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Sample records for toroidal field model

  1. Results of the ITER toroidal field model coil project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salpietro, E.; Maix, R.

    2001-01-01

    In the scope of the ITER EDA one of the seven largest projects was devoted to the development, manufacture and testing of a Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC). The industry consortium AGAN manufactured the TFMC based on on a conceptual design developed by the ITER EDA EU Home Team. The TFMC was completed and assembled in the test facility TOSKA of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the first half of 2001. The first testing phase started in June 2001 and lasted till October 2001. The first results have shown that the main goals of the project have been achieved

  2. Computational model for superconducting toroidal-field magnets for a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    A computational model for predicting the performance characteristics and cost of superconducting toroidal-field (TF) magnets in tokamak reactors is presented. The model can be used to compare the technical and economic merits of different approaches to the design of TF magnets for a reactor system. The model has been integrated into the ANL Systems Analysis Program. Samples of results obtainable with the model are presented

  3. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof

  4. Comparative investigation of ELM control based on toroidal modelling of plasma response to RMP fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2016-10-01

    The type-I edge localized mode (ELM), bursting at low frequency and with large amplitude, can channel a substantial amount of the plasma thermal energy into the surrounding plasma-facing components in tokamak devices operating at the high-confinement mode, potentially causing severe material damages. Learning effective ways of controlling this instability is thus an urgent issue in fusion research, in particular in view of the next generation large devices such as ITER and DEMO. Among other means, externally applied, three-dimensional resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have been experimentally demonstrated to be successful in mitigating or suppressing the type-I ELM, in multiple existing devices. In this work, we shall report results of a comparative study of ELM control using RMPs. Comparison is made between the modelled plasma response to the 3D external fields and the observed change of the ELM behaviour on multiple devices, including MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, EAST, DIII-D, JET, and KSTAR. We show that toroidal modelling of the plasma response, based on linear and quasi-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, provides essential insights that are useful in interpreting and guiding the ELM control experiments. In particular, linear toroidal modelling results, using the MARS-F code, reveal the crucial role of the edge localized peeling-tearing mode response during ELM mitigation/suppression on all these devices. Such response often leads to strong peaking of the plasma surface displacement near the region of weak equilibrium poloidal field (e.g. the X-point), and this provides an alternative practical criterion for ELM control, as opposed to the vacuum field based Chirikov criteria. Quasi-linear modelling using MARS-Q provides quantitative interpretation of the side effects due to the ELM control coils, on the plasma toroidal momentum and particle confinements. The particular role of the momentum and particle fluxes, associated with the neoclassical toroidal

  5. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  6. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 18 0 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  7. Relativistic stars with purely toroidal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Yoshida, Shijun

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic field on the equilibrium structures of the relativistic stars. The basic equations for obtaining equilibrium solutions of relativistic rotating stars containing purely toroidal magnetic fields are derived for the first time. To solve these basic equations numerically, we extend the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky scheme for calculating relativistic rotating stars containing no magnetic field to incorporate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic fields. By using the numerical scheme, we then calculate a large number of the equilibrium configurations for a particular distribution of the magnetic field in order to explore the equilibrium properties. We also construct the equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and/or the constant magnetic flux, which model the evolution of an isolated neutron star as it loses angular momentum via the gravitational waves. Important properties of the equilibrium configurations of the magnetized stars obtained in this study are summarized as follows: (1) For the nonrotating stars, the matter distribution of the stars is prolately distorted due to the toroidal magnetic fields. (2) For the rapidly rotating stars, the shape of the stellar surface becomes oblate because of the centrifugal force. But, the matter distribution deep inside the star is sufficiently prolate for the mean matter distribution of the star to be prolate. (3) The stronger toroidal magnetic fields lead to the mass shedding of the stars at the lower angular velocity. (4) For some equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and magnetic flux, the stars can spin up as they lose angular momentum.

  8. BPX toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzenvoeder, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the toroidal field (TF) coil system of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) which consists of (18) beryllium copper magnets arrayed in a wedged configuration with a major radius of 2.6 meters and a field strength capability on axis of 9.0 Tesla. The toroidal array is constructed from six (3)-coil modules to facilitate remote recovery in the event of a magnet failure after nuclear activation precludes hands-on servicing. The magnets are of a modified Bitter plate design with partial cases of type 316-LN stainless steel welded with Inconel 182 weld wire. The coil turn plates are fabricated from CDA C17510 beryllium copper with optimized mechanical, thermal, and electrical characteristics. joints within the turns and between turns are made by welding with C17200 filler wire. Cryogenic cooling is employed to reduce power dissipation and to enhance performance. The magnets are cooled between experimental pulses by pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through channels in the edges of the coil turns. This arrangement makes possible one full-power pulse per hour. Electrical insulation consists of polyimide-glass sheets bonded in place with vacuum-pressure impregnated epoxy/glass

  9. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish M; Rushinski J; Myatt L; Brooks A; Dahlgren F; Chrzanowski J; Reiersen W; Freudenberg K.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements

  10. High current density toroidal pinch discharges with weak toroidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Brzozowski, J.; Drake, J.R.; Hellblom, G.; Kaellne, E.; Mazur, S.; Nordlund, P.

    1990-01-01

    Toroidal discharges in the ultralow q regime (ULQ) have been studied in the rebuilt Extrap TI device. ULQ discharges are sustained for pulse lengths exceeding 1 ms, which corresponds to more than 10 resistiv shell times. Values for the safety factor at the vacuum vessel wall are between rational values: 1/(n+1) -2 . The magnetic fluctuation level increases during the transition between rational values of q(a). For very low values of q(a), the loop voltage increases and the toroidal field development in the discharge exhibits the characteristic behaviour of the setting-up phase of a field reversed pinch. (author) 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  12. Toroidal field ripple effects in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tsang, K.T.; Callen, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    In an experimental power reactor, the ripple produced by the finite number of toroidal field coils destroys the ideal axisymmetry of the configuration and is responsible for additional particle trapping, loss regions and plasma transport. The effects of toroidal field ripple on the plasma transport coefficient, the loss of alpha particles and energetic injection ions, and the relaxation of toroidal flows are investigated in a new and systematic way. The relevant results are applied to the ORNL-EPR reference design; the maximum ripple there of about 2.2 percent at the outer edge of the plasma column is found to be tolerable from plasma physics considerations

  13. Spherical tokamak without external toroidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.; Avinash, K.; Srinivasan, R.

    2001-01-01

    A spherical tokamak design without external toroidal field coils is proposed. The tokamak is surrounded by a spheromak shell carrying requisite force free currents to produce the toroidal field in the core. Such equilibria are constructed and it is indicated that these equilibria are likely to have robust ideal and resistive stability. The advantage of this scheme in terms of a reduced ohmic dissipation is pointed out. (author)

  14. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, F.; Brechna, H.; Erb, J.; Komarek, P.; Krauth, H.; Maurer, W.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  15. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  16. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1978-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show over half of the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport are needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given

  17. Toroidal modeling of plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation field penetration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liu, Y.Q.; Kirk, A.; Sun, Y.; Cahyna, Pavel; Chapman, I.T.; Denner, P.; Fishpool, G.; Garofalo, A.M.; Harrison, J.R.; Nardon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 12 (2012), s. 124013-124013 ISSN 0741-3335 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * resonant magnetic perturbation * neoclassical toroidal viscosity Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.369, year: 2012 http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/54/12/124013/pdf/0741-3335_54_12_124013.pdf

  18. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  19. Chaotic magnetic field line in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, Tadatsugu; Abe, Yoshihiko; Urata, Kazuhiro; Irie, Haruyuki.

    1989-05-01

    This is an introductory review of chaotic magnetic field line in plasmas, together with some new results, with emphasis on the long-time tail and the fractional Brownian motion of the magnetic field line. The chaotic magnetic field line in toroidal plasmas is a typical chaotic phenomena in the Hamiltonian dynamical systems. The onset of stochasticity induced by a major magnetic perturbation is thought to cause a macroscopic rapid phenomena called the current disruption in the tokamak discharges. Numerical simulations on the basis of magnetohydrodynamics reveal in fact the disruptive phenomena. Some dynamical models which include the area-preserving mapping such as the standard mapping, and the two-wave Hamiltonian system can model the stochastic magnetic field. Theoretical results with use of the functional integral representation are given regarding the long-time tail on the basis of the radial twist mapping. It is shown that application of renormalization group technique to chaotic orbit in the two-wave Hamiltonian system proves decay of the velocity autocorrelation function with the power law. Some new numerical results are presented which supports these theoretical results. (author)

  20. A model for the neoclassical toroidal viscosity effect on Edge plasma toroidal rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miron, I.G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Euratom-MEdC Association, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-11-15

    A semianalytic expression for the edge plasma angular toroidal rotation frequency that includes the neoclassical toroidal viscosity braking influence is obtained. Based on the model presented in a previous paper [I.G. Miron, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 53, 214 (2013)], the less destabilizing error field spectrum is found in order to minimize the nonlinear effect of the NTV on the toroidal rotation of the edge of the plasma. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow in high temperature toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow is discussed for the high temperature plasma in toroidal systems, tokamak and Heliotron type magnetic configurations. The spontaneous toroidal and poloidal flows are observed in the plasma with improved confinement. The radial electric field is mainly determined by the poloidal flow, because the contribution of toroidal flow to the radial electric field is small. The jump of radial electric field and poloidal flow are commonly observed near the plasma edge in the so-called high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in tokamaks and electron root plasma in stellarators including Heliotrons. In general the toroidal flow is driven by the momentum input from neutral beam injected toroidally. There is toroidal flow not driven by neutral beam in the plasma and it will be more significant in the plasma with large electric field. The direction of these spontaneous toroidal flows depends on the symmetry of magnetic field. The spontaneous toroidal flow driven by the ion temperature gradient is in the direction to increase the negative radial electric field in tokamak. The direction of spontaneous toroidal flow in Heliotron plasmas is opposite to that in tokamak plasma because of the helicity of symmetry of the magnetic field configuration. (author)

  2. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  3. ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC). Test and analysis summary report (testing handbook) chapter 3 TOSKA FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulbricht, A.

    2001-05-01

    In the frame of a contract between the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Director and the European Home Team Director was concluded the extension of the TOSKA facility of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe as test bed for the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), one of the 7 large research and development projects of the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activity). The report describes the work and development, which were performed together with industry to extend the existing components and add new components. In this frame a new 2 kW refrigerator was added to the TOSKA facility including the cold lines to the Helium dewar in the TOSKA experimental area. The measuring and control system as well as data acquisition was renewed according to the state-of-the-art. Two power supplies (30 kA, 50 kA) were switched in parallel across an Al bus bar system and combined with an 80 kA dump circuit. For the test of the TFMC in the background field of the EURATOM LCT coil a new 20 kA power supply was taken into operation with the existing 20 kA discharge circuit. Two forced flow cooled 80 kA current leads for the TFMC were developed. The total lifting capacity for loads in the TOSKA building was increased by an ordered new 80 t crane with a suitable cross head (125 t lifting capacity +5 t net mass) to 130 t for assembling and installation of the test arrangement. Numerous pre-tests and development and adaptation work was required to make the components suitable for application. The 1.8 K test of the EURATOM LCT coil and the test of the W 7-X prototype coil count to these tests as overall pre-tests. (orig.)

  4. Liquid toroidal drop under uniform electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabarankin, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The problem of a stationary liquid toroidal drop freely suspended in another fluid and subjected to an electric field uniform at infinity is addressed analytically. Taylor's discriminating function implies that, when the phases have equal viscosities and are assumed to be slightly conducting (leaky dielectrics), a spherical drop is stationary when Q=(2R2+3R+2)/(7R2), where R and Q are ratios of the phases' electric conductivities and dielectric constants, respectively. This condition holds for any electric capillary number, CaE, that defines the ratio of electric stress to surface tension. Pairam and Fernández-Nieves showed experimentally that, in the absence of external forces (CaE=0), a toroidal drop shrinks towards its centre, and, consequently, the drop can be stationary only for some CaE>0. This work finds Q and CaE such that, under the presence of an electric field and with equal viscosities of the phases, a toroidal drop having major radius ρ and volume 4π/3 is qualitatively stationary-the normal velocity of the drop's interface is minute and the interface coincides visually with a streamline. The found Q and CaE depend on R and ρ, and for large ρ, e.g. ρ≥3, they have simple approximations: Q˜(R2+R+1)/(3R2) and CaE∼3 √{3 π ρ / 2 } (6 ln ⁡ρ +2 ln ⁡[96 π ]-9 )/ (12 ln ⁡ρ +4 ln ⁡[96 π ]-17 ) (R+1 ) 2/ (R-1 ) 2.

  5. Progress on large superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.; Beard, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    Large superconducting toroidal field coils of competing designs are being produced by six major industrial teams. In the US, teams headed by General Dynamics Convair, General Electric, and Westinghouse are under contract to design and fabricate one coil each to specifications established by the Large Coil Program. A facility for testing 6 coils in a toroidal array at fields to 8 to 12 tesla is under construction at Oak Ridge. Through an international agreement, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland will produce one coil each for testing with the US coils. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape winding bore and is designed to operate at a current of 10 to 18 kA at a peak field of 8T while subjected to pulsed fields of 0.14 T applied in 1.0 s. There are significant differences among the six coil designs: five use NbTi, one Nb 3 Sn; three are cooled by pool boiling helium, three by forced flow; five have welded or bolted stainless steel coil cases, one has aluminum plate structure. All are designed to be cryostable at 8T, with structural margin for extended operation. The three US coil teams are almost or completely finished with detailed design and are now procuring materials and setting up manufacturing equipment. The non-US teams are at various stages of verification testing and design. The GDC and GE coils are scheduled for delivery in the spring of 1981 and the others will be completed a year later. The 11-m diameter vessel at the test facility has been completed and major components of the test stand are being procured. Engineering and procurement to upgrade the helium liquifier-refrigerator system are under way

  6. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Weiland, J.

    1989-01-01

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  7. Three dimensional transport model for toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhauer, C.

    1980-12-01

    A nonlinear MHD model, developed for three-dimensional toroidal geometries (asymmetric) and for high β (β approximately epsilon), is used as a basis for a three-dimensional transport model. Since inertia terms are needed in describing evolving magnetic islands, the model can calculate transport, both in the transient phase before nonlinear saturation of magnetic islands and afterwards on the resistive time scale. In the β approximately epsilon ordering, the plasma does not have sufficient energy to compress the parallel magnetic field, which allows the Alfven wave to be eliminated in the reduced nonlinear equations, and the model then follows the slower time scales. The resulting perpendicular and parallel plasma drift velocities can be identified with those of guiding center theory

  8. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  9. Toroidal field effects on the stability of Heliotron E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Garcia, L.; Lynch, V.E.

    1986-02-01

    The addition of a small toroidal field to the Heliotron E configuration improves the stability of the n = 1 mode and increases the value of the stability beta critical. Total stabilization of this mode can be achieved with added toroidal fields between 5 and 15% of the total field. In this situation, the plasma can have direct access to the second stability regime. For the Heliotron E configuration, the self-stabilization effect is due to the shear, not to the magnetic well. The toroidal field threshold value for stability depends strongly on the pressure profile and the plasma radius. 21 refs., 15 figs

  10. Toroidal inhomogeneity of the vertical field in a tokamak apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sometani, Taro; Takashima, Hidekazu

    1977-01-01

    An experiment with a model device has been made on the toroidal inhomogeneity of the vertical field in a Tokamak with an iron core. The D.C. vertical field is increased near the yokes of the iron core, while the gross plasma image field (consisting of the components due to the plasma current, the primary current, and its image) is reduced there. These two vertical fields, when superposed, exert force on the plasma as a less inhomogeneous external vertical field. The vertical field can be homogenized satisfactorily by using a compensation winding wound at a proper position on the iron core even if the shielding plates, which are mounted on some Tokamaks, are dispensed with. (auth.)

  11. Structural design of the superconducting toroidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, F.M.G.; Sborchia, C.; Thome, R.J.; Malkov, A.; Titus, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Structural design issues and features of the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will be discussed. Selected analyses of the structural and mechanical behavior of the ITER TF coils will also be presented. (orig.)

  12. Photoelastic analyses of stresses in toroidal magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pih, H.

    1977-02-01

    Several two-dimensional photoelastic stress analyses were made on models of circular and oval toroidal magnetic field coils for fusion reactors. The circumferential variation of each coil's in-plane magnetic force was simulated by applying different pressures to 16 segmented regions of the inner surface of the models. One special loading fixture was used for the model of each shape and size. Birefringence and isoclinic angles were measured in a transmission polariscope at selected points on the loaded model. Boundary stresses in the cases of known boundary conditions were determined directly from the isochromatics. Separate principal stresses were calculated using the combination of photoelastic information and isopachic data obtained by the electrical analogy method from the solution of Laplace's equation. Comparisons were made between experimental results and those computed using the finite element method. The stress distribution between theoretical and experimental agrees very well, although the finite element method yielded slightly higher stresses than the photoelastic method; further work is needed to resolve this difference. In this investigation several variations of coil geometry and methods of support were evaluated. Based on experimental results, optimum structural designs of toroidal field coils were recommended

  13. Effects of Resonant Helical Field on Toroidal Field Ripple in IR-T1 Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavipour, B.; Salar Elahi, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2018-02-01

    The toroidal magnetic field which is created by toroidal coils has the ripple in torus space. This magnetic field ripple has an importance in plasma equilibrium and stability studies in tokamak. In this paper, we present the investigation of the interaction between the toroidal magnetic field ripple and resonant helical field (RHF). We have estimated the amplitude of toroidal field ripples without and with RHF (with different q = m/n) ( m = 2, m = 3, m = 4, m = 5, m = 2 & 3, n = 1) using “Comsol Multiphysics” software. The simulations show that RHF has effects on the toroidal ripples.

  14. Effect of eddy currents in the toroidal field coils of a tokamak with an air-core transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Keiji; Kobayashi, Tomofumi; Tamura, Sanae

    1975-02-01

    The effect of eddy currents in the copper parts of the toroidal field coils is evaluated for a tokamak with the air-core transformer windings located inside the bore of the toroidal field coils. By introducing appropriate weights to the solutions obtained for a simplified cylindrical model, calculation is made of the induction toroidal electric field on the plasma axis in the presence of the eddy currents. The result shows that, to reduce the influence of the eddy currents on the induction one-turn voltage to the permissible level, it is necessary to choose the optimal number of turns and shape of the single conductor of the toroidal field coil. (auth.)

  15. Stress analyses of ITER toroidal field coils under fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1990-02-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is intended as an experimental thermonuclear tokamak reactor for testing the basic physics, performance and technologies essential to future fusion reactors. The ITER design will be based on extensive new design work, supported by new physical and technological results, and on the great body of experience built up over several years from previous national and international reactor studies. Conversely, the ITER design process should provide the fusion community with valuable insights into what key areas need further development or clarification as we move forward towards practical fusion power. As part of the design process of the ITER toroidal field coils the mechanical behaviour of the magnetic system under fault conditions has to be analysed in more detail. This paper describes the work carried out to create a detailed finite element model of two toroidal field coils as well as some results of linear elastic analyses with fault conditions. The analyses have been performed with the finite element code ANSYS. (author). 5 refs.; 8 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Structural analysis of TFTR toroidal field coil conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-10-01

    The conceptual design evaluation of the V-shaped toroidal field coils on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has been performed by detailed structural analysis with the finite element method. The innovation provided by this design and verified in this work is the capability to support toroidal field loads while simultaneously performing the function of twist restraint against the device axial torques resulting from the vertical field loads. The evaluations made for the conceptual design provide predictions for coil deflections and stresses. The results are available for the separate effects from toroidal fields, poloidal fields, and the thermal expansion of the coils as well as for the superposition of the primary loads and the primary plus thermal loads

  17. Protection of toroidal field coils using multiple circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Langton, W.G.; Mann, W.R.; Pillsbury, R.D.; Tarrh, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The protection of toroidal field (TF) coils using multiple circuits is described. The discharge of a single-circuit TF system is given for purposes of definition. Two-circuit TF systems are analyzed and the results presented analytically and graphically. Induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and discharge time constants are compared to the single-circuit system. Three-circuit TF systems are analyzed. In addition to induced currents, maximum discharge voltages, and time constants, several different discharge scenarios are included. The impacts of having discharge rates versus final maximum coil temperatures as requirements are examined. The out-of-plane forces which occur in the three-circuit system are analyzed using an approximate model. The analysis of multiplecircuit TF systems is briefly described and results for a Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) scale device are given based on computer analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of using multiple-circuit systems are summarized and discussed. The primary disadvantages of multiple circuits are the increased circuit complexity and potential for out-of-plane forces. These are offset by the substantial reduction in maximum discharge voltages, as well as other design options which become available when using multiple circuits

  18. Regularity conditions of the field on a toroidal magnetic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, M.

    1985-06-01

    We show that a field B vector which is derived from an analytic canonical potential on an ordinary toroidal surface is regular on this surface when the potential satisfies an elliptic equation (owing to the conservative field) subject to certain conditions of regularity of its coefficients [fr

  19. Neoclassical diffusion in toroidal three-cut magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemov, V.V.; Shishkin, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    Quasi-classical diffusion is investigated in the regime of toroidal drift of 'bananas' in a three cut magnetic field. Unlike previous papers, it is supposed that the inhomogeneity of a helical magnetic field epsilonsub(k) is of the same order or less than that of the toroidal inhomogeneity epsilonsub(t). The case is considered when the efficient frequency of particle collisions exceeds that of the 'banana' precession around the magnetic axis. Expressions for diffusion flows and coefficients are obtained that transform into available ones at epsilonsub(h) > > epsilonsub(t) [ru

  20. Exploring the limits of a very large Nb3Sn conductor: the 80 kA conductor of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Ciazynski, D.; Guerber, O.; Park, S.H.; Zani, L.

    2003-01-01

    In Phase II experiment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) the operation limits of its 80 kA Nb 3 Sn conductor were explored. To increase the magnetic field on the conductor, the TFMC was tested in presence of another large coil: the EURATOM-LCT coil. Under these conditions the maximum field reached on the conductor, was around 10 tesla. This exploration has been performed at constant current, by progressively increasing the coil temperature and monitoring the coil voltage drop in the current sharing regime. Such an operation was made possible thanks to the very high stability of the conductor. The aim of these tests was to compare the critical properties of the conductor with expectations and assess the ITER TF conductor design. These expectations are based on the documented critical field and temperature dependent properties of the 720 superconducting strands which compose the conductor. In addition the conductor properties are highly dependent on the strain, due to the compression appearing on Nb 3 Sn during the heat treatment of the pancakes and related to the differential thermal compression between Nb 3 Sn and the stainless steel jacket. No precise model exists to predict this strain, which is therefore the main information, which is expected from these tests. The method to deduce this strain from the different tests is presented, including a thermalhydraulic analysis to identify the temperature of the critical point and a careful estimation of the field map across the conductor. The measured strain has been estimated in the range -0.75% to -0.79 %. This information will be taken into account for ITER design and some adjustment of the ITER conductor design is under examination. (authors)

  1. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2001-01-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. (author)

  2. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2000-03-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the W7-AS stellarator. (author)

  3. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale

  4. Plasma Heating and Losses in Toroidal Multipole Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armentrout, C. J.; Barter, J. D.; Breun, R. A.; Cavallo, A. J.; Drake, J. R.; Etzweiler,; Greenwood, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The heating and loss of plasmas have been studied in three pulsed, toroidal multipole devices: a large levitated octupole, a small supported octupole and a very small supported quadrupole. Plasmas are produced by gun injection and heated by electron and ion cyclotron resonance heating and ohmic heating. Electron cyclotron heating rates have been measured over a wide range of parameters, and the results are in quantitative agreement with stochastic heating theory. Electron cyclotron resonance heating produces ions with energies larger than predicted by theory. With the addition of a toroidal field, ohmic heating gives densities as high as 10 13 cm -3 in the toroidal quadrupole and 10 12 cm -3 in the small octupole. Plasma losses for n=5 x 10 9 cm -3 plasmas are inferred from Langmuir probe and Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements, and measured with special striped collectors on the wall and rings. The loss to a levitated ring is measured using a modulated light beam telemeter. The confinement is better than Bohm but considerably worse than classical. Low frequency convective cells which are fixed in space are observed. These cells around the ring are diminished when a weak toroidal field is added, and loss collectors show a vastly reduced flux to the rings. Analysis of the spatial density profile shows features of B-independent diffusion. The confinement is sensitive to some kinds of dc field errors, but surprisingly insensitive to perturbations of the ac confining field

  5. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.

    2017-01-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  6. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, K. V.; Salhi, M.; Kouchekian, S.; Siopsis, G.; Passian, A.

    2017-04-01

    Composite and janus type metallodielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieving invisibility cloaks, and obtaining quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nanostructure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle plasmon eigenmodes in other geometries, the amplitudes of the eigenmodes of tori exhibit a distinct forward and backward coupling. We present the plasmon dispersion relations for several relevant toroidal configurations in the quasistatic limit and obtain the dominant retarded dispersion relations of a single ring for comparison, discuss mode complementarity and hybridization, and introduce two new types of toroidal particles in the form of janus nanorings. The resonance frequencies for the first few dominant modes of a ring composed of plasmon supporting materials such as gold, silver, and aluminum are provided and compared to those for a silicon ring. A generalized Green's function is obtained for multilayer tori allowing for calculation of the scattering response to interacting fields. Employing the Green's function, the scalar electric potential distribution corresponding to individual poloidal and toroidal modes in response to an arbitrarily polarized external field and the field of electrons is obtained. The results are applied to obtain the local density of states and decay rate of a dipole near the center of the torus.

  7. Extension of TFTR operations to higher toroidal field levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    For the past year, TFTR has sometimes operated at extended toroidal field (TF) levels. The extension to 5.6 Tesla (79 kA) was crucial for TFTR's November 1994 10.7 MW DT fusion power record. The extension to 6.0 Tesla (85 kA) was commissioned on 9 September 1995. There are several reasons that one could expect the TF coils to survive the higher stresses that develop at higher fields. They were designed to operate at 5.2 Tesla with a vertical field of 0.5 Tesla, whereas the actual vertical field needed for the plasma does not exceed 0.35 Tesla. Their design specification explicitly required they survive some pulses at 6.0 Tesla. TF coil mechanical analysis computer models available during coil design were crude, leading to conservative design. And design analyses also had to consider worst-case misoperations that TFTR's real time Coil Protection Calculators (CPCs) now positively prevent from occurring

  8. Structural analyses of ITER toroidal field coils under fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1992-04-01

    ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is intended to be an experimental thermonuclear tokamak reactor testing the basic physics performance and technologies essential to future fusion reactors. The magnet system of ITER consists essentially of 4 sub-systems, i.e. toroidal field coils (TFCs), poloidal field coils (PFCs), power supplies, and cryogenic supplies. These subsystems do not contain significant radioactivity inventories, but the large energy inventory is a potential accident initiator. The aim of the structural analyses is to prevent accidents from propagating into vacuum vessel, tritium system and cooling system, which all contain significant amounts of radioactivity. As part of design process 3 conditions are defined for PF and TF coils, at which mechanical behaviour has to be analyzed in some detail, viz: normal operating conditions, upset conditions and fault conditions. This paper describes the work carried out by ECN to create a detailed finite element model of 16 TFCs as well as results of some fault condition analyses made with the model. Due to fault conditions, either electrical or mechanical, magnetic loading of TFCs becomes abnormal and further mechanical failure of parts of the overall structure might occur (e.g. failure of coil, gravitational supports, intercoil structure). The analyses performed consist of linear elastic stress analyses and electro-magneto-structural analyses (coupled field analyses). 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  9. Toroidal plasma reactor with low external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Petviashvili, V.I.; Tajima, T.; Gordin, V.A.; Tajima, T.

    1991-01-01

    A toroidal pinch configuration with safety factor q < 0.5 decreasing from the center to periphery without field reversal is proposed. This is capable of containing high pressure plasma with only small toroidal external magnetic field. Sufficient conditions for magnetohydrodynamic stability are fulfilled in this configuration. The stability is studied by constructing the Lyapunov functional and investigating its extrema both analytically and numerically. Comparison of the Lyapunov stability conditions with the conventional linear theory is carried out. Stable configurations are found with average β near 15%, with magnetic field associated mainly with plasma current. The β value calculated with the external magnetic field can be over 100%. Fast charged particles produced by fusion reactions are asymmetrically confined by the poloidal magnetic field (and due to the lack of strong toroidal field). They thus generate a current in the noncentral part of plasma to reinforce the poloidal field. This current drive can sustain the monotonic decrease of q with radius. 20 refs., 9 figs

  10. A class of non-null toroidal electromagnetic fields and its relation to the model of electromagnetic knots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayás, Manuel; Trueba, José L

    2015-01-01

    An electromagnetic knot is an electromagnetic field in vacuum in which the magnetic lines and the electric lines coincide with the level curves of a pair of complex scalar fields ϕ and θ (see equations (A.1), (A.2)). When electromagnetism is expressed in terms of electromagnetic knots, it includes mechanisms for the topological quantization of the electromagnetic helicity, the electric charge, the electromagnetic energy inside a cavity and the magnetic flux through a superconducting ring. In the case of electromagnetic helicity, its topological quantization depends on the linking number of the field lines, both electric and magnetic. Consequently, to find solutions of the electromagnetic knot equations with nontrivial topology of the field lines has important physical consequences. We study a new class of solutions of Maxwell's equations in vacuum Arrayás and Trueba (2011 arXiv:1106.1122) obtained from complex scalar fields that can be interpreted as maps S 3 →S 2 , in which the topology of the field lines is that of the whole torus-knot set. Thus this class of solutions is built as electromagnetic knots at initial time. We study some properties of those fields and consider if detection based on the energy and momentum observables is possible. (paper)

  11. The Electromagnetic Field of Elementary Time-Dependent Toroidal Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.; Stepanovskij, Yu.P.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation field of toroidal-like time-dependent current configurations is investigated. Time-dependent charge-current sources are found outside which the electromagnetic strengths disappear but the potentials survive. This can be used to carry out time-dependent Aharonov-Bohm-like experiments and the information transfer. Using the Neumann-Helmholtz parametrization of the current density we present the time-dependent electromagnetic field in a form convenient for applications. 17 refs

  12. Closed expressions for the magnetic field of toroidal multipole configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1983-04-01

    Closed analytic expressions for the vector potential and the magnetic field for the lower order toroidal multipoles are presented. These expressions can be applied in the study of tokamak plasma cross section shaping. An example of such an application is included. These expressions also allow the vacuum fields required for plasma equilibrium to be specified in a general form independent of a particular coil configuration

  13. The Study of Spherical Cores with a Toroidal Magnetic Field Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Mahmoud [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM)—Maragha, P.O. Box 55134-441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Observational studies of the magnetic fields in molecular clouds have significantly improved the theoretical models developed for the structure and evolution of dense clouds and for the star formation process as well. The recent observational analyses on some cores indicate that there is a power-law relationship between magnetic field and density in the molecular clouds. In this study, we consider the stability of spherical cores with a toroidal magnetic field configuration in the molecular clouds. For this purpose, we model a spherical core that is in magnetostatic equilibrium. Herein, we propose an equation of density structure, which is a modified form of the isothermal Lane–Emden equation in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. The proposed equation describes the effect of the toroidal magnetic field on the cloud structure and the mass cloud. Furthermore, we found an upper limit for this configuration of magnetic field in the molecular clouds. Then, the virial theorem is used to consider the cloud evolution leading to an equation in order to obtain the lower limit of the field strength in the molecular cloud. However, the results show that the field strength of the toroidal configuration has an important effect on the cloud structure, whose upper limit is related to the central density and field gradient. The obtained results address some regions of clouds where the cloud decomposition or star formation can be seen.

  14. Eddy current calculations for the Tore Supra toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.

    1983-01-01

    An outline is given of the calculation of the eddy currents in the magnetic structures of a Tokamak, which can be assimilated to thin conductors, so that the three-dimensional problem can be reduced mathematically to a two-dimensional one, the variables being two orthogonal coordinates of the considered surface. A finite element method has been used in order to treat the complicated geometry of the set of the 18 toroidal field coil casings and mechanical structures of Tore Supra. This eddy current code has been coupled with an axisymmetric equilibrium code in order to simulate typical phases of a Tokamak discharge (plasma current rise, additional heating, disruption, cleaning discharge) and the losses in the toroidal field magnet have thus been calculated. (author)

  15. Baroclinic Instability in the Solar Tachocline for Continuous Vertical Profiles of Rotation, Effective Gravity, and Toroidal Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, Peter A., E-mail: gilman@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2017-06-20

    We present results from an MHD model for baroclinic instability in the solar tachocline that includes rotation, effective gravity, and toroidal field that vary continuously with height. We solve the perturbation equations using a shooting method. Without toroidal fields but with an effective gravity declining linearly from a maximum at the bottom to much smaller values at the top, we find instability at all latitudes except at the poles, at the equator, and where the vertical rotation gradient vanishes (32.°3) for longitude wavenumbers m from 1 to >10. High latitudes are much more unstable than low latitudes, but both have e -folding times that are much shorter than a sunspot cycle. The higher the m and the steeper the decline in effective gravity, the closer the unstable mode peak to the top boundary, where the energy available to drive instability is greatest. The effect of the toroidal field is always stabilizing, shrinking the latitude ranges of instability as the toroidal field is increased. The larger the toroidal field, the smaller the longitudinal wavenumber of the most unstable disturbance. All latitudes become stable for a toroidal field exceeding about 4 kG. The results imply that baroclinic instability should occur in the tachocline at latitudes where the toroidal field is weak or is changing sign, but not where the field is strong.

  16. Poloidal and toroidal plasmons and fields of multilayer nanorings

    OpenAIRE

    Garapati, Kumar Vijay; Salhi, Marouane; Kouchekian, Sherwin; Siopsis, George; Passian, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Composite and janus type metallo-dielectric nanoparticles are increasingly considered as a means to control the spatial and temporal behavior of electromagnetic fields in diverse applications such as coupling to quantum emitters, achieve invisibility cloaks, and obtain quantum correlations between qubits. We investigate the surface modes of a toroidal nano-structure and obtain the canonical plasmon dispersion relations and resonance modes for arbitrarily layered nanorings. Unlike particle pla...

  17. Self-similar solutions for toroidal magnetic fields in a turbulent jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komissarov, S.S.; Ovchinnikov, I.L.

    1989-01-01

    Self-similar solutions for weak toroidal magnetic fields transported by a turbulent jet of incompressible fluid are obtained. It is shown that radial profiles of the self-similar solutions form a discrete spectrum of eigenfunctions of a linear differential operator. The strong depatures from the magnetic flux conservation law, used frequently in turbulent jet models for extragalactic radio sources, are found

  18. EMC3-EIRENE modeling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lore, J.D., E-mail: lorejd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reinke, M.L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); LaBombard, B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Churchill, R.M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feng, Y. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ∼50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modeling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  19. Hamiltonian description of toroidal magnetic fields in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.R.; Bates, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of vacuum magnetic fields in toroidal geometry has been initiated. Previously, the general form of the magnetic scalar potential for fields regular at the poloidal axis was given. Here, these results have been expanded to obtain the magnetic scalar potential in a vacuum region that may surround a toroidal current distribution. Using this generalized magnetic scalar potential in conjunction with Boozer's canonical representation of a magnetic field, a field-line Hamiltonian for nonaxisymmetric vacuum fields has been derived. These fields axe being examined using a novel, open-quotes time-dependentclose quotes perturbation theory, which permits the iterative construction of invariants associated with magnetic field-line Hamiltonians that consist of an axisymmetric zeroth-order term, plus a nonaxisymmetric perturbation. By choosing appropriate independent variables, an explicit constructive procedure is developed which involves only a single canonical transformation. Such invariants are of interest because they provide a means of investigating the topology of magnetic field lines. Our objective is to elucidate the existence of magnetic surfaces for nonaxisymmetric vacuum configurations, as well as to provide an approach for studying the onset of stochastic behavior

  20. Predictions of toroidal rotation and torque sources arising in non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, M.; Satake, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Yoshida, M.; Narita, E.; Nakata, M.; Aiba, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Hayashi, N.; Matsunaga, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Ide, S.

    2017-11-01

    Capabilities of the integrated framework consisting of TOPICS, OFMC, VMEC and FORTEC-3D, have been extended to calculate toroidal rotation in fully non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic fields for demonstrating operation scenarios in actual tokamak geometry and conditions. The toroidally localized perturbed fields due to the test blanket modules and the tangential neutral beam ports in ITER augment the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) substantially, while do not significantly influence losses of beam ions and alpha particles in an ITER L-mode discharge. The NTV takes up a large portion of total torque in ITER and fairly decelerates toroidal rotation, but the change in toroidal rotation may have limited effectiveness against turbulent heat transport. The error field correction coils installed in JT-60SA can externally apply the perturbed fields, which may alter the NTV and the resultant toroidal rotation profiles. However, the non-resonant n=18 components of the magnetic fields arising from the toroidal field ripple mainly contribute to the NTV, regardless of the presence of the applied field by the coil current of 10 kA , where n is the toroidal mode number. The theoretical model of the intrinsic torque due to the fluctuation-induced residual stress is calibrated by the JT-60U data. For five JT-60U discharges, the sign of the calibration factor conformed to the gyrokinetic linear stability analysis and a range of the amplitude thereof was revealed. This semi-empirical approach opens up access to an attempt on predicting toroidal rotation in H-mode plasmas.

  1. Advanced transport modeling of toroidal plasmas with transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Honda, M.; Izumi, Y.; Yagi, M.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Transport modeling of toroidal plasmas is one of the most important issue to predict time evolution of burning plasmas and to develop control schemes in reactor plasmas. In order to describe the plasma rotation and rapid transition self-consistently, we have developed an advanced scheme of transport modeling based on dynamical transport equation and applied it to the analysis of transport barrier formation. First we propose a new transport model and examine its behavior by the use of conventional diffusive transport equation. This model includes the electrostatic toroidal ITG mode and the electromagnetic ballooning mode and successfully describes the formation of internal transport barriers. Then the dynamical transport equation is introduced to describe the plasma rotation and the radial electric field self-consistently. The formation of edge transport barriers is systematically studied and compared with experimental observations. The possibility of kinetic transport modeling in velocity space is also examined. Finally the modular structure of integrated modeling code for tokamaks and helical systems is discussed. (author)

  2. Dynamic processes in field-reversed-configuration compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rej, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this lecture, the dynamic processes involved in field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation, translation, and compression will be reviewed. Though the FRC is related to the field-reversed mirror concept, the formation method used in most experiments is a variant of the field-reversed Θ-pinch. Formation of the FRC eqilibrium occurs rapidly, usually in less than 20 μs. The formation sequence consists of several coupled processes: preionization; radial implosion and compression; magnetic field line closure; axial contraction; equilibrium formation. Recent experiments and theory have led to a significantly improved understanding of these processes; however, the experimental method still relies on a somewhat empirical approach which involves the optimization of initial preionization plasma parameters and symmetry. New improvements in FRC formation methods include the use of lower voltages which extrapolate better to larger devices. The axial translation of compact toroid plasmas offers an attractive engineering convenience in a fusion reactor. FRC translation has been demonstrated in several experiments worldwide, and these plasmas are found to be robust, moving at speeds up to the Alfven velocity over distances of up to 16 m, with no degradation in the confinement. Compact toroids are ideal for magnetic compression. Translated FRCs have been compressed and heated by imploding liners. Upcoming experiments will rely on external flux compression to heat a translater FRC at 1-GW power levels. 39 refs

  3. System design of toroidal field power supply of CDD tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zheng Zhi

    1996-12-01

    This report deals with system design of Toroidal Field Power Supply of CDD tokamak (CDD-TFPS). The general design philosophy and design variations are introduced. After the outline of CDD-TFPS, the short-circuit calculation, the evaluation of converter parameters, the compatibility of converter and line are carried out. the specifications of major components, semi-conductor devices and accessories are given. High attention is paid to protection system. The design of sub-control and grounding system are described too. Some more general material for power supply design are attached in appendices for reference. (author). 30 tabs., 21 figs.

  4. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments

  5. System design of toroidal field power supply of CDD tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zheng Zhi.

    1996-12-01

    This report deals with system design of Toroidal Field Power Supply of CDD tokamak (CDD-TFPS). The general design philosophy and design variations are introduced. After the outline of CDD-TFPS, the short-circuit calculation, the evaluation of converter parameters, the compatibility of converter and line are carried out. the specifications of major components, semi-conductor devices and accessories are given. High attention is paid to protection system. The design of sub-control and grounding system are described too. Some more general material for power supply design are attached in appendices for reference. (author). 30 tabs., 21 figs

  6. Representation of magnetic fields with toroidal topology in terms of field-line invariants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Beginning with Boozer's representation of magnetic fields with toroidal topology [Phys. Fluids 26, 1288 (1983)], a general formalism is presented for the representation of any magnetic field with toroidal topology in terms of field-line invariants. The formalism is an application to the magnetic field case of results developed recently by Lewis et al. (submitted for publication to J. Phys. A) for arbitrary time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with one degree of freedom. Every magnetic field with toroidal topology can be associated with time-dependent Hamiltonian systems with one degree of freedom and every time-dependent Hamiltonian system with one degree of freedom can be associated with magnetic fields with toroidal topology. In the Hamiltonian context, given any particular function I(q,p,t), Lewis et al. derived those Hamiltonians for which I(q,p,t) is an invariant. In addition, for each of those Hamiltonians, they derived a function canonically conjugate to I(q,p,t) that is also an invariant. They applied this result to the case where I(q,p,t) is expressed as a function of two canonically conjugate functions. This general Hamiltonian formalism provides a basis for representing magnetic fields with toroidal topology in terms of field-line invariants. The magnetic fields usually contain plasma with flow and anisotropic pressure. A class of fields with or without rotational symmetry is identified for which there are magnetic surfaces. The formalism is developed for application to the case of vacuum magnetic fields

  7. Roles of electric field on toroidal magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Sanuki, Heiji; Fukuyama, Atsushi.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical research on the influence of the electric field on the toroidal magnetic confinement is surveyed. The static electric field is first described. Physics pictures on the generation of the radial electric field and the influence on the confinement are shown. Neoclassical effects as well as the nonclassical processes are discussed. Emphasis is made on the connection with the improved confinement. Convective cell, i.e. the nonuniform potential on the magnetic surface is also discussed. The roles of the fluctuating electric field are then reviewed. The progress in the recent theories on the anomalous transport is addressed. Through these surveys, the impact of the experiments using the heavy ion beam probes on the modern plasma physics is illustrated. (author) 66 refs

  8. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, F.C., E-mail: khannaf@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, A.P.C., E-mail: adolfo@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas/MCT, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C., E-mail: jmalboui@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Santana, A.E., E-mail: asantana@unb.br [International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus Γ{sub D}{sup d}=(S{sup 1}){sup d}×R{sup D−d} is developed from a Lie-group representation and c{sup ∗}-algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ{sub 4}{sup 1}. The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space–time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy–momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross–Neveu and Nambu

  9. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, F.C.; Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Malbouisson, J.M.C.; Santana, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus Γ D d =(S 1 ) d ×R D−d is developed from a Lie-group representation and c ∗ -algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ 4 1 . The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space–time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy–momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross–Neveu and Nambu–Jona-Lasinio models, are considered. Then

  10. Comparison study of toroidal-field divertors for a compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two divertor configurations for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) based on diverting the minority (toroidal) field have been reported. A critical factor in evaluating the performance of both poloidally symmetric and bundle divertor configurations is the accurate determination of the divertor connection length and the monitoring of magnetic islands introduced by the divertors, the latter being a three-dimensional effect. To this end the poloidal-field, toroidal-field, and divertor coils and the plasma currents are simulated in three dimensions for field-line tracings in both the divertor channel and the plasma-edge regions. The results of this analysis indicate a clear preference for the poloidally symmetric toroidal-field divertor. Design modifications to the limiter-based CRFPR design that accommodate this divertor are presented

  11. Effect of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on error-field penetration thresholds in tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A J; Hegna, C C; Callen, J D

    2007-08-10

    A model for field-error penetration is developed that includes nonresonant as well as the usual resonant field-error effects. The nonresonant components cause a neoclassical toroidal viscous torque that keeps the plasma rotating at a rate comparable to the ion diamagnetic frequency. The new theory is used to examine resonant error-field penetration threshold scaling in Ohmic tokamak plasmas. Compared to previous theoretical results, we find the plasma is less susceptible to error-field penetration and locking, by a factor that depends on the nonresonant error-field amplitude.

  12. TIBER-II TF [toroidal-field] winding pack design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting, toroidal-field (TF) coils in the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER II) are designed with cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) using Nb 3 Sn composite strands. To design the CICC winding pack, we used an optimization technique that maximizes the conductor stability without violating the constraints imposed by the structure, electrical insulation, quench protection, and fabrication technique. Detailed helium-properties codes calculate the heat removal along a flow path, and detailed field calculations determine the temperature, current, and stability margins. The conductor sheath is designed as distributed structure to partially support the combined in-plane and out-of-plane loads generated within the winding pack. Pancakes of the coil are wound, reacted, and insulated before being potted in the case. This design is aggressive but fully consistent with good engineering practice. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Photoelastic and analytical investigation of stress in toroidal magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pih, H.; Gray, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A series of two-dimensional photoelastic stress analyses on circular and oval toroidal magnetic field coils for fusion reactors were made. The circumferential variation of the coil's magnetic force was simulated by applying different pressures to sixteen segmented regions of the inner surface of the models. Isochromatics and isoclinics were measured at selected points on the loaded model in a transmission polariscope using a microphotometer. Separate principal stresses were obtained using the combination of photoelastic information and isopachic data measured from the solution of Laplace's equation by the electrical analog method. Analysis of the same coil geometries, loadings, and boundary conditions were made using the finite element method. General agreement between theory and experiment was realized. From this investigation several variations of coil geometry and methods of support were evaluated. Based upon this experiment, suggestions for optimum structural design of toroidal field coils are presented

  14. Commercial tokamak reactors with resistive toroidal field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombery, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Jassby, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling relations and design concepts are developed for commercial tokamak reactors that use watercooled copper toroidal field (TF) magnets. Illustrative parameters are developed for reactors that are scaled up in size from LITE test reactor designs, which use quasi-continuous copper plate magnets. Acceptably low magnet power requirements may be attainable in a moderate beta (β = 0.065) commercial reactor with a major radius of 6.2 m. The shielding thickness and magnet size are substantially reduced relative to values in commercial reactors with superconducting magnets. Operation at high beta (β = 0.14) leads to a reduction in reactor size, magnet-stored energy, and recirculating power. Reactors using resistive TF magnets could provide advantages of physically smaller devices, improved maintenance features, and increased ruggedness and reliability

  15. Fabrication of the KSTAR toroidal field coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.H.; Sa, J.W.; Park, H.K.; Hong, K.H.; Shin, H.; Kim, H.T.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.; Kwak, J.H.; Moon, H.G.; Yoon, H.H.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, S.K.; Song, J.Y.; Nam, K.M.; Byun, S.E.; Kim, H.C.; Ha, E.T.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.S.; Park, K.H.; Hong, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR toroidal field (TF) coil structure is under fabrication upon completion of engineering design and prototype construction. The prototype TF coil structure has been fabricated within allowable tolerances. Encasing of the prototype TF coil (TF00) in the prototype structure has been carried out through major processes involving a coil encasing, an enclosing weld, a vacuum pressure impregnation, and an outer surface machining. During the enclosing weld of the TF00 coil structure, we have measured temperatures and stresses on the coil surface. Assembly test had been performed with the TF00 coil structure. We have chosen Type 316LN as material of the TF coil structure. We used the narrow-gap TIG welding method. Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Company (DHI) will complete the fabrication of the TF coil structure in Feb. 2006. (author)

  16. Compact toroid development: activity plan for field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and approach for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the field reversed configuration (FRC). This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and a flexible range of output power. The included material represents the second phase of FRC program planning. The first was completed in February 1983, and was reported in DOE/ER-0160; Compact Toroid Development. This planning builds on that previous report and concentrates on the detailed plans for the next several years of the current DOE sponsored program. It has been deliberately restricted to the experimental and theoretical efforts possible within the present scale of effort. A third phase of this planning exercise will examine the subsequent effort and resources needed to achieve near term (1987 to 1990) FRC technical objectives

  17. Field-reversed experiments (FRX) on compact toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, W.T.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1981-11-01

    Equilibrium, stability, and confinement properties of compact toroids produced in field-reversed theta-pinch experiments (FRX) are reported. Two experimental facilities, FRX-A and FRX-B, have been used to study highly elongated compact toroid plasmas confined in a purely poloidal field geometry. Spatial scans and fill pressure scaling of the equilibrium plasma parameters are presented. Plasma conditions range from T/sub e/approx.150 eV, T/sub i/approx.800 eV, n/sub m/approx.1 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ to T/sub e/approx.100 eV, T/sub i/approx.150 eV, n/sub m/approx.4 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/. Typical confined plasma dimensions are: major radius Rapprox.4 cm, minor radius aapprox.2 cm, and total length 35--50 cm. The plasma configuration remains in a stable equilibrium for up to 50 ..mu..sec followed by the destructive n = 2 rotational instability. The stable period prior to the onset of the rotational mode is up to one hundred times greater than characteristic Alfven transit times of the plasma. This stable period increases and the mode growth rate decreases with increased a/rho/sub i/ (where rho/sub i/ is the ion gyroradius). Agreement of experimental and theoretical mode frequencies for the instability is observed. Preferential particle loss has been proposed as a likely cause of rotation. The particle inventory at the onset of the instability is consistent with this hypothesis. The particle loss rate is also consistent with the predicted anomalous transport near the separatrix. Contributions to rotational instability from diffusion, end-shorting, equipartition, and compression are also discussed.

  18. Field-reversed experiments (FRX) on compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, W.T.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1981-01-01

    Equilibrium, stability, and confinement properties of compact toroids produced in field-reversed theta-pinch experiments (FRX) are reported. Two experimental facilities, FRX-A and FRX-B, have been used to study highly elongated compact toroid plasmas confined in a purely poloidal field geometry. Spatial scans and fill pressure scaling of the equilibrium plasma parameters are presented. Plasma conditions range from T/sub e/approx.150 eV, T/sub i/approx.800 eV, n/sub m/approx.1 x 10 15 cm -3 to T/sub e/approx.100 eV, T/sub i/approx.150 eV, n/sub m/approx.4 x 10 15 cm -3 . Typical confined plasma dimensions are: major radius Rapprox.4 cm, minor radius aapprox.2 cm, and total length 35--50 cm. The plasma configuration remains in a stable equilibrium for up to 50 μsec followed by the destructive n = 2 rotational instability. The stable period prior to the onset of the rotational mode is up to one hundred times greater than characteristic Alfven transit times of the plasma. This stable period increases and the mode growth rate decreases with increased a/rho/sub i/ (where rho/sub i/ is the ion gyroradius). Agreement of experimental and theoretical mode frequencies for the instability is observed. Preferential particle loss has been proposed as a likely cause of rotation. The particle inventory at the onset of the instability is consistent with this hypothesis. The particle loss rate is also consistent with the predicted anomalous transport near the separatrix. Contributions to rotational instability from diffusion, end-shorting, equipartition, and compression are also discussed

  19. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...... by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations...

  20. Radial electric field in JET advanced tokamak scenarios with toroidal field ripple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crombe, K.; Andrew, Y.; Biewer, T. M.; Blanco, E.; de Vries, P. C.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Meigs, A.; Tala, T.; von Hellermann, M.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2009-01-01

    A dedicated campaign has been run on JET to study the effect of toroidal field (TF) ripple on plasma performance. Radial electric field measurements from experiments on a series of plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) and different levels of ripple amplitude are presented. They have been

  1. Theoretical study on the laser-driven ion-beam trace probe in toroidal devices with large poloidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Xiao, C.; Chen, Y.; Xu, T.; Yu, Y.; Xu, M.; Wang, L.; Wang, X.; Lin, C.

    2018-03-01

    Recently, a new diagnostic method, Laser-driven Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP), has been proposed to reconstruct 2D profiles of the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) in the tokamak devices. A linear assumption and test particle model were used in those reconstructions. In some toroidal devices such as the spherical tokamak and the Reversal Field Pinch (RFP), Bp is not small enough to meet the linear assumption. In those cases, the error of reconstruction increases quickly when Bp is larger than 10% of the toroidal magnetic field (Bt), and the previous test particle model may cause large error in the tomography process. Here a nonlinear reconstruction method is proposed for those cases. Preliminary numerical results show that LITP could be applied not only in tokamak devices, but also in other toroidal devices, such as the spherical tokamak, RFP, etc.

  2. Current sustaining by RF travelling field in a collisional toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Masaji; Matsuura, Kiyokata.

    1977-06-01

    The relation between the current generation by RF travelling field and the accompanied power absorption is studied in a collisional toroidal plasma, parameters being phase velocity and filling gas pressure or electron collision frequency. It is observed at a low magnetic field that the current is proportional to the plasma conductivity and an effective electromotive force, which is a new concept introduced on the basis of fluid model; the electromotive force is proportional to the absorbed RF power and inversely proportional to the plasma density and the phase velocity of the travelling field. (auth.)

  3. Current sustaining by RF travelling field in a collisional toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Masaji; Matsuura, Kiyokata

    1978-01-01

    The relation between the current generated by RF travelling field and the absorbed power is studied in a collisional toroidal plasma, parameters being phase velocity and filling gap pressure or electron collision frequency. It is observed at a low magnetic field that the current is proportional to the plasma conductivity and an effective electromotive force, which is a new concept introduced on the basis of fluid model; the electromotive force is proportional to the absorbed RF power and inversely proportional to the plasma density and the phase velocity of the travelling field. (author)

  4. Structural analysis of the NET toroidal field coils and conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, N.; Collier, D.; Gori, R.

    1989-01-01

    The NET toroidal field coils will utilise A15-type superconductor at 4.2 K to generate fields up to 11.5 T. The superconductor strands themselves are sensitive to strain, which causes degradation of their current carrying capacity, and thus the detailed behaviour of the coil conductor must be analysied so that the strian can be minimised. This analysis must include the manufacturing processes of the conductor as well as the normal and abnormal loperational loads. The conductor will be insulated and bonded by glass fibre reinforced epoxy resin, with limited bonding shear strength, and the overall support of the complete coil system must be designed to reduce these shear stresses. The coils will be subjected to pulse loads form the poloidal field coils, and analysis of the slip between the various coil components, such as conductors and the coil case, giving rise to frictional heating and possible loss of superconducting properties is another important factor, which has been investigated by a number of stress analyses. The manufacturing, thermal and normal magnetic loads on the coils and the analysis leading to the proposed structural design are described. In addition to the normal operating conditions, there is a range of abnormal load conditions which could result from electrical or mechanical faults on the coils. The effect of these potential faults has been analysed and the coil design modified to prevent catastrophic structural failure. (author). 13 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  5. Equilibrium and stability of high-beta toroidal plasmas with toroidal and poloidal flow in reduced magnetohydrodynamic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2010-11-01

    Effects of flow, finite ion temperature and pressure anisotropy on equilibrium and stability of a high-beta toroidal plasma are studied in the framework of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A set of reduced equilibrium equations for high-beta tokamaks with toroidal and poloidal flow comparable to the poloidal sound velocity is derived in a unified form of single-fluid and Hall MHD models and a two-fluid MHD model with ion finite Larmor radius (FLR) terms. Pressure anisotropy is introduced with equations for the parallel heat flux which are closed by a fluid closure model. It is solved analytically for the single-fluid model and the solutions shows complicated characteristics in the region around the poloidal sound velocity due to pressure anisotropy and the parallel heat flux. Numerical solutions are found by using the finite element method for the two-fluid model with FLR effects in the case of isotropic, adiabatic pressure and indicate the following features of two-fluid equilibria: the isosurfaces of the magnetic flux, the pressure and the ion stream function do not coincide with each other, and the solutions depend on the sign of the radial electric field. Reduced single-fluid MHD equations with time evolution that are consistent with the above equilibria are also derived in order to study their stability. They conserve the energy up to the order required by the equilibria. (author)

  6. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm 2 with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm 3 for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm 3 for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits

  7. Steady state toroidal magnetic field at earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Eugene H.; Pearce, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the dc electrical potential near the top of earth's mantle have been extrapolated into the deep mantle in order to estimate the strength of the toroidal magnetic field component at the core-mantle interface. Recent measurements have been interpreted as indicating that at the core-mantle interface, the magnetic toroidal and poloidal field components are approximately equal in magnitude. A motivation for such measurements is to obtain an estimate of the strength of the toroidal magnetic field in the core, a quantity important to our understanding of the geomagnetic field's dynamo generation. Through the use of several simple and idealized calculation, this paper discusses the theoretical relationship between the amplitude of the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and the actual amplitude within the core. Even with a very low inferred value of the toroidal field amplitude at the core-mantle boundary, (a few gauss), the toroidal field amplitude within the core could be consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo dominated by nonuniform rotation and having a strong toroidal magnetic field.

  8. Toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil systems adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.

    1985-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils, that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization requires a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  9. The ASDEX upgrade toroidal field magnet and poloidal divertor field coil system adapted to reactor requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppendoerfer, W.; Blaumoser, M.; Ennen, K.; Gruber, J.; Gruber, O.; Jandl, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kollotzek, H.; Kotzlowski, H.; Lackner, E.; Lackner, K.; Larcher, T. von; Noterdaeme, J.M.; Pillsticker, M.; Poehlchen, R.; Preis, H.; Schneider, H.; Seidel, U.; Sombach, B.; Speth, E.; Streibl, B.; Vernickel, H.; Werner, F.; Wesner, F.; Wieczorek, A.

    1986-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade is a tokamak experiment with external poloidal field coils that is now under construction at IPP Garching. It can produce elongated single-null (SN), double-null (DN) , and limiter (L) configurations. The SN is the reference configuration with asymmetric load distributions in the poloidal field (PF) system and the toroidal field (TF) magnet. Plasma control and stabilization require a rigid passive conductor close to the plasma. The design principles of the coils and support structure are described. (orig.)

  10. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb$_{3}$Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, a...

  11. Study on usage of fluorocarbon for toroidal field coil cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Arai, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    In JT-60 machine, usage of fluorocarbon as an alternate coolant to a cooling channel of toroidal field coil (TF coil) in which a crack was detected is investigated. Fluorinert (a registered trademark of 3M) liquid which is one of fluorocarbon was reviewed, and liquid 'FC-43' was found as an appropriate one for TF coils cooling because of its physical properties about boiling point and thermal capacity. Fortunately, Fluorinert does not have impact on the greenhouse effect for the earth under the temperature of its boiling point. And thermal analysis shows that the cooling effectiveness obtained with liquid 'FC-43' for TF coils is rather well. Moreover, corrosion tests were carried out between liquid 'FC-43' and materials used in JT-60 by considering deterioration of TF coils. The test results demonstrate that there is no problem in applying liquid 'FC-43' as a coolant to cooling channel of TF coils. Results obtained above conclude that usage of fluorocarbon is one of the effective means to perform further experiments in JT-60. (author)

  12. Validation of helium inlet design for ITER toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, C.; Seo, K.; Hamada, K.; Foussat, A.; Le Rest, M.; Mitchell, N.; Decool, P.; Savary, F.; Sgobba, S.; Weiss, K.P.

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb 3 Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are preparing the helium inlet mock-up for a qualification test. (authors)

  13. Heat treatment trials for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kunihiro; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Nakajima, Hideo; Kimura, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors using Nb 3 Sn strands are used in ITER toroidal fields (TF) coils. Heat treatment generates thermal strain in CIC conductors because of the difference in thermal expansion between the Nb 3 Sn strands and the stainless-steel jacket. The elongation/shrinkage of the TF conductor may make it impossible to insert a wound TF conductor into the groove of a radial plate. In addition, it is expected that the deformation of the winding due to heat treatment-based release of the residual force in the jacket may also make it impossible to insert the winding in the groove, and that correcting the winding geometry to allow insertion of the winding may influence the superconducting performance of the TF conductor. The authors performed several trials using heat treatment as the part of activities in Phase II of TF coil procurement aiming to resolve the above-mentioned technical issues, and evaluated the elongations of 0.064, 0.074 and 0.072% for the straight and curved conductors and 1/3-scale double-pancake (DP) winding, respectively. It was confirmed that correction if the deformed winding did not influence the superconducting performance of the conductor. (author)

  14. Design, manufacture and performance of the JET Toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.; Booth, J.; Pohlchen, R.

    1983-01-01

    The JET Toroidal field magnet compromises 32 D shaped coils each 5.7 m high, 3.8 wide and weighing 12 tonnes. The field produced is 3.45 Tesla at 2.9 m radius when operating at the maximum current of 66.5 kA. The coils are wound with water cooled hollow conductor and operate with an equivalent rectangular current pulse length of 20 seconds at full current. A description of the evolution of the design in relation to the constraints imposed is given first. These design constraints included the low aspect ratio of the Torus, the long pulse duration, the large mechanical forces and also the availability of suitable copper conductor sections. The stress analysis of the coil is outlined as well as the cooling requirements and some specific stresses. The construction of the D shaped coils in hard copper presents problems due to the spring back effect of the conductor. The methods adopted to solve these difficulties together with other problems related to the winding process are given. A large number of tests were carried out in order to establish the conditions necessary to obtain reliable brazed joints. During production the non destructive tests for each joint were very severe and included X-ray examination. In order to meet the JET delivery programme, a large effort has been required in terms of production tools and organization of the work at the supplier's works. This effort and the construction schedule is outlined. After assembly on the JET machine the TF coils have been tested and their initial performances in electrical, mechanical and thermal terms are compared with predicted values

  15. Experiments on a Toroidal Screw Pinch with Various Field Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicker, H.; Wilhelm, R.; Krause, H. [Max-Planck-Institut Fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Garching, Munich, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1971-10-15

    In the toroidal screw pinch ISAR-IV (large diameter 60 cm, aspect ratio 5, maximum storage, energy 140 kj) attempts were made to get an improved stability of the plasma by different kinds of field programming. The best results were obtained with positive trapped B{sub z}-fields and simultaneous switching of main B{sub z}-field and I{sub z}-current. In this case the dense plasma column (n{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 2-3 x 10{sup 16} , kT Almost-Equal-To 50-100 eV, {beta} Almost-Equal-To 15-20%) is surrounded by a force-free plasma ({beta} = 1%) with weak shear and it behaves stably for, at least, 25 {mu}s. The resulting containment time nr of near 10{sup 12} s cm{sup -3} remains a factor of 2-3 below the upper limit given by the classical diffusion. The following loss of the equilibrium position near the coil axis ({Delta} Almost-Equal-To 1-2 cm) is connected to a strong damping of the axial plasma current which starts near the end of the containment. It may be assumed that the increase of the effective plasma resistance mainly results from a contact of the force-free regions with the tube wall. Attempts were made to improve the containment by suitable programming of a plasma z-current. The results are presented. Experiments with one quartz limiter inside the torus improved the equilibrium but introduced instabilities at the new surface of the dilute plasma. To obtain more information about the outer region, the dilute plasma was produced without a dense core and separated from the tube walls by weak adiabatic compression. Under these Tokamak-like conditions the q-value was varied. In the region of q Almost-Equal-To 1 there appeared instabilities which seem to haver higher m-modes and rather short wavelengths. In a different kind of field programming the field distribution of the ''diffuse pinch'' was realized within an accuracy of 5-10% (kT Almost-Equal-To 100 eV, {beta} Almost-Equal-To 30%). In contrast to the predictions of MHD-theory, stability was observed only for

  16. A dissipative model of plasma equilibrium in toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.

    1985-10-01

    In order to describe a steady-state plasma equilibrium in tokamaks, stellarators or other non-axisymmetric configurations, the model of ideal MHD with isotropic plasma pressure is widely used. The ideal MHD - model of a toroidal plasma equilibrium requires the existence of closed magnetic surfaces. Several numerical codes have been developed in the past to solve the three-dimensional equilibrium problem, but so far no existence theorem for a solution has been proved. Another difficulty is the formation of magnetic islands and field line ergodisation, which can only be described in terms of ideal MHD if the plasma pressure is constant in the ergodic region. In order to describe the formation of magnetic islands and ergodisation of surfaces properly, additional dissipative terms have to be incorporated to allow decoupling of the plasma and magnetic field. In a collisional plasma viscosity and inelastic collisions introduce such dissipative processes. In the model used a friction term proportional to the velocity v vector of the plasma is included. Such a term originates from charge exchange interaction of the plasma with a nuetral background. With these modifications, the equilibrium problem reduces to a set of quasilinear elliptic equations for the pressure, the electric potential and the magnetic field. The paper deals with an existence theorem based on the Fixed - Point method of Schauder. It can be shown that a self-consistent and unique equilibrium exists if the friction term is large and the plasma pressure is sufficiently low. The essential role of the dissipative terms is to remove the singularities of the ideal MHD model on rational magnetic surfaces. The problem has a strong similarity to Benard cell convection, and consequently similar behaviour such as bifurcation and exchange of stability are expected. (orig./GG)

  17. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E.

    1992-03-01

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  18. Trial manufacture of ITER toroidal field coil radial plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Katsutoshi; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Hideo; Esaki, Koichi; Nagamoto, Yoshifumi; Makino, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    In an ITER toroidal field (TF) coil, tight tolerances of 1 mm in flatness and a few millimeters in profile are required to manufacture a radial plate (RP), although the height and width of the RP are 13 m and 9 m, respectively. In addition, since cover plates (CPs) should be fitted to a groove in the RP with tolerance of 0.5 mm, tight tolerances are also required for the CPs. The authors therefore performed preliminary and full-scale trials to achieve tight tolerances that meet the required RP manufacturing schedule, such as one RP every three weeks. Before the full-scale trials, preliminary trials were performed to optimize machining procedures, welding conditions and assembly procedures for the RP, and the manufacturing processes for the straight and curved CP segments. Based on these preliminary trial results, full-scale RP and CPs were fabricated. The flatness achieved for the RP is 1 mm, except at the top and bottom where gravity support is insufficient. If the gravity support is suitable, it is expected that a flatness of 1 mm is achievable. The profile of the RP was measured to be within the targeted range, better than 2 mm. In addition, most of the CPs fit the corresponding groove of the RP. Although the issue of hot-cracking in the weld still remains, the test results indicate that this problem can be prevented by improving the geometry of the welding joint. Thus, we can conclude that the manufacturing procedures for RP and CP have been demonstrated. (author)

  19. Toroidal fusion reactor design based on the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.

    1978-07-01

    The toroidal reversed-field pinch (RFP) achieves gross equilibrium and stability with a combination of high shear and wall stabilization, rather than the imposition of tokamak-like q-constraints. Consequently, confinement is provided primarily by poloidal magnetic fields, poloidal betas as large as approximately 0.58 are obtainable, the high ohmic-heating (toroidal) current densities promise a sole means of heating a D-T plasma to ignition, and the plasma aspect ratio is not limited by stability/equilibrium constraints. A reactor-like plasma model has been developed in order to quantify and to assess the general features of a power system based upon RFP confinement. An ''operating point'' has been generated on the basis of this plasma model and a relatively detailed engineering energy balance. These results are used to generate a conceptual engineering model of the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR) which includes a general description of a 750 MWe power plant and the preliminary consideration of vacuum/fueling, first wall, blanket, magnet coils, iron core, and the energy storage/transfer system

  20. Compact-Toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-03-01

    Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CTOR) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  1. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  2. Toroidal electric field in front of the lower hybrid grill of the castor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.; Petrzilka, V.; Devynck, P.; Goniche, M.

    2003-01-01

    A small tokamak Castor (R/a = 0.4/0.85 m) with low plasma energy density and short pulses (20 ms) offers a unique possibility to carry out probe measurements in front of the grill antenna and as a consequence to provide direct information about the local electric fields in this region. For measurements of the toroidal electrical field, a small double probe with 2 tips separated by 3.5 mm in the toroidal direction has been used. The tips are oriented in the radial direction. The probe is radially movable in front of the central grill waveguide. Cross-correlations and FFT (fast Fourier transform) analysis of the measured V fl signals are given together with an attempt to investigate characteristics of toroidal electric field E tor (up to 500 kHz), derived from V fl measured by 2 toroidally separated tips

  3. Equilibrium poloidal-field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1983-01-01

    A comparison between the approximate analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation for reversed-field-pinch (RFP) configurations is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal-field distribution at the conducting shell that surrounds the plasma is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the centre shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the gross equilibrium behaviour of an axisymmetric RFP discharge, as well as an effective tool for designing the poloidal-field systems of RFP experiments. (author)

  4. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  5. Magnetic field profiles during turbulent heating in a toroidal hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalfsbeek, H.W.

    1978-12-01

    A description is given of the measurements of both poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components as functions of radius and time in a small turbulently heated tokamak. These measurements have been carried out with an array of miniature pick-up coils, enclosed in a quartz tube which is inserted into the plasma. The electric fields inside the plasma, as well as the parallel resistivity profiles are deduced from the measured magnetic fields. The ohmically dissipated energy is determined from the field distributions and compared with the total input energy. The experimental results are compared with the outcome of a numerical model. The consistency with information obtained from other diagnostic measurements is checked. (Auth.)

  6. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  7. Results of ITER toroidal field coil cover plate welding test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Matsui, Kunihiro; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Nakajima, Hideo; Iijima, Ami; Makino, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    In ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils, cover plates (CP) are welded to the teeth of the radial plate (RP) to fix conductors in the grooves of the RP. Though the total length of the welds is approximately 1.5 km and the height and width of the RP are 14 and 9 m, respectively, welding deformation of smaller than 1 mm for local out-of-plane distortion and smaller than several millimeters for in-plane deformation is required. Therefore, laser welding is used for CP welding to reduce welding deformation as much as possible. However, the gap in welding joints is expected to be a maximum of 0.5 mm. Thus, a laser welding technique to enable welding of joints with a gap of 0.5 mm in width has been developed. Applying this technology, a CP welding trial using an RP mock-up was successfully performed. The achieved local flatness, that is, the flatness of the cross-section of the RP mock-up, is 0.6 mm. The analysis using inherent strains, which are derived from the welding test using flat plates, also indicates that better local flatness can be achieved if the initial distortion is zero. In addition, the welding deformation of a full-scale RP is evaluated via analysis using the inherent strain. The analytical results show that in-plane deformation is approximately 5 mm and large out-of-plane deformation, consisting of approximately 5 mm-long wave distortion and a twist of approximately 1.5 mm in the RP cross-section, is generated. It is expected that the required profile can be achieved by determining the original geometry of an RP by simulating deformation during welding. It is also expected that the required local flatness of a DP can be achieved, since out-of-plane deformation can be reduced by increasing the number of RPs turned over during CP welding. A more detailed study is required. (author)

  8. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given

  9. Force-free field inside a toroidal magnetic cloud

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romashets, E. P.; Vandas, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 20 (2003), s. 2065, /SSC 8-1 - SSC 8-4/ ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS1003006; GA ČR GA205/03/0953 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : magnetic clouds * toroid al flux rope * analytical solution Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.422, year: 2003

  10. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux

  11. The vacuum-arc plasma motion in a toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timoshenko, A.I.; Gnybida, M.V.; Taran, V.S.; Tereshin, V.I.; Chechelnitskij, O.G.

    2005-01-01

    The separation of the vacuum-arc plasma from macro-particles in the curvilinear plasma filters allows obtaining coatings with especially high characteristics. However, inside such filters the significant plasma losses also have been occurred. At the same time, increasing in the filter's efficiency is a difficult task without an effective mathematical model that really would describe the vacuum-arc plasma motion in a toroidal magnetic field. The description based on the flax-tube model was in fact only the first approximation in the decision of this problem. According to detailed flax-tube analysis of ions passage through the quarter torus plasma guide, the efficiency of the filter should grow up to 85% as the positive potential U, applied to the body of the plasma guide, is on the increase. However, the experiment showed that maximum of transparency reach up to ∼ 12%, at potential about of +18 Volts, and comes down under the further increase in potential. Such big digression from experiment does not justify the use of flux-tube model for designing of curvilinear plasma filters. We offer the new approach to the description of the vacuum-arc plasma motion in a toroidal magnetic field based on the solutions of steady-state (∂/∂t=0) Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the long plasma column aligned parallel to a constant axial magnetic field. The relations for the self-consistent electric polarization fields, which appear due to displacement of the electron component from ionic one on the curvilinear part of motion, were derived within a framework of the drift approximation. The dynamics of the central part of the plasma flow in the electric polarization fields was considered in detail. The displacement of the plasma flow at the output of the plasma guide was calculated for the carbon and titanium plasmas. The good agreement with the experimental data was obtained. (author)

  12. Rotation and toroidal magnetic field effects on the stability of two-component jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millas, Dimitrios; Keppens, Rony; Meliani, Zakaria

    2017-09-01

    Several observations of astrophysical jets show evidence of a structure in the direction perpendicular to the jet axis, leading to the development of 'spine and sheath' models of jets. Most studies focus on a two-component jet consisting of a highly relativistic inner jet and a slower - but still relativistic - outer jet surrounded by an unmagnetized environment. These jets are believed to be susceptible to a relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability, depending on the effective inertia ratio of the two components. We extend previous studies by taking into account the presence of a non-zero toroidal magnetic field. Different values of magnetization are examined to detect possible differences in the evolution and stability of the jet. We find that the toroidal field, above a certain level of magnetization σ, roughly equal to 0.01, can stabilize the jet against the previously mentioned instabilities and that there is a clear trend in the behaviour of the average Lorentz factor and the effective radius of the jet when we continuously increase the magnetization. The simulations are performed using the relativistic MHD module from the open source, parallel, grid adaptive, mpi-amrvac code.

  13. Inward transport of a toroidally confined plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Hong, J.; Kim, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The paper aims at showing that the density and confinement time of a toroidal plasma can be enhanced by radial electric fields far stronger than the ambipolar values, and that, if such electric fields point into the plasma, radially inward transport can result. The investigation deals with low-frequency fluctuation-induced transport using digitally implemented spectral analysis techniques and with the role of strong applied radial electric fields and weak vertical magnetic fields on plasma density and particle confinement times in a Bumpy Torus geometry. Results indicate that application of sufficiently strong radially inward electric fields results in radially inward fluctuation-induced transport into the toroidal electrostatic potential well; this inward transport gives rise to higher average electron densities and longer particle confinement times in the toroidal plasma.

  14. ZONAL TOROIDAL HARMONIC EXPANSIONS OF EXTERNAL GRAVITATIONAL FIELDS FOR RING-LIKE OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Toshio, E-mail: Toshio.Fukushima@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Ohsawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-08-01

    We present an expression of the external gravitational field of a general ring-like object with axial and plane symmetries such as oval toroids or annular disks with an arbitrary density distribution. The main term is the gravitational field of a uniform, infinitely thin ring representing the limit of zero radial width and zero vertical height of the object. The additional term is derived from a zonal toroidal harmonic expansion of a general solution of Laplace’s equation outside the Brillouin toroid of the object. The special functions required are the point value and the first-order derivative of the zonal toroidal harmonics of the first kind, namely, the Legendre function of the first kind of half integer degree and an argument that is not less than unity. We developed a recursive method to compute them from two pairs of seed values explicitly expressed by some complete elliptic integrals. Numerical experiments show that appropriately truncated expansions converge rapidly outside the Brillouin toroid. The truncated expansion can be evaluated so efficiently that, for an oval toroid with an exponentially damping density profile, it is 3000–10,000 times faster than the two-dimensional numerical quadrature. A group of the Fortran 90 programs required in the new method and their sample outputs are available electronically.

  15. Calculation about a modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez A, E.; Melendez L, L.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E.

    1991-07-01

    The charged particles that constitute the plasma in the tokamaks are located in magnetic fields that determine its behavior. The poloidal magnetic field of the plasma current and the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak possess relatively big gradients, which produce drifts on these particles. These drifts are largely the cause of the continuous lost of particles and of energy of the confinement region. In this work the results of numerical calculations of a modification to the 'traditional' toroidal magnetic field that one waits it diminishes the drifts by gradient and improve the confinement properties of the tokamaks. (Author)

  16. Field load and displacement boundary condition computer program used for the finite element analysis and design of toroidal field coils in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The design evaluation of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been performed by structural analysis with the finite element method. The technique employed has been simplified with supplementary computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element computer program. Significant automation has been provided by computer codes in three areas of data input. These are the definition of coil geometry by a mesh of node points, the definition of finite elements via the node points and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The computer programs by name that have been used to perform the above functions are PDXNODE, ELEMENT and PDXFORC. The geometric finite element modeling options for toroidal field coils provided by PDXNODE include one-fourth or one-half symmetric sections of circular coils, oval shaped coils or dee-shaped coils with or without a beveled wedging surface. The program ELEMENT which defines the finite elements for input to the finite element computer code can provide considerable time and labor savings when defining the model of coils of non-uniform cross-section or when defining the model of coils whose material properties are different in the R and THETA directions due to the laminations of alternate epoxy and copper windings. The modeling features provided by the program ELEMENT have been used to analyze the PLT and the TFTR toroidal field coils with integral support structures. The computer program named PDXFORC is described. It computes the node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil from the vector crossproduct of the coil current and the magnetic field. The model can be of one-half or one-fourth symmetry to be consistent with the node model defined by PDXNODE, and the magnetic field is computed from toroidal or poloidal coils

  17. Toroidal magnetic field system for a 2-MA reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, J.G.; Linton, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    The engineering design of the toroidal magnetic field (TF) system for a 2-MA Reversed-Field Pinch experiment (ZT-H) is described. ZT-H is designed with major radius 2.15 meters, minor radius 0.40 meters, and a peak toroidal magnetic field of 0.85 Tesla. The requirement for highly uniform fields, with spatial ripple <0.2% leads to a design with 72 equally spaced circular TF coils, located at minor radius 0.6 meters, carrying a maximum current of 9.0 MA. The coils are driven by a 12-MJ capacitor bank which is allowed to ring in order to aid the reversal of magnetic field. A stress analysis is presented, based upon calculated hoop tension, centering force, and overturning moment, treating these as a combination of static loads and considering that the periodic nature of the loading causes little amplification. The load transfer of forces and moments is considered as a stress distribution resisted by the coils, support structures, wedges, and the structural shell

  18. Passing particle toroidal precession induced by electric field in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of a rotation of passing particles in a tokamak with radial electric field are calculated. The expression for time-averaged toroidal velocity of the passing particle induced by the electric field is derived. The electric-field-induced additive to the toroidal velocity of the passing particle appears to be much smaller than the velocity of the electric drift calculated for the poloidal magnetic field typical for the trapped particle. This quantity can even have the different sign depending on the azimuthal position of the particle starting point. The unified approach for the calculation of the bounce period and of the time-averaged toroidal velocity of both trapped and passing particles in the whole volume of plasma column is presented. The results are obtained analytically and are confirmed by 3D numerical calculations of the trajectories of charged particles

  19. Passing particle toroidal precession induced by electric field in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, V. V. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Ordzhonikidze St. 3, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation); Ilgisonis, V. I.; Sorokina, E. A. [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia, Ordzhonikidze St. 3, Moscow 117198 (Russian Federation); NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    Characteristics of a rotation of passing particles in a tokamak with radial electric field are calculated. The expression for time-averaged toroidal velocity of the passing particle induced by the electric field is derived. The electric-field-induced additive to the toroidal velocity of the passing particle appears to be much smaller than the velocity of the electric drift calculated for the poloidal magnetic field typical for the trapped particle. This quantity can even have the different sign depending on the azimuthal position of the particle starting point. The unified approach for the calculation of the bounce period and of the time-averaged toroidal velocity of both trapped and passing particles in the whole volume of plasma column is presented. The results are obtained analytically and are confirmed by 3D numerical calculations of the trajectories of charged particles.

  20. Qualifying tests for TRIAM-1M superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nagao, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-09-01

    In the strong toroidal magnetic field experimental facility ''TRIAM-1M'' currently under construction, construction of the superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil and the following qualifying tests conducted on the full-scale superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil actually fabricated are described: (1) coil excitation test, (2) superconducting stability test, (3) external magnetic field application test, and (4) high-speed excitation test. On the basis of these test results, stability was evaluated of the superconducting coil being operated in the tokamak device. In normal tokamak operation, there occurs no normal conduction transition. At the time of plasma disruption, though this transition takes place in part of the coil, the superconducting state is immediately restored. By its electromagnetic force analysis, the superconducting coil is also stable in structure.

  1. Dynamic divertor control using resonant mixed toroidal harmonic magnetic fields during ELM suppression in DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, M.; Sun, Y.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Gu, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Abrams, T.; Bykov, I.; Cui, L.; Evans, T.; Garofalo, A.; Guo, W.; Gong, X.; Lasnier, C.; Logan, N. C.; Makowski, M.; Orlov, D.; Wang, H. H.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments using Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs), with a rotating n = 2 toroidal harmonic combined with a stationary n = 3 toroidal harmonic, have validated predictions that divertor heat and particle flux can be dynamically controlled while maintaining Edge Localized Mode (ELM) suppression in the DIII-D tokamak. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. ELM suppression over one full cycle of a rotating n = 2 RMP that was mixed with a static n = 3 RMP field has been achieved. Prominent heat flux splitting on the outer divertor has been observed during ELM suppression by RMPs in low collisionality regime in DIII-D. Strong changes in the three dimensional heat and particle flux footprint in the divertor were observed during the application of the mixed toroidal harmonic magnetic perturbations. These results agree well with modeling of the edge magnetic field structure using the TOP2D code, which takes into account the plasma response from the MARS-F code. These results expand the potential effectiveness of the RMP ELM suppression technique for the simultaneous control of divertor heat and particle load required in ITER.

  2. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Hong; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ((var e psilon) -1 ) larger than the E x B velocity, where (var e psilon) is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  3. Calculation about a modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part I; Calculo sobre una modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak Novillo. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez A, E.; Melendez L, L.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1991-07-15

    The charged particles that constitute the plasma in the tokamaks are located in magnetic fields that determine its behavior. The poloidal magnetic field of the plasma current and the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak possess relatively big gradients, which produce drifts on these particles. These drifts are largely the cause of the continuous lost of particles and of energy of the confinement region. In this work the results of numerical calculations of a modification to the 'traditional' toroidal magnetic field that one waits it diminishes the drifts by gradient and improve the confinement properties of the tokamaks. (Author)

  4. Radial electric field in JET advanced tokamak scenarios with toroidal field ripple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombe, K [Postdoctoral Fellow of the Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO), Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Andrew, Y; De Vries, P C; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N C; Meigs, A; Zastrow, K-D [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Biewer, T M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169, TN (United States); Blanco, E [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Tala, T [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Association EURATOM-Tekes, PO Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Von Hellermann, M [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)], E-mail: Kristel.Crombe@jet.uk

    2009-05-15

    A dedicated campaign has been run on JET to study the effect of toroidal field (TF) ripple on plasma performance. Radial electric field measurements from experiments on a series of plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) and different levels of ripple amplitude are presented. They have been calculated from charge exchange measurements of impurity ion temperature, density and rotation velocity profiles, using the force balance equation. The ion temperature and the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocities are compared in plasmas with both reversed and optimized magnetic shear profiles. Poloidal rotation velocity (v{sub {theta}}) in the ITB region is measured to be of the order of a few tens of km s{sup -1}, significantly larger than the neoclassical predictions. Increasing levels of the TF ripple are found to decrease the ion temperature gradient in the ITB region, a measure for the quality of the ITB, and the maximum value of v{sub {theta}} is reduced. The poloidal rotation term dominates in the calculations of the total radial electric field (E{sub r}), with the largest gradient in E{sub r} measured in the radial region coinciding with the ITB.

  5. Toroidal rotation braking with n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Koslowski, H R

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal rotation braking has been observed in plasmas with application of an n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on the JET tokamak. Calculation results from the momentum transport analysis show that the torque induced by the n = 1 perturbation field has a global profile. The maximal value...

  6. The role of fluctuation-induced transport in a toroidal plasma with strong radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Hong, J. Y.; Kim, Y. C.

    1981-01-01

    Previous work employing digitally implemented spectral analysis techniques is extended to demonstrate that radial fluctuation-induced transport is the dominant ion transport mechanism in an electric field dominated toroidal plasma. Such transport can be made to occur against a density gradient, and hence may have a very beneficial effect on confinement in toroidal plasmas of fusion interest. It is shown that Bohm or classical diffusion down a density gradient, the collisional Pedersen-current mechanism, and the collisionless electric field gradient mechanism described by Cole (1976) all played a minor role, if any, in the radial transport of this plasma.

  7. Development of a global toroidal gyrokinetic Vlasov code with new real space field solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrejan, Kevin; Imadera, Kenji; Li, Ji-Quan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces a new full-f toroidal gyrokinetic (GK) Vlasov simulation code that uses a real space field solver. This solver enables us to compute the gyro-averaging operators in real space to allow proper treatment of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects without requiring any particular hypothesis and in any magnetic field configuration (X-point, D-shaped etc). The code was well verified through benchmark tests such as toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) instability and collisionless damping of zonal flow. (author)

  8. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goumiri, I. R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Rowley, C. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Boyer, M. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Andre, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kolemen, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Taira, K. [Florida State Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Tallahassee, FL USA.

    2016-02-19

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  9. Finite element and node point generation computer programs used for the design of toroidal field coils in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-06-01

    The structural analysis of toroidal field coils in Tokamak fusion machines can be performed with the finite element method. This technique has been employed for design evaluations of toroidal field coils on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Poloidal Diverter Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The application of the finite element method can be simplified with computer programs that are used to generate the input data for the finite element code. There are three areas of data input where significant automation can be provided by supplementary computer codes. These concern the definition of geometry by a node point mesh, the definition of the finite elements from the geometric node points, and the definition of the node point force/displacement boundary conditions. The node point forces in a model of a toroidal field coil are computed from the vector cross product of the coil current and the magnetic field. The computer programs named PDXNODE and ELEMENT are described. The program PDXNODE generates the geometric node points of a finite element model for a toroidal field coil. The program ELEMENT defines the finite elements of the model from the node points and from material property considerations. The program descriptions include input requirements, the output, the program logic, the methods of generating complex geometries with multiple runs, computational time and computer compatibility. The output format of PDXNODE and ELEMENT make them compatible with PDXFORC and two general purpose finite element computer codes: (ANSYS) the Engineering Analysis System written by the Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc., and (WECAN) the Westinghouse Electric Computer Analysis general purpose finite element program. The Fortran listings of PDXNODE and ELEMENT are provided

  10. About the Toroidal Magnetic Field of a Tokamak Burning Plasma Experiment with Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2002-01-01

    In tokamaks, the strong dependence on the toroidal magnetic field of both plasma pressure and energy confinement is what makes possible the construction of small and relatively inexpensive burning plasma experiments using high-field resistive coils. On the other hand, the toroidal magnetic field of tokamaks using superconducting coils is limited by the critical field of superconductivity. In this article, we examine the relative merit of raising the magnetic field of a tokamak plasma by increasing its aspect ratio at a constant value of the peak field in the toroidal magnet. Taking ITER-FEAT as an example, we find that it is possible to reach thermonuclear ignition using an aspect ratio of approximately 4.5 and a toroidal magnetic field of 7.3 T. Under these conditions, fusion power density and neutron wall loading are the same as in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor], but the normalized plasma beta is substantially smaller. Furthermore, such a tokamak would be able to reach an energy gain of approximately 15 even with the deterioration in plasma confinement that is known to occur near the density limit where ITER is forced to operate

  11. Reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple in the advanced material tokamak experiment on JFT-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Miura, Y.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Koike, T.; Nakayama, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Urata, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple, the reduction of ripple amplitude (δ) by inserting ferritic steel is studied, taking its toroidal mode number into account. The guideline of the design for reduction is wider and thicker ferritic board (FB) is located at further position from VV. The δ depends on the toroidal magnetic field. The value of B r21 /B t in the case of displacement of few cm is about 1 x 10 -5 which is one order smaller than the critical value. The offsetting of FB is not a problem for locked mode. Preliminary experiments with insertion of one or two FB's indicate no adverse effect on global plasma parameters. (author)

  12. Reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple in the advanced material tokamak experiment on JFT-2M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Miura, Y.; Kimura, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Koike, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan); Nakayama, T. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp. (Japan); Urata, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to reduce fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple, the reduction of ripple amplitude ({delta}) by inserting ferritic steel is studied, taking its toroidal mode number into account. The guideline of the design for reduction is wider and thicker ferritic board (FB) is located at further position from VV. The {delta} depends on the toroidal magnetic field. The value of B{sub r21} /B{sub t} in the case of displacement of few cm is about 1 x 10{sup -5} which is one order smaller than the critical value. The offsetting of FB is not a problem for locked mode. Preliminary experiments with insertion of one or two FB's indicate no adverse effect on global plasma parameters. (author)

  13. Structural characteristics of proposed ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coil conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, C.R.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of transverse loading on a cable-in-conduit conductor which has been proposed for the toroidal field coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The primary components of this conductor are a loose cable of superconducting wires, a thin-wall tube for helium containment, and a U-shaped structural channel. A method is given where the geometry of this conductor can be optimized for a given set of operating conditions. It is shown, using finite-element modeling, that the structural channel is effective in supporting loads due to transverse forces and internal pressure. In addition, it is shown that the superconducting cable is effectively shielded from external transverse loads that might otherwise degrade its current carrying capacity. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  15. Heterotic free fermionic and symmetric toroidal orbifold models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A.E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool,Liverpool L69 7ZL (United Kingdom); Nibbelink, S. Groot [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,80333 München (Germany); Mehta, V.M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg,69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-04-07

    Free fermionic models and symmetric heterotic toroidal orbifolds both constitute exact backgrounds that can be used effectively for phenomenological explorations within string theory. Even though it is widely believed that for ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2} orbifolds the two descriptions should be equivalent, a detailed dictionary between both formulations is still lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap: we give a detailed account of how the input data of both descriptions can be related to each other. In particular, we show that the generalized GSO phases of the free fermionic model correspond to generalized torsion phases used in orbifold model building. We illustrate our translation methods by providing free fermionic realizations for all ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2} orbifold geometries in six dimensions.

  16. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.; Watkin, D.C.; Hollis, M.J.; DePew, R.E.; Kuban, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  17. Stability properties of a toroidal z-pinch in an external magnetic multipole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    MHD stability of m=1, axisymmetric, external modes of a toroidal z-pinch immersed in an external multipole field (Extrap configuration) is studied. The description includes the effects of a weak toroidicity, a non-circular plasma cross-section and the influence of induced currents in the external conductors. It is found that the non-circularity of the plasma cross-section always has a destabilizing effect but that the m=1 mode can be stabilized by the external feedback if the non-circularity is small. (author)

  18. Effect of toroidal field ripple on the formation of internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, P C de; Hawkes, N C; Challis, C D; Andrew, Y; Beurskens, M; Brix, M; Giroud, C; Zastrow, K-D [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E [EFDA-JET CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Litaudon, X [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/DFRC, CEA Cadarache, 13108, St Paul lez Durance (France); Brzozowski, J; Johnson, T [Association EURATOM-VR, Fusion Plasma Physics, EES, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Hobirk, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Loennroth, J; Salmi, A [Association Euratom-Tekes, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 4100, 02015 TKK (Finland); Tala, T [Association Euratom-Tekes, VTT, PO Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Yavorskij, V [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Association EURATOM-OEAW, University of Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: Peter.de.Vries@jet.uk

    2008-06-15

    The effect of a toroidal field (TF) ripple on the formation and performance of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has been studied in JET. It was found that the TF ripple had a profound effect on the toroidal plasma rotation. An increased TF ripple up to {delta} = 1% led to a lower rotation and reduced the rotational shear in the region where the ITBs were formed. ITB triggering events were observed in all cases and it is thought that the rotational shear may be less important for this process than, for example, the q-profile. However, the increase in the pressure gradient following the ITB trigger was reduced in discharges with a larger TF ripple and consequently a lower rotational shear. This suggests that toroidal rotation and its shear play a role in the growth of the ITB once it has been triggered.

  19. Statistical analysis of the Nb3Sn strand production for the ITER toroidal field coils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vostner, A.; Jewell, M.C.; Pong, I.; Sullivan, N.; Devred, A.; Bessette, D.; Bevillard, G.; Mitchell, N.; Romano, G.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The ITER toroidal field (TF) strand procurement initiated the largest Nb3Sn superconducting strand production hitherto. The industrial-scale production started in Japan in 2008 and finished in summer 2015. Six ITER partners (so-called Domestic Agencies, or DAs) are in charge of the procurement and

  20. Edge pedestal characteristics in JET and JT-60U tokamaks under variable toroidal field ripple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urano, H.; Saibene, G.; Oyama, N.; Parail, V.; P. de Vries,; Sartori, R.; Kamada, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Loarte, A.; Lonnroth, J.; Sakamoto, Y.; Salmi, A.; Shinohara, K.; Takenaga, H.; Yoshida, M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of toroidal field (TF) ripple on the edge pedestal characteristics were examined in the TF ripple scan experiments at the plasma current I(p) of 1.1 MA in JET and JT-60U. The TF ripple amplitude delta(R) was defined as a value averaged over the existing ripple wells at the separatrix on

  1. Numerical analyses of magnetic field and force in toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage using unit coils (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamaru, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than other systems of electric energy storage because of its larger amounts of stored energy and its higher efficiency. There are two types of SMES. One is the solenoid type and the other is the toroidal type. Some models of solenoid-type SMES are designed in the U.S. and in Japan. But the large scale SMES causes a high magnetic field in the living environment, and causes the erroneous operation of electronic equipment. The authors studied some suitable designs of magnetic shielding for the solenoidal-type SMES to reduce the magnetic field in the living environment. The toiroidal type SMES is studied in this article. The magnetic leakage flux of the toiroidal-type SMES is generally lower than that of the solenoid-type SMES. The toroidal-type SMES is constructed of unit coils, which are convenient for construction. The magnetic leakage flux occurs between unit coils. The electromagnetic force of the coils is very strong. Therefore analyses of the leakage flux and electromagnetic force are important to the design of SMES. The authors studied the number, radius, and length of unit coils. The storage energy is 5 G Wh. The numerical analyses of magnetic fields in the toroidal type SMES are obtained by analytical solutions. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Suppression of m = 0 in a RFP by toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.; Robertson, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Reversatron RFP is normally operated with the toroidal field coils connected in series. The time-integrated voltage applied to the circuit determines the sum of the fluxes linking each turn but not the flux within each turn. Each winding may have a different flux determined by the external drive and by currents within the plasma. A parallel connection of the field coils results in the flux within each coil being determined by the volt-seconds applied to the windings; thus the toroidal flux is the same within each coil. This configuration suppresses any toroidal variation in the toroidal flux and effectively reduces the level of the m = 0 component of the radial field. The m = 0 fluctuations are expected to arise due to nonlinear coupling of the m = 1 modes. A parallel connection of field coils is impractical due to the low impedance required for driving the coils. The authors have tested the effect of parallel connected coils by adding an auxiliary set of 36 coils. These are connected in parallel but are not connected to any supply. The toroidal flux is generated by the series-connected coils which generate voltage but not current in the parallel-connected coils. With the auxiliary coils, the discharge duration is increased from 500 to 550 μsec, the plasma current is increased from 50 kA to 60 kA, F is more negative, Θ is larger, and there is less shot-to-shot variation in the discharges. The m = 0 fluctuations measured by 43 surface coils are, however, only slightly reduced

  3. Physical mechanism determining the radial electric field and its radial structure in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi; Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae

    1994-10-01

    Radial structures of plasma rotation and radial electric field are experimentally studied in tokamak, heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices. The perpendicular and parallel viscosities are measured. The parallel viscosity, which is dominant in determining the toroidal velocity in heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices, is found to be neoclassical. On the other hand, the perpendicular viscosity, which is dominant in dictating the toroidal rotation in tokamaks, is anomalous. Even without external momentum input, both a plasma rotation and a radial electric field exist in tokamaks and heliotrons/torsatrons. The observed profiles of the radial electric field do not agree with the theoretical prediction based on neoclassical transport. This is mainly due to the existence of anomalous perpendicular viscosity. The shear of the radial electric field improves particle and heat transport both in bulk and edge plasma regimes of tokamaks. (author) 95 refs

  4. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    CERN Document Server

    Mordik, S N

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model.

  5. Third-order transfer matrices calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser including fringing-field effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordik, S.N.; Ponomarev, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The third-order transfer matrices are calculated for an electrostatic toroidal sector condenser using a rigorously conserved matrix method that implies the conservation of the beam phase volume at each step in the calculations. The transfer matrices (matrizants) obtained, include the fringing-field effect due to the stray fields. In the case of a rectangular distribution of the field components along the optical axis, the analytical expressions for all aberration coefficients, including the dispersion ones, are derived accurate to the third-order terms. In simulations of real fields with the stray field width other than zero, a smooth distribution of the field components is used for which similar aberration coefficients were calculated by means of the conserved numerical method . It has been found that for a smooth model, as the stray field width tends to zero, the aberration coefficients approach the corresponding aberration values in the rectangular model

  6. New lens system using toroidal magnetic field for intense ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohri, Akihiro; Ikuta, Kazunari; Fujita, Junji.

    1976-11-01

    The use of toroidal magnetic field as a lens system is proposed for producing intense ion beam. The characteristics of the lens system are obtained both analytically and numerically. Some examples of ray-trajectories are presented for different focal lengths. The system is applicable to neutral beam injection heating and micro-pellet implosion for nuclear fusion, and to the other fields such as ion beam X-ray lasers. (auth.)

  7. Taylor-Couette flow stability with toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalybkov, D

    2005-01-01

    The linear stability of the dissipative Taylor-Couette flow with imposed azimuthal magnetic field is considered. Unlike to ideal flow, the magnetic field is fixed function of radius with two parameters only: a ratio of inner to outer cylinder radii and a ratio of the magnetic field values on outer and inner cylinders. The magnetic field with boundary values ratio greater than zero and smaller than inverse radii ratio always stabilizes the flow and called stable magnetic field below. The current free magnetic field is the stable magnetic field. The unstable magnetic field destabilizes every flow if the magnetic field (or Hartmann number) exceeds some critical value. This instability survives even without rotation (for zero Reynolds number). For the stable without the magnetic field flow, the unstable modes are located into some interval of the vertical wave numbers. The interval length is zero for critical Hartmann number and increases with increasing Hartmann number. The critical Hartmann numbers and the length of the unstable vertical wave numbers interval is the same for every rotation law. There are the critical Hartmann numbers for m = 0 sausage and m = 1 kink modes only. The critical Hartmann numbers are smaller for kink mode and this mode is the most unstable mode like to the pinch instability case. The flow stability do not depend on the magnetic Prandtl number for m = 0 mode. The same is true for critical Hartmann numbers for m = 0 and m = 1 modes. The typical value of the magnetic field destabilizing the liquid metal Taylor-Couette flow is order of 100 Gauss

  8. Formation of magnetic islands due to field perturbations in toroidal stellarator configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.K.; Harris, J.H.; Lee, G.S.

    1990-06-01

    An explicit formulation is developed to determine the width of a magnetic island separatrix generated by magnetic field perturbations in a general toroidal stellarator geometry. A conventional method is employed to recast the analysis in a magnetic flux coordinate system without using any simplifying approximations. The island width is seen to be proportional to the square root of the Fourier harmonic of B ρ /B ζ that is in resonance with the rational value of the rotational transform, where B ρ and B ζ are contravariant normal and toroidal components of the perturbed magnetic field, respectively. The procedure, which is based on a representation of three-dimensional flux surfaces by double Fourier series, allows rapid and fairly accurate calculation of the island widths in real vacuum field configurations, without the need to follow field lines through numerical integration of the field line equations. Numerical results of the island width obtained in the flux coordinate representation for the Advanced Toroidal Facility agree closely with those determined from Poincare puncture points obtained by following field lines. 22 refs., 5 tabs

  9. Experimental and calculating study on the stressed state of superconducting coils of toroidal field in the T-15 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, I.G.; Gusev, S.V.; Sivkova, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Results of calculational and experimental atudy of stress-deformed state of superconducting coils of the T-15 tokamak toroidal field are presented. The calculations are made using the method of finite elements and refined theory of cores. Experimental studies were carried out using elastic tensometric model of polymer materials. Test results are compared with the calculational results. Divergence between calculational and experimental values of displacement of characteristic points in the unit does not exceed 20 %. Results of model studies confirm the expediency of the calculational model used for designing SOTP unit for the T-15 tokamak

  10. Toroidal rotation braking with n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Koslowski, H R; Harting, D; Wiegmann, C; Wiesen, S; Jachmich, S; Alfier, A; Asunta, O; Corrigan, G; Giroud, C; Gryaznevich, M P; Hender, T; Nardon, E; Parail, V; Naulin, V; Tala, T

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal rotation braking has been observed in plasmas with application of an n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on the JET tokamak. Calculation results from the momentum transport analysis show that the torque induced by the n = 1 perturbation field has a global profile. The maximal value of this torque is at the plasma core region (ρ - √ν regime in the plasma core, but it is close to the transition between the 1/ν and ν - √ν regimes. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in the 1/ν and ν - √ν regimes is calculated. The observed torque is of a magnitude in between that of the NTV torque in the 1/ν and ν - √ν regimes. The NTV torque in the ν - √ν regimes is enhanced using the Lagrangian variation of the magnetic field strength. However, it is still smaller than the observed torque by one order of magnitude.

  11. On the choice of toroidal magnetic field for thermonuclear tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The value of the magnetic field chosen for tokamak experiments is the result of a compromise between physics requirements, technological limits and financial constraints. The consequences of some physics requirements and limitations, in the light of recent results on the scaling of energy confinement and on limits of density are examined. (author)

  12. A novel superconducting toroidal field magnetic concept using advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma physics database indicates that two distinct approaches to tokamak design may lead to commercial fusion reactors: Low Aspect ratio, high plasma current, relatively low magnetic field devices, and high Aspect ratio, high field devices. The former requires significant enhancements in plasma performance, while the latter depends primarily upon technology development. The key technology for the commercialization of the high-field approach is large, high magnetic field superconducting magnets. In this paper, the physics motivation for the high field approach and key superconducting magnet (SCM) development issues are reviewed. Improved SCM performance may be obtained from improved materials and/or improved engineering. Superconducting materials ranging from NbTi to high-T c oxides are reviewed, demonstrating the broad range of potential superconducting materials. Structural material options are discussed, including cryogenic steel alloys and fiber-reinforced composite materials. The potential for improved magnet engineering is quantified in terms of the Virial Theorem Limit, and two examples of approaches to highly optimized magnet configurations are discussed. The force-reduced concept, which is a finite application of the force-free solutions to Ampere's Law, appear promising for large SCMs but may be limited by the electromagnetics of a fusion plasma. The Solid Superconducting Cylinder (SSC) concept is proposed. This concept combines the unique properties of high-T c superconductors within a low-T c SCM to obtain (1) significant reductions in the structural material volume, (2) a decoupling of the tri-axial (compressive and tensile) stress rate, and (3) a demountable TF magnet system. The advantages of this approach are quantified in terms of a 24 T commercial reactor TF magnet system. Significant reductions in the mechanical stress and the TF radial build are demonstrated. 54 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs

  13. High current superconductors for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Conductors rated at 10,000 A for 8 T and 4.2 K are being purchased for the first large coil segment tests at ORNL. Requirements for these conductors, in addition to the high current rating, are low pulse losses, cryostatic stability, and acceptable mechanical properties. The conductors are required to have losses less than 0.4 W/m under pulsed fields of 0.5 T with a rise time of 1 sec in an ambient 8-T field. Methods of calculating these losses and techniques for verifying the performance by direct measurement are discussed. Conductors stabilized by two different cooling methods, pool boiling and forced helium flow, have been proposed. Analysis of these conductors is presented and a proposed definition and test of stability is discussed. Mechanical property requirements, tensile and compressive, are defined and test methods are discussed

  14. Supporting structures of the toroidal field coils of intor-net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Biggio, M.; Macco, A.; Perfumo, A.; Reale, M.

    1984-01-01

    The design of the toroidal field (TF) coil supporting structures for INTOR-NET Phase 2A (European Configuration) is described. In order to identify the proposed design several preliminary evaluations were performed. These evaluations indicated that suitable supporting structures are those shown in the annexed figures, where each coil is guided and centered by a separate reinforcing structure, on which the intercoil structures are attached. A simplified structural analysis was carried out considering only the cyclic out-of-plane loads due to the poloidal field, acting on the coils, since this constitutes the most critical loading condition due to its impact on the fatigue behavior of the material. This analysis was performed with finite element method for displacements and stresses calculations by using the SAP IV-code. The calcaulation model was made with the aid of the GIFTS system. The results show that the maximum equivalent stress does not exceed the stress limit assumed in the INTOR specifications for stainless steel (AISI 316 type) at cryogenic temperature and under cyclic loading, for the operating conditions of INTOR. Consequently the proposed concept for the support of the TF coils can be considered a workable scheme. Further detailed analysis must be done, so as to demonstrate the complete feasibility of the system. (orig.)

  15. Topological symmetry breaking of self-interacting fractional Klein-Gordon field theories on toroidal spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2008-01-01

    Quartic self-interacting fractional Klein-Gordon scalar massive and massless field theories on toroidal spacetime are studied. The effective potential and topologically generated mass are determined using zeta-function regularization technique. Renormalization of these quantities are derived. Conditions for symmetry breaking are obtained analytically. Simulations are carried out to illustrate regions or values of compactified dimensions where symmetry-breaking mechanisms appear

  16. The importance of the toroidal magnetic field for the feasibility of a tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2000-01-01

    The next step in the demonstration of the scientific feasibility of a tokamak fusion reactor is a DT burning plasma experiment for the study and control of self-heated plasmas. In this paper, the authors examine the role of the toroidal magnetic field on the confinement of a tokamak plasma in the ELMy H-mode regime--the operational regime foreseen for ITER

  17. Resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    This paper analyzes the optimization of the geometry of resistive TF coils of rectangular bore for tokamak fusion test reactors and practical neutron generators. In examining the trade-offs between geometric parameters and magnetic field for reactors giving a specified neutron wall loading, either the resistive power loss or the lifetime coil cost can be minimized. Aspects of cooling, magnetic stress, and construction are addressed for several reference designs. Bending moment distributions in closed form have been derived for rectangular coils on the basis of the theory of rigid frames. Candidate methods of fabrication and of implementing demountable joints are summarized

  18. The forming of a superconductor cable during the winding of a large toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messemer, G.; Zehlein, H.

    1984-01-01

    The feasible range for the tension force which acts on a superconductor cable during the winding of a large D-shaped toroidal field coil depends strongly on the mechanical properties of the cable, on the geometry of the winding pack and on the arrangement of the equipment. The upper limit is imposed by possible damage within the cable. The lower limit is set by the need to assure enough compaction and to overcome the friction forces between the layers. Within this 'corridor' optimal control of elastic prestresses is desirable: this may be chosen with regard to the residual stresses and/or the elastic springback after removal of the coil former. This paper presents a simplified elastica conductor model built by a finite chain of intervals with constant bending moment and curvature. This paper describes the discrete model as well as the iterative shooting method, which finds the equilibrium shape of the conductor. The distributions of bending moment and shear forces around the D-shaped contour, as well as along the conductor, are given. Desirable improvements are outlined. In particular, the possibility of mitigating the stress concentration effect by supporting rollers suitably placed along the 'free' conductor near the bobbin is discussed. (author)

  19. Highlights from the assembly of the helical field coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The helical field (HF) coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device consist of a set of 24 identical segments connected to form a continuous pair of helical coils wrapped around a toroidal vacuum vessel. Each segment weighs approximately 1364 kg (3000 lb) and is composed of 14 water-cooled copper plate conductors bolted to a cast stainless steel structural support member with a T-shape cross section (known as the structural tee). The segment components are electrically insulated with Kapton adhesive tape, G-10, Tefzel, and rubber to withstand 2.5 kV. As a final insulator and structural support, the entire segment is vacuum impregnated with epoxy. This paper offers a brief overview of the processes used to assemble the component parts into a completed segment, including identification of items that required special attention. 4 figs

  20. STRUCTURAL RESPONSE OF THE DIII-D TOROIDAL FIELD COIL TO INCREASED LATERAL LOADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REIS, E.E; CHIN, E.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Recent calibration shots in which full toroidal field (TF) coil current interacted with the maximum poloidal field coils have produced increased lateral loads on the outer sections of the TF-coil. The increased lateral loads have resulted in deflections that have been sufficient to cause the TF-coil to contact adjacent equipment and produce a transient short to ground within the coil. The six outer turns of each TF-coil bundle are clamped together by insulated preloaded studs to provide increased bending stiffness. These sections of the outer bundles depend on friction to react the lateral loads as a bundle rather than six individual turns. A major concern is that the increased loads will produce slip between turns resulting in excessive lateral deflections and possible damage to the insulating sleeve on the preloaded studs. A finite element structural model of the TF-coil was developed for the calculation of deflections and the shear load distribution throughout the coil for the applied lateral loads from a full current calibration shot. The purpose of the updated structural model is to correlate the applied lateral loads to the total shear force between the unbonded sections of the outer turns. An allowable integrated lateral load applied to the outer turns is established based on the maximum shear force that can be reacted by friction. A program that calculates the magnetic fields and integrated lateral load along the outer turns can be incorporated into the plasma control system. The integrated load can then be compared to the calculated allowable value prior to execution of calibration shots. Calibration shots with a calculated total lateral load greater than the allowable value will be prevented

  1. Compact-toroid fusion reactor based on the field-reversed theta pinch: reactor scaling and optimization for CTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Early scoping studies based on approximate, analytic models have been extended on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach to examine a Compact Toroid (CT) reactor embodiment that uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plasmoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conduction shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radiation shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  2. The Pre-compression System of the Toroidal Field Coils in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Jong, C.; Vollmann, T.; Ferrari, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Toroidal Field (TF) coils of ITER will undergo out-of-plane forces caused by the machine poloidal fields required to maintain the toroidal stability of the plasma. These forces will be supported against overturning moments by links between the coils. In turn, these links consist of the Inner Intercoil Structure (IIC), which are composed by 2 sets of 4 poloidal shear keys inserted in slots between adjacent coils placed at the top and bottom part of the inboard leg, and the Outer Intercoil Structure (OIS) formed by 4 bands of shear panels at the outboard leg. The magnetic forces during energization of ITER would cause at IIC locations a toroidal gap between adjacent TF coils of 0.35 mm; during plasma operation this value could reach >1 mm causing a loosening of the keys and intensifying stress concentrations. This undesired effect will be suppressed by the application of a centripetal force of 70 MN per coil (35 MN at both the bottom and top part of the inboard leg of each of the 18 TF coils) that will be provided by 2 sets of 3 fibre-glass epoxy composite rings submitted to a toroidal hoop force of 100 MN per set. The calculated maximum stress in the rings will occur during the installation phase at room temperature, where the maximum radial elongation (∼ 25 mm) is required, and it will be less than 30% of its ultimate stress. The imposed elongation to reach that force and the lower Young modulus of the composite compared with the stainless steel one will ease component tolerances and/or settlement effects in the final assembly. (author)

  3. Ion heating at the cyclotron resonance in plasmas magnetically confined in a toroidal octupole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barter, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures as high as 600 eV have been produced using rf wave heating at the ion cyclotron resonance frequency in a toroidal octupole magnetic field. Rf is coupled to the plasma with an externally driven ''fifth'' hoop which forms the inductive leg of an oscillator tank circuit. Power levels up to 1 MW at 1 to 3 MHz have been applied for periods up to 2 msec. Plasmas produced either by ECRH or by gun injection are simulated with a computer program in which known particle and energy production and loss mechanisms are used to predict the spatially averaged time behaviour of the plasma in the presence of the applied ion heating. The program can be used to calculate the consequences of the heating model in the presence of many cooling mechanisms which may each have a separate dependence on instantaneous plasma parameters. Experimental quantities compared to computer predictions include density, ion temperature, and loading of the hoop by the plasma, both resistive and reactive, and neutral reflux from the wall by electron and ion impact. Wave penetration to the resonance zone is good up to the highest densities available (6 x 10 12 cm -3 by gun injection) in good agreement with theory. Neutral reflux from the walls and the large charge exchange cooling which results is the dominant loss mechanism at the higher hoop voltages

  4. Analytical modelling of resistive wall mode stabilization by rotation in toroidal tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C J; Gimblett, C G; Hastie, R J

    2011-01-01

    Stabilization of the resitive wall mode (RWM) may allow fusion power to be doubled for a given magnetic field in advanced tokamak operation. Experimental evidence from DIII-D and other machines suggests that plasma rotation can stabilize the RWM. Several authors (Finn 1995 Phys. Plasmas 2 3782, Bondeson and Xie 1997 Phys. Plasmas 4 2081) have constructed analytical cylindrical models for the RWM, but these do not deal with toroidal effects. The framework of Connor et al (1988 Phys. Fluids 31 577) is used to develop ideal plasma analytic models with toroidicity included. Stepped pressure profiles and careful ordering of terms are used to simplify the analysis. First, a current driven kink mode model is developed and a dispersion relation for arbitrary current profile is calculated. Second, the external pressure driven kink mode is similarly investigated as the most important RWM arises from this mode. Using this latter model it is found that the RWM is stabilized by Alfven continuum damping with rotation levels similar to those seen in experiments. An expression for the stability of the external kink mode for more general current profiles and a resistive wall is derived in the appendix.

  5. Spatial Variations of Poloidal and Toroidal Mode Field Line Resonances Observed by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Kepko, L.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field line resonances (FLRs) are magnetosphere's responses to solar wind forcing and internal instabilities generated by solar wind-magnetospheric interactions. They are standing waves along the Earth's magnetic field lines oscillating in either poloidal or toroidal modes. The two types of waves have their unique frequency characteristics. The eigenfrequency of FLRs is determined by the length of the field line and the plasma density, and thus gradually changes with L. For toroidal mode oscillations with magnetic field perturbations in the azimuthal direction, ideal MHD predicts that each field line oscillates independently with its own eigenfrequency. For poloidal mode waves with field lines oscillating radially, their frequency cannot change with L easily as L shells need to oscillate in sync to avoid efficient damping due to phase mixing. Observations, mainly during quiet times, indeed show that poloidal mode waves often exhibit nearly constant frequency across L shells. Our recent observations, on the other hand, reveal a clear L-dependent frequency trend for a long lasting storm-time poloidal wave event, indicating the wave can maintain its power with changing frequencies for an extended period [Le et al., 2017]. The spatial variation of the frequency shows discrete spatial structures. The frequency remains constant within each discrete structure that spans about 1 REalong L, and changes discretely. We present a follow-up study to investigate spatial variations of wave frequencies using the Wigner-Ville distribution. We examine both poloidal and toroidal waves under different geomagnetic conditions using multipoint observations from MMS, and compare their frequency and occurrence characteristics for insights into their generation mechanisms. Reference: Le, G., et al. (2017), Global observations of magnetospheric high-m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3456-3464, doi:10.1002/2017GL073048.

  6. Compact toroid formation using barrier fields and controlled reconnection in the TRX-1 field reversed theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.L.; Armstrong, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    TRX-1 is a new 20 cm diameter, 1-m long field reversed theta pinch with a magnetic field swing of 10 kG in 3 μsec. It employs z discharge preionization and octopole barrier fields to maximize flux trapping on first half cycle operation. Cusp coils are used at the theta pinch ends to delay reconnection and fast mirror coils are used to trigger reconnection at a time designed to maximize axial heating efficiency and toroid lifetime. These controls are designed to study toroid formation methods which are claimed to be especially efficient by Russian experimenters. Studies have been conducted on flux trapping efficiency, triggered reconnection, and equilibrium and lifetime

  7. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-01-01

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  8. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1994-12-01

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical ExB rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons

  9. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ˜1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  10. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T., E-mail: cstd14003@g.nihon-u.ac.jp; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T. [Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ∼1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  11. Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field for high-beta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagayasu; Tamaru, Ken; Nagata, Akiyoshi.

    1979-01-01

    Formation of toroidal pre-heat plasma was studied. The pre-heat plasma without residual magnetic field was made by chopping the current for pre-heat, A small toroidal-pinch system was used for the experiment. The magnetic field was measured with a magnetic probe. One turn loop was used for the measurement of the toroidal one-turn electric field. A pair of Rogoski coil was used for the measurement of plasma current. The dependence of residual magnetic field on chopping time was measured. By fast chopping of the primary current in the pre-heating circuit, the poloidal magnetic field was reduced to several percent within 5 microsecond. After chopping, no instability was observed in the principal discharge plasma produced within several microsecond. As the conclusion, it can be said that the control of residual field can be made by current chopping. (Kato, T.)

  12. Realization of toroidal field power supply control system for J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Shengshun; Zhuang Ge; Zhang Ming; Feng Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Based on the integrated development environment provided by QNX real-time operation system, the control system of toroidal field power supply is designed and developed. The system is proved to be reliable, stable and in real-time. It can control the power supply successfully to produce a constant current up to 92.5kA lasting for 1s and 1.74T at the magnetic axis. In conclusion, the control system can meet the requirements of the J-TEXT routine operation at present. (authors)

  13. Mechanical stress calculations for toroidal field coils by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soell, M.; Jandl, O.; Gorenflo, H.

    1976-09-01

    After discussing fundamental relationships of the finite element method, this report describes the calculation steps worked out for mechanical stress calculations in the case of magnetic forces and forces produced by thermal expansion or compression of toroidal field coils using the SOLID SAP IV computer program. The displacement and stress analysis are based on the 20-node isoparametric solid element. The calculation of the nodal forces produced by magnetic body forces are discussed in detail. The computer programs, which can be used generally for mesh generation and determination of the nodal forces, are published elsewhere. (orig.) [de

  14. Development of high-mechanical strength electrical insulations for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, C.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical insulation for the TF (Toroidal Field) coils is subjected to a high interlaminar shear, tensile and compressive stresses. Two candidate epoxy/glass fiber systems using prepreg and vacuum impregnation techniques were evaluated. Specimens were prepared and processed under controlled conditions to simulate specification manufacturing procedures. The strengths of the insulation were measured in interlaminar shear, tension, compression, and combined shear and compression statically. Shear modulus determinations were also made. Various techniques of surface treatments to increase bond strengths with three resin primers were tested

  15. HTMR: an experimental tokamak reactor with hybrid copper/superconductor toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanzini, P.G.; Raia, G.; Rosatelli, F.; Zampaglione, V.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of a hybrid configuration superconducting coils/copper coils for a next generation tokamak TF magnet has been investigated. On the basis of this hybrid solution, the conceptual design has been developed for a medium-high toroidal field tokamak reactor (HTMR). The results of this study show the possibility of designing a tokamak reactor with reduced size in comparison with other INTOR like devices, still gaining some margins in front of the uncertainties in the scaling laws for plasma physics parameters and retaining the presence of a blanket with a tritium breeding ratio of about 1

  16. Composite coils for toroidal field coils and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Trujillo, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite toroidal field (TF) generating means consisting of segmented magnetic coil windings is disclosed. Each coil winding of the TF generating means consists of a copper or copper alloy conductor segment and an aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segment. The conductor segments are joined at a high strength, low electrical resistance joint and the joint may either be a mechanical or metallurgical one. The use of the aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segments improves the neutron economy of the reactor with which the TF coil is associated and reduces TF coil nuclear heating and heating gradients, and activation in the TF coils

  17. Some analytical results for toroidal magnetic field coils with elongated minor cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, J.

    1976-09-01

    The problem of determining the shape of a flexible current filament forming part of an ideal toroidal magnetic field coil is solved in a virtually analytical form. Analytical formulae for characteristic coil dimensions, stored magnetic energies, inductances and forces are derived for the so-called D-coils. The analytically calculated inductances of ideal D-coils are compared with numerically calculated ones for the case of finite numbers of D-shaped current filaments. Finally, the magnetic energies stored in ideal rectangular, elliptic and D-coils are compared. (orig.) [de

  18. Effects of toroidal field ripple on injected deuterons in the FED device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, R.H.; Rome, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    A Monte Carlo beam deposition and thermalization code is used to assess the effects of toroidal field (TF) ripple on injected fast deuterons in the Fusion Engineering Device (FED). The code uses realistic geometry for the beam, plasma equilibrium, TF ripple, and vacuum chamber. For injection at an angle of 35 0 (co) from perpendicular, no particles were ripple trapped and less than 1% of the injected power went to the wall and the limiter. However, due to the large amounts of computer time required by these programs, only 100 particles were followed in the rippled case and the results must be regarded as preliminary

  19. Toroid field coil shear key installation study, DOE task No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Meier, R.W.; Yuen, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Concepts for fitting and installation of the scissor keys, triangular keys, and truss keys in the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Coil Assembly were developed and evaluated. In addition, the process of remote removal and replacement of a failed TF coil was considered. Two concepts were addressed: central solenoid installed last (Naka Option 1) and central solenoid installed first (Naka Option 2). In addition, a third concept was developed which utilized the favorable features of both concepts. A time line for installation was estimated for the Naka Option 1 concept

  20. Analysis and test to predict the fatigue life of the ISX-B toroidal field coils' finger joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Toole, J.A.; Ojalvo, I.U.; Raynor, G.E.; Zatz, I.J.; Johnson, N.E.; Walls, J.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Cain, W.D.; Walstrom, P.L.; Pearce, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A new and more rigorous structural evaluation of the ISX toroidal field (TF) coil fingers joints was undertaken to assess the effects of high-/beta/ operation of ISX-B. A new poloidal field (PF) coil set which allows high-/beta/ operation and produces larger out-of-plane loads on the TF coils was installed as part of the change to ISX-B. It was determined that the iron core significantly affects the out-of-plane load distribution and forces were calculated using the GFUN-3D code which considers 3-D iron core effects. These loads were applied to a half-symmetric finite element NASTRAN code model in which the TF coils were modeled as a string of beam elements. 8 refs

  1. Approximate model for toroidal force balance in the high-beta stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.

    1979-03-01

    A simple model for estimating the body force acting on a diffuse plasma confined in a three-dimensional, high-beta stellarator geometry is given. The equilibrium is treated by an asymptotic expansion about a straight theta pinch with diffuse, circular cross section. The expansion parameter delta is the strength of the applied helical fields. This expansion leads to an inconsistent set of equations for the equilibrium in second order. Nevertheless, by averaging the equilibrium equations over the volume of the confined plasma, a unique condition for toroidal equilibrium is obtained. When the results are compared with the predictions of previous equilibrium theory, which is based on the sharp-boundary model, a large deviation is found. This correction is especially large for l = 0,1 systems at high beta and must be accounted for in any confinement experiment

  2. The pre-compression system of the toroidal field coils in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaster, J.; Ferrari, M.; Jong, C.; Vollmann, T.

    2007-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils of ITER will undergo out-of-plane forces caused by the poloidal fields required to confine the plasma. These forces will be supported against overturning moments by links between the coils. In turn, these links consist of the inner intercoil structure (IIC), which is composed of two pairs (placed at the top and bottom part of the inboard leg) of four sets of poloidal shear keys inserted in slots between adjacent coils, and the outer intercoil structure (OIS) formed by four bands of shear panels on the outboard leg. The magnetic forces during energization of ITER would cause at IIC locations at toroidal gap between adjacent TF coils of 0.35 mm; during plasma operation this value could reach >1 mm causing a loosening of the keys and intensifying stress concentrations. This undesired effect will be suppressed by the application of a centripetal force of 70 MN/coil (35 MN at both the bottom and top part of the inboard leg of each of the 18 TF coils) that will be provided by two sets of three glass fibre/epoxy composite rings submitted to a toroidal hoop force of 100 MN/set. The calculated maximum stress in the rings will occur during the installation phase at room temperature, where the maximum radial elongation (∼25 mm) is required, and it reaches 1/5 of the composite presently estimated ultimate stress. The imposed elongation to reach that force and the lower Young's modulus of the composite compared with that of stainless steel will ease component tolerances and/or settlement effects in the final assembly. The paper describes the evolution in the design of the pre-compression system, from the conceptual phase when two circular cross-sections rings were considered to the present definitive one with three rectangular cross-section rings

  3. Electromagnetic torque on the toroidal plasma and the error-field induced torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2007-01-01

    The electromagnetic torque on the toroidal plasma is calculated assuming a linear plasma response to the applied perturbation, which may be the error field or the field created by the correction coils, or both. The result is compared with recently published expressions for the error field induced torque (Zheng et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 L9, Zheng and Kotschenreuther 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 165001), and the conclusions of these papers are revised. We resolve the problem of the torque resonance raised there. It is shown that the strong increase in the torque due to the static error field must occur at the resistive wall mode stability limit and not at the no-wall stability limit

  4. Equilibrium and stability of theta-pinch plasma in modified toroidal multiple mirror field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, S.; Saito, K.; Osanai, Y.; Itagaki, T.; Karakizawa, T.; Gesso, H.; Todoroki, J.; Kawakami, I.; Yoshimura, H.

    1976-01-01

    To confine a high-beta plasma a new toroidal magnetic configuration with closed lines of force has been proposed [1]. The configuration is an appropriate superposition of l = 0, l = +- 1, l = +- 2,sup(...), helical fields. In this experiment, it is generated by modifying the multiple mirror field by enclosing the discharge tube in a copper shell which has longitudinal gap. This configuration is preferred for the wall stabilizing effect to that with the separated helical windings. The characteristics of the equilibrium conditions are examined based on the near-axis approximation theory and compared with the experimental results. The stability of plasma in the configurations with l = 0 field and with superposition of l = 0, l = +- 2 fields is investigated in linear geometry. (author)

  5. Topological currents in neutron stars: kicks, precession, toroidal fields, and magnetic helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, James; Zhitnitsky, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    The effects of anomalies in high density QCD are striking. We consider a direct application of one of these effects, namely topological currents, on the physics of neutron stars. All the elements required for topological currents are present in neutron stars: degenerate matter, large magnetic fields, and parity violating processes. These conditions lead to the creation of vector currents capable of carrying momentum and inducing magnetic fields. We estimate the size of these currents for many representative states of dense matter in the neutron star and argue that they could be responsible for the large proper motion of neutron stars (kicks), the toroidal magnetic field and finite magnetic helicity needed for stability of the poloidal field, and the resolution of the conflict between type-II superconductivity and precession. Though these observational effects appear unrelated, they likely originate from the same physics — they are all P-odd phenomena that stem from a topological current generated by parity violation

  6. Stress analysis of the conceptual design configurations of constant tension D-shaped superconducting toroidal field coils for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernades, R.; Smith, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Conceptual design configurations of D-shaped toroidal field coils applicable to the TNS program are studied under the action of the toroidal field loading condition and the vertical field loading condition, but not the fault condition. Although the analysis is specific to an 8 Tesla design using a niobium titanium superconductor, the results can be extended to a coil with a different conductor material and subjected to a field of different magnitude provided the condition of linear elasticity is not violated. The analysis technique used is the finite element method, with three dimensional finite elements defined in the ANSYS computer code, and supplemented by closed form analytical solutions

  7. Evaluation of mechanical strength of the joints in JT-60 toroidal field coil conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Monoru; Sasajima, Hiroshi

    1980-04-01

    Toroidal field (TF) coils of JT-60 produce a toroidal field of 45 kG at a plasma axis, they have an inner bore of 3.90 m and a weight of about 80 metric tons per coil. Eighteen TF coils are located around a torus axis at regular intervals. TF coil conductors are mostly jointed by high frequency induction brazing, the rest jointed by welding. In deciding the details of the jointing procedures, the conductor size and the requested mechanical strength are mainly taken into consideration. Described are non-destructive inspection methods for the brazed joints, strength evaluation, and the inspection criteria. Ultrasonic testing method is found to be the most effective in evaluation of mechanical properties of the brazed joints especially in terms of fatigue strength. In section 1, specifications of the TF coils are given. In section 2, the ultrasonic inspection method and the detectability of this apparatus are described in detail, the defects of known size are compared with the indication values and display figures. The apparatus developed for JT-60 is operated automatically also recording the inspectionresults. In section 3, mechanical strength of the brazed joints with initial defects is discussed on the basis of Fracture Mechanics theory and results of the fatigue crack growth test. The inspection criteria in accordance with the descriptions of section 2 and 3 are given in section 4. (author)

  8. Effects of magnetic geometry, fluctuations, and electric fields on confinement in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Aceto, S.; Baylor, L.R.; Bigelow, T.S.; Bell, G.L.; Bell, J.D.; Carreras, B.A.; Colchin, R.J.; Crume, E.C.; Dominguez, N.; Dory, R.A.; Dunlap, J.L.; Dyer, G.R.; England, A.C.; Gandy, R.F.; Glowienka, J.C.; Hanson, G.R.; Harris, J.H.; Hiroe, S.; Horton, L.D.; Jernigan, T.C.; Ji, H.; Langley, R.A.; Lee, D.K.; Likin, K.M.; Lyon, J.F.; Ma, C.H.; Morimoto, S.; Murakami, M.; Okada, H.; Qualls, A.L.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Rome, J.A.; Sato, M.; Schwelberger, J.G.; Shats, M.G.; Simpkins, J.E.; Thomas, C.E.; Uckan, T.; Wade, M.R.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wing, W.R.; Yamada, H.; Zielinski, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) [Fusion Technol. 10, 179 (1986)] have been directed toward investigations of the basic physics mechanisms that control confinement in this device. Measurements of the density fluctuations throughout the plasma volume have provided indications for the existence of theoretically predicted dissipative trapped electron and resistive interchange instabilities. These identifications are supported by results of dynamic configuration scans of the magnetic fields during which the magnetic well volume, shear, and fraction of confined trapped particles are changed continuously. The influence of magnetic islands on the global confinement has been studied by deliberately applying error fields which strongly perturb the nested flux-surface geometry, and the effects of electric fields have been investigated by means of biased limiter experiments

  9. Pure tension superconducting toroidal-field coil system design studies for the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Purcell, J.R.; Demichele, D.W.; Turner, L.R.

    1975-11-01

    As part of the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) design studies, a toroidal field (TF) coil system has been designed. NbTi was chosen as the most suitable superconductor and 8T was regarded as a practical peak field level in this study. The 16-coil design was chosen as a reasonable compromise between 2 percent field ripple and 3 m access gap. To minimize the coil structure and the bending moments on the conductor, a pure tension coil shape is necessary. A correct approach for determining the pure tension coil profile in a bumpy TF coil system is given. Verification of the pure tension coil by a three-dimensional stress analysis is presented. For coil quench protection, a series-connected scheme is proposed

  10. World's largest DC flywheel generator for the toroidal field power supply of JAERI's JFT-2M Tokamak nuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yuji; Horita, Tsuyoshi; Kawase, Chiharu; Oyabu, Isao; Kishimoto, Takeshi.

    1996-01-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has delivered the world's largest DC generator for the toroidal field coil power supply of the JFT-2M Tokamak at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The unit rotates at 225 or 460 rpm, providing a maximum rated output of 2,700 V, 19,000 A and 51.3 MW. The toroidal field is a DC field, so use of a DC generator permits a simpler design consuming less floor space than an AC drive system. The generator was manufactured following extensive studies on commutation, mechanical strength and insulation. (author)

  11. Kinetic extensions of magnetohydrodynamic models for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1989-04-01

    A nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) has been developed to integrate a set of non-Hermitian integro-differential eigenmode equations due to energetic particles for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas in a general flux coordinate system with an arbitrary Jacobian. The NOVA-K code employs the Galerkin method involving Fourier expansions in the generalized poloidal angle θ and generalized toroidal angle /zeta/ directions, and cubic-B spline finite elements in the radial /Psi/ direction. Extensive comparisons with the existing variational ideal MHD codes show that the ideal MHD version of the NOVA-K code converges faster and gives more accurate results. The NOVA-K code is employed to study the effects of energetic particles on MHD-type modes: the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of ''fishbone'' internal kink modes; and the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are also presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n = 1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of the core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to have negligible effects on the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode, but the circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 60 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab

  12. Non-invasive diagnostics of ion beams in strong toroidal magnetic fields with standard CMOS cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Adem; Ates, Yakup; Niebuhr, Heiko; Ratzinger, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    A superconducting Figure-8 stellarator type magnetostatic Storage Ring (F8SR) is under investigation at the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) at Goethe University Frankfurt. Besides numerical simulations on an optimized design for beam transport and injection a scaled down (0.6T) experiment with two 30°toroidal magnets is set up for further investigations. A great challenge is the development of a non-destructive, magnetically insensitive and flexible detector for local investigations of an ion beam propagating through the toroidal magnetostatic field. This paper introduces a new way of beam path measurement by residual gas monitoring. It uses a single board camera connected to a standard single board computer by a camera serial interface all placed inside the vacuum chamber. First experiments with one camera were done and in a next step two under 90 degree arranged cameras were installed. With the help of the two cameras which are moveable along the beam pipe the theoretical predictions are experimentally verified successfully. Previous experimental results have been confirmed. The transport of H+ and H2+ ion beams with energies of 7 keV and at beam currents of about 1 mA is investigated successfully.

  13. The linear stability analysis of MHD models in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manickam, J.; Grimm, R.C.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A computational model to analyze the linear stability properties of general toroidal systems in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limits is presented. This model includes an explicit treatment of the asymptotic singular behaviour at rational surfaces. It is verified through applications to internal kink modes. (orig.)

  14. Steady-state resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1979-12-01

    If spatially-averaged values of the beta ratio can reach 5 to 10% in tokamaks, as now seems likely, resistive toroidal-field coils may be advantageous for use in reactors intended for fusion-neutron applications. The present investigation has parameterized the design of steady-state water-cooled copper coils of rectangular cross section in order to maximize figures of merit such as the ratio of fusion neutron wall loading to coil power dissipation. Four design variations distinguished by different ohmic-heating coil configurations have been examined. For a wall loading of 0.5 MW/m 2 , minimum TF-coil lifetime costs (including capital and electricity costs) are found to occur with coil masses in the range 2400 to 4400 tons, giving 200 to 250 MW of resistive dissipation, which is comparable with the total power drain of the other reactor subsystems

  15. Four giga joule flywheel motor-generator for JT-60 toroidal field coil power supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, T.; Kanke, M.; Shimada, R.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamashita, K.; Nakayama, T.

    1986-01-01

    A fusion test reactor often needs motor-generators as a power source in order to reduce disturbances to utility lines. The toroidal field coil power supply system of JT-60 also adopted a motor-generator for this purpose. The motor-generator started operation in April, 1985 at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute together with the whole system. The motor-generator has several special features both electrically and mechanically. One electrical feature is that it is used as a pulse source of large current and power for periodic short-time duty. A mechanical feature is that a large flywheel is directly coupled to the motor-generator shaft and operated intermittently and at high speed. Therefore detailed investigations were carried out concerning constitution, characteristics as well as the coordination with the system performance. This paper describes the outlines of the flywheel motor-generator and discusses several topics

  16. Elastic-plastic analysis of the toroidal field coil inner leg of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.

    1987-07-01

    Elastic-plastic analyses were made for the inner leg of the Compact Ignition Tokamak toroidal field (TF) coil, which is made of copper-Inconel composite material. From the result of the elastic-plastic analysis, the effective Young's moduli of the inner leg were determined by the analytical equations. These Young's moduli are useful for the three-dimensional, elastic, overall TF coil analysis. Comparison among the results of the baseline design (R = 1.324 m), the bucked pressless design, the 1.527-m major radius design, and the 1.6-m major radius design was also made, based on the elastic-plastic TF coil inner leg analyses

  17. Implementation of vertically asymmetric toroidal-field ripple for beam heating of tokamak reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Sheffield, G.V.; Towner, H.H.; Weissenburger, D.W.

    1976-10-01

    The neutral-beam energy required for adequate penetration of tokamak plasmas of high opacity can be reduced by a large factor if the beam is injected vertically into a region of large TF (toroidal-field) ripple. Energetic ions are trapped in local magnetic wells and drift vertically toward the midplane (z = 0). If the ripple is made very small on the opposite side of the midplane, drifting ions are detrapped and thermalized in the central plasma region. This paper discusses design considerations for establishing the required vertically asymmetric ripple. Examples are given of special TF-coil configurations, and of the use of auxiliary coil windings to create the prescribed ripple profiles

  18. Effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Towner, H.H.

    1980-02-01

    Analytic calculations of three important effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas are presented. In the first process, collisional ripple-trapping, beam ions become trapped in local magnetic wells near their banana tips due to pitch-angle scattering as they traverse the ripple on barely unripple-trapped orbits. In the second process, collisionless ripple-trapping, near-perpendicular untrapped ions are captured (again near a banana tip) due to their finite orbits, which carry them out into regions of higher ripple. In the third process, banana-drift diffusion, fast-ion banana orbits fail to close precisely, due to a ripple-induced variable lingering period near the banana tips. These three mechanisms lead to substantial radial transport of banana-trapped, neutral-beam-injected ions when the quantity α* identical with epsilon/sin theta/Nqdelta is of order unity or smaller

  19. Effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Towner, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Analytic calculations of three important effects of toroidal field ripple on suprathermal ions in tokamak plasmas are presented. In the first process, collisional ripple-trapping, ions become trapped in local magnetic wells near their banana tips owing to pitch-angle scattering as they traverse the ripple on barely unripple-trapped orbits. In the second process, collisionless ripple-trapping, ions are captured (again near a banana tip) owing to their finite orbits, which carry them out into regions of higher ripple. In the third process, banana-drift diffusion, fast-ion banana orbits fail to close precisely, due to a ripple-induced 'variable lingering period' near the banana tips. These three mechanisms lead to substantial radial transport of banana-trapped, neutral-beam-injected ions when the quantity α* is identical with epsilonsinthetaNqdelta is of order unity or smaller. (author)

  20. Analysis of the TFTR toroidal field power supply and its interactions with other loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    The rectifiers which supply the four major pulsed loads of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) share two flywheel generators. Thus there is a possibility of significant interaction between these rectifiers by way of the notched voltage waveforms which they create at the generator terminals. This paper presents an analysis of the build up of current in the toroidal field (TF) coil, which is the largest load. From this analysis, the notched waveform caused by the TF rectifier is derived and its effect on the other rectifiers is investigated. It is concluded that with the present conceptual design parameters, the external effects of the interactions are likely to be small. However, the internal control circuits of the rectifiers must be carefully designed to minimize those effects

  1. A code for calculating force and temperature of a bitter plate type toroidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, U.

    1989-01-01

    To assist the design effort of the TF coils for CIT, a set of programs was developed to calculate the transient spatial distribution of the current density, the temperature and the forces in the TF coil conductor region. The TF coils are of the Bitter (disk) type design and therefore have negligible variation of current density in the toroidal direction. During the TF pulse, voltages are induced which cause the field and current to diffuse in the minor radial direction. This penetration, combined with the increase of resistance due to the temperature rise determines the distribution of the current. After the current distribution has been determined, the in-plane (TF-TF) and the out-of-plane (TF-PF) forces in the conductor are computed. The predicted currents and temperatures have been independently corroborated using the SPARK code which has been modified for this type of problem. 6 figs

  2. A short introduction to the status and motivation for reversed field pinch and compact toroid research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, H.

    1987-09-01

    Potential commercial fusion power systems must be acceptable from a safety and environmental standpoint. They must also promise to be competitive with other sources of energy (i.e., fossil, fission, etc.) when considered from the standpoint of the cost of electricity (COE) and the unit direst cost (UDC) in ($/kWe). These costs are affected by a host of factors including recirculating power, plant availability, construction time, capital cost etc., and are, thus, influenced by technological complexity. In a attempt to meet these requirements, the emphasis of fusion research in the United States has been moving toward smaller, lower-cost systems. There is increased interest in higher beta tokamaks and stellarators, and in compact alternate concepts such as the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) and the Compact Toroids (CTs) which are, in part, the subject of this paper

  3. Upgrade of DIII-D toroidal magnetic field power supply controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrach, P.M.; Rouleau, A.R.; McNulty, R.D.; Patrick, D.B.; Walin, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    The toroidal magnetic field power supply for the DIII-D tokamak is of the 12 pulse line commutated variety. It consists of four individual modules and a main system control cabinet which are combined to deliver 127,000 A and 1000 V to the toroidal field coil. The modules are connected in a series-parallel configuration but can be run alone or two at a time as well. Normally on DIII-D experiments, the series-parallel configuration is required. The original design provided each individual module with its own voltage and current control loop and a main control loop. A problem with this design was that the individual control loops would cause a current sharing imbalance in the parallel modules if the calibrated loops drifted by the slightest amount. It was determined that individual control loops were not needed and a single phase lock firing circuit was employed in the system cabinet with fiber optic links to the modules for gate drive signals. Since all four modules have to be on line for DIII-D to operate, a problem in any of the five E ampersand I control loops resulted in the supply, and, therefore, the tokamak, being idled. By reducing the number of control loops to one, the sharing problem was eliminated, as well as 4 out of 5 potential control failures. The original supply employed relay logic for sequence control and fault monitoring. There were over 130 relays in each module plus an additional 100 in the system cabinet. The combination of the number of relays with the required interconnecting wiring, the age of the supply, the vibrations of the cabinets and the harsh environment, resulted in a continuously escalating number of phantom, and often intermittent, faults. The fault and sequence logic relays were replaced by a new Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). All existing interconnect wire was removed and replaced with multiconductor cables that connect directly from fault sensors and input devices to the PLC

  4. Ferritic insertion for reduction of toroidal magnetic field ripple on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, K.; Sakurai, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Tsuzuki, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Masaki, K.; Naito, O.; Kurihara, K.; Suzuki, T.; Koide, Y.; Fujita, T.; Miura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Ferritic steel tiles (FSTs) have been installed to improve the energetic ion confinement by reducing a toroidal magnetic field ripple. Aiming at cost-effective installation, orbit-following calculations of energetic ions were carried out for a design of the installation of ferritic steel on the JT-60U by using the fully three dimensional magnetic field orbit-following Monte-Carlo (F3D OFMC) code, which had been developed for ferritic insert experiments on the JFT-2M and can treat the complex magnetic field structure produced by ferritic inserts. The installed FSTs add a non-linear magnetic field on magnetic sensors for plasma control and an equilibrium calculation. The code for real-time control has been modified to take into account the magnetic field by the FSTs. The plasma operation was successfully resumed after usual conditioning processes and real-time plasma control was successfully carried out. The heat load measurement indicates the improved confinement of energetic ions. These results are important for practical application of the ferritic steel, which is a leading candidate of a structural material on a DEMO reactor

  5. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 21, Materials and processes selection. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document identifies the candidate materials and manufacturing processes selected for development of the TPX Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet. Supporting rationale and selection criteria are provided for justification and the materials properties database report is included for completeness. Specific properties for each material selection are included in this document

  6. Nonlinear ECRH and ECCD modeling in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamendje, R.; Kernbichler, W.; Heyn, M.F.; Kasilov, S.V.; Poli, E.

    2003-01-01

    A Monte Carlo method of evaluation of the electron distribution function which takes into account realistic orbits of electrons during their nonlinear cyclotron interaction with the wave beam has been proposed. The focus there was on a proper description of particle interaction with a wave beam while the geometry of the main magnetic field outside the beam was the simplest possible (slab model). In the actual work, a more realistic tokamak geometry has been implemented in the model. In addition, an expression for the parallel current density through Green's function has been used. This allows to reduce statistical errors which result from the fact that the current generated by particles with positive v parallel >0 is almost compensated by the current resulting from particles with v parallel <0 if the complete distribution function is taken into account in the expression for the current. The code ECNL which is a Monte Carlo kinetic equation solver based on this model, has been coupled with the beam tracing code TORBEAM. The results of nonlinear modeling of ECCD in a tokamak with ASDEX Upgrade parameters with help of this combination of codes are compared below to the results of linear modeling performed with TORBEAM alone. In addition, implications for stellarators are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Construction of force-free fields which have toroidal surfaces about a given surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouligand, G.

    1983-05-01

    A study of two-fields (B vector, rotB vector) of conservative flux which admits a family of toroidal surfaces of parameter phi on a domain limited by a given surface S, suggests their construction by a Cauchy-Arzela method of step by step. Taking into account the Newcomb condition this method is consistent with force-free magnetic fields and with helical equilibria with scalar pressure. The method supposes that B vector is of class C 1 . This construction makes use of the remarkable property of the field B vector to be the surface gradient of a generating multivalued function Q on a closed surface. Consequently, the initial surface will be given with its normal metric coefficient K; that is to say, B vector admits a family F of homotopic surfaces on a infinitesimal domain about S, an element of F. From this, the periodic part of Q is a solution of a Beltrami equation for the flux conservation of which numerical resolution is envisaged. The study of these fields is made in a biorthogonal system of coordinates. The coeffficients of the two fundamental metric forms of magnetic surfaces vary with phi and are interrelated by a sixth order differential system of equations which gives their variation [fr

  8. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn 3 conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended

  9. Current, temperature and confinement time scaling in toroidal reversed-field pinch experiments ZT-I and ZT-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Di Marco, J.N.; Haberstich, A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Howell, R.B.; Karr, H.J.; Schofield, A.E.

    1977-01-01

    The scaling properties of a toroidal reversed-field Z pinch have been investigated over a limited range by comparing two experiments having conducting walls and discharge-tube minor diameters which differ by a factor of approximately 1.5. Both the confinement time of the plasma column and the electron temperature were found to increase about a factor of two with the increased minor diameter. Both the poloidal field diffusion and the decay of the toroidal reversed field were significantly reduced with the larger tube diameter. These results support the hypothesis that the loss of stability later in the discharge is caused by diffusion-induced deterioration of initially favourable plasma-field profiles to MHD unstable ones. This conclusion has been verified by stability analysis of the magnetic field profiles. Fusion reactor calculations show that small reactors are conceptually possible assuming good containment can be achieved for current densities approximately >20MAm -2 . (author)

  10. Initial Results of the SSPX Transient Internal Probe System for Measuring Toroidal Field Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Jarboe, T. R.; Mattick, A. T.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Cellamare, V.

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is using a field profile diagnostic called the Transient Internal Probe (TIP). TIP consists of a verdet-glass bullet that is used to measure the magnetic field by Faraday rotation. This probe is shot through the spheromak by a light gas gun at speeds near 2 km/s. An argon laser is aligned along the path of the probe. The light passes through the probe and is retro-reflected to an ellipsometer that measures the change in polarization angle. The measurement is spatially resolved down to the probes’ 1 cm length to within 15 Gauss. Initial testing results are given. This and future data will be used to determine the field profile for equilibrium reconstruction. TIP can also be used in conjunction with wall probes to map out toroidal mode amplitudes and phases internally. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  11. Dynamic ELM and divertor control using resonant toroidal multi-mode magnetic fields in DIII-D and EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youwen

    2017-10-01

    A rotating n = 2 Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) field combined with a stationary n = 3 RMP field has validated predictions that access to ELM suppression can be improved, while divertor heat and particle flux can also be dynamically controlled in DIII-D. Recent observations in the EAST tokamak indicate that edge magnetic topology changes, due to nonlinear plasma response to magnetic perturbations, play a critical role in accessing ELM suppression. MARS-F code MHD simulations, which include the plasma response to the RMP, indicate the nonlinear transition to ELM suppression is optimized by configuring the RMP coils to drive maximal edge stochasticity. Consequently, mixed toroidal multi-mode RMP fields, which produce more densely packed islands over a range of additional rational surfaces, improve access to ELM suppression, and further spread heat loading on the divertor. Beneficial effects of this multi-harmonic spectrum on ELM suppression have been validated in DIII-D. Here, the threshold current required for ELM suppression with a mixed n spectrum, where part of the n = 3 RMP field is replaced by an n = 2 field, is smaller than the case with pure n = 3 field. An important further benefit of this multi-mode approach is that significant changes of 3D particle flux footprint profiles on the divertor are found in the experiment during the application of a rotating n = 2 RMP field superimposed on a static n = 3 RMP field. This result was predicted by modeling studies of the edge magnetic field structure using the TOP2D code which takes into account plasma response from MARS-F code. These results expand physics understanding and potential effectiveness of the technique for reliably controlling ELMs and divertor power/particle loading distributions in future burning plasma devices such as ITER. Work supported by USDOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and NNSF of China under 11475224.

  12. Compact toroid challenge experiment with the increasing in the energy input into plasma and the level of trapped magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romadanov, I.V.; Ryzhkov, S.V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Compact torus formation method with high level of magnetic flux is proposed. • A compact torus is produced in a theta-pinch-coil with pulse mode of operation. • Key feature is a pulse of current in an axial direction. • We report a level of linked magnetic flux is higher than theta-pinch results. - Abstract: The present work reports on compact toroid hydrogen plasma creation by means of a specially designed discharge system and results of magnetic fields introduction. Experiments in the compact toroid challenge (CTC) device at P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN) have been conducted since 2005. The CTC device differs from the conventional theta-pinch formation in the use of an axial current for enhanced efficiency. We have used a novel technique to maximize the flux linked to the plasma. The purpose of this method is to increase the energy input into the plasma and the level of trapped magnetic flux using an additional toroidal magnetic field. A study of compact torus formation with axial and toroidal currents was done and a new method is proposed and implemented.

  13. Hamilton-Jacobi theory for continuation of magnetic field across a toroidal surface supporting a plasma pressure discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGann, M.; Hudson, S.R.; Dewar, R.L.; Nessi, G. von

    2010-01-01

    The vanishing of the divergence of the total stress tensor (magnetic plus kinetic) in a neighborhood of an equilibrium plasma containing a toroidal surface of discontinuity gives boundary and jump conditions that strongly constrain allowable continuations of the magnetic field across the surface. The boundary conditions allow the magnetic fields on either side of the discontinuity surface to be described by surface magnetic potentials, reducing the continuation problem to that of solving a Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The characteristics of this equation obey Hamiltonian equations of motion, and a necessary condition for the existence of a continued field across a general toroidal surface is that there exist invariant tori in the phase space of this Hamiltonian system. It is argued from the Birkhoff theorem that existence of such an invariant torus is also, in general, sufficient for continuation to be possible. An important corollary is that the rotational transform of the continued field on a surface of discontinuity must, generically, be irrational.

  14. Modelling of the toroidal asymmetry of poloidal halo currents in conducting structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Bialek, J.M.; Part, W.

    1998-01-01

    During plasma disruptions, substantial toroidal and poloidal eddy currents are generated in the vacuum vessel and other plasma facing conducting structures. Eddy currents that conduct charge through paths which close through the plasma periphery are called halo currents, and these can be of substantial magnitude. Of particular concern for tokamak design and operation is the observed toroidal asymmetry of the halo current distribution: such an asymmetric distribution leads to problematic non-uniform forces on the conducting structures. The premise is adopted that the source of toroidal asymmetry is the plasma deformation resulting from the non-linear external kink instability that develops during the current quench phase of a disruption. A simple model is presented of the kinked plasma that allows an analytic calculation of the dependence of the toroidal peaking factor (TPF) on the ratio of the halo current to the total toroidal plasma current, I h /I p . Expressions for the TPF as a function of I h /I p are derived for m/n=2/1 and m/n=1/1 helical instabilities. The expressions depend on a single parameter, which measures the amplitude of the saturated state of the kink instability. A comparison with disruption data from experiments shows good agreement. Numerical experiments that simulate non-linear external kinks provide guidance on the values expected for the saturated amplitude. It is proposed that a simple plasma halo model is adequate for assessing the engineering impact of asymmetric halo currents, since the force distribution on the conducting structures depends mainly on the 'resistive distribution' of the eddy currents. A brief description is given of an electromagnetics code that calculates the time development of eddy currents in conducting structures, and the code is applied to two halo current disruption scenarios. These are used to emphasize the importance of having an accurate eddy current calculation to correctly estimate the engineering impact of

  15. Phase coexistence and electric-field control of toroidal order in oxide superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, A R; Clarkson, J D; Hong, Z; Liu, H; Yadav, A K; Nelson, C T; Hsu, S-L; McCarter, M R; Park, K-D; Kravtsov, V; Farhan, A; Dong, Y; Cai, Z; Zhou, H; Aguado-Puente, P; García-Fernández, P; Íñiguez, J; Junquera, J; Scholl, A; Raschke, M B; Chen, L-Q; Fong, D D; Ramesh, R; Martin, L W

    2017-10-01

    Systems that exhibit phase competition, order parameter coexistence, and emergent order parameter topologies constitute a major part of modern condensed-matter physics. Here, by applying a range of characterization techniques, and simulations, we observe that in PbTiO 3 /SrTiO 3 superlattices all of these effects can be found. By exploring superlattice period-, temperature- and field-dependent evolution of these structures, we observe several new features. First, it is possible to engineer phase coexistence mediated by a first-order phase transition between an emergent, low-temperature vortex phase with electric toroidal order and a high-temperature ferroelectric a 1 /a 2 phase. At room temperature, the coexisting vortex and ferroelectric phases form a mesoscale, fibre-textured hierarchical superstructure. The vortex phase possesses an axial polarization, set by the net polarization of the surrounding ferroelectric domains, such that it possesses a multi-order-parameter state and belongs to a class of gyrotropic electrotoroidal compounds. Finally, application of electric fields to this mixed-phase system permits interconversion between the vortex and the ferroelectric phases concomitant with order-of-magnitude changes in piezoelectric and nonlinear optical responses. Our findings suggest new cross-coupled functionalities.

  16. Phase coexistence and electric-field control of toroidal order in oxide superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damodaran, A. R.; Clarkson, J. D.; Hong, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Systems that exhibit phase competition, order parameter coexistence, and emergent order parameter topologies constitute a major part of modern condensed-matter physics. Here, by applying a range of characterization techniques, and simulations, we observe that in PbTiO 3 /SrTiO 3 superlattices all of these effects can be found. By exploring superlattice period-, temperature- and field-dependent evolution of these structures, we observe several new features. First, it is possible to engineer phase coexistence mediated by a first-order phase transition between an emergent, low-temperature vortex phase with electric toroidal order and a high-temperature ferroelectric a 1 /a 2 phase. At room temperature, the coexisting vortex and ferroelectric phases form a mesoscale, fibre-textured hierarchical superstructure. The vortex phase possesses an axial polarization, set by the net polarization of the surrounding ferroelectric domains, such that it possesses a multi-order-parameter state and belongs to a class of gyrotropic electrotoroidal compounds. Finally, application of electric fields to this mixed-phase system permits interconversion between the vortex and the ferroelectric phases concomitant with order-of-magnitude changes in piezoelectric and nonlinear optical responses. Here, our findings suggest new cross-coupled functionalities.

  17. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  18. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, Christoph M

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  19. Characterization of high temperature superconductor cables for magnet toroidal field coils of the DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christoph M.

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is a key technology to satisfy the basic demand for electric energy sustainably. The official EUROfusion schedule foresees a first industrial DEMOnstration Fusion Power Plant for 2050. In this work several high temperature superconductor sub-size cables are investigated for their applicability in large scale DEMO toroidal field coils. Main focus lies on the electromechanical stability under the influence of high Lorentz forces at peak magnetic fields of up to 12 T.

  20. Toroidal field magnets for ZEPHYR tape and bitter concepts conductor and insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breit, E.; Brossmann, U.; Gruber, J.E.; Haubenberger, W.D.; Jandl, O.; Kamm, S.; Mast, F.; Mukherjee, S.; Soell, M.; Springmann, E.

    1981-08-01

    The general design aspects of the Toroidal Field Magnet System for a compact ignition experiment ZEPHYR are discussed. The 17 Tesla field calls for a steel reinforcement of the copper conductor. Two different types of magnet systems, a tape magnet and a Bitter magnet, are possible. In both systems the coils will be arranged in a steel casing. Force transfer is achieved by steel wedges between the coil casings. The mechanical stresses of the magnet structure were calculated by employing finite element methods. The pulse-operated magnet system will be force-cooled by liquid nitrogen to an initial starting temperature of 80 K before each single field pulse is applied. The problems of spacer cooling as well as the finally chosen channel cooling are discussed. The steel-reinforced copper conductor was developed in collaboration with industry, resulting in a high strength (700 N/mm 2 ) copper/austenite compound. The insulation system consisting of a glass/kapton wrapping of the conductors and of vacuum impregnation with an epoxy resin has to withstand high mechanical loads and a neutron/gamma irradiation in the order of 5 x 10 9 rad. The static and cyclic fatigue strength of different insulation systems at ambient and liquid nitrogen temperature has been investigated in mechanical tests of tension, compression and shear samples. The radiation resistance of the insulation resin was tested with gamma and neutron/gamma irradiation to doses of 10 10 rad. The aspects of field diffusion in the tape magnet are given in the appendix. (orig.)

  1. ZZ di-boson measurements with the ATLAS detector at the LHC and study of the toroidal magnetic field sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protopapadaki, Eftychia-Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Elementary particles and their interactions are described by the Standard Model. Even successful, there are still some unanswered questions which need to be addressed. In this work, the ZZ Standard Model process was studied in the leptonic decay channel. The data used were collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20 fb -1 . The center of mass energy was 8 TeV. All the analysis elements, such as the signal selection and efficiencies, the background estimation, the measurement uncertainties and the statistical method employed for the cross section extraction, are discussed in this document. The total ZZ on-shell cross section is measured to be 6.98±0.41(stat.)±0.36(syst.)±0.20(lumi) pb. A measurement of the on-shell 'fiducial' cross section, defined in a volume close to the reconstructed one, was also performed for each decay channel. Both total and fiducial measurements are in agreement, within uncertainties, with the SM predictions. The neutral boson-self interactions are forbidden in the SM. Therefore, if triple gauge boson couplings are observed, they will indirectly point to the existence of new physics. Observables sensitive to the presence of anomalous triple gauge couplings, along with the optimal binning were investigated. The traverse momentum of the most energetic boson was among the most sensitive observables, and it was thus used in order to extract 95% CL limits on the anomalous coupling parameters. All observed limits are found to be compatible with the SM expectations. In the framework of this thesis a performance study was conducted. In order to increase particles mass measurement precision, the accurate knowledge of the toroidal magnetic field inside the detector is essential. The sensors used for the production of the ATLAS toroidal magnetic field map were studied, and it was found that more than 97% of these sensors are reliable. The existing magnetic field map was probed, and even

  2. Basic analysis of weldability and machinability of structural materials for ITER Toroidal Field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Masanori [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan)], E-mail: masanori_onozuka@mnes-us.com; Shimizu, Katsusuke; Urata, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Masahiro; Kadowaki, Hirokazu; Okamoto, Mamoru [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Konan 2-16-5, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8215 (Japan); Nakajima, Hideo; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Mukouyama 801-1, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    A manufacturing study has been conducted to examine the welding and machining capabilities for strengthened austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen content, JJ1 and ST-SS316LN, to be employed for ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil structural components. It was found that the applicable EB welding condition for JJ1 was limited to up to 40 mm thick plates. A wider range of welding conditions was found in the vertical upward direction. Based on those results, a verification test up to 900 mm in length was successfully conducted. With respect to TIG welding, an average deposition rate of 26 g/min (i.e. the filler wire supplying speed of 3000 mm/min) was achieved. In addition to the welding tests, a series of machining tests has been conducted to examine the machinability of JJ1 and ST-SS316LN. Various types of machining tools were examined. In practical application, the cutting speed should be low to extend the tool life. At a cutting speed of 40 m/min, a tool life of more than 2 h (at a traveling distance of up to 9 m) was attained. The degree of cutter wear after 30 min of operation, at a cutting speed of 40 m/min, was found to be around 0.1 mm, which is within an acceptable range.

  3. Development of optimum manufacturing technologies of radial plates for the ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, H.; Hamada, K.; Okuno, K.; Abe, K.; Shimizu, T.; Kakui, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Maruyama, N.; Takayanagi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency is studying rational manufacturing method and developing the optimum manufacturing technologies of the radial plates used in the toroidal field coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in collaboration with the Japanese industries. Three sector form pieces were cut by plasma cutting machine from a hot rolled plate without any difficulties and one of them was machined to a 1.32-m long curved segment of the radial plate having the same size as the actual one. However, unacceptable large deformation about 5 mm flatness, which was not observed in 1-m long straight radial plate, was found after intermediate machining. Since it would be caused by groove direction against the hot rolled direction and/or curved shape of grooves, two trial manufactures of 0.4-m long straight radial plates have been performed to clarify the cause of the large deformation. Detailed investigation showed that the large deformation could be avoided if the groove direction would have been parallel to a rolling direction of the plate. Welding trials by using fiber laser technique was also performed and penetration of 15 mm could be obtained in a welding speed of 0.1 m/min at 5 kW laser power. An optimum manufacturing method has been proposed based on the development of manufacturing technologies

  4. Mechanical testing and development of the helical field coil joint for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Bryan, W.E.; Goranson, P.L.; Warwick, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The helical field (HF) coil set for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is an M = 12, l = 2, constant-ratio torsatron winding consisting of 2 coils, each with 14 turns of heavy copper conductor. The coils are divided into 24 identical segments to facilitate fabrication and minimize the assembly schedule. The segments are connected across through-bolted lap joints that must carry up to 124,000 A per turn for 5 s or 62,500 A steady-state. In addition, the joints must carry the high magnetic and thermal loads induced in the conductor and still fit within the basic 140- by 30-mm copper envelope. Extensive testing and development were undertaken to verify and refine the basic joint design. Tests included assembly force and clamping force for various types of misalignment; joint resistance as a function of clamping force; clamp bolt relaxation due to thermal cycling; fatigue testing of full-size, multiturn joint prototypes; and low-cycle fatigue and tensile tests of annealed CDA102 copper. The required performance parameters and actual test results, as well as the final joint configuration, are presented. 2 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Irradiation and testing of compact ignition tokamak toroidal field coil insulation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, G.K.; Sherick, M.J.; Sparks, D.C.

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the results of an irradiation and testing program performed on behalf of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. in support of the Compact Ignition Tokamak Research and Development program. The purpose of the irradiation and testing program was to determine the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the mechanical and electrical properties of candidate toroidal field coil insulation materials. Insulation samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in a large I-hole. The insulation samples were irradiated within a lead shield to reduce exposure to gamma radiation to better approximate the desired ration of neutron to gamma exposure. Two different exposure levels were specified for the insulation samples. To accomplish this, the samples were encapsulated in two separate aluminum capsules; the capsules positioned at the ATR core mid-plane and at the top of the fueled region to take advantage of the axial cosine distribution of the neutron and gamma flux; and by varying the length of irradiation time of the two capsules. Disassembly of the irradiated capsules and testing of the insulation samples were performed at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cell Facilities. Testing of the samples included shear compression static, shear compression fatigue, flexure static, and electrical resistance measurements

  6. Current drive by neutral beams, rotating magnetic fields and helicity injection in compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo code is used to study neutral beam current drive in Spheromaks. The exact particle trajectories are followed in the self-consistent equilibria calculated including the beam current. Reducing Z(eff) does not increase the current drive efficiency because the reduction of the stopping cross section is compensated by an increase in the electron canceling current. Significant changes in the safety factor profile can be produced with relatively low beam currents. Minimum dissipation states of a flux core spheromak sustained by helicity injection are presented. Helicity balance is used as a constraint and the resistivity is considered to be non-uniform. Two types of relaxed states are found; one has a central core of open flux surrounded by a toroidal region of closed flux surfaces and the other has the open flux wrapped around the closed flux surfaces. Non-uniform resistivity effects can be very important due to the changes they produce in the safety factor profile. A hybrid, fluid electrons particle ions, code is employed to study ion dynamics in FRCs sustained by rotating magnetic fields. (author)

  7. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the US TIBER concept. The nuclear heating generated during operation is removed from the windings by helium flowing through the conductor. The heat in the coil case is removed through a separate cooling circuit operating at approximately 20 K. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete coil cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Fabrication of Nb3Sn cables for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isono, Takaaki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Hideo; Ishibashi, Tatsuji; Sato, Go; Chida, Kenji; Suzuki, Rikio; Tanji, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER toroidal field (TF) coils will be operated at 68 kA and 11.8 T. The cable is composed of 1,422 strands with a diameter of 0.82 mm. There were two options for initial procurement. For option 2, the twist pitches at lower stages are longer than in option 1. Trials were performed to assess the feasibility of these options. In the trials for option 1, the nominal outer diameter of sub-cables and reduction schedule of final cables were evaluated and finalized. In the trials for option 2, problems were encountered at the third stage cabling. These problems were resolved through increasing the die size in that stage and improving the tension balance of the second-stage cables to reduce friction between the die and the cable, and also through avoiding loose twisting at both edges of the third cables. Option 2 was finally selected in 2009 based on superconducting performance enhancement of the cable. After the qualification of the fabrication procedure using fabrication of a 760-m dummy cable and a 415-m superconducting cable, mass production of the cables started in March 2010. (author)

  9. Status of European manufacture of Toroidal Field conductor and strand for JT-60SA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zani, Louis, E-mail: louis.zani@jt60sa.org [Fusion for Energy, D-85748 Garching (Germany); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Barabaschi, Pietro; Di Pietro, Enrico [Fusion for Energy, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    In the framework of the JT-60SA project, part of the Broader Approach (BA) agreement, EURATOM provides to Japan, the Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system, consisting of 18 superconducting coils. The procurement of the conductor for the TF coils is managed by Fusion for Energy, acting as EU representative in the BA agreement. The TF conductor procurement is split into two contracts, one dedicated to the production of Niobium Titanium (NbTi) and Cu strand and the other to TF conductor production through strand cabling and cable jacketing operations. The TF conductor is a rectangular-shaped cable-in-conduit conductor formed by 486 (0.81 mm diameter) strands (2/3 NbTi–1/3 Cu) wrapped in a stainless steel foil and embedded into a stainless steel jacket. The 18 TF coils require (including spares) 115 ‘Unit Lengths’ (UL) of such conductor, each 240 m long for a total of about 28 km. Correspondingly about 10,000 km for NbTi and 5000 km for Cu strand are produced. The Japanese company Furukawa Electric Co. (FEC) is in charge of TF strand manufacture while the Italian company Italian Consortium for Applied Superconductivity (ICAS) is in charge of cabling and jacketing of TF conductor ULs. In the paper, we provide information on the production stages presently achieved in TF strand and conductor contracts.

  10. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1; Diseno mecanico del encapsulado de las bobinas de campo toroidal del Tokamak TPM1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ucaldino@outlook.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  11. Cryogenic aspects of a demountable toroidal field magnet system for tokamak type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.Y.; Powell, J.; Lehner, J.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for superconducting Toroidal Field (TF) magnet construction is presented. It is termed the ''Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress'' (DEALS) magnet system. In contrast to continuous wound conventional superconducting coils, each magnet coil is made from several straight coil segments to form a polygon which can be joined and disjoined to improve reactor maintenance accessibility or to replace failed coil segments if necessary. A design example is presented of a DEALS magnet system for a UWMAK II size reactor. The overall magnet system is described, followed by a detailed analysis of the major heat loads in order to assess the refrigeration requirements for the concept. Despite the increased heat loads caused by high current power leads (200,000 amps) and the coil warm reinforcement support system, the analysis shows that at most, only about one percent (approximately 20 Mw) of the plant electrical output (approximately 2,000 Mw) is needed to operate the magnet cryogenic system. The advantages and the drawbacks of the DEALS magnet system are also discussed. The advantages include: capability to replace failed coils, increased accessibility to the blanket shield assembly, reduced reliability requirements for the magnet, much lower stress in conductor, easier application of improved high field brittle superconductors like Nb 3 Sn, improved magnet safety features, etc. The drawbacks are the increased refrigeration requirements and the necessity of a movable coil support system. A comparison with a conventional magnet system is made. It is concluded that the benefits of the DEALS approach far outweigh its penalties, and that the DEALS concept is the most practical, economical way to construct TF magnet systems for Tokamak reactors

  12. Strength-limited magnetic field intensity of toroidal magnet systems fabricated or the base of layer-by-layer shrouded solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinnko, Yu.A.

    1982-01-01

    The possibilities, as to the ultimate magnetic field strength, of tokamak magnet systems made on the base of layer-by-laeyer shrouded coils are considered numerically. The toroidal magnet system is considered which consists of N skewe, layer-by-layer shrouded, equistrong coils in the ideal torus approximation. The dependences of the ragnetic field strength on the internal- and external torus radii, pulse duration and aspect ratio for copper coils shrouded with fiberglass are calculated as an example. The analysis of the obtained results shows that using of the layer-by-layer shrouding scheme for toroidal solenoid coils leads to a considerable growth of the ultimate magnetic field strengths in a wide duration range. For example, the limiting field strength along the toroidal solenoid axis of the considered type inside the ''FT'' installation toroidal solenoid at equivalent field pulse duration of approximately 0.3 s reaches H 0 =1.3zx10 7 A/m

  13. PC-based package for interactive assessment of MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the assessment of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and Poloidal Field Coil (PFC) arrangement for toroidal axisymmetric geometry, the Grad-Shafranov equation must be solved, either analytically or numerically. Existing numerical tools have been developed primarily for mainframe usage and can prove cumbersome for screening assessments and parametric evaluations. The objective of this thesis was to develop a personal computer (PC)-based calculational tool for assessing MHD/PFC problems in a highly interactive mode, well suited for scoping studies. The approach adopted involves a two-step process: first the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then the PFC arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium, is determined in an interactive design environment. The PC-based system developed consists of two programs: (1) PCEQ, which solve the MHD equilibrium problem and (2) PFDE-SIGN, which is employed to arrive at a PFC arrangement. PCEQ provides an output file including, but not limited to, the following: poloidal beta, total beta, safety factors, q, on axis and on edge. PCEQ plots the following contours and/or profiles: flux, pressure and toroidal current density, safety factor, and ratio of plasma toroidal field to vacuum field

  14. Distortion of magnetic field lines caused by radial displacements of ITER toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoskov, V.M., E-mail: sytch@niiefa.spb.su [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gribov, Y.V. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lamzin, E.A.; Sytchevsky, S.E. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    An assessment of distortions of ideal (circle) field lines caused by random radial displacements of the TF coils by |∆R| ≤ 5 mm has been performed from the statistical analysis assuming a uniform probability density function for displacements.

  15. Compact toroid formation, compression, and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Baca, G.P.; Beason, J.D.; Bell, D.E.; Dearborn, M.E.; Dietz, D.; Douglas, M.R.; Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Hackett, K.E.; Holmes, J.H.; Hussey, T.W.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Lehr, F.M.; Marklin, G.J.; Mullins, B.W.; Price, D.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruden, E.L.; Sovinec, C.R.; Turchi, P.J.; Bird, G.; Coffey, S.K.; Seiler, S.W.; Chen, Y.G.; Gale, D.; Graham, J.D.; Scott, M.; Sommars, W.

    1993-01-01

    Research on forming, compressing, and accelerating milligram-range compact toroids using a meter diameter, two-stage, puffed gas, magnetic field embedded coaxial plasma gun is described. The compact toroids that are studied are similar to spheromaks, but they are threaded by an inner conductor. This research effort, named MARAUDER (Magnetically Accelerated Ring to Achieve Ultra-high Directed Energy and Radiation), is not a magnetic confinement fusion program like most spheromak efforts. Rather, the ultimate goal of the present program is to compress toroids to high mass density and magnetic field intensity, and to accelerate the toroids to high speed. There are a variety of applications for compressed, accelerated toroids including fast opening switches, x-radiation production, radio frequency (rf) compression, as well as charge-neutral ion beam and inertial confinement fusion studies. Experiments performed to date to form and accelerate toroids have been diagnosed with magnetic probe arrays, laser interferometry, time and space resolved optical spectroscopy, and fast photography. Parts of the experiment have been designed by, and experimental results are interpreted with, the help of two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. When not driven by a second discharge, the toroids relax to a Woltjer--Taylor equilibrium state that compares favorably to the results of 2-D equilibrium calculations and to 2-D time-dependent MHD simulations. Current, voltage, and magnetic probe data from toroids that are driven by an acceleration discharge are compared to 2-D MHD and to circuit solver/slug model predictions. Results suggest that compact toroids are formed in 7--15 μsec, and can be accelerated intact with material species the same as injected gas species and entrained mass ≥1/2 the injected mass

  16. Compact toroid injection fueling in a large field-reversed configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Gota, H.; Sekiguchi, J.; Edo, T.; Garate, E.; Takahashi, Ts.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2017-07-01

    A repetitively driven compact toroid (CT) injector has been developed for the large field-reversed configuration (FRC) facility of the C-2/C-2U, primarily for particle refueling. A CT is formed and injected by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) exclusively developed for the C-2/C-2U FRC. To refuel the particles of long-lived FRCs, multiple CT injections are required. Thus, a multi-stage discharge circuit was developed for a multi-pulsed CT injection. The drive frequency of this system can be adjusted up to 1 kHz and the number of CT shots per injector is two; the system can be further upgraded for a larger number of injection pulses. The developed MCPG can achieve a supersonic ejection velocity in the range of ~100 km s-1. The key plasma parameters of electron density, electron temperature and the number of particles are ~5  ×  1021 m-3, ~30 eV and 0.5-1.0  ×  1019, respectively. In this project, single- and double-pulsed counter CT injection fueling were conducted on the C-2/C-2U facility by two CT injectors. The CT injectors were mounted 1 m apart in the vicinity of the mid-plane. To avoid disruptive perturbation on the FRC, the CT injectors were operated at the lower limit of the particle inventory. The experiments demonstrated successful refueling with a significant density build-up of 20-30% of the FRC particle inventory per single CT injection without any deleterious effects on the C-2/C-2U FRC.

  17. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 0 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated, and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs

  18. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rista, P. E. C.; Shull, J.; Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen & helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper.

  19. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C Rista, P E; Shull, J; Sargent, S

    2015-01-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen and helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper. (paper)

  20. Energy measurement of fast ions trapped in the toroidal field ripple of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Hutter, T.; Martin, G.; Pecquet, A.L.; Saoutic, B.

    1993-09-01

    During additional heating in Tore Supra (ICRF or NBI) fast ion losses due to the toroidal field ripple were clearly measured by a set of graphite probes. This diagnostic collects the flow of fast ions entering a vertical port and usually shows a maximum flux for ions originating from the vicinity of surface δ * = 0. During the monster sawteeth regime, achieved with ICRF, a remarkable phenomenon was observed: the ejection of fast ions, not correlated with any measured MHD activity. The radial distribution of these ions is quite different from that usually observed exhibiting a peak located in the central section of the plasma. In order to measure the energy distribution of these ions, from 80 keV (energy of the neutral beam injected in Tore Supra) up to 1 MeV (expected during ICRF), a new diagnostic is under construction. The principle of the diagnostic is to discriminate the ions in energy using their Larmor radius (p = 1.3 cm for 100 keV → p = 3.6 cm for 700 keV, B = 4T). The detector is made of a hollow graphite cylinder with a small entrance slot, located in a vertical port on the ion drift side. An array of six metallic collectors placed inside the graphite cylinder intercepts the ions. The current on each collector was estimated at 10 → 100 nA, during ICRF heating. The energy resolution of this diagnostic is expected to be about 20 keV for the lowest energy range and 100 keV for the highest. This type of ruggedized detector might be extrapolated for the measurements of alpha particle losses in future DT experiments. It should also be suitable for the studies of stochastic ripple diffusion. (authors). 3 refs., 9 figs

  1. Divertor experiments in a toroidal plasma, with E x B drift due to an applied radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E.J.

    1979-09-01

    It is proposed that the E x B drift arising from an externally applied electric field could be used in a tokamak or other toroidal magnetic plasma confinement device to remove plasma and impurities from the region near the wall and reduce the amount of plasma striking the wall. This could either augment or replace a conventional magnetic field divertor. Among the possible advantages of this scheme are easy external control over the rate of removal of plasma, more rapid removal than the naturally occurring rate in a magnetic divertor, and simplification of construction if the magnetic divertor is eliminated. Results of several related experiments performed in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole are presented

  2. Thermal convection in a toroidal duct of a liquid metal blanket. Part I. Effect of poloidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 2D convection flow develops with internal heating and strong axial magnetic field. • Poloidal magnetic field suppresses turbulence at high Hartmann number. • Flow structure is dominated by large-scale counter-rotation vortices. • Effective heat transfer is maintained by surviving convection structures. - Abstract: We explore the effect of poloidal magnetic field on the thermal convection flow in a toroidal duct of a generic liquid metal blanket. Non-uniform strong heating (the Grashof number up to 10 11 ) arising from the interaction of high-speed neutrons with the liquid breeder, and strong magnetic field (the Hartmann number up to 10 4 ) corresponding to the realistic reactor conditions are considered. The study continues our earlier work , where the problem was solved for a purely toroidal magnetic field and the convection was found to result in two-dimensional turbulence and strong mixing within the duct. Here, we find that the poloidal component of the magnetic field suppresses turbulence, reduces the flow's kinetic energy and high-amplitude temperature fluctuations, and, at high values of Hartmann number, leads to a steady-state flow. At the same time, the intense mixing by the surviving convection structures remains able to maintain effective heat transfer between the liquid metal and the walls.

  3. Born-Infeld magnetars: larger than classical toroidal magnetic fields and implications for gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Coelho, Jaziel G.; de Lima, Rafael C. R.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetars are neutron stars presenting bursts and outbursts of X- and soft-gamma rays that can be understood with the presence of very large magnetic fields. In this setting, nonlinear electrodynamics should be taken into account for a more accurate description of such compact systems. We study that in the context of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and make a realization of our analysis to the case of the well known Born-Infeld (BI) electromagnetism in order to come up with some of its astrophysical consequences. We focus here on toroidal magnetic fields as motivated by already known magnetars with low dipolar magnetic fields and their expected relevance in highly magnetized stars. We show that BI electrodynamics leads to larger toroidal magnetic fields when compared to Maxwell's electrodynamics. Hence, one should expect higher production of gravitational waves (GWs) and even more energetic giant flares from nonlinear stars. Given current constraints on BI's scale field, giant flare energetics and magnetic fields in magnetars, we also find that the maximum magnitude of magnetar ellipticities should be 10^{-6}-10^{-5}. Besides, BI electrodynamics may lead to a maximum increase of order 10-20% of the GW energy radiated from a magnetar when compared to Maxwell's, while much larger percentages may arise for other physically motivated scenarios. Thus, nonlinear theories of the electromagnetism might also be probed in the near future with the improvement of GW detectors.

  4. Basic study on weldability and machinability of structural materials for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Shimizu, K.; Urata, K.; Kimura, M.; Kadowaki, H.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, H.; Hamada, K.; Okuno, K.

    2006-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils for ITER are very large components. The main structural component of the coil is the coil case, which requires a massive complex geometry with high fabrication accuracy to attain the required magnetic performance for plasma operations. To provide high mechanical strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature, the structural components employ high-strength austenite stainless steels that have been specially developed for ITER. However, one of the main drawbacks of using those materials is the difficulty of manufacturing capabilities. A manufacturing study has been conducted to examine welding and machining capabilities for JJ1 and ST-SS316LN, to be employed for TF coil structural components. Both materials include a high nitrogen content up to around 0.2%, which makes welding and machining difficult compared with conventional stainless steels. Electron beam welding conditions were studied for the JJ1 material. The applicable welding condition was found for a bead length of up to about 300 mm in the case of 40 mm thick plates. No optimal condition was found for plates thicker than 40 mm. An additional experimental study was also conducted to explore suitable welding conditions for different welding positions and directions. It was found that the appearance of defects depends on the welding positions and directions. A wider range of welding conditions was found for cases in the vertical upward direction, as opposed to those in the vertical downward and horizontal directions. Based on those results, a verification test up to 900 mm in length was conducted. The test results showed that vertical upward EB welding should be used for the coil case wherever possible. With respect to TIG welding, an average deposition rate as high as 26 g/min (i.e. the filler wire supplying speed of 3,000 mm/min) was achieved. A series of tests have been conducted to examine machinability of JJ1 and ST-SS316LN. Various types of milling tools, including face

  5. Development of Optimum Manufacturing Technologies of Radial Plates for the ITER Toroidal Field Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, H.; Hamada, K.; Okuno, K.; Abe, K.; Kakui, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Maruyama, N.

    2006-01-01

    A stainless steel structure called a radial plate is used in the toroidal field (TF) coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in order to support large electromagnetic force generated in the conductors. It is a 13.7 m x 8.7 m D-shaped plate having 11 grooves on each side in which conductors are wound. Although severe dimensional accuracy, for example flatness within 2 mm, and tight schedule that all radial plates for 9 TF coils (63 plates) have to be manufactured in about 4 years are required in manufacture of the radial plates, there are no industries in the world who have manufactured a large complicated structure like the radial plate with high accuracy. Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been studying rational manufacturing method and developing the optimum manufacturing technologies of the radial plates in order to satisfy the above requirements in collaboration with the Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). Several trial manufactures of radial plates have been performed to clarify the following key points: · Effect of nitrogen content in material on machinability · Effect of cutting direction of a piece on deformation caused by machining · Effect of machining shape (curve or straight) on machining condition · Effect of laser welding technique on penetration and welding deformation Three different 316LN materials having nitrogen content of 0.12 %, 0.17%, and 0.20% were used to investigate nitrogen content effect on machinability. Machinability of lower nitrogen content material was slightly better than that of higher nitrogen content material. Three sectoral pieces were cut by plasma cutting technique from a hot rolled plate without any difficulties and one of them was machined to a curved segment of the radial plate having the same size as actual one. However, unacceptable large deformation over 5 mm flatness was found during machining which would be caused by curved shape of grooves and/or cutting direction

  6. Theoretical study of structure of electric field in helical toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Itoh, K.

    2001-06-01

    A set of transport equations is analyzed, including the bifurcation of the electric field. The structure of the electric field is studied by use of the theoretical model for the anomalous transport diffusivities. The steep gradient of the electric field is obtained at the electric domain. The suppression of the anomalous transport diffusivity is studied in the presence of the strong shear of the electric field. The hard transition with the multiple ambipolar solutions is examined in the structure of the radial electric field. The details of the structure of the electric domain interface are investigated. (author)

  7. Little strings, quasi-topological sigma model on loop group, and toroidal Lie algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwinkumar, Meer; Cao, Jingnan; Luo, Yuan; Tan, Meng-Chwan; Zhao, Qin

    2018-03-01

    We study the ground states and left-excited states of the Ak-1 N = (2 , 0) little string theory. Via a theorem by Atiyah [1], these sectors can be captured by a supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model on CP1 with target space the based loop group of SU (k). The ground states, described by L2-cohomology classes, form modules over an affine Lie algebra, while the left-excited states, described by chiral differential operators, form modules over a toroidal Lie algebra. We also apply our results to analyze the 1/2 and 1/4 BPS sectors of the M5-brane worldvolume theory.

  8. Progress in the construction of the B0 model of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Acerbi, E; Ambrosio, G; Baccaglioni, G; Broggi, F; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Volpini, G

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS Barrel Toroid air-core magnet (BT) will be composed by 8 superconducting coils, each one 25 m long and 5 m wide. In order to validate the technologies and manufacturing processes, a smaller model (9 m long) of one BT coil, named B0, is now under construction. This paper presents a general overview of the B0 project status, with special regard to the components for which the LASA Lab. is responsible: (a) the aluminium-clad NbTi conductor; (b) the double coils winding and impregnation; (c) the components of the cryostat (vacuum chamber, thermal shield and suspension rod). (6 refs).

  9. Little strings, quasi-topological sigma model on loop group, and toroidal Lie algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meer Ashwinkumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ground states and left-excited states of the Ak−1 N=(2,0 little string theory. Via a theorem by Atiyah [1], these sectors can be captured by a supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model on CP1 with target space the based loop group of SU(k. The ground states, described by L2-cohomology classes, form modules over an affine Lie algebra, while the left-excited states, described by chiral differential operators, form modules over a toroidal Lie algebra. We also apply our results to analyze the 1/2 and 1/4 BPS sectors of the M5-brane worldvolume theory.

  10. The Direct Effect of Toroidal Magnetic Fields on Stellar Oscillations: An Analytical Expression for the General Matrix Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, René; Schad, Ariane; Roth, Markus [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik, Schöneckstraße 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-09-10

    Where is the solar dynamo located and what is its modus operandi? These are still open questions in solar physics. Helio- and asteroseismology can help answer them by enabling us to study solar and stellar internal structures through global oscillations. The properties of solar and stellar acoustic modes are changing with the level of magnetic activity. However, until now, the inference on subsurface magnetic fields with seismic measures has been very limited. The aim of this paper is to develop a formalism to calculate the effect of large-scale toroidal magnetic fields on solar and stellar global oscillation eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies. If the Lorentz force is added to the equilibrium equation of motion, stellar eigenmodes can couple. In quasi-degenerate perturbation theory, this coupling, also known as the direct effect, can be quantified by the general matrix element. We present the analytical expression of the matrix element for a superposition of subsurface zonal toroidal magnetic field configurations. The matrix element is important for forward calculations of perturbed solar and stellar eigenfunctions and frequency perturbations. The results presented here will help to ascertain solar and stellar large-scale subsurface magnetic fields, and their geometric configuration, strength, and change over the course of activity cycles.

  11. Direct Imaging of a Toroidal Magnetic Field in the Inner Jet of NRAO 150

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol N. Molina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Most formation models and numerical simulations cause a helical magnetic field to form, accelerate and collimate jets in active galactic nuclei (AGN. For this reason, observational direct evidence for the existence of these helical magnetic fields is of special relevance. In this work, we present ultra- high-resolution observations of the innermost regions of the jet in the quasar NRAO150. We study the polarization structure and report evidence of a helical magnetic field.

  12. Plasma-wall interaction and locked modes in the toroidal pinch experiment TPE-RX reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasqualini, D.; Martin, P.; Koguchi, H.; Yagi, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.; Spizzo, G.

    2006-01-01

    The MHD instabilities that sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration tend to phase-lock together and also to wall-lock, forming a bulging of the plasma column, called 'locked mode'. This phenomenon is of particular interest, since the locked mode causes a larger plasma resistivity, plasma cooling, and, in some cases, anomalous discharge termination. Up to now, studies of the locked mode have been focused on m=1 modes (being m the poloidal mode number). In this Letter we show that m=0 modes also play a role, based on the cross-check between magnetic spectra and toroidally resolved D α array measurements. (author)

  13. MHD turbulence models for the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C.G.; Watkins, M.L.

    1976-01-01

    A kinematic model which describes the effect of isotropic, non-mirror symmetric turbulence on a mean magnetic field is used to examine the temporal behaviour of magnetic field in high beta pinch experiments. Solutions to the model can indicate the formation of a steady-state, force-free configuration that corresponds to the state of lowest magnetic energy and the reversal of the toroidal magnetic field at the plasma boundary in accordance with experimental observations on toroidal pinches such as ZETA and HBTX. This model neglects both the dynamic interaction between fluid and field and the associated anisotropy. These effects are examined in a further model. (author)

  14. TOKMINA, Toroidal Magnetic Field Minimization for Tokamak Fusion Reactor. TOKMINA-2, Total Power for Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: TOKMINA finds the minimum magnetic field, Bm, required at the toroidal coil of a Tokamak type fusion reactor when the input is beta(ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), q(Kruskal-Shafranov plasma stability factor), and y(ratio of plasma radius to vacuum wall radius: rp/rw) and arrays of PT (total thermal power from both d-t and tritium breeding reactions), Pw (wall loading or power flux) and TB (thickness of blanket), following the method of Golovin, et al. TOKMINA2 finds the total power, PT, of such a fusion reactor, given a specified magnetic field, Bm, at the toroidal coil. 2 - Method of solution: TOKMINA: the aspect ratio(a) is minimized, giving a minimum value for Bm. TOKMINA2: a search is made for PT; the value of PT which minimizes Bm to the required value within 50 Gauss is chosen. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Input arrays presently are dimensioned at 20. This restriction can be overcome by changing a dimension card

  15. 18–22 cm VLBA Observational Evidence for Toroidal B-Field Components in Six AGN Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Motter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN is related to accretion onto their central supermassive black holes, and magnetic (B fields are believed to play a central role in launching, collimating, and accelerating the jet streams from very compact regions out to kiloparsec scales. We present results of Faraday rotation studies based on Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA data obtained at 18–22 cm for six well known AGN (OJ 287, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, 3C 345, BL Lac, and 3C 454.3, which probe projected distances out to tens of parsecs from the observed cores. We have identified statistically significant, monotonic, transverse Faraday rotation gradients across the jets of all but one of these sources, indicating the presence of toroidal B fields, which may be one component of helical B fields associated with these AGN jets.

  16. TOROID II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    three axis fluxgate magnetometer , CMOS sun and star sensors, and a Kalman filter. The work and tasks that have been accomplished on the TOROID... magnetometer . The problem was found to be a missing ferrite bead which connects the 12V power supply to the op-amps which are used to appropriately...establish an overall operational timeline for TOROID. Testing and calibration was performed on the three-axis magnetometer which is primary attitude

  17. Toroidal rotation studies in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. G.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Investigation of the toroidal rotation is one of the most important topics for the magnetically confined fusion plasma researches since it is essential for the stabilization of resistive wall modes and its shear plays an important role to improve plasma confinement by suppressing turbulent transport. The most advantage of KSTAR tokamak for toroidal rotation studies is that it equips two main diagnostics including the high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and charge exchange spectroscopy (CES). Simultaneous core toroidal rotation and ion temperature measurements of different impurity species from the XICS and CES have shown in reasonable agreement with various plasma discharges in KSTAR. It has been observed that the toroidal rotation in KSTAR is faster than that of other tokamak devices with similar machine size and momentum input. This may due to an intrinsically low toroidal field ripple and error field of the KSTAR device. A strong braking of the toroidal rotation by the n = 1 non-resonant magnetic perturbations (NRMPs) also indicates these low toroidal field ripple and error field. Recently, it has been found that n = 2 NRMPs can also damp the toroidal rotation in KSTAR. The detail toroidal rotation studies will be presented. Work supported by the Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under the KSTAR project.

  18. The implementation of a toroidal limiter model into the gyrokinetic code ELMFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leerink, S.; Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Nora, M. [Euratom-Tekes Association, Helsinki University of Technology (Finland); Heikkinen, J.A. [Euratom-Tekes Association, VTT, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Ogando, F. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    The ELMFIRE full nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code has been developed for calculations of plasma evolution and dynamics of turbulence in tokamak geometry. The code is applicable for calculations of strong perturbations in particle distribution function, rapid transients and steep gradients in plasma. Benchmarking against experimental reflectometry data from the FT2 tokamak is being discussed and in this paper a model for comparison and studying poloidal velocity is presented. To make the ELMFIRE code suitable for scrape-off layer simulations a simplified toroidal limiter model has been implemented. The model is be discussed and first results are presented. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Toroidal Extrap Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.

    1982-04-01

    Ideal MHD-equilibria for the toroidal EXTRAP configuration have been computed with an equilibrium code. The free-boundary prob- lem is solved by using the condition that the current density is proportional to r on a flux surface. It is found that the toroidal Z-pinch, initially induced in the central zero-field region of a transverse octupole field, drifts radially outwards producing an inverse -D shaped cross-section. The plasma current of this high- beta equilibrium may be increased if the plasma is pushed back by altering the external confining magnetic field as demonstrated. (Author)

  20. Compact-Toroid Fusion Reactor (CTOR) based on the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Scoping studies of a translating Compact Torus Reactor (CTOR) have been made on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach. This CTOR embodiment uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plamoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radition shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  1. Mechanical Commissioning of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Bajas, H; Védrine, P; Berriaud, C; Sun, Z; Sorbi, M

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Its features include the 4 T Barrel Toroid magnet, the largest superconducting magnet (25 m long, 20 m diameter) that provides the magnetic field for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The coils integrated at CERN, were tested individually at maximum current of 22 kA in 2005. Following the mechanical assembly of the Barrel Toroid in the ATLAS underground cavern, the test of the full Barrel Toroid was performed in October 2006. Further tests are foreseen at the end 2007 when the system will include the two End Cap Toroids (ECT). The paper gives an overview of the good mechanical test results achieved in comparison with model predictions and the experience gained in the mechanical behavior of the ATLAS Toroidal coils is discussed.

  2. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  3. A simple toroidal shell model for the study of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhang, Hogun

    2008-01-01

    A study is conducted on the feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes (RWMs) in a tokamak plasma using a toroidal shell model. An analytically tractable form of the RWM dispersion relation is derived in the presence of a set of discrete feedback coil currents. A parametric study is carried out to optimize the feedback system configuration. It is shown that the total toroidal angle of a resistive wall spanned by the feedback coils and the poloidal angular extent of a feedback coil are crucial parameters to determine the efficacy of the feedback system

  4. Full-wave modeling of the O-X mode conversion in the Pegasus toroidal experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehn, A. [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 (Germany); Jacquot, J. [IRFM, CEA, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bongard, M. W.; Hinson, E. T.; Volpe, F. A. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Gallian, S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The ordinary-extraordinary (O-X) mode conversion is modeled with the aid of a 2D full-wave code in the Pegasus toroidal experiment as a function of the launch angles. It is shown how the shape of the plasma density profile in front of the antenna can significantly influence the mode conversion efficiency and, thus, the generation of electron Bernstein waves (EBWs). It is therefore desirable to control the density profile in front of the antenna for successful operation of an EBW heating and current drive system. On the other hand, the conversion efficiency is shown to be resilient to vertical displacements of the plasma as large as {+-}10 cm.

  5. Effects of toroidal coupling on the non-linear evolution of tearing modes and on the stochastisation of the magnetic field topology in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edery, D.; Pellat, R.; Soule, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The resistive MHD equations have been handled in toroidal geometry following the tokamak ordering, in order to obtain a simplified set of non-linear equations. This system of equations is compact, closed, consistent and exact to the first two orders in the expansion in the inverse aspect ratio. Studies of the non-linear evolution of tearing modes in the real geometry of tokamak discharges are now in progress, and quite significant results have been obtained from the numerical code REVE of Fontenay based on our above model. From the analytical results, strong linear coupling between neighbouring modes is expected as is demonstrated by the numerical results in the linear, and non-linear regimes. Moreover, coupling exhibits a stochastic structure of the magnetic field lines, the threshold of which is seen to be easily computed by a simple analytical criterion. (orig.)

  6. PROGRESS IN THE PEELING-BALLOONING MODEL OF ELMS: TOROIDAL ROTATION AND 3D NONLINEAR DYNAMICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SNYDER, P.B.; WILSON, H.R.; XU, X.Q.; WEBSTER, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the physics of the H-Mode pedestal and edge localized modes (ELMs) is very important to next-step fusion devices for two primary reasons: (1) The pressure at the top of the edge barrier (''pedestal height'') strongly impacts global confinement and fusion performance, and (2) large ELMs lead to localized transient heat loads on material surfaces that may constrain component lifetimes. The development of the peeling-ballooning model has shed light on these issues by positing a mechanism for ELM onset and constraints on the pedestal height. The mechanism involves instability of ideal coupled ''peeling-ballooning'' modes driven by the sharp pressure gradient and consequent large bootstrap current in the H-mode edge. It was first investigated in the local, high-n limit [1], and later quantified for non-local, finite-n modes in general toroidal geometry [2,3]. Important aspects are that a range of wavelengths may potentially be unstable, with intermediate n's (n ∼ 3-30) generally limiting in high performance regimes, and that stability bounds are strongly sensitive to shape [Fig l(a)], and to collisionality (i.e. temperature and density) [4] through the bootstrap current. The development of efficient MHD stability codes such as ELITE [3,2] and MISHKA [5] has allowed detailed quantification of peeling-ballooning stability bounds (e.g. [6]) and extensive and largely successful comparisons with observation (e.g. [2,6-9]). These previous calculations are ideal, static, and linear. Here we extend this work to incorporate the impact of sheared toroidal rotation, and the non-ideal, nonlinear dynamics which must be studied to quantify ELM size and heat deposition on material surfaces

  7. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  8. Toroidal drift magnetic pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1977-01-01

    A set of azimuthal coils which carry properly dephased rf-currents in the KHz frequency range can be used to heat toroidal plasmas by perpendicular Landau damping of subsonic Alfven waves. The heating mechanism and the rf-field structure are discussed in some detail

  9. Variation of the poloidal field during a disruption and consequences on the vacuum chamber, the poloidal system and the toroidal magnet (Tore II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatineau, F.; Leloup, C.; Pariente, M.

    1977-12-01

    The currents induced into the vacuum vessel and into the poloidal field coils and the overvoltages on the generators during a plasma current disruption are calculated. The subsequent applied mechanical forces and the poloidal field variations at the toroidal field conductor are deduced. The current decrease rate considered, during a disruption, ranges from d Ip/dt=0.810 9 A/s to 0.410 11 A/s [fr

  10. Turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in low flow gyrokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    We derive a self-consistent equation for the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks in the low flow ordering that only requires solving gyrokinetic Fokker-Planck and quasineutrality equations correct to second order in an expansion on the gyroradius over scale length. We also show that according to our orderings the long wavelength toroidal rotation and the long wavelength radial electric field satisfy the neoclassical relation that gives the toroidal rotation as a function of the radial electric field and the radial gradients of pressure and temperature. Thus, the radial electric field can be solved for once the toroidal rotation is calculated from the transport of toroidal angular momentum. Unfortunately, even though this methodology only requires a gyrokinetic model correct to second order in gyroradius over scale length, current gyrokinetic simulations are only valid to first order. To overcome this difficulty, we exploit the smallish ratio B p /B, where B is the total magnetic field and B p is its poloidal component. When B p /B is small, the usual first order gyrokinetic equation provides solutions that are accurate enough to employ for our expression for the transport of toroidal angular momentum. We show that current δf and full f simulations only need small corrections to achieve this accuracy. Full f simulations, however, are still unable to determine the long wavelength, radial electric field from the quasineutrality equation.

  11. Modeling of Local Magnetic Field Enhancements within Solar Flux Ropes

    OpenAIRE

    Romashets, E; Vandas, M; Poedts, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    To model and study local magnetic-field enhancements in a solar flux rope we consider the magnetic field in its interior as a superposition of two linear (constant alpha) force-free magnetic-field distributions, viz. a global one, which is locally similar to a part of the cylinder, and a local torus-shaped magnetic distribution. The newly derived solution for a toroid with an aspect ratio close to unity is applied. The symmetry axis of the toroid and that of the cylinder may or may not coinci...

  12. Conceptual design of a Bitter-magnet toroidal-field system for the ZEPHYR Ignition Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.E.C.; Becker, H.D.; Bobrov, E.S.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Davin, J.M.; Erez, E.

    1981-05-01

    The following problems are described and discussed: (1) parametric studies - these studies examine among other things the interdependence of throat stresses, plasma parameters (margins of ignition) and stored energy. The latter is a measure of cost and is minimized in the present design; (2) magnet configuration - the shape of the plates are considered in detail including standard turns, turns located at beam ports, diagnostic and closure flanges; (3) ripple computation - this section describes the codes by which ripple is computed; (4) field diffusion and nuclear heating - the effect of magnetic field diffusion on heating is considered along with neutron heating. Current, field and temperature profiles are computed; (5) finite element analysis - the two and three dimensional finite element codes are described and the results discussed in detail; (6) structures engineering - this considers the calculation of critical stresses due to toroidal and overturning forces and discusses the method of constraint of these forces. The Materials Testing Program is also discussed; (7) fabrication - the methods available for the manufacture of the constituent parts of the Bitter plates, the method of assembly and remote maintenance are summarized

  13. Observation of plasma toroidal-momentum dissipation by neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W; Sabbagh, S A; Bell, R E; Bialek, J M; Bell, M G; LeBlanc, B P; Kaye, S M; Levinton, F M; Menard, J E; Shaing, K C; Sontag, A C; Yuh, H

    2006-06-09

    Dissipation of plasma toroidal angular momentum is observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment due to applied nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields and their plasma-induced increase by resonant field amplification and resistive wall mode destabilization. The measured decrease of the plasma toroidal angular momentum profile is compared to calculations of nonresonant drag torque based on the theory of neoclassical toroidal viscosity. Quantitative agreement between experiment and theory is found when the effect of toroidally trapped particles is included.

  14. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T., E-mail: cstd14003@g.nihon-u.ac.jp; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 1018308 (Japan); Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Allfrey, I.; Valentine, T.; Morehouse, M.; Roche, T.; Kinley, J.; Aefsky, S.; Cordero, M.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010 Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Tajima, T. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010 Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, ∼40 eV, and 0.5–1.0 × 10{sup 19}, respectively.

  15. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively.

  16. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Allfrey, I.; Valentine, T.; Morehouse, M.; Roche, T.; Kinley, J.; Aefsky, S.; Cordero, M.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-01-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10"2"1 m"−"3, ∼40 eV, and 0.5–1.0 × 10"1"9, respectively.

  17. Performance of cable-in-conduit conductors in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils with varying heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Wong, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) coils in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will operate with varying heat loads generated by ac losses and nuclear heating. The total heat load is estimated to be 2 kW per TF coil under normal operation and can be higher for different operating scenarios. Ac losses are caused by ramping the poloidal field (PF) for plasma initiation, burn, and shutdown; nuclear heating results from neutrons that penetrate into the coil past the shield. Present methods to reduce or eliminate these losses lead to larger and more expensive machines, which are unacceptable with today's budget constraints. A suitable solution is to design superconductors that operate with high heat loads. The cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) can operate with high heat loads. One CICC design is analyzed for its thermal performance using two computer codes developed at LLNL. One code calculates the steady state flow conditions along the flow path, while the other calculates the transient conditions in the flow. We have used these codes to analyze the superconductor performance during the burn phase of the ITER plasma. The results of these analyses give insight to the choice of flow rate on superconductor performance. 4 refs., 5 figs

  18. Detailed electromagnetic numerical evaluation of eddy currents induced by toroidal and poloidal magnetic field variation and halo currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Marin, A.; Lucca, F.; Merola, M.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of the EM loads in the ITER divertor during plasma disruptions is mandatory for the correct dimensioning of the divertor component. The EM loads during plasma disruptions are mainly produced by: (1) toroidal flux variation (TFV) during the thermal quench (TQ) and current quench (CQ); (2) halo currents (HC); and (3) poloidal flux variation (PFV) during TQ and CQ phase. The new ITER reference disruption and the last changes in the divertor design have been considered in the EM models created to calculate all the EM loads due to TFV, HC and PFV. All the analyses have been performed for the three different main design options of the divertor plasma facing units (PFU). The effects of PFV have been analyzed using an EM-zooming procedure that has allowed a good detail of the component model, while new numerical approaches have been developed for the evaluation of the effects due to TFV and HC maintaining the same detail for the divertor model. Separate models have been developed to evaluate the equivalent electrical resistivities of the various PFU options; this allows in the full 3D model a strong simplification of a geometry which would otherwise be very complex. The effect of an electrical surface bridging of the PFU castellation has also been taken into account

  19. Detailed electromagnetic numerical evaluation of eddy currents induced by toroidal and poloidal magnetic field variation and halo currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccella, M. [L.T. Calcoli S.a.S. Piazza Prinetti, 26/B, Merate (Lecco) (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.roccella@ltcalcoli.it; Marin, A.; Lucca, F. [L.T. Calcoli S.a.S. Piazza Prinetti, 26/B, Merate (Lecco) (Italy); Merola, M. [ITER Team, Cadarache (France)

    2008-12-15

    A detailed evaluation of the EM loads in the ITER divertor during plasma disruptions is mandatory for the correct dimensioning of the divertor component. The EM loads during plasma disruptions are mainly produced by: (1) toroidal flux variation (TFV) during the thermal quench (TQ) and current quench (CQ); (2) halo currents (HC); and (3) poloidal flux variation (PFV) during TQ and CQ phase. The new ITER reference disruption and the last changes in the divertor design have been considered in the EM models created to calculate all the EM loads due to TFV, HC and PFV. All the analyses have been performed for the three different main design options of the divertor plasma facing units (PFU). The effects of PFV have been analyzed using an EM-zooming procedure that has allowed a good detail of the component model, while new numerical approaches have been developed for the evaluation of the effects due to TFV and HC maintaining the same detail for the divertor model. Separate models have been developed to evaluate the equivalent electrical resistivities of the various PFU options; this allows in the full 3D model a strong simplification of a geometry which would otherwise be very complex. The effect of an electrical surface bridging of the PFU castellation has also been taken into account.

  20. Acceleration of calculation of nuclear heating distributions in ITER toroidal field coils using hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Polunovskiy, Eduard; Loughlin, Michael J.; Grove, Robert E.; Sawan, Mohamed E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Assess the detailed distribution of the nuclear heating among the components of the ITER toroidal field coils. • Utilize the FW-CADIS method to dramatically accelerate the calculation of detailed nuclear analysis. • Compare the efficiency and reliability of the FW-CADIS method and the MCNP weight window generator. - Abstract: Because the superconductivity of the ITER toroidal field coils (TFC) must be protected against local overheating, detailed spatial distribution of the TFC nuclear heating is needed to assess the acceptability of the designs of the blanket, vacuum vessel (VV), and VV thermal shield. Accurate Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions of the TFC nuclear heating are challenged by the small volumes of the tally segmentations and by the thick layers of shielding provided by the blanket and VV. To speed up the MCNP calculation of the nuclear heating distribution in different segments of the coil casing, ground insulation, and winding packs of the ITER TFC, the ITER Organization (IO) used the MCNP weight window generator (WWG). The maximum relative uncertainty of the tallies in this calculation was 82.7%. In this work, this MCNP calculation was repeated using variance reduction parameters generated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) code and both MCNP calculations were compared in terms of computational efficiency and reliability. Even though the ADVANTG MCNP calculation used less than one-sixth of the computational resources of the IO calculation, the relative uncertainties of all the tallies in the ADVANTG MCNP calculation were less than 6.1%. The nuclear heating results of the two calculations were significantly different by factors between 1.5 and 2.3 in some of the segments of the furthest winding pack turn from the plasma neutron source. Even though the nuclear heating in this turn may not affect the ITER design because it is much smaller than the nuclear heating in the

  1. Acceleration of calculation of nuclear heating distributions in ITER toroidal field coils using hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M., E-mail: ibrahimam@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Polunovskiy, Eduard; Loughlin, Michael J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon Sur Verdon, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Grove, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Assess the detailed distribution of the nuclear heating among the components of the ITER toroidal field coils. • Utilize the FW-CADIS method to dramatically accelerate the calculation of detailed nuclear analysis. • Compare the efficiency and reliability of the FW-CADIS method and the MCNP weight window generator. - Abstract: Because the superconductivity of the ITER toroidal field coils (TFC) must be protected against local overheating, detailed spatial distribution of the TFC nuclear heating is needed to assess the acceptability of the designs of the blanket, vacuum vessel (VV), and VV thermal shield. Accurate Monte Carlo calculations of the distributions of the TFC nuclear heating are challenged by the small volumes of the tally segmentations and by the thick layers of shielding provided by the blanket and VV. To speed up the MCNP calculation of the nuclear heating distribution in different segments of the coil casing, ground insulation, and winding packs of the ITER TFC, the ITER Organization (IO) used the MCNP weight window generator (WWG). The maximum relative uncertainty of the tallies in this calculation was 82.7%. In this work, this MCNP calculation was repeated using variance reduction parameters generated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) code and both MCNP calculations were compared in terms of computational efficiency and reliability. Even though the ADVANTG MCNP calculation used less than one-sixth of the computational resources of the IO calculation, the relative uncertainties of all the tallies in the ADVANTG MCNP calculation were less than 6.1%. The nuclear heating results of the two calculations were significantly different by factors between 1.5 and 2.3 in some of the segments of the furthest winding pack turn from the plasma neutron source. Even though the nuclear heating in this turn may not affect the ITER design because it is much smaller than the nuclear heating in the

  2. Suspension of a field-cooled BiPbSrCaCuO high-T sub c superconductor under a toroidal permanent magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S H; Choe, W; Lee, T S

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic flux measurements of a toroidal magnet revealed a concave-shaped field distribution with a single minimum and a null field along the axis of the torus at the point where the field reversed. The non-linear magnetic field of the toroidal magnet perpendicular to the Ag sub 2 O-doped superconducting disc sample with trapped magnetic flux distorted the field line distribution. As a result, the interaction force between the magnet and the sample exhibited regions of repulsive, null, attractive, null and finally repulsive force. The asymmetrical concave-shaped force pattern along the axis with two null force points indicates that the force exerted on the sample changes direction, the transition from repulsive to attractive at the null force point, and the force becomes repulsive again beyond the second null force point as the distance along the axis increases. The magnetic field simulation using the Poisson numerical code for the toroidal magnet of 46 mm OD, 12 mm ID and 10 mm thickness was in close agreeme...

  3. Viscous damping of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W. M. [Georgia Tech Fusion Research Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The Braginskii viscous stress tensor formalism was generalized to accommodate non-axisymmetric 3D magnetic fields in general toroidal flux surface geometry in order to provide a representation for the viscous damping of toroidal rotation in tokamaks arising from various “neoclassical toroidal viscosity” mechanisms. In the process, it was verified that the parallel viscosity contribution to damping toroidal angular momentum still vanishes even in the presence of toroidal asymmetries, unless there are 3D radial magnetic fields.

  4. Study of the behaviour of magnetic lines after perturbation of a toroidal field with magnetic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, C.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of a perturbing magnetic field on a field whose magnetic surfaces are tori nested around a closed central line is studied. This perturbation effect creates magnetic islands around surfaces with rational rotational transform. These islands are investigated analytically, which makes it possible to evaluate their size. The resulting turbulence of the medium can then be studied by calculating the interaction of two neighbouring islands

  5. Energy measurement of fast ions trapped in the toroidal magnetic field ripple of Tore Supra during ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Grisolia, C.; Hutter, T.; Mayaux, G.; Martin, G.; Saoutic, B.; Vartanian, S.

    1995-01-01

    Direct losses of ions trapped in the toroidal field ripple of Tore Supra using two techniques were made. The first (DRIPPLE I) correlates the ion loss current measured by an electric probe with the ion loss power measured by a calorimeter. As the calorimeter integrates over all particle energies and time, it yields only the averaged lost ion energy. The second technique (DRIPPLE II), still under development, is a Faraday cup positioned and filtered so as to select ions by their Larmor radius. The currents measured are small (1-100 nA), and improvements in instrumentation are needed to take full advantage of the data, but the preliminary results are still useful. During ICRH (hydrogen minority regime, resonance on axis) a direct correlation between the lost ion mean energy and the density of hydrogen was seen. The energy increased when the hydrogen minority density decreased. Moreover, the line averaged density and the lower hybrid heating (LH) had also an effect on fast ion losses. (authors). 3 refs., 7 figs

  6. A parametric study of AC electric field-induced toroidal vortex formation in laminar nonpremixed coflow flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2017-05-02

    This study presents an experimental work investigating the controlling parameters on the formation of an electrically-induced inner toroidal vortex (ITV) near a nozzle rim in small, laminar nonpremixed coflow flames, when an alternating current is applied to the nozzle. A systematic parametric study was conducted by varying the flow parameters of the fuel and coflowing-air velocities, and the nozzle diameter. The fuels tested were methane, ethylene, ethane, propane, n-butane, and i-butane, each representing different ion-generation characteristics and sooting tendencies. The results showed that the fluid dynamic effects on ITV formation were weak, causing only mild variation when altering flow velocities. However, increased fuel velocity resulted in increased polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation, which promoted ITV formation. When judging the ITV-formation tendency based on critical applied voltage and frequency, it was qualitatively well correlated with the PAH concentration and the relative location of PAHs to the nozzle rim. The sooting tendency of the fuels did not affect the results much. A change in the nozzle diameter highlighted the importance of the relative distance between the PAH zone and the nozzle rim, indicating the role of local electric-field intensity on ITV formation. Detailed onset conditions, characteristics of near-nozzle flow patterns, and PAH distributions are also discussed.

  7. Contributions to the design and to the fabrication of the magnet of the toroidal field of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a collection of published papers in French and in English about the design and the qualification of the magnet of the toroidal field of Tore Supra. The development test programme, the controls during conductor manufacturing and the acceptance tests have shown to be the bases for achieving a very low level of rejection for the whole production. A systematic study of the performances correlated to the fabrication conditions has provided valuable informations for the optimization of the manufacturing processes of superconductors. The tests of single coils have enabled the commissioning of a monitoring and protection system specially adapted for this magnet of 18 coils cooled in a superfluid helium bath. After the accident caused by an arcing in one coil of the Torus, and the replacement of the faulty coil, the monitoring and safety discharge system have been adapted. The current in the magnet has been increased up to 1 455 A for 9.3 T on the conductors (nominal values 1 400 A and 9 T). During the last three years (1989-1991) only one transition to normal state has been observed in one coil strongly irradiated after a severe plasma disruption. In these conditions the protection system acted very well and as expected

  8. Analysis of quench-vent pressures for present design of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] TF [toroidal field] coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Japan, the European Community, the Union of the Soviet Union, and the United States. This paper examines the effects of a quench within the toroidal field (TF) coils based on current ITER design. It is a preliminary, rough analysis. Its intent is to assist ITER designers while more accurate computer codes are being developed and to provide a check against these more rigorous solutions. Rigorous solutions to the quench problem are very complex involving three-dimensional heat transfer, extreme changes in heat capacities and copper resistivity, and varying flow dynamics within the conductors. This analysis addresses all these factors in an approximate way. The result is much less accurate than a rigorous analysis. Results here could be in error as much as 30 to 40 percent. However, it is believed that this paper can still be very useful to the coil designer. Coil pressures and temperatures vs time into a quench are presented. Rate of helium vent, energy deposition in the coil, and depletion of magnetic stored energy are also presented. Peak pressures are high (about 43 MPa). This is due to the very long vent path length (446 m), small hydraulic diameters, and high current densities associated with ITER's cable-in-conduit design. The effects of these pressures as well as the ability of the coil to be self protecting during a quench are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Numerical computation of the transport matrix in toroidal plasma with a stochastic magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siqiang; Chen, Dunqiang; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2018-04-01

    A new numerical method, based on integrating along the full orbit of guiding centers, to compute the transport matrix is realized. The method is successfully applied to compute the phase-space diffusion tensor of passing electrons in a tokamak with a stochastic magnetic field. The new method also computes the Lagrangian correlation function, which can be used to evaluate the Lagrangian correlation time and the turbulence correlation length. For the case of the stochastic magnetic field, we find that the order of magnitude of the parallel correlation length can be estimated by qR0, as expected previously.

  10. On the role of poloidal and toroidal fluctuating electric fields in tokamak transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Wootton, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    The two different expressions for the radial particle flux Λ found in the literature, as given by equations (2) and (4), are identical if the parallel electric field is small. The first expression is derivable in a fluid approach, whereas the second follows from the analysis of individual particle orbits. These expressions, without change, are also valid for an arbitrary axisymmetric magnetic geometry. In a situation where the parallel electric field is significant, the more accurate expression for the particle flux is in terms of the standard E x B velocity

  11. Transverse magnetic field penetration through the JET toroidal coil and support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core, W.G.F.; Noll, P.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a study of transverse magnetic field penetration through the JET magnetic field coil systems and supporting structures. The studies were carried out during the initial JET design phase (1973-78) and were part of a major radius compression plasma heating feasibility study. In view of the interest in this problem the authors have decided to re-issue the original work as a JET report. The material basically remains unchanged although better estimates of the penetration times have been obtained and typographical errors which occurred in the original have been corrected. (author)

  12. Configuration development of a hydraulic press for preloading the toroidal field coils of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) is part of a national design team that is developing the conceptual design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). To achieve a compact device with the minimum major radius, a vertical preload system is being developed to react the vertical separating force normally carried by the inboard leg of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The preload system is in the form of a hydraulic press. Challenges in the design include the development of hydraulic and structural systems for very large force requirements, which could interface with the CIT machine, while allowing maximum access to the top, bottom, and radial periphery of the machine. Maximum access is necessary for maintenance, diagnostics, instrumentation, and control systems. Materials used in the design must function in the nuclear environment and in the presence of high magnetic fields. The structural system developed is an arrangement in which the CIT device is installed in the jaws of the press. Large built-up beams above and below the CIT span the machine and deliver the vertical force to the center cylinder formed by the inboard legs of the TF coils. During the conceptual design study, the vertical force requirement has ranged between 25,000 and 52,000 t. The access requirement on top and bottom limits the width of the spanning beams. Nonmagnetic steel materials are also required because of operation in the high magnetic fields. In the hydraulic system design for the press, several options are being explored. These range from small-diameter jacks operating at very high pressure [228 MPa (33 ksi)] to large-diameter jacks operating at pressures up to 69 MPa (10 ksi). Configurations with various locations for the hydraulic cylinders have also been explored. The nuclear environment and maintenance requirements are factors that affect cylinder location. This paper presents the configuration development of the hydraulic press used to vertically preload the CIT device

  13. Current drive by neutral beams, rotating magnetic fields and helicity injection in compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.; Arista, N.R.; Lifschitz, A.F.; Clemente, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of neutral beams (NB) for current drive and heating in spheromaks, the relaxed states of flux core spheromaks (FCS) sustained by helicity injection and the effect of ion dynamics on rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in spherical tokamaks (ST) are studied. (author)

  14. Turbulent and neoclassical toroidal momentum transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiteboul, J.

    2012-10-01

    The goal of magnetic confinement devices such as tokamaks is to produce energy from nuclear fusion reactions in plasmas at low densities and high temperatures. Experimentally, toroidal flows have been found to significantly improve the energy confinement, and therefore the performance of the machine. As extrinsic momentum sources will be limited in future fusion devices such as ITER, an understanding of the physics of toroidal momentum transport and the generation of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks would be an important step in order to predict the rotation profile in experiments. Among the mechanisms expected to contribute to the generation of toroidal rotation is the transport of momentum by electrostatic turbulence, which governs heat transport in tokamaks. Due to the low collisionality of the plasma, kinetic modeling is mandatory for the study of tokamak turbulence. In principle, this implies the modeling of a six-dimensional distribution function representing the density of particles in position and velocity phase-space, which can be reduced to five dimensions when considering only frequencies below the particle cyclotron frequency. This approximation, relevant for the study of turbulence in tokamaks, leads to the so-called gyrokinetic model and brings the computational cost of the model within the presently available numerical resources. In this work, we study the transport of toroidal momentum in tokamaks in the framework of the gyrokinetic model. First, we show that this reduced model is indeed capable of accurately modeling momentum transport by deriving a local conservation equation of toroidal momentum, and verifying it numerically with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Secondly, we show how electrostatic turbulence can break the axisymmetry and generate toroidal rotation, while a strong link between turbulent heat and momentum transport is identified, as both exhibit the same large-scale avalanche-like events. The dynamics of turbulent transport are

  15. Ambipolar electric fields and turbulence studies in the Wisconsin levitated toroidal octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armentrout, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed studies of hot ion plasmas (T/sub i/ > T/sub e/) in the poloidal field octupole show that the ambipolar electric field which is perpendicular to the flux surfaces is well explained by the observed properties of the microturbulence structures in the plasma. The turbulence structure has been measured by correlation techniques which are carefully described. In these experiments, signals were studied which are aperiodic in time and space, short lived compared to the decay times of the bulk plasma parameters, short ranged compared to the machine size, and are therefore classified as microturbulence structures. The resulting spatial and temporal correlation functions (CFs) are well fitted to a Gaussian function and the associated correlation lengths or times are the half width at half maximum of the CFs. The correlation length is measured to be the ion gyro radius for the hot hydrogen plasma and somewhat less for the helium plasma

  16. Stochastic layers of magnetic field lines and formation of ITB in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, E.D.; Bererzhnyi, V.L.; Bondarenko, V.N.

    2003-01-01

    The results of local measurements of RF discharge plasma parameters in the process of ITB formation in the vicinity of rational magnetic surfaces in the Uragan-3M torsatron are presented. The next phenomena were observed in the process of ITB formation: the widening of the radial density distribution, the formation of pedestals on radial density and electron temperature distributions, the formation of regions with high shear of poloidal plasma rotation velocity and radial electric field in the vicinity of stochastic layers of magnetic field lines, the decrease of density fluctuations and their radial correlation length, the decorrelation of density fluctuations, the increase of the bootstrap current. After the ITB formation, the transition to the improved plasma confinement regime takes place. The transition moves to the beginning of the discharge with the increase of heating power. The possible mechanism of ITB formation near rational surfaces is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Toroidal Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Teruhiro; Shizuoka, Yoshihide.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the shielding capacity of a current breaker for a current transformer coil and to facilitate the manufacture and the assembly of the current transformer coil. Constitution: A first current transformer coil is provided between a vacuum container for enclosing a plasma and a toroidal magnetic field coil, and a secon current transformer coil is provided outside the toroidal magnetic field coil. The rise of the plasma current is performed by the variation in the current of the coil of the first transformer having high electromagnetic coupling with the plasma current, and the variation in the magnetic flux necessary for maintaining the plasma is performed by the variation in the current of the second transformer coil. In this manner, the current shielding capacity of the first transformer coil can be reduced to decrease the number of coil turns, thereby facilitating the manufacture and assembly. (Seki, T.)

  18. Bio-field array: a dielectrophoretic electromagnetic toroidal excitation to restore and maintain the golden ratio in human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Marcy C; Butawan, Matthew B A; Ramsey, Risa D

    2018-06-01

    Erythrocytes must maintain a biconcave discoid shape in order to efficiently deliver oxygen (O 2 ) molecules and to recycle carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) molecules. The erythrocyte is a small toroidal dielectrophoretic (DEP) electromagnetic field (EMF) driven cell that maintains its zeta potential (ζ) with a dielectric constant (ԑ) between a negatively charged plasma membrane surface and the positively charged adjacent Stern layer. Here, we propose that zeta potential is also driven by both ferroelectric influences (chloride ion) and ferromagnetic influences (serum iron driven). The Golden Ratio, a function of Phi φ, offers a geometrical mathematical measure within the distinct and desired curvature of the red blood cell that is governed by this zeta potential and is required for the efficient recycling of CO 2 in our bodies. The Bio-Field Array (BFA) shows potential to both drive/fuel the zeta potential and restore the Golden Ratio in human erythrocytes thereby leading to more efficient recycling of CO 2 . Live Blood Analyses and serum CO 2 levels from twenty human subjects that participated in immersion therapy sessions with the BFA for 2 weeks (six sessions) were analyzed. Live Blood Analyses (LBA) and serum blood analyses performed before and after the BFA immersion therapy sessions in the BFA pilot study participants showed reversal of erythrocyte rheological alterations (per RBC metric; P = 0.00000075), a morphological return to the Golden Ratio and a significant decrease in serum CO 2 (P = 0.017) in these participants. Immersion therapy sessions with the BFA show potential to modulate zeta potential, restore this newly defined Golden Ratio and reduce rheological alterations in human erythrocytes. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  19. Optimization of confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary report on the identification and optimization of independent variables which affect the ion density and confinement time in a bumpy torus plasma is presented. The independent variables include the polarity, position, and number of the midplane electrode rings, the method of gas injection, and the polarity and strength of a weak vertical magnetic field. Some characteristic data taken under condition when most of the independent variables were optimized are presented. The highest value of the electron number density on the plasma axis is 3.2 x 10 to the 12th power/cc, the highest ion heating efficiency is 47 percent, and the longest particle containment time is 2.0 milliseconds

  20. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  1. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B; Kozak, S; Kozak, J; Wojtasiewicz, G; Majka, M; Janowski, T

    2010-01-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  2. Analytical study of cover plate welding deformation of the radial plate of the ITER toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, Junji; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Mitsuru

    2009-09-01

    The winding pack (WP) of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil of ITER consists of 7 double-pancakes (DPs). In the DP, the conductor is embedded in a groove of a radial plate (RP), and cover plates (CP) are welded to the RP teeth to fix the conductors in the RP groove. The dimensions of the DP are 15 m in height and 9 m in width while the tolerances of the DP are very severe, such as a flatness of 2 mm and an in-plane deviation of a few millimeters. It is therefore required to reduce the deformation of the DP by CP welding. In order to estimate welding deformation, the authors apply an analytical method in which the CP welding deformation of the DP can be calculated using inherent strain evaluated from welding deformation measured using a RP mock-up. Calculated results indicate that out-of-plane distortion can be kept to within required tolerances, but in-plane deformation is larger than allowed when welding thickness is 2.5 mm. The in-plane deformation is mainly caused by the bending of the curved RP region. Therefore, reducing the welding thickness at the curved region emerges as the most promising solution of this issue. Calculated results assuming a welding thickness of 1 mm at the curved region show that the in-plane deformation conforms to required tolerances. Furthermore, since the maximum out-of-plane deformation is within tolerances but marginal, an alternative design in which the number of welding lines is half that of the reference design, is proposed not only to improve the out-of-plane distortion but also to simplify the manufacture of the DP. It is found that the alternative design is effective in reducing welding distortion. (author)

  3. Neoclassical poloidal and toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Diamond, P.H.; Groebner, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the neoclassical poloidal and toroidal rotation speeds of primary ion and impurity species are derived via the Hirshman and Sigmar moment approach. The rotation speeds of the primary ion can be significantly different from those of impurities in various interesting cases. The rapid increase of impurity poloidal rotation in the edge region of H-mode discharges in tokamaks can be explained by a rapid steepening of the primary ion pressure gradient. Depending on ion collisionality, the poloidal rotation speed of the primary ions at the edge can be quite small and the flow direction may be opposite to that of the impurities. This may cast considerable doubts on current L to H bifurcation models based on primary ion poloidal rotation only. Also, the difference between the toroidal rotation velocities of primary ions and impurities is not negligible in various cases. In Ohmic plasmas, the parallel electric field induces a large impurity toroidal rotation close to the magnetic axis, which seems to agree with experimental observations. In the ion banana and plateau regime, there can be non-negligible disparities between primary ion and impurity toroidal rotation velocities due to the ion density and temperature gradients. Detailed analytic expressions for the primary ion and impurity rotation speeds are presented, and the methodology for generalization to the case of several impurity species is also presented for future numerical evaluation

  4. Effects of fast ions and an external inductive electric field on the neoclassical parallel flow, current, and rotation in general toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Okamoto, Masao.

    1992-05-01

    Effects of external momentum sources, i.e., fast ions produced by the neutral beam injection and an external inductive electric field, on the neoclassical ion parallel flow, current, and rotation are analytically investigated for a simple plasma in general toroidal systems. It is shown that the contribution of the external sources to the ion parallel flow becomes large as the collision frequency of thermal ions increases because of the momentum conservation of Coulomb collisions and sharply decreasing viscosity coefficients, with collision frequency. As a result, the beam-driven parallel flow of thermal ions becomes comparable to that of electrons in the Pfirsh-Schluter collisionality regime, whereas in the 1/μ or banana regime it is smaller than that of electrons by the order of √(m e /m i ) (m e and m i are electron and ion masses). This beam-driven ion parallel flow can not produce a large beam-driven current because of the cancellation with electron parallel flow, but produces a large toroidal rotation of ions. As both electrons and ions approach the Pfirsh-Schluter collisionality regime the contribution of thermodynamical forces becomes negligibly small and the large toroidal rotation of ions is predominated by the beam-driven component in the non-axisymmetric configuration with large helical ripples. (author)

  5. Toroidal simulation magnet tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.; Domm, T.C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of different schemes for testing superconducting coils in a simulated tokamak environment are analyzed for their merits relative to a set of test criteria. Two of the concepts are examined in more detail: the so-called cluster test scheme, which employs two large background field coils, one on either side of the test coil, and the compact torus, a low-aspect ratio toroidal array of a small number of coils in which all of the coils are essentially test coils. Simulation of the pulsed fields of the tokamak is discussed briefly

  6. Heating of toroidal plasmas by neutral injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, T.H.

    1971-08-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the physics of ion acceleration, charge exchange and ionization, trajectories for fast ions in toroidal magnetic fields, and fast-ion thermalization. The injection of fast atoms is found to be a highly competitive method both for heating present-day experimental toroidal plasmas and for bringing full-scale toroidal CTR plasmas to low-density ignition. 13 refs., 9 figs

  7. Effects of 3D magnetic perturbations on toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    stochasticity and increase plasma transport in the edge of H-mode plasmas. These various effects of 3D fields can be used to modify directly the plasma toroidal rotation (and possibly transport via multiple RMPs for controlling edge localized modes) and indirectly anomalous plasma transport. The present understanding and modelling of these various 3D magnetic field perturbation effects including for test blanket modules in ITER are summarized. Finally, implications of the present understanding and key open issues for developing a predictive capability of them for ITER are discussed. (topical review)

  8. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  9. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-06-01

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  10. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label

  11. Investigations of toroidal wave numbers of the kink instabilities in a toroidal pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamajima, Takataro; Irisawa, Juichi; Tsukada, Tokuaki; Sugito, Osamu; Maruyama, Hideaki

    1979-01-01

    The axial toroidal wave numbers of the kink instability of toroidal pinch plasma were measured and investigated with a specially designed coil, and the results were compared with the MHD theory. The schematic figure and the particulars of the experimental apparatus are briefly illustrated in the first part. The method of generating theta-Z pinch plasma, the wave form of the magnetic flux density in Z-direction and the plasma current are also explained. The 360 deg stereoscopic framing photographs were taken with an image converter camera at the intervals of 0.5 μs after the initiation of the main electric discharge in Z-circuit. From these photographs, the growth of the kink instability was observed. The measured magnetic field distribution at t = 2 μs is presented. In the second part, the radial displacement of plasma and toroidal wave number were measured from the above framing photographs. Then the spectra of plasma displacement were analyzed by the Fourier analysis. The measured results of toroidal wave number was analyzed by both the skin current model and the diffuse current model. Many new results obtained from the present study were mainly derived from the observation of the framing photographs, and they are summarized in the final part of this paper. (Aoki, K.)

  12. Convective cells and transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassam, A.B.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1978-12-01

    The properties of convective cells and the diffusion resulting from such cells are significantly influenced by an inhomogeneity in the extermal confining magnetic field, such as that in toroidal plasmas. The convective diffusion in the presence of a field inhomogeneity is estimated. For a thermal background, this diffusion is shown to be substantially smaller than classical collisional diffusion. For a model nonthermal background, the diffusion is estimated, for typical parameters, to be at most of the order of collisional diffusion. The model background employed is based on spectra observed in numerical simulations of drift-wave-driven convective cells

  13. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Ballooning instabilities in toroidally linked mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastie, R.J.; Watson, C.J.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper examines the stability against ballooning modes of plasma equilibria in toroidally linked mirror configurations consisting of a number of quadrupole minimum-B mirrors linked toroidally. On the basis of the Kruskal-Oberman energy principle, a class of displacements is identified which are potentially unstable, and a necessary criterion for stability is derived. The criterion is obtained from the eigenvalues of an ordinary differential equation, which determines the variation of the displacement along a field line. The coefficients in the equation are determined by the configuration, and by inserting various model configurations, estimates are obtained of the maximum value of β consistent with stability. In cases of interest, quite high β-values are obtained. (author)

  15. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the ..beta.. limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor).

  16. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 29, Analysis results. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Minfeng

    1995-01-01

    The electromagnetic analysis is mainly based on model built with 3-D electromagnetic software OPERA/TOSCA. In the process of evaluating the software package, some models are also built with 3-D boundary element electromagnetic software AMPERES. Fortran programs are also developed at B ampersand W to perform Monte-Carlo simulations of the field error analysis to assist tolerance determinations

  17. Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic confinement plasma device under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. The ATF is a type of stellerator, known as a ''torsatron'' which theoretically has the capability to operate at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 2 s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin, helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the Impurities Studies Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of electron cyclotron heating. The ATF is scheduled to start operation in late 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented, including details of the construction process envisioned. 9 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a new magnetic plasma confinement device, under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which will lead to improvements in toroidal magnetic fusion reactors. ATF is a type of stellarator known as a torsatron which theoretically has the capability at greater than or equal to8% beta in steady state. The ATF plasma has a major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a field of 2 T for a 5-s duration or 1 T steady state. The ATF device consists of a helical field (HF) coil set, a set of poloidal field (PF) coils, an exterior shell structure to support the coils, and a thin helically contoured vacuum vessel inside the coils. The ATF replaces the ISX-B tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B auxiliary systems including 4 MW of neutral injection heating and 0.2 MW of electron cyclotron heating. ATF device is scheduled to start operation in the fall of 1986. An overview of the ATF device is presented including details of the construction process envisioned

  19. Modelling of ion thermal transport in ergodic region of collisionless toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Nunami, Masanori; Satake, Shinsuke; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi; Takamaru, Hisanori; Okamoto, Masao

    2009-09-01

    In recent tokamak experiments it has been found that so-called diffusion theory based on the 'diffusion of magnetic field lines' overestimates the radial energy transport in the ergodic region of the collisionless plasma affected by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), though the RMPs induce chaotic behavior of the magnetic field lines. The result implies that the modelling of the transport should be reconsidered for low collisionality cases. A computer simulation study of transport in the ergodic region is required for understanding fundamental properties of collisionless ergodized-plasmas, estimating the transport coefficients, and reconstructing the modelling of the transport. In this paper, we report the simulation study of thermal transport in the ergodic region under the assumption of neglecting effects of an electric field, impurities and neutrals. Because of the simulations neglecting interactions with different particle-species and saving the computational time, we treat ions (protons) in our numerical-study of the transport. We find that the thermal diffusivity in the ergodic region is extremely small compared to the one predicted by the theory of field-line diffusion and that the diffusivity depends on both the collision frequency and the strength of RMPs even for the collisionless ergodized-plasma. (author)

  20. Time-Dependent Toroidal Compactification Proposals and the Bianchi Type I Model: Classical and Quantum Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Toledo Sesma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type I model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Under this approach, we present an isotropization mechanism for the Bianchi I cosmological model through the analysis of the ratio between the anisotropic parameters and the volume of the Universe which in general keeps constant or runs into zero for late times. We also find that the presence of extra dimensions in this model can accelerate the isotropization process depending on the momenta moduli values. Finally, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW equation in the context of standard quantum cosmology.

  1. Studies on limiter confined toroidal plasma in BETA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bera, D.; Reddy, C.; Jayakumar, R.; Kaw, P.K.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma equilibrium and stability in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field and a poloidal limiter is being studied experimentally in the BETA experiment. In a simple toroidal magnetic field, plasma cannot be in equilibrium because of the effect of the magnetic field curvature, which tends to expand the plasma. The electric field, which causes this expansion, is short circuited if a poloidal conducting limiter is placed and this brings about a quasi-equilibrium. In the model the charge separation current flows on the surface of the plasma and closes the path by flowing parallel to the magnetic field away from the limiter and transverse to the field at the limiter. For such an equilibrium, the vertical pressure profile is expected to be uniform, while the radial pressure profile is determined by transport. Such a profile is unstable to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, if the magnetic field gradient and the pressure gradient have the same sense

  2. Perturbative studies of toroidal momentum transport using neutral beam injection modulation in the Joint European Torus: Experimental results, analysis methodology, and first principles modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Tala, T.; Ferreira, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Perturbative experiments have been carried out in the Joint European Torus [Fusion Sci. Technol. 53(4) (2008)] in order to identify the diffusive and convective components of toroidal momentum transport. The torque source was modulated either by modulating tangential neutral beam power...... or by modulating in antiphase tangential and normal beams to produce a torque perturbation in the absence of a power perturbation. The resulting periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity was modeled using time-dependent transport simulations in order to extract empirical profiles of momentum...

  3. Toroidal Trivelpiece-Gould modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoessel, F.P.

    1979-01-01

    Electron plasma waves are treated in quasi-electrostatic approximation in a toroidal cavity of rectangular cross-section in an infinitely strong azimuthal magnetic field. The differential equation for the electrostatic potential, derived from fluid equations, can be separated using cylindrical coordinates. The eigenvalue problem for the radial dependence is solved numerically by a shooting method. Eigenvalues are given for different aspect ratios. Comparison with appropriate modes of the straight geometry shows that the toroidal frequencies generally lie some percent above those for the straight case. Plots of the eigenfunctions demonstrate clearly the influence of toroidicity. The deviation from symmetry (which should appear for straight geometry) depends not only on the aspect ratio but also strongly on the mode numbers. (author)

  4. Modal analysis of a stiffened toroidal shell sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerreta, R.; Di Pietro, E.; Pizzuto, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the modal analysis of a sector of the toroidal vacuum vessel of a new experimental machine for research in the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion (FTU - Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). The vacuum vessel, one of the most critical components of the experimental device, consist of 12 stainless steel toroidal sectors, and it is designed to withstand pulsed electromagnetic loads during operation. Results of the modal analysis of the stiffened toroidal shell sector are compared and discussed with regard to the experimental data. Theoretical eigenvalues and eigenvectors have been predicted by means of ABAQUS finite element code. Experimental analysis has been carried out on a full scale model and natural frequencies have been measured. Satisfactory agreement between experimental and theoretical eigenvalues has been found

  5. A current profile model for magnetic analysis of the start-up phase of toroidal plasmas driven by electron cyclotron heating and current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, T.; Uchida, M.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2007-01-01

    An estimation model of plasma current density distribution for the start-up phase of toroidal plasmas generated by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in the low aspect ratio torus experiment device is presented. The model assumes a power law parabolic current profile having seven fitting parameters. Its position, extent and broadness (or steepness) are fitted by adjusting these parameters to the observed magnetic flux signals. The adequacy of the model has been examined and confirmed by comparisons of the reconstructed current profiles and the resultant poloidal flux surfaces with the plasma images at visible light range at various stages of start-up discharges, including both the initial open field phase, the subsequent closed field phase, the current decay phase after ECH is turned off and also by a current-profile limiting experiment. This method may be useful for the study of non-inductive start-up experiments by ECH, where there is no appropriate MHD constraint on the current distribution as that in the full tokamak discharge plasmas

  6. Electrical disruption in toroidal plasma of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, M.; Silva, C.A.B.; Goes, L.C.S.; Sudano, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The initial phase of ionization of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated using zero-dimensional model. The model describes the temporal evolution of plasma by spatial medium of particle density and temperature, on whole plasma volume. The energy and particle (electrons and ions) balance equations are considered. The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss involves ionization, Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating converter gives the initial voltage necessary to disruption. (M.C.K.)

  7. Intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch with partial coverage of the toroidal surface by a discrete active coil array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    An active feedback system is required for long pulse operation of the reversed field pinch (RFP) device to suppress resistive wall modes (RWMs). A general feature of a feedback system using a discrete active coil array is a coupling effect which arises when a set of side band modes determined by the number of active coils is produced. Recent results obtained on the EXTRAP T2R RFP demonstrated the suppression of independent m = 1 RWMs using an active feedback system with a two-dimensional array of discrete active coils in the poloidal and toroidal directions. One of the feedback algorithms used is the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Active feedback systems having different number of active coils in the poloidal (Mc) and toroidal (Nc) directions (Mc × Nc = 2 × 32 and Mc × Nc = 4 × 16) are studied. Different side band effects are seen for these configurations. A significant prolongation of the plasma discharge is achieved for the intelligent shell feedback scheme using the 2 × 32 active coil configuration. This is attributed to the side band sets including only one of the dominant unstable RWMs and avoiding coupling to resonant modes. Analog proportional-integral-derivative controllers are used in the feedback system. Regimes with different values of the proportional gain are studied. The requirement of the proportional-integral control for low proportional gain and proportional-derivative control for high proportional gain is seen in the experiments.

  8. Effect of plasma current breakaway on the operating stability of the superconducting coil of the toroidal magnetic field in the T-10M installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostenko, A.I.; Kravchenko, M.Yu.; Monoszon, N.A.; Trokhachev, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The method and calculation results of stability of a superconducting coil of the toroidal magnetic field in the T-10M installation to plasma current breakaway are presented. The calculations were performed for two values of the magnetic field induction in the centre of the plasma cross section: 3.5 and 5 T. The calculation of energy losses and heating of the superconducting coil was performed assuming the plasma current in case of breakaway decreases to zero with an infinite rate, so that the estimations obtained are maxiaum. It is shown that in case of 3.5 T induction the superconducting coil exhibits resistance to plasma current breakaways, and in case of 5 T it is necessary to use electromagnetic screening to provide stability

  9. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  10. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I.; Silva, H.; Wagner, U.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  11. A personal-computer-based package for interactive assessment of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and poloidal field coil design in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    A personal-computer (PC)-based calculational approach assesses magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and poloidal field (PF) coil arrangement in a highly interactive mode, well suited for tokamak scoping studies. The system developed involves a two-step process: the MHD equilibrium is calculated and then a PF coil arrangement, consistent with the equilibrium is determined in an interactive design environment. In this paper the approach is used to examine four distinctly different toroidal configurations: the STARFIRE rector, a spherical torus (ST), the Big Dee, and an elongated tokamak. In these applications the PC-based results are benchmarked against those of a mainframe code for STARFIRE, ST, and Big Dee. The equilibrium and PF coil arrangement calculations obtained with the PC approach agree within a few percent with those obtained with the mainframe code

  12. Compact toroids with Alfvenic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhehui; Tang, X.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equilibria form a class of stationary ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria stabilized by magnetic-field-aligned Alfvenic flows. Analytic solutions of the Chandrasekhar equilibria are explicitly constructed for both field-reversed configurations and spheromaks. Favorable confinement property of nested closed flux surfaces and the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the compact toroids are of interest for both magnetic trapping of high energy electrons in astrophysics and confinement of high temperature plasmas in laboratory

  13. Particle simulations in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydemir, A.Y.

    1992-09-01

    A computational tool to be used in kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas is being developed. The initial goal of the project is to develop an electrostatic gyrokinetic model for studying transport and stability problems in tokamaks. In this brief report, preliminary results from the early stages of this effort are presented

  14. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, Francisco [New York Univ. (NYU), Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  15. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  16. Model for spontaneous frequency sweeping of an Alfvén wave in a toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Berk, H. L.

    2012-05-01

    We study the frequency chirping signals arising from spontaneously excited toroidial Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) waves that are being driven by an inverted energetic particle distribution whose free energy is tapped from the generic particle/wave resonance interaction. Initially a wave is excited inside the Alfvén gap with a frequency determined from the linear tip model of Rosenbluth, Berk and Van dam (RBV) [1]. Hole/clumps structures are formed and are observed to chirp towards lower energy states. We find that the chirping signals from clump enter the Alfvén continuum which eventually produce more rapid chirping signals. The accuracy of the adiabatic approximation for the mode evolution is tested and verified by demonstrating that a WKB-like decomposition of the time response for the field phase and amplitude agree with the data. Plots of the phase space structure correlate well with the chirping dependent shape of the separatrix structure. A novel aspect of the simulation is that it performed close to the wave frame of the phase space structure, which enables the numerical time step to remain the same during the simulation, independent of the rest frame frequency.

  17. MHD-model for low-frequency waves in a tokamak with toroidal plasma rotation and problem of existence of global geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Sorokina, E. A., E-mail: sorokina.ekaterina@gmail.com, E-mail: vilkiae@gmail.com; Ilgisonis, V. I. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Konovaltseva, L. V. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A set of reduced linear equations for the description of low-frequency perturbations in toroidally rotating plasma in axisymmetric tokamak is derived in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The model suitable for the study of global geodesic acoustic modes (GGAMs) is designed. An example of the use of the developed model for derivation of the integral conditions for GGAM existence and of the corresponding dispersion relation is presented. The paper is dedicated to the memory of academician V.D. Shafranov.

  18. Motion of a compact toroid inside a cylindrical flux conserver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1980-10-13

    Compact toroids have been generated in a cylindrical resistive flux conserver. They are observed to rotate so that their major axis is perpendicular to the axis of the flux conserver. Subsequently they remain stationary and their magnetic fields decay with a time constant of about 100 ..mu..s. This is the first observation of the predicted tipping mode and its saturation when no external fields are present. The compact toroids contain toroidal fields and are initially prolate in shape.

  19. Motion of a compact toroid inside a cylindrical flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    Compact toroids have been generated in a cylindrical resistive flux conserver. They are observed to rotate so that their major axis is perpendicular to the axis of the flux conserver. Subsequently they remain stationary and their magnetic fields decay with a time constant of about 100 μs. This is the first observation of the predicted tipping mode and its saturation when no external fields are present. The compact toroids contain toroidal fields and are initially prolate in shape

  20. Stationary magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of toroidal plasma in rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missiato, O.

    1986-01-01

    The stationary equations of classical magnetohydrodynamics are utilized to study the toroidal motion of a thermonuclear magnetically - confined plasma with toroidal symmetry (Tokamak). In the present work, we considered a purely toroidal stationary rotation and te problem is reduced to studing a second order partial differencial equation of eliptic type Maschke-Perrin. Assuming that the temperature remains constant on the magnetic surfaces, an analitic solution, valid for low Mach numbers (M ≤ 0 .4), was obtained for the above-mentioned equation by means of a technique developed by Pantuso Sudano. From the solution found, we traced graphs for the quantities which described the equilibrium state of the plasma, namely: mass density, pressure, temperature, electric current density and toroidal magnetic field. Finally we compare this analitical model with others works which utilized differents analitical models and numerical simulations. We conclude that the solutions obtained are in good agreement with the previos results. In addition, however, our model contains the results of Sudano-Goes with the additional advantage of employing much simple analitical expressions. (author) [pt

  1. Collapse analysis of toroidal shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomares, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to determine the collapse characteristics of a toroidal shell using finite element method (FEM) analysis. The study also included free drop testing of a quarter scale prototype to verify the analytical results. The full sized toroidal shell has a 24-inch toroidal diameter with a 24-inch tubal diameter. The shell material is type 304 strainless steel. The toroidal shell is part of the GE Model 2000 transportation packaging, and acts as an energy absorbing device. The analyses performed were on a full sized and quarter scaled models. The finite element program used in all analyses was the LIBRA code. The analytical procedure used both the elasto-plastic and large displacement options within the code. The loading applied in the analyses corresponded to an impact of an infinite rigid plane oriented normal to the drop direction vector. The application of the loading continued incrementally until the work performed by the deforming structure equalled the kinetic energy developed in the free fall. The comparison of analysis and test results showed a good correlation

  2. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  3. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  4. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  5. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  6. Effects of 3D Magnetic Perturbations on Toroidal Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To lowest order tokamaks are two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric magnetic systems. But small 3D magnetic perturbations (both externally applied and from plasma instabilities) have many interesting and useful effects on tokamak (and quasi-symmetric stellarator) plasmas. Plasma transport equations that include these effects, especially on diamagnetic-level toroidal plasma rotation, have recently been developed. The 3D magnetic perturbations and their plasma effects can be classified according to their toroidal mode number n: low n (1 to 5) resonant (q = m/n in plasma) and non-resonant fields, medium n (due to toroidal field ripple), and high n (due to microturbulence). This paper concentrates on low and medium n perturbations. Low n non-resonant magnetic fields induce a neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) that damps toroidal plasma rotation throughout the plasma toward an offset flow in the counter-I p direction; recent tokamak experiments have confirmed and exploited these predictions by applying external low n non-resonant magnetic perturbations. Medium n perturbations have similar effects plus possible ripple trapping and resultant edge ion losses. A low n resonant magnetic field induces a toroidal plasma torque in the vicinity of the rational surface; when large enough it can stop plasma rotation there and lead to a locked mode, which often causes a plasma disruption. Externally applied 3D magnetic perturbations usually have many components; in the plasma their lowest n components are amplified by plasma responses, particularly at high beta. Low n plasma instabilities (e.g., NTMs, RWMs) cause additional 3D magnetic perturbations in tokamak plasmas; tearing modes can bifurcate the topology and form magnetic islands. Finally, multiple resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) can cause local magnetic stochasticity and influence H-mode edge pedestal transport. These various effects of 3D magnetic perturbations can be used to control the toroidal plasma

  7. Alfven continuum with toroidicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Mahajan, S.M.

    1985-06-01

    The symmetry property of the MHD wave propagation operator is utilized to express the toroidal eigenmodes as a superposition of the mutually orthogonal cylindrical modes. Because of the degeneracy among cylindrical modes with the same frequency but resonant surfaces of different helicity the toroidal perturbation produces a zeroth order mixing of the above modes. The toroidal eigenmodes of frequency ω 0 2 have multiple resonant surfaces, with each surface shifted relative to its cylindrical position and carrying a multispectral content. Thus a single helicity toroidal antenna of frequency ω 0 couples strongly to all different helicity resonant surfaces with matching local Alfven frequency. Zeroth order coupling between modes in the continuum and global Alfven modes also results from toroidicity and degeneracy. Our perturbation technique is the MHD counterpart of the quantum mechanical methods and is applicable through the entire range of the MHD spectrum

  8. Moving toroidal limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari; Miyahara, Akira.

    1983-06-01

    The concept of the limiter-divertor proposed by Mirnov is extended to a toroidal limiter-divertor (which we call moving toroidal limiter) using the stream of ferromagnetic balls coated with a low Z materials such as plastics, graphite and ceramics. An important advantage of the use of the ferromagnetic materials would be possible soft landing of the balls on a catcher, provided that the temperature of the balls is below Curie point. Moreover, moving toroidal limiter would work as a protector of the first wall not only against the vertical movement of plasma ring but also against the violent inward motion driven by major disruption because the orbit of the ball in the case of moving toroidal limiter distributes over the small major radius side of the toroidal plasma. (author)

  9. Samus Toroid Installation Fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-27

    The SAMUS (Small Angle Muon System) toroids have been designed and fabricated in the USSR and delivered to D0 ready for installation into the D0 detector. These toroids will be installed into the aperture of the EF's (End Toroids). The aperture in the EF's is 72-inch vertically and 66-inch horizontally. The Samus toroid is 70-inch vertically by 64-inch horizontally by 66-inch long and weighs approximately 38 tons. The Samus toroid has a 20-inch by 20-inch aperture in the center and it is through this aperture that the lift fixture must fit. The toroid must be 'threaded' through the EF aperture. Further, the Samus toroid coils are wound about the vertical portion of the aperture and thus limit the area where a lift fixture can make contact and not damage the coils. The fixture is designed to lift along a surface adjacent to the coils, but with clearance to the coil and with contact to the upper steel block of the toroid. The lift and installation will be done with the 50 ton crane at DO. The fixture was tested by lifting the Samus Toroid 2-inch off the floor and holding the weight for 10 minutes. Deflection was as predicted by the design calculations. Enclosed are sketches of the fixture and it relation to both Toroids (Samus and EF), along with hand calculations and an Finite Element Analysis. The PEA work was done by Kay Weber of the Accelerator Engineering Department.

  10. In vivo preclinical evaluation of the accuracy of toroidal-shaped HIFU treatments using a tumor-mimic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N'Djin, W A; Melodelima, D; Parmentier, H; Chapelon, J Y; Rivoire, M

    2010-01-01

    The pig is an ideal animal model for preclinical evaluation of HIFU treatments, especially in the liver. However, there is no liver tumor model available for pigs. In this work, we propose to study an in vivo tumor-mimic model as a tool for evaluating if a sonographycally guided HIFU treatment, delivered by a toroidal-shaped device dedicated for the treatment of liver metastases, is correctly located in the liver. One centimeter tumor-mimics were created in liver tissues. These tumor-mimics were detectable on ultrasound imaging and on gross pathology. Two studies were carried out. First, an in vivo study of tolerance at mid-term (30 days, 10 pigs) revealed that tumor-mimics are suitable for studying HIFU treatments at a preclinical stage, since local and biological tolerances were excellent. The dimensions of the tumor-mimics were reproducible (diameter at day 0: 9.7 ± 2.0 mm) and were the same as a function of time (p = 0.64). A second in vivo study was carried out in ten pigs. Tumor mimics were used as targets in liver tissues in order to determine if the HIFU treatment is correctly located in the liver. A procedure of extensive HIFU ablation using multiple HIFU lesions juxtaposed manually was then tested on eight tumor-mimics. In 88% of the cases (seven out of eight), tumor-mimics were treated with negative margins (≥1 mm) in all directions. On average, negative margins measured 10.0 ± 6.7 mm. These tumor-mimics constitute an excellent reference for studying in vivo the accuracy of HIFU therapy in the liver.

  11. Modeling of the three-dimensional motion of toroidal magnetic clouds in the inner heliosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romashets, E.; Vandas, Marek; Poedts, S.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 466, č. 1 (2007), s. 357-365 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506; GA ČR GA205/06/0875 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : magnetic cloud s * interplanetary magnetic field Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2007

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric systems with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, N.L.P.

    1986-01-01

    A model for studying magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymetrically confined plasma with toroidal rotation, extended to the Grad. Shafranov equation is presented. The expression used for the scalar pressure is modifiec, and the influence of toroidal magnetic field is included, The equation for general motion of axisymetrically confined plasma, particularizing for rotation movements is described. Two cases are compared: one supposes the entropy as a function of poloidal magnetic flux and other supposes the temperature as a function of flux. The equations for these two cases obtaining a simplified expression by others approximations are established. The proposed model is compared with Shibata model, which uses density as function of flux, and with the ideal spheromak model. A set of cases taking in account experimental data is studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Numerical determination of axisymmetric toroidal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Dalhed, H.E.; Greene, J.M.

    1978-07-01

    Numerical schemes for the determination of stationary axisymmetric toroidal equilibria appropriate for modeling real experimental devices are given. Iterative schemes are used to solve the elliptic nonlinear partial differential equation for the poloidal flux function psi. The principal emphasis is on solving the free boundary (plasma-vacuum interface) equilibrium problem where external current-carrying toroidal coils support the plasma column, but fixed boundary (e.g., conducting shell) cases are also included. The toroidal current distribution is given by specifying the pressure and either the poloidal current or the safety factor profiles as functions of psi. Examples of the application of the codes to tokamak design at PPPL are given

  14. Rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1995-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three dimensional and plane fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localised below the plane fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension. (author)

  15. External field threshold for the unlocking of magnetic islands in the presence of resistive Wall effects and toroidal mode coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, R.; Lazzaro, E.

    2000-01-01

    The unlocking of static resistive tearing modes by rotating external magnetic perturbations such as those which may arise from the natural tokamak error-field is discussed. For a single mode the balance between the accelerating torque imparted by the error-field and the braking torque due to the interaction of the mode with the wall sets a threshold for the error-field current [H. P. Furth et al. Phys. Fluids 6, 459 (1963)], below which the mode frequency will not lock to the error-field frequency. If the mode resonant with the error-field is coupled to another mode with a rational surface located elsewhere in the plasma, the unlocking process is more elaborated and substantial modifications to the current threshold are expected. The present analysis may contribute to the explanation of some mode unlocking events in tokamak discharges with a non negligible error-field. (orig.)

  16. THEORETICAL MODELING OF THE FEEDBACK STABILIZATION OF EXTERNAL MHD MODES IN TOROIDAL GEOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHANCE, M.S.; CHU, M.S.; OKABAYASHI, M.; TURNBULL, A.D.

    2001-02-01

    OAK-B135 A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism against external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools--the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code--have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modeled in θ, with only a single harmonic variation in φ. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model have been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved

  17. Analytic model of the radiation-dominated decay of a compact toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The coaxial-gun, compact-torus experiments at LLNL and LASNL are believed to be radiation-dominated, in the sense that most or all of the input energy is lost by impurity radiation. This paper presents a simple analytic model of the radiation-dominated decay of a compact torus, and demonstrates that several striking features of the experiment (finite lifetime, linear current decay, insensitivity of the lifetime to density or stored magnetic energy) may also be explained by the hypothesis that impurity radiation dominates the energy loss. The model incorporates the essential features of the more elaborate 1 1/2-D simulations of Shumaker et al., yet is simple enough to be solved exactly. Based on the analytic results, a simple criterion is given for the maximum tolerable impurity density

  18. Modeling the Compression of Merged Compact Toroids by Multiple Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ron; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A fusion propulsion scheme has been proposed that makes use of the merging of a spherical distribution of plasma jets to dynamically form a gaseous liner. The gaseous liner is used to implode a magnetized target to produce the fusion reaction in a standoff manner. In this paper, the merging of the plasma jets to form the gaseous liner is investigated numerically. The Los Alamos SPHINX code, based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to model the interaction of the jets. 2-D and 3-D simulations have been performed to study the characteristics of the resulting flow when these jets collide. The results show that the jets merge to form a plasma liner that converge radially which may be used to compress the central plasma to fusion conditions. Details of the computational model and the SPH numerical methods will be presented together with the numerical results.

  19. Review of the Advanced Toroidal Facility program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Murakami, M.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the history and design goals of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The ATF is nearing completion at ORNL with device completion expected in May 1987 and first useful plasma operation in June/July 1987. ATF is a moderate-aspect-ratio torsatron, the world's largest stellarator facility with R = 2.1 m, α bar = 0.3 m and B = 2 T (5-s pulse) or 1 T (steady-state capability). It has been specifically designed to support the US tokamak program by studying important toroidal confinement issues in a similar magnetic geometry that allows external control of the magnetic configuration properties and their radial profiles: transform, shear, well depth, shaping, axis topology, etc. ATF will operate in a current-free model which allows separation of current-driven and pressure-driven plasma behavior. It also complements the world stellarator program in its magnetic configuration (between Heliotron-E and W VII-AS) and its capabilities (large size, good access, steady state capability, second stability access, etc.). For both roles ATF will require high-power long-pulse heating to carry out its physics goals since the high power NBI pulse is limited to 0.3 s. The ATF program focuses on demonstrating the principles of high-beta, steady-state operation in toroidal geometry through its study of: (1) scaling of beta limits with magnetic configuration properties and the plasma behavior in the second stability regime; (2) transport scaling at low collisionality and the role/control of electric field; (3) control of plasma density and impurities using divertors; (4) plasma heating with NBI, ECH, ICH, and plasma fueling with gas puffing and pellet injection; and (5) optimization of the magnetic configuration

  20. Form factor of some types of toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryavko, V.I.; Litvinenko, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Obtained were the type of dependence between consumed power and formed field for toroidal helical-wound solenoids and the expression for the form factor analogous to the Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids. Determined were optimum dimensions of the helical winding of ''forceless'' toroidal solenoids satisfying the condition of the formation of maximum field at minimum consumed power. Investigations also covered some types of conventional toroidal solenoids. Presented in the paper diagrams permitted to chose dimensions of the considered toroidal solenoids according to their consumed power and winding material volume

  1. Development of 3D ferromagnetic model of tokamak core withstrong toroidal asymmetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, M.; Ďuran, Ivan; Svoboda, V.; Pánek, Radomír

    96-97, October (2015), s. 302-305 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology 2014(SOFT-28)/28./. San Sebastián, 29.09.2014-03.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2341; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * ferromagnetic core * model of ferromagnet * integral method * tokamak GOLEM Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.301, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379615002100

  2. Theoretical modeling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes of toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, M.S.; Chu, M.S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism against external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modeled in θ, with only a single harmonic variation in φ. An optimized configuration and placement of the feedback and sensor coils as well as the time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell have been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved. (author)

  3. Collisionless kinetic-fluid model of zonal flows in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Horton, W.

    2006-12-01

    A novel kinetic-fluid model is presented, which describes collisionless time evolution of zonal flows in tokamaks. In the new zonal-flow closure relations, the parallel heat fluxes are written by the sum of short- and long-time-evolution parts. The former part is given in the dissipative form of the parallel heat diffusion and relates to collisionless damping processes. The latter is derived from the long-time-averaged gyrocenter distribution and plays a major role in describing low-frequency or stationary zonal flows, for which the parallel heat fluxes are expressed in terms of the parallel flow as well as the nonlinear-source and initial-condition terms. It is shown analytically and numerically that, when applied to the zonal flow driven by either ion or electron temperature gradient turbulence, the kinetic-fluid equations including the new closure relations can reproduce the same long-time zonal-flow responses to the initial condition and to the turbulence source as those obtained from the gyrokinetic model. (author)

  4. Instability and electrical response of small laminar coflow diffusion flames under AC electric fields: Toroidal vortex formation and oscillating and spinning flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    Dynamical and electrical responses of a small coflow diffusion flame were investigated by applying a high-voltage alternating current (AC), to a fuel jet nozzle. High-speed imaging and electrical diagnostics were adopted to capture flame dynamics and electrical signals, such as voltage (V ), frequency (f ) and current (I ). In the V -f domain of 0-5kV and 0-5kHz, AC-driven instabilities, resulting in various flame modes such as an oscillation, pinch-off and spinning of flames were identified. Characteristic frequency of each mode was determined and a visualization of near-nozzle flow structures suggested a close causality of initial counter-rotating vortices (inner and outer toroidal vortices - ITV and OTV), to the other observed flame. An axisymmetric ITV shedding was identified within oscillating and pinch-off modes, while asymmetric ITV shedding was identified with the spinning mode. Integrated electric power over several AC periods correlated well with variation in the flame surface area for these instabilities, demonstrating that measured electric power is a potential indicator of combustion instabilities in electric-field-assisted combustion.

  5. Instability and electrical response of small laminar coflow diffusion flames under AC electric fields: Toroidal vortex formation and oscillating and spinning flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2016-06-24

    Dynamical and electrical responses of a small coflow diffusion flame were investigated by applying a high-voltage alternating current (AC), to a fuel jet nozzle. High-speed imaging and electrical diagnostics were adopted to capture flame dynamics and electrical signals, such as voltage (V ), frequency (f ) and current (I ). In the V -f domain of 0-5kV and 0-5kHz, AC-driven instabilities, resulting in various flame modes such as an oscillation, pinch-off and spinning of flames were identified. Characteristic frequency of each mode was determined and a visualization of near-nozzle flow structures suggested a close causality of initial counter-rotating vortices (inner and outer toroidal vortices - ITV and OTV), to the other observed flame. An axisymmetric ITV shedding was identified within oscillating and pinch-off modes, while asymmetric ITV shedding was identified with the spinning mode. Integrated electric power over several AC periods correlated well with variation in the flame surface area for these instabilities, demonstrating that measured electric power is a potential indicator of combustion instabilities in electric-field-assisted combustion.

  6. Applications of the Local Algebras of Vector Fields to the Modelling of Physical Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Bayak, Igor V.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the local algebras of linear vector fields that can be used in the mathematical modelling of physical space by building the dynamical flows of vector fields on eight-dimensional cylindrical or toroidal manifolds. It is shown that the topological features of the vector fields obey the Dirac equation when moving freely within the surface of a pseudo-sphere in the eight-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space.

  7. Application of plasma focus device to compression of toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1980-01-01

    A new concept of compressing a toroidal plasma using a plasma focus device is considered. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined merely by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to a sheet plasma in a focus device because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An initiation senario of plasma-linear is also proposed with a possible application of this concepts to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e., burning plasma vortex. (author)

  8. Comparative study of a constant-alpha force-free field and its approximations in an ideal toroid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vandas, Marek; Romashets, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 580, August (2015), A123/1-A123/7 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : solar wind * magnetic fields * magnetohydrodynamics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  9. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  10. Next generation toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one`s view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  11. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.W.; Lao, L.L.; Taylor, T.S.

    1994-11-01

    A new code demonstrates the stabilization of MHD ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation. A shifted model is used to elucidate the physics and numerically reconstructed equilibria are used to analyze DIII-D discharges. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and, in the shifted circle model, direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is a fraction of the Alfven frequency ω A = V A /qR. Shear stabilization is also demonstrated for an equilibrium reconstruction of a DIII-D VH-mode

  12. Axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium with flow and anisotropic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacono, R.; Bondeson, A.; Troyon, F.; Gruber, R.

    1989-10-01

    Axisymmetric toroidal plasma equilibria with mass flows and anisotropic pressure are investigated. The equilibrium system is derived for a general functional form of the pressures, which includes both fluid models, such as the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and the double-adiabatic models, and Grad's guiding centre model. This allows for detailed comparisons between the models and clarifies how the 'first hyperbolic region', occurring in the fluid theory when the poloidal flow is of the order of the poloidal sound speed, can be eliminated in guiding centre theory. In the case of a pure toroidal rotation, macroscopic equations of state are derived from the guiding centre model, characterized by a parallel temperature that is constant on each magnetic surface and a perpendicular temperature that varies with the magnetic field. The outward centrifugal shifts of the magnetic axis and of the mass density profile, due to toroidal rotation, are increased by anisotropy. The guiding centre model shows that poloidal flow produces an inward shift of the density profile, in contrast with the MHD result. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 17 refs

  13. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  14. Modelling of radial electric field profile for different divertor configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhansky, V; Kaveeva, E; Voskoboynikov, S; Counsell, G; Kirk, A; Meyer, H; Coster, D; Conway, G; Schirmer, J; Schneider, R

    2006-01-01

    The impact of divertor configuration on the structure of the radial electric field has been simulated by the B2SOLPS5.0 transport fluid code. It is shown that the change in the parallel flows in the scrape-off layer, which are transported through the separatrix due to turbulent viscosity and diffusivity, should result in variation of the radial electric field and toroidal rotation in the separatrix vicinity. The modelling predictions are compared with the measurements of the radial electric field for the low field side equatorial mid-plane of ASDEX Upgrade in lower, upper and double-null (DN) divertor configurations. The parallel (toroidal) flows in the scrape-off layer and mechanisms for their formation are analysed for different geometries. It is demonstrated that a spike in the electric field exists at the high field side equatorial mid-plane in the connected DN divertor configuration. Its origin is connected with different potential drops between the separatrix vicinity and divertor plates in the two disconnected scrape-off layers, while the separatrix should be at almost the same potential. The spike might be important for additional turbulent suppression

  15. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J.

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately

  16. US-Japan workshop on field-reversed configurations with steady-state high-temperature fusion plasmas and the 11th US-Japan workshop on compact toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, D.C.; Fernandez, J.C.; Rej, D.J. (comps.)

    1990-05-01

    The US-Japan Workshop on Field-Reversed Configurations with Steady-State High-Temperature Fusion Plasma and the 11th US-Japan Workshop on Compact Toroids were held at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico on November 7--9, 1989. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the workshops as submitted by the authors. These papers have been indexed separately.

  17. Poloidal and toroidal heat flux distribution in the CCT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Dhir, V.K.; Taylor, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Plasma heat flux to the Faraday shield panels of the UCLA Continuous Current Tokamak (CCT) has been measured calorimetrically in order to identify the dominant parameters affecting the spatial distribution of heat deposition. Three heating methods were investigated: audio frequency discharge cleaning, RF heating, and AC ohmic. Significant poloidal asymmetry is present in the heat flux distribution. On the average, the outer panels received 25-30% greater heat flux than the inner ones, with the ratio of maximum to minimum values attaining a difference of more than a factor of 2. As a diagnostic experiment the current to a selected toroidal field coil was reduced in order to locally deflect the toroidal field lines outward in a ripple-like fashion. Greatly enhanced heat deposition (up to a factor of 4) was observed at this location on the outside Faraday panels. The enhancement was greatest for conditions of low toroidal field and low neutral pressure, leading to low plasma densities, for which Coulomb collisions are the smallest. An exponential model based on a heat flux e-folding length describes the experimentally found localization of thermal energy quite adequately. (orig.)

  18. Current control necessary for toroidal plasma equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a significant amount of dipole current is necessary for the plasma equilibrium of toroidal configurations in general. Through the vector product with the poloidal field, this dipole current force has to balance with the hoop force of plasma pressure itself of the annular shape. The measurement of such a current of dipole type may be interesting for the confirmation of the plasma equilibrium in the toroidal system. Moreover it is certained that there is a new mode of a tokamak operation with such a dipole current component and with smaller vertical field than that based on the classical tokamak theory. (author) [pt

  19. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The s-α diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, ω A =V A /qR. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak; Projeto e analise dos circuitos de producao de campo magnetico toroidal e de formacao do plasma do Tokamak ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Structure of DNA toroids and electrostatic attraction of DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherstvy, A G

    2005-01-01

    DNA-DNA electrostatic attraction is considered as the driving force for the formation of DNA toroids in the presence of DNA condensing cations. This attraction comes from the DNA helical charge distribution and favours hexagonal toroidal cross-sections. The latter is in agreement with recent cryo-electron microscopy studies on DNA condensed with cobalt hexammine. We treat the DNA-DNA interactions within the modern theory of electrostatic interaction between helical macromolecules. The size and thickness of the toroids is calculated within a simple model; other models of stability of DNA toroids are discussed and compared

  2. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  3. An interim report on the materials and selection criteria analysis for the Compact Ignition Tokamak Toroidal Field Coil Turn-to-Turn Insulation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, V.W.; Dooley, J.B.; Hubrig, J.G.; Janke, C.J.; McManamy, T.J.; Welch, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria for the Compact Ignition Tokamak, Toroidal-Field (TF) Coil, Turn-to-Turn Insulation System require an insulation sheet and bonding system that will survive cryogenic cycling in a radiation environment and maintain structural integrity during exposure to the significant compressive and shear loads associated with each operating cycle. For thermosetting resin systems, a complex interactive dependency exists between optimum peak value, in-service property performance capabilities of candidate generic materials; key handling and processing parameters required to achieve their optimum in-service property performance as an insulation system; and suitability of their handling and processing parameters as a function of design configuration and assembly methodology. This dependency is assessed in a weighted study matrix in which two principal programmatic approaches for the development of the TF Coil Subassembly Insulation System have been identified. From this matrix study, two viable approaches to the fabrication of the insulation sheet were identified: use of a press-formed sheet bonded in place with epoxy for mechanical bonding and tolerance take-up and formation of the insulation sheet by placement of dry cloth and subsequent vacuum pressure impregnation. Laboratory testing was conducted to screen a number of combinations of resins and hardeners on a generic basis. These combinations were chosen for their performance in similar applications. Specimens were tested to screen viscosity, thermal-shock tolerance, and cryogenic tolerance. Cryogenic shock and cryogenic temperature proved to be extremely lethal to many combinations of resin, hardener, and cure. Two combinations survived: a heavily flexibilized bisphenol A resin with a flexibilized amine hardener and a bisphenol A resin with cycloaliphatic amine hardener. 7 refs., 12 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Overview of toroidal momentum transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, A.G.; Hornsby, W.A.; Angioni, C.; Hein, T.; Kluy, N.; Strintzi, D.; Tardini, G.; Bortolon, A.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F.J.; Snodin, A.P.; Szepesi, G.; Duval, B.; Fiederspiel, L.; Idomura, Y.; Mantica, P.; Parra, F.I.; Tala, T.; De Vries, P.; Weiland, J.

    2011-01-01

    Toroidal momentum transport mechanisms are reviewed and put in a broader perspective. The generation of a finite momentum flux is closely related to the breaking of symmetry (parity) along the field. The symmetry argument allows for the systematic identification of possible transport mechanisms. Those that appear to lowest order in the normalized Larmor radius (the diagonal part, Coriolis pinch, E x B shearing, particle flux, and up-down asymmetric equilibria) are reasonably well understood. At higher order, expected to be of importance in the plasma edge, the theory is still under development.

  5. Toroidal nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yutaka; Kasahara, Tatsuo; Takizawa, Teruhiro.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To design a device so as to be formed into a large-size and to arrange ports, through which neutral particles enter, in inclined fashion. Structure: Toroidal coils are wound about vacuum vessels which are divided into plural number. In the outer periphery of the vacuum vessels, ports are disposed inclined in the peripheral direction of the vacuum vessels and communicated with the vacuum vessels, and wall surfaces opposed to the ports of the toroidal coils adjacent at least the inclined sides of the ports are inclined substantially simularly to the port wall surfaces. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively.

  7. A steady-state axisymmetric toroidal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for achieving a steady state in an axisymmetric toroidal system are studied with emphasis on a very-high-beta field-reversed configuration. The analysis is carried out for the electromotive force produced by the Ohkawa current that is induced by neutral-beam injection. It turns out that, since the perpendicular component of the current j-vectorsub(perpendicular) to the magnetic field can be generated automatically by the diamagnetic effect, only the parallel component j-vectorsub(parallel) must be driven by the electromotive force. The drive of j-vectorsub(parallel) generates shear in the field line so that the pure toroidal field on the magnetic axis is rotated towards the plasma boundary and matched to the external field lines. This matching condition determines the necessary amount of injection beam current and power. It is demonstrated that a very-high-beta field-reversed configuration requires only a small amount of current-driving beam power because almost all the toroidal current except that close to the magnetic axis is carried by the diamagnetic current due to high beta. A low-beta tokamak, on the other hand, needs very high current-driving power since most of the toroidal current is composed of j-vectorsub(parallel) which must be driven by the beam. (author)

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Stability of a Toroidal Plasma's Separatrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, A. J.; Gimblett, C. G.

    2009-01-01

    Large tokamaks capable of fusion power production such as ITER, should avoid large edge localized modes (ELMs), thought to be triggered by an ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability due to current at the plasma's separatrix boundary. Unlike analytical work in a cylindrical approximation, numerical work finds the modes are stable. The plasma's separatrix might stabilize modes, but makes analytical and numerical work difficult. We generalize a cylindrical model to toroidal separatrix geometry, finding one parameter Δ ' determines stability. The conformal transformation method is generalized to allow nonzero derivatives of a function on a boundary, and calculation of the equilibrium vacuum field allows Δ ' to be found analytically. As a boundary more closely approximates a separatrix, we find the energy principle indicates instability, but the growth rate asymptotes to zero

  9. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  10. The barrel muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector has acquired its first cosmic event in a magnetic field produced by the barrel toroid magnet.

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A 3-D event display of a cosmic muon event, showing the path of a muon travelling through three layers of the barrel muon spectrometer. Three of the eight coils of the barrel toroid magnet can be seen in the top half of the drawing.

  11. Equations for the non linear evolution of the resistive tearing modes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edery, D.; Pellat, R.; Soule, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    Following the tokamak ordering, we simplify the resistive MHD equations in toroidal geometry. We obtain a closed system of non linear equations for two scalar potentials of the magnetic and velocity fields and for plasma density and temperature. If we expand these equations in the inverse of aspect ratio they are exact to the two first orders. Our formalism should correctly describe the mode coupling by curvature effects /1/ and the toroidal displacement of magnetic surfaces /2/. It provides a natural extension of the well known cylindrical model /3/ and is now being solved on computer

  12. Gauge field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becchi, C.; Rouet, A.; Stora, R.

    1975-10-01

    Stora's analysis is continued in discussing the nonabelian (Yang-Mills) gauge field models (G.F.M.). The gauge independence of the physical scattering operator is discussed in some details and the connection between its unitary and the Slavnov symmetry outlined. Only the models involving semisimple gauge groups are considered. This greatly simplifies the analysis of the possible quantum corrections to the Quantum Action Principle which is reduced to the study of the cohomology group of the Lie algebra characterizing the gauge theory. The discussion is at the classical level for the algebraic properties of the SU(2) Higgs-Kibble-Englert-Brout-Faddeev-Popov lagrangian and its invariance under Slavnov identity transformations is exhibited. The renormalization of the Slavnov identity in the G.M.F. involving semisimple gauge groups is studied. The unitary and gauge independence of the physical S operator in the SU(2) H.K. model is dealt with [fr

  13. Guiding Center Equations in Toroidal Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Roscoe; Zakharov, Leonid

    2002-01-01

    Guiding center equations for particle motion in a general toroidal magnetic equilibrium configuration are derived using magnetic coordinates. Previous derivations made use of Boozer coordinates, in which the poloidal and toroidal angle variables are chosen so that the Jacobian is inversely proportional to the square of the magnetic field. It is shown that the equations for guiding center motion in any equilibrium possessing nested flux surfaces have exactly the same simple form as those derived in this special case. This allows the use of more spatially uniform coordinates instead of the Boozer coordinates, greatly increasing the accuracy of calculations in large beta and strongly shaped equilibria

  14. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  15. Toroidal asymmetries in divertor impurity influxes in NSTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Scotti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toroidal asymmetries in divertor carbon and lithium influxes were observed in NSTX, due to toroidal differences in surface composition, tile leading edges, externally-applied three-dimensional (3D fields and toroidally-localized edge plasma modifications due to radio frequency heating. Understanding toroidal asymmetries in impurity influxes is critical for the evaluation of total impurity sources, often inferred from measurements with a limited toroidal coverage. The toroidally-asymmetric lithium deposition induced asymmetries in divertor lithium influxes. Enhanced impurity influxes at the leading edge of divertor tiles were the main cause of carbon toroidal asymmetries and were enhanced during edge localized modes. Externally-applied 3D fields led to strike point splitting and helical lobes observed in divertor impurity emission, but marginal changes to the toroidally-averaged impurity influxes. Power coupled to the scrape-off layer SOL plasma during radio frequency (RF heating of H-mode discharges enhanced impurity influxes along the non-axisymmetric divertor footprint of flux tubes connecting to plasma in front of the RF antenna.

  16. Anisotropic diffusion in a toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Paul F

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's applications oriented SciDAC project, three model problems have been proposed by the Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamics Modeling to test the potential of numerical algorithms for challenging magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problems that are required for future fusion development. The first of these, anisotropic diffusion in a toroidal geometry, is considered in this note

  17. Escape of magnetic toroids from the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, John W.; Rust, David M.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of heliospheric magnetic fields at 1 AU shows that 10 24 Mx of net toroidal flux escapes from the Sun per solar cycle. This rate is compared with the apparent rate of flux emergence at the solar surface, and it is concluded that escaping toroids will remove at least 20% of the emerging flux, and may remove as much as 100% of emerging flux if multiple eruptions occur on the toroids. The data imply that flux escapes the Sun with an efficiency far exceeding Parker's upper limit estimate of 3%. Toroidal flux escape is almost certainly the source of the observed overwinding of the interplanetary magnetic field spiral. Two mechanisms to facilitate net flux escape are discussed: helicity charging to push open the fields and flux transport with reconnection to close them off. We estimate the Sun will shed ∼2x10 45 Mx 2 of magnetic helicity per solar cycle, leading to a mean helicity density of 100 Mx 2 cm -3 at 1 AU, which agrees well with observations

  18. Discussion of discrete D shape toroidal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiho, Katsuyuki; Ohara, Takeshi; Agatsuma, Ko; Onishi, Toshitada

    1988-01-01

    A novel design for a toroidal coil, called the D shape coil, was reported by J. File. The coil conductors are in pure tension and then subject to no bending moment. This leads to a smaller number of emf supports in a simpler configuration than that with the conventional toroidal coil of circular cross-section. The contours of the D shape are given as solutions of a differential equation. This equation includes the function of the magnetic field distribution in the conductor region which is inversely proportional to the winding radius. It is therefore important to use the exact magnetic field distribution. However the magnetic field distribution becomes complicated when the D shape toroidal coil is comprised of discrete coils and also depends on the D shape configuration. A theory and a computer program for designing the practical pure-tension toroidal coil are developed. Using this computer code, D shape conductors are calculated for various numbers of discrete coils and the results are compared. Electromagnetic forces in the coils are also calculated. It is shown that the hoop stress in the conductors depends only on the total ampere-turns of the coil when the contours of the D shape are similar. (author)

  19. Femtometer toroidal structures in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, J.L.; Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.; Wiringa, R.B.; Schiavilla, R.; Arriaga, A.

    1996-01-01

    The two-nucleon density distributions in states with isospin T=0, spin S=1, and projection M S =0 and ±1 are studied in 2 H, 3,4 He, 6,7 Li, and 16 O. The equidensity surfaces for M S =0 distributions are found to be toroidal in shape, while those of M S =±1 have dumbbell shapes at large density. The dumbbell shapes are generated by rotating tori. The toroidal shapes indicate that the tensor correlations have near maximal strength at r 3 He, 4 He, and 6 Li. The toroidal distribution has a maximum-density diameter of ∼1 fm and a half-maximum density thickness of ∼0.9 fm. Many realistic models of nuclear forces predict these values, which are supported by the observed electromagnetic form factors of the deuteron, and also predicted by classical Skyrme effective Lagrangians, related to QCD in the limit of infinite colors. Due to the rather small size of this structure, it could have a revealing relation to certain aspects of QCD. Experiments to probe this structure and its effects in nuclei are suggested. Pair distribution functions in other T,S channels are also discussed; those in T,S=1,1 have anisotropies expected from one-pion-exchange interactions. The tensor correlations in T,S=0,1 states are found to deplete the number of T,S=1,0 pairs in nuclei and cause a reduction in nuclear binding energies via many-body effects. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  20. Generation of toroidal pre-heat plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagayasu; Tamaru, Ken; Nagata, Akiyoshi.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics of toroidal plasma in the initial stage of electric discharge were investigated. A small toroidal-pinch system was used for the present work. A magnetic probe was used to measure the magnetic field. The time of beginning of discharge was determined by observing the variation of the magnetic field. The initial gas pressure dependence of the induced electric field regions, in which electric discharge can be caused, was studied. It is necessary to increase the initial induced electric field for starting discharge. The delay time of large current discharge was measured, and it was about 2 microsecond. Dependences of the electric fields at the beginning of discharge on the charging voltage of capacitors, on the initial gas pressure, and on the discharge frequency were studied. The formation mechanism of plasma column was analyzed. (Kato, T.)

  1. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.; Mazzitelli, G.

    1984-01-01

    The article is a rather detailed report on the highlights in the area of the ''Heating in toroidal plasmas'', as derived from the presentations and discussions at the international symposium with the same name, held in Rome, March 1984. The symposium covered both the physics (experiments and theory) and technology of toroidal fusion plasma heating. Both large fusion devices (either already in operation or near completion) requiring auxiliary heating systems at the level of tens of megawatts, as well as physics of their heating processes and their induced side effects (as studied on smaller devices), received attention. Substantial progress was reported on the broad front of auxiliary plasma heating and Ohmic heating. The presentation of the main conclusions of the symposium is divided under the following topics: neutral-beam heating, Alfven wave heating, ion cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating, RF current drive, electron cyclotron heating, Ohmic heating and special contributions

  2. Heating in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on the 2nd Joint Grenoble-Varenna International Symposium on Heating in Toroidal Plasmas, held at Como, Italy, from the 3-12 September 1980. Important problems in relation to the different existing processes of heating. The plasma were identified and discussed. Among others, the main processes discussed were: a) neutral beam heating, b) ion-(electron)-cyclotron resonance heating, c) hybrid resonance and low frequency heating

  3. Formation of a compact torus using a toroidal plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.A.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Myers, Levine and Pincosy earlier reported results using a toroidal plasma gun. The device differs from the usual coaxial plasma gun in the use of a strong toroidal bias current for enhanced efficiency, a pair of disk-like accelerating electrodes for reduced viscosity and a fast pulsed toroidal gas valve for more effective use of the injected gas sample. In addition, a technique is used for generating a toroidal current in the plasma ring. The combination offers an opportunity to deliver a plasma with a large amount of energy and to vary the density and relative toroidal and poloidal magnetic field intensities over a range of values. It is the purpose of this paper to report further experimental results, to project the gun's applications to the formation of a compact torus, and to propose a simple modification of the present apparatus as a test

  4. Toroidal mode-conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaun, A.; Hellsten, T.; Chiu, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Mode-conversion is studied in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighborhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave which deposits the wave energy through resonant interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted and could in experiments be driven to large amplitudes so as to interact efficiently with fast particles. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 48 refs

  5. Toroidal vortices in resistive magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.; Bates, J.W.; Li, S.

    1997-01-01

    When a time-independent electric current flows toroidally in a uniform ring of electrically conducting fluid, a Lorentz force results, jxB, where j is the local electric current density, and B is the magnetic field it generates. Because of purely geometric effects, the curl of jxB is nonvanishing, and so jxB cannot be balanced by the gradient of any scalar pressure. Taking the curl of the fluid close-quote s equation of motion shows that the net effect of the jxB force is to generate toroidal vorticity. Allowed steady states necessarily contain toroidal vortices, with flows in the poloidal directions. The flow pattern is a characteristic open-quotes double smoke ringclose quotes configuration. The effect seems quite general, although it is analytically simple only in special limits. One limit described here is that of high viscosity (low Reynolds number), with stress-free wall boundary conditions on the velocity field, although it is apparent that similar mechanical motions will result for no-slip boundaries and higher Reynolds numbers. A rather ubiquitous connection between current-carrying toroids and vortex rings seems to be implied, one that disappears in the open-quotes straight cylinderclose quotes limit. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  7. On the parametric cyclotron heating of a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanivsky, K.C.; Punithavelu, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of heating the ionic component of a dense plasma at the parametric cyclotron resonance, using a section of the conducting toroidal chamber of a large scale Tokamak as a resonance cavity, is considered. It is suggested to use the mode TE 011 to overcome the difficulties with the penetration of HF fields into such a dense plasma. The experimental investigation of parametric cyclotron heating of electrons in a overdense plasma (n/nsub(cut off)=10 2 ) on such a model has given hopeful results

  8. Self-consistent perturbed equilibrium with neoclassical toroidal torque in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Logan, Nikolas C.

    2017-01-01

    Toroidal torque is one of the most important consequences of non-axisymmetric fields in tokamaks. The well-known neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) is due to the second-order toroidal force from anisotropic pressure tensor in the presence of these asymmetries. This work shows that the first-order toroidal force originating from the same anisotropic pressure tensor, despite having no flux surface average, can significantly modify the local perturbed force balance and thus must be included in perturbed equilibrium self-consistent with NTV. The force operator with an anisotropic pressure tensor is not self-adjoint when the NTV torque is finite and thus is solved directly for each component. This approach yields a modified, non-self-adjoint Euler-Lagrange equation that can be solved using a variety of common drift-kinetic models in generalized tokamak geometry. The resulting energy and torque integral provides a unique way to construct a torque response matrix, which contains all the information of self-consistent NTV torque profiles obtainable by applying non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma. This torque response matrix can then be used to systematically optimize non-axisymmetric field distributions for desired NTV profiles. Published by AIP Publishing.

  9. Superconducting endcap toroid design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, C.R.; Baynham, D.E.; Holtom, E.; Coombs, R.C.

    1992-10-01

    The Atlas Experiment proposed for the LHC machine will use toroidal magnet systems to achieve high muon momentum resolutions. One of the options under consideration is an air cored superconducting toroidal magnet system consisting of a long barrel toroid with small and cap toroids inserted in it to provide high resolution at high pseudorapidity. The design of the barrel toroid has been studied over the past two years and the design outline is given in a Saclay Report. More recently consideration has been given to an end cap toroid system which is based on air cored superconducting coils. This report presents the basic engineering design of such a system, the proposals for fabrication, assembly and installation, and an outline cost estimate for one end cap is presented in Appendix 1.

  10. Supporting device for Toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the response of a toroidal coil supporting device upon earthquakes and improve the earthquake proofness in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Constitution: Structural materials having large longitudinal modulus and enduring great stresses, for example, stainless steels are used as the toroidal coil supporting legs and heat insulating structural materials are embedded in a nuclear reactor base mats below the supporting legs. Furthermore, heat insulating concretes are spiked around the heat insulating structural materials to prevent the intrusion of heat to the toroidal coils. The toroidal coils are kept at cryogenic state and superconductive state for the conductors. In this way, the period of proper vibrations of the toroidal coils and the toroidal coil supporting structures can be shortened thereby decreasing the seismic response. Furthermore, since the strength of the supporting legs is increased, the earthquake proofness of the coils can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemon, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations

  13. Neoclassical transport in toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.

    1992-01-01

    The neoclassical theory of general toroidal equilibria is reformulated. The toroidal equilibrium of tokamaks and stellarators are described in Hamada coordinates. The relevant geometrical parameters are identified and it is shown how the reduction of Pfirsch-Schluter currents affects neoclassical transport and bootstrap effects. General flux-friction relations between thermodynamic forces and fluxes are derived. In drift-kinetic approximation the neoclassical transport coefficients are Onsager symmetric. Since a toroidal loop voltage is included, the theory is valid for all toroidal systems. (Author)

  14. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  15. Toroidal equilibrium and radial profiles from magnetic measurements in Extrap T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, Per; Jin Li; Tennfors, Einar

    1991-01-01

    The toroidal equilibrium position in the Extrap T1 toroidal Z-pinch is studied by measuring the currents induced in the external octupole field rings. Radial profiles are obtained by an internal magnetic coil array. From the magnetic field, profiles of current density, plasma pressure, safety factor, resistivity and input power density are deduced. A polynomial model is developed to simulate the measured profiles. The classical ion heat conduction losses in Extrap discharges are calculated using this model and compared to the power input. for polynomials matched to magnetic field profiles measured in present experiments, these losses are small. By varying the coefficients of the polynomials, a region is found where the power input can balance the classical heat conduction losses at higher values of Θ and β o . (Author)

  16. Runaway electrons in toroidal discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoepfel, H.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of runaway electrons in toroidal devices are reviewed here, with particular reference to tokamaks. The complex phenomenology of runaway effects, which have been the subject of research for the past twenty years, is organized within the framework of a number of physical models. The mechanisms and rates for runaway production are discussed first, followed by sections on runaway-driven kinetic relaxation processes and runaway orbit confinement. Next, the equilibrium and stability of runaway-dominated discharges are reviewed. Models for runaway production at early times in the discharge and the scaling of runaway phenomena to larger devices are also discussed. Finally, detection techniques and possible applications of runaways are mentioned. (author)

  17. Finite toroidal flow generated by unstable tearing mode in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, G. Z., E-mail: haogz@swip.ac.cn; Wang, A. K.; Xu, Y. H.; He, H. D.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sun, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academic of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Cui, S. Y. [School of Mathematics and Statistics Science, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2014-12-15

    The neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity torque and electromagnetic torque, generated by tearing mode (TM) in a toroidal plasma, are numerically investigated using the MARS-Q code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 042503 (2013)]. It is found that an initially unstable tearing mode can intrinsically drive a toroidal plasma flow resulting in a steady state solution, in the absence of the external momentum input and external magnetic field perturbation. The saturated flow is in the order of 0.5%ω{sub A} at the q=2 rational surface in the considered case, with q and ω{sub A} being the safety factor and the Alfven frequency at the magnetic axis, respectively. The generation of the toroidal flow is robust, being insensitive to the given amplitude of the perturbation at initial state. On the other hand, the flow amplitude increases with increasing the plasma resistivity. Furthermore, the initially unstable tearing mode is fully stabilized by non-linear interaction with the self-generated toroidal flow.

  18. Toroidal visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic steady states contain vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.W.; Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    Poloidal velocity fields seem to be a fundamental feature of resistive toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) steady states. They are a consequence of force balance in toroidal geometry, do not require any kind of instability, and disappear in the open-quotes straight cylinderclose quotes (infinite aspect ratio) limit. If a current density j results from an axisymmetric toroidal electric field that is irrotational inside a torus, it leads to a magnetic field B such that ∇x(jxB) is nonvanishing, so that the Lorentz force cannot be balanced by the gradient of any scalar pressure in the equation of motion. In a steady state, finite poloidal velocity fields and toroidal vorticity must exist. Their calculation is difficult, but explicit solutions can be found in the limit of low Reynolds number. Here, existing calculations are generalized to the more realistic case of no-slip boundary conditions on the velocity field and a circular toroidal cross section. The results of this paper strongly suggest that discussions of confined steady states in toroidal MHD must include flows from the outset. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  19. On steady poloidal and toroidal flows in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClements, K. G.; Hole, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of poloidal and toroidal flows on tokamak plasma equilibria are examined in the magnetohydrodynamic limit. ''Transonic'' poloidal flows of the order of the sound speed multiplied by the ratio of poloidal magnetic field to total field B θ /B can cause the (normally elliptic) Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to become hyperbolic in part of the solution domain. It is pointed out that the range of poloidal flows for which the GS equation is hyperbolic increases with plasma beta and B θ /B, thereby complicating the problem of determining spherical tokamak plasma equilibria with transonic poloidal flows. It is demonstrated that the calculation of the hyperbolicity criterion can be easily modified when the assumption of isentropic flux surfaces is replaced with the more tokamak-relevant one of isothermal flux surfaces. On the basis of the latter assumption, a simple expression is obtained for the variation of density on a flux surface when poloidal and toroidal flows are simultaneously present. Combined with Thomson scattering measurements of density and temperature, this expression could be used to infer information on poloidal and toroidal flows on the high field side of a tokamak plasma, where direct measurements of flows are not generally possible. It is demonstrated that there are four possible solutions of the Bernoulli relation for the plasma density when the flux surfaces are assumed to be isothermal, corresponding to four distinct poloidal flow regimes. Finally, observations and first principles-based theoretical modeling of poloidal flows in tokamak plasmas are briefly reviewed and it is concluded that there is no clear evidence for the occurrence of supersonic poloidal flows.

  20. Curvature driven instabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.

    1986-11-01

    The electromagnetic ballooning mode, the curvature driven trapped electron mode and the toroidally induced ion temperature gradient mode have been studies. Eigenvalue equations have been derived and solved both numerically and analytically. For electromagnetic ballooning modes the effects of convective damping, finite Larmor radius, higher order curvature terms, and temperature gradients have been investigated. A fully toroidal fluid ion model has been developed. It is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for an instability below the MHD limit is the presence of an ion temperature gradient. Analytical dispersion relations giving results in good agreement with numerical solutions are also presented. The curvature driven trapped electron modes are found to be unstable for virtually all parameters with growth rates of the order of the diamagnetic drift frequency. Studies have been made, using both a gyrokinetic ion description and the fully toroidal ion model. Both analytical and numerical results are presented and are found to be in good agreement. The toroidally induced ion temperature gradients modes are found to have a behavior similar to that of the curvature driven trapped electron modes and can in the electrostatic limit be described by a simple quadratic dispersion equation. (author)

  1. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath. II. Towards a first principles theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auluck, S. K. H.

    2017-11-01

    This paper continues earlier discussion [S. K. H. Auluck, Phys. Plasmas 21, 102515 (2014)] concerning the formulation of conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy in a local curvilinear coordinate system in the dense plasma focus. This formulation makes use of the revised Gratton-Vargas snowplow model [S. K. H. Auluck, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)], which provides an analytically defined imaginary surface in three dimensions which resembles the experimentally determined shape of the plasma. Unit vectors along the local tangent to this surface, along the azimuth, and along the local normal define a right-handed orthogonal local curvilinear coordinate system. The simplifying assumption that physical quantities have significant variation only along the normal enables writing laws of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in the form of effectively one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations using expressions for various differential operators derived for this coordinate system. This formulation demonstrates the highly non-trivial result that the axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions, experimentally observed by multiple prestigious laboratories, are natural consequences of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in the curved geometry of the dense plasma focus current sheath. The present paper continues the discussion in the context of a 3-region shock structure similar to the one experimentally observed: an unperturbed region followed by a hydrodynamic shock containing some current followed by a magnetic piston. Rankine-Hugoniot conditions are derived, and expressions are obtained for the specific volumes and pressures using the mass-flux between the hydrodynamic shock and the magnetic piston and current fraction in the hydrodynamic shock as unknown parameters. For the special case of a magnetic piston that remains continuously in contact with the fluid being pushed, the theory gives closed form algebraic results for the

  2. Model of unified gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1998-04-01

    In this work, we discuss the physical ideas which represents the basis for the unified gauge field model. Despite of the difficulties that we presently have for embodying in a natural manner muons and hadrons in that model, we have the feeling that we are on the way which seems to lead to the construction of a theory in which the Maxwell electromagnetic field and the Fermi weak interaction field are manifestations of a unique subjacent physical entity - the unified gauge fields. (author)

  3. Quantum mechanics of toroidal anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    We consider a toroidal solenoid with an electric charge attached to it. It turns out that statistical properties of the wave function describing interacting toroidal anions depend on both their relative position and orientation. The influence of the particular gauge choice on the exchange properties of the wave function is studied. 30 refs.; 6 figs

  4. Confinement time exceeding one second for a toroidal electron plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, J P; Stoneking, M R

    2008-04-18

    Nearly steady-state electron plasmas are trapped in a toroidal magnetic field for the first time. We report the first results from a new toroidal electron plasma experiment, the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II, in which electron densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3) are trapped in a 270-degree toroidal arc (670 G toroidal magnetic field) by application of trapping potentials to segments of a conducting shell. The total charge inferred from measurements of the frequency of the m=1 diocotron mode is observed to decay on a 3 s time scale, a time scale that approaches the predicted limit due to magnetic pumping transport. Three seconds represents approximately equal to 10(5) periods of the lowest frequency plasma mode, indicating that nearly steady-state conditions are achieved.

  5. Transport in the high temperature core of toroidal confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental results on confinement of hot plasmas in toroidal devices, particularly tokamaks, are discussed from general principal points of view and related to predictions from a toroidal drift wave model using a full transport matrix including off diagonal terms. A reactive fluid model corresponding to a two pole approximation of the kinetic response is used. This model has the ability to reproduce both adiabatic and isothermal limits of the perpendicular dynamics. 106 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  6. Commissioning Test of ATLAS End-Cap Toroidal Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Foussat, A; Benoit, P; Jeckel, M; Olyunin, A; Kopeykin, N; Stepanov, V; Deront, L; Olesen, G; Ponts, X; Ravat, S; Sbrissa, K; Barth, J; Bremer, J; Delruelle, J; Metselaar, J; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O; Buskop, J; Baynham, D E; Carr, F S; Holtom, E

    2009-01-01

    The system of superconducting toroids in the ATLAS experiment at CERN consists of three magnets. The Barrel Toroid was assembled and successfully tested in 2006. Next, two End-Cap Toroids have been tested on surface at 77 K and installed in the cavern, 100-m underground. The End Cap Toroids are based on Al stabilized Nb-Ti/Cu Rutherford cables, arranged in double pancake coils and conduction cooled at 4.6 K. The nominal current is 20.5 kA at 4.1 T peak field in the windings and the stored energy is 250 MJ per toroid. Prior to final testing of the entire ATLAS Toroidal system, each End Cap Toroid passed a commissioning test up to 21 kA to guarantee a reliable performance in the final assembly. In this paper the test results are described. It includes the stages of test preparation, isolation vacuum pumping and leak testing, cooling down, step-by-step charging to full current, training quenches and quench recovery. By fast discharges the quench detection and protection system was checked to demonstrate a safe e...

  7. Device for supporting a toroidal coil in a toroidal type nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Hakaru; Sato, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily manufacture a center block having a strength sufficient to withstand an electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a toroidal coil and to increase its reliability. Structure: In a device for supporting toroidal coils wherein the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a plurality of toroidal coils arranged in toroidal fashion, the contact surface between the toroidal coil and the center block is arranged parallel to the center axis of toroidal so as to receive the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of the toroidal coil as the component of force in a radial direction. (Taniai, N.)

  8. A method for external measurement of toroidal equilibrium parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Hellblom, G.; Brynolf, J.

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for determining from external magnetic field measurements the horizontal shift, the vertical shift and the poloidal field asymmetry parameter (Λ) of a toroidal plasma in force equilibrium. The magnetic measurements consist of two toroidal differential flux loops, giving the average vertical magnetic field and the average radial magnetic field respectively, together with cosine-coils for obtaining the m=1 cosine harmonic of the external poloidal magnetic field component. The method is used to analyse the evolution of the toroidal equilibrium during reversed-field pinch discharges in the Extrap T1-U device. We find that good equilibrium control is needed for long plasma pulses. For non-optimized externally applied vertical fields, the diagnostic clearly shows a horizontal drift motion of the pinch resulting in earlier discharge termination. (au)

  9. TORFA - toroidal reactor for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The near-term goal of the US controlled fusion program should be the development, for practical applications, of an intense, quasi-steady, reliable 14-MeV neutron source with an electrical utilization efficiency at least 10 times larger than the value characterizing beam/solid-target neutron generators. This report outlines a method for implementing that goal, based on tokamak fusion reactors featuring resistive toroidal-field coils designed for ease of demountability

  10. Progress in the design of a superconducting toroidal magnet for the ATLAS detector on LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baze, J.M.; Berriaud, C.; Cure, C.

    1996-01-01

    The toroidal system consists of three air core superconducting toroids. The barrel toroid covers the central region over a length of 26 m with an inner bore of 9.4 m and an outer diameter of 19.5 m. The two end cap toroids are inserted in the barrel at each end over a length of 5.6 m with an inner bore of 1.26 m. Each toroid consists of eight flat coils assembled around the beam axis and carrying 3 MAt each. The present paper describes the barrel toroid. Features of the design which are presented include the electromagnetic design, field and forces calculations, the basic concept of indirectly cooled aluminium conductor and monolithic fully impregnated winding, the description of the alu-alloy mechanical structure, the thermal analysis and the quench protection. Cryogenics principles, cryostat and toroid assembly procedures are summarized. Unsymmetric loadings, fault sensing and stability are discussed, in relation with the requirements of transparency

  11. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing

  12. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a Monte Carlo method to estimate the transport of different groups of particles for plasmas in toroidal geometries. This method can determine the important transport mechanisms driving the anomalous transport by comparing the numerical results with the experimental data. The important groups of particles whose transport can be estimated by this method include runaway electrons, thermal electrons, both passing and trapped diagnostic beam ions etc. The three basic mechanisms driving the anomalous transport are: spatial variation of magnetic field strength, spatial variation of electrostatic potential within the flux surfaces, and the loss of flux surfaces. The equation of motion are obtained from the drift hamiltonian. The equations of motion are developed in the canonical and in the non-canonical, practical co-ordinates as well. The effects of collisions are represented by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion at each time-step. Here we present the results of application of this method to three cases: superathermal alphas in the rippled field of tokamaks, motion in the magnetic turbulence of takapole II, and transport in the stochastic fields of ZT40. This work is supported by DOE OFE and ORAU HBCU program

  13. Experimental studies of plasma confinement in toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodin, H.A.B.; Keen, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    In this article the closed-line magnetic field approach to the plasma isolation and confinement problem in toroidal systems is reviewed. The theoretical aspects of closed-line magnetic field systems, indicating that topologically such systems are toroidal, are surveyed under the headings; topology of closed-line systems, equilibrium in different configurations and classification of toroidal devices, MHD stability, non-ideal effects in MHD stability, microscopic stability, and plasma energy loss. A section covering the experimental results of plasma confinement in toroidal geometry considers Stellerators, Tokamaks, toroidal pinch -the reversed-field pinch, screw pinches and high-β Tokamaks, Levitrons and multipoles (internal-ring devices), and miscellaneous toroidal containment devices. Recent achievements and the present position are discussed with reference to the status of Tokamak research, low-β stellerator research and high-β research. It is concluded from the continuing progress made in this research that the criteria for the magnetic containment of plasmas can be met. Further, it is concluded that the construction of a successful and economic fusion reactor is within the scope of advancing science and technology. 250 references. (U.K.)

  14. Experimental studies of plasma confinement in toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodin, H A.B.; Keen, B E [UKAEA, Abingdon. Culham Lab.

    1977-12-01

    In this article the closed-line magnetic field approach to the plasma isolation and confinement problem in toroidal systems is reviewed. The theoretical aspects of closed-line magnetic field systems, indicating that topologically such systems are toroidal, are surveyed under the headings; topology of closed-line systems, equilibrium in different configurations and classification of toroidal devices, MHD stability, non-ideal effects in MHD stability, microscopic stability, and plasma energy loss. A section covering the experimental results of plasma confinement in toroidal geometry considers Stellerators, Tokamaks, toroidal pinch -the reversed-field pinch, screw pinches and high-..beta.. Tokamaks, Levitrons and multipoles (internal-ring devices), and miscellaneous toroidal containment devices. Recent achievements and the present position are discussed with reference to the status of Tokamak research, low-..beta.. stellerator research and high-..beta.. research. It is concluded from the continuing progress made in this research that the criteria for the magnetic containment of plasmas can be met. Further, it is concluded that the construction of a successful and economic fusion reactor is within the scope of advancing science and technology. 250 references.

  15. Efficiency of wave-driven rigid body rotation toroidal confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rax, J. M.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-03-01

    The compensation of vertical drifts in toroidal magnetic fields through a wave-driven poloidal rotation is compared with compensation through the wave driven toroidal current generation to support the classical magnetic rotational transform. The advantages and drawbacks associated with the sustainment of a radial electric field are compared with those associated with the sustainment of a poloidal magnetic field both in terms of energy content and power dissipation. The energy content of a radial electric field is found to be smaller than the energy content of a poloidal magnetic field for a similar set of orbits. The wave driven radial electric field generation efficiency is similarly shown, at least in the limit of large aspect ratio, to be larger than the efficiency of wave-driven toroidal current generation.

  16. Poloidal variations in toroidal fusion reactor wall power loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    A geometric formulation is developed by the authors for determining poloidal variations in bremmstrahlung, cyclotron radiation, and neutron wall power loadings in toroidal fusion devices. Assuming toroidal symmetry and utilizing a numerical model which partitions the plasma into small cells, it was generally found that power loadings are highest on the outer surface of the torus, although variations are not as large as some have predicted. Results are presented for various plasma power generation configurations, plasma volume fractions, and toroidal aspect ratios, and include plasma and wall blockage effects

  17. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-01-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension. (orig.)

  18. Toroidal equilibrium of a non-neutral plasma with toroidal current, inertia and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.N.; Avinash, K.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium of non-neutral clouds in a toroidal vessel with toroidal magnetic field is demonstrated in the presence of a toroidal current, finite mass and finite pressure. With a toroidal current, it is shown that in a large-aspect-ratio conducting torus the equilibrium is governed by competition between forces produced by image charges and image currents. When μ 0 ε 0 E r 2 >B θ 2 (whe re E r and B θ are the self electrostatic and self magnetic fields of the cloud), the confinement is electrostatic and plasma shifts inwards; when μ 0 ε 0 E r 2 θ 2 , the confinement is magnetic and plasma shifts outwards. For μ 0 ε 0 E r 2 = B θ 2 there is no equilibrium. With finite mass or finite pressure, it is shown, in a large-aspect-ratio approximation, that the fluid drift surfaces and equipotential surfaces are displaced with respect to each other. In both cases the fluid drift surfaces are shifted inwards from the equipotential surfaces. (author)

  19. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  20. Mirror theory applied to toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Central features of a mirror plasma are strong departures from Maxwellian distribution functions, ambipolar potentials and densities which vary along a field line, and losses, and the mirror field itself. To examine these features, mirror theorists have developed analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Fokker-Planck equation, evaluate the potentials consistent with the resulting distribution functions, and assess the microstability of these distributions. Various combinations of mirror-plasma fetures are present and important in toroidal plasmas as well, particularly in the edge region and in plasmas with strong r.f. heating. In this paper we survey problems in toroidal plasmas where mirror theory and computational techniques are applicable, and discuss in more detail three specific examples: calculation of the toroidal generalization of the Spitzer-Haerm distribution function (from which trapped-particle effects on current drive can be calculated), evaluation of the nonuniform potential and density set up by pulsed electron-cyclotron heating, and calculation of steady-state distribution functions in the presence of strong r.f. heating and collisions. 37 refs., 3 figs

  1. Mirror theory applied to toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Central features of a mirror plasma are strong departures from Maxwellian distribution functions, ambipolar potentials and densities which vary along a field line, end losses, and the mirror field itself. To examine these features, mirror theorists have developed analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Fokker-Planck equation, evaluate the potentials consistent with the resulting distribution functions, and assess the microstability of these distributions. Various combinations of mirror-plasma features are present and important in toroidal plasmas as well, particularly in the edge region and in plasmas with strong rf heating. In this paper we survey problems in toroidal plasmas where mirror theory and computational techniques are applicable, and discuss in more detail three specific examples: calculation of the toroidal generalization of the Spitzer-Haerm distribution function (from which trapped-particle effects on current drive can be calculated), evaluation of the nonuniform potential and density set up by pulsed electron-cyclotron heating, and calculation of steady-state distribution functions in the presence of strong rf heating and collisions. 37 refs

  2. Field Model: An Object-Oriented Data Model for Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    We present an extensible, object-oriented data model designed for field data entitled Field Model (FM). FM objects can represent a wide variety of fields, including fields of arbitrary dimension and node type. FM can also handle time-series data. FM achieves generality through carefully selected topological primitives and through an implementation that leverages the potential of templated C++. FM supports fields where the nodes values are paired with any cell type. Thus FM can represent data where the field nodes are paired with the vertices ("vertex-centered" data), fields where the nodes are paired with the D-dimensional cells in R(sup D) (often called "cell-centered" data), as well as fields where nodes are paired with edges or other cell types. FM is designed to effectively handle very large data sets; in particular FM employs a demand-driven evaluation strategy that works especially well with large field data. Finally, the interfaces developed for FM have the potential to effectively abstract field data based on adaptive meshes. We present initial results with a triangular adaptive grid in R(sup 2) and discuss how the same design abstractions would work equally well with other adaptive-grid variations, including meshes in R(sup 3).

  3. Polymer- and salt-induced toroids of hexagonal DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Ubbink, J; Odijk, T

    1995-01-01

    A model is proposed for polymer- and salt-induced toroidal condensates of DNA, based on a recent theory of the undulation enhancement of the electrostatic interaction in the bulk hexagonal phase of semiflexible polyions. In a continuum approximation, the thermodynamic potential of a monomolecular toroid may be split up in bulk, surface, and curvature contributions. With the help of an approximate analytical minimization procedure, the optimal torus dimensions are calculated as a function of t...

  4. Grinding Inside A Toroidal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Walter; Adams, James F.; Burley, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    Weld lines ground smooth within about 0.001 in. Grinding tool for smoothing longitudinal weld lines inside toroidal cavity includes curved tunnel jig to guide grinding "mouse" along weld line. Curvature of tunnel jig matched to shape of toroid so grinding ball in mouse follows circular arc of correct radius as mouse is pushed along tunnel. Tool enables precise control of grindout shape, yet easy to use.

  5. Equivelar toroids with few flag-orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, José; Montero, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    An $(n+1)$-toroid is a quotient of a tessellation of the $n$-dimensional Euclidean space with a lattice group. Toroids are generalizations of maps in the torus on higher dimensions and also provide examples of abstract polytopes. Equivelar toroids are those that are induced by regular tessellations. In this paper we present a classification of equivelar $(n+1)$-toroids with at most $n$ flag-orbits; in particular, we discuss a classification of $2$-orbit toroids of arbitrary dimension.

  6. Tunable plasmonic toroidal terahertz metamodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerislioglu, Burak; Ahmadivand, Arash; Pala, Nezih

    2018-04-01

    Optical modulators are essential and strategic parts of micro- and nanophotonic circuits to encode electro-optical signals in the optical domain. Here, by using arrays of multipixel toroidal plasmonic terahertz (THz) metamolecules, we developed a functional plasmonic metamodulator with high efficiency and tunability. Technically, the dynamic toroidal dipole induces nonradiating charge-current arrangements leading to have an exquisite role in defining the inherent spectral features of various materials. By categorizing in a different family of multipoles far from the traditional electromagnetic multipoles, the toroidal dipole corresponds to poloidal currents flowing on the surface of a closed-loop torus. Utilizing the sensitivity of the optically driven toroidal momentum to the incident THz beam power and by employing both numerical tools and experimental analysis, we systematically studied the spectral response of the proposed THz plasmonic metadevice. In this Rapid Communication, we uncover a correlation between the existence and the excitation of the toroidal response and the incident beam power. This mechanism is employed to develop THz toroidal metamodulators with a strong potential to be employed for practical advanced and next-generation communication, filtering, and routing applications.

  7. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1989-12-01

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  8. Toroidal and rotating bubble nuclei and the nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Fauchard, C.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1997-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. Previously, a one-parameter shape sequence has been defined to describe the path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes. New analytical expressions for the shape dependent functions have been obtained. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three-dimensional and plane-fragmentation barriers. Metastable bubble-like minima only appear at very high angular momentum and above the three dimensional fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localized below the plane-fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension

  9. Particle transort in field-reversed configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuszewski, M.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; Sgro, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    A field reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact toroid that contains no toroidal field. These plasmas are observed to be grossly stable for about 10-100 ..mu..sec. The lifetimes appear limited by an n = 2 rotational instability which may be caused by particle loss. Particle transport is therefore an important issue for these configurations. We investigate particle loss with a steady-state, 1-D model which approximates the experimental observation of elongated FRC equilibrium with about constant separatrix radius.

  10. Investigation of intrinsic toroidal rotation scaling in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Ko, S. H.; Seol, J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, J. H.

    2017-07-01

    The behaviors of an intrinsic toroidal rotation without any external momentum sources are investigated in KSTAR. In these experiments, pure ohmic discharges with a wide range of plasma parameters are carefully selected and analyzed to speculate an unrevealed origin of toroidal rotation excluding any unnecessary heating sources, magnetic perturbations, and strong magneto-hydrodynamic activities. The measured core toroidal rotation in KSTAR is mostly in the counter-current direction and its magnitude strongly depends on the ion temperature divided by plasma current (Ti/IP). Especially the core toroidal rotation in the steady-state is well fitted by Ti/IP scaling with a slope of ˜-23, and the possible explanation of the scaling is compared with various candidates. As a result, the calculated offset rotation could not explain the measured core toroidal rotation since KSTAR has an extremely low intrinsic error field. For the stability conditions for ion and electron turbulences, it is hard to determine a dominant turbulence mode in this study. In addition, the intrinsic toroidal rotation level in ITER is estimated based on the KSTAR scaling since the intrinsic rotation plays an important role in stabilizing resistive wall modes for future reference.

  11. Estimation of toroidal field coil stresses from magnetic loads in FER and NET using analytic methods and improved computer subroutine for TFC stress estimation in TRESCODE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemer, B.W.; Miki, Nobuharu; Hashizume, Takashi.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the comparison of TF coil stresses in NET and FER. The analyses focus on the straight part of the inner legs, since it is this part of the coil which most directly influences the radial build of the machine. NET's TF coils are wedged together and the centering force on each of the coils is reacted by toroidal compression of the inner legs. The forces that act out of the plane of each coil are reacted by friction between adjacent inner legs such that the set of legs behave much like a cylinder under torsion. In contrast, the FER device employs a bucking cylinder to react the centering load, which incurs a penalty in radial thickness, and the out of plane forces are reacted by the use of shear keys between adjacent inner legs. Analytic techniques or ''hand methods'' have been used to estimate and compare the strains and stresses at the inner leg mid-plane section resulting from both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic forces. Such techniques forced a more thorough understanding of the structural behavior of the coils. The amount of effort in analyzing the NET coil is greater than for FER as the reaction of centering load in its wedged design is more complex, and because it was found that friction plays a very important part in determining the coil stresses. The FER coil is simpler in this regard, and a ''hand estimation'' of its coil stresses was straightfoward. In this report, the program written to perform these analyses is also described. It was desired to provide new capabilities to the original TF stress subroutine in TRESCODE and to review and improve it where possible. This has been accomplished, and subroutines are now available for use in JAERI's system code, TRESCODE. It is hoped that the inner leg radial thickness can be better optimized by using the program. (author)

  12. Conformal FDTD modeling wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurgens, T.; Harfoush, F.

    1991-05-01

    Many computer codes have been written to model wake fields. Here we describe the use of the Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain (CFDTD) method to model the wake fields generated by a rigid beam traveling through various accelerating structures. The non- cylindrical symmetry of some of the problems considered here requires the use of a three dimensional code. In traditional FDTD codes, curved surfaces are approximated by rectangular steps. The errors introduced in wake field calculations by such an approximation can be reduced by increasing the mesh size, therefore increasing the cost of computing. Another approach, validated here, deforms Ampere and Faraday contours near a media interface so as to conform to the interface. These improvements of the FDTD method result in better accuracy of the fields at asymptotically no computational cost. This method is also capable of modeling thin wires as found in beam profile monitors, and slots and cracks as found in resistive wall motions. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Toroidal current asymmetry and boundary conditions in disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Henry

    2014-10-01

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the plasma current. The toroidal current asymmetry ΔIϕ is proportional to the vertical current moment ΔMIZ , with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was claimed that this could only be explained by Hiro current. It is shown that instead it is essentially a kinematic effect produced by the VDE displacement of a 3D magnetic perturbation. This is verified by M3D simulations. The simulation results do not require penetration of plasma into the boundary, as in the Hiro current model. It is shown that the normal velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field vanishes at the wall, in the small Larmor radius limit of electromagnetic sheath boundary conditions. Plasma is absorbed into the wall only via the parallel velocity, which is small, penetrates only an infinitesimal distance into the wall, and does not affect forces exerted by the plasma on the wall. Supported by USDOE and ITER.

  14. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian “particles” or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations

  15. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-07-01

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian "particles" or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations.

  16. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  17. Toroidal Plasma Thruster for Interplanetary and Interstellar Space Flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Zakharov, L.E.; Gorelenkova, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    This work involves a conceptual assessment for using the toroidal fusion reactor for deep space interplanetary and interstellar missions. Toroidal thermonuclear fusion reactors, such as tokamaks and stellarators, are unique for space propulsion, allowing for a design with the magnetic configuration localized inside toroidal magnetic field coils. Plasma energetic ions, including charged fusion products, can escape such a closed configuration at certain conditions, a result of the vertical drift in toroidal rippled magnetic field. Escaping particles can be used for direct propulsion (since toroidal drift is directed one way vertically) or to create and heat externally confined plasma, so that the latter can be used for propulsion. Deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV also can be used for direct propulsion. A special design allows neutrons to escape the shield and the blanket of the tokamak. This provides a direct (partial) conversion of the fusion energy into the directed motion of the propellant. In contrast to other fusion concepts proposed for space propulsion, this concept utilizes the natural drift motion of charged particles out of the closed magnetic field configuration

  18. Hairy AdS black holes with a toroidal horizon in 4D Einstein-nonlinear omega-model system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Astorino, M.; Canfora, F.; Giacomini, A.; Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 776, 10 January (2018), s. 236-241 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : AdS black holes * nonlinear sigma model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0370269317309437

  19. Hairy AdS black holes with a toroidal horizon in 4D Einstein-nonlinear omega-model system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Astorino, M.; Canfora, F.; Giacomini, A.; Ortaggio, Marcello

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 776, 10 January (2018), s. 236-241 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : AdS black holes * nonlinear sigma model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Applied mathematics Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0370269317309437

  20. Tearing modes in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Cowley, S.C.; Hastie, R.J.; Hender, T.C.; Hood, A.; Martin, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The separation of the cylindrical tearing mode stability problem into a resistive resonant layer calculation and an external marginal ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculation (Δ' calculation) is generalized to axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The general structure of this separation is analyzed and the marginal ideal MHD information (the toroidal generalization of Δ') required to discuss stability is isolated. This can then, in principle, be combined with relevant resonant layer calculations to determine tearing mode growth rates in realistic situations. Two examples are given: the first is an analytic treatment of toroidally coupled (m = 1, n = 1) and (m = 2, n = 1) tearing modes in a large aspect ratio torus; the second, a numerical treatment of the toroidal coupling of three tearing modes through finite pressure effects in a large aspect ratio torus. In addition, the use of a coupling integral approach for determining the stability of coupled tearing modes is discussed. Finally, the possibility of using initial value resistive MHD codes in realistic toroidal geometry to determine the necessary information from the ideal MHD marginal solution is discussed

  1. Improved model predictive control of resistive wall modes by error field estimator in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2016-12-01

    Many implementations of a model-based approach for toroidal plasma have shown better control performance compared to the conventional type of feedback controller. One prerequisite of model-based control is the availability of a control oriented model. This model can be obtained empirically through a systematic procedure called system identification. Such a model is used in this work to design a model predictive controller to stabilize multiple resistive wall modes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch. Model predictive control is an advanced control method that can optimize the future behaviour of a system. Furthermore, this paper will discuss an additional use of the empirical model which is to estimate the error field in EXTRAP T2R. Two potential methods are discussed that can estimate the error field. The error field estimator is then combined with the model predictive control and yields better radial magnetic field suppression.

  2. Renormalization of gauge fields models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becchi, C.; Rouet, A.; Stora, R.

    1974-01-01

    A new approach to gauge field models is described. It is based on the Bogoliubov-Parasiuk-Hepp-Zimmermann (BPHZ) renormalization scheme making extensive use of the quantum action principle, and the Slavnov invariance. The quantum action principle being first summarized in the framework of the BPHZ is then applied to a global symmetry problem. The symmetry property of the gauge field Lagrangians in the tree approximation is exhibited, and the preservation of this property at the quantum level is discussed. The main results relative to the Abelian and SU(2) Higgs-Kibble models are briefly reviewed [fr

  3. Toroidal helical quartz forming machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, K.W.; Cole, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Scyllac fusion experimental machine used 10 cm diameter smooth bore discharge tubes formed into a simple toroidal shape prior to 1974. At about that time, it was discovered that a discharge tube was required to follow the convoluted shape of the load coil. A machine was designed and built to form a fused quartz tube with a toroidal shape. The machine will accommodate quartz tubes from 5 cm to 20 cm diameter forming it into a 4 m toroidal radius with a 1 to 5 cm helical displacement. The machine will also generate a helical shape on a linear tube. Two sets of tubes with different helical radii and wavelengths have been successfully fabricated. The problems encountered with the design and fabrication of this machine are discussed

  4. MHD equilibrium with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1987-03-01

    The present work attempts to formulate the equilibrium of axisymmetric plasma with purely toroidal flow within ideal MHD theory. In general, the inertial term Rho(v.Del)v caused by plasma flow is so complicated that the equilibrium equation is completely different from the Grad-Shafranov equation. However, in the case of purely toroidal flow the equilibrium equation can be simplified so that it resembles the Grad-Shafranov equation. Generally one arbitrary two-variable functions and two arbitrary single variable functions, instead of only four single-variable functions, are allowed in the new equilibrium equations. Also, the boundary conditions of the rotating (with purely toroidal fluid flow, static - without any fluid flow) equilibrium are the same as those of the static equilibrium. So numerically one can calculate the rotating equilibrium as a static equilibrium. (author)

  5. Theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaing, K C; Chu, M S; Hsu, C T; Sabbagh, S A; Seol, Jae Chun; Sun, Y

    2012-01-01

    Error fields and magnetohydrodynamic modes break toroidal symmetry in tokamaks. The broken symmetry enhances the toroidal plasma viscosity, which results in a steady-state toroidal plasma flow. A theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity in the low-collisionality regimes is developed. It extends stellarator transport theory to include multiple modes and to allow for |m − nq| ∼ 1. Here, m is the poloidal mode number, n is the toroidal mode number and q is the safety factor. The bounce averaged drift kinetic equation is solved in several asymptotic limits to obtain transport fluxes. These fluxes depend non-linearly on the radial electric field except for those in the 1/ν regime. Here, ν is the collision frequency. The theory is refined to include the effects of the superbanana plateau resonance at the phase space boundary and the finite ∇B drift on the collisional boundary layer fluxes. Analytical expressions that connect all asymptotic limits are constructed and are in good agreement with the numerical results. The flux–force relations that relate transport fluxes to forces are used to illustrate the roles of transport fluxes in the momentum equation. It is shown that the ambipolar state is reached when the momentum equation is relaxed. It is also shown that the origin of the momentum for plasma flow generated without momentum sources is the local unbalance of particles' momenta and is diamagnetic in nature regardless of the details of the theory. (paper)

  6. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  7. Prandtl number of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Fukuyama, A.; Yagi, M.; Azumi, M.

    1993-06-01

    Theory of the L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas is developed. The Prandtl number, the ratio between the ion viscosity and the thermal conductivity is obtained for the anomalous transport process which is caused by the self-sustained turbulence in the toroidal plasma. It is found that the Prandtl number is of order unity both for the ballooning mode turbulence in tokamaks and for the interchange mode turbulence in helical system. The influence on the anomalous transport and fluctuation level is evaluated. Hartmann number and magnetic Prandtl number are also discussed. (author)

  8. A model unified field equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perring, J.K.; Skyrme, T.H.R.

    1994-01-01

    The classical solutions of a unified field theory in a two-dimensional space-time are considered. This system, a model of a interacting mesons and baryons, illustrates how the particle can be built from a wave-packet of mesons and how reciprocally the meson appears as a tightly bound combination of particle and antiparticle. (author). 6 refs

  9. A versatile ray-tracing code for studying rf wave propagation in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y; Decker, J; Morini, L

    2012-01-01

    A new ray-tracing code named C3PO has been developed to study the propagation of arbitrary electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) waves in magnetized toroidal plasmas. Its structure is designed for maximum flexibility regarding the choice of coordinate system and dielectric model. The versatility of this code makes it particularly suitable for integrated modeling systems. Using a coordinate system that reflects the nested structure of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks, fast and accurate calculations inside the plasma separatrix can be performed using analytical derivatives of a spline-Fourier interpolation of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium. Applications to reverse field pinch magnetic configuration are also included. The effects of 3D perturbations of the axisymmetric toroidal MHD equilibrium, due to the discreteness of the magnetic coil system or plasma fluctuations in an original quasi-optical approach, are also studied. Using a Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method for solving the set of ordinary differential equations, the ray-tracing code is extensively benchmarked against analytical models and other codes for lower hybrid and electron cyclotron waves. (paper)

  10. MHD simulation study of compact toroid injection into magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2000-01-01

    To understand the fuelling process in a fusion device by a compact toroid (CT) plasmoid injection method, we have carried out MHD numerical simulations where a spheromak-like CT (SCT) is injected into a magnetized target plasma region. So far, we revealed that the penetration depth of the SCT plasma becomes shorter than that estimated from the conducting sphere (CS) model, because in the simulation the Lorentz force of the target magnetic field sequentially decelerates the injected SCT while in the CS model only the magnetic pressure force acts as the deceleration mechanism. In this study, we represent the new theoretical model where the injected SCT is decelerated by both the magnetic pressure force and the magnetic tension force (we call it the non-slipping sphere (NS) model) and investigate in detail the deceleration mechanism of the SCT by comparison with simulation results. As a result, it is found that the decrease of the SCT kinetic energy in the simulation coincides with that in the NS model more than in the CS model. It means that not only the magnetic pressure force but also the magnetic tension force acts as the deceleration mechanism of the SCT. Furthermore, it is revealed that magnetic reconnection between the SCT magnetic field and the target magnetic field plays a role to relax the SCT deceleration. (author)

  11. MHD-Vlasov simulation of the toroidal Alfven eigenmode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, Y.; Sato, T.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, T.H.; Horiuchi, R.

    1994-11-01

    A new simulation method has been developed to investigate the excitation and saturation processes of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE modes). The background plasma is described by a full-MHD fluid model, while the kinetic evolution of energetic alpha particles is followed by the drift kinetic equation. The magnetic fluctuation of n = 2 mode develops and saturates at the level of 1.8x10 -3 of the equilibrium field when the initial beta of alpha particles is 2% at the magnetic axis. After saturation, the TAE mode amplitude shows an oscillatory behavior with a frequency corresponding to the bounce frequency of the alpha particles trapped by the TEA mode. The decrease of the power transfer rate from the alpha particles to the TAE mode, which is due to the trapped particle effect of a finite-amplitude wave, causes the saturation. From the linear growth rate the saturation level can be estimated. (author)

  12. One-dimensional MHD simulations of MTF systems with compact toroid targets and spherical liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Zindler, Ryan; Barsky, Sandra; Delage, Michael; Laberge, Michel

    2017-10-01

    One-dimensional (1D) MHD code is developed in General Fusion (GF) for coupled plasma-liner simulations in magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems. The main goal of these simulations is to search for optimal parameters of MTF reactor, in which spherical liquid metal liner compresses compact toroid plasma. The code uses Lagrangian description for both liner and plasma. The liner is represented as a set of spherical shells with fixed masses while plasma is discretized as a set of nested tori with circular cross sections and fixed number of particles between them. All physical fields are 1D functions of either spherical (liner) or small toroidal (plasma) radius. Motion of liner and plasma shells is calculated self-consistently based on applied forces and equations of state. Magnetic field is determined by 1D profiles of poloidal and toroidal fluxes - they are advected with shells and diffuse according to local resistivity, this also accounts for flux leakage into the liner. Different plasma transport models are implemented, this allows for comparison with ongoing GF experiments. Fusion power calculation is included into the code. We performed a series of parameter scans in order to establish the underlying dependencies of the MTF system and find the optimal reactor design point.

  13. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seward, Clint

    1998-01-01

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed

  14. Toroidal current asymmetry in tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-10-01

    It was discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current I ϕ. It was found that the toroidal current asymmetry was proportional to the vertical current moment asymmetry with positive sign for an upward vertical displacement event (VDE) and negative sign for a downward VDE. It was observed that greater displacement leads to greater measured I ϕ asymmetry. Here, it is shown that this is essentially a kinematic effect produced by a VDE interacting with three dimensional MHD perturbations. The relation of toroidal current asymmetry and vertical current moment is calculated analytically and is verified by numerical simulations. It is shown analytically that the toroidal variation of the toroidal plasma current is accompanied by an equal and opposite variation of the toroidal current flowing in a thin wall surrounding the plasma. These currents are connected by 3D halo current, which is π/2 radians out of phase with the n = 1 toroidal current variations.

  15. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  16. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  17. Field testing of bioenergetic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Doubly labeled water provides a direct measure of the rate of carbon dioxide production by free-living animals. With appropriate conversion factors, based on chemical composition of the diet and assimilation efficiency, field metabolic rate (FMR), in units of energy expenditure, and field feeding rate can be estimated. Validation studies indicate that doubly labeled water measurements of energy metabolism are accurate to within 7% in reptiles, birds, and mammals. This paper discusses the use of doubly labeled water to generate empirical models for FMR and food requirements for a variety of animals

  18. X-ray imaging with toroidal mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Sadao; Sakayanagi, Yoshimi

    1978-01-01

    X-ray imaging is made with a single toroidal mirror or two successive toroidal mirrors. Geometrical images at the Gaussian image plane are described by the ray trace. Application of a single toroidal mirror to small-angle scattering is presented. (author)

  19. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  20. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  1. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  2. A full wave code for ion cyclotron waves in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1996-02-01

    The code TORIC solves the finite Larmor radius wave equations in the ion cyclotron frequency range in arbitrary axisymmetric toroidal geometry. The model used describes the compressional and torsional Alfven waves (or, depending on the parallel phase velocity, the kinetic counterpart of the latter), and ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion near the first ion cyclotron harmonic. In the ion response the broadening of the absorption regions due to the finite width of the cyclotron resonance of individual ions in toroidal geometry is taken into account. The parallel component of the wave electric field is evaluated on the same footing as the transverse ones; the response of the electrons includes Landau damping, Transit Time damping and the mixed term. The numerical approach uses a spectral representation of the solution in the poloidal angle θ, and cubic finite elements in the radial variable ψ. Great flexibility is provided in the way ion Bernstein waves excited by mode conversion are damped when their wavelength becomes comparable with the ion Larmor radius, in the regularization of Alfven resonances, and in the treatment of the outer plasma layers. As an option, we have also implemented the Order Reduction Algorithm, which provides a particularly fast, yet accurate evaluation of the power deposition profiles in toroidal geometry. Thee present report describes the model and its numerical implementation, and provides the information needed to use the code. A few examples illustrating applications of TORIC are also included. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of toroidal plasma current in RF heated helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besshou, Sakae

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the measurement of toroidal plasma current by a semiflexible Rogowski coil in a helical vacuum chamber. A Rogowski coil measures the toroidal plasma current with a resolution of 0.1 kA, frequency range of up to 1 kHz and sensitivity of 6.5 x 10 -9 V · s/A. We measured the spontaneous toroidal plasma current (from -1.2 to +1.2 kA) under electron cyclotron resonance heating at 0.94 T toroidal field in the Heliotron-E device. We found that the measured direction of toroidal plasma current changes its sign as in the predicted behavior of a neoclassical diffusion-driven bootstrap current, depending on the horizontal position of the plasma column. We explain the observed plasma currents in terms of the compound phenomenon of an ohmic current and a neoclassical diffusion-driven current. The magnitude of the neoclassical current component is smaller than the value predicted by a collisionless neoclassical theory. (author)

  4. Compression of toroidal plasma by imploding plasma-liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1979-07-01

    A new concept of compressing a plasma in a closed magnetic configuration by a version of liner implosion flux compression technique is considered. The liner consists of a dense plasma cylinder, i.e. the plasma-liner. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined just by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to the liner plasma because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A start-up senario of plasma-liner is also proposed with a possible application of this concept to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e. burning plasma vortex. (author)

  5. Compact toroid theory issues and approaches: a panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    In the six years since the initiation of the compact toroid program by the Office of Fusion Energy, remarkable scientific advances have occurred on both field-reversed configurations (FRC) and spheromaks. This progress has been stimulated by a diverse experimental program with facilities at six laboratories, and by a small but nevertheless broad theoretical research effort encompassing more than a dozen institutions. The close coupling between theoretical and experimental programs has contributed immeasurably to this progress. This document offers guidance for future compact toroid theory by identifying and discussing the key physics issues. In most cases promising approaches to these issues are offered

  6. ALT-II toroidal belt limiter biasing experiments on TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.; Boedo, J.A.; Gray, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    Edge electric fields have been related to H-mode-like behaviour. The experiments reported here are an attempt to control the SOL profiles by electrostatic biasing of the full toroidal-belt limiter ALT-II. The specific goals are: influencing the edge particle flows, particle removal, power deposition and the global confinement. The ALT-II pump limiter is a full toroidal belt located at 45 o below the outer midplane and consisting of eight graphite covered blades which can be independently biased. Particle scoops located behind the limiter neutralize and direct the incoming plasma into the pumping ducts. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  7. Design features of HTMR-Hybrid Toroidal Magnet Tokamak Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosatelli, F.; Avanzini, P.G.; Brunelli, B.; Derchi, D.; Magnasco, M.; Grattarola, M.; Peluffo, M.; Raia, G.; Zampaglione, V.

    1985-01-01

    The HTMR (Hybrid Toroidal Magnet Tokamak Reactor) conceptual design is aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a Tokamak reactor which could fulfill the scientific and technological objectives expected from next generation devices (e.g. INTOR-NET) with size and costs as small as possible. An hybrid toroidal field magnet, made up by copper and superconducting coils, seems to be a promising solution, allowing a considerable flexibility in machine performances, so as to gain useful margins in front of the uncertainties in confinement time scaling laws and beta and plasma density limits. In this paper the authors describe the optimization procedure for the hybrid magnet configuration, the main design features of HTMR and the preliminary mechanical calculations of the superconducting toroidal coils

  8. Design features of HTMR-hybrid toroidal magnet tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosatelli, F.; Avanzini, P.G.; Derchi, D.; Magnasco, M.; Grattarola, M.; Peluffo, M.; Raia, G.; Brunelli, B.; Zampaglione, V.

    1984-01-01

    The HTMR (Hybrid Toroidal Magnet Tokamak Reactor) conceptual design is aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a Tokamak reactor which could fulfil the scientific and technological objectives expected from next generation devices with size and costs as small as possible. A hybrid toroidal field magnet, made up by copper and superconducting coils, seems to be a promising solution, allowing a considerable flexibility in machine performances, so as to gain useful margins in front of the uncertainties in confinement time scaling laws and beta and plasma density limits. The optimization procedure for the hybrid magnet, configuration, the main design features of HTMR and the preliminary mechanical calculations of the superconducting toroidal coils are described. (author)

  9. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.

    2011-05-16

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  10. Correlation Models for Temperature Fields

    KAUST Repository

    North, Gerald R.; Wang, Jue; Genton, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents derivations of some analytical forms for spatial correlations of evolving random fields governed by a white-noise-driven damped diffusion equation that is the analog of autoregressive order 1 in time and autoregressive order 2 in space. The study considers the two-dimensional plane and the surface of a sphere, both of which have been studied before, but here time is introduced to the problem. Such models have a finite characteristic length (roughly the separation at which the autocorrelation falls to 1/e) and a relaxation time scale. In particular, the characteristic length of a particular temporal Fourier component of the field increases to a finite value as the frequency of the particular component decreases. Some near-analytical formulas are provided for the results. A potential application is to the correlation structure of surface temperature fields and to the estimation of large area averages, depending on how the original datastream is filtered into a distribution of Fourier frequencies (e.g., moving average, low pass, or narrow band). The form of the governing equation is just that of the simple energy balance climate models, which have a long history in climate studies. The physical motivation provided by the derivation from a climate model provides some heuristic appeal to the approach and suggests extensions of the work to nonuniform cases.

  11. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  12. On nonlinear MHD-stability of toroidal magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgisonis, V.I.; Pastukhov, V.P.

    1994-01-01

    The variational approach to analyze the nonlinear MHD stability of ideal plasma in toroidal magnetic field is proposed. The potential energy functional to be used is expressed in terms of complete set of independent Lagrangian invariants, that allows to take strictly into account all the restrictions inherent in the varied functions due to MHD dynamic equations. (author). 3 refs

  13. The Quasi-Toroidal Stellarator: An Innovative Confinement Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, S. F.

    2001-01-01

    To develop a new class of stellarators that exhibit improved confinement compared to conventional stellarators. This approach generally makes use of a designed symmetry of the magnetic field strength along a particular coordinate axis in the toroidal geometry of the stellarator, and is referred to as quasi-symmetry

  14. Injection of electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy into an area of toroidal field ripple in a tokamak plasma to improve plasma confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masayuki; Furth, Harold

    1993-01-01

    An electron injection scheme for controlling transport in a tokamak plasma. Electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy are injected into a ripple field region created by a group of localized poloidal field bending magnets. The trapped electrons then grad-B drift vertically toward the plasma interior until they are detrapped, charging the plasma negative. Calculations indicate that the highly perpendicular velocity electrons can remain stable against kinetic instabilities in the regime of interest for tokamak experiments. The penetration distance can be controlled by controlling the "ripple mirror ratio", the energy of the injected electrons, and their v.sub..perp. /v.sub.51 ratio. In this scheme, the poloidal torque due to the injected radial current is taken by the magnets and not by the plasma. Injection is accomplished by the flat cathode containing an ECH cavity to pump electrons to high v.sub..perp..

  15. Plasma flow in toroidal systems with a separatrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribkov, V.M.; Morozov, D.Kh.; Pogutse, O.P.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic plasma flow in toroidal systems is considered. Rlasma flow lines for various magnetic configurations are calculated. A particular attention is given to studying plasma flow in configurations with two magnetic a axes and a separatrix. The flow picture i the toroidal case is shown to qualita ity to penetrate through the separatrix - the latter becomes ''perforated''. Th he pictkre of these flows is calculated. The plasma diffusion coefficient with account for the separatrix is calculated and is shown not to turn into the infin nity in the toroidal case as well. The plasma flow is analytically considered in the model with distributed current as well as in the model with current conce entrated at the oroidal system axis. In the first case the existence of ''stagnant'' regions near the magnetic axis is established from which the plasma a does not flow out

  16. A simple highly accurate field-line mapping technique for three-dimensional Monte Carlo modeling of plasma edge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Sardei, F.; Kisslinger, J.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a new simple and accurate numerical field-line mapping technique providing a high-quality representation of field lines as required by a Monte Carlo modeling of plasma edge transport in the complex magnetic boundaries of three-dimensional (3D) toroidal fusion devices. Using a toroidal sequence of precomputed 3D finite flux-tube meshes, the method advances field lines through a simple bilinear, forward/backward symmetric interpolation at the interfaces between two adjacent flux tubes. It is a reversible field-line mapping (RFLM) algorithm ensuring a continuous and unique reconstruction of field lines at any point of the 3D boundary. The reversibility property has a strong impact on the efficiency of modeling the highly anisotropic plasma edge transport in general closed or open configurations of arbitrary ergodicity as it avoids artificial cross-field diffusion of the fast parallel transport. For stellarator-symmetric magnetic configurations, which are the standard case for stellarators, the reversibility additionally provides an average cancellation of the radial interpolation errors of field lines circulating around closed magnetic flux surfaces. The RFLM technique has been implemented in the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE and is used routinely for plasma transport modeling in the boundaries of several low-shear and high-shear stellarators as well as in the boundary of a tokamak with 3D magnetic edge perturbations

  17. Investigation of diocotron modes in toroidally trapped electron plasmas using non-destructive method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachhvani, Lavkesh; Pahari, Sambaran; Sengupta, Sudip; Yeole, Yogesh G.; Bajpai, Manu; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    2017-10-01

    Experiments with trapped electron plasmas in a SMall Aspect Ratio Toroidal device (SMARTEX-C) have demonstrated a flute-like mode represented by oscillations on capacitive (wall) probes. Although analogous to diocotron mode observed in linear electron traps, the mode evolution in toroids can have interesting consequences due to the presence of in-homogeneous magnetic field. In SMARTEX-C, the probe signals are observed to undergo transition from small, near-sinusoidal oscillations to large amplitude, non-linear "double-peaked" oscillations. To interpret the wall probe signal and bring forth the dynamics, an expression for the induced current on the probe for an oscillating charge is derived, utilizing Green's Reciprocation Theorem. Equilibrium position, poloidal velocity of the charge cloud, and charge content of the cloud, required to compute the induced current, are estimated from the experiments. Signal through capacitive probes is thereby computed numerically for possible charge cloud trajectories. In order to correlate with experiments, starting with an intuitive guess of the trajectory, the model is evolved and tweaked to arrive at a signal consistent with experimentally observed probe signals. A possible vortex like dynamics is predicted, hitherto unexplored in toroidal geometries, for a limited set of experimental observations from SMARTEX-C. Though heuristic, a useful interpretation of capacitive probe data in terms of charge cloud dynamics is obtained.

  18. Linear wave propagation in a hot axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaun, A.

    1995-03-01

    Kinetic effects on the propagation of the Alfven wave are studied for the first time in a toroidal plasma relevant for experiments. This requires the resolution of a set of coupled partial differential equations whose coefficients depend locally on the plasma parameters. For this purpose, a numerical wave propagation code called PENN has been developed using either a bilinear or a bicubic Hermite finite element discretization. It solves Maxwell's equations in toroidal geometry, with a dielectric tensor operator that takes into account the linear response of the plasma. Two different models have been implemented and can be used comparatively to describe the same physical case: the first treats the plasma as resistive fluids and gives results which are in good agreement with toroidal fluid codes. The second is a kinetic model and takes into account the finite size of the Larmor radii; it has successfully been tested against a kinetic plasma model in cylindrical geometry. New results have been obtained when studying kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. Two different conversion mechanisms to the kinetic Alfven wave have been described: one occurs at toroidally coupled resonant surfaces and is the kinetic counterpart of the fluid models' resonance absorption. The other has no such correspondence and results directly from the toroidal coupling between the kinetic Alfven wave and the global wavefield. An analysis of a heating scenario suggests that it might be difficult to heat a plasma with Alfven waves up to temperatures that are relevant for a tokamak reactor. Kinetic effects are studied for three types of global Alfven modes (GAE, TAE, BAE) and a new class of kinetic eigenmodes is described which appear inside the fluid gap: it could be related to recent observations in the JET (Joint European Torus) tokamak. (author) 56 figs., 6 tabs., 58 refs

  19. Linear wave propagation in a hot axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaun, A [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1995-03-01

    Kinetic effects on the propagation of the Alfven wave are studied for the first time in a toroidal plasma relevant for experiments. This requires the resolution of a set of coupled partial differential equations whose coefficients depend locally on the plasma parameters. For this purpose, a numerical wave propagation code called PENN has been developed using either a bilinear or a bicubic Hermite finite element discretization. It solves Maxwell`s equations in toroidal geometry, with a dielectric tensor operator that takes into account the linear response of the plasma. Two different models have been implemented and can be used comparatively to describe the same physical case: the first treats the plasma as resistive fluids and gives results which are in good agreement with toroidal fluid codes. The second is a kinetic model and takes into account the finite size of the Larmor radii; it has successfully been tested against a kinetic plasma model in cylindrical geometry. New results have been obtained when studying kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. Two different conversion mechanisms to the kinetic Alfven wave have been described: one occurs at toroidally coupled resonant surfaces and is the kinetic counterpart of the fluid models` resonance absorption. The other has no such correspondence and results directly from the toroidal coupling between the kinetic Alfven wave and the global wavefield. An analysis of a heating scenario suggests that it might be difficult to heat a plasma with Alfven waves up to temperatures that are relevant for a tokamak reactor. Kinetic effects are studied for three types of global Alfven modes (GAE, TAE, BAE) and a new class of kinetic eigenmodes is described which appear inside the fluid gap: it could be related to recent observations in the JET (Joint European Torus) tokamak. (author) 56 figs., 6 tabs., 58 refs.

  20. Fusion reactor in which the hydrogen plasma is heated, confined, and stabilized by oscillating magnetic fields in the center of a spherical or toroidal reaction vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The two most difficult problems in the tests for controlled nuclear fusion are heating of the plasma to fusion temperature as well as the safe confinement in a magnetic field. According to the invention, low-resistance, low-inductive, iron-free AC compression coils are provided for dealing with these two problems the coils being arranged on the reactor vessel in such a way that both effective heating and a sufficient enclosure time are possible. It is of essential importance in this connection that the coils are fed with a relatively rectangular alternating current, which is variable with respect to frequency and power. (orig./GG) [de