genetic resources underlying valuable ecological functions, including biogeochemical cycling and degradation of common urban pollutants. IMPORTANCE Management of urban soil biodiversity by favoring taxa associated with decontamination or other microbial metabolic processes is a

  13. Targeting RNA transcription and translation in ovarian cancer cells with pharmacological inhibitor CDKI-73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Frankie; Abbas, Abdullahi Y; Shao, Hao; Teo, Theodosia; Adams, Julian; Li, Peng; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Fischer, Peter M; Walsby, Elisabeth; Pepper, Chris; Chen, Yi; Ding, Jian; Wang, Shudong

    2014-09-15

    Dysregulation of cellular transcription and translation is a fundamental hallmark of cancer. As CDK9 and Mnks play pivotal roles in the regulation of RNA transcription and protein synthesis, respectively, they are important targets for drug development. We herein report the cellular mechanism of a novel CDK9 inhibitor CDKI-73 in an ovarian cancer cell line (A2780). We also used shRNA-mediated CDK9 knockdown to investigate the importance of CDK9 in the maintenance of A2780 cells. This study revealed that CDKI-73 rapidly inhibited cellular CDK9 kinase activity and down-regulated the RNAPII phosphorylation. This subsequently caused a decrease in the eIF4E phosphorylation by blocking Mnk1 kinase activity. Consistently, CDK9 shRNA was also found to down-regulate the Mnk1 expression. Both CDKI-73 and CDK9 shRNA decreased anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 and induced apoptosis. The study confirmed that CDK9 is required for cell survival and that ovarian cancer may be susceptible to CDK9 inhibition strategy. The data also implied a role of CDK9 in eIF4E-mediated translational control, suggesting that CDK9 may have important implication in the Mnk-eIF4E axis, the key determinants of PI3K/Akt/mTOR- and Ras/Raf/MAPK-mediated tumorigenic activity. As such, CDK9 inhibitor drug candidate CDKI-73 should have a major impact on these pathways in human cancers.

  14. The Battle of RNA Synthesis: Virus versus Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwig, Alex; Landick, Robert; Berkhout, Ben

    2017-10-21

    Transcription control is the foundation of gene regulation. Whereas a cell is fully equipped for this task, viruses often depend on the host to supply tools for their transcription program. Over the course of evolution and adaptation, viruses have found diverse ways to optimally exploit cellular host processes such as transcription to their own benefit. Just as cells are increasingly understood to employ nascent RNAs in transcription regulation, recent discoveries are revealing how viruses use nascent RNAs to benefit their own gene expression. In this review, we first outline the two different transcription programs used by viruses, i.e., transcription (DNA-dependent) and RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Subsequently, we use the distinct stages (initiation, elongation, termination) to describe the latest insights into nascent RNA-mediated regulation in the context of each relevant stage.

  15. TGF-β1 targets a microRNA network that regulates cellular adhesion and migration in renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusławska, Joanna; Rodzik, Katarzyna; Popławski, Piotr; Kędzierska, Hanna; Rybicka, Beata; Sokół, Elżbieta; Tański, Zbigniew; Piekiełko-Witkowska, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    In our previous study we found altered expression of 19 adhesion-related genes in renal tumors. In this study we hypothesized that disturbed expression of adhesion-related genes could be caused by microRNAs: short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Here, we found that expression of 24 microRNAs predicted to target adhesion-related genes was disturbed in renal tumors and correlated with expression of their predicted targets. miR-25-3p, miR-30a-5p, miR-328 and miR-363-3p directly targeted adhesion-related genes, including COL5A1, COL11A1, ITGA5, MMP16 and THBS2. miR-363-3p and miR-328 inhibited proliferation of renal cancer cells, while miR-25-3p inhibited adhesion, promoted proliferation and migration of renal cancer cells. TGF-β1 influenced the expression of miR-25-3p, miR-30a-5p, and miR-328. The analyzed microRNAs, their target genes and TGF-β1 formed a network of strong correlations in tissue samples from renal cancer patients. The expression signature of microRNAs linked with TGF-β1 levels correlated with poor survival of renal cancer patients. The results of our study suggest that TGF-β1 coordinates the expression of microRNA network that regulates cellular adhesion in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Elucidating the role of free polycations in gene knockdown by siRNA polyplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauber, Thomas Christopher Bogh; Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Sawant, Rupa R.

    2016-01-01

    capability, but are very different regarding siRNA decondensation, cellular internalization and induction of reporter gene knockdown. Lipid conjugation of bPEI 1.8. kDa improves the siRNA delivery properties, but with markedly different formulation requirements and mechanisms of action compared...... today.A major reason for the lack of progress is insufficient understanding of cell-polyplex interaction. We investigate siRNA delivery using polyethyleneimine (PEI) based vectors and examine how crucial formulation parameters determine the challenges associated with PEI as a delivery vector. We further...

  17. Trans-acting translational regulatory RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Robert F; Smith, Tom S; Mulroney, Thomas; Queiroz, Rayner M L; Pizzinga, Mariavittoria; Dezi, Veronica; Villenueva, Eneko; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Lilley, Kathryn S; Willis, Anne E

    2018-05-01

    The canonical molecular machinery required for global mRNA translation and its control has been well defined, with distinct sets of proteins involved in the processes of translation initiation, elongation and termination. Additionally, noncanonical, trans-acting regulatory RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are necessary to provide mRNA-specific translation, and these interact with 5' and 3' untranslated regions and coding regions of mRNA to regulate ribosome recruitment and transit. Recently it has also been demonstrated that trans-acting ribosomal proteins direct the translation of specific mRNAs. Importantly, it has been shown that subsets of RBPs often work in concert, forming distinct regulatory complexes upon different cellular perturbation, creating an RBP combinatorial code, which through the translation of specific subsets of mRNAs, dictate cell fate. With the development of new methodologies, a plethora of novel RNA binding proteins have recently been identified, although the function of many of these proteins within mRNA translation is unknown. In this review we will discuss these methodologies and their shortcomings when applied to the study of translation, which need to be addressed to enable a better understanding of trans-acting translational regulatory proteins. Moreover, we discuss the protein domains that are responsible for RNA binding as well as the RNA motifs to which they bind, and the role of trans-acting ribosomal proteins in directing the translation of specific mRNAs. This article is categorized under: RNA Interactions with Proteins and Other Molecules > RNA-Protein Complexes Translation > Translation Regulation Translation > Translation Mechanisms. © 2018 Medical Research Council and University of Cambridge. WIREs RNA published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  19. A Systematic Comparison of Purification and Normalization Protocols for Quantitative MicroRNA Expressional Profiling in Insulin-Producing Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Blankestijn, Maaike; Stahl, Jonathan Lucien

    2016-01-01

    As microRNAs (miRs) are gaining increasing attention as key regulators of cellular processes, expressional quantification is widely applied. However, in the processing of relatively quantified data, the importance of testing the stability of several reference mRNAs and/or miRs and choosing among...... these for normalization is often overlooked, potentially leading to biased results. Here, we have optimized the purification of miR-enriched total RNA from pancreatic insulin-producing INS-1 cells. Additionally, we optimized and analyzed miR expression by a qPCR-based microarray and by specific qPCR and tested...

  20. High-Concentrate Diet-Induced Change of Cellular Metabolism Leads to Decreases of Immunity and Imbalance of Cellular Activities in Rumen Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhongyan; Shen, Hong; Shen, Zanming

    2018-01-01

    In animals, the immune and cellular processes of tissue largely depend on the status of local metabolism. However, in the rumen epithelium, how the cellular metabolism affects epithelial immunity, and cellular processes, when the diet is switched from energy-rich to energy-excess status, with regard to animal production and health, have not as yet been reported. RNA-seq was applied to compare the biological processes altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 10% to 35% with those altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 35% to 65% (dietary concentrate: the non-grass component in diet, including corn, soya bean meal and additive. High concentrate diet composed of 35% grass, 55% corn, 8% soya bean meal and 2% additive). In addition to the functional analysis of enriched genes in terms of metabolism, the immune system, and cellular process, the highly correlated genes to the enriched metabolism genes were identified, and the function and signaling pathways related to the differentially expressed neighbors were compared among the groups. The variation trends of molar proportions of ruminal SCFAs and those of enriched pathways belonging to metabolism, immune system, and cellular process were altered with the change of diets. With regard to metabolism, lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism were most affected. According to the correlation analysis, both innate and adaptive immune responses were promoted by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. However, the majority of immune responses were suppressed under the 35% concentrate diet. Moreover, the exclusive upregulation of cell growth and dysfunction of cellular transport and catabolism were induced by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. On the contrary, a balanced regulation of cellular processes was detected under the 35% concentrate diet. These results indicated that the alterations of cellular metabolism promote the alterations in cellular

  1. High-Concentrate Diet-Induced Change of Cellular Metabolism Leads to Decreases of Immunity and Imbalance of Cellular Activities in Rumen Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyan Lu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In animals, the immune and cellular processes of tissue largely depend on the status of local metabolism. However, in the rumen epithelium, how the cellular metabolism affects epithelial immunity, and cellular processes, when the diet is switched from energy-rich to energy-excess status, with regard to animal production and health, have not as yet been reported. Methods: RNA-seq was applied to compare the biological processes altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 10% to 35% with those altered by an increase of dietary concentration from 35% to 65% (dietary concentrate: the non-grass component in diet, including corn, soya bean meal and additive. High concentrate diet composed of 35% grass, 55% corn, 8% soya bean meal and 2% additive. In addition to the functional analysis of enriched genes in terms of metabolism, the immune system, and cellular process, the highly correlated genes to the enriched metabolism genes were identified, and the function and signaling pathways related to the differentially expressed neighbors were compared among the groups. Results: The variation trends of molar proportions of ruminal SCFAs and those of enriched pathways belonging to metabolism, immune system, and cellular process were altered with the change of diets. With regard to metabolism, lipid metabolism and amino acid metabolism were most affected. According to the correlation analysis, both innate and adaptive immune responses were promoted by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. However, the majority of immune responses were suppressed under the 35% concentrate diet. Moreover, the exclusive upregulation of cell growth and dysfunction of cellular transport and catabolism were induced by the metabolism genes enriched under the 65% concentrate diet. On the contrary, a balanced regulation of cellular processes was detected under the 35% concentrate diet. Conclusions: These results indicated that the

  2. LNA-modified oligonucleotides mediate specific inhibition of microRNA function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørom, Ulf Andersson; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H

    2006-01-01

    microRNAs are short, endogenous non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression. Important functions for microRNAs have been found in the regulation of development, cellular proliferation and differentiation, while perturbed miRNA expression patterns have been...... observed in many human cancers. Here we present a method for specific inhibition of miRNA function through interaction with LNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides and report the specificity of this application. We show that LNA-modified oligonucleotides can inhibit exogenously introduced miRNAs with high...... specificity using a heterologous reporter assay, and furthermore demonstrate their ability to inhibit an endogenous miRNA in Drosophila melanogaster cells, leading to up-regulation of the cognate target protein. The method shows stoichiometric and reliable inhibition of the targeted miRNA and can thus...

  3. Non-coding RNA networks in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Eleni; Jacob, Leni S; Slack, Frank J

    2018-01-01

    Thousands of unique non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences exist within cells. Work from the past decade has altered our perception of ncRNAs from 'junk' transcriptional products to functional regulatory molecules that mediate cellular processes including chromatin remodelling, transcription, post-transcriptional modifications and signal transduction. The networks in which ncRNAs engage can influence numerous molecular targets to drive specific cell biological responses and fates. Consequently, ncRNAs act as key regulators of physiological programmes in developmental and disease contexts. Particularly relevant in cancer, ncRNAs have been identified as oncogenic drivers and tumour suppressors in every major cancer type. Thus, a deeper understanding of the complex networks of interactions that ncRNAs coordinate would provide a unique opportunity to design better therapeutic interventions.

  4. Downregulation of the non-integrin laminin receptor reduces cellular viability by inducing apoptosis in lung and cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiashanee Moodley

    Full Text Available The non-integrin laminin receptor, here designated the 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor (LRP/LR, is involved in many physiologically relevant processes, as well as numerous pathological conditions. The overexpression of LRP/LR on various cancerous cell lines plays critical roles in tumour metastasis and angiogenesis. This study investigated whether LRP/LR is implicated in the maintenance of cellular viability in lung and cervical cancer cell lines. Here we show a significant reduction in cellular viability in the aforementioned cell lines as a result of the siRNA-mediated downregulation of LRP. This reduction in cellular viability is due to increased apoptotic processes, reflected by the loss of nuclear integrity and the significant increase in the activity of caspase-3. These results indicate that LRP/LR is involved in the maintenance of cellular viability in tumorigenic lung and cervix uteri cells through the blockage of apoptosis. Knockdown of LRP/LR by siRNA might represent an alternative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung and cervical cancer.

  5. Evidence for a Complex Class of Nonadenylated mRNA in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, J. Lynn; Fouts, David L.; Manning, Jerry E.

    1980-01-01

    The amount, by mass, of poly(A+) mRNA present in the polyribosomes of third-instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, and the relative contribution of the poly(A+) mRNA to the sequence complexity of total polysomal RNA, has been determined. Selective removal of poly(A+) mRNA from total polysomal RNA by use of either oligo-dT-cellulose, or poly(U)-sepharose affinity chromatography, revealed that only 0.15% of the mass of the polysomal RNA was present as poly(A+) mRNA. The present study shows that this RNA hybridized at saturation with 3.3% of the single-copy DNA in the Drosophila genome. After correction for asymmetric transcription and reactability of the DNA, 7.4% of the single-copy DNA in the Drosophila genome is represented in larval poly(A+) mRNA. This corresponds to 6.73 x 106 nucleotides of mRNA coding sequences, or approximately 5,384 diverse RNA sequences of average size 1,250 nucleotides. However, total polysomal RNA hybridizes at saturation to 10.9% of the single-copy DNA sequences. After correcting this value for asymmetric transcription and tracer DNA reactability, 24% of the single-copy DNA in Drosophila is represented in total polysomal RNA. This corresponds to 2.18 x 107 nucleotides of RNA coding sequences or 17,440 diverse RNA molecules of size 1,250 nucleotides. This value is 3.2 times greater than that observed for poly(A+) mRNA, and indicates that ≃69% of the polysomal RNA sequence complexity is contributed by nonadenylated RNA. Furthermore, if the number of different structural genes represented in total polysomal RNA is ≃1.7 x 104, then the number of genes expressed in third-instar larvae exceeds the number of chromomeres in Drosophila by about a factor of three. This numerology indicates that the number of chromomeres observed in polytene chromosomes does not reflect the number of structural gene sequences in the Drosophila genome. PMID:6777246

  6. UVA and UVB Irradiation Differentially Regulate microRNA Expression in Human Primary Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Anne; Chen, I-Peng; Henning, Stefan; Faust, Alexandra; Volkmer, Beate; Atkinson, Michael J.; Moertl, Simone; Greinert, Ruediger

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of the cellular transcriptome is an important epigenetic mechanism for fine-tuning regulatory pathways. These include processes related to skin cancer development, progression and metastasis. However, little is known about the role of microRNA as an intermediary in the carcinogenic processes following exposure to UV-radiation. We now show that UV irradiation of human primary keratinocytes modulates the expression of several cellular miRNAs. A common set of miRNAs was influenced by exposure to both UVA and UVB. However, each wavelength band also activated a distinct subset of miRNAs. Common sets of UVA- and UVB-regulated miRNAs harbor the regulatory elements GLYCA-nTRE, GATA-1-undefined-site-13 or Hox-2.3-undefined-site-2 in their promoters. In silico analysis indicates that the differentially expressed miRNAs responding to UV have potential functions in the cellular pathways of cell growth and proliferation. Interestingly, the expression of miR-23b, which is a differentiation marker of human keratinocytes, is remarkably up-regulated after UVA irradiation. Studying the interaction between miR-23b and its putative skin-relevant targets using a Luciferase reporter assay revealed that RRAS2 (related RAS viral oncogene homolog 2), which is strongly expressed in highly aggressive malignant skin cancer, to be a direct target of miR-23b. This study demonstrates for the first time a differential miRNA response to UVA and UVB in human primary keratinocytes. This suggests that selective regulation of signaling pathways occurs in response to different UV energies. This may shed new light on miRNA-regulated carcinogenic processes involved in UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:24391759

  7. UVA and UVB irradiation differentially regulate microRNA expression in human primary keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kraemer

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA-mediated regulation of the cellular transcriptome is an important epigenetic mechanism for fine-tuning regulatory pathways. These include processes related to skin cancer development, progression and metastasis. However, little is known about the role of microRNA as an intermediary in the carcinogenic processes following exposure to UV-radiation. We now show that UV irradiation of human primary keratinocytes modulates the expression of several cellular miRNAs. A common set of miRNAs was influenced by exposure to both UVA and UVB. However, each wavelength band also activated a distinct subset of miRNAs. Common sets of UVA- and UVB-regulated miRNAs harbor the regulatory elements GLYCA-nTRE, GATA-1-undefined-site-13 or Hox-2.3-undefined-site-2 in their promoters. In silico analysis indicates that the differentially expressed miRNAs responding to UV have potential functions in the cellular pathways of cell growth and proliferation. Interestingly, the expression of miR-23b, which is a differentiation marker of human keratinocytes, is remarkably up-regulated after UVA irradiation. Studying the interaction between miR-23b and its putative skin-relevant targets using a Luciferase reporter assay revealed that RRAS2 (related RAS viral oncogene homolog 2, which is strongly expressed in highly aggressive malignant skin cancer, to be a direct target of miR-23b. This study demonstrates for the first time a differential miRNA response to UVA and UVB in human primary keratinocytes. This suggests that selective regulation of signaling pathways occurs in response to different UV energies. This may shed new light on miRNA-regulated carcinogenic processes involved in UV-induced skin carcinogenesis.

  8. Salivary micro RNA as a potential biomarker in oral potentially malignant disorders: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T N Uma Maheswari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD are oral mucosal disorders which have a high potential to turn into malignancy. A recent report suggests that 16%–62% of epithelial dysplasia cases of OPMD undergo malignant transformation, showing the need for early detection of malignancy in these disorders. Micro RNA (miRNA plays an important role in cellular growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and immune response, and hence, deregulation of miRNA is considered a signature of oral carcinogenesis. A search was done using MeSH terms in the PubMed, ScienceDirect databases, hand search, and finally, six studies were included in this systematic review. A total of 167 patients with oral cancer, 78 with OPMDs, 147 healthy controls, and 20 disease controls were analyzed for the expression of salivary miRNAs. Quality assessment based on the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 tool was used to obtain a risk of bias chart using Revman 5.3 software and it was proved that the study done by Zahran et al. in 2015 had a low risk of bias. The results of this study revealed upregulated miRNA 184 with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 and miRNA 21 with an AUC of 0.73 and downregulated miRNA 145 with an AUC of 0.68, which proved that these miRNAs are significant in detecting early malignancy in OPMD and should be further analyzed in various populations. This systematic review explored the potential of expression of salivary miRNA in OPMD for future studies. This could pave the way to utilize saliva as a surrogate marker in diagnosing early malignant changes in OPMD.

  9. Alterations in messenger RNA and small nuclear RNA metabolism resulting from fluorouracil incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.D.; Cadman, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    Studies were completed to examine the effect of 5-fluorouracil (FUra) incorporation on messenger RNA (mRNA) and small molecular weight nuclear RNA (SnRNA) metabolism. Studies of mRNA were completed using cDNA-mRNA hybridization methods to specifically examine dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mRNA. C 3 -L5178Y murine leukemia cells which are gene-amplified for DHFR, were exposed to FUra for 6, 12 or 24 hr, and the nuclear and cytoplasmic levels of DHFR-mRNA determined by hybridization with 32 P-DHFR-cDNA. FUra produced a dose-dependent increase in nuclear DHFR-mRNA levels, while total cytoplasmic DHFR-mRNA levels appeared to be unchanged. To examine only mRNA synthesized during FUra exposure, cells were also treated concurrently with [ 3 H] cytidine, and the [ 3 H]mRNA-cDNA hybrids measured following S 1 -nuclease treatment. FUra produced a concentration-dependent increase in nascent nuclear DHFR-mRNA levels, and a decrease in nascent cytoplasmic DHFR-mRNAs levels. These results suggest that FUra produces either an inhibition of mRNA processing, or an inhibition of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport. Preliminary experiments to examine ATP-dependent mRNA transport were completed with isolated nuclei from cells treated with FUra for 1 or 24 hr and then pulse-labeled for 1 hr with [ 3 H] cytidine. The results demonstrate a FUra-concentration and time-dependent inhibition of ATP-mediated mRNA efflux

  10. Cellular telephone use and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Jacobsen, Rune; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The widespread use of cellular telephones has heightened concerns about possible adverse health effects. The objective of this study was to investigate cancer risk among Danish cellular telephone users who were followed for up to 21 years. METHODS: This study is an extended follow......-up of a large nationwide cohort of 420,095 persons whose first cellular telephone subscription was between 1982 and 1995 and who were followed through 2002 for cancer incidence. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated by dividing the number of observed cancer cases in the cohort by the number...... expected in the Danish population. RESULTS: A total of 14,249 cancers were observed (SIR = 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.93 to 0.97) for men and women combined. Cellular telephone use was not associated with increased risk for brain tumors (SIR = 0.97), acoustic neuromas (SIR = 0.73), salivary...

  11. A powerful method for transcriptional profiling of specific cell types in eukaryotes: laser-assisted microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W Schmid

    Full Text Available The acquisition of distinct cell fates is central to the development of multicellular organisms and is largely mediated by gene expression patterns specific to individual cells and tissues. A spatially and temporally resolved analysis of gene expression facilitates the elucidation of transcriptional networks linked to cellular identity and function. We present an approach that allows cell type-specific transcriptional profiling of distinct target cells, which are rare and difficult to access, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. We combined laser-assisted microdissection (LAM, linear amplification starting from <1 ng of total RNA, and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq. As a model we used the central cell of the Arabidopsis thaliana female gametophyte, one of the female gametes harbored in the reproductive organs of the flower. We estimated the number of expressed genes to be more than twice the number reported previously in a study using LAM and ATH1 microarrays, and identified several classes of genes that were systematically underrepresented in the transcriptome measured with the ATH1 microarray. Among them are many genes that are likely to be important for developmental processes and specific cellular functions. In addition, we identified several intergenic regions, which are likely to be transcribed, and describe a considerable fraction of reads mapping to introns and regions flanking annotated loci, which may represent alternative transcript isoforms. Finally, we performed a de novo assembly of the transcriptome and show that the method is suitable for studying individual cell types of organisms lacking reference sequence information, demonstrating that this approach can be applied to most eukaryotic organisms.

  12. Tap and Dbp5, but not Gag, are involved in DR-mediated nuclear export of unspliced Rous sarcoma virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, Jason J.; Uddowla, Sabena; Abraham, Benjamin; Clatterbuck, Sarah; Beemon, Karen L.

    2007-01-01

    All retroviruses must circumvent cellular restrictions on the export of unspliced RNAs from the nucleus. While the unspliced RNA export pathways for HIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are well characterized, that of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is not. We have previously reported that the RSV direct repeat (DR) elements are involved in the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA. Here, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrate that unspliced viral RNAs bearing a single point mutation (G8863C) in the DR exhibit a restricted cellular localization in and around the nucleus. In contrast, wild type unspliced viral RNA had a diffuse localization throughout the nucleus and cytoplasm. Since the RSV Gag protein has a transient localization in the nucleus, we examined the effect of Gag over-expression on a DR-mediated reporter construct. While Gag did not enhance DR-mediated nuclear export, the dominant-negative expression of two cellular export factors, Tap and Dbp5, inhibited expression of the same reporter construct. Furthermore, FISH studies using the dominant-negative Dbp5 demonstrated that unspliced wild type RSV RNA was retained within the nucleus. Taken together, these results further implicate the DR in nuclear RNA export through interactions with Tap and Dbp5

  13. Three RNA recognition motifs participate in RNA recognition and structural organization by the pro-apoptotic factor TIA-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, William J.; Heath, Jason; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) regulates developmental and stress-responsive pathways through distinct activities at the levels of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. The TIA-1 polypeptide contains three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs). The central RRM2 and C-terminal RRM3 associate with cellular mRNAs. The N-terminal RRM1 enhances interactions of a C-terminal Q-rich domain of TIA-1 with the U1-C splicing factor, despite linear separation of the domains in the TIA-1 sequence. Given the expanded functional repertoire of the RRM family, it was unknown whether TIA-1 RRM1 contributes to RNA binding as well as documented protein interactions. To address this question, we used isothermal titration calorimetry and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to dissect the roles of the TIA-1 RRMs in RNA recognition. Notably, the fas RNA exhibited two binding sites with indistinguishable affinities for TIA-1. Analyses of TIA-1 variants established that RRM1 was dispensable for binding AU-rich fas sites, yet all three RRMs were required to bind a polyU RNA with high affinity. SAXS analyses demonstrated a `V' shape for a TIA-1 construct comprising the three RRMs, and revealed that its dimensions became more compact in the RNA-bound state. The sequence-selective involvement of TIA-1 RRM1 in RNA recognition suggests a possible role for RNA sequences in regulating the distinct functions of TIA-1. Further implications for U1-C recruitment by the adjacent TIA-1 binding sites of the fas pre-mRNA and the bent TIA-1 shape, which organizes the N- and C-termini on the same side of the protein, are discussed. PMID:22154808

  14. The tRNA-like structure of Turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA is a 3'-translational enhancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Daiki; Dreher, Theo W.

    2004-01-01

    Many positive stand RNA viral genomes lack the poly(A) tail that is characteristic of cellular mRNAs and that promotes translation in cis. The 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of such genomes are expected to provide similar translation-enhancing properties as a poly(A) tail, yet the great variety of 3' sequences suggests that this is accomplished in a range of ways. We have identified a translational enhancer present in the 3' UTR of Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) RNA using luciferase reporter RNAs with generic 5' sequences transfected into plant cells. The 3' terminal 109 nucleotides comprising the tRNA-like structure (TLS) and an upstream pseudoknot (UPSK) act in synergy with a 5'-cap to enhance translation, with a minor contribution in stabilizing the RNA. Maximum enhancement requires that the RNA be capable of aminoacylation, but either the native valine or engineered methionine is acceptable. Mutations that decrease the affinity for translation elongation factor eEF1A (but also diminish aminoacylation efficiency) strongly decrease translational enhancement, suggesting that eEF1A is mechanistically involved. The UPSK seems to act as an important, though nonspecific, spacer element ensuring proper presentation of a functional TLS. Our studies have uncovered a novel type of translational enhancer and a new role for a plant viral TLS

  15. Acute dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence and renders osteosarcoma cells resistant to genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ping; Mobasher, Maral E.; Alawi, Faizan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dyskerin depletion triggers cellular senescence in U2OS osteosarcoma cells. • Dyskerin-depleted cells are resistant to apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress. • Chromatin relaxation sensitizes dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. - Abstract: Dyskerin is a conserved, nucleolar RNA-binding protein implicated in an increasing array of fundamental cellular processes. Germline mutation in the dyskerin gene (DKC1) is the cause of X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Conversely, wild-type dyskerin is overexpressed in sporadic cancers, and high-levels may be associated with poor prognosis. It was previously reported that acute loss of dyskerin function via siRNA-mediated depletion slowed the proliferation of transformed cell lines. However, the mechanisms remained unclear. Using human U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we show that siRNA-mediated dyskerin depletion induced cellular senescence as evidenced by proliferative arrest, senescence-associated heterochromatinization and a senescence-associated molecular profile. Senescence can render cells resistant to apoptosis. Conversely, chromatin relaxation can reverse the repressive effects of senescence-associated heterochromatinization on apoptosis. To this end, genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed in dyskerin-depleted cells. In contrast, agents that induce chromatin relaxation, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and the DNA intercalator chloroquine, sensitized dyskerin-depleted cells to apoptosis. Dyskerin is a core component of the telomerase complex and plays an important role in telomere homeostasis. Defective telomere maintenance resulting in premature senescence is thought to primarily underlie the pathogenesis of X-linked DC. Since U2OS cells are telomerase-negative, this leads us to conclude that loss of dyskerin function can also induce cellular senescence via mechanisms independent of telomere shortening

  16. Comparison of preribosomal RNA processing pathways in yeast, plant and human cells - focus on coordinated action of endo- and exoribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Sikorski, Pawel J; Zakrzewska-Placzek, Monika

    2017-07-01

    Proper regulation of ribosome biosynthesis is mandatory for cellular adaptation, growth and proliferation. Ribosome biogenesis is the most energetically demanding cellular process, which requires tight control. Abnormalities in ribosome production have severe consequences, including developmental defects in plants and genetic diseases (ribosomopathies) in humans. One of the processes occurring during eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis is processing of the ribosomal RNA precursor molecule (pre-rRNA), synthesized by RNA polymerase I, into mature rRNAs. It must not only be accurate but must also be precisely coordinated with other phenomena leading to the synthesis of functional ribosomes: RNA modification, RNA folding, assembly with ribosomal proteins and nucleocytoplasmic RNP export. A multitude of ribosome biogenesis factors ensure that these events take place in a correct temporal order. Among them are endo- and exoribonucleases involved in pre-rRNA processing. Here, we thoroughly present a wide spectrum of ribonucleases participating in rRNA maturation, focusing on their biochemical properties, regulatory mechanisms and substrate specificity. We also discuss cooperation between various ribonucleolytic activities in particular stages of pre-rRNA processing, delineating major similarities and differences between three representative groups of eukaryotes: yeast, plants and humans. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun, E-mail: ydu@uark.edu

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  18. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Li Xincang; Li Lu; Wang Jinxing; Jin Wenrui

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10 -14 mol L -1 . Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  19. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-02-24

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced "RNA disruption" is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3'-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues and is

  20. Effects of short-term exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on microRNA expression in zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenny, Matthew J.; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Hahn, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Although many drugs and environmental chemicals are teratogenic, the mechanisms by which most toxicants disrupt embryonic development are not well understood. MicroRNAs, single-stranded RNA molecules of ∼ 22 nt that regulate protein expression by inhibiting mRNA translation and promoting mRNA sequestration or degradation, are important regulators of a variety of cellular processes including embryonic development and cellular differentiation. Recent studies have demonstrated that exposure to xenobiotics can alter microRNA expression and contribute to the mechanisms by which environmental chemicals disrupt embryonic development. In this study we tested the hypothesis that developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a well-known teratogen, alters microRNA expression during zebrafish development. We exposed zebrafish embryos to DMSO (0.1%) or TCDD (5 nM) for 1 h at 30 hours post fertilization (hpf) and measured microRNA expression using several methods at 36 and 60 hpf. TCDD caused strong induction of CYP1A at 36 hpf (62-fold) and 60 hpf (135-fold) as determined by real-time RT-PCR, verifying the effectiveness of the exposure. MicroRNA expression profiles were determined using microarrays (Agilent and Exiqon), next-generation sequencing (SOLiD), and real-time RT-PCR. The two microarray platforms yielded results that were similar but not identical; both showed significant changes in expression of miR-451, 23a, 23b, 24 and 27e at 60 hpf. Multiple analyses were performed on the SOLiD sequences yielding a total of 16 microRNAs as differentially expressed by TCDD in zebrafish embryos. However, miR-27e was the only microRNA to be identified as differentially expressed by all three methods (both microarrays, SOLiD sequencing, and real-time RT-PCR). These results suggest that TCDD exposure causes modest changes in expression of microRNAs, including some (miR-451, 23a, 23b, 24 and 27e) that are critical for hematopoiesis and cardiovascular

  1. MicroRNA transcriptome analysis identifies miR-365 as a novel negative regulator of cell proliferation in Zmpste24-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xing-dong [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Jung, Hwa Jin [Departments of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Gombar, Saurabh [Departments of Systems Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Park, Jung Yoon [Departments of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Zhang, Chun-long; Zheng, Huiling [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Ruan, Jie; Li, Jiang-bin [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524023 (China); Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan 523808 (China); Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Kaeberlein, Matt [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical College, Xin Cheng Avenue 1#, Songshan Lake, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive miRNA transcriptome of MEFs from Zmpste24{sup −/−} and control mice. • Identification of miR-365 as a down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs. • Characterization of miR-365 as a modulator of cellular growth in part by targeting Rasd1. - Abstract: Zmpste24 is a metalloproteinase responsible for the posttranslational processing and cleavage of prelamin A into mature laminA. Zmpste24{sup −/−} mice display a range of progeroid phenotypes overlapping with mice expressing progerin, an altered version of lamin A associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Increasing evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs contribute to the regulation of normal aging process, but their roles in progeroid disorders remain poorly understood. Here we report the miRNA transcriptomes of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) established from wild type (WT) and Zmpste24{sup −/−} progeroid mice using a massively parallel sequencing technology. With data from 19.5 × 10{sup 6} reads from WT MEFs and 16.5 × 10{sup 6} reads from Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs, we discovered a total of 306 known miRNAs expressed in MEFs with a wide dynamic range of read counts ranging from 10 to over 1 million. A total of 8 miRNAs were found to be significantly down-regulated, with only 2 miRNAs upregulated, in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs as compared to WT MEFs. Functional studies revealed that miR-365, a significantly down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs, modulates cellular growth phenotypes in MEFs. Overexpression of miR-365 in Zmpste24{sup −/−} MEFs increased cellular proliferation and decreased the percentage of SA-β-gal-positive cells, while inhibition of miR-365 function led to an increase of SA-β-gal-positive cells in WT MEFs. Furthermore, we identified Rasd1, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, as a functional target of miR-365. While expression of miR-365 suppressed Rasd1 3′ UTR luciferase-reporter activity

  2. MicroRNA transcriptome analysis identifies miR-365 as a novel negative regulator of cell proliferation in Zmpste24-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Xing-dong; Jung, Hwa Jin; Gombar, Saurabh; Park, Jung Yoon; Zhang, Chun-long; Zheng, Huiling; Ruan, Jie; Li, Jiang-bin; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A comprehensive miRNA transcriptome of MEFs from Zmpste24 −/− and control mice. • Identification of miR-365 as a down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24 −/− MEFs. • Characterization of miR-365 as a modulator of cellular growth in part by targeting Rasd1. - Abstract: Zmpste24 is a metalloproteinase responsible for the posttranslational processing and cleavage of prelamin A into mature laminA. Zmpste24 −/− mice display a range of progeroid phenotypes overlapping with mice expressing progerin, an altered version of lamin A associated with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). Increasing evidence has demonstrated that miRNAs contribute to the regulation of normal aging process, but their roles in progeroid disorders remain poorly understood. Here we report the miRNA transcriptomes of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) established from wild type (WT) and Zmpste24 −/− progeroid mice using a massively parallel sequencing technology. With data from 19.5 × 10 6 reads from WT MEFs and 16.5 × 10 6 reads from Zmpste24 −/− MEFs, we discovered a total of 306 known miRNAs expressed in MEFs with a wide dynamic range of read counts ranging from 10 to over 1 million. A total of 8 miRNAs were found to be significantly down-regulated, with only 2 miRNAs upregulated, in Zmpste24 −/− MEFs as compared to WT MEFs. Functional studies revealed that miR-365, a significantly down-regulated miRNA in Zmpste24 −/− MEFs, modulates cellular growth phenotypes in MEFs. Overexpression of miR-365 in Zmpste24 −/− MEFs increased cellular proliferation and decreased the percentage of SA-β-gal-positive cells, while inhibition of miR-365 function led to an increase of SA-β-gal-positive cells in WT MEFs. Furthermore, we identified Rasd1, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, as a functional target of miR-365. While expression of miR-365 suppressed Rasd1 3′ UTR luciferase-reporter activity, this effect was lost with mutations in the

  3. Use of the cellular model of body composition to describe changes in body water compartments after total fasting, very low calorie diet and low calorie diet in obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siervo, M; Faber, P; Gibney, E R; Lobley, G E; Elia, M; Stubbs, R J; Johnstone, A M

    2010-05-01

    The cellular model of body composition divides the body in body cell mass (BCM), extracellular solids and extracellular fluids. This model has been infrequently applied for the evaluation of weight loss (WL) programmes. (1) To assess changes in body compartments in obese men undergoing fasting, very low calorie diet (VLCD) and low calorie diet (LCD); (2) to evaluate two cellular models for the determination of changes in BCM, fat mass (FM) and body fluids. Three groups of six, obese men participated in a total fast (F) for 6 days, a VLCD (2.5 MJ per day) for 3 weeks or an LCD (5.2 MJ per day) for 6 weeks. Body composition was measured at baseline and after small ( approximately 5%) and moderate ( approximately 10%) WL. FM was measured using a four-compartment model. Total body water (TBW) and extracellular water (ECW) were, respectively, measured by deuterium and sodium bromide dilution and intracellular water (ICW) calculated by difference. Two cellular models were used to measure BCM, FM and body fluids distribution. After about 5%WL changes in TBW were F=-3.2+/-1.2 kg (Pfasting (+1.5+/-3.1 kg, n.s.), decreased during the VLCD (-2.0+/-1.5 kg, Pfasting (-4.7+/-3.9 kg, Pfasting group and it was directly associated with changes in ICW. After a 6-day period of fasting we observed more ICW losses and less fat mobilization compared with VLCD and LCD. The cellular model of body composition is suitable for the characterization of changes in body fluids distribution during WL.

  4. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  5. A loss of function analysis of host factors influencing Vaccinia virus replication by RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa M Beard

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus that requires complex interactions with host proteins in order to replicate. To explore these interactions a functional high throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA screen targeting 6719 druggable cellular genes was undertaken to identify host factors (HF influencing the replication and spread of an eGFP-tagged VACV. The experimental design incorporated a low multiplicity of infection, thereby enhancing detection of cellular proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread of VACV. The screen revealed 153 pro- and 149 anti-viral HFs that strongly influenced VACV replication. These HFs were investigated further by comparisons with transcriptional profiling data sets and HFs identified in RNAi screens of other viruses. In addition, functional and pathway analysis of the entire screen was carried out to highlight cellular mechanisms involved in VACV replication. This revealed, as anticipated, that many pro-viral HFs are involved in translation of mRNA and, unexpectedly, suggested that a range of proteins involved in cellular transcriptional processes and several DNA repair pathways possess anti-viral activity. Multiple components of the AMPK complex were found to act as pro-viral HFs, while several septins, a group of highly conserved GTP binding proteins with a role in sequestering intracellular bacteria, were identified as strong anti-viral VACV HFs. This screen has identified novel and previously unexplored roles for cellular factors in poxvirus replication. This advancement in our understanding of the VACV life cycle provides a reliable knowledge base for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine vectors and development of anti-viral theraputics.

  6. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  7. Prediction of miRNA-mRNA associations in Alzheimer's disease mice using network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Haneul; Park, Charny; Park, Soojun; Lee, Young Seek; Cho, Soo Young; Seo, Hyemyung

    2014-08-03

    Little is known about the relationship between miRNA and mRNA expression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) at early- or late-symptomatic stages. Sequence-based target prediction algorithms and anti-correlation profiles have been applied to predict miRNA targets using omics data, but this approach often leads to false positive predictions. Here, we applied the joint profiling analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression levels to Tg6799 AD model mice at 4 and 8 months of age using a network topology-based method. We constructed gene regulatory networks and used the PageRank algorithm to predict significant interactions between miRNA and mRNA. In total, 8 cluster modules were predicted by the transcriptome data for co-expression networks of AD pathology. In total, 54 miRNAs were identified as being differentially expressed in AD. Among these, 50 significant miRNA-mRNA interactions were predicted by integrating sequence target prediction, expression analysis, and the PageRank algorithm. We identified a set of miRNA-mRNA interactions that were changed in the hippocampus of Tg6799 AD model mice. We determined the expression levels of several candidate genes and miRNA. For functional validation in primary cultured neurons from Tg6799 mice (MT) and littermate (LM) controls, the overexpression of ARRDC3 enhanced PPP1R3C expression. ARRDC3 overexpression showed the tendency to decrease the expression of miR139-5p and miR3470a in both LM and MT primary cells. Pathological environment created by Aβ treatment increased the gene expression of PPP1R3C and Sfpq but did not significantly alter the expression of miR139-5p or miR3470a. Aβ treatment increased the promoter activity of ARRDC3 gene in LM primary cells but not in MT primary cells. Our results demonstrate AD-specific changes in the miRNA regulatory system as well as the relationship between the expression levels of miRNAs and their targets in the hippocampus of Tg6799 mice. These data help further our understanding of the function

  8. Environment Aware Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented rise of mobile user demand over the years have led to an enormous growth of the energy consumption of wireless networks as well as the greenhouse gas emissions which are estimated currently to be around 70 million tons per year. This significant growth of energy consumption impels network companies to pay huge bills which represent around half of their operating expenditures. Therefore, many service providers, including mobile operators, are looking for new and modern green solutions to help reduce their expenses as well as the level of their CO2 emissions. Base stations are the most power greedy element in cellular networks: they drain around 80% of the total network energy consumption even during low traffic periods. Thus, there is a growing need to develop more energy-efficient techniques to enhance the green performance of future 4G/5G cellular networks. Due to the problem of traffic load fluctuations in cellular networks during different periods of the day and between different areas (shopping or business districts and residential areas), the base station sleeping strategy has been one of the main popular research topics in green communications. In this presentation, we present several practical green techniques that provide significant gains for mobile operators. Indeed, combined with the base station sleeping strategy, these techniques achieve not only a minimization of the fossil fuel consumption but also an enhancement of mobile operator profits. We start with an optimized cell planning method that considers varying spatial and temporal user densities. We then use the optimal transport theory in order to define the cell boundaries such that the network total transmit power is reduced. Afterwards, we exploit the features of the modern electrical grid, the smart grid, as a new tool of power management for cellular networks and we optimize the energy procurement from multiple energy retailers characterized by different prices and pollutant

  9. RNA-FISH to Study Regulatory RNA at the Site of Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Marta; Boque-Sastre, Raquel; Guil, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    The increasing role of all types of regulatory RNAs in the orchestration of cellular programs has enhanced the development of a variety of techniques that allow its precise detection, quantification, and functional scrutiny. Recent advances in imaging and fluoresecent in situ hybridization (FISH) methods have enabled the utilization of user-friendly protocols that provide highly sensitive and accurate detection of ribonucleic acid molecules at both the single cell and subcellular levels. We herein describe the approach originally developed by Stellaris ® , in which the target RNA molecule is fluoresecently labeled with multiple tiled complementary probes each carrying a fluorophore, thus improving sensitivity and reducing the chance of false positives. We have applied this method to the detection of nascent RNAs that partake of special regulatory structures called R loops. Their growing role in active gene expression regulation (Aguilera and Garcia-Muse, Mol Cell 46:115-124, 2012; Ginno et al., Mol Cell 45:814-825, 2012; Sun et al., Science 340:619-621, 2013; Bhatia et al., Nature 511:362-365, 2014) imposes the use of a combination of in vivo and in vitro techniques for the detailed analysis of the transcripts involved. Therefore, their study is a good example to illustrate how RNA FISH, combined with transcriptional arrest and/or cell synchronization, permits localization and temporal characterization of potentially regulatory RNA sequences.

  10. An improved radiolabelled RNA aptamer molecule for HER2 imaging in cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmira, Kambiz; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Noaparast, Zohreh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression has been shown to be increased in several types of human tumours. In this study, for the imaging of HER2-related tumours, a modified RNA aptamer with HER2-specific targeting was labelled with (99m)Tc, by using hydrazino nicotinamide (HYNIC) as the chelator in the presence of tricine or ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) as the co-ligand. Stability testing of the radiolabelled aptamers in the serum was performed through SDS-PAGE. The aptamer-radionuclide conjugate was evaluated for its cellular HER2-specific binding in ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3), and its biodistribution properties were assessed in normal and SKOV-3 tumour-bearing mice. In the presence of either tricine or EDDA, the HYNIC-RNA aptamers were labelled with (99m)Tc at a high yield and radiochemical purity. Cellular experiments confirmed the specific binding of the RNA aptamer to the HER2 receptor. In the animal biodistribution study, uptake of the EDDA-co-liganded (99m)Tc-HYNIC-RNA aptamer by the liver and spleen was remarkably lower than that of the aptamer with tricine. Tumours also showed a higher accumulation of radioactivity with the EDDA-co-liganded aptamer complex. This study demonstrated EDDA to be better than tricine for use as a co-ligand with the RNA aptamer, which can be a potential tool for the molecular imaging of HER2-overexpressing cancers.

  11. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6 and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold and PERK (up to 8 fold genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (scAAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ssAAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively. However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  12. Effect of thyroxine on cellular oxygen-consumption and glucose uptake: evidence of an effect of total T4 and not "free T4"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies of cellular T4 and T3 uptake have indicated active transport of the hormones into the cell rather than passive diffusion of the non-protein bound fraction. In order to study the significance of the extracellular environment, oxygen consumption and glucose uptake were examined...... in human mononuclear blood cells. Cells were incubated in protein free medium and in human serum totally depleted of thyroid hormones by resin treatment and fixed amounts of T4 (total T4 = 0-50-100-5000 nmol/l; free T4 = 0-5-11-5600 pmol/l) were added. Thyroxine stimulated glucose uptake and oxygen......-consumption in a dose dependent manner but the T4 stimulation was dependent on the total concentration of T4 and did not differ between serum incubation or non-protein containing medium. Addition of ANS (100 mg/l) which inhibits binding of T4 to TBG, did not increase T4 effect in serum. Inhibition of the Na...

  13. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  14. An Improved Quick Method for the Isolation of Total RNA from Cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David PANG

    2011-11-02

    Nov 2, 2011 ... in liquid nitrogen in a mortar and pestle and stored until. RNA isolation. ... our laboratory for microarray analysis, cDNA pyro- sequencing studies and construction ..... Economic and rapid method for extracting cotton genomic ...

  15. Gene silencing of HPV16 E6/E7 induced by promoter-targeting siRNA in SiHa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, D; Lu, W; Ye, F; Hu, Y; Xie, X

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, transcriptional gene silencing induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was found in mammalian and human cells. However, previous studies focused on endogenous genes. Methods: In this study, we designed siRNA targeting the promoter of human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 and transfected it into the cervical cancer cell line, SiHa. E6 and E7 mRNA and protein expression were detected in cells treated by promoter-targeting siRNA. Futhermore, cellular growth, proliferation, apoptos...

  16. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds as gene carriers: development of stable colloidal dispersion for in vitro cellular uptake studies and siRNA delivery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwani, Saniya; Kaur, Randeep; Michel, Deborah; Chitanda, Jackson M; Verrall, Ronald E; Karunakaran, Chithra; Badea, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nanodiamonds (NDs) are emerging as an attractive tool for gene therapeutics. To reach their full potential for biological application, NDs should maintain their colloidal stability in biological milieu. This study describes the behavior of lysine-functionalized ND (lys-ND) in various dispersion media, with an aim to limit aggregation and improve the colloidal stability of ND-gene complexes called diamoplexes. Furthermore, cellular and macromolecular interactions of lys-NDs are also analyzed in vitro to establish the understanding of ND-mediated gene transfer in cells. Methods lys-NDs were synthesized earlier through covalent conjugation of lysine amino acid to carboxylated NDs surface generated through re-oxidation in strong oxidizing acids. In this study, dispersions of lys-NDs were prepared in various media, and the degree of sedimentation was monitored for 72 hours. Particle size distributions and zeta potential measurements were performed for a period of 25 days to characterize the physicochemical stability of lys-NDs in the medium. The interaction profile of lys-NDs with fetal bovine serum showed formation of a protein corona, which was evaluated by size and charge distribution measurements. Uptake of lys-NDs in cervical cancer cells was analyzed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Cellular uptake of diamoplexes (complex of lys-NDs with small interfering RNA) was also analyzed using flow cytometry. Results Aqueous dispersion of lys-NDs showed minimum sedimentation and remained stable over a period of 25 days. Size distributions showed good stability, remaining under 100 nm throughout the testing period. A positive zeta potential of >+20 mV indicated a preservation of surface charges. Size distribution and zeta potential changed for lys-NDs after incubation with blood serum, suggesting an interaction with biomolecules, mainly proteins, and a possible formation of a protein corona. Cellular internalization

  17. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds as gene carriers: development of stable colloidal dispersion for in vitro cellular uptake studies and siRNA delivery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwani, Saniya; Kaur, Randeep; Michel, Deborah; Chitanda, Jackson M; Verrall, Ronald E; Karunakaran, Chithra; Badea, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are emerging as an attractive tool for gene therapeutics. To reach their full potential for biological application, NDs should maintain their colloidal stability in biological milieu. This study describes the behavior of lysine-functionalized ND (lys-ND) in various dispersion media, with an aim to limit aggregation and improve the colloidal stability of ND-gene complexes called diamoplexes. Furthermore, cellular and macromolecular interactions of lys-NDs are also analyzed in vitro to establish the understanding of ND-mediated gene transfer in cells. lys-NDs were synthesized earlier through covalent conjugation of lysine amino acid to carboxylated NDs surface generated through re-oxidation in strong oxidizing acids. In this study, dispersions of lys-NDs were prepared in various media, and the degree of sedimentation was monitored for 72 hours. Particle size distributions and zeta potential measurements were performed for a period of 25 days to characterize the physicochemical stability of lys-NDs in the medium. The interaction profile of lys-NDs with fetal bovine serum showed formation of a protein corona, which was evaluated by size and charge distribution measurements. Uptake of lys-NDs in cervical cancer cells was analyzed by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. Cellular uptake of diamoplexes (complex of lys-NDs with small interfering RNA) was also analyzed using flow cytometry. Aqueous dispersion of lys-NDs showed minimum sedimentation and remained stable over a period of 25 days. Size distributions showed good stability, remaining under 100 nm throughout the testing period. A positive zeta potential of >+20 mV indicated a preservation of surface charges. Size distribution and zeta potential changed for lys-NDs after incubation with blood serum, suggesting an interaction with biomolecules, mainly proteins, and a possible formation of a protein corona. Cellular internalization of lys-NDs was confirmed

  18. Generation of Recombinant Polioviruses Harboring RNA Affinity Tags in the 5′ and 3′ Noncoding Regions of Genomic RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flather, Dylan; Cathcart, Andrea L.; Cruz, Casey; Baggs, Eric; Ngo, Tuan; Gershon, Paul D.; Semler, Bert L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being intensely studied for more than 50 years, a complete understanding of the enterovirus replication cycle remains elusive. Specifically, only a handful of cellular proteins have been shown to be involved in the RNA replication cycle of these viruses. In an effort to isolate and identify additional cellular proteins that function in enteroviral RNA replication, we have generated multiple recombinant polioviruses containing RNA affinity tags within the 3′ or 5′ noncoding region of the genome. These recombinant viruses retained RNA affinity sequences within the genome while remaining viable and infectious over multiple passages in cell culture. Further characterization of these viruses demonstrated that viral protein production and growth kinetics were unchanged or only slightly altered relative to wild type poliovirus. However, attempts to isolate these genetically-tagged viral genomes from infected cells have been hindered by high levels of co-purification of nonspecific proteins and the limited matrix-binding efficiency of RNA affinity sequences. Regardless, these recombinant viruses represent a step toward more thorough characterization of enterovirus ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in RNA replication. PMID:26861382

  19. Integrating microRNA and mRNA expression profiles in response to radiation-induced injury in rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Ling; Zhou, Jundong; Zhang, Shuyu; Chen, Qing; Lai, Rensheng; Ding, Weiqun; Song, ChuanJun; Meng, XingJun; Wu, Jinchang

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to radiation provokes cellular responses, which are likely regulated by gene expression networks. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs, which regulate gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting protein translation. The expression patterns of both mRNA and miRNA during the radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) remain less characterized and the role of miRNAs in the regulation of this process has not been studied. The present study sought to evaluate miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in the rat lung after irradiation. Male Wistar rats were subjected to single dose irradiation with 20 Gy using 6 MV x-rays to the right lung. (A dose rate of 5 Gy/min was applied). Rats were sacrificed at 3, 12 and 26 weeks after irradiation, and morphological changes in the lung were examined by haematoxylin and eosin. The miRNA and mRNA expression profiles were evaluated by microarrays and followed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. A cDNA microarray analysis found 2183 transcripts being up-regulated and 2917 transcripts down-regulated (P ≤ 0.05, ≥2.0 fold change) in the lung tissues after irradiation. Likewise, a miRNAs microarray analysis indicated 15 miRNA species being up-regulated and 8 down-regulated (P ≤ 0.05). Subsequent bioinformatics anal -yses of the differentially expressed mRNA and miRNAs revealed that alterations in mRNA expression following irradiation were negatively correlated with miRNAs expression. Our results provide evidence indicating that irradiation induces alterations of mRNA and miRNA expression in rat lung and that there is a negative correlation of mRNA and miRNA expression levels after irradiation. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of radiation-induced lung injury. In summary, RILI does not develop gradually in a linear process. In fact, different cell types interact via cytokines in a very complex network. Furthermore, this study suggests that

  20. Constitutive Transcription and Stable RNA Accumulation in Plastids during the Conversion of Chloroplasts to Chromoplasts in Ripening Tomato Fruits 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, María Rosa; Carrillo, Néstor

    1992-01-01

    The size distribution of plastid transcripts during chromoplast differentiation in ripening tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruits was determined using northern blot analysis. Hybridization of total cellular RNA from leaves and fruits with several tobacco chloroplast DNA probes showed distinct transcript patterns in chloroplasts and chromoplasts. We also compared transcriptional rates by probing immobilized DNA fragments of small size (representing about 85% of the plastid genome) with run-on transcripts from tomato plastids. The relative rates of transcription of the various DNA regions were very similar in chloro- and chromoplasts. Parallel determination of the steady-state levels of plastid RNA showed no strict correlation between synthesis rate and RNA accumulation. Differences in the relative abundance of transcripts between chloro- and chromoplasts were not very pronounced and were limited to a small number of genes. The results indicate that the conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts at the onset of tomato fruit ripening proceeds with no important variations in the relative transcription rates and with only moderate changes in the relative stability of plastid-encoded transcripts. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:16653091

  1. Quantifying the global cellular thiol-disulfide status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rosa E; Roth, Doris; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the redox status of protein thiols is of central importance to protein structure and folding and that glutathione is an important low-molecular-mass redox regulator. However, the total cellular pools of thiols and disulfides and their relative abundance have never been...... determined. In this study, we have assembled a global picture of the cellular thiol-disulfide status in cultured mammalian cells. We have quantified the absolute levels of protein thiols, protein disulfides, and glutathionylated protein (PSSG) in all cellular protein, including membrane proteins. These data...... cell types. However, when cells are exposed to a sublethal dose of the thiol-specific oxidant diamide, PSSG levels increase to >15% of all protein cysteine. Glutathione is typically characterized as the "cellular redox buffer"; nevertheless, our data show that protein thiols represent a larger active...

  2. SPIDIA-RNA: second external quality assessment for the pre-analytical phase of blood samples used for RNA based analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malentacchi

    Full Text Available One purpose of the EC funded project, SPIDIA, is to develop evidence-based quality guidelines for the pre-analytical handling of blood samples for RNA molecular testing. To this end, two pan-European External Quality Assessments (EQAs were implemented. Here we report the results of the second SPIDIA-RNA EQA. This second study included modifications in the protocol related to the blood collection process, the shipping conditions and pre-analytical specimen handling for participants. Participating laboratories received two identical proficiency blood specimens collected in tubes with or without an RNA stabilizer. For pre-defined specimen storage times and temperatures, laboratories were asked to perform RNA extraction from whole blood according to their usual procedure and to return extracted RNA to the SPIDIA facility for further analysis. These RNA samples were evaluated for purity, yield, integrity, stability, presence of interfering substances, and gene expression levels for the validated markers of RNA stability: FOS, IL1B, IL8, GAPDH, FOSB and TNFRSF10c. Analysis of the gene expression results of FOS, IL8, FOSB, and TNFRSF10c, however, indicated that the levels of these transcripts were significantly affected by blood collection tube type and storage temperature. These results demonstrated that only blood collection tubes containing a cellular RNA stabilizer allowed reliable gene expression analysis within 48 h from blood collection for all the genes investigated. The results of these two EQAs have been proposed for use in the development of a Technical Specification by the European Committee for Standardization.

  3. SNHG5 promotes colorectal cancer cell survival by counteracting STAU1-mediated mRNA destabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damas, Nkerorema Djodji; Marcatti, Michela; Côme, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We currently have limited knowledge of the involvement of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in normal cellular processes and pathologies. Here, we identify and characterize SNHG5 as a stable cytoplasmic lncRNA with up-regulated expression in colorectal cancer. Depletion of SNHG5 induces cell cycle...... characterize SNHG5 as a lncRNA promoting tumour cell survival in colorectal cancer and delineate a novel mechanism in which a cytoplasmic lncRNA functions through blocking the action of STAU1....

  4. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Ruben A T; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Mäder, Ulrike; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L

    2015-03-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions.

  5. Interaction between the cellular protein eEF1A and the 3'-terminal stem-loop of West Nile virus genomic RNA facilitates viral minus-strand RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William G; Blackwell, Jerry L; Shi, Pei-Yong; Brinton, Margo A

    2007-09-01

    RNase footprinting and nitrocellulose filter binding assays were previously used to map one major and two minor binding sites for the cell protein eEF1A on the 3'(+) stem-loop (SL) RNA of West Nile virus (WNV) (3). Base substitutions in the major eEF1A binding site or adjacent areas of the 3'(+) SL were engineered into a WNV infectious clone. Mutations that decreased, as well as ones that increased, eEF1A binding in in vitro assays had a negative effect on viral growth. None of these mutations affected the efficiency of translation of the viral polyprotein from the genomic RNA, but all of the mutations that decreased in vitro eEF1A binding to the 3' SL RNA also decreased viral minus-strand RNA synthesis in transfected cells. Also, a mutation that increased the efficiency of eEF1A binding to the 3' SL RNA increased minus-strand RNA synthesis in transfected cells, which resulted in decreased synthesis of genomic RNA. These results strongly suggest that the interaction between eEF1A and the WNV 3' SL facilitates viral minus-strand synthesis. eEF1A colocalized with viral replication complexes (RC) in infected cells and antibody to eEF1A coimmunoprecipitated viral RC proteins, suggesting that eEF1A facilitates an interaction between the 3' end of the genome and the RC. eEF1A bound with similar efficiencies to the 3'-terminal SL RNAs of four divergent flaviviruses, including a tick-borne flavivirus, and colocalized with dengue virus RC in infected cells. These results suggest that eEF1A plays a similar role in RNA replication for all flaviviruses.

  6. Does constructive neutral evolution play an important role in the origin of cellular complexity? Making sense of the origins and uses of biological complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijer, Dave

    2011-01-01

    Recently, constructive neutral evolution has been touted as an important concept for the understanding of the emergence of cellular complexity. It has been invoked to help explain the development and retention of, amongst others, RNA splicing, RNA editing and ribosomal and mitochondrial respiratory

  7. Zika virus produces noncoding RNAs using a multi-pseudoknot structure that confounds a cellular exonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Laurence, Hannah M.; University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; University of California, Davis, CA; Massey, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) and associated fetal microcephaly mandates efforts to understand the molecular processes of infection. Related flaviviruses produce noncoding subgenomic flaviviral RNAs (sfRNAs) that are linked to pathogenicity in fetal mice. These viruses make sfRNAs by co-opting a cellular exonuclease via structured RNAs called xrRNAs. We found that ZIKV-infected monkey and human epithelial cells, mouse neurons, and mosquito cells produce sfRNAs. The RNA structure that is responsible for ZIKV sfRNA production forms a complex fold that is likely found in many pathogenic flaviviruses. Mutations that disrupt the structure affect exonuclease resistance in vitro and sfRNA formation during infection. The complete ZIKV xrRNA structure clarifies the mechanism of exonuclease resistance and identifies features that may modulate function in diverse flaviviruses.

  8. A numerical investigation into the influence of the properties of cobalt chrome cellular structures on the load transfer to the periprosthetic femur following total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlehurst, Kevin Brian; Wang, Chang Jiang; Stanford, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Stress shielding of the periprosthetic femur following total hip arthroplasty is a problem that can promote the premature loosening of femoral stems. In order to reduce the need for revision surgery it is thought that more flexible implant designs need to be considered. In this work, the mechanical properties of laser melted square pore cobalt chrome molybdenum cellular structures have been incorporated into the design of a traditional monoblock femoral stem. The influence of incorporating the properties of cellular structures on the load transfer to the periprosthetic femur was investigated using a three dimensional finite element model. Eleven different stiffness configurations were investigated by using fully porous and functionally graded approaches. This investigation confirms that the periprosthetic stress values depend on the stiffness configuration of the stem. The numerical results showed that stress shielding is reduced in the periprosthetic Gruen zones when the mechanical properties of cobalt chrome molybdenum cellular structures are used. This work identifies that monoblock femoral stems manufactured using a laser melting process, which are designed for reduced stiffness, have the potential to contribute towards reducing stress shielding. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  10. DNAzyme-mediated recovery of small recombinant RNAs from a 5S rRNA-derived chimera expressed in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willson Richard C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manufacturing large quantities of recombinant RNAs by overexpression in a bacterial host is hampered by their instability in intracellular environment. To overcome this problem, an RNA of interest can be fused into a stable bacterial RNA for the resulting chimeric construct to accumulate in the cytoplasm to a sufficiently high level. Being supplemented with cost-effective procedures for isolation of the chimera from cells and recovery of the recombinant RNA from stabilizing scaffold, this strategy might become a viable alternative to the existing methods of chemical or enzymatic RNA synthesis. Results Sequence encoding a 71-nucleotide recombinant RNA was inserted into a plasmid-borne deletion mutant of the Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA gene in place of helix III - loop C segment of the original 5S rRNA. After transformation into Escherichia coli, the chimeric RNA (3×pen aRNA was expressed constitutively from E. coli rrnB P1 and P2 promoters. The RNA chimera accumulated to levels that exceeded those of the host's 5S rRNA. A novel method relying on liquid-solid partitioning of cellular constituents was developed for isolation of total RNA from bacterial cells. This protocol avoids toxic chemicals, and is therefore more suitable for large scale RNA purification than traditional methods. A pair of biotinylated 8-17 DNAzymes was used to bring about the quantitative excision of the 71-nt recombinant RNA from the chimera. The recombinant RNA was isolated by sequence-specific capture on beads with immobilized complementary deoxyoligonucleotide, while DNAzymes were recovered by biotin affinity chromatography for reuse. Conclusions The feasibility of a fermentation-based approach for manufacturing large quantities of small RNAs in vivo using a "5S rRNA scaffold" strategy is demonstrated. The approach provides a route towards an economical method for the large-scale production of small RNAs including shRNAs, siRNAs and aptamers for use

  11. TNF-α inhibits trophoblast integration into endothelial cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B; Nakhla, S; Makris, A; Hennessy, A

    2011-03-01

    Preeclampsia has been linked to shallow trophoblast invasion and failure of uterine spiral artery transformation. Interaction between trophoblast cells and maternal uterine endothelium is critically important for this remodelling. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of TNF-α on the interactions of trophoblast-derived JEG-3 cells into capillary-like cellular networks. We have employed an in vitro trophoblast-endothelial cell co-culture model to quantify trophoblast integration into endothelial cellular networks and to investigate the effects of TNF-α. Controlled co-cultures were also treated with anti-TNF-α antibody (5 μg/ml) to specifically block the effect of TNF-α. The invasion was evaluated by performing quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) to analyse gene expression of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, integrins (α(1)β(1) and α(6)β(4)), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, E-cadherin and VE-cadherin. JEG-3 cell integration into endothelial networks was significantly inhibited by exogenous TNF-α. The inhibition was observed in the range of 0.2-5 ng/ml, to a maximum 56% inhibition at the highest concentration. This inhibition was reversed by anti-TNF-α antibody. Q-PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of integrins α(1)β(1) and MMP-2 was significantly decreased. VE-cadherin mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated (32-80%, p integration into maternal endothelial cellular networks, and this process involves the inhibition of MMP-2 and a failure of integrins switch from α(6)β(4) to α(1)β(1.) These molecular correlations reflect the changes identified in human preeclampsia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. From Cells to Virus Particles: Quantitative Methods to Monitor RNA Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Ferrer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In cells, positive strand RNA viruses, such as Retroviridae, must selectively recognize their full-length RNA genome among abundant cellular RNAs to assemble and release particles. How viruses coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both RNA and protein components to the assembly sites of infectious particles at the cell surface remains a long-standing question. The mechanisms ensuring packaging of genomic RNA are essential for viral infectivity. Since RNA packaging impacts on several essential functions of retroviral replication such as RNA dimerization, translation and recombination events, there are many studies that require the determination of RNA packaging efficiency and/or RNA packaging ability. Studies of RNA encapsidation rely upon techniques for the identification and quantification of RNA species packaged by the virus. This review focuses on the different approaches available to monitor RNA packaging: Northern blot analysis, ribonuclease protection assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase-coupled polymerase chain reaction as well as the most recent RNA imaging and sequencing technologies. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of these approaches will be discussed in order to help the investigator to choose the most appropriate technique. Although the review was written with the prototypic simple murine leukemia virus (MLV and complex human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in mind, the techniques were described in order to benefit to a larger community.

  13. Sensitive and long-term monitoring of intracellular microRNAs using a non-integrating cytoplasmic RNA vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Masayuki; Ohtaka, Manami; Iijima, Minoru; Nakasu, Asako; Kato, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Mahito

    2017-10-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Different types of cells express unique sets of miRNAs that can be exploited as potential molecular markers to identify specific cell types. Among the variety of miRNA detection methods, a fluorescence-based imaging system that utilises a fluorescent-reporter gene regulated by a target miRNA offers a major advantage for long-term tracking of the miRNA in living cells. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based miRNA-monitoring system using a non-integrating cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp). Because SeVdp vectors robustly and stably express transgenes, this system enabled sensitive monitoring of miRNAs by fluorescence microscopy. By applying this system for cellular reprogramming, we found that miR-124, but not miR-9, was significantly upregulated during direct neuronal conversion. Additionally, we were able to isolate integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells by long-term tracking of let-7 expression. Notably, this system was easily expandable to allow detection of multiple miRNAs separately and simultaneously. Our findings provide insight into a powerful tool for evaluating miRNA expression during the cellular reprogramming process and for isolating reprogrammed cells potentially useful for medical applications.

  14. MicroRNA-221 and -222 Regulate Radiation Sensitivity by Targeting the PTEN Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunzhi; Kang Chunsheng; Wang Ping; Cao Yongzhen; Lv Zhonghong; Yu Shizhu; Wang Guangxiu; Zhang Anling; Jia Zhifan; Han Lei; Yang Chunying; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Teh, Bin S.; Xu Bo; Pu Peiyu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs inhibiting expression of numerous target genes by posttranscriptional regulation. miRNA-221 and miRNA-222 (miRNA-221/-222) expression is elevated in radioresistant tumor cell lines; however, it is not known whether and how miRNAs control cellular responses to ionizing irradiation. Methods and Materials: We used bioinformatic analyses, luciferase reporter assay, and genetic knockdown and biochemical assays to characterize the regulation pathways of miRNA-221/-222 in response to radiation treatment. Results: We identified the PTEN gene as a target of miRNA-221/-222. Furthermore, we found that knocking down miRNA-221/-222 by antisense oligonucleotides upregulated PTEN expression. Upregulated PTEN expression suppressed AKT activity and increased radiation-induced apoptosis, resulting in enhancement of radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Conclusions: miRNA-221/-222 control radiation sensitivity by regulating the PTEN/AKT pathway and can be explored as novel targets for radiosensitization.

  15. Histological staining methods preparatory to laser capture microdissection significantly affect the integrity of the cellular RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hongyang; Owens, James D; Shih, Joanna H; Li, Ming-Chung; Bonner, Robert F; Mushinski, J Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis of cells enriched by laser capture microdissection (LCM) faces several technical challenges. Frozen sections yield higher quality RNA than paraffin-imbedded sections, but even with frozen sections, the staining methods used for histological identification of cells of interest could still damage the mRNA in the cells. To study the contribution of staining methods to degradation of results from gene expression profiling of LCM...

  16. CYP3A5 mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Florent; Cresteil, Thierry

    2005-09-01

    The total CYP3A5 mRNA level is significantly greater in carriers of the CYP3A5*1 allele than in CYP3A5*3 homozygotes. Most of the CYP3A5*3 mRNA includes an intronic sequence (exon 3B) containing premature termination codons (PTCs) between exons 3 and 4. Two models were used to investigate the degradation of CYP3A5 mRNA: a CYP3A5 minigene consisting of CYP3A5 exons and introns 3 to 6 transfected into MCF7 cells, and the endogenous CYP3A5 gene expressed in HepG2 cells. The 3'-untranslated region g.31611C>T mutation has no effect on CYP3A5 mRNA decay. Splice variants containing exon 3B were more unstable than wild-type (wt) CYP3A5 mRNA. Cycloheximide prevents the recognition of PTCs by ribosomes: in transfected MCF7 and HepG2 cells, cycloheximide slowed down the degradation of exon 3B-containing splice variants, suggesting the participation of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). When PTCs were removed from pseudoexon 3B or when UPF1 small interfering RNA was used to impair the NMD mechanism, the decay of the splice variant was reduced, confirming the involvement of NMD in the degradation of CYP3A5 splice variants. Induction could represent a source of variability for CYP3A5 expression and could modify the proportion of splice variants. The extent of CYP3A5 induction was investigated after exposure to barbiturates or steroids: CYP3A4 was markedly induced in a pediatric population compared with untreated neonates. However, no effect could be detected in either the total CYP3A5 RNA, the proportion of splice variant RNA, or the protein level. Therefore, in these carriers, induction is unlikely to switch on the phenotypic CYP3A5 expression in carriers of CYP3A5*3/*3.

  17. Role of nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport during the life cycle of retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisatoshi eShida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have evolved mechanisms for transporting their intron-containing RNAs (including genomic and messenger RNAs, which encode virion components from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the infected cell. Human retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, encode the regulatory proteins Rev and Rex, which form a bridge between the viral RNA and the export receptor CRM1. Recent studies show that these transport systems are not only involved in RNA export, but also in the encapsidation of genomic RNA; furthermore, they influence subsequent events in the cytoplasm, including the translation of the cognate mRNA, transport of Gag proteins to the plasma membrane, and the formation of virus particles. Moreover, the mode of interaction between the viral and cellular RNA transport machinery underlies the species-specific propagation of HIV-1 and HTLV-1, forming the basis for constructing animal models of infection. This review article discusses recent progress regarding these issues.

  18. MicroRNA expression profiles in human cancer cells after ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemoeller, Olivier M; Niyazi, Maximilian; Corradini, Stefanie; Zehentmayr, Franz; Li, Minglun; Lauber, Kirsten; Belka, Claus

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are regulators of central cellular processes and are implicated in the pathogenesis and prognosis of human cancers. MicroRNAs also modulate responses to anti-cancer therapy. In the context of radiation oncology microRNAs were found to modulate cell death and proliferation after irradiation. However, changes in microRNA expression profiles in response to irradiation have not been comprehensively analyzed so far. The present study's intend is to present a broad screen of changes in microRNA expression following irradiation of different malignant cell lines. 1100 microRNAs (Sanger miRBase release version 14.0) were analyzed in six malignant cell lines following irradiation with clinically relevant doses of 2.0 Gy. MicroRNA levels 6 hours after irradiation were compared to microRNA levels in non-irradiated cells using the 'Geniom Biochip MPEA homo sapiens'. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed a pattern, which significantly (p = 0.014) discerned irradiated from non-irradiated cells. The expression levels of a number of microRNAs known to be involved in the regulation of cellular processes like apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, local immune response and radioresistance (e. g. miR-1285, miR-24-1, miR-151-5p, let-7i) displayed 2 - 3-fold changes after irradiation. Moreover, several microRNAs previously not known to be radiation-responsive were discovered. Ionizing radiation induced significant changes in microRNA expression profiles in 3 glioma and 3 squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. The functional relevance of these changes is not addressed but should by analyzed by future work especially focusing on clinically relevant endpoints like radiation induced cell death, proliferation, migration and metastasis

  19. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xincang [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-01-24

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10{sup -14} mol L{sup -1}. Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  20. RNA Binding Proteins in Eye Development and Disease: Implication of Conserved RNA Granule Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Soma; Siddam, Archana D.; Barnum, Carrie E.; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-01-01

    The molecular biology of metazoan eye development is an area of intense investigation. These efforts have led to the surprising recognition that although insect and vertebrate eyes have dramatically different structures, the orthologs or family members of several conserved transcription and signaling regulators such as Pax6, Six3, Prox1 and Bmp4 are commonly required for their development. In contrast, our understanding of post-transcriptional regulation in eye development and disease, particularly regarding the function of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), is limited. We examine the present knowledge of RBPs in eye development in the insect model Drosophila, as well as several vertebrate models such as fish, frog, chicken and mouse. Interestingly, of the 42 RBPs that have been investigated with for their expression or function in vertebrate eye development, 24 (~60%) are recognized in eukaryotic cells as components of RNA granules such as Processing bodies (P-bodies), Stress granules, or other specialized ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. We discuss the distinct developmental and cellular events that may necessitate potential RBP/RNA granule-associated RNA regulon models to facilitate post-transcriptional control of gene expression in eye morphogenesis. In support of these hypotheses, three RBPs and RNP/RNA granule components Tdrd7, Caprin2 and Stau2 are linked to ocular developmental defects such as congenital cataract, Peters anomaly and microphthalmia in human patients or animal models. We conclude by discussing the utility of interdisciplinary approaches such as the bioinformatics tool iSyTE (integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery) to prioritize RBPs for deriving post-transcriptional regulatory networks in eye development and disease. PMID:27133484

  1. LAMMER kinase Kic1 is involved in pre-mRNA processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Portillio, Jessica; Ngo, Benson; Chang, Cathey; Wen, Teresa; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2011-01-01

    The LAMMER kinases are conserved through evolution. They play vital roles in cell growth/differentiation, development, and metabolism. One of the best known functions of the kinases in animal cells is the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Kic1 is the LAMMER kinase in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Despite the reported pleiotropic effects of kic1 + deletion/overexpression on various cellular processes the involvement of Kic1 in splicing remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Kic1 not only is required for efficient splicing but also affects mRNA export, providing evidence for the conserved roles of LAMMER kinases in the unicellular context of fission yeast. Consistent with the hypothesis of its direct participation in multiple steps of pre-mRNA processing, Kic1 is predominantly present in the nucleus during interphase. In addition, the kinase activity of Kic1 plays a role in modulating its own cellular partitioning. Interestingly, Kic1 expression oscillates in a cell cycle-dependent manner and the peak level coincides with mitosis and cytokinesis, revealing a potential mechanism for controlling the kinase activity during the cell cycle. The novel information about the in vivo functions and regulation of Kic1 offers insights into the conserved biological roles fundamental to LAMMER kinases in eukaryotes.

  2. RNA binding efficacy of theophylline, theobromine and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, I Maria; Kumar, S G Bhuvan; Malathi, R

    2003-04-01

    The binding of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine to nucleic acids are reckoned to be pivotal as they are able to modulate the cellular activities. We explore the interaction of yeast RNA binding efficacy of the above xanthine derivatives by using UV absorption differential spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Both the analyses show discrimination in their binding affinity to RNA. The differential UV-spectrum at P/D 3.3 reveals the greater RNA binding activity for theophylline (85 +/- 5%), whereas moderate and comparatively less binding activity for theobromine (45 +/- 5%) and caffeine (30 +/- 5%) and the binding activity was found to depend on concentration of the drugs. In FTIR analysis we observed changes in the amino group (NH) of RNA complexed by drugs, where the NH band is found to become very broad, indicating hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) with theophylline (3343.4 cm(-1)), theobromine (3379.8 cm(-1)) and caffeine (3343 cm(-1)) as compared to the free RNA (3341.6 cm(-1)). Furthermore in RNA-theophylline complex, it is observed that the carbonyl (C=O) vibration frequency (nu(C=O)) of both drug (nu(C=O)=1718, 1666 cm(-1)) as well as RNA (nu(C=O)=1699, 1658 cm(-1)) disappeared and a new vibration band appeared around 1703 cm(-1), indicating that the C=O and NH groups of drug and RNA are effectively involved in H-bonding. Whereas in RNA-theobromine and RNA-caffeine complexes, we found very little changes in C=O frequency and only broadening of the NH band of RNA due to complexation is observed in these groups. The changes in the vibrations of G-C/A-U bands and other bending frequencies are discussed. Thus the discrimination in the binding affinity of methylxanthines with RNA molecule shows that strong RNA binding drugs like theophylline can selectively be delivered to RNA targets of microbial pathogens having the mechanism of RNA catalysis.

  3. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada); Bag, Jnanankur, E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G2W1 (Canada)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. {yields} PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. {yields} PABP depletion does not affect transcription. {yields} PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  4. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B.; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. → PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. → PABP depletion does not affect transcription. → PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  5. Inference of miRNA targets using evolutionary conservation and pathway analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Nimwegen Erik

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulatory genes in a variety of cellular processes and, in recent years, hundreds of such genes have been discovered in animals. In contrast, functional annotations are available only for a very small fraction of these miRNAs, and even in these cases only partially. Results We developed a general Bayesian method for the inference of miRNA target sites, in which, for each miRNA, we explicitly model the evolution of orthologous target sites in a set of related species. Using this method we predict target sites for all known miRNAs in flies, worms, fish, and mammals. By comparing our predictions in fly with a reference set of experimentally tested miRNA-mRNA interactions we show that our general method performs at least as well as the most accurate methods available to date, including ones specifically tailored for target prediction in fly. An important novel feature of our model is that it explicitly infers the phylogenetic distribution of functional target sites, independently for each miRNA. This allows us to infer species-specific and clade-specific miRNA targeting. We also show that, in long human 3' UTRs, miRNA target sites occur preferentially near the start and near the end of the 3' UTR. To characterize miRNA function beyond the predicted lists of targets we further present a method to infer significant associations between the sets of targets predicted for individual miRNAs and specific biochemical pathways, in particular those of the KEGG pathway database. We show that this approach retrieves several known functional miRNA-mRNA associations, and predicts novel functions for known miRNAs in cell growth and in development. Conclusion We have presented a Bayesian target prediction algorithm without any tunable parameters, that can be applied to sequences from any clade of species. The algorithm automatically infers the phylogenetic distribution of functional sites for each miRNA, and

  6. Isothermal folding of a light-up bio-orthogonal RNA origami nanoribbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Emanuela; Kozyra, Jerzy Wieslaw; Gu, Jing-Ying; Stimming, Ulrich; Piantanida, Luca; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2018-05-03

    RNA presents intringuing roles in many cellular processes and its versatility underpins many different applications in synthetic biology. Nonetheless, RNA origami as a method for nanofabrication is not yet fully explored and the majority of RNA nanostructures are based on natural pre-folded RNA. Here we describe a biologically inert and uniquely addressable RNA origami scaffold that self-assembles into a nanoribbon by seven staple strands. An algorithm is applied to generate a synthetic De Bruijn scaffold sequence that is characterized by the lack of biologically active sites and repetitions larger than a predetermined design parameter. This RNA scaffold and the complementary staples fold in a physiologically compatible isothermal condition. In order to monitor the folding, we designed a new split Broccoli aptamer system. The aptamer is divided into two nonfunctional sequences each of which is integrated into the 5' or 3' end of two staple strands complementary to the RNA scaffold. Using fluorescence measurements and in-gel imaging, we demonstrate that once RNA origami assembly occurs, the split aptamer sequences are brought into close proximity forming the aptamer and turning on the fluorescence. This light-up 'bio-orthogonal' RNA origami provides a prototype that can have potential for in vivo origami applications.

  7. Extracellular plasma RNA from colon cancer patients is confined in a vesicle-like structure and is mRNA-enriched

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José Miguel; García, Vanesa; Peña, Cristina; Domínguez, Gemma; Silva, Javier; Diaz, Raquel; Espinosa, Pablo; Citores, Maria Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Bonilla, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Little is yet known about the origin and protective mechanism of free nucleic acids in plasma. We investigated the possibility of these free nucleic acids being particle associated. Plasma samples from colon cancer patients and cell culture media were subjected to various antibody incubations, ultracentrifugation, and RNA extraction protocols for total RNA, epithelial RNA, and mRNA. Flow cytometry using a Ber-EP4 antibody and confocal laser microscopy after staining with propidium iodide were also performed. mRNA levels of the LISCH7 and SDHA genes were determined in cells and in culture media. Ber-EP4 antibody and polystyrene beads coated with oligo dT sequences were employed. We observed that, after incubation, total RNA and mRNA were always detected after membrane digestion, and that epithelial RNA was detected before this procedure. In ultracentrifugation, mRNA was caught in the supernatant only if a former lysis mediated or in the pellet if there was no previous digestion. Flow cytometry determinations showed that antibody-coated microbeads keep acellular structures bearing epithelial antigens apart. Confocal laser microscopy made 1- to 2-μm-diameter particles perceptible in the vicinity of magnetic polystyrene beads. Relevant differences were observed between mRNA of cells and culture media, as there was a considerable difference in LISCH7 mRNA levels between HT29 and IMR90 cell co-cultures and their culture media. Our results support the view that extracellular RNA found in plasma from cancer patients circulates in association with or is protected in a multiparticle complex, and that an active release mechanism by tumor cells may be a possible origin. PMID:18456845

  8. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M.; Pritzker, Laura B.; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-01-01

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced “RNA disruption” is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3’-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues

  9. Nucleation by rRNA Dictates the Precision of Nucleolus Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahati, Hanieh; Pelham-Webb, Bobbie; Blythe, Shelby; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-02-08

    Membrane-less organelles are intracellular compartments specialized to carry out specific cellular functions. There is growing evidence supporting the possibility that such organelles form as a new phase, separating from cytoplasm or nucleoplasm. However, a main challenge to such phase separation models is that the initial assembly, or nucleation, of the new phase is typically a highly stochastic process and does not allow for the spatiotemporal precision observed in biological systems. Here, we investigate the initial assembly of the nucleolus, a membrane-less organelle involved in different cellular functions including ribosomal biogenesis. We demonstrate that the nucleolus formation is precisely timed in D. melanogaster embryos and follows the transcription of rRNA. We provide evidence that transcription of rRNA is necessary for overcoming the highly stochastic nucleation step in the formation of the nucleolus, through a seeding mechanism. In the absence of rDNA, the nucleolar proteins studied are able to form high-concentration assemblies. However, unlike the nucleolus, these assemblies are highly variable in number, location, and time at which they form. In addition, quantitative study of the changes in the nucleoplasmic concentration and distribution of these nucleolar proteins in the wild-type embryos is consistent with the role of rRNA in seeding the nucleolus formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isothermal Amplification for MicroRNA Detection: From the Test Tube to the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ruijie; Zhang, Kaixiang; Li, Jinghong

    2017-04-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that act as pivotal post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, thus involving in many fundamental cellular processes such as cell proliferation, migration, and canceration. The detection of miRNAs has attracted significant interest, as abnormal miRNA expression is identified to contribute to serious human diseases such as cancers. Particularly, miRNAs in peripheral blood have recently been recognized as important biomarkers potential for liquid biopsy. Furthermore, as miRNAs are expressed heterogeneously in different cells, investigations into single-cell miRNA expression will be of great value for resolving miRNA-mediated regulatory circuits and the complexity and heterogeneity of miRNA-related diseases. Thus, the development of miRNA detection methods, especially for complex clinic samples and single cells is in great demand. In this Account, we will present recent progress in the design and application of isothermal amplification enabling miRNA detection transition from the test tube to the clinical sample and single cell, which will significantly advance our knowledge of miRNA functions and disease associations, as well as its translation in clinical diagnostics. miRNAs present a huge challenge in detection because of their extremely short length (∼22 nucleotides) and sequence homology (even with only single-nucleotide variation). The conventional golden method for nucleic acid detection, quantitative PCR (qPCR), is not amenable to directly detecting short RNAs and hardly enables distinguishing between miRNA family members with very similar sequences. Alternatively, isothermal amplification has emerged as a powerful method for quantification of nucleic acids and attracts broad interest for utilization in developing miRNA assays. Compared to PCR, isothermal amplification can be performed without precise control of temperature cycling and is well fit for detecting short RNA or DNA. We and other

  11. Increased cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle and tendon in response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Bayer, Monika L; Mackey, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate exercise-induced cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle/tendon with the use of 3'-[F-18]fluoro-3'deoxythymidine (FLT) and to quantitatively study concomitant changes in the proliferation-associated factor, Ki67. PROCEDURES: Wistar rats (...... = 13) performed 3 days of treadmill running. Cellular proliferation was investigated 3 days before and 48 h after the running exercise with the use of FLT and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Results were compared to a sedentary control group (n = 10). Image......-derived results were supported by a correlation in calf muscle to Ki67 (protein and mRNA level), while this coherence was not found in tendon. CONCLUSION: FLT-PET seems to be a promising tool for imaging of exercise-induced cellular proliferation in musculo-tendinous tissue....

  12. Nuclear distribution of the Trypanosoma cruzi RNA Pol I subunit RPA31 during growth and metacyclogenesis, and characterization of its nuclear localization signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela-Pérez, Israel; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Cevallos, Ana María; Hernández, Roberto

    2018-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiologic agent of Chagas disease. Our research group studies ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene transcription and nucleolus dynamics in this species of trypanosomes. RPA31 is an essential subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) whose presence is apparently restricted to trypanosomes. Using fluorescent-tagged versions of this protein (TcRPA31-EGFP), we describe its nuclear distribution during growth and metacyclogenesis. Our findings indicate that TcRPA31-EGFP alters its nuclear presence from concentrated nucleolar localization in exponentially growing epimastigotes to a dispersed granular distribution in the nucleoplasm of stationary epimastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes. These changes likely reflect a structural redistribution of the Pol I transcription machinery in quiescent cellular stages where downregulation of rRNA synthesis is known to occur. In addition, and related to the nuclear internalization of this protein, the presence of a classical bipartite-type nuclear localization signal was identified towards its C-terminal end. The functionality of this motif was demonstrated by its partial or total deletion in recombinant versions of the tagged fluorescent protein. Moreover, ivermectin inhibited the nuclear localization of the labelled chimaera, suggesting the involvement of the importin α/β transport system.

  13. Sodium arsenite-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is related to inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression in mouse activated T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, Patricia; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, CINVESTAV, Seccion Toxicologia, P.O. Box 14-740, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Goytia-Acevedo, Raquel C. [Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Facultad de Medicina, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    A proposed mechanism for the As-induced inhibition of cell proliferation is the inhibition of IL-2 secretion. However, the effects of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression or on the ERK pathway in activated-T cells have not yet been described. We examined the effect of arsenite on IL-2 mRNA expression, cell activation and proliferation in PHA-stimulated murine lymphocytes. Arsenite (1 and 10 {mu}M) decreased IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation. Arsenite (10 {mu}M) strongly inhibited ERK-phosphorylation. However, the partial inhibition (50%) of IL-2 mRNA produced by 1 {mu}M, consistent with the effects on IL-2 secretion and cell proliferation, could not be explained by the inhibition of ERK-phosphorylation, which was not affected at this concentration. The inhibition of IL-2 mRNA expression caused by 1 {mu}M could be associated to effects on pathways located downstream or parallel to ERK. Arsenite also decreased early activation (surface CD69{sup +} expression) in both CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +}, and decreased total CD8{sup +} count without significantly affecting CD4{sup +}, supporting that the cellular immune response mediated by cytotoxic T cells is an arsenic target. Thus, our results suggest that arsenite decreases IL-2 mRNA levels and T-cell activation and proliferation. However, further studies on the effects of arsenite on IL-2 gene transcription and IL-2 mRNA stability are needed. (orig.)

  14. Presence of viral RNA and proteins in exosomes from the cellular clones resistant to Rift Valley Fever Virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor eAhsan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley Fever Virus (RVFV is a RNA virus that belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. It infects humans and livestock and causes Rift Valley fever. RVFV is considered an agricultural pathogen by the USDA, as it can cause up to 100% abortion in cattle and extensive death of newborns. In addition, it is designated as Category A pathogen by the CDC and the NIAID. In some human cases of RVFV infection, the virus causes fever, ocular damage, liver damage, hemorrhagic fever, and death. There are currently limited options for vaccine candidates, which include the MP-12 and clone 13 versions of RVFV. Viral infections often deregulate multiple cellular pathways that contribute to replication and host pathology. We have previously shown that latent HIV-1 and HTLV-1 infected cells secrete exosomes that contain short viral RNAs, limited number of genomic RNAs, and viral proteins. These exosomes largely target neighboring cells and activate the NF-кB pathway, leading to cell proliferation and overall better viral replication. In this manuscript, we studied the effects of exosome formation from RVFV infected cells and their function on recipient cells. We initially infected cells, isolated resistant clones, and further purified using dilution cloning. We then characterized these cells as resistant to new RVFV infection, but sensitive to other viral infections, including Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV. These clones contained normal markers (i.e. CD63 for exosomes and were able to activate the TLR pathway in recipient reporter cells. Interestingly, the exosome rich preparations, much like their host cell, contained viral RNA (L, M, and S genome. The RNAs were detected using qRT-PCR in both parental and exosomal preparations as well as in CD63 immunoprecipitates. Viral proteins such as N and a modified form of NSs were present in some of these exosomes. Finally, treatment of recipient cells (T- cells and monocytic cells showed

  15. Expression Profiles of Cellular Retinol-binding Protein, Type II (CRBP II in Erlang Mountainous Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Yin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular retinol-binding protein II (CRBP II belongs to the family of cellular retinol-binding proteins and plays a major role in absorption, transport, and metabolism of vitamin A. In addition, because vitamin A is correlated with reproductive performance, we measured CRBP II mRNA abundance in erlang mountainous chickens by real-time PCR using the relative quantification method. The expression of CRBP II showed a tissue-specific pattern and egg production rate-dependent changes. The expression was very high (p<0.05 in jejunum and liver, intermediate in kidney, ovary, and oviduct, and lowest (p<0.05 in heart, hypothalamus, and pituitary. In the hypothalamus, oviduct, ovary, and pituitary, CRBP II mRNA abundance were correlated to egg production rate, which increased from 12 wk to 32 wk, peaked at 32 wk relative to the other time points, and then decreased from 32 wk to 45 wk. In contrast, the expression of CRBP II mRNA in heart, jejunum, kidney, and liver was not different at any of the ages evaluated in this study. These data may help to understand the genetic basis of vitamin A metabolism, and suggest that CRBP II may be a candidate gene to affect egg production traits in chickens.

  16. Gene expression analysis of skin grafts and cultured keratinocytes using synthetic RNA normalization reveals insights into differentiation and growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Shintaro; Skoog, Tiina; Jouhilahti, Eeva-Mari; Siitonen, H Annika; Nuutila, Kristo; Tervaniemi, Mari H; Vuola, Jyrki; Johnsson, Anna; Lönnerberg, Peter; Linnarsson, Sten; Elomaa, Outi; Kankuri, Esko; Kere, Juha

    2015-06-25

    Keratinocytes (KCs) are the most frequent cells in the epidermis, and they are often isolated and cultured in vitro to study the molecular biology of the skin. Cultured primary cells and various immortalized cells have been frequently used as skin models but their comparability to intact skin has been questioned. Moreover, when analyzing KC transcriptomes, fluctuation of polyA+ RNA content during the KCs' lifecycle has been omitted. We performed STRT RNA sequencing on 10 ng samples of total RNA from three different sample types: i) epidermal tissue (split-thickness skin grafts), ii) cultured primary KCs, and iii) HaCaT cell line. We observed significant variation in cellular polyA+ RNA content between tissue and cell culture samples of KCs. The use of synthetic RNAs and SAMstrt in normalization enabled comparison of gene expression levels in the highly heterogenous samples and facilitated discovery of differences between the tissue samples and cultured cells. The transcriptome analysis sensitively revealed genes involved in KC differentiation in skin grafts and cell cycle regulation related genes in cultured KCs and emphasized the fluctuation of transcription factors and non-coding RNAs associated to sample types. The epidermal keratinocytes derived from tissue and cell culture samples showed highly different polyA+ RNA contents. The use of SAMstrt and synthetic RNA based normalization allowed the comparison between tissue and cell culture samples and thus proved to be valuable tools for RNA-seq analysis with translational approach. Transciptomics revealed clear difference both between tissue and cell culture samples and between primary KCs and immortalized HaCaT cells.

  17. The bio-complex "reaction pattern in vertebrate cells" reduces cytokine-induced cellular adhesion molecule mRNA expression in human endothelial cells by attenuation of NF-kappaB translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnau, Cindy; Liebermann, Herbert E H; Helbig, Franz; Staudt, Alexander; Felix, Stephan B; Ewert, Ralf; Landsberger, Martin

    2009-02-28

    The bio-complex "reaction pattern in vertebrate cells" (RiV) is mainly represented by characteristic exosome-like particles--probably as reaction products of cells to specific stress. The transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a central role in inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that RiV particle preparations (RiV-PP) reduce cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin) by the attenuation of NF-kappaB translocation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). After 4 hours, pre-incubation of HUVEC with RiV-PP before stimulation with TNF-alpha significantly reduced ICAM-1 (65.5+/-10.3%) and VCAM-1 (71.1+/-12.3%) mRNA expression compared to TNF-alpha-treated cells (100%, n=7). ICAM-1 surface expression was significantly albeit marginally reduced in RiV/TNF-alpha- treated cells (92.0+/-5.6%, n=4). No significant effect was observed on VCAM-1 surface expression. In RiV/TNF-alpha-treated cells (n=4), NF-kappaB subunits p50 (85.7+/-4.1%) and p65 (85.0+/-1.8%) nuclear translocation was significantly reduced. RiV-PP may exert an anti-inflammatory effect in HUVEC by reducing CAM mRNA expression via attenuation of p50 and p65 translocation.

  18. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

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    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  19. Role of G3BP1 in glucocorticoid receptor-mediated microRNA-15b and microRNA-23a biogenesis in endothelial cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin

    2017-05-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of non-coding RNAs that play crucial roles in regulating various normal cellular responses. Recent studies revealed that the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway is subject to sophisticated regulation. Hormonal control of miRNA biogenesis by androgen and estrogen has been demonstrated, but the direct effects of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) on miRNA biogenesis are unknown. This study revealed the role of GR in miRNA maturation. We showed that two GR agonists, dexamethasone and ginsenoside-Rg1 rapidly suppressed the expression of mature miR-15b, miR-23a, and miR-214 in human endothelial cells. RNA pulldown coupled with proteomic analysis identified GTPase-activating protein (SH3 domain) binding protein 1 (G3BP1) as one of the RNA-binding proteins mediating GR-regulated miRNA maturation. Activated GR induced phosphorylation of v-AKT Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homologue (AKT) kinase, which in turn phosphorylated and promoted nuclear translocation of G3BP1. The nuclear G3BP1 bound to the G3BP1 consensus sequence located on primary miR-15b~16-2 and miR-23a~27a~24-2 to inhibit their maturation. The findings from this study have advanced our understanding of the non-genomic effects of GR in the vascular system.