WorldWideScience

Sample records for topolyatomic molecules application

  1. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  2. Single molecule force spectroscopy: methods and applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yi; Hu Jun

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule measurements have transformed our view of biomolecules. Owing to the ability of monitoring the activity of individual molecules, we now see them as uniquely structured, fluctuating molecules that stochastically transition between frequently many substrates, as two molecules do not follow precisely the same trajectory. Indeed, it is this discovery of critical yet short-lived substrates that were often missed in ensemble measurements that has perhaps contributed most to the better understanding of biomolecular functioning resulting from single molecule experiments. In this paper, we give a review on the three major techniques of single molecule force spectroscopy, and their applications especially in biology. The single molecular study of biotin-streptavidin interactions is introduced as a successful example. The problems and prospects of the single molecule force spectroscopy are discussed, too. (authors)

  3. Single molecule SERS: Perspectives of analytical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčková, B.; Pavel, I.; Sládková, M.; Šišková, K.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    834-836, - (2007), s. 42-47 ISSN 0022-2860. [European Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy /28./. Istanbul, 03.09.2006-08.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0688 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) * surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) * single molecule SERS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.486, year: 2007

  4. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows: 1......) QD blinking and bleaching statistics, 2) the use of QDs in high speed single particle tracking with a special focus on how to design the biofunctional coatings of QDs which enable specific targeting to single proteins or lipids of interest, 3) a hybrid lipid-DNA analogue binding QDs which allows...... for tracking single lipids in lipid bilayers, 4) two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of QDs and 5) optical trapping and excitation of single QDs. In all of these applications, the focus is on the single particle sensitivity level of QDs. The high applicability of QDs in live cell imaging...

  5. Mushroom immunomodulators: unique molecules with unlimited applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Enshasy, Hesham A; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2013-12-01

    For centuries, mushrooms have been used as food and medicine in different cultures. More recently, many bioactive compounds have been isolated from different types of mushrooms. Among these, immunomodulators have gained much interest based on the increasing growth of the immunotherapy sector. Mushroom immunomodulators are classified under four categories based on their chemical nature as: lectins, terpenoids, proteins, and polysaccharides. These compounds are produced naturally in mushrooms cultivated in greenhouses. For effective industrial production, cultivation is carried out in submerged culture to increase the bioactive compound yield, decrease the production time, and reduce the cost of downstream processing. This review provides a comprehensive overview on mushroom immunomodulators in terms of chemistry, industrial production, and applications in medical and nonmedical sectors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cold and ultracold molecules: science, technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Lincoln D; DeMille, David; Krems, Roman V; Ye Jun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in the research field of cold and ultracold molecules. It serves as an introduction to the focus issue of New Journal of Physics on Cold and Ultracold Molecules and describes new prospects for fundamental research and technological development. Cold and ultracold molecules may revolutionize physical chemistry and few-body physics, provide techniques for probing new states of quantum matter, allow for precision measurements of both fundamental and applied interest, and enable quantum simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. Ultracold molecules offer promising applications such as new platforms for quantum computing, precise control of molecular dynamics, nanolithography and Bose-enhanced chemistry. The discussion is based on recent experimental and theoretical work and concludes with a summary of anticipated future directions and open questions in this rapidly expanding research field.

  7. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F

    2006-08-16

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  8. Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritort, F

    2006-01-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives. (topical review)

  9. Biosurfactants: promising bioactive molecules for oral-related health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikh, Mohamed; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-09-01

    Biosurfactants are naturally produced molecules that demonstrate potentially useful properties such as the ability to reduce surface tensions between different phases. Besides having similar properties to their artificial chemical counterparts, they are regarded as environmental friendly, biodegradable and less toxic, which make them desirable candidates for downstream applications. The structure-activity-related properties of the biosurfactants which are directly correlated with potency of the biosurfactants as antimicrobial agents, the ability of the biosurfactants to alter surface energies and their ability to increase bioavailability are particularly what attract researchers to exploit their potential use in the oral-related health applications. Current research into biosurfactant indicates significant future potential for use in cosmetic and therapeutic oral hygiene product formulations and related medical device treatments. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Spectral simulations of polar diatomic molecules immersed in He clusters: application to the ICl (X) molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarreal, P; Lara-Castells, M P de; Prosmiti, R; Delgado-Barrio, G; Lopez-Duran, D; Gianturco, F A; Jellinek, J

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed quantum-chemistry-like methodology to study molecules solvated in atomic clusters is applied to the ICl (iodine chloride) polar diatomic molecule immersed in clusters of He atoms. The atoms of the solvent clusters are treated as the 'electrons' and the solvated molecule as a structured 'nucleus' of the combined solvent-solute system. The helium-helium and helium-dopant interactions are represented by parametrized two-body and ab initio three-body potentials, respectively. The ground-state wavefunctions are used to compute the infrared (IR) spectra of the solvated molecule. In agreement with the experimental observations, the computed spectra exhibit considerable differences depending on whether the solvent cluster is comprised of bosonic ( 4 He) or fermionic ( 3 He) atoms. The source of these differences is attributed to the different spin-statistics of the solvent clusters. The bosonic versus fermionic nature of the solvent is reflected in the IR absorption selection rules. Only P and R branches with single state transitions appear in the spectrum when the molecule is solvated in a bosonic cluster. On the other hand, when the solvent represents a fermionic environment, quasi-degenerate multiplets of spin states contribute to each branch and, in addition, the Q-branch becomes also allowed. Combined, these two factors explain the more congested nature of the spectrum in the fermionic case

  11. Fluorine-18-labelled molecules: synthesis and application in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, F.; Perrio, C.; Barre, L.; Lasne, M.C.; Le Bars, D.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the more powerful available techniques for medical imaging. It relies on the use of molecules labelled with a positron emitter (β + ). Among those emitters, fluorine-18, available from a cyclotron, is a radionuclide of choice because of its relatively long-half-life (109.8 min) and the relatively low energy of the emitted-positron. The electrophilic form of fluorine-18 ([ 18 F]F 2 or reagents derived from [ 18 F]F 2 ) is mainly used for hydrogen or metal substitutions on aromatic or vinylic carbons. The presence of the stable isotope (fluorine-19) in the radiotracers limits their use in medical imaging. The nucleophilic form of fluorine-18 (alkaline mono-fluoride, K[ 18 F]F, the most used), obtained from irradiation of enriched water, is widely used in aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic substitutions for the synthesis of radiotracers with high specific radioactivity. Some examples of radio-fluorinated tracers used in PET are presented, as well as some of their in vivo applications in human. (authors)

  12. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals

  13. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals.

  14. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eRuscito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012 notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  15. Analytic description of highly excited vibrational-rotational states of diatomic molecules: II. Application to the hydrogen chloride molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, A.V.; Ryabikin, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Processing of the precise experimental data on transition frequencies and energy levels in the ground electronic state of the H 35 Cl molecule was carried out on the basis of the asymptotically correct perturbation series analytically constructed to describe the discrete vibrational-rotational spectrum of a diatomic molecule. The perturbation series was shown to converge rapidly up to the dissociation energy E D , whereas the conventional Dunham series has a distinct limit of applicability equal to 0.39E D . 12 refs., 2 figs

  16. Applications of cross sections for electron-molecule collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The role of electron-molecule collision cross sections is discussed for the study of the ionospheric and auroral processes in planetary atmospheres and of discharge-pumped lasers. These two areas emphasize the importance of further theoretical and experimental studies concerning electron-impact processes. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Transfer mechanisms between emitter molecules for OLED applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbacher, Frank [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Chiu, Chien-Shu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Krause, Ralf; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Within the last few years white organic light emitting diodes based on small molecules have shown the potential to have a promising future in the field of lighting technology. Nevertheless there is still room for improvement of the overall efficiency and lifetime of white OLEDs. A deeper understanding of the energy transfer mechanisms between different matrix and emitter molecules used in the OLED stack concept can help to optimize the layout and reduce driving voltage thus increasing the power efficiency and color stability of the device. To simplify the complex interactions within a complete white OLED we start out with a basic model system only containing the molecules of interest. This enables us to predict the fundamental concepts causing the behavior of more intricate systems. Using photoluminescence, excitation spectra and time-resolved photoluminescence we investigated the exciton transfer between different dyes for a variety of emitter systems. Our results indicate a dependence of exciton transfer probability on the total concentrations and therefore the distance between the molecules involved.

  18. Production, Manipulation, and Applications of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    were added to the MURI, and in some cases , the experiments were carried out on different molecules than originally stated (e.g., laser cooling and...interactions between like homonuclear alkali metal diatoms. J. Chem. Phys., 135:244307, 2011. [21] Jason N. Byrd, H. Harvey Michels, Jr. John A. Montgomery...111:1, 2013. [35] M. I. Fabrikant, Tian Li, N. J. Fitch, N. Farrow, Jonathan D. Weinstein , and H. J. Lewandowski. Method for traveling-wave

  19. Metastable Molecules in the Ground and in Excited States, Theory Development, Implementation and Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bartlett, Rodney J

    2006-01-01

    ... fingerprints for identification. We also make applications of interesting clusters, atmospheric systems, potential interstellar molecules, and to gas phase molecular reactions of the sort that can occur in flames.

  20. Application of the method of continued fractions for electron scattering by linear molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Lara, O.; Brasilia Univ., DF

    1995-01-01

    The method of continued fractions (MCF) of Horacek and Sasakawa is adapted for the first time to study low-energy electron scattering by linear molecules. Particularly, we have calculated the reactance K-matrices for an electron scattered by hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion as well as by a polar LiH molecule in the static-exchange level. For all the applications studied herein. the calculated physical quantities converge rapidly, even for a strongly polar molecule such as LiH, to the correct values and in most cases the convergence is monotonic. Our study suggests that the MCF could be an efficient method for studying electron-molecule scattering and also photoionization of molecules. (Author)

  1. High performance photovoltaic applications using solution-processed small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wan, Xiangjian; Long, Guankui

    2013-11-19

    Energy remains a critical issue for the survival and prosperity of humancivilization. Many experts believe that the eventual solution for sustainable energy is the use of direct solar energy as the main energy source. Among the options for renewable energy, photovoltaic technologies that harness solar energy offer a way to harness an unlimited resource and minimum environment impact in contrast with other alternatives such as water, nuclear, and wind energy. Currently, almost all commercial photovoltaic technologies use Si-based technology, which has a number of disadvantages including high cost, lack of flexibility, and the serious environmental impact of the Si industry. Other technologies, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, can overcome some of these issues. Today, polymer-based OPV (P-OPV) devices have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that exceed 9%. Compared with P-OPV, small molecules based OPV (SM-OPV) offers further advantages, including a defined structure for more reproducible performance, higher mobility and open circuit voltage, and easier synthetic control that leads to more diversified structures. Therefore, while largely undeveloped, SM-OPV is an important emerging technology with performance comparable to P-OPV. In this Account, we summarize our recent results on solution-processed SM-OPV. We believe that solution processing is essential for taking full advantage of OPV technologies. Our work started with the synthesis of oligothiophene derivatives with an acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure. Both the backbone conjugation length and electron withdrawing terminal groups play an important role in the light absorption, energy levels and performance of the devices. Among those molecules, devices using a 7-thiophene-unit backbone and a 3-ethylrhodanine (RD) terminal unit produced a 6.1% PCE. With the optimized conjugation length and terminal unit, we borrowed from the results with P-OPV devices to optimize the backbone. Thus we

  2. Wealth of bioactive molecules from marine bacteria and their applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    , carbohydrates, lipids or even nucleic acids and their derivatives Enzymes or their inhibitors are most sought after for various applications from food to medical realms Peptides have been useful in the medical field Polysachharides and oligosachharides...

  3. Group lattices with applications to the molecule C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, S.

    1993-01-01

    A brief introduction to group lattices and their application to the electronic structure of C 6 0 is presented. Group lattice methods with experimental results yield a fairly clear picture of the electronic energy levels. (Author) 7 refs

  4. Zero-phonon-line emission of single molecules for applications in quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, Alper; Ehrl, M.; Mustecaplioglu, O. E.; Hellerer, T.; Brauchle, C.; Zumbusch, A.

    2005-07-01

    A single photon source which generates transform limited single photons is highly desirable for applications in quantum optics. Transform limited emission guarantees the indistinguishability of the emitted single photons. This, in turn brings groundbreaking applications in linear optics quantum information processing within an experimental reach. Recently, self-assembled InAs quantum dots and trapped atoms have successfully been demonstrated as such sources for highly indistinguishable single photons. Here, we demonstrate that nearly transform limited zero-phonon-line (ZPL) emission from single molecules can be obtained by using vibronic excitation. Furthermore we report the results of coincidence detection experiments at the output of a Michelson-type interferometer. These experiments reveal Hong-Ou-Mandel correlations as a proof of the indistinguishability of the single photons emitted consecutively from a single molecule. Therefore, single molecules constitute an attractive alternative to single InAs quantum dots and trapped atoms for applications in linear optics quantum information processing. Experiments were performed with a home-built confocal microscope keeping the sample in a superfluid liquid Helium bath at 1.4K. We investigated terrylenediimide (TDI) molecules highly diluted in hexadecane (Shpol'skii matrix). A continuous wave single mode dye laser was used for excitation of vibronic transitions of individual molecules. From the integral fluorescence, the ZPL of single molecules was selected with a spectrally narrow interference filter. The ZPL emission was then sent to a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for linewidth measurements or a Michelson-type interferometer for coincidence detection.

  5. Biomedical application of MALDI mass spectrometry for small-molecule analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J A; Burgers, Peter C; de Groot, Ronald; Gruters, Rob A; Luider, Theo M

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging analytical tool for the analysis of molecules with molar masses below 1,000 Da; that is, small molecules. This technique offers rapid analysis, high sensitivity, low sample consumption, a relative high tolerance towards salts and buffers, and the possibility to store sample on the target plate. The successful application of the technique is, however, hampered by low molecular weight (LMW) matrix-derived interference signals and by poor reproducibility of signal intensities during quantitative analyses. In this review, we focus on the biomedical application of MALDI-MS for the analysis of small molecules and discuss its favorable properties and its challenges as well as strategies to improve the performance of the technique. Furthermore, practical aspects and applications are presented. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Application of the R-matrix method to photoionization of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Motomichi

    2010-04-07

    The R-matrix method has been used for theoretical calculation of electron collision with atoms and molecules for long years. The method was also formulated to treat photoionization process, however, its application has been mostly limited to photoionization of atoms. In this work, we implement the R-matrix method to treat molecular photoionization problem based on the UK R-matrix codes. This method can be used for diatomic as well as polyatomic molecules, with multiconfigurational description for electronic states of both target neutral molecule and product molecular ion. Test calculations were performed for valence electron photoionization of nitrogen (N(2)) as well as nitric oxide (NO) molecules. Calculated photoionization cross sections and asymmetry parameters agree reasonably well with the available experimental results, suggesting usefulness of the method for molecular photoionization.

  7. Few molecule SERS detection using nanolens based plasmonic nanostructure: application to point mutation detection

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind

    2016-10-27

    Advancements in nanotechnology fabrication techniques allow the possibility to design and fabricate a device with a minimum gap (<10 nm) between the composing nanostructures in order to obtain better control over the creation and spatial definition of plasmonic hot-spots. The present study is intended to show the fabrication of nanolens and their application to single/few molecules detection. Theoretical simulations were performed on different designs of real structures, including comparison of rough and smooth surfaces. Various molecules (rhodamine 6G, benzenethiol and BRCA1/BRCT peptides) were examined in this regard. Single molecule detection was possible for synthetic peptides, with a possible application in early detection of diseases. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Few molecule SERS detection using nanolens based plasmonic nanostructure: application to point mutation detection

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind; Alrasheed, Salma; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Nicastri, Annalisa; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Giovanni; Perozziello, Gerardo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in nanotechnology fabrication techniques allow the possibility to design and fabricate a device with a minimum gap (<10 nm) between the composing nanostructures in order to obtain better control over the creation and spatial definition of plasmonic hot-spots. The present study is intended to show the fabrication of nanolens and their application to single/few molecules detection. Theoretical simulations were performed on different designs of real structures, including comparison of rough and smooth surfaces. Various molecules (rhodamine 6G, benzenethiol and BRCA1/BRCT peptides) were examined in this regard. Single molecule detection was possible for synthetic peptides, with a possible application in early detection of diseases. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Assigned and unassigned distance geometry: applications to biological molecules and nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billinge, Simon J. L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). X-ray Scattering Group; Duxbury, Phillip M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Gonçalves, Douglas S. [Univ. Federal de Santa Catarina,; Lavor, Carlile [Univ. of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. of Applied Mathematics (IMECC-UNICAMP); Mucherino, Antonio [Univ. de Rennes, Rennes (France). Institut de Recherche en Informatique et Systemes Aleatoires

    2016-04-04

    Here, considering geometry based on the concept of distance, the results found by Menger and Blumenthal originated a body of knowledge called distance geometry. This survey covers some recent developments for assigned and unassigned distance geometry and focuses on two main applications: determination of three-dimensional conformations of biological molecules and nanostructures.

  10. Acenes, Heteroacenes and Analogous Molecules for Organic Photovoltaic and Field Effect Transistor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Devin Benjamin

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons composed of benzenoid rings fused in a linear fashion comprise the class of compounds known as acenes. The structures containing three to six ring fusions are brightly colored and possess band gaps and charge transport efficiencies sufficient for semiconductor applications. These molecules have been investigated throughout the past several decades to assess their optoelectronic properties. The absorption, emission and charge transport properties of this series of molecules has been studied extensively to elucidate structure-property relationships. A wide variety of analogous molecules, incorporating heterocycles in place of benzenoid rings, demonstrate similar properties to the parent compounds and have likewise been investigated. Functionalization of acene compounds by placement of groups around the molecule affects the way in which molecules interact in the solid state, in addition to the energetics of the molecule. The use of electron donating or electron withdrawing groups affects the frontier molecular orbitals and thus affects the optical and electronic gaps of the molecules. The use of bulky side groups such as alkylsilylethynyl groups allows for crystal engineering of molecular aggregates, and changing the volume and dimensions of the alkylsilyl groups affects the intermolecular interactions and thus changes the packing motif. In chapter 2, a series of tetracene and pentacene molecules with strongly electron withdrawing groups is described. The investigation focuses on the change in energetics of the frontier molecular orbitals between the base acene and the nitrile and dicyanovinyl derivatives as well as the differences between the pentacene and tetracene molecules. The differences in close packing motifs through use of bulky alkylsilylethynyl groups is also discussed in relation to electron acceptor material design and bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic characteristics. Chapter 3 focuses on molecular acceptor and

  11. Symmetry-adapted HAM/3 method and its application to some symmetric molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narita Susumu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The semiempirical HAM/3 method developed by Lindholm and coworkers about two decades ago has been known to have a deficiency that splits energies for the degenerate energy states. We have recently proposed a group-theoretical approach to remedy the internally broken symmetry of the HAM/3 Hamiltonians. In this paper, we present some results of its application to various small molecules with symmetry Td, C3v, and D3h. The proposed scheme gives correct degeneracy for these molecules.

  12. Symmetry-adapted HAM/3 method and its application to some symmetric molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Narita, Susumu; Shibuya, Tai-ichi; Fujiwara, Fred Y.; Takahata, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    The semiempirical HAM/3 method developed by Lindholm and coworkers about two decades ago has been known to have a deficiency that splits energies for the degenerate energy states. We have recently proposed a group-theoretical approach to remedy the internally broken symmetry of the HAM/3 Hamiltonians. In this paper, we present some results of its application to various small molecules with symmetry Td, C3v, and D3h. The proposed scheme gives correct degeneracy for these molecules. O método...

  13. Analytical applications of ion/molecule reactions in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinter, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The development of triple quadrupole mass spectrometers as a means of performing tandem mass spectrometry has provided a versatile instrument on which the ion/molecule reactions of a mass selected ion can be studied. This dissertation details the application of ion/molecule reactions in a triple quadrupole to two analytical problems. Part I. Ion/Molecule Reactions of Ammonia with Translationally Excited C 2 H 5 O + /Ions. The ability to impart low center-of-mass translational energies, which upon collision are converted into internal energy, allows the observation of reactions that require energy input. In addition, the systematic variation of the ion kinetic energy, often referred to as energy-resolved mass spectrometer, adds another dimension to the mass spectrum and can allow the observation of thresholds for reactions requiring energy input. This investigation develops methods for determining these thresholds. Part 2. The Use of Ion/Molecule Reactions in selected Reaction Monitoring GC/MSD/MS Analyses. An approach to improving the selectivity of an analysis is to improve the selectivity of the detection method. In GC/MS, one method has been to monitor a selected fragmentation reaction, either metastable or collisionally activated, in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. This develops the use of ion/molecule reactions for selected reaction monitoring analyses

  14. Molecule database framework: a framework for creating database applications with chemical structure search capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiener, Joos

    2013-12-11

    Research in organic chemistry generates samples of novel chemicals together with their properties and other related data. The involved scientists must be able to store this data and search it by chemical structure. There are commercial solutions for common needs like chemical registration systems or electronic lab notebooks. However for specific requirements of in-house databases and processes no such solutions exist. Another issue is that commercial solutions have the risk of vendor lock-in and may require an expensive license of a proprietary relational database management system. To speed up and simplify the development for applications that require chemical structure search capabilities, I have developed Molecule Database Framework. The framework abstracts the storing and searching of chemical structures into method calls. Therefore software developers do not require extensive knowledge about chemistry and the underlying database cartridge. This decreases application development time. Molecule Database Framework is written in Java and I created it by integrating existing free and open-source tools and frameworks. The core functionality includes:•Support for multi-component compounds (mixtures)•Import and export of SD-files•Optional security (authorization)For chemical structure searching Molecule Database Framework leverages the capabilities of the Bingo Cartridge for PostgreSQL and provides type-safe searching, caching, transactions and optional method level security. Molecule Database Framework supports multi-component chemical compounds (mixtures).Furthermore the design of entity classes and the reasoning behind it are explained. By means of a simple web application I describe how the framework could be used. I then benchmarked this example application to create some basic performance expectations for chemical structure searches and import and export of SD-files. By using a simple web application it was shown that Molecule Database Framework

  15. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  16. Single-molecule techniques in biophysics: a review of the progress in methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Shepherd, Jack; Wollman, Adam J. M.; Leake, Mark C.

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule biophysics has transformed our understanding of biology, but also of the physics of life. More exotic than simple soft matter, biomatter lives far from thermal equilibrium, covering multiple lengths from the nanoscale of single molecules to up to several orders of magnitude higher in cells, tissues and organisms. Biomolecules are often characterized by underlying instability: multiple metastable free energy states exist, separated by levels of just a few multiples of the thermal energy scale k B T, where k B is the Boltzmann constant and T absolute temperature, implying complex inter-conversion kinetics in the relatively hot, wet environment of active biological matter. A key benefit of single-molecule biophysics techniques is their ability to probe heterogeneity of free energy states across a molecular population, too challenging in general for conventional ensemble average approaches. Parallel developments in experimental and computational techniques have catalysed the birth of multiplexed, correlative techniques to tackle previously intractable biological questions. Experimentally, progress has been driven by improvements in sensitivity and speed of detectors, and the stability and efficiency of light sources, probes and microfluidics. We discuss the motivation and requirements for these recent experiments, including the underpinning mathematics. These methods are broadly divided into tools which detect molecules and those which manipulate them. For the former we discuss the progress of super-resolution microscopy, transformative for addressing many longstanding questions in the life sciences, and for the latter we include progress in ‘force spectroscopy’ techniques that mechanically perturb molecules. We also consider in silico progress of single-molecule computational physics, and how simulation and experimentation may be drawn together to give a more complete understanding. Increasingly, combinatorial techniques are now used, including

  17. Design, Optimization and Application of Small Molecule Biosensor in Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Ye; Wang, Meng

    2017-01-01

    The development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering has painted a great future for the bio-based economy, including fuels, chemicals, and drugs produced from renewable feedstocks. With the rapid advance of genome-scale modeling, pathway assembling and genome engineering/editing, our ability to design and generate microbial cell factories with various phenotype becomes almost limitless. However, our lack of ability to measure and exert precise control over metabolite concentration related phenotypes becomes a bottleneck in metabolic engineering. Genetically encoded small molecule biosensors, which provide the means to couple metabolite concentration to measurable or actionable outputs, are highly promising solutions to the bottleneck. Here we review recent advances in the design, optimization and application of small molecule biosensor in metabolic engineering, with particular focus on optimization strategies for transcription factor (TF) based biosensors.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Single-molecule experiments in biological physics: methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritort, F.

    2006-08-01

    I review single-molecule experiments (SMEs) in biological physics. Recent technological developments have provided the tools to design and build scientific instruments of high enough sensitivity and precision to manipulate and visualize individual molecules and measure microscopic forces. Using SMEs it is possible to manipulate molecules one at a time and measure distributions describing molecular properties, characterize the kinetics of biomolecular reactions and detect molecular intermediates. SMEs provide additional information about thermodynamics and kinetics of biomolecular processes. This complements information obtained in traditional bulk assays. In SMEs it is also possible to measure small energies and detect large Brownian deviations in biomolecular reactions, thereby offering new methods and systems to scrutinize the basic foundations of statistical mechanics. This review is written at a very introductory level, emphasizing the importance of SMEs to scientists interested in knowing the common playground of ideas and the interdisciplinary topics accessible by these techniques. The review discusses SMEs from an experimental perspective, first exposing the most common experimental methodologies and later presenting various molecular systems where such techniques have been applied. I briefly discuss experimental techniques such as atomic-force microscopy (AFM), laser optical tweezers (LOTs), magnetic tweezers (MTs), biomembrane force probes (BFPs) and single-molecule fluorescence (SMF). I then present several applications of SME to the study of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA and DNA condensation) and proteins (protein-protein interactions, protein folding and molecular motors). Finally, I discuss applications of SMEs to the study of the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of small systems and the experimental verification of fluctuation theorems. I conclude with a discussion of open questions and future perspectives.

  19. Application of Fourier transform infrared ellipsometry to assess the concentration of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard; De Martino, Antonello; Schwartz, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a noninvasive optical characterization technique mainly used in the semiconductor field to characterize bare substrates and thin films. In particular, it allows the gathering of information concerning the physical structure of the sample, such as roughness and film thickness, as well as its optical response. In the mid-infrared (IR) range each molecule exhibits a characteristic absorption fingerprint, which makes this technique chemically selective. Phase-modulated IR ellipsometry does not require a baseline correction procedure or suppression of atmospheric CO2 and water-vapor absorption bands, thus greatly reducing the subjectivity in data analysis. We have found that ellipsometric measurements of thin films, such as the solid residuals left on a plane surface after evaporation of a liquid drop containing a given compound in solution, are particularly favorable for dosing purposes because the intensity of IR absorptions shows a linear behavior along a wide range of solution concentrations of the given compound. Our aim is to illustrate with a concrete example and to justify theoretically the linearity experimentally found between radiation absorption and molecule concentration. For the example, we prepared aqueous solutions of glycogen, a molecule of huge biological importance currently tested in biochemical analyses, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 1 g/l, which correspond to those found in physiological conditions. The results of this example are promising for the application of ellipsometry for dosing purposes in biochemistry and biomedicine.

  20. A Study of Applications of Machine Learning Based Classification Methods for Virtual Screening of Lead Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Renu; Bapat, Sanket; Jain, Esha; Tambe, Sanjeev S; Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-based virtual screening of combinatorial libraries employs a number of statistical modeling and machine learning methods. A comprehensive analysis of the application of these methods for the diversity oriented virtual screening of biological targets/drug classes is presented here. A number of classification models have been built using three types of inputs namely structure based descriptors, molecular fingerprints and therapeutic category for performing virtual screening. The activity and affinity descriptors of a set of inhibitors of four target classes DHFR, COX, LOX and NMDA have been utilized to train a total of six classifiers viz. Artificial Neural Network (ANN), k nearest neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Naïve Bayes (NB), Decision Tree--(DT) and Random Forest--(RF). Among these classifiers, the ANN was found as the best classifier with an AUC of 0.9 irrespective of the target. New molecular fingerprints based on pharmacophore, toxicophore and chemophore (PTC), were used to build the ANN models for each dataset. A good accuracy of 87.27% was obtained using 296 chemophoric binary fingerprints for the COX-LOX inhibitors compared to pharmacophoric (67.82%) and toxicophoric (70.64%). The methodology was validated on the classical Ames mutagenecity dataset of 4337 molecules. To evaluate it further, selectivity and promiscuity of molecules from five drug classes viz. anti-anginal, anti-convulsant, anti-depressant, anti-arrhythmic and anti-diabetic were studied. The TPC fingerprints computed for each category were able to capture the drug-class specific features using the k-NN classifier. These models can be useful for selecting optimal molecules for drug design.

  1. Exopolysaccharides produced by marine bacteria and their applications as glycosaminoglycan-like molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eDELBARRE-LADRAT

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although polysaccharides are ubiquitous and the most abundant renewable bio-components, their studies, covered by the glycochemistry and glycobiology fields, remain a challenge due to their high molecular diversity and complexity.Polysaccharides are industrially used in food products; human therapeutics fall into a more recent research field and pharmaceutical industry is looking for more and more molecules with enhanced activities. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs found in animal tissues play a critical role in cellular physiological and pathological processes as they bind many cellular components. Therefore, they present a great potential for the design and preparation of therapeutic drugs.On the other hand, microorganisms producing exopolysaccharides (EPS are renewable resources meeting well the actual industrial demand. In particular, the diversity of marine microorganisms is still largely unexplored offering great opportunities to discover high value products such as new molecules and biocatalysts.EPS-producing bacteria from the marine environment will be reviewed with a focus on marine-derived EPS from bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Information on chemical and structural features, putative pathways of biosynthesis, novel strategies for chemical and enzymatic modifications and potentialities in the biomedical field will be provided. An integrated approach should be used to increase the basic knowledge on these compounds and their applications; new clean environmentally friendly processes for the production of carbohydrate bio-active compounds should also be proposed for a sustainable industry.

  2. Exopolysaccharides produced by marine bacteria and their applications as glycosaminoglycan-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarre-Ladrat, Christine; Sinquin, Corinne; Lebellenger, Lou; Zykwinska, Agata; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Although polysaccharides are ubiquitous and the most abundant renewable bio-components, their studies, covered by the glycochemistry and glycobiology fields, remain a challenge due to their high molecular diversity and complexity. Polysaccharides are industrially used in food products; human therapeutics fall into a more recent research field and pharmaceutical industry is looking for more and more molecules with enhanced activities. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) found in animal tissues play a critical role in cellular physiological and pathological processes as they bind many cellular components. Therefore, they present a great potential for the design and preparation of therapeutic drugs. On the other hand, microorganisms producing exopolysaccharides (EPS) are renewable resources meeting well the actual industrial demand. In particular, the diversity of marine microorganisms is still largely unexplored offering great opportunities to discover high value products such as new molecules and biocatalysts. EPS-producing bacteria from the marine environment will be reviewed with a focus on marine-derived EPS from bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Information on chemical and structural features, putative pathways of biosynthesis, novel strategies for chemical and enzymatic modifications and potentialities in the biomedical field will be provided. An integrated approach should be used to increase the basic knowledge on these compounds and their applications; new clean environmentally friendly processes for the production of carbohydrate bio-active compounds should also be proposed for a sustainable industry.

  3. Fluorescent labeling of NASBA amplified tmRNA molecules for microarray applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplinski Lauris

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we present a novel promising microbial diagnostic method that combines the sensitivity of Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA with the high information content of microarray technology for the detection of bacterial tmRNA molecules. The NASBA protocol was modified to include aminoallyl-UTP (aaUTP molecules that were incorporated into nascent RNA during the NASBA reaction. Post-amplification labeling with fluorescent dye was carried out subsequently and tmRNA hybridization signal intensities were measured using microarray technology. Significant optimization of the labeled NASBA protocol was required to maintain the required sensitivity of the reactions. Results Two different aaUTP salts were evaluated and optimum final concentrations were identified for both. The final 2 mM concentration of aaUTP Li-salt in NASBA reaction resulted in highest microarray signals overall, being twice as high as the strongest signals with 1 mM aaUTP Na-salt. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated efficient combination of NASBA amplification technology with microarray based hybridization detection. The method is applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics including environmental monitoring, bio threat detection, industrial process monitoring and clinical microbiology.

  4. High field high frequency EPR techniques and their application to single molecule magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.S.; Hill, S.; Goy, P.; Wylde, R.; Takahashi, S.

    2004-01-01

    We present details of a new high-field/high-frequency EPR technique, and its application to measurements of single-molecule magnets (SMMs). By using a quasi-optical set-up and microwave sources covering a continuous frequency range from 170 to 600 GHz, in conjunction with a millimetre-wave vector network analyser, we are able to measure EPR to high magnetic fields. For example, a g=2 system will exhibit EPR at about 14 T at a frequency of 400 GHz. We illustrate the technique by presenting details of recent high-frequency experiments on several SMMs which are variations of the well-known SMM Mn 12 -Ac. This material has a spin ground state of S=10 and large uniaxial anisotropy, hence frequencies above 300 GHz are required in order to observe EPR from the ground state

  5. Selective laser spectroscopy of molecules and ions in solids: a history, fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Michael

    2018-03-01

    A history of the development of selective laser spectroscopy is presented, beginning with a pioneering work by Yu. V. Denisov and V. A. Kizel in 1967, who were the first to demonstrate the possibility of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of luminescence spectra of impurity ions in glasses upon monochromatic resonance excitation. Selective excitation of optical centers can be achieved due to existence of zero-phonon transitions corresponding to narrow homogeneous zero-phonon lines in the spectra of impurity centers in solids, which are hidden in broad inhomogeneous optical bands upon usual nonselective excitation. The fundamentals of zero-phonon transition spectroscopy are considered and the mechanism of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of optical spectra of ions and molecules in crystals and amorphous solids under selective laser excitation of luminescence and persistent hole burning in absorption spectra is presented in detail. Various applications of selective laser spectroscopy for fundamental and applied studies are discussed.

  6. Application of Optical Biosensors in Small-Molecule Screening Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Knecht

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have seen remarkable progress and improvements in optical biosensor systems such that those are currently seen as an important and value-adding component of modern drug screening activities. In particular the introduction of microplate-based biosensor systems holds the promise to match the required throughput without compromising on data quality thus representing a sought-after complement to traditional fluidic systems. This article aims to highlight the application of the two most prominent optical biosensor technologies, namely surface plasmon resonance (SPR and optical waveguide grating (OWG, in small-molecule screening and will present, review and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different assay formats on these platforms. A particular focus will be on the specific advantages of the inhibition in solution assay (ISA format in contrast to traditional direct binding assays (DBA. Furthermore we will discuss different application areas for both fluidic as well as plate-based biosensor systems by considering the individual strength of the platforms.

  7. Mixed Matrix Composite Membranes Containing POSS Molecules for Carbon Dioxide Removal Application

    KAUST Repository

    Rini, Eki Listya

    2011-05-10

    CO2 removal by membrane processes is considerably potential for several applications such as natural gas and synthesis gas purification, enhanced oil recovery application, and carbon dioxide capture in combat against global warming. Dense polymeric membranes are commonly utilized for these type of gas separation applications. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of dense polymeric membranes, which commonly characterize by the low gas permeability versus high gas selectivity trade–off or vice versa, is less desirable. In order to meet the increased demand of CO2 removal, a strategy to improve the gas separation performance of a polymeric membrane is investigated in this study. With this regard, mixed matrix membranes in which inorganic non porous fillers are incorporated into a polymeric matrix were prepared to achieve the aforementioned objective. The mixed matrix membranes were prepared from Pebax® block copolymers and PEG POSS® molecules. These hybrid membranes were formed as both dense and multilayer composite membranes. The dense transparent membranes with well–dispersed fillers could be obtained by variation of the solvent mixture. The DSC analyses showed that incorporation of PEG POSS® into Pebax® matrix altered the thermal properties of the matrix. The multilayer composite membranes were then prepared from a PTMSP gutter layer deposited on a PAN porous support and an adjacent hybrid Pebax®/PEG POSS® as the top layer. These hybrid multilayer composite membranes exhibited an enhanced CO2 selectiv4 ity by a factor of two relative to the pure Pebax®. In these hybrid systems, the CO2 separation was presumably enhanced by the high ether oxides content from PEG POSS® that has high affinities for CO2. For particular composition of Pebax® and PEG POSS® concentrations, the PTMSP gutter layer harnessed the CO2 selectivity without losing the CO2 permeation rate. At the same time, these membrane, however, suffered severe adhesion between the gutter layer

  8. New insights into the microemulsion-based chromatographic NMR resolution mechanism and its application to fragrance/flavor molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Roy E.; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-07-01

    The NMR chromatography method is applied to a class of molecules with similar physical properties. We correlate the separation ability of microemulsions to the physical properties of the analyzed molecules. Flavor and aroma compounds are very widespread. Compositional analysis is in many cases tedious. Any new method of analysis is always useful and challenging. Here we show a new application to a class of fragrance molecules, with only a moderate variation in their chemical and physical characteristics. Up to 11 selected compounds in one mixture are resolved in one spectrum by NMR chromatography, despite the similarity of the compounds. The differences between O/W and W/O microemulsions and their resolution mechanism as applied to fragrance molecules are explained in terms of hydrophilicity and lipophilicity and effective critical packing parameters of the microemulsions. The observed diffusion rates are shown to correlate with solvation parameters. These results can be used to estimate the diffusion rates of molecules to be separated, allowing selection of the microemulsion or NMR chromatography solvent appropriate for each specific application.

  9. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitsugu Fujita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas (CRISPR/Cas system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing.

  10. AGOA: A Hydration Procedure and Its Application to the 1-Phenyl-beta-Carboline Molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandes, Marcelo Z.; Silva, João B. P. da; Longo, Ricardo L.

    2002-01-01

    A new procedure, named AGOA, has been developed and implemented in a computer program written in FORTRAN 77 to explore the hydration structures of polar solutes using its molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). This procedure can be generalized to polar solvents other than water. It has been tested for several small molecules, and applied to complex molecules of pharmacological interest, such as the beta-carbolinic systems derived from indole. This is a stringent, but not general, test of th...

  11. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  12. Polymeric biomaterials for nerve regeneration applications: From promoting cellular organization to the delivery of bioactive molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Rivera, Roberto L.

    Thousands of new cases of injury to the central nervous system (CNS) occur each year in the USA and all over the world. However, despite recent advances, at present there is no cure for the resulting paraplegia or quadriplegia. This research is directed towards engineering biomaterial platforms to promote cellular organization at the surface of polymer scaffolds that will be conducive to proper regeneration of injured CNS. In addition, the formulation of a delivery system for neuroactive molecules using polymer-based materials will be evaluated to establish its potential to treat CNS disorders. Initial studies involved the chemical modification of an electrospun nonwoven matrix of nanofibers with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). Nanofibers alone up-regulated FGF-2, albeit to a lesser extent than nanofibers covalently modified with FGF-2. These results underscore the importance of both surface topography and growth factor presentation on cellular function. Moreover, that FGF-2 modified nanofibrillar scaffolds may demonstrate utility in tissue engineering applications for replacement and regeneration of damaged tissue following CNS injury or disease. Subsequent research efforts focused on a novel micropatterning technique called microscale plasma-initiated patterning (microPIP). This patterning method uses a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp to selectively protect regions of an underlying substrate from oxygen plasma treatment resulting in hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. FGF-2 and laminin-1 were applied to an electrospun polyamide nanofibrillar matrix following plasma treatment. In this work it, was possible to demonstrate that textured surfaces, such as nanofibrillar scaffolds, can be micropatterned to provide external chemical cues for cellular organization. Finally, a microsphere system capable of encapsulating proteins while minimizing the mechanisms of protein degradation and providing a controlled release was investigated. Microspheres were comprised of

  13. Symmetry numbers for rigid, flexible, and fluxional molecules: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Michael K; Irikura, Karl K

    2010-12-16

    The use of molecular simulations and ab initio calculations to predict thermodynamic properties of molecules has become routine. Such methods rely upon an accurate representation of the molecular partition function or configurational integral, which in turn often includes a rotational symmetry number. However, the reason for including the symmetry number is unclear to many practitioners, and there is also a need for a general prescription for evaluating the symmetry numbers of flexible molecules, i.e., for molecules with thermally active internal degrees of freedom, such as internal rotors. Surprisingly, we have been unable to find any complete and convincing explanations of these important issues in textbooks or the journal literature. The present paper aims to explain why symmetry numbers are needed and how their values should be determined. Both classical and quantum approaches are provided.

  14. Theoretical study of molecular vibration and Application to linear triatomic molecules: case of OCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianavalomahefa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to give a theoretical approach to the calculation of vibrational energy levels of polyatomic molecules. By using matrix calculation, we have to solve an eigenvalue equation that gives normal vibration frequencies of the system. A basis change introduces normal coordinates of vibration, which diagonalize the Hamiltonian. The harmonic approximation gives a rough evaluation of parameters which describe the system. Then, we introduce nonlinear terms to take into account the anharmonicity of interatomic bounds. Morse oscillator gives good approximation for diatomic molecules. We consider cubic and quartic potential terms for polyatomic molecules. We treat the problem both in classical and quantum approach. The results thus obtained are applied to study longitudinal vibration of carbonyl sulfide. [fr

  15. Diabatic potential-optimized discrete variable representation: application to photodissociation process of the CO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, Ana Carla P; Prudente, Frederico V; Vianna, Jose David M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new numerically optimized discrete variable representation using eigenstates of diabatic Hamiltonians. This procedure provides an efficient method to solve non-adiabatic coupling problems since the generated basis sets take into account information on the diabatic potentials. The method is applied to the B 1 Σ + - D' 1 Σ + Rydberg-valence predissociation interaction in the CO molecule. Here we give an account of the discrete variable representation and present the procedure for the calculation of its optimized version, which we apply to obtain the total photodissociation cross sections of the CO molecule

  16. [Innovative application of small molecules to influence -pathogenicity of dental plaque].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, M M; Volgenant, C M C; Krom, B P

    2018-05-01

    Current preventive measures against infectious oral diseases are mainly focussed on plaque removal and promoting a healthy lifestyle. This in vitro study investigated a third preventive method: maintaining healthy dental plaque with the use of small molecules. As a model of dental plaque, in vitro biofilms were cultivated under conditions that induce pathogenic characteristics. The effect of erythritol and other small molecules on the pathogenic characteristics and bacterial composition of the biofilm was evaluated. The artificial sweetener erythritol and the molecule 3-Oxo-N-(2-oxycyclohexyl)dodecanamide (3-Oxo-N) had no clinically relevant effect on total biofilm formation. Erythritol did, however, lower the gingivitis related protease activity of the biofilm, while 3-Oxo-N blocked the caries related lactic acid accumulation. Furthermore, both substances ensured the biofilm maintained a young, non-pathogenic microbial composition. This shows it is possible to influence the dental plaque in a positive manner in vitro with the help of small molecules. Further research is necessary before this manipulation of dental plaque can be applied.

  17. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung; Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference

  18. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference.

  19. Ninth international conference on hole burning, single molecule and related spectroscopies: science and applications (HBSM 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This conference was organized around 9 sessions: -) single molecule, -) quantum optics, -) hole-burning materials and mechanisms, -) single nano-particle spectroscopy, -) dephasing and spectral diffusion, -) microwave photonics, -) biological systems, -) rare earth doped materials, -) novel laser sources. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  20. Enhanced Electron Attachment to Highly-Excited Molecules and Its Applications in Pulsed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.X.; Ma, C.Y.; McCorkle, D.L.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past several years have shown that electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules have extremely large cross sections. We will discuss the implications of this for pulsed discharges used for H - generation, material processing, and plasma remediation

  1. Ninth international conference on hole burning, single molecule and related spectroscopies: science and applications (HBSM 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This conference was organized around 9 sessions: -) single molecule, -) quantum optics, -) hole-burning materials and mechanisms, -) single nano-particle spectroscopy, -) dephasing and spectral diffusion, -) microwave photonics, -) biological systems, -) rare earth doped materials, -) novel laser sources. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  2. The synthesis and host-guest applications of synthetic receptor molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osner, Zachary R.

    2011-12-01

    Host-guest chemistry involves the complimentary binding between two molecules. Host molecules have been synthesized to bind negative, positive, and neutral molecules such as proteins and enzymes, and have been used as optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, supramolecular catalysts, and in the pharmaceutical industry as anti-cancer agents.1 The field of nanoscience has exploited guest-host interactions to create optical sensors with colloidal gold and Dip-Pen nanolithography technologies. Gold nanoparticles, have been functionalized with DNA, and have been developed as a selective colorimetric detection system, that upon binding turns the solution from a red to blue in color.2 Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) 1 is a common supramolecular scaffold that has been previously employed in guest-host chemistry, and the construction of CTV involves the cyclic trimerization of veratryl alcohol via the veratryl cation.3 Due to the rigid bowl shaped structure of CTV, CTV has been shown to act as a host molecule for fullerene-C60.4 Lectin binding receptor proteins are a specific class of proteins found in bacteria, viruses, plants, and animals that can bind to complimentary carbohydrates. It is these lectins that are believed to be responsible for cell-cell interactions and the formation of biofilms in pathenogenic bacteria.5 P. aeruginosa is a pathenogenic bacterium, shown to have a high resistance to many antibiotics, which can form biofilms in human lung tissue, causing respiratory tract infections in patients with compromised immune systems. 5 I will exploit guest-host interactions to create synthetic supramolecular and carbohydrate receptor molecules to that will be of use as biological sensing devices via self-assembled monolayers on solid surfaces and nanoparticle technologies. *Please refer to dissertation for references/footnotes.

  3. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  4. Naming polyhedra by general face-spirals - theory and applications to fullerenes and other polyhedral molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Lukas; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Avery, James Emil

    2018-01-01

    We present a general face-spiral algorithm for cubic polyhedral graphs (including fullerenes and fulleroids), and extend it to the full class of all polyhedral graphs by way of the leapfrog transform. This yields compact canonical representations of polyhedra with a simple and intuitive geometrical...... polyhedral molecules, and an especially compact form for the special class of fullerenes. A unique numbering of vertices is obtained as a byproduct of the spiral algorithm. This is required to denote modifications of the parent cage in IUPAC naming schemes. Similarly, the symmetry group of the molecule can...... be found together with the canonical general spiral at negligible cost. The algorithm is fully compatible with the classical spiral algorithm developed by Manolopoulos for fullerenes, i. e., classical spirals are accepted as input, and spiralable graphs lead to identical output. We prove that the algorithm...

  5. Application of terahertz spectroscopy for characterization of biologically active organic molecules in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaliūnas, Mindaugas; Jakštas, Vytautas; Nasser, Kinan E.; Venckevičius, Rimvydas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Valušis, Gintaras

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a comparative research of biologically active organic molecules in its natural environment using the terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy (TDS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) systems is carried out. Absorption coefficient and refractive index of Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves containing nicotine, Cannabis sativa L. leaves containing tetrahydrocannabinol, and Humulu lupulus L. leaves containing α-acids, active organic molecules that obtain in natural environment, were measured in broad frequency range from 0.1 to 13 THz at room temperature. In the spectra of absorption coefficient the features were found to be unique for N. tabacum, C. sativa and H. lupulus. Moreover, those features can be exploited for identification of C. sativa sex and N. tabacum origin. The refractive index can be also used to characterize different species.

  6. Putting prions into focus: application of single molecule detection to the diagnosis of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, A; Bieschke, J; Eigen, M; Kretzschmar, H A

    2000-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the cerebral deposition of an aggregated pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) which constitutes the principal component of the transmissible agent termed prion. In order to develop a highly sensitive method for the detection of PrP(Sc) aggregates in biological samples such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we used a method based on Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), a technique which allows detection of single fluorescently labeled molecules in solution. Within the FCS setup, fluorescent photons emitted by molecules passing an open volume element defined by the beam of an excitation laser focussed into a diffraction-limited spot are imaged confocally onto a single photon counting detector. Aggregates of PrP(Sc) could be labeled by co-aggregation of probe molecules such as monomeric recombinant PrP or PrP-specific antibodies tagged with a fluorescent dye. In addition to slow diffusion, labeled aggregates are characterized by high fluorescence intensity, which allows detection and quantification by analysis of fluorescence intensity distribution. To improve detection of rare target particles, the accessible volume element was increased by scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). To further improve sensitivity and specificity, two different probes were used simultaneously in a two-color setup. In a diagnostic model system of CSF spiked with purified prion rods, dual-color SIFT was more sensitive than Western blot analysis. In addition, a PrP(Sc)-specific signal was also detected in a number of CSF samples derived from CJD patients but not in controls.

  7. Developments and Applications of Electrophoresis and Small Molecule Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive native fluorescence detection of proteins with miniaturized one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was achieved with laser side-entry excitation, which provides both high excitation power and low background level. The detection limit for R-phycoerythrin protein spots in 1-D SDS-PAGE was as low as 15 fg, which corresponds to 40 thousand molecules only. The average detection limit of six standard native proteins was 5 pg per band and the dynamic range spanned more than 3 orders of magnitude. Approximately 150 protein spots from 30 ng of total Escherichia coli extraction were detected on a 0.8 cm x 1 cm gel in two-dimensional separation. Estrogen-DNA adducts as 4-OHE1(E2)-1-N3Ade and 4-OHEI(E2)-2-NacCys were hypothesized as early risk assessment of prostate and breast cancers. Capillary electrophoresis, luminescence/absorption spectroscopy and LC-MS were used to characterize and detect these adducts. Monoclonal antibodies against each individual adduct were developed and used to enrich such compounds from urine samples of prostate and breast cancer patients as well as healthy people. Adduct 4-OHE1-1-N3Ade was detected at much higher level in urine from subjects with prostate cancer patients compared to healthy males. The same adduct and 4-OHEI-2-NacCys were also detected at a much higher level in urine from a woman with breast carcinoma than samples from healthy controls. These two DNA adducts may serve as novel biomarkers for early diagnostic of cancers. The adsorption properties of R-phycoerythrin (RPE), on the fused-silica surface were studied using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and single molecule spectroscopy. The band shapes and migration times were measured in CE. Adsorption and desorption events were recorded at the single-molecule level by imaging of the evanescent-field layer using total internal reflection. The adsorbed RPE molecules on the fused-silica prism surface were

  8. Gas phase chemical kinetics at high temperature of carbonaceous molecules: application to circumstellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biennier, L.; Gardez, A.; Saidani, G.; Georges, R.; Rowe, B.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar shells of evolved stars are a theater of extremely rich physical and chemical processes. More than seventy molecules of varied nature have been identified in the envelopes through their spectral fingerprints in the microwave or far infrared regions. Many of them are carbon chain molecules and radicals and a significant number are unique to the circumstellar medium. However, observational data remain scarce and more than half of the detected species have been observed in only one object, the nearby carbon star IRC + 10216. Chemical kinetic models are needed to describe the formation of molecules in evolved circumstellar outflows. Upcoming terrestrial telescopes such as ALMA will increase the spatial resolution by several orders of magnitude and provide a wealth of data. The determination of relevant laboratory kinetics data is critical to keep up with the development of the observations and of the refinement of chemical models. Today, the majority of reactions studied in the laboratory are the ones involved in combustion and concerning light hydrocarbons. Our objective is to provide the scientific community with rate coefficients of reactions between abundant species in these warm environments. Cyanopolyynes from HC_2N to HC_9N have all been detected in carbon rich circumstellar envelopes in up to 10 sources for HC_3N. Neutral-neutral reactions of the CN radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons could be a dominant route in the formation of cyanopolyynes, even at low temperatures. Our approach aims to bridge the temperature gap between resistively heated flow tubes and shock tubes. The present kinetic measurements are obtained using a new reactor combining a high enthalpy source (Moudens et al. 2011) with a flow tube and a pulsed laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence system to probe the undergoing chemical reactions. The high enthalpy flow tube has been used to measure the rate constant of the reaction of the CN radical with propane, propene

  9. Synthetic strategies for controlling inter- and intramolecular interactions: Applications in single-molecule fluorescence imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and palladium catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Nicholas R.

    The field of synthetic organic chemistry has reached such maturity that, with sufficient effort and resources, the synthesis of virtually any small molecule which exhibits reasonable stability at room temperature can be realized. While representing a monumental achievement for the field, the ability to exert precise control over molecular structure is just a means to an end, and it is frequently the responsibility of the synthetic chemist to determine which molecules should actually be synthesized. For better or worse, there exists no competitive free market in academia for new molecules, and as a result, the decision of which compounds should be synthesized is seldom driven by the forces of supply and demand; rather, it is guided by the synthetic chemist's interest in an anticipated structure-function relationship or in the properties of a previously unstudied class of molecules. As a consequence, there exists a pervasive need for chemists with synthetic expertise in fields (e.g., molecular imaging) and subdisciplines of chemistry (e.g., physical chemistry) in which the identification of promising synthetic targets dramatically outpaces the synthetic output in that field or subdiscipline, and ample opportunities are available for synthetic chemists who choose to pursue such cross-disciplinary research. This thesis describes synthetic efforts that leverage these opportunities to realize applications in biological imaging and in palladium catalysis. In Part I, the synthesis and characterization of three novel luminophores and their imaging applications are discussed. The first is a molecular beacon that utilizes a fluorophorefluorophore pair which exhibits H-dimer quenching in the closed conformation. This probe offers several advantages over conventional fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons in the detection of oligonucleotides, both in bulk and at the single-molecule level. Secondly, a fluorescent, Cy3-Cy5 covalent heterodimer is reported, which on account of the

  10. Angle and Spin Resolved Auger Emission Theory and Applications to Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmann, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The Auger effect must be interpreted as the radiationless counterpart of photoionization and is usually described within a two-step model. Angle and spin resolved Auger emission physics deals with the theoretical and numerical description, analysis and interpretation of such types of experiments on free atoms and molecules. This monograph derives the general theory applying the density matrix formalism and, in terms of irreducible tensorial sets, so called state multipoles and order parameters, for parameterizing the atomic and molecular systems, respectively. Propensity rules and non-linear dependencies between the angular distribution and spin polarization parameters are included in the discussion. The numerical approaches utilizing relativistic distorted wave (RDWA), multiconfigurational Dirac-Fock (MCDF), and Greens operator methods are described. These methods are discussed and applied to theoretical predictions, numerical results and experimental data for a variety of atomic systems, especially the rare...

  11. Application of GAMESS/NEO to quantum calculations of muonic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheely, Eugene V; Burggraf, Larry W [Air Force Institute of Technology, AFIT/ENP, 2950 Hobson Way, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Adamson, Paul E [High Power Microwave (HPM) Technologies Branch, HPM Division, Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Duan, Xiaofeng F [DoD Supercomputing Resource Center (DSRC), Air Force Research Laboratory, 2435 Fifth Street, Bldg 676, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Schmidt, Mike W, E-mail: Eugene.Sheely@afit.ed [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, 201 Spedding Hall, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    The General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS) has been modified to perform studies involving negative muons. This system, coupled with the Nuclear-Electronic Orbital (NEO) method enables the ab-initio study of muonic atoms where both the negative muon and the positive nuclei are modeled as quantum particles. This is of particular usefulness in the study light nuclei, muonic atoms, such as is encountered in muon-catalyzed fusion. NEO was also modified to allow the inclusion of positive exotic-particles to be studied using open and closed shell Hartree-Fock and Configuration Interaction. Capitalizing on these modified methods, the muon density and vibrational dynamics of some light muonic molecules have been analyzed.

  12. Application of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in stabilization process of biological molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossien Salmani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Co-precipitation method is an easy way to prepare magnetic nanoparticles of iron with a large surface and small particle size, which increases the ability of these particles to act as a suitable carrier for enzyme stabilization. Adequate modification of the surface of these nanoparticles enhances their ability to bind to biological molecules. The immobilized protein or enzyme on magnetic nanoparticles are more stable against structural changes, temperature and pH in comparison with un-stabilized structures, and it is widely used in various sciences, including protein isolation and purification, pharmaceutical science, and food analysis. Stabilization based on the covalent bonds and physical absorption is nonspecific, which greatly limits their functionality. The process of stabilization through bio-mediums provide a new method to overcome the selectivity problem.

  13. Synthesis of new host molecules and applications for imaging by NMR Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traore, T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used today for early medical diagnosis. During the MRI examination, the use of contrast agent allows the obtention of well resolved images. However the lack of sensibility of this technic lead to the utilization of hyper-polarized species ( 3 He, 13 C, 129 Xe) in MRI. The xenon (Xe) is the more promising but due to its weak selectivity, it cannot be used in molecular imaging. So, the development and utilization of host molecules able to encapsulate the xenon and bring it to a targeted biological tissue or organ is necessary. In these conditions, during this thesis, we worked on the elaboration of such molecules, and particularly, in cryptophanes since these compounds have strong affinity for xenon and could be used as tools for MRI by hyper-polarized xenon (Hp Xe). A new route synthesis of cryptophane-111, that has the highest affinity for xenon, was developed; first functionalized derivatives of this compound have been also obtained in order to obtain the first biosensors based on cryptophane-111. The coating of specific ligand on these functionalized compounds could allow targeted MRI. A probe for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) detection was synthesized. Hydrogen peroxide is implicated in cellular oxidative stress and present in case of neuro-degenerative diseases (Parkinson, Alzheimer). The probe obtained allowed the imaging of H 2 O 2 by MRI Xe for the first time. nano-tubes functionalized with strong concentration of cryptophane have been synthesized in order to increase the sensitivity of the imaging technic that uses xenon. (author) [fr

  14. Electronic sputtering of large organic molecules and its application in bio molecular mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, B.U.R.

    1992-01-01

    This is a review of research which has its origin in the discovery of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS). Two main fields of research have developed, namely fundamental studies of the ejection process at fast ion impact and studies of applications of the new mass spectrometric technique. In this review the emphasis will be on the process of electronic sputtering of organic solids but also applications of this process in bio molecular mass spectrometry will be discussed. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current-Voltage and Thermopower Measurements: Application to C60 Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-16

    The electronic structure of molecular junctions has a significant impact on their transport properties. Despite the decisive role of the electronic structure, a complete characterization of the electronic structure remains a challenge. This is because there is no straightforward way of measuring electron spectroscopy for an individual molecule trapped in a nanoscale gap between two metal electrodes. Herein, a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the electronic structure in single-molecule junctions based on the analysis of current-voltage (I-V) and thermoelectric characteristics is described. It is shown that the electronic structure of the prototypical C 60 single-molecule junction can be resolved by analyzing complementary results of the I-V and thermoelectric measurement. This combined approach confirmed that the C 60 single-molecule junction was highly conductive with molecular electronic conductances of 0.033 and 0.003 G 0 and a molecular Seebeck coefficient of -12 μV K -1 . In addition, we revealed that charge transport was mediated by a LUMO whose energy level was located 0.5≈0.6 eV above the Fermi level of the Au electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Molecule-Molecule Inelastic Scattering: Derivations of Equations and Application to N2 + H2 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-12-17

    The mixed quantum classical theory, MQCT, for inelastic scattering of two molecules is developed, in which the internal (rotational, vibrational) motion of both collision partners is treated with quantum mechanics, and the molecule-molecule scattering (translational motion) is described by classical trajectories. The resultant MQCT formalism includes a system of coupled differential equations for quantum probability amplitudes, and the classical equations of motion in the mean-field potential. Numerical tests of this theory are carried out for several most important rotational state-to-state transitions in the N2 + H2 system, in a broad range of collision energies. Besides scattering resonances (at low collision energies) excellent agreement with full-quantum results is obtained, including the excitation thresholds, the maxima of cross sections, and even some smaller features, such as slight oscillations of energy dependencies. Most importantly, at higher energies the results of MQCT are nearly identical to the full quantum results, which makes this approach a good alternative to the full-quantum calculations that become computationally expensive at higher collision energies and for heavier collision partners. Extensions of this theory to include vibrational transitions or general asymmetric-top rotor (polyatomic) molecules are relatively straightforward.

  17. Metabolomic applications in radiation biodosimetry: exploring radiation effects through small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fornace, Albert J; Laiakis, Evagelia C

    2017-10-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation has increased in the past decades, primarily due to long distance travel and medical procedures. On the other hand, accidental exposures, nuclear accidents, and elevated threats of terrorism with the potential detonation of a radiological dispersal device or improvised nuclear device in a major city, all have led to increased needs for rapid biodosimetry and assessment of exposure to different radiation qualities and scenarios. Metabolomics, the qualitative and quantitative assessment of small molecules in a given biological specimen, has emerged as a promising technology to allow for rapid determination of an individual's exposure level and metabolic phenotype. Advancements in mass spectrometry techniques have led to untargeted (discovery phase, global assessment) and targeted (quantitative phase) methods not only to identify biomarkers of radiation exposure, but also to assess general perturbations of metabolism with potential long-term consequences, such as cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disease. Metabolomics of radiation exposure has provided a highly informative snapshot of metabolic dysregulation. Biomarkers in easily accessible biofluids and biospecimens (urine, blood, saliva, sebum, fecal material) from mouse, rat, and minipig models, to non-human primates and humans have provided the basis for determination of a radiation signature to assess the need for medical intervention. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the current status of radiation metabolomic studies for the purpose of rapid high-throughput radiation biodosimetry in easily accessible biofluids and discuss future directions of radiation metabolomics research.

  18. Z-dependent perturbation theory and its application to polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Z-dependent perturbation theory is applied to study the ground states of simple diatomic and triatomic molecules in order to calculate the total third-order energies for these systems. The systems studied are H 2 + , H 2 , H 3 + , HeH +2 , HeH + , and HeH 2 +2 . The total energies are compared with exact energy values, as well as Hartree-Fock values, and the author's results are a considerable improvement over second-order energies for most internuclear distances, and consistently better than Hartree-Fock calculations for all internuclear distances. Compared with variational methods, this method is simpler and more efficient. In order to calculate total energies up to third order, the wave functions necessary will be two-center, one electron or one-center, two-electron wave functions, at most. Hence, the most complicated integrals that have to be performed are three-center, two-electron integrals, and four-center, one-electron integrals, no matter how complex the molecular system. More importantly, the results obtained for the one-electron diatomic molecular ion are directly incorporated into the calculations for polyatomic systems

  19. CaI and SrI molecules for iodine determination by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry: Greener molecules for practical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Melina Borges Teixeira; Nakadi, Flávio Venâncio; da Veiga, Márcia Andreia Mesquita Silva

    2018-03-01

    A new method to determine iodine in drug samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) has been developed. The method measures the molecular absorption of a diatomic molecule, CaI or SrI (less toxic molecule-forming reagents), at 638.904 or 677.692nm, respectively, and uses a mixture containing 5μg of Pd and 0.5μg of Mg as chemical modifier. The method employs pyrolysis temperatures of 1000 and 800°C and vaporization temperatures of 2300 and 2400°C for CaI and SrI, respectively. The optimized amounts of Ca and Sr as molecule-forming reagents are 100 and 150µg, respectively. On the basis of interference studies, even small chlorine concentrations reduce CaI and SrI absorbance significantly. The developed method was used to analyze different commercial drug samples, namely thyroid hormone pills with three different iodine amounts (15.88, 31.77, and 47.66µg) and one liquid drug with 1% m v -1 active iodine in their compositions. The results agreed with the values informed by the manufacturers (95% confidence level) regardless of whether CaI or SrI was determined. Therefore, the developed method is useful for iodine determination on the basis of CaI or SrI molecular absorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Point Based Image Registration Errors With Applications in Single Molecule Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, E A K; Ober, R J

    2013-12-15

    We present an asymptotic treatment of errors involved in point-based image registration where control point (CP) localization is subject to heteroscedastic noise; a suitable model for image registration in fluorescence microscopy. Assuming an affine transform, CPs are used to solve a multivariate regression problem. With measurement errors existing for both sets of CPs this is an errors-in-variable problem and linear least squares is inappropriate; the correct method being generalized least squares. To allow for point dependent errors the equivalence of a generalized maximum likelihood and heteroscedastic generalized least squares model is achieved allowing previously published asymptotic results to be extended to image registration. For a particularly useful model of heteroscedastic noise where covariance matrices are scalar multiples of a known matrix (including the case where covariance matrices are multiples of the identity) we provide closed form solutions to estimators and derive their distribution. We consider the target registration error (TRE) and define a new measure called the localization registration error (LRE) believed to be useful, especially in microscopy registration experiments. Assuming Gaussianity of the CP localization errors, it is shown that the asymptotic distribution for the TRE and LRE are themselves Gaussian and the parameterized distributions are derived. Results are successfully applied to registration in single molecule microscopy to derive the key dependence of the TRE and LRE variance on the number of CPs and their associated photon counts. Simulations show asymptotic results are robust for low CP numbers and non-Gaussianity. The method presented here is shown to outperform GLS on real imaging data.

  1. Resummation of divergent perturbation series: Application to the vibrational states of H2CO molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchko, A N; Bykov, A D

    2015-10-21

    Large-order Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory (RSPT) is applied to the calculation of anharmonic vibrational energy levels of H2CO molecule. We use the model of harmonic oscillators perturbed by anharmonic terms of potential energy. Since the perturbation series typically diverge due to strong couplings, we apply the algebraic approximation technique because of its effectiveness shown earlier by Goodson and Sergeev [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8205 (1999); ibid. 124, 094111 (2006)] and in our previous articles [A. D. Bykov et al. Opt. Spectrosc. 114, 396 (2013); ibid. 116, 598 (2014)]. To facilitate the resummation of terms contributing to perturbed states, when resonance mixing between states is especially strong and perturbation series diverge very quick, we used repartition of the Hamiltonian by shifting the normal mode frequencies. Energy levels obtained by algebraic approximants were compared with the results of variational calculation. It was found that for low energy states (up to ∼5000 cm(-1)), algebraic approximants gave accurate values of energy levels, which were in excellent agreement with the variational method. For highly excited states, strong and multiple resonances complicate series resummation, but a suitable change of normal mode frequencies allows one to reduce the resonance mixing and to get accurate energy levels. The theoretical background of the problem of RSPT series divergence is discussed along with its numerical analysis. For these purposes, the vibrational energy is considered as a function of a complex perturbation parameter. Layout and classification of its singularities allow us to model the asymptotic behavior of the perturbation series and prove the robustness of the algorithm.

  2. Resummation of divergent perturbation series: Application to the vibrational states of H2CO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchko, A. N.; Bykov, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Large-order Rayleigh–Schrödinger perturbation theory (RSPT) is applied to the calculation of anharmonic vibrational energy levels of H 2 CO molecule. We use the model of harmonic oscillators perturbed by anharmonic terms of potential energy. Since the perturbation series typically diverge due to strong couplings, we apply the algebraic approximation technique because of its effectiveness shown earlier by Goodson and Sergeev [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8205 (1999); ibid. 124, 094111 (2006)] and in our previous articles [A. D. Bykov et al. Opt. Spectrosc. 114, 396 (2013); ibid. 116, 598 (2014)]. To facilitate the resummation of terms contributing to perturbed states, when resonance mixing between states is especially strong and perturbation series diverge very quick, we used repartition of the Hamiltonian by shifting the normal mode frequencies. Energy levels obtained by algebraic approximants were compared with the results of variational calculation. It was found that for low energy states (up to ∼5000 cm −1 ), algebraic approximants gave accurate values of energy levels, which were in excellent agreement with the variational method. For highly excited states, strong and multiple resonances complicate series resummation, but a suitable change of normal mode frequencies allows one to reduce the resonance mixing and to get accurate energy levels. The theoretical background of the problem of RSPT series divergence is discussed along with its numerical analysis. For these purposes, the vibrational energy is considered as a function of a complex perturbation parameter. Layout and classification of its singularities allow us to model the asymptotic behavior of the perturbation series and prove the robustness of the algorithm

  3. Exact results in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics: Formalism and applications in chemical kinetics and single-molecule free energy estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Artur B.

    In the last two decades or so, a collection of results in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics that departs from the traditional near-equilibrium framework introduced by Lars Onsager in 1931 has been derived, yielding new fundamental insights into far-from-equilibrium processes in general. Apart from offering a more quantitative statement of the second law of thermodynamics, some of these results---typified by the so-called "Jarzynski equality"---have also offered novel means of estimating equilibrium quantities from nonequilibrium processes, such as free energy differences from single-molecule "pulling" experiments. This thesis contributes to such efforts by offering three novel results in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics: (a) The entropic analog of the Jarzynski equality; (b) A methodology for estimating free energies from "clamp-and-release" nonequilibrium processes; and (c) A directly measurable symmetry relation in chemical kinetics similar to (but more general than) chemical detailed balance. These results share in common the feature of remaining valid outside Onsager's near-equilibrium regime, and bear direct applicability in protein folding kinetics as well as in single-molecule free energy estimation.

  4. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Hong, Seok-Cheol [Seoul, KR; Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A.; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  5. Directional ratio based on parabolic molecules and its application to the analysis of tubular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, Demetrio; Negi, Pooran; Ozcan, Burcin; Papadakis, Manos

    2015-09-01

    As advances in imaging technologies make more and more data available for biomedical applications, there is an increasing need to develop efficient quantitative algorithms for the analysis and processing of imaging data. In this paper, we introduce an innovative multiscale approach called Directional Ratio which is especially effective to distingush isotropic from anisotropic structures. This task is especially useful in the analysis of images of neurons, the main units of the nervous systems which consist of a main cell body called the soma and many elongated processes called neurites. We analyze the theoretical properties of our method on idealized models of neurons and develop a numerical implementation of this approach for analysis of fluorescent images of cultured neurons. We show that this algorithm is very effective for the detection of somas and the extraction of neurites in images of small circuits of neurons.

  6. Single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) for new-age biochemistry: methodology and biochemical applications of single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) for probing biomolecular interactions in crude cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vasudha; Ha, Taekjip

    2014-11-01

    Macromolecular interactions play a central role in many biological processes. Protein-protein interactions have mostly been studied by co-immunoprecipitation, which cannot provide quantitative information on all possible molecular connections present in the complex. We will review a new approach that allows cellular proteins and biomolecular complexes to be studied in real-time at the single-molecule level. This technique is called single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull), because it integrates principles of conventional immunoprecipitation with the powerful single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. SiMPull is used to count how many of each protein is present in the physiological complexes found in cytosol and membranes. Concurrently, it serves as a single-molecule biochemical tool to perform functional studies on the pulled-down proteins. In this review, we will focus on the detailed methodology of SiMPull, its salient features and a wide range of biological applications in comparison with other biosensing tools. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. Versatile piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source for gaseous compounds and organic molecules with femtomole accuracy for UHV and surface science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiesser, Alexander; Schaefer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the construction of a piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source based upon a design presented in an earlier work [D. Proch and T. Trickl, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 60, 713 (1988)]. The design features significant modifications that permit the determination of the number of molecules in a beam pulse with an accuracy of 1x10 11 molecules per pulse. The 21 cm long plunger-nozzle setup allows the molecules to be brought to any point of the UHV chamber with very high intensity. Furthermore, besides typical gaseous compounds, also smaller organic molecules with a vapor pressure higher than 0.1 mbar at room temperature may serve as feed material. This makes the new design suitable for various applications in chemical and surface science studies.

  9. Cross sections and oscillator strengths for electron-impact excitation of electronic states in polyatomic molecules. Application examples of the BEf- scaling model in optically-allowed transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Kawahara, H.; Hoshino, M.

    2009-12-01

    Integral cross sections for optically allowed electronic-state excitations by electron impact, are reviewed for polyatomic molecules by applying the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) scaling model. Following the context of the present review, the scaling model originally proposed by Yong-Ki Kim to determine electron-impact cross sections for ionization of atoms and molecules is also summarized briefly for its wide range of applications [Electron-Impact Cross Section Database, NIST, Y.-K. Kim]. The present report not only focuses on the need for the cross-section data, but also elucidates the verification of the scaling model in the general application for atoms and molecules. Since this report is for a data base, it is summarized for data base users by citing (copying) the descriptions in the original papers and the references within those papers in the style of a textbook. (author)

  10. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  11. Physical manipulation of single-molecule DNA using microbead and its application to analysis of DNA-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an individual DNA manipulation using an optical trapping for a microbead. This manipulation system is based on a fluorescent microscopy equipped with an IR laser. Both ends of linear DNA molecule were labeled with a biotin and a thiol group, respectively. Then the biotinylated end was attached to a microbead, and the other was immobilized on a thiol-linkable glass surface. We controlled the form of an individual DNA molecule by moving the focal point of IR laser, which trapped the microbead. In addition, we applied single-molecule approach to analyze DNA hydrolysis. We also used microchannel for single-molecule observation of DNA hydrolysis. The shortening of DNA in length caused by enzymatic hydrolysis was observed in real-time. The single-molecule DNA manipulation should contribute to elucidate detailed mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions

  12. Small Molecule Sequential Dual-Targeting Theragnostic Strategy (SMSDTTS): from Preclinical Experiments towards Possible Clinical Anticancer Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Hitting the evasive tumor cells proves challenging in targeted cancer therapies. A general and unconventional anticancer approach namely small molecule sequential dual-targeting theragnostic strategy (SMSDTTS) has recently been introduced with the aims to target and debulk the tumor mass, wipe out the residual tumor cells, and meanwhile enable cancer detectability. This dual targeting approach works in two steps for systemic delivery of two naturally derived drugs. First, an anti-tubulin vascular disrupting agent, e.g., combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), is injected to selectively cut off tumor blood supply and to cause massive necrosis, which nevertheless always leaves peripheral tumor residues. Secondly, a necrosis-avid radiopharmaceutical, namely (131)I-hypericin ((131)I-Hyp), is administered the next day, which accumulates in intratumoral necrosis and irradiates the residual cancer cells with beta particles. Theoretically, this complementary targeted approach may biologically and radioactively ablate solid tumors and reduce the risk of local recurrence, remote metastases, and thus cancer mortality. Meanwhile, the emitted gamma rays facilitate radio-scintigraphy to detect tumors and follow up the therapy, hence a simultaneous theragnostic approach. SMSDTTS has now shown promise from multicenter animal experiments and may demonstrate unique anticancer efficacy in upcoming preliminary clinical trials. In this short review article, information about the two involved agents, the rationale of SMSDTTS, its preclinical antitumor efficacy, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theragnostic property, and toxicities of the dose regimens are summarized. Meanwhile, possible drawbacks, practical challenges and future improvement with SMSDTTS are discussed, which hopefully may help to push forward this strategy from preclinical experiments towards possible clinical applications.

  13. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  14. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  15. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  16. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  17. Application of the weak-field asymptotic theory to the analysis of tunneling ionization of linear molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed weak-field asymptotic theory [ Phys. Rev. A 84 053423 (2011)] is applied to the analysis of tunneling ionization of a molecular ion (H2+), several homonuclear (H2, N2, O2) and heteronuclear (CO, HF) diatomic molecules, and a linear triatomic molecule (CO2) in a static...... electric field. The dependence of the ionization rate on the angle between the molecular axis and the field is determined by a structure factor for the highest occupied molecular orbital. This factor is calculated using a virtually exact discrete variable representation wave function for H2+, very accurate...... Hartree-Fock wave functions for the diatomics, and a Hartree-Fock quantum chemistry wave function for CO2. The structure factors are expanded in terms of standard functions and the associated structure coefficients, allowing the determination of the ionization rate for any orientation of the molecule...

  18. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm-1 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, D.S.

    1991-05-01

    This project uses high resolution infrared spectroscopy to probe the mechanism of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) in isolated polyatomic molecules. We have found only vibrationally anharmonic coupling in the C-H stretch region of 1-butyne but rotationally mediated coupling is evident in similar spectra of ethanol. The ''keyhole'' model of IVR was developed to account for the similarities and differences between these molecules. The concepts of the model are being implemented numerically in random matrix calculations. A second F-center laser has been purchased and is now being set up to develop an infrared double resonance technique which can be applied to this problem. 4 refs., 5 figs

  19. New models for intermolecular repulsion and their application to Van Der Waals complexes and crystals of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.H.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Model intermolecular potentials are required for simulations of molecules in the gas, liquid, or solid phase. The widely used isotropic atom-atom model potentials are empirically fitted and based on the assumptions of transferability, combining rules and that atoms in molecules are spherical. This thesis develops a non-empirical method of modelling repulsion by applying the overlap model, which we show as a general non-empirical method of deriving repulsion potentials for a specific molecule. In this thesis, the repulsion parameters for an exponential atom-atom model potential are obtained from the ab initio charge density of a small organic molecule by making the assumption that the repulsion is proportional to the overlap of a pair of molecules. The proportionality constant is fixed by a limited number of intermolecular perturbation theory (IMPT) calculations. To complete the model potential, the electrostatic interaction is represented by a distributed multipole analysis, and the Slater-Kirkwood formula is used for the dispersion. These non-empirical potentials can reproduce experimental crystal structure when applied to crystal structure prediction of an oxyboryl derivative. A detailed study on further improving the overlap model was carried out for phenol-water, by including other minor intermolecular contributions of charge-transfer and penetration. High quality ab initio calculations on the complex were performed for use in comparison. To compare with experimental data, diffusion Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the potential, so that the effects of anharmonic zero-point motion on structure and energy of the system are included. When the system is too large for an IMPT calculation, the proportionality constant can be determined empirically by fitting the cell volume as shown in our study of crystal structures of chlorothalonil. This is used with an anisotropic repulsion model that has been derived for Cl and N atoms in chlorothalonil. This model

  20. Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrix for application of MALDI-MS for forensics. Soft-ionization to obtain protonated molecules of low molecular weight compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, Tetsu, E-mail: tetsu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Asano, Takashi [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Criminal Investigation Laboratory, Metropolitan Police Department, 2-1-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8929 (Japan); Fujino, Tatsuya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Nishihara, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► MALDI-MS applications for drug identification in forensic science is investigated. ► Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrices strongly suppress the obstacle peaks of organic matrix compounds. ► Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrices also suppress the alkali adducted molecule peaks. ► Sugar units of cyclodextrins work for this specific features. - Abstract: A mass measurement technique for detecting low-molecular-weight drugs with a cyclodextrin-supported organic matrix was investigated. By using cyclodextrin-supported 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP), the matrix-related peaks of drugs were suppressed. The peaks of protonated molecules of the sample and THAP were mainly observed, and small fragments were detected in a few cases. Despite the Na{sup +} and K{sup +} peaks were observed in the spectrum, Na{sup +} or K{sup +} adduct sample molecules were undetected, owing to the sugar units of cyclodextrin. The advantages of MALDI-MS with cyclodextrin-supported matrices as an analytical tool for forensic samples are discussed. The suppression of alkali adducted molecules and desorption process are also discussed.

  1. Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrix for application of MALDI-MS for forensics. Soft-ionization to obtain protonated molecules of low molecular weight compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Tetsu; Asano, Takashi; Fujino, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► MALDI-MS applications for drug identification in forensic science is investigated. ► Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrices strongly suppress the obstacle peaks of organic matrix compounds. ► Cyclodextrin-supported organic matrices also suppress the alkali adducted molecule peaks. ► Sugar units of cyclodextrins work for this specific features. - Abstract: A mass measurement technique for detecting low-molecular-weight drugs with a cyclodextrin-supported organic matrix was investigated. By using cyclodextrin-supported 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP), the matrix-related peaks of drugs were suppressed. The peaks of protonated molecules of the sample and THAP were mainly observed, and small fragments were detected in a few cases. Despite the Na + and K + peaks were observed in the spectrum, Na + or K + adduct sample molecules were undetected, owing to the sugar units of cyclodextrin. The advantages of MALDI-MS with cyclodextrin-supported matrices as an analytical tool for forensic samples are discussed. The suppression of alkali adducted molecules and desorption process are also discussed

  2. Multiconformation, Density Functional Theory-Based pKa Prediction in Application to Large, Flexible Organic Molecules with Diverse Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochevarov, Art D; Watson, Mark A; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Philipp, Dean M

    2016-12-13

    We consider the conformational flexibility of molecules and its implications for micro- and macro-pK a . The corresponding formulas are derived and discussed against the background of a comprehensive scientific and algorithmic description of the latest version of our computer program Jaguar pK a , a density functional theory-based pK a predictor, which is now capable of acting on multiple conformations explicitly. Jaguar pK a is essentially a complex computational workflow incorporating research and technologies from the fields of cheminformatics, molecular mechanics, quantum mechanics, and implicit solvation models. The workflow also makes use of automatically applied empirical corrections which account for the systematic errors resulting from the neglect of explicit solvent interactions in the algorithm's implicit solvent model. Applications of our program to large, flexible organic molecules representing several classes of functional groups are shown, with a particular emphasis in illustrations laid on drug-like molecules. It is demonstrated that a combination of aggressive conformational search and an explicit consideration of multiple conformations nearly eliminates the dependence of results on the initially chosen conformation. In certain cases this leads to unprecedented accuracy, which is sufficient for distinguishing stereoisomers that have slightly different pK a values. An application of Jaguar pK a to proton sponges, the pK a of which are strongly influenced by steric effects, showcases the advantages that pK a predictors based on quantum mechanical calculations have over similar empirical programs.

  3. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  4. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  5. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian; Hummel, Helga; Bruns, Michael; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm

    2016-06-01

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  7. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Peters

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl-4,4’-diamine and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline-(4-phenylphenoxyaluminum, originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  8. Application of the generator coordinates method to the intra-molecular proton tunneling in the malonaldehyde molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andre Campos Kersten

    1995-01-01

    The effects of different vibrational modes on the isomerization process of polyatomic molecules, or solvent's effects on reaction rates are object of up-to-date interest. In general, such many body phenomena are, in principle, multidimensional, and they first require a reduction of relevant degrees of freedom. In order to investigated, some aspects of the intra-molecular proton tunneling on a malonaldehyde molecule, we use the Generator Coordinate Method. The model used to describe such a process is the so-called System-Bath model, where the system is the reaction coordinate and the bath are the intrinsic degrees of freedom (vibrational modes of the molecule), which are described by a harmonic oscillator set linearly coupled to the system. The reduction of the multidimensional problem to the effective unidimensional one is done using a energy related variational principle on the intrinsic degrees of freedom. we obtained analytically a effective Hamiltonian where the effects of the various degrees of freedom reveal themselves in the appearance of a effective mass and in changes of the shape of the potential barrier. The analyticity of the method was crucial on identifying clearly the roles played by the different physical parameters involved. (author)

  9. Photophysical properties of novel small acceptor molecules and their application in hybrid small-molecular/polymeric organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inal, Sahika; Castellani, Mauro; Neher, Dieter [Universitaet Potsdam, Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Sellinger, Alan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-07-01

    Recent experimental investigations revealed that the photovoltaic properties of our devices are related to the balance between recombination and field-induced dissociation of interfacial excited states such as exciplexes or geminate polaron pairs. This balance was shown to be affected by the nanomorphology at the heterojunction. We have analyzed the photophysical properties of a new materials couple comprising an electron-donating PPV copolymer and a vinazene-based small molecule acceptor. Steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy in solution and in the solid state showed the formation of excimers within the acceptor. The associated long-range diffusion promise efficient energy harvesting at the heterojunction. On the other hand, blends of the PPV-derivative and the small molecule revealed strong exciplex formation. Therefore, bilayered hybrid small-molecular/polymeric solar cells have been fabricated by consequently spin-coating the macromolecular donor and the small molecule acceptor from two different solvents. The bilayer architecture limits recombination processes enabling high FFs of around 44% and a technologically important open circuit voltage of 1Volt.

  10. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.raupp@kit.edu; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm [Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hummel, Helga [Philips Technologie GmbH Innovative Technologies, Aachen (Germany); Bruns, Michael [Institute for Applied Materials and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  11. Inelastic Scattering of Identical Molecules within Framework of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory: Application to Rotational Excitations in H2 + H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-06-09

    Theoretical foundation is laid out for description of permutation symmetry in the inelastic scattering processes that involve collisions of two identical molecules, within the framework of the mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT). In this approach, the rotational (and vibrational) states of two molecules are treated quantum-mechanically, whereas their translational motion (responsible for scattering) is treated classically. This theory is applied to H2 + H2 system, and the state-to-state transition cross sections are compared versus those obtained from the full-quantum calculations and experimental results from the literature. Good agreement is found in all cases. It is also found that results of MQCT, where the Coriolis coupling is included classically, are somewhat closer to exact full-quantum results than results of the other approximate quantum methods, where those coupling terms are neglected. These new developments allow applications of MQCT to a broad variety of molecular systems and processes.

  12. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  13. Joint application of neutron and X-ray scattering for determination of atomic and electronic structures of molecules and crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozerov, R.P.; Tsirel'son, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the main principles of methods based on the joint neutron and x-ray diffraction studies. The methods allow one to obtain the information on the charge distribution in molecules in detail. Neutron scattering makes it possible to locate very closely the nucleus of atom or, more precisely, the gravity center of the ellipsoid of nuclear thermal oscillations. X-ray diffraction gives the distribution of electronic density at some distance from the shell gravity center. The joint diffraction method holds the promise and importance for solving physical-chemical problems

  14. Shape-driven graphical unitary group approach to the electron correlation problem. Application to the ethylene molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxe, P.; Fox, D.J.; Schaefer, H.F. III; Handy, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    A new method for the approximate solution of Schroedinger's equation for many electron molecular systems is outlined. The new method is based on the unitary group approach (UGA) and exploits in particular the shape of loops appearing in Shavitt's graphical representation for the UGA. The method is cast in the form of a direct CI, makes use of Siegbahn's external space simplifications, and is suitable for very large configuration interaction (CI) wave functions. The ethylene molecule was chosen, as a prototype of unsaturated organic molecules, for the variational study of genuine many (i.e.,>2) body correlation effects. With a double zeta plus polarization basis set, the largest CI included all valence electron single and double excitations with respect to a 703 configuration natural orbital reference function. This variational calculation, involving 1 046 758 spin- and space-adapted 1 A/sub g/ configurations, was carried out on a minicomputer. Triple excitations are found to contribute 2.3% of the correlation energy and quadruple excitations 6.4%

  15. Rational design of tetraphenylethylene-based luminescent down-shifting molecules: photophysical studies and photovoltaic applications in a CdTe solar cell from small to large units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Li, Zhipeng; Ablekim, Tursunjan; Ren, Tianhui; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-12-21

    A rational design strategy of novel fluorophores for luminescent down-shifting (LDS) application was proposed and tested in this paper. Three new fluorophores (1a-c) with specific intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics were synthesized as LDS molecules for increasing the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell. Photophysical studies of their solution and solid states, and photovoltaic measurements of their PMMA solid films applied on a CdTe solar cell suggested that the specific spectroscopic properties and Jsc enhancement effects of these molecules were highly related to their chemical structures. The Jsc enhancement effects of these fluorophores were measured on both a CdTe small cell and a large panel. An increase in the output Jsc by as high as 5.69% for a small cell and 8.88% for a large panel was observed. Compared to a traditional LDS molecule, Y083, these fluorophores exhibited more superior capabilities of LDS.

  16. Toward a List of Molecules as Potential Biosignature Gases for the Search for Life on Exoplanets and Applications to Terrestrial Biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, S; Bains, W; Petkowski, J J

    2016-06-01

    Thousands of exoplanets are known to orbit nearby stars. Plans for the next generation of space-based and ground-based telescopes are fueling the anticipation that a precious few habitable planets can be identified in the coming decade. Even more highly anticipated is the chance to find signs of life on these habitable planets by way of biosignature gases. But which gases should we search for? Although a few biosignature gases are prominent in Earth's atmospheric spectrum (O2, CH4, N2O), others have been considered as being produced at or able to accumulate to higher levels on exo-Earths (e.g., dimethyl sulfide and CH3Cl). Life on Earth produces thousands of different gases (although most in very small quantities). Some might be produced and/or accumulate in an exo-Earth atmosphere to high levels, depending on the exo-Earth ecology and surface and atmospheric chemistry. To maximize our chances of recognizing biosignature gases, we promote the concept that all stable and potentially volatile molecules should initially be considered as viable biosignature gases. We present a new approach to the subject of biosignature gases by systematically constructing lists of volatile molecules in different categories. An exhaustive list up to six non-H atoms is presented, totaling about 14,000 molecules. About 2500 of these are CNOPSH compounds. An approach for extending the list to larger molecules is described. We further show that about one-fourth of CNOPSH molecules (again, up to N = 6 non-H atoms) are known to be produced by life on Earth. The list can be used to study classes of chemicals that might be potential biosignature gases, considering their accumulation and possible false positives on exoplanets with atmospheres and surface environments different from Earth's. The list can also be used for terrestrial biochemistry applications, some examples of which are provided. We provide an online community usage database to serve as a registry for volatile molecules

  17. Applications of the quasi-elastic light scattering to the study of dynamic properties of charged macro-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouesin-Menez, Renee

    1979-01-01

    The object of this research thesis is to study the modifications of dynamic properties of a macromolecule under the influence of variations of its medium, by using a frequency analysis of the spectrum of light scattered by a solution of particles. Thus, an important part of this thesis addresses the study and development of the scattering method and of its analysis by 'photon pulses', and the development and adjustment of an electrophoretic device to study light scattering by molecules submitted to an electric field. Then, hydrodynamic characteristics of some macromolecules have been measured with or without electric field. The studied molecular systems have been: calibrated spheres of latex polystyrene, a globular protein (bovine serum albumin), a polysaccharide (under the form of a rigid short stick), a flexible linear polyelectrolyte (polymethacrylate), and two DNA samples

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of water molecules at the surface of proteins and applications to binding site prediction and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuming, Thijs; Che, Ye; Abel, Robert; Kim, Byungchan; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Sherman, Woody

    2012-03-01

    Water plays an essential role in determining the structure and function of all biological systems. Recent methodological advances allow for an accurate and efficient estimation of the thermodynamic properties of water molecules at the surface of proteins. In this work, we characterize these thermodynamic properties and relate them to various structural and functional characteristics of the protein. We find that high-energy hydration sites often exist near protein motifs typically characterized as hydrophilic, such as backbone amide groups. We also find that waters around alpha helices and beta sheets tend to be less stable than waters around loops. Furthermore, we find no significant correlation between the hydration site-free energy and the solvent accessible surface area of the site. In addition, we find that the distribution of high-energy hydration sites on the protein surface can be used to identify the location of binding sites and that binding sites of druggable targets tend to have a greater density of thermodynamically unstable hydration sites. Using this information, we characterize the FKBP12 protein and show good agreement between fragment screening hit rates from NMR spectroscopy and hydration site energetics. Finally, we show that water molecules observed in crystal structures are less stable on average than bulk water as a consequence of the high degree of spatial localization, thereby resulting in a significant loss in entropy. These findings should help to better understand the characteristics of waters at the surface of proteins and are expected to lead to insights that can guide structure-based drug design efforts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The spherical-harmonics representation for the interaction between diatomic molecules: The general case and applications to COsbnd CO and COsbnd HF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Patricia R. P.; Cruz, Ana Claudia P. S.; Barreto, Rodrigo L. P.; Palazzetti, Federico; Albernaz, Alessandra F.; Lombardi, Andrea; Maciel, Glauciete S.; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    The spherical-harmonics expansion is a mathematically rigorous procedure and a powerful tool for the representation of potential energy surfaces of interacting molecular systems, determining their spectroscopic and dynamical properties, specifically in van der Waals clusters, with applications also to classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations. The technique consists in the construction (by ab initio or semiempirical methods) of the expanded potential interaction up to terms that provide the generation of a number of leading configurations sufficient to account for faithful geometrical representations. This paper reports the full general description of the method of the spherical-harmonics expansion as applied to diatomic-molecule - diatomic-molecule systems of increasing complexity: the presentation of the mathematical background is given for providing both the application to the prototypical cases considered previously (O2sbnd O2, N2sbnd N2, and N2sbnd O2 systems) and the generalization to: (i) the COsbnd CO system, where a characteristic feature is the lower symmetry order with respect to the cases studied before, requiring a larger number of expansion terms necessary to adequately represent the potential energy surface; and (ii) the COsbnd HF system, which exhibits the lowest order of symmetry among this class of aggregates and therefore the highest number of leading configurations.

  20. Exploring the multifunctionality of thioflavin- and deferiprone-based molecules as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for potential application in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telpoukhovskaia, Maria A; Patrick, Brian O; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Cristina; Orvig, Chris

    2013-04-05

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that affects millions of people worldwide. With no prevention or cure available, this progressive disease has a significant impact on society - dementia patients and their caretakers, healthcare systems, and the economy. Previously, we have reported initial developments of multifunctional drug candidates for AD based on two scaffolds - thioflavin-T and deferiprone. Individually, these molecules have shown several favorable functionalities, including dissociation of toxic amyloid-β aggregates, antioxidant and/or metal chelating ability that can pacify reactive oxygen species, plaque targeting, and blood-brain barrier penetration. In this work, the two scaffolds are augmented with a new functionality - acetylcholinesterase inhibition. This functionality is incorporated by derivatization with a carbamate group, which is the active group in some AD drugs currently in the market. We present the rationale for designing three novel compounds, their synthesis and characterization, including X-ray crystallographic data, and encouraging results from in vitro and computational acetylcholinesterase inhibition studies. Also, we evaluate the compounds as potential drug candidates by Lipinski's rules and cytotoxicity studies in a neuronal cell line. Overall, we demonstrate the feasibility of improving on two well established scaffolds, as well as show in vitro efficacy plus initial mode of action and biological compatibility data.

  1. Computational investigation and synthesis of a sol-gel imprinted material for sensing application of some biologically active molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atta, Nada F., E-mail: Nada_fah1@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt); Hamed, Maher M.; Abdel-Mageed, Ali M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt)

    2010-05-14

    A hybrid sol-gel material was molecularly imprinted with a group of neurotransmitters. Imprinted material is a sol-gel thin film that is spin coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Imprinted films were characterized electrochemically using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the encapsulated molecules were extracted from the films and complementary molecular cavities are formed that enable their rebind. The films were tested in their corresponding template solutions for rebinding using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Computational approach for exploring the primary intermolecular forces between templates and hydrolyzed form of the precursor monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were carried out using Hartree-Fock method (HF). Interaction energy values were computed for each adduct formed between a monomer and a template. Analysis of the optimized conformations of various adducts could explain the mode of interaction between the templates and the monomer units. We found that interaction via the amino group is the common mode among the studied compounds and the results are in good agreement with the electrochemical measurements.

  2. Adsorption of NO2 molecules on armchair phosphorene nanosheet for nano sensor applications - A first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, V; Chandiramouli, R

    2017-08-01

    The electronic and NO 2 adsorption properties of hydrogenated armchair phosphorene nanosheet device is investigated through density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green's function method (NEGF). The armchair phosphorene nanosheet is used for the detection of NO 2 gas in phosphorene molecular device. The DOS spectrum demonstrates the change in peak maxima due to transfer of electrons between NO 2 gas and phosphorene base material. The change in the peak amplitude is observed along the valance band as well as in the conduction band in the transmission spectrum of phosphorene device. I-V characteristics support the change in the current upon adsorption of NO 2 gas molecule on phosphorene molecular device. Using formation energy, structural stability of phosphorene nanosheet has been studied. The adsorption properties of NO 2 on phosphorene nanosheet have also been investigated with the help of adsorption energy, Mulliken charge and Bader charge analysis. In order to ascertain the selectivity of NO 2 gas along phosphorene molecular device in the ambient condition, the adsorption behavior of O 2 and CO 2 is also studied. The findings of the present work confirm that phosphorene molecular device can be used as a NO 2 gas sensor and also the influence of Al substitution in phosphorene nanosheet device is explored and reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of Auger effect in DNA when bound to molecules containing platinum. A possible application to hadrontherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, K.; Usami, N.; Sasaki, I.; Frohlich, H.; Le Sech, C. E-mail: lesech@lcam.u-psud.fr

    2003-01-01

    Complexes made of DNA and Cyclo-Pt bound to plasmid DNA, were placed in aqueous solution and irradiated with monochromatic X-rays in the range E=8.5-13 keV, including the resonant photoabsorption energy of the L{sub III} shell of the platinum atom. The number of single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) induced by irradiation on a supercoiled DNA plasmid was measured by the production of circular-nicked and linear forms. In order to disentangle the contribution of the direct effects imparted to ionization, and the indirect effects due to a free radical attack, experiments have been performed in the presence of a small concentration (64 mmol l{sup -1}) of hydroxyl free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). An enhancement of the number of ssb and dsb is observed when the plasmids contain the Pt intercalating molecules. Even when off-resonant X-rays are used, the strand break efficiency remains higher than expected based upon the absorption cross-section, as if the Pt bound to DNA is increasing the yield of strand breaks. A mechanism is suggested, involving photoelectrons generated from the ionization of water which efficiently ionize Pt atoms. This observation may provide an insight to understanding the effects of new radiotherapy protocols, associated chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin and ordinary radiotherapy for tumoral treatments.

  4. Transition metal-induced activation of alkynes leading to metal carbene species: synthetic application to new {pi}-conjugated molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, T; Ohe, K [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: ohe@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-03-15

    The in situ generation of furylcarbene complexes by means of transition metals was applied to catalytic carbene reactions, such as Wittig-type olefination and cycloisomerization reactions. In the presence of [Rh(OAc){sub 2}]{sub 2} as a catalyst and triphenylphosphine as a carbene accepter, carbonyl-ene-ynes 1a reacted with benzaldehyde to give a 2-styrylfuran derivative 3a. The reaction involving phosphine-ylide formation followed by Wittig-type olefination with aldehydes was applied to synthesis of furfurylidene-containing p-extended conjugated molecules. A Ruthenium catalyst underwent cycloisomerization of 1,2-bis(carbonylenyl)acetylene 10a,b to afford 2,2'-bifuran structures. The crystal structure of 5,5'-diphenyl-2,2'-bifuran 11b was determined by X-ray crystallography. The ORTEP drawings of 11b exhibited transoid and highly planar structure. The emission bands of the bisfuran 11b were observed at 414 and 440 nm, its quantum yield (84%) was higher than that of a similar 5,5'-diphenyl-2,2'-bithiophene.

  5. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  6. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  7. Optoelectronic figure of merit of a metal nanoparticle—quantum dot (MNP-QD) hybrid molecule for assessing its suitability for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchi, Harini; Mallawaarachchi, Sudaraka; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Zhu, Weiren; Premaratne, Malin

    2018-02-01

    Recently, many have studied various configurations of metal nanoparticle-quantum dot (MNP-QD) hybrid molecules based on different metals and tunable parameters. In this paper, we aim to incite the interest in using MNP-QD nanohybrids, which possess sensing capabilities superior to those of the individual constituents, for sensing applications that rely on scattered light. When assessing whether a given MNP-QD configuration is suited for an application, sometimes it is hard to assess the pros and cons of a given configuration against other candidates. Here we propose a simple, elegant relative figure of merit (RFoM), which focuses on maximizing the scattered intensity and the refractive index sensitivity of the nanohybrid, to rank the suitability of viable MNP-QD configurations for a particular sensing application. We use the proposed RFoM to analyse the optical spectra of noble, transition, post transition and alkali metal based MNP-QD nanohybrids using the representative metals Au, Ag, Cu, Al and Na, adopting a generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) method based cavity QED approach. Based on our observations, we suggest how the usage of MNP-QD nanohybrids could improve the conventionally studied tumour targeting applications. Moreover, we propose potential substitutes for noble metals conventionally considered for MNP-QD nanohybrids.

  8. Resummation of divergent perturbation series: Application to the vibrational states of H{sub 2}CO molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchko, A. N. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Bykov, A. D., E-mail: adbykov@rambler.ru [V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-21

    Large-order Rayleigh–Schrödinger perturbation theory (RSPT) is applied to the calculation of anharmonic vibrational energy levels of H{sub 2}CO molecule. We use the model of harmonic oscillators perturbed by anharmonic terms of potential energy. Since the perturbation series typically diverge due to strong couplings, we apply the algebraic approximation technique because of its effectiveness shown earlier by Goodson and Sergeev [J. Chem. Phys. 110, 8205 (1999); ibid. 124, 094111 (2006)] and in our previous articles [A. D. Bykov et al. Opt. Spectrosc. 114, 396 (2013); ibid. 116, 598 (2014)]. To facilitate the resummation of terms contributing to perturbed states, when resonance mixing between states is especially strong and perturbation series diverge very quick, we used repartition of the Hamiltonian by shifting the normal mode frequencies. Energy levels obtained by algebraic approximants were compared with the results of variational calculation. It was found that for low energy states (up to ∼5000 cm{sup −1}), algebraic approximants gave accurate values of energy levels, which were in excellent agreement with the variational method. For highly excited states, strong and multiple resonances complicate series resummation, but a suitable change of normal mode frequencies allows one to reduce the resonance mixing and to get accurate energy levels. The theoretical background of the problem of RSPT series divergence is discussed along with its numerical analysis. For these purposes, the vibrational energy is considered as a function of a complex perturbation parameter. Layout and classification of its singularities allow us to model the asymptotic behavior of the perturbation series and prove the robustness of the algorithm.

  9. Versatile microfluidic total internal reflection (TIR)-based devices: application to microbeads velocity measurement and single molecule detection with upright and inverted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John C; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2009-01-21

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) chip for Total Internal Reflection (TIR)-based imaging and detection has been developed using Si bulk micromachining and PDMS casting. In this paper, we report the applications of the chip on both inverted and upright fluorescent microscopes and confirm that two types of sample delivery platforms, PDMS microchannel and glass microchannel, can be easily integrated depending on the magnification of an objective lens needed to visualize a sample. Although any device configuration can be achievable, here we performed two experiments to demonstrate the versatility of the microfluidic TIR-based devices. The first experiment was velocity measurement of Nile red microbeads with nominal diameter of 500 nm in a pressure-driven flow. The time-sequenced fluorescent images of microbeads, illuminated by an evanescent field, were cross-correlated by a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) program to obtain near-wall velocity field of the microbeads at various flow rates from 500 nl/min to 3000 nl/min. We then evaluated the capabilities of the device for Single Molecule Detection (SMD) of fluorescently labeled DNA molecules from 30 bp to 48.5 kbp and confirm that DNA molecules as short as 1105 bp were detectable. Our versatile, integrated device could provide low-cost and fast accessibility to Total Internal Reflection Fluorescent Microscopy (TIRFM) on both conventional upright and inverted microscopes. It could also be a useful component in a Micro-Total Analysis System (micro-TAS) to analyze nanoparticles or biomolecules near-wall transport or motion.

  10. Prototyping of thermoplastic microfluidic chips and their application in high-performance liquid chromatography separations of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sam; De Vos, Jelle; Dores-Sousa, José Luís; Wouters, Bert; Desmet, Gert; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2017-11-10

    The present paper discusses practical aspects of prototyping of microfluidic chips using cyclic olefin copolymer as substrate and the application in high-performance liquid chromatography. The developed chips feature a 60mm long straight separation channel with circular cross section (500μm i.d.) that was created using a micromilling robot. To irreversibly seal the top and bottom chip substrates, a solvent-vapor-assisted bonding approach was optimized, allowing to approximate the ideal circular channel geometry. Four different approaches to establish the micro-to-macro interface were pursued. The average burst pressure of the microfluidic chips in combination with an encasing holder was established at 38MPa and the maximum burst pressure was 47MPa, which is believed to be the highest ever report for these polymer-based microfluidic chips. Porous polymer monolithic frits were synthesized in-situ via UV-initiated polymerization and their locations were spatially controlled by the application of a photomask. Next, high-pressure slurry packing was performed to introduce 3μm silica reversed-phase particles as the stationary phase in the separation channel. Finally, the application of the chip technology is demonstrated for the separation of alkyl phenones in gradient mode yielding baseline peak widths of 6s by applying a steep gradient of 1.8min at a flow rate of 10μL/min. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport and fate of labelled molecules after application of 14C-gibberellic acid to the young leaves of tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couillerot, J.-P.; Bonnemain, J.-L.

    1975-01-01

    After application of 14 C-GA 3 to the distal leaflet of young leaves (2.5 cm long) of tomato plants, labelled molecules are exported by the donor leaflet. In the first stage, the transport was basipetal, and preferably took place in the tissues of foliar traces; the tracers moved toward the roots at an average speed greater than 4 cm.h -1 . One part of the tracers seemed to accumulate in the elongating internodes, whereas a more important part went into the vessels and then was driven upwards to the leaves by the transpiration stream. A high concentration of tracers was localized in the extremity of some leaflets. The guttated fluid contained labelled molecules having for the most part a Rsub(t) value similar or nearly similar to the Rsub(f) value of GA 3 according to the solvent systems. The exportation of 14 C, which was at first very low, continued during the development of the donor leaf [fr

  12. The establishment of RIA method for the assessment of soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiyou; Fang Peihua; Lu Mei; Gao Shuo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To establish the radioimmunoassay (RIA) method for the assessment of soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and to apply it in clinical evaluation of Graves' disease (GD). Methods: The rabbits were immunized by sICAM-1 to prepare the specific polyclonal antibody for the sICAM-1 RIA. The study population was composed of 400 healthy people, 56 simple goiter patients, 312 GD patients before treatment, 445 GD patients after treatment with antithyroid drug whose thyroid functional parameters were normal, 36 GD patients before and after 131 I treatment, 93 GD patients before and after antithyroid drug treatment, 6 GD patients before and after thyroidectomy, 52 relapse GD patients and their serum sICAM-1 levels were measured. Results: The sensitivity of sICAM-1 RIA was 66.53 μg/L. The non-specific binding was less than 8%. The intra-assay coefficients of variation (CV) were 4.25%, 4.35%, 3.99% (n=6) and the inter-assay CV were 5.55%, 2.82%, 3.48% (n=6) for 110, 220, 320 μg/L, respectively. The average recovery rate of the method was 100.88%. The serum level of sICAM-1 (μg/L) in normal group was 168.43+-72.46 (x-bar+-2s) and in the GD groups of before and after antithyroid drug treatment the serum levels were both higher than that in normal groups (P 0.05); in the before treatment GD group it was higher than that in after treatment group (P 131 I treatment and antithyroid drug treatment GD groups, the levels were all decreased markedly after treatment (P<0.05); in the relapse GD group, it was higher than in the GD group with normal thyroid functional parameters (P<0.01). Conclusions: sICAM-1 RIA has been established successfully. The results show that sICAM-1 may be an important indicator for estimating effects of therapy, the relapse of GD and the necessity of drug administration ceasing

  13. Silica diatom shells tailored with Au nanoparticles enable sensitive analysis of molecules for biological, safety and environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.; Villani, M.; Coluccio, M. L.; Majewska, R.; Alabastri, A.; Battista, E.; Schirato, A.; Calestani, D.; Coppedé , N.; Cesarelli, M.; Amato, F.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Gentile, F.

    2018-01-01

    Diatom shells are a natural, theoretically unlimited material composed of silicon dioxide, with regular patterns of pores penetrating through their surface. For their characteristics, diatom shells show promise to be used as low cost, highly efficient drug carriers, sensor devices or other micro-devices. Here, we demonstrate diatom shells functionalized with gold nanoparticles for the harvesting and detection of biological analytes (bovine serum albumin—BSA) and chemical pollutants (mineral oil) in low abundance ranges, for applications in bioengineering, medicine, safety, and pollution monitoring.

  14. Silica diatom shells tailored with Au nanoparticles enable sensitive analysis of molecules for biological, safety and environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2018-04-19

    Diatom shells are a natural, theoretically unlimited material composed of silicon dioxide, with regular patterns of pores penetrating through their surface. For their characteristics, diatom shells show promise to be used as low cost, highly efficient drug carriers, sensor devices or other micro-devices. Here, we demonstrate diatom shells functionalized with gold nanoparticles for the harvesting and detection of biological analytes (bovine serum albumin—BSA) and chemical pollutants (mineral oil) in low abundance ranges, for applications in bioengineering, medicine, safety, and pollution monitoring.

  15. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  16. From Protein Structure to Small-Molecules: Recent Advances and Applications to Fragment-Based Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2017-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is a broadly used strategy in structure-guided ligand design, whereby low-molecular weight hits move from lead-like to drug-like compounds. Over the past 15 years, an increasingly important role of the integration of these strategies into industrial and academic research platforms has been successfully established, allowing outstanding contributions to drug discovery. One important factor for the current prominence of FBDD is the better coverage of the chemical space provided by fragment-like libraries. The development of the field relies on two features: (i) the growing number of structurally characterized drug targets and (ii) the enormous chemical diversity available for experimental and virtual screenings. Indeed, fragment-based campaigns have contributed to address major challenges in lead optimization, such as the appropriate physicochemical profile of clinical candidates. This perspective paper outlines the usefulness and applications of FBDD approaches in medicinal chemistry and drug design. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Photophysical Behavior of Modified Xanthenic Dyes Embedded into Silsesquioxane Hybrid Films: Application in Photooxidation of Organic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina V. Waiman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials based on a bridged silsesquioxane with pendant dodecyl chains were synthesized and modified with different xanthenic dyes with the aim of developing a material with potential application in photooxidation of organic compounds. The employed dyes constitute a family of novel xanthenic chromophores with outstanding properties as singlet oxygen photosensitizers. The hybrid matrix was chosen for its enhanced properties such as flexibility and chemical resistance. The employed dyes were easily incorporated into the hybrid polymer obtaining homogeneous, transparent, and low-refractive-index materials. The polymeric films were characterized using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, and laser flash photolysis techniques. The ability of these materials to produce singlet oxygen was tested following the photooxidation of 9,10-dimethylanthracene which is a well-known chemical trap for singlet oxygen. High photooxidation efficiencies were observed for these materials, which present the advantage of being easily removed/collected from the solution where photooxidation takes place. While photobleaching of the incorporated dyes is commonly observed in the solution, it takes place very slowly when dyes are embedded in the hybrid matrix. These properties bode well for the potential use of these materials in novel wastewater purification strategies.

  18. Ammonia as a preferred additive in chiral and achiral applications of supercritical fluid chromatography for small, drug-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Manuel; Murphy, Brent; Goetzinger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-13

    Supercritical fluid chromatography is routinely utilized by analytical separations groups in the pharmaceutical industry to efficiently handle separations for discovery medicinal chemistry purposes. Purifications are performed on samples ranging from a few milligrams up to hundreds of grams. Basic additives dissolved into the liquid component of the SFC mobile phase are commonly used to improve peak shape and efficiency in achiral and chiral separations. While for purposes of analysis there is minimal consequence to additive introduction in the mobile phase, for preparative separations one needs to consider the potential effect of an additive's presence when concentrated with the desired compound. Following an SFC purification using an additive-containing modifier, the resulting fractions will contain an easily evaporated modifier, and after its evaporation perhaps still significant levels of the less volatile additive. Depending on the aqueous solubility and basicity of the final product, the process of removing basic amine additives can be time-consuming and can result in reduced yields. NMR analysis following preparative isolation and evaporation often reveals the fact of insufficient removal of the chromatographic additive even after aqueous work up steps. In this study, ammonia is evaluated as an alternative additive to strong bases such as diethylamine (DEA) in SFC purification and analysis and to the authors' knowledge no previous publication has been written describing the application of methanolic ammonia as an additive for SFC separations. Dimethylethylamine (DMEA), a more volatile additive than DEA, is also evaluated relative to ammonia for its potential to simplify the isolation process after purification and in terms of chromatographic performance. The loss in concentration of ammonia in methanol modifier over time due to evaporation and effects of that loss are also described. Furthermore, for ammonia the analytical benefit is shown to extend to on

  19. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  20. Enzyme Molecules in Solitary Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela B. Liebherr

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  1. Organizing and addressing magnetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatteschi, Dante; Cornia, Andrea; Mannini, Matteo; Sessoli, Roberta

    2009-04-20

    Magnetic molecules ranging from simple organic radicals to single-molecule magnets (SMMs) are intensively investigated for their potential applications in molecule-based information storage and processing. The goal of this Article is to review recent achievements in the organization of magnetic molecules on surfaces and in their individual probing and manipulation. We stress that the inherent fragility and redox sensitivity of most SMM complexes, combined with the noninnocent role played by the substrate, ask for a careful evaluation of the structural and electronic properties of deposited molecules going beyond routine methods for surface analysis. Detailed magnetic information can be directly obtained using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or newly emerging scanning probe techniques with magnetic detection capabilities.

  2. Fundamental study of ionization and dissociation processes caused by electron impact in aromatic molecules; application of the quasi-equilibrium theory to phenanthrene and to methylphenanthrenes; Etudes fondamentales des processus d'ionisation et de dissociation des molecules aromatiques par impact electronique et application de la theorie du quasi-equilibre au phenanthrene et aux methyl-phenanthrenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nounou, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The quasi-equilibrium theory has been applied only to the family of long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons. We have tried to extend it to phenanthrene and methyl-phenanthrenes molecules, i.e. to aromatic molecules possessing a great number of degrees of freedom. In a first part, we have attempted to give a method of interpretation of the ionization and dissociation processes of the phenanthrenic molecules. These preliminary experimental studies of the behaviour under electron impact of the compounds provide us a great wealth of information about important structural transformations of the molecular and fragment ions, and also about auto-ionization and excitation processes of the studied molecules. The experimental study of the metastable peaks has then confirmed the validity of the preceding dissociation processes, while it gave with more accuracy some thermodynamical values in connection with decomposition reactions. The three studies of the ionization, then dissociation processes and of the metastable peaks, represent the three phases of a general method of interpretation of the fragmentation in mass spectrometry. In order to give this method a theoretical basis, we have carried out the molecular diagrams of each of the studied, compounds, showing by this way the aid of Quantum Mechanics to the study of excited and ionic states. In a second part, we have carried out the mass spectra of the phenanthrene and methyl-phenanthrenes molecules by means of the rate constants expression given by ROSENSTOCK. We have proposed new methods of calculation of the frequency factors, for the aliphatic molecules as well as the aromatic ones. If the rather good agreement observed between the experimental and calculated results cannot be surely attributed to the validity of the theory, however it out-lines the interest presented by the application of this theory to large aromatic molecules. Furthermore, the results at which we arrived provide us with interesting information about the

  3. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Enantio-specific C(sp3)-H activation catalyzed by ruthenium nanoparticles: application to isotopic labeling of molecules of biological interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taglang, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic labeling with deuterium and tritium is extensively used in chemistry, biology and pharmaceutical research. Numerous methods of labeling by isotopic exchange allow high isotopic enrichments but generally require harsh conditions (high temperatures, acidity). As a consequence, a general, regioselective and smooth labeling method that might be applicable to a wide diversity of substrates remains to develop. In the first part of this thesis, we demonstrated that the use of ruthenium nanoparticles, synthesized by Pr. Bruno Chaudret's team (INSA Toulouse), allowed the mild (2 bar of deuterium gas at 55 C), effective and selective H/D exchange reaction of a large variety of nitrogen-containing compounds, such as pyridines, indoles and primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl amines. The usefulness and the efficiency of this novel methodology was demonstrated by the deuteration of eight nitrogen-containing molecules of biological interest without altering their chemical and stereochemical properties. However, the conservation of the original stereochemistry of an activated chiral C-H center remains a major issue. We studied the reactivity of RuNP(at)PVP on different categories of nitrogen-containing substrates (amines, aminoacids and peptides) in water or in organic solvents. Our results showed that C-H activation of chiral carbons C(sp3) took place efficiently, selectively and, in all cases, with total retention of configuration. The wide range of applications of this procedure was demonstrated by the labeling of three chiral amines, fourteen aminoacids, three aromatic amino esters and four peptides. Moreover, our collaboration with Pr. Romuald Poteau's team (INSA Toulouse) led to the identification of two mechanisms by ab initio simulation in agreement with our experimental results: the σ-bond metathesis mechanism and the oxidative addition mechanism. These two mechanisms imply two vicinal ruthenium atoms leading to the formation an original

  5. Statistics of work and orthogonality catastrophe in discrete level systems: an application to fullerene molecules and ultra-cold trapped Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Sindona

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The sudden introduction of a local impurity in a Fermi sea leads to an anomalous disturbance of its quantum state that represents a local quench, leaving the system out of equilibrium and giving rise to the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. The statistics of the work done describe the energy fluctuations produced by the quench, providing an accurate and detailed insight into the fundamental physics of the process. We present here a numerical approach to the non-equilibrium work distribution, supported by applications to phenomena occurring at very diverse energy ranges. One of them is the valence electron shake-up induced by photo-ionization of a core state in a fullerene molecule. The other is the response of an ultra-cold gas of trapped fermions to an embedded two-level atom excited by a fast pulse. Working at low thermal energies, we detect the primary role played by many-particle states of the perturbed system with one or two excited fermions. We validate our approach through the comparison with some photoemission data on fullerene films and previous analytical calculations on harmonically trapped Fermi gases.

  6. The variational cellular method for quantum mechanical applications : calculations of the ground and excited states of F2 and Ne2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, J.R.; Fazzio, A.; Lima, M.A.P.; Dias, A.M.; Rosato, A.; Segre, E.R.A.

    1980-12-01

    A self-consistent calculation based on the Variational Cellular Method is performed on the F 2 and Ne 2 molecules. The potential curve for the group state and for excited states of these molecules are determined. Spectroscopic constants related to the potential curves are also obtained. (Author) [pt

  7. Theory of low-energy electron-molecule collision physics in the coupled-channel method and application to e-CO2 scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.A.

    1976-08-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering based on the fixed-nuclei approximation in a body-fixed reference frame is formulated and applied to e-CO 2 collisions in the energy range from 0.07 to 10.0 eV. The procedure used is a single-center coupled-channel method which incorporates a highly accurate static interaction potential, an approximate local exchange potential, and an induced polarization potential. Coupled equations are solved by a modification of the integral equations algorithm; several partial waves are required in the region of space near the nuclei, and a transformation procedure is developed to handle the consequent numerical problems. The potential energy is converged by separating electronic and nuclear contributions in a Legendre-polynomial expansion and including a large number of the latter. Formulas are derived for total elastic, differential, momentum transfer, and rotational excitation cross sections. The Born and asymptotic decoupling approximations are derived and discussed in the context of comparison with the coupled-channel cross sections. Both are found to be unsatisfactory in the energy range under consideration. An extensive discussion of the technical aspects of calculations for electron collisions with highly nonspherical targets is presented, including detailed convergence studies and a discussion of various numerical difficulties. The application to e-CO 2 scattering produces converged results in good agreement with observed cross sections. Various aspects of the physics of this collision are discussed, including the 3.8 eV shape resonance, which is found to possess both p and f character, and the anomalously large low-energy momentum transfer cross sections, which are found to be due to Σ/sub g/ symmetry. Comparison with static and static-exchange approximations are made

  8. Synthesis, characterization of bay-substituted perylene diimide based D-A-D type small molecules and their applications as a non-fullerene electron acceptor in polymer solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Ganesamoorthy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a series of bay substituted perylene diimide based donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D type small molecule acceptor derivatives such as S-I, S-II, S-III and S-IV for small molecule based organic solar cell (SM-OSC applications. The electron rich thiophene derivatives such as thiophene, 2-hexylthiophene, 2,2′-bithiophene, and 5-hexyl-2,2′-bithiophene were used as a donor (D, and perylene diimide was used as an acceptor (A. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by FT-IR, NMR, and HR-MS. The small molecules showed wide and strong absorption in the UV-vis region up to 750 nm, which reduced the optical band gap to <2 eV. The calculated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO were comparable with those of the PC61BM. Scanning electron microscope (SEM studies confirmed the aggregation of the small molecules, S-I to S-IV. Small molecules showed thermal stability up to 300 °C. In bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs, the S-I based device showed a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE of 0.12% with P3HT polymer donor. The PCE was declined with respect to the number of thiophene units and the flexible alkyl chain in the bay position. Keywords: Perylene diimide, Donor–acceptor, Small molecule, Non-fullerene, Suzuki coupling

  9. Synthesis of novel fluorene-based two-photon absorbing molecules and their applications in optical data storage, microfabrication, and stimulated emission depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez, Ciceron

    2009-12-01

    Two-photon absorption (2PA) has been used for a number of scientific and technological applications, exploiting the fact that the 2PA probability is directly proportional to the square of the incident light intensity (while one-photon absorption bears a linear relation to the incident light intensity). This intrinsic property of 2PA leads to 3D spatial localization, important in fields such as optical data storage, fluorescence microscopy, and 3D microfabrication. The spatial confinement that 2PA enables has been used to induce photochemical and photophysical events in increasingly smaller volumes and allowed nonlinear, 2PA-based, technologies to reach sub-diffraction limit resolutions. The primary focus of this dissertation is the development of novel, efficient 2PA, fluorene-based molecules to be used either as photoacid generators (PAGs) or fluorophores. A second aim is to develop more effective methods of synthesizing these compounds. As a third and final objective, the new molecules were used to develop a write-once-read many (WORM) optical data storage system, and stimulated emission depletion probes for bioimaging. In Chapter I, the microwave-assisted synthesis of triarylsulfonium salt photoacid generators (PAGs) from their diphenyliodonium counterparts is reported. The microwave-assisted synthesis of these novel sulfonium salts afforded reaction times 90 to 420 times faster than conventional thermal conditions, with photoacid quantum yields of new sulfonium PAGs ranging from 0.01 to 0.4. These PAGs were used to develop a fluorescence readout-based, nonlinear three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage system (Chapter II). In this system, writing was achieved by acid generation upon two-photon absorption (2PA) of a PAG (at 710 or 730 nm). Readout was then performed by interrogating two-photon absorbing dyes, after protonation, at 860 nm. Two-photon recording and readout of voxels was demonstrated in five and eight consecutive, crosstalk-free layers within a

  10. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  11. A Mott-like State of Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, S.; Volz, T.; Syassen, N.; Bauer, D. M.; Hansis, E.; Rempe, G.

    2006-01-01

    We prepare a quantum state where each site of an optical lattice is occupied by exactly one molecule. This is the same quantum state as in a Mott insulator of molecules in the limit of negligible tunneling. Unlike previous Mott insulators, our system consists of molecules which can collide inelastically. In the absence of the optical lattice these collisions would lead to fast loss of the molecules from the sample. To prepare the state, we start from a Mott insulator of atomic 87Rb with a central region, where each lattice site is occupied by exactly two atoms. We then associate molecules using a Feshbach resonance. Remaining atoms can be removed using blast light. Our method does not rely on the molecule-molecule interaction properties and is therefore applicable to many systems

  12. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  13. Molecules cooled below the Doppler limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Hambach, M.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical trapping and sub-Doppler cooling have been essential to most experiments with quantum degenerate gases, optical lattices, atomic fountains and many other applications. A broad set of new applications await ultracold molecules, and the extension of laser cooling to molecules has begun. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been demonstrated for a single molecular species, SrF, but the sub-Doppler temperatures required for many applications have not yet been reached. Here we demonstrate a MOT of a second species, CaF, and we show how to cool these molecules to 50 μK, well below the Doppler limit, using a three-dimensional optical molasses. These ultracold molecules could be loaded into optical tweezers to trap arbitrary arrays for quantum simulation, launched into a molecular fountain for testing fundamental physics, and used to study collisions and chemistry between atoms and molecules at ultracold temperatures.

  14. Symbolic derivation of high-order Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation energies using computer algebra: Application to vibrational-rotational analysis of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, John M. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory is an effective and popular tool for describing low-lying vibrational and rotational states of molecules. This method, in conjunction with ab initio techniques for computation of electronic potential energy surfaces, can be used to calculate first-principles molecular vibrational-rotational energies to successive orders of approximation. Because of mathematical complexities, however, such perturbation calculations are rarely extended beyond the second order of approximation, although recent work by Herbert has provided a formula for the nth-order energy correction. This report extends that work and furnishes the remaining theoretical details (including a general formula for the Rayleigh-Schroedinger expansion coefficients) necessary for calculation of energy corrections to arbitrary order. The commercial computer algebra software Mathematica is employed to perform the prohibitively tedious symbolic manipulations necessary for derivation of generalized energy formulae in terms of universal constants, molecular constants, and quantum numbers. As a pedagogical example, a Hamiltonian operator tailored specifically to diatomic molecules is derived, and the perturbation formulae obtained from this Hamiltonian are evaluated for a number of such molecules. This work provides a foundation for future analyses of polyatomic molecules, since it demonstrates that arbitrary-order perturbation theory can successfully be applied with the aid of commercially available computer algebra software.

  15. Multiple photon infrared processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Butcher, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current understanding of the process of multiple photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules, whereby in the presence of an intense infrared laser field a molecule may absorb upwards of 30 photons. The application of this process to new photochemistry and in particular laser isotope separation is also discussed. (author)

  16. Investigation of the adsorption of ozone molecules on TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites by DFT computations: Applications to gas sensor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Amirali; Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption of O3 molecule on the undoped and N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites was studied using first principles density functional theory calculations. O3 interaction with TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites is considered so as to investigate WSe2 effects on the adsorption process. WSe2 favors the adsorption of O3 on TiO2 particles. In other words, WSe2 is conducive to the interaction of O3 molecule with fivefold coordinated titanium sites of TiO2. The effects of vdW interactions were taken into account in order to obtain equilibrium geometries of O3 molecules at TiO2/WSe2 interfaces. For all adsorption configurations, the binding site was positioned on the fivefold coordinated titanium atoms. The results show that the interactions between O3 and TiO2 in TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites are stronger than those between O3 and bare TiO2, suggesting that WSe2 helps to strengthen the interaction of ozone molecule with TiO2 particles. The results also indicate that the adsorption of the O3 molecule on the N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposite is more energetically favorable than the adsorption of O3 on the pristine one, representing that the N-doped nanocomposites are more sensitive than the undoped ones. Our DFT results clearly show that the N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposite would be a promising O3 gas sensor. The electronic structure of the adsorption system was also investigated, including analysis of the total and projected density of states, and charge density differences of the TiO2/WSe2 with adsorbed O3 molecules. The charge density difference calculations indicate that the charges were accumulated over the adsorbed O3 molecule. Besides, the N-doped nanocomposites have better sensing response than the pristine ones. This work was devoted to provide the theory basis for the design and development of novel and advanced O3 sensors based on modified TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites.

  17. Optical probing of single fluorescent molecules and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Parajo, M.F.; Veerman, J.A.; Bouwhuis, R.; Bouwhuis, Rudo; van Hulst, N.F.; Vallée, R.A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Single-molecule detection and analysis of organic fluorescent molecules and proteins are presented, with emphasis o­n the underlying principles methodology and the application of single-molecule analysis at room temperature. This Minireview is mainly focused o­n the application of confocal and

  18. Quantum transport through organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport for the model of benzene-1, 4-dithiolate (BDT) molecule and some other geometric models of benzene molecule attached with two semi-infinite metallic electrodes by the use of Green's function technique. An analytic approach for the electronic transport through the molecular bridges is presented, based on the tight-binding model. Transport of electrons in such molecular bridges is strongly affected by the geometry of the molecules and their coupling strength with the electrodes. Conductance (g) shows resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy eigenstates. In the weak molecule-to-electrodes coupling limit current (I) passing through the molecules shows staircase-like behavior with sharp steps, while, it varies quite continuously in the limit of strong molecular coupling with the applied bias voltage (V). In presence of the transverse magnetic field conductance gives oscillatory behavior with flux φ, threaded by the molecular ring, showing φ 0 ( = ch/e) flux-quantum periodicity. Though conductance changes with the application of transverse magnetic field, but the current-voltage characteristics remain same in presence of this magnetic field for these molecular bridge systems

  19. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V.

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  20. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  1. Individual Magnetic Molecules on Ultrathin Insulating Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hallak, Fadi; Warner, Ben; Hirjibehedin, Cyrus

    2012-02-01

    Single molecule magnets have attracted ample interest because of their exciting magnetic and quantum properties. Recent studies have demonstrated that some of these molecules can be evaporated on surfaces without losing their magnetic properties [M. Mannini et al., Nature 468, 417, (2010)]. This remarkable progress enhances the chances of real world applications for these molecules. We present STM imaging and spectroscopy data on iron phthalocyanine molecules deposited on Cu(100) and on a Cu2N ultrathin insulating surface. These molecules have been shown to display a large magnetic anisotropy on another thin insulating surface, oxidized Cu(110) [N. Tsukahara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 167203 (2009)]. By using a combination of elastic and inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy, we investigate the binding of the molecules to the surface and the impact that the surface has on their electronic and magnetic properties.

  2. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  3. Application of a generalisation of the Kohn variational method to the calculation of cross sections for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The phaseshift corresponding to the lowest partial wave and the associated approximation to the total cross section are calculated for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering using a generalisation of the Kohn variational method. The trial wavefunction is expressed in terms of confocal elliptical coordinates. Except at incident positron energies below about 2 eV, reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained below the positronium formation threshold at 8.63 eV. (author)

  4. A high-yield, one-step synthesis of surfactant-free gold nanostars and numerical study for single-molecule SERS application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S.; Ringane, A. B.; Arya, A.; Das, G. M.; Dantham, V. R., E-mail: dantham@iitp.ac.in; Laha, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Department of Physics (India); Hussian, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2016-08-15

    We report a high-yield synthesis of star-shaped gold nanostructures in one step, using a new surfactant-free wet chemistry method. Compared to the existing reports, these nanostars were found to have longer and sharper spikes anchored uniformly on the surface of the spherical core, allowing at least a few hot spots irrespective of the incident light polarization. The average experimental values of core radius and spike length were found to be 88.5 and 72 nm, respectively. Using these values in numerical simulations, the local electric field enhancement (η) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrum were obtained. Moreover, the single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor was found to vary from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 13} depending on the excitation wavelengths. Our theoretical calculations suggest that these nanostructures can be used to fabricate efficient SERS-based biosensors for the detection of single molecules in real time and for predicting structural information of single molecules.

  5. Development of the relaxation-assisted 2DIR method for accessing structures of molecules and its application for studying the energy transport on a molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, Valeriy Mitrofanovich

    Measuring the three-dimensional structure of molecules, dynamics of structural changes, and energy transport on a molecular scale is important for many areas of natural science. Supplementing the widely used methods of x-ray diffraction, NMR, and optical spectroscopies, a two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) method was introduced about a decade ago. The 2DIR method measures pair-wise interactions between vibrational modes in molecules, thus acquiring molecular structural constraints such as distances between vibrating groups and the angles between their transition dipoles. The 2DIR method has been applied to a variety of molecular systems but in studying larger molecules such as proteins and peptides the method is facing challenges associated with the congestion of their vibrational spectra and delocalized character of their vibrational modes. To help extract structural information from such spectra and make efficient use of vibrational modes separated by large distances, a novel relaxation-assisted 2DIR method (RA 2DIR) has recently been proposed, which exploits the transport of excess vibrational energy from the initially excited mode. With the goal of further development of RA 2DIR, we applied it to a variety of molecular systems, including model compounds, transition-metal complexes, and isomers. The experiments revealed several novel effects which both enhance the power of RA 2DIR and bring a deeper understanding to the fundamental process of energy transport on a molecular level. We demonstrated that RA 2DIR can enhance greatly (27-fold) the cross-peak amplitude among spatially remote modes, which leads to an increase of the range of distances accessible for structural measurements by several fold. We demonstrated that the energy transport time correlates with the intermode distance. This correlation offers a new way for identifying connectivity patterns in molecules. We developed two models of energy transport in molecules. In one, a spatial overlap

  6. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  7. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  8. Aligning molecules with intense nonresonant laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Safvan, C.P.; Sakai, H.

    1999-01-01

    Molecules in a seeded supersonic beam are aligned by the interaction between an intense nonresonant linearly polarized laser field and the molecular polarizability. We demonstrate the general applicability of the scheme by aligning I2, ICl, CS2, CH3I, and C6H5I molecules. The alignment is probed...... by mass selective two dimensional imaging of the photofragment ions produced by femtosecond laser pulses. Calculations on the degree of alignment of I2 are in good agreement with the experiments. We discuss some future applications of laser aligned molecules....

  9. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  10. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  11. Small molecule probes for cellular death machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qian, Lihui; Yuan, Junying

    2017-08-01

    The past decade has witnessed a significant expansion of our understanding about the regulated cell death mechanisms beyond apoptosis. The application of chemical biological approaches had played a major role in driving these exciting discoveries. The discovery and use of small molecule probes in cell death research has not only revealed significant insights into the regulatory mechanism of cell death but also provided new drug targets and lead drug candidates for developing therapeutics of human diseases with huge unmet need. Here, we provide an overview of small molecule modulators for necroptosis and ferroptosis, two non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms, and discuss the molecular pathways and relevant pathophysiological mechanisms revealed by the judicial applications of such small molecule probes. We suggest that the development and applications of small molecule probes for non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms provide an outstanding example showcasing the power of chemical biology in exploring novel biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  13. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  14. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Single molecule conductance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis represents an excursion into the world of molecular electronics, i.e. the field of research trying to use individual (organic) molecules as electronic components; in this work various experimental methods have been explored to connect individual molecules to metallic contacts and

  16. Electrical properties of SAM-modified ITO surface using aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups for OLED applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, Mustafa; Havare, Ali Kemal; Aydın, Hasan; Yagmurcukardes, Nesli; Demic, Serafettin; Icli, Sıddık; Okur, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that the performance of OLED consist of aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups on ITO surface. • The OLED devices were tested in terms of electrical and optical characteristics. • The I–V results show that OLEDs with SAM-modified ITO surface have lower turn on voltages than OLED configurations without SAMs. - Abstract: 5-[(3-Methylphenyl)(phenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-MePIFA) and 5-(diphenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-DPIFA) organic molecules were synthesized to form self-assembled monolayer on indium tin oxide (ITO) anode to enhance hole transport from ITO to organic hole transport layers such as TPD. The modified surface was characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The change in the surface potential was measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Our Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements showed that the surface potentials increased more than 100 mV with reference to bare indium tin-oxide. The results show that the threshold voltage on OLEDs with modified ITO is lowered significantly compared to OLEDs with unmodified ITO. The hole mobility of TPD has been estimated using space–charge-limited current measurements (SCLC)

  17. Electrical properties of SAM-modified ITO surface using aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups for OLED applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Mustafa [Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Sciences, Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey); Havare, Ali Kemal [Toros University, Faculty of Engineering, Electric and Electronic Department, Mersin (Turkey); Aydın, Hasan; Yagmurcukardes, Nesli [Izmir Institute of Technology, Material Science and Engineering, Izmir (Turkey); Demic, Serafettin [Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey); Icli, Sıddık [Ege University, Solar Energy Institute, Izmir (Turkey); Okur, Salih, E-mail: salih.okur@ikc.edu.tr [Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Çiğli, Izmir (Turkey)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We report that the performance of OLED consist of aromatic small molecules with double bond carboxylic acid groups on ITO surface. • The OLED devices were tested in terms of electrical and optical characteristics. • The I–V results show that OLEDs with SAM-modified ITO surface have lower turn on voltages than OLED configurations without SAMs. - Abstract: 5-[(3-Methylphenyl)(phenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-MePIFA) and 5-(diphenyl)amino]isophthalic acid (5-DPIFA) organic molecules were synthesized to form self-assembled monolayer on indium tin oxide (ITO) anode to enhance hole transport from ITO to organic hole transport layers such as TPD. The modified surface was characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The change in the surface potential was measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Our Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements showed that the surface potentials increased more than 100 mV with reference to bare indium tin-oxide. The results show that the threshold voltage on OLEDs with modified ITO is lowered significantly compared to OLEDs with unmodified ITO. The hole mobility of TPD has been estimated using space–charge-limited current measurements (SCLC)

  18. Application of Chemical Genomics to Plant-Bacteria Communication: A High-Throughput System to Identify Novel Molecules Modulating the Induction of Bacterial Virulence Genes by Plant Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandelle, Elodie; Puttilli, Maria Rita; Chini, Andrea; Devescovi, Giulia; Venturi, Vittorio; Polverari, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    The life cycle of bacterial phytopathogens consists of a benign epiphytic phase, during which the bacteria grow in the soil or on the plant surface, and a virulent endophytic phase involving the penetration of host defenses and the colonization of plant tissues. Innovative strategies are urgently required to integrate copper treatments that control the epiphytic phase with complementary tools that control the virulent endophytic phase, thus reducing the quantity of chemicals applied to economically and ecologically acceptable levels. Such strategies include targeted treatments that weaken bacterial pathogens, particularly those inhibiting early infection steps rather than tackling established infections. This chapter describes a reporter gene-based chemical genomic high-throughput screen for the induction of bacterial virulence by plant molecules. Specifically, we describe a chemical genomic screening method to identify agonist and antagonist molecules for the induction of targeted bacterial virulence genes by plant extracts, focusing on the experimental controls required to avoid false positives and thus ensuring the results are reliable and reproducible.

  19. Use of two-potential theory in electron-molecule scattering: Application to wide-angle e-H2 scattering at 40 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, B.

    1984-01-01

    A Green's-function approach is used to solve the Schroedinger equation in an effective potential (V 0 ), which is the sum of independent-atom static potentials. The equation for the Green's function is conveniently solved in momentum space (MS), where the MS ''potentials'' (Fourier transforms of the atom-centered potentials) have translational symmetry. The Green's function is then used to construct the solution to the Schroedinger equation for scattering in the potential V-V 0 (where V is the e-molecule static potential plus a local exchange potential) relative to scattering in V 0 . This solution is found in coordinate space using single-center expansions about the internuclear midpoint. These are more rapidly convergent for V-V 0 than for V or V 0 alone. The sum of the amplitudes for scattering in V 0 and in V-V 0 relative to V 0 then represents the amplitude for scattering from the molecule. This method is intended to combine the dynamical methods best suited for each type of potential (multicenter for V 0 and single center for V-V 0 ). It also exposes the shortcomings of the use of V 0 alone

  20. Application of the Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory to Excited-State Dynamics of Molecules and 2D Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2018-04-01

    We review our recent developments in the ab initio simulation of excited-state dynamics within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Our targets range from molecules to 2D materials, although the methods are general and can be applied to any other finite and periodic systems. We discuss examples of excited-state dynamics obtained by real-time TDDFT coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) and the Ehrenfest approximation, including photoisomerization in molecules, photoenhancement of the weak interatomic attraction of noble gas atoms, photoenhancement of the weak interlayer interaction of 2D materials, pulse-laser-induced local bond breaking of adsorbed atoms on 2D sheets, modulation of UV light intensity by graphene nanoribbons at terahertz frequencies, and collision of high-speed ions with the 2D material to simulate the images taken by He ion microscopy. We illustrate how the real-time TDDFT approach is useful for predicting and understanding non-equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. We also discuss recent developments that address the excited-state dynamics of systems out of equilibrium and future challenges in this fascinating field of research.

  1. Molecules in stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, research related to molecules in stars has rapidly expanded because of progress in related fields. For this reason, it is almost impossible to cover all the topics related to molecules in stars. Thus, here the authors focus their attention on molecules in the atmospheres of cool stars and do not cover in any detail topics related to circumstellar molecules originating from expanding envelopes located far from the stellar surface. However, the authors do discuss molecules in quasi-static circumstellar envelopes (a recently discovered new component of circumstellar envelopes) located near the stellar surface, since molecular lines originating from such envelopes show little velocity shift relative to photospheric lines, and hence they directly affect the interpretation and analysis of stellar spectra

  2. Relaxation of structural parameters and potential coefficients of nonrigid molecules. General symmetry properties and application to ab initio study of 1,2-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, T.-K.; Günthard, H. H.

    1989-07-01

    Structural parameters like bond length, bond angles, etc. and harmonic and anharmonic potential coefficients of molecules with internal rotation, inversion or puckering modes are generally assumed to vary with the large amplitude internal coordinates in a concerted manner (relaxation). Taking the coordinate vectors of the nuclear configuration of semirigid molecules with relaxation (SRMRs) as functions of relaxing structural parameters and finite amplitude internal coordinate, the isometric group of SRMRs is discussed and the irreducible representations of the latter are shown to classify into engendered and nonengendered ones. On this basis a concept of equivalent sets of nuclei SRMRs is introduced and an analytical expression is derived which defines the most general functional form of relaxation increments of all common types of structural parameters compatible with isometric symmetry. This formula is shown to be a close analog of an analytical expression defining the transformations induced by the isometric group of infinitesimal internal coordinates associated with typical structural parameters. Furthermore analogous formulae are given for the most general form of the relaxation of harmonic potential coefficients as a function of finite internal coordinates. The general relations are illustrated by ab initio calculations for 1,2-difluoroethane at the MP4/DZP//HF/4-31G* level for twelve values of the dihedral angle including complete structure optimization. The potential to internal rotation is found to be in essential agreement with experimentally derived data. For a complete set of ab initio structural parameters the associated relaxation increments are represented as Fourier series, which are shown to confirm the form predicted by the general formula and the isometric group of 1,2-difluoroethane. Depending on type of the structural parameters (bond length, bond angles, etc.), the associated relaxation increments appear to follow some simple rules. Similarly

  3. Effective charge model in the theory of infrared intensities and its application for study of charge di.stribution in the molecules of organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksanyan, V.T.; Samvelyan, S.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    General principles of plotting the parametric theory of IR spectrum intensities of polyatomic molecules are outlined. The development of the effective charges model in this theory is considered and the mathematical formalism of the first approximation of the method of effective atom charges is described in detail. The results of calculations of charges distribution in the Mo(CO) 6 , W(CO) 6 , Cp 2 V, Cp 2 Ru and others (Cp-cyclopentadiene), performed in the frame work of the outlined scheme are presented. It is shown that in the investigated carbonyles the effective charge on oxygen and metal atoms is negative, on carbon atom - positive. In dicyclopentavienyl complexes the effective charge on the metal atom is positive and is not over 0.6e; charge values on hydrogen and carbon atoms do not exceed, 0.10-0.15e. The notions of ''electrovalence'' of coordination bond and charge distribution in the case of metallocenes are not correlated

  4. New naphtho[1,2-b:5,6-b‧]difuran based two-dimensional conjugated small molecules for photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongjian; Luan, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Lixia; Li, Hang; Liu, Ye; Zou, Yingping

    2017-10-01

    Two new A-D-A small molecules with alkoxyphenyl and alkylthiophenyl-substituted naphtho[1,2-b:5,6-b‧]difuran (NDF) as the central building block named NDFPO-DPP and NDFPS-DPP were synthesized and firstly used as donor materials in organic solar cells (OSCs). The effects of the alkoxyphenyl and alkylthiophenyl side chains on the NDF unit have been investigated. With a single atom variation from O to S, NDFPS-DPP exhibited lower HOMO energy levels than its counterpart NDFPO-DPP, which resulted in enhanced Voc. The device based on NDFPO-DPP with thermal annealing exhibited a better PCE of 3.10% due to the higher and more balanced hole and electron mobilities. The investigations show that NDF could be a promising building block in OSCs via rational molecular structure design and device optimizations.

  5. Study of ions - molecules reactions in the gas phase with collision reaction cell devices: Applications to the direct resolution of spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, G.

    2008-12-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry emerged as the most widespread mass spectrometry technique in inorganic analytical chemistry for determining the concentration of a given isotope or an isotope ratio. The problem of spectroscopic interferences, inherent to this technique, finds a solution through the use of reaction cell devices. An in situ interference removal is feasible with the addition of a well selected gas in the cell. The understanding of the chemistry of ions-molecules interactions in the gas phase is however fundamental to optimize the efficiency of such devices. An accurate knowledge of experimental conditions in the reaction zone according to instrumental parameters appears crucial in order to interpret observed reactivities. This preliminary study is then used for the resolution of two nuclear field characteristic interferences. (author)

  6. Inclusion of exact exchange in the noniterative partial-differential-equation method of electron-molecule scattering - Application to e-N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, C. A.; Onda, K.; Temkin, A.

    1985-01-01

    The noniterative partial-differential-equation (PDE) approach to electron-molecule scattering of Onda and Temkin (1983) is modified to account for the effects of exchange explicitly. The exchange equation is reduced to a set of inhomogeneous equations containing no integral terms and solved noniteratively in a difference form; a method for propagating the solution to large values of r is described; the changes in the polarization potential of the original PDE method required by the inclusion of exact static exchange are indicated; and the results of computations for e-N2 scattering in the fixed-nuclei approximation are presented in tables and graphs and compared with previous calculations and experimental data. Better agreement is obtained using the modified PDE method.

  7. An oxidative cross-coupling reaction of 4-hydroxydithiocoumarin and amines/thiols using a combination of I2 and TBHP: access to lead molecules for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Karuna; Arora, Neha; Ray Bagdi, Prasanta; Gattu, Radhakrishna; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Khan, Abu T

    2018-02-06

    A metal-free I 2 /TBHP induced highly atom economic and operationally simple oxidative cross-coupling reaction has been developed for the direct synthesis of sulfenamides/sulfanes/disulfides from the reaction of 4-hydroxydithiocoumarin and amines/thiols. The novelties of the present protocol are unprecedented S-C bond formation in addition to S-N and S-S bonds, shorter reaction time, mild and environmentally benign reaction conditions, functional group tolerance and moderate to excellent yields. Moreover, the four newly synthesized compounds namely 4q, 6d, 6e and 7a exhibit anti-proliferative activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7, and may be lead molecules for future drug development.

  8. MCSCF wave functions for excited states of polar molecules - Application to BeO. [Multi-Configuration Self-Consistent Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Yarkony, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    A previously reported multi-configuration self-consistent field (MCSCF) algorithm based on the generalized Brillouin theorem is extended in order to treat the excited states of polar molecules. In particular, the algorithm takes into account the proper treatment of nonorthogonality in the space of single excitations and invokes, when necessary, a constrained optimization procedure to prevent the variational collapse of excited states. In addition, a configuration selection scheme (suitable for use in conjunction with extended configuration interaction methods) is proposed for the MCSCF procedure. The algorithm is used to study the low-lying singlet states of BeO, a system which has not previously been studied using an MCSCF procedure. MCSCF wave functions are obtained for three 1 Sigma + and two 1 Pi states. The 1 Sigma + results are juxtaposed with comparable results for MgO in order to assess the generality of the description presented here.

  9. Application of R-matrix theory to resonant reactive electron-molecule scattering: Vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment of N2 and F2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.F.; Light, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Based on the R-matrix approach of Schneider et al. [J. Phys. B 12, L 365 (1979)] to reactive electron-molecule scattering, a new propagative R-matrix method (PRMM) is presented which is more appropriate for polyatomic systems. The new method should be useful in other calculations where complicated integrals need to be propagated. We also introduce an effective R-matrix model (ERMM) in which the usual resonance parameters (potential and width) can be used as input in model R-matrix calculations. The PRMM and ERMM have been applied to the electron-N 2 system and the electron-F 2 system. The results agree very well with previous calculations for both vibrationally inelastic scattering and dissociative attachment when identical potentials and parameters are used

  10. Recoil ion momentum spectroscopy in atomic and nuclear physics: applications to low energy ion-atom/molecule collisions and to beta-neutrino angular correlation in beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechard, X.

    2012-12-01

    Since the early 1990's, Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy is an ideal tool for ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions study. We detail here the development of this experimental technique during the last twenty years, illustrated with some of the most striking results obtained at GANIL (Caen) and J.R. Mac Donald Laboratory (Kansas State University). Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy is also particularly well suited for β-ν angular correlation measurements in nuclear β decay. The LPCTrap experiment, installed at GANIL, is based on this technique, coupled to the use of a Paul trap for the radioactive ions confinement. The precise measurements performed with this setup allow both, to test specific aspects of the Standard Model of elementary particles, and to study the electron shake-off process following β decay. (author)

  11. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  12. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  13. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... barriers, an ability classical particles do not possess. Tunnelling is a fundamental quantum mechanical process, a process that is distinctly non-classical, so solving this tunnelling problem is not only relevant for molecular physics, but also for quantum theory in general. In this dissertation the theory...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  14. Physics of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Joachain, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a unified account of the physics of atoms and molecules at a level suitable for second- and third-year undergraduate students of physics and physical chemistry. Following a brief historical introduction to the subject the authors outline the ideas and approximation methods of quantum mechanics to be used later in the book. Six chapters look at the structure of atoms and the interactions between atoms and electromagnetic radiation. The authors then move on to describe the structure of molecules and molecular spectra. Three chapters deal with atomic collisions, the scattering of electrons by atoms and the scattering of atoms by atoms. The concluding chapter considers a few of the many important applications of atomic physics within astrophysics, laser technology, and nuclear fusion. Problems are given at the end of each chapter, with hints at the solutions in an appendix. Other appendices include various special topics and derivations together with useful tables of units. (author)

  15. Dissociation in small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    The study of molecular dissociation processes is one of the most interesting areas of modern spectroscopy owing to the challenges presented bt even the simplest of diatomic molecules. This paper reviews the commonly used descriptions of molecular dissociation processes for diatomic molecules, the selection rules for predissociation, and a few of the principles to be remembered when one is forced to speculate about dissociation mechanisms in a new molecule. Some of these points will be illustrated by the example of dissociative ionization in O 2

  16. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  17. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolved as a new line of thinking wherein a single molecule or perhaps a collection .... In photonic communication processes, laser light has to be modulated and .... The author wishes to thank G Rajaram for a critical reading of the manuscript.

  18. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    overall absorption spectrum of a molecule is a superposition of many such sharp lines .... dilute solution of the enzyme and the substrate over few drops of silicone oil placed ..... Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM): Development.

  19. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  20. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Keywords. Adamantane; diamondoid systems; plastic crystals. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  1. Population distribution of flexible molecules from maximum entropy analysis using different priors as background information: application to the Φ, Ψ-conformational space of the α-(1-->2)-linked mannose disaccharide present in N- and O-linked glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säwén, Elin; Massad, Tariq; Landersjö, Clas; Damberg, Peter; Widmalm, Göran

    2010-08-21

    The conformational space available to the flexible molecule α-D-Manp-(1-->2)-α-D-Manp-OMe, a model for the α-(1-->2)-linked mannose disaccharide in N- or O-linked glycoproteins, is determined using experimental data and molecular simulation combined with a maximum entropy approach that leads to a converged population distribution utilizing different input information. A database survey of the Protein Data Bank where structures having the constituent disaccharide were retrieved resulted in an ensemble with >200 structures. Subsequent filtering removed erroneous structures and gave the database (DB) ensemble having three classes of mannose-containing compounds, viz., N- and O-linked structures, and ligands to proteins. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the disaccharide revealed a two-state equilibrium with a major and a minor conformational state, i.e., the MD ensemble. These two different conformation ensembles of the disaccharide were compared to measured experimental spectroscopic data for the molecule in water solution. However, neither of the two populations were compatible with experimental data from optical rotation, NMR (1)H,(1)H cross-relaxation rates as well as homo- and heteronuclear (3)J couplings. The conformational distributions were subsequently used as background information to generate priors that were used in a maximum entropy analysis. The resulting posteriors, i.e., the population distributions after the application of the maximum entropy analysis, still showed notable deviations that were not anticipated based on the prior information. Therefore, reparameterization of homo- and heteronuclear Karplus relationships for the glycosidic torsion angles Φ and Ψ were carried out in which the importance of electronegative substituents on the coupling pathway was deemed essential resulting in four derived equations, two (3)J(COCC) and two (3)J(COCH) being different for the Φ and Ψ torsions, respectively. These Karplus relationships are denoted

  2. Fluorescence Quenching of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots by Using Black Hole Quencher Molecules Intermediated With Peptide for Biosensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sreenadh Sasidharan; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Onoshima, Daisuke; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-12-17

    Quantum dots (QDs) have recently been investigated as fluorescent probes for detecting a very small number of biomolecules and live cells; however, the establishment of molecular imaging technology with on-off control of QD fluorescence remains to be established. Here we have achieved the fluorescence off state of QDs with the conjugation of black hole quencher (BHQ) molecules intermediated with peptide by using streptavidin-QDs585 and biotin-pep-BHQ-1. The fluorescence of streptavidin-QDs585 was decreased by the addition of biotin-pep-BHQ-1 in a dose-dependent manner. It has been suggested that the decrease in QDs585 fluorescence occurred through a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism from the analysis of fluorescence intensity and lifetime of streptavidin-QDs585 and QDs585-pep-BHQ-1. QDs585 fluorescence could be quenched by more than 60% efficiency in this system. The sequence of intermediate peptide (pep) was GPLGVRGK, which can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by cancer cells. QDs585-pep-BHQ-1 is thus expected to detect the MMP production by the recovery of QDs585 fluorescence as a new bioanalytical agent for molecular imaging.

  3. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Li Xincang; Li Lu; Wang Jinxing; Jin Wenrui

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10 -14 mol L -1 . Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  4. Ultra-sensitive DNA assay based on single-molecule detection coupled with fluorescent quantum dot-labeling and its application to determination of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xincang [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-01-24

    An ultra-sensitive single-molecule detection (SMD) method for quantification of DNA using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) coupled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD)-labeling was developed. In this method, the target DNA (tDNA) was captured by the capture DNA immobilized on the silanized coverslip blocked with ethanolamine and bovine serum albumin. Then, the QD-labeled probe DNA was hybridized to the tDNA. Ten fluorescent images of the QD-labeled sandwich DNA hybrids on the coverslip were taken by a high-sensitive CCD. The tDNA was quantified by counting the bright spots on the images using a calibration curve. The LOD of the method was 1 x 10{sup -14} mol L{sup -1}. Several key factors, including image acquirement, fluorescence probe, substrate preparation, noise elimination from solutions and glass coverslips, and nonspecific adsorption and binding of solution-phase detection probes were discussed in detail. The method could be applied to quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells. In order to determine mRNA, double-stranded RNA-DNA hybrids consisting of mRNA and corresponding cDNA were synthesized from the cellular mRNA template using reverse transcription in the presence of reverse transcriptase. After removing the mRNA in the double-stranded hybrids using ribonuclease, cDNA was quantified using the SMD-based TIRFM. Osteopontin mRNA in decidual stromal cells was chosen as the model analyte.

  5. Time dependence of the field energy densities surrounding sources: Application to scalar mesons near point sources and to electromagnetic fields near molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persico, F.; Power, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The time dependence of the dressing-undressing process, i.e., the acquiring or losing by a source of a boson field intensity and hence of a field energy density in its neighborhood, is considered by examining some simple soluble models. First, the loss of the virtual field is followed in time when a point source is suddenly decoupled from a neutral scalar meson field. Second, an initially bare point source acquires a virtual meson cloud as the coupling is switched on. The third example is that of an initially bare molecule interacting with the vacuum of the electromagnetic field to acquire a virtual photon cloud. In all three cases the dressing-undressing is shown to take place within an expanding sphere of radius r = ct centered at the source. At each point in space the energy density tends, for large times, to that of the ground state of the total system. Differences in the time dependence of the dressing between the massive scalar field and the massless electromagnetic field are discussed. The results are also briefly discussed in the light of Feinberg's ideas on the nature of half-dressed states in quantum field theory

  6. Molar mass, radius of gyration and second virial coefficient from new static light scattering equations for dilute solutions: application to 21 (macro)molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illien, Bertrand; Ying, Ruifeng

    2009-05-11

    New static light scattering (SLS) equations for dilute binary solutions are derived. Contrarily to the usual SLS equations [Carr-Zimm (CZ)], the new equations have no need for the experimental absolute Rayleigh ratio of a reference liquid and solely rely on the ratio of scattered intensities of solutions and solvent. The new equations, which are based on polarizability equations, take into account the usual refractive index increment partial differential n/partial differential rho(2) complemented by the solvent specific polarizability and a term proportional to the slope of the solution density rho versus the solute mass concentration rho(2) (density increment). Then all the equations are applied to 21 (macro)molecules with a wide range of molar mass (0.2equations clearly achieve a better agreement with supplier M values. For macromolecules (M>500 kg mol(-1)), for which the scattered intensity is no longer independent of the scattering angle, the new equations give the same value of the radius of gyration as the CZ equation and consistent values of the second virial coefficient.

  7. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  8. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  9. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  10. Biological mechanisms, one molecule at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed the development of tools that allow the observation and manipulation of single molecules. The rapidly expanding application of these technologies for investigating biological systems of ever-increasing complexity is revolutionizing our ability to probe the mechanisms of biological reactions. Here, we compare the mechanistic information available from single-molecule experiments with the information typically obtained from ensemble studies and show how these two experimental approaches interface with each other. We next present a basic overview of the toolkit for observing and manipulating biology one molecule at a time. We close by presenting a case study demonstrating the impact that single-molecule approaches have had on our understanding of one of life's most fundamental biochemical reactions: the translation of a messenger RNA into its encoded protein by the ribosome. PMID:21685361

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  13. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structure and properties (includingreactivt'ty) - both static (independent of time) and ... Furthermore, since the energy of H2 + in the ground state must be lower than that of .... (Figure 2b); note also that dp is positive in parts of the antibinding regions behind the two ... But, now both the sizes and shapes of molecules enter into.

  14. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  15. OMG: Open molecule generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peironcely, J.E.; Rojas-Chertó, M.; Fichera, D.; Reijmers, T.; Coulier, L.; Faulon, J.-L.; Hankemeier, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical

  16. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Employing self-assembly methods, it is possible to engineer a bulk molecular material ... synthesis of molecular magnets in 1986, a large variety of them have been synthesized, which can be catego- ... maintained stably per organic molecule, stabilization of a ..... rotating freely under an applied field because it is a magne-.

  17. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  19. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  20. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  1. Superexcited states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Takagi, Hidekazu.

    1990-01-01

    The report addresses the nature and major features of molecule's superexcited states, focusing on their involvement in dynamic processes. It also outlines the quantum defect theory which allows various processes involving these states to be treated in a unified way. The Rydberg state has close relation with an ionized state with a positive energy. The quantum defect theory interprets such relation. Specifically, the report first describes the quantum defect theory focusing on its basic principle. The multi-channel quantum defect theory is then outlined centering on how to describe a Rydberg-type superexcited state. Description of a dissociative double-electron excited state is also discussed. The quantum defect theory is based on the fact that the physics of the motion of a Rydberg electron vary with the region in the electron's coordinate space. Finally, various molecular processes that involve a superexcited state are addressed focusing on autoionization, photoionization, dissociative recombination and bonding ionization of diatomic molecules. (N.K.)

  2. Cold guided beams of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motsch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experiments characterizing cold guided beams of polar molecules which are produced by electrostatic velocity filtering. This filtering method exploits the interaction between the polar molecules and the electric field provided by an electrostatic quadrupole guide to extract efficiently the slow molecules from a thermal reservoir. For molecules with large and linear Stark shifts such as deuterated ammonia (ND 3 ) or formaldehyde (H 2 CO), fluxes of guided molecules of 10 10 -10 11 molecules/s are produced. The velocities of the molecules in these beams are in the range of 10-200 m/s and correspond to typical translational temperatures of a few Kelvin. The maximum velocity of the guided molecules depends on the Stark shift, the molecular mass, the geometry of the guide, and the applied electrode voltage. Although the source is operated in the near-effusive regime, the number density of the slowest molecules is sensitive to collisions. A theoretical model, taking into account this velocity-dependent collisional loss of molecules in the vicinity of the nozzle, reproduces the density of the guided molecules over a wide pressure range. A careful adjustment of pressure allows an increase in the total number of molecules, whilst yet minimizing losses due to collisions of the sought-for slow molecules. This is an important issue for future applications. Electrostatic velocity filtering is suited for different molecular species. This is demonstrated by producing cold guided beams of the water isotopologs H 2 O, D 2 O, and HDO. Although these are chemically similar, they show linear and quadratic Stark shifts, respectively, when exposed to external electric fields. As a result, the flux of HDO is larger by one order of magnitude, and the flux of the individual isotopologs shows a characteristic dependence on the guiding electric field. The internal-state distribution of guided molecules is studied with a newly developed diagnostic method: depletion

  3. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  4. Laser Control of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Letkhov, V S

    2007-01-01

    This text treats laser light as a universal tool to control matter at the atomic and molecular level, one of the most exciting applications of lasers. Lasers can heat matter, cool atoms to ultra-low temperatures where they show quantum collective behaviour, and can act selectively on specific atoms and molecules for their detection and separation.

  5. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  6. Interstellar molecules and masers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Q-Rieu; Guibert, J.

    1978-01-01

    The study of dense and dark clouds, in which hydrogen is mostly in molecular form, became possible since the discovery of interstellar molecules, emitting in the centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. The molecular lines are generally not in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Their intensity can often be explained by invoking a population inversion mechanism. Maser emission lines due to OH, H 2 O and SiO molecules are among the most intense molecular lines. The H 2 CO molecule, detected in absorption in front of the cold cosmic background radiation of 2.7 K, illustrates the inverse phenomenon, the antimaser absorption. For a radio transition of frequency v, the inversion rate Δn (relative population difference between the upper and lower level) as well as the maser gain can be determined from the radio observations. In the case of the OH lines in the 2 PIsub(3/2), J=3/2 state, the inversion rates approximately 1 to 2% derived from the observations, are comparable with those obtained in the laboratory. The determination of the excitation mechanisms of the masers, through the statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations, implies the knowledge of collisional and radiative transition probabilities. A pumping model, which can satisfactorily explain the radio observations of some interstellar OH clouds, will be discussed [fr

  7. Development of Chiral LC-MS Methods for small Molecules and Their Applications in the Analysis of Enantiomeric Composition and Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Meera Jay [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop sensitive LC-MS methods for enantiomeric separation and detection, and then apply these methods for determination of enantiomeric composition and for the study of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a chiral nutraceutical. Our first study, evaluated the use of reverse phase and polar organic mode for chiral LC-API/MS method development. Reverse phase methods containing high water were found to decrease ionization efficiency in electrospray, while polar organic methods offered good compatibility and low limits of detection with ESI. The use of lower flow rates dramatically increased the sensitivity by an order of magnitude. Additionally, for rapid chiral screening, the coupled Chirobiotic column afforded great applicability for LC-MS method development. Our second study, continued with chiral LC-MS method development in this case for the normal phase mode. Ethoxynonafluorobutane, a fluorocarbon with low flammability and no flashpoint, was used as a substitute solvent for hexane/heptane mobile phases for LC-APCI/MS. Comparable chromatographic resolutions and selectivities were found using ENFB substituted mobile phase systems, although, peak efficiencies were significantly diminished. Limits of detection were either comparable or better for ENFB-MS over heptane-PDA detection. The miscibility of ENFB with a variety of commonly used organic modifiers provided for flexibility in method development. For APCI, lower flow rates did not increase sensitivity as significantly as was previously found for ESI-MS detection. The chiral analysis of native amino acids was evaluated using both APCI and ESI sources. For free amino acids and small peptides, APCI was found to have better sensitivities over ESI at high flow rates. For larger peptides, however, sensitivity was greatly improved with the use of electrospray. Additionally, sensitivity was enhanced with the use of non-volatile additives, This optimized method was then

  8. Free and binary rotation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konyukhov, V K

    2003-01-01

    A modification of the quantum-mechanical theory of rotation of polyatomic molecules (binary rotation) is proposed, which is based on the algebra and representations of the SO(4) group and allows the introduction of the concept of parity, as in atomic spectroscopy. It is shown that, if an asymmetric top molecule performing binary rotation finds itself in a spatially inhomogeneous electric field, its rotational levels acquire the additional energy due to the quadrupole moment. The existence of the rotational states of polyatomic molecules that cannot transfer to the free rotation state is predicted. In particular, the spin isomers of a water molecule, which corresponds to such states, can have different absolute values of the adsorption energy due to the quadrupole interaction of the molecule with a surface. The difference in the adsorption energies allows one to explain qualitatively the behaviour of the ortho- and para-molecules of water upon their adsorption on the surface of solids in accordance with experimental data. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Hyun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 μm) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 μm was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial

  10. Molecular spintronics using single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    A revolution in electronics is in view, with the contemporary evolution of the two novel disciplines of spintronics and molecular electronics. A fundamental link between these two fields can be established using molecular magnetic materials and, in particular, single-molecule magnets. Here, we review the first progress in the resulting field, molecular spintronics, which will enable the manipulation of spin and charges in electronic devices containing one or more molecules. We discuss the advantages over more conventional materials, and the potential applications in information storage and processing. We also outline current challenges in the field, and propose convenient schemes to overcome them.

  11. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  12. Quark chemistry: charmonium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rujula, A.; Jaffe, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidence for two quark-two antiquark hadrons is reviewed. Concentration is placed on predictions for S-wave ''charmonium molecules,'' built of a c anti c charmonium pair and a light quark-antiquark pair. Their spectrum and quantum numbers are predicted and an estimate of their decay couplings and their prediction in monochromatic pion decays from charmonium resonances produced in e + e - -annihilation is given. Some S-wave charmonium resonances should be detectable in these decays, but typical branching ratios are only at the 1% level. 19 references

  13. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  14. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  15. Collision data involving hydro-carbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.; Itikawa, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Tanaka, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1990-07-01

    Hydro-carbon molecules are abundantly produced when graphites are used as internal wall materials of hydrogen plasmas and strongly influence properties of low temperature plasmas near the edges as well as those of high temperature plasmas at the center. In this report, following simple description of the production mechanisms of hydro-carbon molecules under the interactions between graphite and hydrogen plasma, the present status of collision data for hydro-carbon molecules by electron impact is discussed and the relevant data are summarized in a series of figures and tables. It should also be noted that, in addition to fusion plasmas, these hydrocarbon data compiled here are quite useful in other applications such as plasma chemistry and material processing. (author)

  16. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  17. Multiphoton processes in isolated atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudbo, A.S.

    1979-11-01

    The theory of coherent excitation of a multilevel quantum mechanical system is developed. Damping of the system is taken into account by the use of a density matrix formalism. General properties of the wave function and/or the density matrix are discussed. The physical implications for the behavior of the system are described, together with possible applications of the formalism, including the infrared multiphoton excitation of molecules, and optical pumping in alkali atoms. Experimental results are presented on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of molecules, followed by a discussion of the general features of this process. The experimental results were obtained using a crossed laser and molecular beam method, and the emphasis is on determining the properties of the dissociating molecule and the dissociation products. The dissociation process is shown to be described very well by the standard statistical theory (RRKM theory) of unimolecular reactions, a brief presentation of which is also included

  18. Alternating gradient focusing and deceleration of polar molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlem, H.L.; Tarbutt, M.R.; Kupper, J.; Carty, D.; Wohlfart, K.; Hinds, E.A.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    Beams of polar molecules can be focused using an array of electrostatic lenses in alternating gradient (AG) configuration. They can also be accelerated or decelerated by applying an appropriate high-voltage switching sequence to the lenses. AG focusing is applicable to molecules in both low-field-

  19. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  20. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  1. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  2. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  3. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  4. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  5. An electrostatic elliptical mirror for neutral polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Flórez, A Isabel; Meek, Samuel A; Haak, Henrik; Conrad, Horst; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Meijer, Gerard

    2011-11-14

    Focusing optics for neutral molecules finds application in shaping and steering molecular beams. Here we present an electrostatic elliptical mirror for polar molecules consisting of an array of microstructured gold electrodes deposited on a glass substrate. Alternating positive and negative voltages applied to the electrodes create a repulsive potential for molecules in low-field-seeking states. The equipotential lines are parallel to the substrate surface, which is bent in an elliptical shape. The mirror is characterized by focusing a beam of metastable CO molecules and the results are compared to the outcome of trajectory simulations.

  6. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clay and wood and the technology consisted' in reshaping and restructuring physically these ... are completely and drastically modified. Though not known ... application of these materials was based primarily on their electrical, magnetic ...

  7. Linear algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, B.I.; Collins, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    The various levels of sophistication of the linear algebraic method are discussed and its application to electron-molecule collisions of H 2 , N 2 LiH, LiF and HCl is described. 13 references, 2 tables

  8. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  9. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  10. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10] Elsila et al. (2005) GCA 5, 1349. [11] Glavin and Dworkin (2009) PNAS 106, 5487. [12] Pizzarello et al. (2003) GCA 67, 1589. [13] Chan et al. (2012) MAPS. 47, 1502

  11. Trichloroacetimidates as Alkylating Reagents and Their Application in the Synthesis of Pyrroloindoline Natural Products and Synthesis of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arijit A.

    was applied towards the synthesis of natural products and their analogs. The pyrroloindoline ring system is found in many alkaloids and cyclic peptides which mainly differ in the substitution at the C3a position. To provide rapid access to these natural products a diversity-oriented strategy was established via displacement of C3a-trichloroacetimidate pyrroloindoline. Carbon, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles were all shown to undergo substitution reactions with these trichloroacetimidates in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst. In order to demonstrate the utility of this new method it was applied towards the synthesis of arundinine and a formal synthesis of psychotriasine. Current investigations involve the application of this method towards the synthesis of a complex pyrroloindoline natural product kapakahine C and the progress made therein has been discussed. The reactivity of trichloroacetimidates was also investigated for the selective C3-alkylation of 2,3-disubstituted indoles to provide indolenines. Indolenines serve as useful intermediates in the synthesis of many complex alkaloids. Different benzylic and allylic trichloroacetimidates were shown to provide 3,3'-disubstituted indolenines with high yields in the presence of catalytic amounts of Lewis acids. Various substituted indoles were evaluated under these reaction conditions. This methodology was also applied towards the synthesis of the core tetracyclic ring system found in communesin natural products. In addition to the above work, synthesis of small molecule inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP) has also been described. Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) cellular signaling pathway can lead to diseased cellular states like cancer. Herein we have reported stereoselective synthesis of two quinoline based small molecule SHIP inhibitors. The lead compounds and their analogs were tested for their activities against SHIP by Malachite green assay

  12. Isatin, a versatile molecule: studies in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.iq@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Isatin is a small, versatile and widely applicable pharmacological molecule. These characteristics make isatin and its derivatives attractive to many research groups as resources for chemical and pharmacological studies. Although it has a relatively simple structure, isatin is a useful chemical scaffold for a variety of chemical transformations. This article discusses several studies performed by Brazilian groups, including investigations of its structural changes, biological assay designs and new methods for the synthesis of isatin. (author)

  13. Tunnelling of a molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, P.D.; Bulte, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical description of tunnelling is presented for a one-dimensional system with internal oscillator degrees of freedom. The 'charged diatomic molecule' is frustrated on encountering a barrier potential by its centre of charge not being coincident with its centre of mass, resulting in transitions amongst internal states. In an adiabatic limit, the tunnelling of semiclassical coherent-like oscillator states is shown to exhibit the Hartman and Bueuttiker-Landauer times t H and t BL , with the time dependence of the coherent state parameter for the tunnelled state given by α(t) = α e -iω(t+Δt) , Δt = t H - it BL . A perturbation formalism is developed, whereby the exact transfer matrix can be expanded to any desired accuracy in a suitable limit. An 'intrinsic' time, based on the oscillator transition rate during tunnelling, transmission or reflection, is introduced. In simple situations the resulting intrinsic tunnelling time is shown to vanish to lowest order. In the general case a particular (nonzero) parametrisation is inferred, and its properties discussed in comparison with the literature on tunnelling times for both wavepackets and internal clocks. Copyright (1998) CSIRO Australia

  14. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  15. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  16. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  17. Gibbs Free Energy of Hydrolytic Water Molecule in Acyl-Enzyme Intermediates of a Serine Protease: A Potential Application for Computer-Aided Discovery of Mechanism-Based Reversible Covalent Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yosuke; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In order to predict the potencies of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors, the relationships between calculated Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule in acyl-trypsin intermediates and experimentally measured catalytic rate constants (k cat ) were investigated. After obtaining representative solution structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, hydration thermodynamics analyses using WaterMap™ were conducted. Consequently, we found for the first time that when Gibbs free energy of the hydrolytic water molecule was lower, logarithms of k cat were also lower. The hydrolytic water molecule with favorable Gibbs free energy may hydrolyze acylated serine slowly. Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule might be a useful descriptor for computer-aided discovery of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors of hydrolytic enzymes.

  18. Growing interstellar molecules with ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohme, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of gas-phase ion-molecule reactions continue to provide important insights into the chemistry of molecular growth in interstellar environments. It is also true that the measurements are becoming more demanding as larger molecules capture our interest. While some of these measurements are motivated by current developments in chemical models of interstellar environments or by new molecular observations by astronomers, others explore novel chemistry which can lead to predictions of new interstellar molecules. Here the author views the results of some recent measurements, taken in the Ion Chemistry Laboratory at York University with the SIFT technique, which address some of the current needs of modellers and observers and which also provide some new fundamental insight into molecular growth, particularly when it occurs in the presence of large molecules such as PAH molecules which are now thought to have a major influence on the chemistry of interstellar environments in which they are present

  19. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  20. Molecules as nanomagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Sessoli, R.

    1998-01-01

    The design and the synthesis of molecular clusters which give rise to slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperature are the focus of a great interdisciplinary interest, because they provide unique materials to test the theories of quantum tunneling of the magnetization. A short review is provided here of the best systems so far discovered, outlining the possible relevance of this new class of materials to future applications [it

  1. FlavorDB: a database of flavor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neelansh; Sethupathy, Apuroop; Tuwani, Rudraksh; Nk, Rakhi; Dokania, Shubham; Iyer, Arvind; Gupta, Ayushi; Agrawal, Shubhra; Singh, Navjot; Shukla, Shubham; Kathuria, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; Kanji, Rakesh; Jain, Anupam; Kaur, Avneet; Nagpal, Rashmi; Bagler, Ganesh

    2018-01-04

    Flavor is an expression of olfactory and gustatory sensations experienced through a multitude of chemical processes triggered by molecules. Beyond their key role in defining taste and smell, flavor molecules also regulate metabolic processes with consequences to health. Such molecules present in natural sources have been an integral part of human history with limited success in attempts to create synthetic alternatives. Given their utility in various spheres of life such as food and fragrances, it is valuable to have a repository of flavor molecules, their natural sources, physicochemical properties, and sensory responses. FlavorDB (http://cosylab.iiitd.edu.in/flavordb) comprises of 25,595 flavor molecules representing an array of tastes and odors. Among these 2254 molecules are associated with 936 natural ingredients belonging to 34 categories. The dynamic, user-friendly interface of the resource facilitates exploration of flavor molecules for divergent applications: finding molecules matching a desired flavor or structure; exploring molecules of an ingredient; discovering novel food pairings; finding the molecular essence of food ingredients; associating chemical features with a flavor and more. Data-driven studies based on FlavorDB can pave the way for an improved understanding of flavor mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  3. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  4. Molecules as nanomagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caneschi, A.; Gatteschi, D.; Sessoli, R. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dep. di Chimica

    1998-12-01

    The design and the synthesis of molecular clusters which give rise to slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperature are the focus of a great interdisciplinary interest, because they provide unique materials to test the theories of quantum tunneling of the magnetization. A short review is provided here of the best systems so far discovered, outlining the possible relevance of this new class of materials to future applications. [Italiano] La progettazione e la sintesi di cluster molecolari che danno luogo a rilassamento lento della magnetizzazione a bassa temperatura sono oggetto di un grande interesse interdisciplinare, perche` sono materiali unici per mettere alla prova le teorie sugli effetti quantistici che si possono osservare in sintesi macroscopici. In questo articolo vengono brevemente passati in rassegna i migliori sistemi fin qui scoperti e vengono date alcune indicazioni per la possibile importanza di questa nuova classe di materiali per applicazioni future.

  5. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations (i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface) is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules.

  6. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations [i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface] is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules

  7. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  8. Environmental effects on molecules immersed in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sese, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology to study environmental effects is thoroughly discussed. It combines molecular quantum mechanics and classical statistical mechanics of molecular fluids. Pair distribution functions collecting statistical information appear quite naturally in the quantum equations describing a single molecule. As well as allowing the computation of any individual molecular property in a liquid phase, this approach satisfies a number of theoretical requirements (dependence on density and temperature, validity in the thermodynamic limit). In a sense, it can be regarded as a useful alternative to the well-known Monte Carlo averaging processes for calculating molecular properties. Numerical applications studying liquid carbon disulphide and liquid carbon tetrachloride at several state points are given. Results cover typical RHF information (CNDO/2) on molecules, and show the sensitivity of the presented methodology to structural changes in liquids. (orig.)

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of Venus at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Charlotte C; Dedecker, Peter; De Cremer, Gert; Verstraeten, Natalie; Kint, Cyrielle; Michiels, Jan; Hofkens, Johan

    2012-02-01

    Venus is a recently developed, fast maturating, yellow fluorescent protein that has been used as a probe for in vivo applications. In the present work the photophysical characteristics of Venus were analyzed spectroscopically at the bulk and single molecule level. Through time-resolved single molecule measurements we found that single molecules of Venus display pronounced fluctuations in fluorescence emission, with clear fluorescence on- and off-times. These fluorescence intermittencies were found to occupy a broad range of time scales, ranging from milliseconds to several seconds. Such long off-times can complicate the analysis of single molecule counting experiments or single-molecule FRET experiments. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  10. The formation and interactions of cold and ultracold molecules: new challenges for interdisciplinary physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulieu, O [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, Bat. 505, Univ Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gabbanini, C [Istituto per i processi chimico-fisici del C.N.R., Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: olivier.dulieu@lac.u-psud.fr, E-mail: carlo@ipcf.cnr.it

    2009-08-15

    Progress on research in the field of molecules at cold and ultracold temperatures is reported in this review. It covers extensively the experimental methods to produce, detect and characterize cold and ultracold molecules including association of ultracold atoms, deceleration by external fields and kinematic cooling. Confinement of molecules in different kinds of traps is also discussed. The basic theoretical issues related to the knowledge of the molecular structure, the atom-molecule and molecule-molecule mutual interactions, and to their possible manipulation and control with external fields, are reviewed. A short discussion on the broad area of applications completes the review.

  11. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries.

  12. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  13. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  14. Photoionization of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed

  15. Low pressure tritiation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.F.; Powers, J.C.; Lively, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of tritiating sensitive biological molecules by depositing molecules of the substance to be tritiated on a supporting substrate in an evacuated vacuum chamber near, but not in the path of, an electron beam which traverses the chamber, admitting tritium gas into the chamber, and subjecting the tritium to the electron beam. Vibrationally excited tritium gas species are generated which collide and react with the substance thus incorporating tritium atoms into the substance. (U.K.)

  16. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  17. Dynamic Colloidal Molecules Maneuvered by Light-Controlled Janus Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yirong; Mou, Fangzhi; Feng, Yizheng; Che, Shengping; Li, Wei; Xu, Leilei; Guan, Jianguo

    2017-07-12

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a dynamic colloidal molecule that is capable of moving autonomously and performing swift, reversible, and in-place assembly dissociation in a high accuracy by manipulating a TiO 2 /Pt Janus micromotor with light irradiation. Due to the efficient motion of the TiO 2 /Pt Janus motor and the light-switchable electrostatic interactions between the micromotor and colloidal particles, the colloidal particles can be captured and assembled one by one on the fly, subsequently forming into swimming colloidal molecules by mimicking space-filling models of simple molecules with central atoms. The as-demonstrated dynamic colloidal molecules have a configuration accurately controlled and stabilized by regulating the time-dependent intensity of UV light, which controls the stop-and-go motion of the colloidal molecules. The dynamic colloidal molecules are dissociated when the light irradiation is turned off due to the disappearance of light-switchable electrostatic interaction between the motor and the colloidal particles. The strategy for the assembly of dynamic colloidal molecules is applicable to various charged colloidal particles. The simulated optical properties of a dynamic colloidal molecule imply that the results here may provide a novel approach for in-place building functional microdevices, such as microlens arrays, in a swift and reversible manner.

  18. Zero-mode waveguide nanophotonic structures for single molecule characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Garrison M.; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W.

    2018-05-01

    Single-molecule characterization has become a crucial research tool in the chemical and life sciences, but limitations, such as limited concentration range, inability to control molecular distributions in space, and intrinsic phenomena, such as photobleaching, present significant challenges. Recent developments in non-classical optics and nanophotonics offer promising routes to mitigating these restrictions, such that even low affinity (K D ~ mM) biomolecular interactions can be studied. Here we introduce and review specific nanophotonic devices used to support single molecule studies. Optical nanostructures, such as zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs), are usually fabricated in thin gold or aluminum films and serve to confine the observation volume of optical microspectroscopy to attoliter to zeptoliter volumes. These simple nanostructures allow individual molecules to be isolated for optical and electrochemical analysis, even when the molecules of interest are present at high concentration (µM–mM) in bulk solution. Arrays of ZMWs may be combined with optical probes such as single molecule fluorescence, single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for distributed analysis of large numbers of single-molecule reactions or binding events in parallel. Furthermore, ZMWs may be used as multifunctional devices, for example by combining optical and electrochemical functions in a single discrete architecture to achieve electrochemical ZMWs. In this review, we will describe the optical properties, fabrication, and applications of ZMWs for single-molecule studies, as well as the integration of ZMWs into systems for chemical and biochemical analysis.

  19. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houfek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  20. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houfek, Karel, E-mail: karel.houfek@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-15

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  1. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  2. Defining RNA-Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Luo, Yiling; Tran, Tuan; Haniff, Hafeez S; Nakai, Yoshio; Fallahi, Mohammad; Martinez, Gustavo J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-22

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif-small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule-RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  3. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  4. Quantum theory of anharmonic effects in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Konstantin V

    2012-01-01

    Presented in a clear and straightforward analysis, this book explores quantum mechanics and the application of quantum mechanics to interpret spectral phenomena. Specifically, the book discusses the relation between spectral features in mid or rear infrared regions, or in Raman scattering spectrum, and interactions between molecules or molecular species such as molecular ions, and their respective motions in gaseous or crystalline conditions. Beginning with an overview of conventional methods and problems which arise in molecular spectroscopy, the second half of the book suggests original t

  5. Conducting single-molecule magnet materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosquer, Goulven; Shen, Yongbing; Almeida, Manuel; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2018-05-11

    Multifunctional molecular materials exhibiting electrical conductivity and single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour are particularly attractive for electronic devices and related applications owing to the interaction between electronic conduction and magnetization of unimolecular units. The preparation of such materials remains a challenge that has been pursued by a bi-component approach of combination of SMM cationic (or anionic) units with conducting networks made of partially oxidized (or reduced) donor (or acceptor) molecules. The present status of the research concerning the preparation of molecular materials exhibiting SMM behaviour and electrical conductivity is reviewed, describing the few molecular compounds where both SMM properties and electrical conductivity have been observed. The evolution of this research field through the years is discussed. The first reported compounds are semiconductors in spite being able to present relatively high electrical conductivity, and the SMM behaviour is observed at low temperatures where the electrical conductivity of the materials is similar to that of an insulator. During the recent years, a breakthrough has been achieved with the coexistence of high electrical conductivity and SMM behaviour in a molecular compound at the same temperature range, but so far without evidence of a synergy between these properties. The combination of high electrical conductivity with SMM behaviour requires not only SMM units but also the regular and as far as possible uniform packing of partially oxidized molecules, which are able to provide a conducting network.

  6. Entangled photons from single atoms and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordén, Bengt

    2018-05-01

    The first two-photon entanglement experiment performed 50 years ago by Kocher and Commins (KC) provided isolated pairs of entangled photons from an atomic three-state fluorescence cascade. In view of questioning of Bell's theorem, data from these experiments are re-analyzed and shown sufficiently precise to confirm quantum mechanical and dismiss semi-classical theory without need for Bell's inequalities. Polarization photon correlation anisotropy (A) is useful: A is near unity as predicted quantum mechanically and well above the semi-classic range, 0 ⩽ A ⩽ 1 / 2 . Although yet to be found, one may envisage a three-state molecule emitting entangled photon pairs, in analogy with the KC atomic system. Antibunching in fluorescence from single molecules in matrix and entangled photons from quantum dots promise it be possible. Molecules can have advantages to parametric down-conversion as the latter photon distribution is Poissonian and unsuitable for producing isolated pairs of entangled photons. Analytical molecular applications of entangled light are also envisaged.

  7. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  8. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  9. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  10. Physics of Complex Polymeric Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Joshua Walter

    The statistical physics of complex polymers with branches and circuits is the topic of this dissertation. An important motivation are large, single-stranded (ss) RNA molecules. Such molecules form complex ``secondary" and ``tertiary" structures that can be represented as branched polymers with circuits. Such structures are in part directly determined by the nucleotide sequence and in part subject to thermal fluctuations. The polymer physics literature on molecules in this class has mostly focused on randomly branched polymers without circuits while there has been minimal research on polymers with specific structures and on polymers that contain circuits. The dissertation is composed of three parts: Part I studies branched polymers with thermally fluctuating structure confined to a potential well as a simple model for the encapsidation of viral RNA. Excluded volume interactions were ignored. In Part II, I apply Flory theory to the study of the encapsidation of viral ss RNA molecules with specific branched structures, but without circuits, in the presence of excluded volume interaction. In Part III, I expand on Part II and consider complex polymers with specific structure including both branching and circuits. I introduce a method based on the mathematics of Laplacian matrices that allows me to calculate density profiles for such molecules, which was not possible within Flory theory.

  11. Theoretical study of non reactive collisions between alkaline atoms and hydrogen or deuterium molecules. Calculations and analysis of the potential surfaces. Application to the fine structure transitions of the Rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, F.N.

    1986-10-01

    The adiabatic potential lines are first obtained through the use of a pseudo-potential, depending on the electronic orbital moment. A perturbative method is then used to generate the potential surfaces, according to the potential lines. A quantum calculation in the thermal energy domain is realized, for the cross-sections concerning the structure transitions of the Rubidium, induced by the collision with hydrogen or deuterium molecules. This allowed the interpretation of the experimentally observed isotopic effect [fr

  12. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  13. Application of the generator coordinates method to the intra-molecular proton tunneling in the malonaldehyde molecule; Aplicacao do metodo das coordenadas geradoras ao processo de tunelamento do proton intramolecular na molecula de malonaldeido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andre Campos Kersten

    1995-12-31

    The effects of different vibrational modes on the isomerization process of polyatomic molecules, or solvent`s effects on reaction rates are object of up-to-date interest. In general, such many body phenomena are, in principle, multidimensional, and they first require a reduction of relevant degrees of freedom. In order to investigated, some aspects of the intra-molecular proton tunneling on a malonaldehyde molecule, we use the Generator Coordinate Method. The model used to describe such a process is the so-called System-Bath model, where the system is the reaction coordinate and the bath are the intrinsic degrees of freedom (vibrational modes of the molecule), which are described by a harmonic oscillator set linearly coupled to the system. The reduction of the multidimensional problem to the effective unidimensional one is done using a energy related variational principle on the intrinsic degrees of freedom. we obtained analytically a effective Hamiltonian where the effects of the various degrees of freedom reveal themselves in the appearance of a effective mass and in changes of the shape of the potential barrier. The analyticity of the method was crucial on identifying clearly the roles played by the different physical parameters involved. (author) 17 refs., 29 figs.

  14. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  16. Magnetic Molecules from Chemist's Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, David

    2002-03-01

    A single-molecule magnet (SMM) is a molecule that functions as a nanoscale, single-domain magnetic particle that, below its blocking temperature, exhibits magnetization hysteresis [1]. SMMs have attracted considerable interest because they : (1) can serve as the smallest nanomagnet, monodisperse in size, shape and anisotropy; (2) exhibit quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM); and (3) may function as memory devices in a quantum computer. SMM’s are synthetically designed nanomagnets, built from a core containing metal ion unpaired spin carriers bridged by oxide or other simple ions which is surrounded by organic ligands. Many systematic changes can be made in the structure of these molecular nanomagnets. Manganese-containing SMM’s are known with from Mn4 to Mn_30 compositions. The magnetic bistability, which is desirable for data storage applications, is achievable at temperatures below 3K. The largest spin of the ground state of a SMM is presently S = 13. Appreciable largely uniaxial magnetoanisotropy in the ground state leads to magnetic bistability. Rather than a continuum of higher energy states separating the “spin-up” and “spin-down” ground states, the quantum nature of the molecular nanomagnets result in a well defined ladder of discrete quantum states. Recent studies have definitively shown that, under conditions that can be controlled via the application of external perturbations, quantum tunneling may occur through the energy separating the “spin-up” and “spin-down” states. The tunneling is due to weak symmetry breaking perturbations that give rise to long-lived quantum states consisting of coherent superpositions of the “spin-up” and “spin-down” states. It is the ability to manipulate these coherent states that makes SMMs particularly attractive for quantum computation. Reference: [1] G. Christou, D. Gatteschi, D. N. Hendrickson, R. Sessoli, “Single-molecule Magnets”, M.R.S. Bull. 25, 66 (2001).

  17. Deep learning for single-molecule science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Slabaugh, Gregory; Alonso, Eduardo; Al-Arif, SM Masudur R.

    2017-10-01

    Exploring and making predictions based on single-molecule data can be challenging, not only due to the sheer size of the datasets, but also because a priori knowledge about the signal characteristics is typically limited and poor signal-to-noise ratio. For example, hypothesis-driven data exploration, informed by an expectation of the signal characteristics, can lead to interpretation bias or loss of information. Equally, even when the different data categories are known, e.g., the four bases in DNA sequencing, it is often difficult to know how to make best use of the available information content. The latest developments in machine learning (ML), so-called deep learning (DL) offer interesting, new avenues to address such challenges. In some applications, such as speech and image recognition, DL has been able to outperform conventional ML strategies and even human performance. However, to date DL has not been applied much in single-molecule science, presumably in part because relatively little is known about the ‘internal workings’ of such DL tools within single-molecule science as a field. In this Tutorial, we make an attempt to illustrate in a step-by-step guide how one of those, a convolutional neural network (CNN), may be used for base calling in DNA sequencing applications. We compare it with a SVM as a more conventional ML method, and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In particular, a ‘deep’ neural network has many features of a ‘black box’, which has important implications on how we look at and interpret data.

  18. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author)

  19. Teaching lasers to control molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Rabitz, H.

    1992-01-01

    We simulate a method to teach a laser pulse sequences to excite specified molecular states. We use a learning procedure to direct the production of pulses based on ''fitness'' information provided by a laboratory measurement device. Over a series of pulses the algorithm learns an optimal sequence. The experimental apparatus, which consists of a laser, a sample of molecules and a measurement device, acts as an analog computer that solves Schroedinger's equation n/Iexactly, in real time. We simulate an apparatus that learns to excite specified rotational states in a diatomic molecule

  20. Wave equation of a nonlinear triatomic molecule and the adiabatic correction to the Born--Oppenheimer approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardo, R.D.; Wolfsberg, M.

    1977-01-01

    The wave equation for a nonlinear polyatomic molecule is formulated in molecule-fixed coordinates by a method originally due to Hirschfelder and Wigner. Application is made to a triatomic molecule, and the wave equation is explicitly presented in a useful molecule-fixed coordinate system. The formula for the adiabatic correction to the Born--Oppenheimer approximation for a triatomic molecule is obtained. The extension of the present formulation to larger polyatomic molecules is pointed out. Some terms in the triatomic molecule wave equation are discussed in detail

  1. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  2. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  3. Parasitic helminths: a pharmacopeia of anti-inflammatory molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M J G; MacDonald, J A; McKay, D M

    2009-02-01

    Infection with parasitic helminths takes a heavy toll on the health and well-being of humans and their domestic livestock, concomitantly resulting in major economic losses. Analyses have consistently revealed bioactive molecules in extracts of helminths or in their excretory/secretory products that modulate the immune response of the host. It is our view that parasitic helminths are an untapped source of immunomodulatory substances that, in pure form, could become new drugs (or models for drug design) to treat disease. Here, we illustrate the range of immunomodulatory molecules in selected parasitic trematodes, cestodes and nematodes, their impact on the immune cells in the host and how the host may recognize these molecules. There are many examples of the partial characterization of helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, but these have not yet translated into new drugs, reflecting the difficulty of isolating and fully characterizing proteins, glycoproteins and lipid-based molecules from small amounts of parasite material. However, this should not deter the investigator, since analytical techniques are now being used to accrue considerable structural information on parasite-derived molecules, even when only minute quantities of tissue are available. With the introduction of methodologies to purify and structurally-characterize molecules from small amounts of tissue and the application of high throughput immunological assays, one would predict that an assessment of parasitic helminths will yield a variety of novel drug candidates in the coming years.

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    , controllability, tunable interactions, no disorder, etc). First, they are more easily manipulated because of the strong response of their electric dipole moment to external electric fields, DC or AC. The electric dipole moment also creates the new aspect of long range interactions. Second, they have a rich internal structure, with vibrational and rotational states, fine or hyperfine structure, and Ω- or Λ-doublets. This internal structure allows for wonderful new possibilities in areas such as precision measurement and exquisite control of system dynamics. Therefore, although this focus issue contains a few articles on homonuclear molecules, more complex molecules such as benzene, and even a contribution on atomic chromium, which has a significant magnetic dipole moment, our main focus is on the heteronuclear polar case. This focus issue explores both direct and indirect cooling of mainly polar molecules, and the theory to support and inspire these advances. Thirty-eight research groups have contributed original work, and there are two review articles to complement these advances: the first covers cold and ultracold molecules broadly from few body to many body physics, including foundational theory, the technology to make them, and their scientific applications. The second is on the search for time variation of fundamental constants. The former review, which is comprehensive in nature, concludes with a list of open questions. This sets the tone for the focus issue, namely, openness, innovation, and possibility, an emphasis for which New Journal of Physics, an open-access journal of the highest quality, is especially fitted. Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules Contents Cold and ultracold molecules: science, technology and applications Lincoln D Carr, David DeMille, Roman V Krems and Jun Ye Ultracold molecules: new probes on the variation of fundamental constants Cheng Chin, V V Flambaum and M G Kozlov Probing the unitarity limit at low laser intensities Philippe Pellegrini and

  5. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  6. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  7. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  8. Mass spectrometry of large molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchetti, S.

    1985-01-01

    The lectures in this volume were given at a course on mass spectrometry of large molecules, organized within the framework of the Training and Education programme of the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities. Although first presented in 1983, most of the lectures have since been updated by their authors. (orig.)

  9. WHAT ARE THE MOLECULES DOING?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa ... [African Journal of Chemical Education—AJCE 6(2), July 2016] ... understand science concepts: in essence these are macroscopic (phenomena), microscopic .... than the simple freeing up of already-existing smaller molecules: this implies a high melting point.

  10. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Using a Natural ... Road Banashankari 2nd Stage Bangalore 560 070, India. Department of Chemistry Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning Brindavan Campus Bangalore 560 067, India.

  11. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Sweet Stimulants of ... Road Banashankari 2nd Stage Bangalore 560 070, India. Department of Chemistry Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning Brindavan Campus Bangalore 560 067, India.

  12. Multiphoton dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, P.A.

    1979-10-01

    The dynamics of infrared multiphoton excitation and dissociation of SF 6 was investigated under collision free conditions by a crossed laser-molecular beam method. In order to understand the excitation mechanism and to elucidate the requirements of laser intensity and energy fluence, a series of experiments were carried out to measure the dissociation yield dependences on energy fluence, vibrational temperature of SF 6 , the pulse duration of the CO 2 laser and the frequency in both one and two laser experiments. Translational energy distributions of the SF 5 dissociation product measured by time of flight and angular distributions and the dissociation lifetime of excited SF 6 as inferred from the observation of secondary dissociation of SF 5 into SF 4 and F during the laser pulse suggest that the dynamics of dissociation of excited molecules is dominated by complete energy randomization and rapid intramolecular energy transfer on a nanosecond timescale, and can be adequately described by RRKM theory. An improved phenomenological model including the initial intensity dependent excitation, a rate equation describing the absorption and stimulated emission of single photons, and the unimolecular dissociation of excited molecules is constructed based on available experimental results. The model shows that the energy fluence of the laser determines the excitation of molecules in the quasi-continuum and the excess energy with which molecules dissociate after the laser pulse. The role played by the laser intensity in multiphoton dissociation is more significant than just that of overcoming the intensity dependent absorption in the lowest levels. 63 references

  13. A single-electron picture based on the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method: application to the anisotropic ionization and subsequent high-harmonic generation of the CO molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, S.; Kato, T.; Oyamada, T.; Koseki, S.; Ohmura, H.; Kono, H.

    2018-02-01

    The mechanisms of anisotropic near-IR tunnel ionization and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a CO molecule are theoretically investigated by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method developed for the simulation of multielectron dynamics of molecules. The multielectron dynamics obtained by numerically solving the equations of motion (EOMs) in the MCTDHF method is converted to a single orbital picture in the natural orbital representation where the first-order reduced density matrix is diagonalized. The ionization through each natural orbital is examined and the process of HHG is classified into different optical paths designated by a combinations of initial, intermediate and final natural orbitals. The EOMs for natural spin-orbitals are also derived within the framework of the MCTDHF, which maintains the first-order reduced density matrix to be a diagonal one throughout the time propagation of a many-electron wave function. The orbital dependent, time-dependent effective potentials that govern the dynamics of respective time-dependent natural orbitals are deduced from the derived EOMs, of which the temporal variation can be used to interpret the motion of the electron density associated with each natural spin-orbital. The roles of the orbital shape, multiorbital ionization, linear Stark effect and multielectron interaction in the ionization and HHG of a CO molecule are revealed by the effective potentials obtained. When the laser electric field points to the nucleus O from C, tunnel ionization from the C atom side is enhanced; a hump structure originating from multielectron interaction is then formed on the top of the field-induced distorted barrier of the HOMO effective potential. This hump formation, responsible for the directional anisotropy of tunnel ionization, restrains the influence of the linear Stark effect on the energy shifts of bound states.

  14. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  15. Controlling the alignment of neutral molecules by a strong laser field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakai, H.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Hald, K.

    1999-01-01

    by lowering the initial rotational energy of the molecules or by increasing the laser intensity. The alignment is measured by photodissociating the molecules with a femtosecond laser pulse and detecting the direction of the photofragments by imaging techniques. The strongest degree of alignment observed......A strong nonresonant nanosecond laser pulse is used to align neutral iodine molecules. The technique, applicable to both polar and nonpolar molecules, relies on the interaction between the strong laser field and the induced dipole moment of the molecules. The degree of alignment is enhanced...

  16. Preparation of translationally cold neutral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenicantonio, Giulia; Bertsche, Benjamin; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Efforts at EPFL to obtain translationally cold neutral molecules are described. Active deceleration of polar molecules is performed by confining the molecules in moving three-dimensional electrostatic traps, and by appropriately choosing the velocity of those traps. Alternatively, cold molecules can be obtained by velocity filtering. Here, the velocity of the molecules is not changed, but instead the cold molecules are extracted from a thermal sample by using the competition between the electrostatic force and the centrifugal force inside a bent electrostatic guide for polar molecules.

  17. USAGE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES FOR DETERMINATION OF LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS AND FIBRIN POLYMERIZATION SITES WITHIN FIBRINOGEN AND FIBRIN MOLECULES AND THEIR APPLICATION IN TEST--SYSTEMS FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND THE THREAT OF THROMBUS FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lugovskoi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown by monoclonal antibodies that B?N-region of fibrin desA molecule (B?1-53 comprises the polymerization site including the peptide bond B?14-15. This site participates in the second stage of fibrin polymerization — lateral association of protofibrils. In the B?15-53 fragment was also found the site called «C», which together with the site «A» participate in the first stage of polymerization — the protofibrils formation. The model of the primary intermolecular interaction of fibrin was designed. It was found by monoclonal antibodies II-4d the site («c» in the N-terminal half of ? chain of the fibrin D-region. This site participates in the protofibrils formation and is complement to site «C» as we assume. We have discovered two neoantigenic determinants. One of these determinants exposes within the coiledcoil fragment B?126-135 of fibrin as a result of fibrinopeptide A splitting off from fibrinogen by thrombin. The structural rearrangements discovered in this site of the fibrin molecule are necessary for the following protofibrils lateral association. The second neoantigenic determinant is localized in the fragment B?134-190 of D-dimer formed after plasmin degradation of fibrin stabilized by FXIIIa. We have obtained the fibrin-specific monoclonal antibodie FnI-3C to the first determinant and D-dimer-specific mAb III-3b to the second one. Three monoclonal antibodies were obtained against the ?C-region of fibrin(ogen molecule. It has been experimentally shown by of one of them that ?C-domains is connected with the fibrinopeptides B in fibrinogen and fibrin desA molecules, but removes from the core of the molecules after fibrinopeptides B splitting off by thrombin. Two other monoclonal antibodies specifically inhibit the fibrin polymerization by blocking two unknown polymerization sites within the ?C-region. The test-systems for the soluble fibrin and D-dimer quantification in human blood plasma were designed on the basis of

  18. Fluorescent Biosensors Based on Single-Molecule Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-09-20

    fluorescence signals by specific in vitro/in vivo fluorescent labeling, and consequently, the fluorescent molecules indicate the presence of target molecules. The resultant fluorescence signals may be simply counted by either microfluidic device-integrated confocal microscopy or total internal reflection fluorescence-based single-molecule imaging. We have developed a series of single-molecule counting-based biosensors which can be classified as separation-free and separation-assisted assays. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the applications of single-molecule counting-based biosensors for sensitive detection of various target biomolecules such as DNAs, miRNAs, proteins, enzymes, and intact cells, which may function as the disease-related biomarkers. Moreover, we give a summary of future directions to expand the usability of single-molecule counting-based biosensors including (1) the development of more user-friendly and automated instruments, (2) the discovery of new fluorescent labels and labeling strategies, and (3) the introduction of new concepts for the design of novel biosensors. Due to their high sensitivity, good selectivity, rapidity, and simplicity, we believe that the single-molecule counting-based fluorescent biosensors will indubitably find wide applications in biological research, clinical diagnostics, and drug discovery.

  19. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  20. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L., E-mail: david.andrews@physics.org [School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-07

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  1. Observing electron motion in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelkowski, S; Yudin, G L; Bandrauk, A D

    2006-01-01

    We study analytically the possibility for monitoring electron motion in a molecule using two ultrashort laser pulses. The first prepares a coherent superposition of two electronic molecular states whereas the second (attosecond pulse) photoionizes the molecule. We show that interesting information about electron dynamics can be obtained from measurement of the photoelectron spectra as a function of the time delay between two pulses. In particular, asymmetries in photoelectron angular distribution provide a simple signature of the electron motion within the initial time-dependent coherently coupled two molecular states. Both asymmetries and electron spectra show very strong two-centre interference patterns. We illustrate these effects using as an example a dissociating hydrogen molecular ion probed by the attosecond pulses

  2. Intersystem crossing in complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappalardo, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The general question of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing is addressed in the context of large organic molecules, i.e., ''complex'' molecules capable of self-relaxation in the absence of collisions. Examples of spectral properties of such molecules in the vapor phase are discussed, relying on extensive Russian literature in this area. Formal expressions for the relaxation rate in the electronic excited states are derived on the basis of the formalism of collision theory, and are applied to the specific case of intersystem crossing. The derivation of the ''energy-gap'' law for triplet-singlet conversion in aromatic hydrocarbons is briefly outlined. The steep rise of internal conversion rates as a function of excess excitation energy, and its competition with the intersystem crossing process, are reviewed for the case of naphthalene vapor. A general expression for the spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian in molecular systems is outlined. Experimental observations on singlet-triplet conversion rates and the factors that can drastically affect such rates are discussed, with emphasis on the ''in- ternal'' and ''external'' heavy-atom effects. Basic relations of ESR spectroscopy and magnetophotoselection are reviewed. Technological implications of the singlet-triplet crossing in complex molecules are discussed in the context of chelate lasers, dye lasers and luminescent displays. Effects related to singlet-triplet crossing, and generally to excited-state energy-transfer in biological systems, are exemplified by the role of aromatic amino-acids in the phosphorescence of proteins, by some recent studies of energy-transfer in models of biomembranes, and by the clustering of triplet-energy donor-acceptor pairs in micelles

  3. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  4. Electron interactions with polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a number of the features of discrete and continuous spectra of electrons interacting with polar molecules. Attention is focused on the extent to which theoretical predictions concerning cross sections, resonances, and bound states are strongly influenced by the various approximations that are so ubiquitous in the treatment of such problems. Similarly, threshold scattering and photodetachment processes are examined for the case of weakly bound dipole states whose higher members overlap the continuum

  5. A linear algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, L.A.; Schnieder, B.I.

    1982-01-01

    The linear algebraic approach to electron-molecule collisions is examined by firstly deriving the general set of coupled integrodifferential equations that describe electron collisional processes and then describing the linear algebraic approach for obtaining a solution to the coupled equations. Application of the linear algebraic method to static-exchange, separable exchange and effective optical potential, is examined. (U.K.)

  6. Single molecule magnet behaviour in robust dysprosium-biradical complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernot, Kevin; Pointillart, Fabrice; Rosa, Patrick; Etienne, Mael; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2010-09-21

    A Dy-biradical complex was synthesized and characterized down to very low temperature. ac magnetic measurements reveal single molecule magnet behaviour visible without any application of dc field. The transition to the quantum tunneling regime is evidenced. Photophysical and EPR measurements provide evidence of the excellent stability of these complexes in solution.

  7. Vibrational-rotational excitation: chemical reactions of vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.B.; Smith, I.W.M.

    1979-03-01

    This review considers a limited number of systems, particularly gas-phase processes. Excited states and their preparation, direct bimolecular reactions, reactions of highly excited molecules, and reactions in condensed phases are discussed. Laser-induced isotope separation applications are mentioned briefly. 109 references

  8. DNA molecules and human therapeutics | Danquah | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors, display ...

  9. Density-functional theory of atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Robert G

    1995-01-01

    Provides an account of the fundamental principles of the density-functional theory of the electronic structure of matter and its applications to atoms and molecules. This book contains a discussion of the chemical potential and its derivatives. It is intended for physicists, chemists, and advanced students in chemistry.

  10. The effect of H2O gas on volatilities of planet-forming major elements. I - Experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of Ca-, Al-, and Si-hydroxide gas molecules and its application to the solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Akihiko

    1992-01-01

    The vapor pressures of Ca(OH)2(g), Al(OH)3(g), and Si(OH)4(g) molecules in equilibrium with solid calcium-, aluminum, and silicon-oxides, respectively, were determined, and were used to derive the heats of formation and entropies of these species, which are expected to be abundant under the currently postulated physical conditions in the primordial solar nebula. These data, in conjunction with thermodynamic data from literature, were used to calculate the relative abundances of M, MO(x), and M(OH)n gas species and relative volatilities of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Al for ranges of temperature, total pressure, and H/O abundance ratio corresponding to the plausible ranges of physical conditions in the solar nebula. The results are used to explain how Ca and Al could have evaporated from Ca,Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, while Si, Mg, and Fe condensed onto them during the preaccretion alteration of CAIs.

  11. A single-molecule diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current–voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur–gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current–voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current–voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. PMID:15956208

  12. The largest molecules in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The bulk of complex molecules in the space between the stars is shown to be in the small frozen particles of interstellar dust. Each dust grain typically contains some 10 9 atoms of oxygen, carbon and nitrogen in an amorphous molecular mixture. As a result of chemical processing of the particles by ultraviolet photons over times spanning proportional10 8 -10 9 years a substantial portion of each dust grain is converted into complex organic molecules whose maximum molecular weight is limited only by the size of the grain. Laboratory studies of evolution of analog grain materials shows that molecular weights of the order of 500 are readily created and that there is an excellent probability of much more complex molecules being produced. The organic dust component constitutes about one tenth of a percent of the total mass of the Milky Way and far outweighs any estimates of the total mass of all the planets. A planet like the earth is continually accreting matter from space and there was a high probability that in the first five hundred million years after its crust formed it passed through several dark clouds and accreted from a hundred million to ten thousand million tonnes of the organic material of the interstellar dust during each passage. It is suggested that this rain of material could have provided the molecular templates for the origin of life. (orig.)

  13. Electric moments in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenberger, Sandra; Gerlich, Stefan; Arndt, Markus; Tuexen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the influence of different electric moments on the shift and dephasing of molecules in a matter wave interferometer. Firstly, we provide a quantitative comparison of two molecules that are non-polar yet polarizable in their thermal ground state and that differ in their stiffness and response to thermal excitations. While C 25 H 20 is rather rigid, its larger derivative C 49 H 16 F 52 is additionally equipped with floppy side chains and vibrationally activated dipole moment variations. Secondly, we elucidate the role of a permanent electric dipole momentby contrasting the quantum interference pattern of a (nearly) non-polar and a polar porphyrin derivative. We find that a high molecular polarizability and even sizeable dipole moment fluctuations are still well compatible with high-contrast quantum interference fringes. The presence of permanent electric dipole moments, however, can lead to a dephasing and rapid degradation of the quantum fringe pattern already at moderate electric fields. This finding is of high relevance for coherence experiments with large organic molecules, which are generally equipped with strong electric moments.

  14. Investigation of polyelectrolyte desorption by single molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedsam, C; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the investigation of intra- and intermolecular interactions at the level of individual molecules. Many examples, including the investigation of the dynamic properties of complex biological systems as well as the properties of covalent bonds or intermolecular transitions within individual polymers, are reported in the literature. The technique has recently been extended to the systematic investigation of desorption processes of individual polyelectrolyte molecules adsorbed on generic surfaces. The stable covalent attachment of polyelectrolyte molecules to the AFM-tip provides the possibility of performing long-term measurements with the same set of molecules and therefore allows the in situ observation of the impact of environmental changes on the adsorption behaviour of individual molecules. Different types of interactions, e.g. electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions, that determine the adsorption process could be identified and characterized. The experiments provided valuable details that help to understand the nature and the properties of non-covalent interactions, which is helpful with regard to biological systems as well as for technical applications. Apart from this, desorption experiments can be utilized to characterize the properties of surfaces or polymer coatings. Therefore they represent a versatile tool that can be further developed in terms of various aspects

  15. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  16. A Single Molecule Investigation of the Photostability of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Kulatunga, Pasad; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence applications. We report here however that single QDs that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a 100W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching a per...... is especially detrimental for multi-color single molecule applications, as we regularly observe spectral blue-shifts of 50 nm, or more even after only ten seconds of illumination....

  17. Improved Dye Stability in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    EcheverrÍa Aitken, Colin; Marshall, R. Andrew; Pugi, Joseph D.

    Complex biological systems challenge existing single-molecule methods. In particular, dye stability limits observation time in singlemolecule fluorescence applications. Current approaches to improving dye performance involve the addition of enzymatic oxygen scavenging systems and small molecule additives. We present an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system that improves dye stability in single-molecule experiments. Compared to the currently-employed glucose-oxidase/catalase system, the protocatechuate-3,4-dioxygenase system achieves lower dissolved oxygen concentration and stabilizes single Cy3, Cy5, and Alexa488 fluorophores. Moreover, this system possesses none of the limitations associated with the glucose oxidase/catalase system. We also tested the effects of small molecule additives in this system. Biological reducing agents significantly destabilize the Cy5 fluorophore as a function of reducing potential. In contrast, anti-oxidants stabilize the Cy3 and Alexa488 fluorophores. We recommend use of the protocatechuate-3,4,-dioxygenase system with antioxidant additives, and in the absence of biological reducing agents. This system should have wide application to single-molecule fluorescence experiments.

  18. Mechanochemical synthesis of small organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumar Achar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the growing interest in renewable energy and global warming, it is important to minimize the usage of hazardous chemicals in both academic and industrial research, elimination of waste, and possibly recycle them to obtain better results in greener fashion. The studies under the area of mechanochemistry which cover the grinding chemistry to ball milling, sonication, etc. are certainly of interest to the researchers working on the development of green methodologies. In this review, a collection of examples on recent developments in organic bond formation reactions like carbon–carbon (C–C, carbon–nitrogen (C–N, carbon–oxygen (C–O, carbon–halogen (C–X, etc. is documented. Mechanochemical syntheses of heterocyclic rings, multicomponent reactions and organometallic molecules including their catalytic applications are also highlighted.

  19. Molecules in strong laser fields. In depth study of H{sub 2} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awasthi, Manohar

    2009-10-29

    A method for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) describing the electronic motion of the molecules exposed to very short intense laser pulses has been developed. The time-dependent electronic wavefunction is expanded in terms of a superposition of field-free eigenstates. The field-free eigenstates are calculated in two ways. In the first approach, which is applicable to two electron systems like H{sub 2}, fully correlated field-free eigenstates are obtained in complete dimensionality using configuration-interaction calculation where the one-electron basis functions are built from B splines. In the second approach, which is even applicable to larger molecules, the field-free eigenstates are calculated within the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation using density functional theory. In general, the method can be divided into two parts, in the first part the field-free eigenstates are calculated and then in the second part a time propagation for the laser pulse parameters is performed. The H{sub 2} molecule is the testing ground for the implementation of both the methods. The reliability of the configuration interaction (CI) based method for the solution of TDSE (CI-TDSE) is tested by comparing results in the low-intensity regime to the prediction of lowest-order perturbation theory. Another test for the CI-TDSE method is in the united atom limit for the H{sub 2} molecule. By selecting a very small value of the internuclear distance close to zero for the H{sub 2} molecule, Helium atom is obtained. Once the functionality and the reliability of the method is established, it is used for obtaining accurate results for molecular hydrogen exposed to intense laser fields. The results for the standard 800 nm Titanium-Sapphire laser and its harmonics at 400 nm and 266 nm are shown. The results for a scan over a wide range of incident photon energies as well as dependence on the internuclear distance are presented. The photoelectron spectra including

  20. Molecules in strong laser fields. In depth study of H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Manohar

    2009-01-01

    A method for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) describing the electronic motion of the molecules exposed to very short intense laser pulses has been developed. The time-dependent electronic wavefunction is expanded in terms of a superposition of field-free eigenstates. The field-free eigenstates are calculated in two ways. In the first approach, which is applicable to two electron systems like H 2 , fully correlated field-free eigenstates are obtained in complete dimensionality using configuration-interaction calculation where the one-electron basis functions are built from B splines. In the second approach, which is even applicable to larger molecules, the field-free eigenstates are calculated within the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation using density functional theory. In general, the method can be divided into two parts, in the first part the field-free eigenstates are calculated and then in the second part a time propagation for the laser pulse parameters is performed. The H 2 molecule is the testing ground for the implementation of both the methods. The reliability of the configuration interaction (CI) based method for the solution of TDSE (CI-TDSE) is tested by comparing results in the low-intensity regime to the prediction of lowest-order perturbation theory. Another test for the CI-TDSE method is in the united atom limit for the H 2 molecule. By selecting a very small value of the internuclear distance close to zero for the H 2 molecule, Helium atom is obtained. Once the functionality and the reliability of the method is established, it is used for obtaining accurate results for molecular hydrogen exposed to intense laser fields. The results for the standard 800 nm Titanium-Sapphire laser and its harmonics at 400 nm and 266 nm are shown. The results for a scan over a wide range of incident photon energies as well as dependence on the internuclear distance are presented. The photoelectron spectra including above

  1. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayed, F.; Mashaghi, A.; Tans, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an

  2. Towards the mass production of slow, trappable molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J.

    2018-05-01

    The Fast Track Communication by Petzold et al (2018 New J. Phys. 20 042001) demonstrates the first Zeeman slowing scheme for species with type-II optical cycling transitions. This new approach is directly applicable to those 2Σ molecules that have recently been captured and cooled in molecular magneto-optical traps (MOTs) and has the potential to efficiently and continuously load these traps for the first time. This advance could produce molecular MOTs with populations comparable to their atomic counterparts and realize an ideal platform for a wide range of studies using large, dense samples of ultracold molecules.

  3. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    The dissertation describes the use of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffuse Scattering (TR-XDS) to study photo-induced structural changes in molecules in solution. The application of the technique is exemplified with experiments on two bimetallic molecules. The main focus is on the data-flow and process......)42+ obtained at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are presented to exemplify TR-XDS at synchrotrons. Similarly, measurements on Ir2(dimen)42+ are used to show the XFEL data-flow and how it deviates from the prior. A method to identify and account for systematic fluctuations...

  4. Adhesion molecules in breast carcinoma: a challenge to the pathologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rossetti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of adhesion molecules is very important both in the activation of carcinogenesis and in the differentiation of subtypes of breast carcinoma, aiding in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic choice in these tumors. Therefore, understanding the functions and interrelationships among these molecules is crucial to the pathologist, who often uses these factors as a resource to differentiate tumors and further classify them according to a molecular point of view. Our goal is to describe the applicability and the difficulties encountered by the pathologist in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma, discussing the most commonly used markers of adhesion in routine analyses.

  5. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  6. Single Molecule Nano-Metronome

    OpenAIRE

    Buranachai, Chittanon; McKinney, Sean A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2006-01-01

    We constructed a DNA-based nano-mechanical device called the nano-metronome. Our device is made by introducing complementary single stranded overhangs at the two arms of the DNA four-way junction. The ticking rates of this stochastic metronome depend on ion concentrations and can be changed by a set of DNA-based switches to deactivate/reactivate the sticky end. Since the device displays clearly distinguishable responses even with a single basepair difference, it may lead to a single molecule ...

  7. Single Molecule Nano-Metronome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranachai, Chittanon; McKinney, Sean A.; Ha, Taekjip

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a DNA-based nano-mechanical device called the nano-metronome. Our device is made by introducing complementary single stranded overhangs at the two arms of the DNA four-way junction. The ticking rates of this stochastic metronome depend on ion concentrations and can be changed by a set of DNA-based switches to deactivate/reactivate the sticky end. Since the device displays clearly distinguishable responses even with a single basepair difference, it may lead to a single molecule sensor of minute sequence differences of a target DNA. PMID:16522050

  8. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  9. ''Crown molecules'' for separating cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.; Lamare, V.

    2002-01-01

    After the minor actinides, the second category of radionuclides that must be isolated to optimize nuclear waste management concerns fission products, especially two cesium isotopes. If the cesium-135 isotope could be extracted, it could subsequently be transmuted or conditioned using a tailor-made process. Eliminating the 137 isotope from reprocessing and nuclear facility-dismantling waste would allow to dispose of most of this waste in near-surface facilities, and simply process the small remaining quantity containing long-lived elements. CEA research teams and their international partners have thought up crown molecules that could be used to pick out the cesium and meet these objectives. (authors)

  10. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO 2 molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  11. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  12. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  13. Advances and challenges in electron-molecule scattering physics-A Report of the 14th International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakoo, M A [Department of Physics, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Lima, M A P [Departamento de Eletronica Quantica, Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' -UNICAMP, Caixa Postal 6165, 13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Tennyson, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    A report is presented of the 13th International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions Physics (Instituto de Fisica, Unicamp, Campinas, Brazil, 27-30 July 2005). This workshop covered low-energy electron interactions with atoms, molecules and condensed matter systems. Several important aspects of this symposium were to bring together theory and experimental advances in this field for gaseous targets as well as showcasing the increasing diversity of electron-molecule collision applications in condensed matter and biological applications. A summary session was held wherein were discussed aspects of the future of the field, including the development of new theoretical and experimental capabilities.

  14. Toward a generalized computational workflow for exploiting transient pockets as new targets for small molecule stabilizers: Application to the homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase mutants at the base of rare disease Alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Andrea; Galderisi, Silvia; Spiga, Ottavia; Bernardini, Giulia; Niccolai, Neri; Manetti, Fabrizio; Santucci, Annalisa

    2017-10-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an inborn error of metabolism where mutation of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene leads to a deleterious or misfolded product with subsequent loss of enzymatic degradation of homogentisic acid (HGA) whose accumulation in tissues causes ochronosis and degeneration. There is no licensed therapy for AKU. Many missense mutations have been individuated as responsible for quaternary structure disruption of the native hexameric HGD. A new approach to the treatment of AKU is here proposed aiming to totally or partially rescue enzyme activity by targeting of HGD with pharmacological chaperones, i.e. small molecules helping structural stability. Co-factor pockets from oligomeric proteins have already been successfully exploited as targets for such a strategy, but no similar sites are present at HGD surface; hence, transient pockets are here proposed as a target for pharmacological chaperones. Transient pockets are detected along the molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein and filtered down to a set of suitable sites for structural stabilization by mean of biochemical and pharmacological criteria. The result is a computational workflow relevant to other inborn errors of metabolism requiring rescue of oligomeric, misfolded enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Positron creation in superheavy quasi-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, B.

    1976-01-01

    The review of positron creation in superheavy quasi-molecules includes spontaneous positron emission from superheavy atoms, supercritical quasi-molecules, background effects, and some implications of the new ground state. 66 references

  16. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  17. Double-valence-fluctuating molecules and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.E.; Scalapino, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of ''double-valence-fluctuating'' molecules, having two ground-state configurations differing by two electrons. We propose a possible realization of such a molecule, and experimental ways to look for it. We argue that a weakly coupled array of such molecules should give rise to a strong-coupling Shafroth-Blatt-Butler superconductor, with a high transition temperature

  18. Trapping molecules in two and three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkse, PW.H.; Junglen, T.; Rieger, T.; Rangwala, S.A.; Windpassinger, P.; Rempe, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold molecules offer a new testing ground for quantum-physical effects in nature. For example, producing slow beams of large molecules could push experiments studying the boundary between quantum interference and classical particles up towards ever heavier particles. Moreover, cold molecules, in particular YbF, seem an attractive way to narrow down the constraints on the value of the electron dipole moment and finally, quantum information processing using chains of cold polar molecules or vibrational states in molecules have been proposed. All these proposals rely on advanced production and trapping techniques, most of which are still under development. Therefore, novel production and trapping techniques for cold molecules could offer new possibilities not found in previous methods. Electric traps hold promise for deep trap potentials for neutral molecules. Recently we have demonstrated two-dimensional trapping of polar molecules in a four-wire guide using electrostatic and electrodynamic trapping techniques. Filled from a thermal effusive source, such a guide will deliver a beam of slow molecules, which is an ideal source for interferometry experiments with large molecules, for instance. Here we report about the extension of this work to three-dimensional trapping. Polar molecules with a positive Stark shift can be trapped in the minimum of an electrostatic field. We have successfully tested a large volume electrostatic trap for ND3 molecules. A special feature of this trap is that it can be loaded continuously from an electrostatic guide, at a temperature of a few hundred mK. (author)

  19. DNA analysis by single molecule stretching in nanofluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, E.; Juarros, A.; Retolaza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Imprint Lithography (NIL) technology combined with a conventional anodic bonding of the silicon base and Pyrex cover. Using this chip, we have performed single molecule imaging on a bench-top fluorescent microscope system. Lambda phage DNA was used as a model sample to characterize the chip. Single molecules of λ-DNA......Stretching single DNA molecules by confinement in nanofluidic channels has attracted a great interest during the last few years as a DNA analysis tool. We have designed and fabricated a sealed micro/nanofluidic device for DNA stretching applications, based on the use of the high throughput Nano...... stained with the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 were stretched in the nanochannel array and the experimental results were analysed to determine the extension factor of the DNA in the chip and the geometrical average of the nanochannel inner diameter. The determination of the extension ratio of the chip provides...

  20. Calculation of a hydrogen molecule in the adiabatic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukajlovich, F.R.; Mogilevskij, O.A.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1979-01-01

    The adiabatic approximation js used for calculating the energy levels of a hydrogen molecule, i.e. of the simplest four-body system with a Coulomb interaction. The aim of this paper is the investigation of the possible use of the adiabatic method in the molecular problems. The most effective regions of its application are discussed. An infinite system of integro-differential equations is constructed, which describes the hydrogen molecule in the adiabatic approximation with the effective potentials taking into account the corrections to the nuclear motion. The energy of the first three vibrational states of the hydrogen molecule is calculated and compared with the experimental data. The convergence of the method is discussed

  1. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  2. Coherent Control of Ground State NaK Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zoe; Park, Jee Woo; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold dipolar molecules exhibit anisotropic, tunable, long-range interactions, making them attractive for the study of novel states of matter and quantum information processing. We demonstrate the creation and control of 23 Na40 K molecules in their rovibronic and hyperfine ground state. By applying microwaves, we drive coherent Rabi oscillations of spin-polarized molecules between the rotational ground state (J=0) and J=1. The control afforded by microwave manipulation allows us to pursue engineered dipolar interactions via microwave dressing. By driving a two-photon transition, we are also able to observe Ramsey fringes between different J=0 hyperfine states, with coherence times as long as 0.5s. The realization of long coherence times between different molecular states is crucial for applications in quantum information processing. NSF, AFOSR- MURI, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, DARPA-OLE

  3. Surface-confined electroactive molecules for multistate charge storage information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Torrent, M; Rovira, C; Veciana, J

    2013-01-18

    Bi-stable molecular systems with potential for applications in binary memory devices are raising great interest for device miniaturization. Particular appealing are those systems that operate with electrical inputs since they are compatible with existing electronic technologies. The processing of higher memory densities in these devices could be accomplished by increasing the number of memory states in each cell, although this strategy has not been much explored yet. Here we highlight the recent advances devoted to the fabrication of charge-storage molecular surface-confined devices exhibiting multiple states. Mainly, this goal has been realized immobilizing a variety (or a combination) of electroactive molecules on a surface, although alternative approaches employing non-electroactive systems have also been described. Undoubtedly, the use of molecules with chemically tunable properties and nanoscale dimensions are raising great hopes for the devices of the future in which molecules can bring new perspectives such as multistability.

  4. Theoretical model for ultracold molecule formation via adaptive feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschinger, Ulrich; Salzmann, Wenzel; Wester, Roland; Weidemueller, Matthias; Koch, Christiane P; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate pump-dump photoassociation of ultracold molecules with amplitude- and phase-modulated femtosecond laser pulses. For this purpose, a perturbative model for light-matter interaction is developed and combined with a genetic algorithm for adaptive feedback control of the laser pulse shapes. The model is applied to the formation of 85 Rb 2 molecules in a magneto-optical trap. We find that optimized pulse shapes may maximize the formation of ground state molecules in a specific vibrational state at a pump-dump delay time for which unshaped pulses lead to a minimum of the formation rate. Compared to the maximum formation rate obtained for unshaped pulses at the optimum pump-dump delay, the optimized pulses lead to a significant improvement of about 40% for the target level population. Since our model yields the spectral amplitudes and phases of the optimized pulses, the results are directly applicable in pulse shaping experiments

  5. Development of novel small molecules for imaging and drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanting

    Small organic molecules, including small molecule based fluorescent probes, small molecule based drugs or prodrugs, and smart multifunctional fluorescent drug delivery systems play important roles in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical practices. Despite the significant progress made in these fields, the development of novel and diverse small molecules is needed to meet various demands for research and clinical applications. My Ph.D study focuses on the development of novel functional molecules for recognition, imaging and drug release. In the first part, a turn-on fluorescent probe is developed for the detection of intracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels based on multiplexing recognitions. Considering the unique and complicated structure of ATP molecules, a fluorescent probe has been implemented with improved sensitivity and selectivity due to two synergistic binding recognitions by incorporating of 2, 2'-dipicolylamine (Dpa)-Zn(II) for targeting of phospho anions and phenylboronic acid group for cis-diol moiety. The novel probe is able to detect intracellular ATP levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Meanwhile, the advantages of multiplexing recognition design concept have been demonstrated using two control molecules. In the second part, a prodrug system is developed to deliver multiple drugs within one small molecule entity. The prodrug is designed by using 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl (NPE) as phototrigger, and biphenol biquaternary ammonium as the prodrug. With controlled photo activation, both DNA cross-linking agents mechlorethamine and o-quinone methide are delivered and released at the preferred site, leading to efficient DNA cross-links formation and cell death. The prodrug shows negligible cytotoxicity towards normal skin cells (Hekn cells) with and without UV activation, but displays potent activity towards cancer cells (HeLa cells) upon UV activation. The multiple drug release system may hold a great potential for practical application. In the

  6. Structural and electronic properties of single molecules and organic layers on surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Single molecules and organic layers on well-defined solid surfaces have attracted tremendous attention owing to their interesting physical and chemical properties. The ultimate utility of single molecules or self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for potential applications is critically dependent on the

  7. Advances on the nanostructuration of magnetic molecules on surfaces: the case of single-molecule magnets (SMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Segura, Jordi; Veciana, Jaume; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel

    2007-09-28

    SMMs exhibit slow magnetization relaxation rates characteristic of nanodomain particles whose origin is however on individual molecules. For this reason, they have attracted much interest due to their potential applications in high-density information storage devices and quantum computing applications, where for instance, each molecule can be used as a magnetic bit of information. However, for this to become a reality, several basic studies such as their deposition on surfaces are still highly required. Here we will revise all the experimental approximations that have been so far reported for their addressing, nanostructuration and study on surfaces, from the use of stamps as templates to their anchorage to gold surface through the use of thiol-based ligands. It is also important to emphasize that the results and methodologies described along this review are applicable not only to SMMs but to any molecular material.

  8. JSME: a free molecule editor in JavaScript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfait, Bruno; Ertl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A molecule editor, i.e. a program facilitating graphical input and interactive editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. Today, when a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. One of the most popular tools for molecular structure input on the web is the JME applet. Since its release nearly 15 years ago, however the web environment has changed and Java applets are facing increasing implementation hurdles due to their maintenance and support requirements, as well as security issues. This prompted us to update the JME editor and port it to a modern Internet programming language - JavaScript. The actual molecule editing Java code of the JME editor was translated into JavaScript with help of the Google Web Toolkit compiler and a custom library that emulates a subset of the GUI features of the Java runtime environment. In this process, the editor was enhanced by additional functionalities including a substituent menu, copy/paste, drag and drop and undo/redo capabilities and an integrated help. In addition to desktop computers, the editor supports molecule editing on touch devices, including iPhone, iPad and Android phones and tablets. In analogy to JME the new editor is named JSME. This new molecule editor is compact, easy to use and easy to incorporate into web pages. A free molecule editor written in JavaScript was developed and is released under the terms of permissive BSD license. The editor is compatible with JME, has practically the same user interface as well as the web application programming interface. The JSME editor is available for download from the project web page http://peter-ertl.com/jsme/

  9. A single-molecule diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Mark; Ochs, Rolf; Koentopp, Max; Fischer, Matthias; von Hänisch, Carsten; Weigend, Florian; Evers, Ferdinand; Weber, Heiko B.; Mayor, Marcel

    2005-06-01

    We have designed and synthesized a molecular rod that consists of two weakly coupled electronic π -systems with mutually shifted energy levels. The asymmetry thus implied manifests itself in a current-voltage characteristic with pronounced dependence on the sign of the bias voltage, which makes the molecule a prototype for a molecular diode. The individual molecules were immobilized by sulfur-gold bonds between both electrodes of a mechanically controlled break junction, and their electronic transport properties have been investigated. The results indeed show diode-like current-voltage characteristics. In contrast to that, control experiments with symmetric molecular rods consisting of two identical π -systems did not show significant asymmetries in the transport properties. To investigate the underlying transport mechanism, phenomenological arguments are combined with calculations based on density functional theory. The theoretical analysis suggests that the bias dependence of the polarizability of the molecule feeds back into the current leading to an asymmetric shape of the current-voltage characteristics, similar to the phenomena in a semiconductor diode. Author contributions: F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. designed research; M.E., R.O., M.K., M.F., F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. performed research; M.E., R.O., M.K., M.F., C.v.H., F.W., F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. contributed new reagents/analytic tools; M.E., R.O., M.K., C.v.H., F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. analyzed data; and F.E., H.B.W., and M.M. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: A, acceptor; D, donor; MCB, mechanically controlled break junction.Data deposition: The atomic coordinates have been deposited in the Cambridge Structural Database, Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, Cambridge CB2 1EZ, United Kingdom (CSD reference no. 241632).

  10. Single-photon sources based on single molecules in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerner, W E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecules in suitable host crystals have been demonstrated to be useful single-photon emitters both at liquid-helium temperatures and at room temperature. The low-temperature source achieved controllable emission of single photons from a single terrylene molecule in p-terphenyl by an adiabatic rapid passage technique. In contrast with almost all other single-molecule systems, terrylene single molecules show extremely high photostability under continuous, high-intensity irradiation. A room-temperature source utilizing this material has been demonstrated, in which fast pumping into vibrational sidebands of the electronically excited state achieved efficient inversion of the emissive level. This source yielded a single-photon emission probability p(1) of 0.86 at a detected count rate near 300 000 photons s -1 , with very small probability of emission of more than one photon. Thus, single molecules in solids can be considered as contenders for applications of single-photon sources such as quantum key distribution

  11. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  12. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qun-Chao, Fan; Wei-Guo, Sun

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7 LiD, 7 LiH, 6 LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy–Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies D e theory , which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies D e expt . (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. Generalizations of the Toda molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velthoven, W. P. G.; Bais, F. A.

    1986-12-01

    Finite-energy monopole solutions are constructed for the self-dual equations with spherical symmetry in an arbitrary integer graded Lie algebra. The constraint of spherical symmetry in a complex noncoordinate basis leads to a dimensional reduction. The resulting two-dimensional ( r, t) equations are of second order and furnish new generalizations of the Toda molecule equations. These are then solved by a technique which is due to Leznov and Saveliev. For time-independent solutions a further reduction is made, leading to an ansatz for all SU(2) embeddings of the Lie algebra. The regularity condition at the origin for the solutions, needed to ensure finite energy, is also solved for a special class of nonmaximal embeddings. Explicit solutions are given for the groups SU(2), SO(4), Sp(4) and SU(4).

  14. Optoelectronics of Molecules and Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices are being developed at an extraordinary rate. Organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and electro-optical modulators are pivotal to the future of displays, photosensors and solar cells, and communication technologies. This book details the theories underlying the relevant mechanisms in organic materials and covers, at a basic level, how the organic components are made. The first part of this book introduces the fundamental theories used to detail ordered solids and localised energy levels. The methods used to determine energy levels in perfectly ordered molecular and macromolecular systems are discussed, making sure that the effects of quasi-particles are not missed. The function of excitons and their transfer between two molecules are studied, and the problems associated with interfaces and charge injection into resistive media are presented. The second part details technological aspects such as the fabrication of devices based on organic materials by dry etching. The princ...

  15. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  16. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Esau, Luke E.

    2014-01-01

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  17. Hydride Molecules towards Nearby Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Raquel R.; La, Ngoc; Goldsmith, Paul

    2018-06-01

    Observations carried out by the Herschel Space Observatory revealed strong spectroscopic signatures from light hydride molecules within the Milky Way and nearby active galaxies. To better understand the chemical and physical conditions of the interstellar medium, we conducted the first comprehensive survey of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and water molecular lines observed through the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer. By collecting and analyzing the sub-millimeter spectra of over two hundred sources, we found that the HF J = 1 - 0 rotational transition which occurs at approximately 1232 GHz was detected in a total of 39 nearby galaxies both in absorption and emission. The analysis will determine the main excitation mechanism of HF in nearby galaxies and provide steady templates of the chemistry and physical conditions of the ISM to be used in the early universe, where observations of hydrides are more scarce.

  18. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  19. Observation of pendular butterfly Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederprüm, Thomas; Thomas, Oliver; Eichert, Tanita; Lippe, Carsten; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.; Ott, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    Engineering molecules with a tunable bond length and defined quantum states lies at the heart of quantum chemistry. The unconventional binding mechanism of Rydberg molecules makes them a promising candidate to implement such tunable molecules. A very peculiar type of Rydberg molecules are the so-called butterfly molecules, which are bound by a shape resonance in the electron–perturber scattering. Here we report the observation of these exotic molecules and employ their exceptional properties to engineer their bond length, vibrational state, angular momentum and orientation in a small electric field. Combining the variable bond length with their giant dipole moment of several hundred Debye, we observe counter-intuitive molecules which locate the average electron position beyond the internuclear distance. PMID:27703143

  20. Entangled exciton states in quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Manfred

    2002-03-01

    Currently there is strong interest in quantum information processing(See, for example, The Physics of Quantum Information, eds. D. Bouwmeester, A. Ekert and A. Zeilinger (Springer, Berlin, 2000).) in a solid state environment. Many approaches mimic atomic physics concepts in which semiconductor quantum dots are implemented as artificial atoms. An essential building block of a quantum processor is a gate which entangles the states of two quantum bits. Recently a pair of vertically aligned quantum dots has been suggested as optically driven quantum gate(P. Hawrylak, S. Fafard, and Z. R. Wasilewski, Cond. Matter News 7, 16 (1999).)(M. Bayer, P. Hawrylak, K. Hinzer, S. Fafard, M. Korkusinski, Z.R. Wasilewski, O. Stern, and A. Forchel, Science 291, 451 (2001).): The quantum bits are individual carriers either on dot zero or dot one. The different dot indices play the same role as a "spin", therefore we call them "isospin". Quantum mechanical tunneling between the dots rotates the isospin and leads to superposition of these states. The quantum gate is built when two different particles, an electron and a hole, are created optically. The two particles form entangled isospin states. Here we present spectrocsopic studies of single self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules that support the feasibility of this proposal. The evolution of the excitonic recombination spectrum with varying separation between the dots allows us to demonstrate coherent tunneling of carriers across the separating barrier and the formation of entangled exciton states: Due to the coupling between the dots the exciton states show a splitting that increases with decreasing barrier width. For barrier widths below 5 nm it exceeds the thermal energy at room temperature. For a given barrier width, we find only small variations of the tunneling induced splitting demonstrating a good homogeneity within a molecule ensemble. The entanglement may be controlled by application of electromagnetic field. For

  1. Density functional theory study of adsorption geometries and electronic structures of azo-dye-based molecules on anatase TiO2 surface for dye-sensitized solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajongtat, Pongthep; Suramitr, Songwut; Nokbin, Somkiat; Nakajima, Koichi; Mitsuke, Koichiro; Hannongbua, Supa

    2017-09-01

    Structural and electronic properties of eight isolated azo dyes (ArNNAr', where Ar and Ar' denote the aryl groups containing benzene and naphthalene skeletons, respectively) were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) based on the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and TD-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) methods The effect of methanol solvent on the structural and electronic properties of the azo dyes was elucidated by employing a polarizable continuum model (PCM). Then, the azo dyes adsorbed onto the anatase TiO 2 (101) slab surface through a carboxyl group. The geometries and electronic structures of the adsorption complexes were determined using periodic DFT based on the PWC/DNP method. The calculated adsorption energies indicate that the adsorbed dyes preferentially take configuration of the bidentate bridging rather than chelating or monodentate ester-type geometries. Furthermore, the azo compounds having two carboxyl groups are coordinated to the TiO 2 surface more preferentially through the carboxyl group connecting to the benzene skeleton than through that connecting to the naphthalene skeleton. The dihedral angles (Φ B-N ) between the benzene- and naphthalene-skeleton moieties are smaller than 10° for the adsorbed azo compounds containing one carboxyl group. In contrast, Φ B-N > 30° are obtained for the adsorbed azo compounds containing two carboxyl groups. The almost planar conformations of the former appear to strengthen both π-electrons conjugation and electronic coupling between low-lying unoccupied molecular orbitals of the azo dyes and the conduction band of TiO 2 . On the other hand, such coupling is very weak for the latter, leading to a shift of the Fermi level of TiO 2 in the lower-energy direction. The obtained results are useful to the design and synthesize novel azo-dye-based molecules that give rise to higher photovoltaic performances of the dye-sensitized solar cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  3. Hyperfine structure of 2Σ molecules containing alkaline-earth-metal atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldegunde, Jesus; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2018-04-01

    Ultracold molecules with both electron spin and an electric dipole moment offer new possibilities in quantum science. We use density-functional theory to calculate hyperfine coupling constants for a selection of molecules important in this area, including RbSr, LiYb, RbYb, CaF, and SrF. We find substantial hyperfine coupling constants for the fermionic isotopes of the alkaline-earth-metal and Yb atoms. We discuss the hyperfine level patterns and Zeeman splittings expected for these molecules. The results will be important both to experiments aimed at forming ultracold open-shell molecules and to their applications.

  4. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hierarchical virtual screening approaches in small molecule drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2015-01-01

    Virtual screening has played a significant role in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of therapeutic targets in last two decades. Various ligand and structure-based virtual screening approaches are employed to identify small molecule ligands for proteins of interest. These approaches are often combined in either hierarchical or parallel manner to take advantage of the strength and avoid the limitations associated with individual methods. Hierarchical combination of ligand and structure-based virtual screening approaches has received noteworthy success in numerous drug discovery campaigns. In hierarchical virtual screening, several filters using ligand and structure-based approaches are sequentially applied to reduce a large screening library to a number small enough for experimental testing. In this review, we focus on different hierarchical virtual screening strategies and their application in the discovery of small molecule modulators of important drug targets. Several virtual screening studies are discussed to demonstrate the successful application of hierarchical virtual screening in small molecule drug discovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chip-based microtrap arrays for cold polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-12-01

    Compared to the atomic chip, which has been a powerful platform to perform an astonishing range of applications from rapid Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) production to the atomic clock, the molecular chip is only in its infant stages. Recently a one-dimensional electric lattice was demonstrated to trap polar molecules on a chip. This excellent work opens up the way to building a molecular chip laboratory. Here we propose a two-dimensional (2D) electric lattice on a chip with concise and robust structure, which is formed by arrays of squared gold wires. Arrays of microtraps that originate in the microsize electrodes offer a steep gradient and thus allow for confining both light and heavy polar molecules. Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations are performed using two types of sample molecules, N D3 and SrF, to justify the possibility of our proposal. The height of the minima of the potential wells is about 10 μm above the surface of the chip and can be easily adjusted in a wide range by changing the voltages applied on the electrodes. These microtraps offer intriguing perspectives for investigating cold molecules in periodic potentials, such as quantum computing science, low-dimensional physics, and some other possible applications amenable to magnetic or optical lattice. The 2D adjustable electric lattice is expected to act as a building block for a future gas-phase molecular chip laboratory.

  7. A small molecule for a big transformation: Topical application of a 20-nucleotide-long antisense fragment of the DIAP-2 gene inhibits the development of Drosophila melanogaster female imagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyadar Palmah M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several genes have been identified to play important roles associated with sex selection in Drosophila melanogaster. An essential part is attributed to the sex-lethal gene that depends on the expression of the X:A (number of chromosomes to autosomes ratio signal controlling both sex selection and dosage compensation processes in D. melanogaster. Interestingly, for sex selection in D. melanogaster there are no documented data addressing the role of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP genes and their signaling influence on this biological process. In this study, we found that topical application of a 20-nucleotide-long antisense DNA fragment (oligoDIAP-2 from the death-associated inhibitor of apoptosis (DIAP-2 gene interferes with D. melanogaster development and significantly decreases the number of female imagos and their biomass. We show that the applied antisense oligoDIAP-2 fragment downregulates the target DIAP-2 gene whose normal concentration is necessary for the development of female D. melanogaster. These data correspond to the results on downregulation of the target host IAP-Z gene of Lymantria dispar L. female imagos after topical treatment with an 18-nucleotide-long antisense DNA fragment from the L. dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus IAP-3 gene at the larval stage. The observed novel phenomenon linking the downregulation of insect IAP genes and the low rate of female imago development could have practical application, especially in insect pest control and molecular pathology.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the degradation mechanisms in host and guest molecules used in OLED active layers

    KAUST Repository

    Winget, Paul; Hong, Minki; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    systems. We identify degradation pathways and define new strategies to guide the synthesis of stable materials for OLED applications for both phosphorescent emitters and organic host materials. The chemical reactivity of these molecules in the active

  9. Adsorption Characteristics of DNA Nucleobases, Aromatic Amino Acids and Heterocyclic Molecules on Silicene and Germanene Monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Tanveer; Vovusha, Hakkim; Kaewmaraya, Thanayut; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    Binding of DNA/RNA nucleobases, aromatic amino acids and heterocyclic molecules on two-dimensional silicene and germanene sheets have been investigated for the application of sensing of biomolecules using first principle density functional theory

  10. Single-molecule dynamics in nanofabricated traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam

    2009-03-01

    The Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic trap (ABEL trap) provides a means to immobilize a single fluorescent molecule in solution, without surface attachment chemistry. The ABEL trap works by tracking the Brownian motion of a single molecule, and applying feedback electric fields to induce an electrokinetic motion that approximately cancels the Brownian motion. We present a new design for the ABEL trap that allows smaller molecules to be trapped and more information to be extracted from the dynamics of a single molecule than was previously possible. In particular, we present strategies for extracting dynamically fluctuating mobilities and diffusion coefficients, as a means to probe dynamic changes in molecular charge and shape. If one trapped molecule is good, many trapped molecules are better. An array of single molecules in solution, each immobilized without surface attachment chemistry, provides an ideal test-bed for single-molecule analyses of intramolecular dynamics and intermolecular interactions. We present a technology for creating such an array, using a fused silica plate with nanofabricated dimples and a removable cover for sealing single molecules within the dimples. With this device one can watch the shape fluctuations of single molecules of DNA or study cooperative interactions in weakly associating protein complexes.

  11. Electro-induced reactions of biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocisek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The thesis presents the results of research activities in the field of electron interactions with biologically relevant molecules which was carried out during my PhD studies at the Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University in Bratislava. Electron induced interactions with biologically relevant molecules were experimentally studied using crossed electron-molecule beams experiment. The obtained results, were presented in four publications in international scientific journals. First study of deals with electron impact ionisation of furanose alcohols [see 1. in list of author publications on page 22]. It has been motivated by most important works in the field of electron induced damages of DNA bases [4]. Studied 3-hydroxytetrahydrofuran and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol, are important model molecules for more complex biological systems (e.g. deoxyribose).The influence of hydroxyl group on stabilisation of the positive ions of the molecules, together with the stability of furan ring in ionized form are main themes of the study. The studies of small amides and aminoacids are connected to scientific studies in the field of formation of the aminoacids and other biologically relevant molecules in space and works trying to explain electron induced processes in more complex molecules[12, 13, 24]. The most important results were obtained for aminoacid Serine [see 2. in list of author publications on page 22]. We have showed that additional OH group of Serine considerably lower the reaction enthalpy limit of reactions resulting to formation of neutral water molecules, in comparison to other amino acids. Also the study of (M-H)- reaction channel using the electron beam with FWHM under 100 meV is of high importance in the field. The last part of the thesis is focused on the electron interactions with organosilane compounds. Materials prepared from organosilane molecules in plasmas have wide range of applications in both biology and medicine. We have studied electron

  12. Revisiting the Central Dogma One Molecule at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Cheng, Wei; Meija, Yara

    2011-01-01

    The faithful relay and timely expression of genetic information depend on specialized molecular machines, many of which function as nucleic acid translocases. The emergence over the last decade of single-molecule fluorescence detection and manipulation techniques with nm and Å resolution, and their application to the study of nucleic acid translocases are painting an increasingly sharp picture of the inner workings of these machines, the dynamics and coordination of their moving parts, their thermodynamic efficiency, and the nature of their transient intermediates. Here we present an overview of the main results arrived at by the application of single-molecule methods to the study of the main machines of the central dogma. PMID:21335233

  13. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  14. Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules: First annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Our first goal was to investigate the phenomenon of aerodynamic focusing in supersonic free jets, in order to assess its potential technological uses in /open quotes/direct writing/close quotes/ and other energy-related applications. Our research program divides itself naturally into two chapters: on focusing microscopic particles, and on focusing individual molecules of heavy vapors carried in jets of He and H 2 . In both lines we combine diverse experimental and theoretical methods of attack. 3 refs., 4 figs

  15. Single Molecule Fluorescence: from Physical Fascination to Biological Relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Segers-Nolten, Gezina M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy is particularly well-known from the beautiful images that have been obtained with this technique from cells. Several cellular components could be nicely visualized simultaneously by staining them with different fluorophores. Not only for ensemble applications but also in single molecule research confocal fluorescence microscopy became a popular technique. In this thesis the possibilities are shown to study a complicated biological process, which is Nucleotide ...

  16. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  17. NMR of dielectrically oriented molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruessink, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    General information on experimental aspects of EFNMR is given. It is shown that the complete 14 N quadrupole tensor (qct) of pyridine and pyrimidine in the liquid state is accessible to EFNMR. Information obtained about 17 O qct in liquid nitromethane, is compared with results from other techniques. The 33 S qct in liquid sulfolane is investigated. The EFNMR results, combined with those from spin-lattice relaxation time measurements and from Hartree-Fock-Slater MO calculations, allowed the complete assignment of the 33 S qct. The quadrupole coupling of both 10 B and 11 B in a carborane compound is investigated and, together with the results of spin-lattice relaxation time measurements, detailed information about the assignment of the boron qct's could be derived. EFNMR studies of apolar molecules are described. A limitation in EFNMR is the inhomogeneity (delta B) of the magnetic field, which is introduced by the use of non-spinning sample cells. A way out is the detection of zero quantum transitions, their widths being independent of delta B. The results and prospectives of this approach are shown for the simple three spin 1/2 system of acrylonitrile in which the small dipolar proton-proton couplings could be revealed via zero quantum transitions. (Auth.)

  18. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  19. Laser spectroscopy on organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasaka, T

    1996-06-01

    Various laser spectrometric methods have been developed until now. Especially, laser fluorometry is most sensitive and is frequently combined with a separation technique such as capillary electrophoresis. For non-fluorescent compounds, photothermal spectrometry may be used instead. A diode laser is potentially useful for practical trace analysis, because of its low cost and long-term trouble-free operation. On the other hand, monochromaticity of the laser is essential in high-resolution spectrometry, e.g. in low temperature spectrometry providing a very sharp spectral feature. Closely-related compounds such as isomers can easily be differentiated, and information for assignment is obtained from the spectrum. Multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry is useful for soft ionization, providing additional information concerned with molecular weight and chemical structure. A short laser pulse with a sufficient energy is suitable for rapid heating of the solid surface. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ion-ization technique is recently employed for introduction of a large biological molecule into a vacuum for mass analysis. In the future, laser spectrometry will be developed by a combination with state-of-the-art laser technology. In the 21st century, new laser spectrometry will be developed, which may be based on revolutionary ideas or unexpected discoveries. Such studies will open new frontiers in analytical laser spectroscopy.

  20. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  1. Modulation of intermolecular interactions in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie Jeanne

    Polynuclear manganese clusters exhibiting interesting magnetic and quantum properties have been an area of intense research since the discovery of the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) in 1993. These molecules, below their blocking temperature, function as single-domain magnetic particles which exhibit classical macroscale magnetic properties as well as quantum mechanical phenomena such as quantum tunnelling of magnetization (QTM) and quantum phase interference. The union of classical and quantum behavior in these nanomaterials makes SMMs ideal candidates for high-density information storage and quantum computing. However, environmental coupling factors (nuclear spins, phonons, neighboring molecules) must be minimized if such applications are ever to be fully realized. The focus of this work is making small structural changes in well-known manganese SMMs in order to drastically enhance the overall magnetic and quantum properties of the system. Well-isolated molecules of high crystalline quality should lead to well-defined energetic and spectral properties as well. An advantage of SMMs over bulk magnetic materials is that they can be chemically altered from a "bottom-up" approach providing a synthetic tool for tuning magnetic properties. This systematic approach is utilized in the work presented herein by incorporating bulky ligands and/or counterions to "isolate" the magnetic core of [Mn4] dicubane SMMs. Reducing intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice (neighboring molecules, solvate molecules, dipolar interactions) is an important step toward developing viable quantum computing devices. Detailed bulk magnetic studies as well as single crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency EPR studies on these sterically-isolated complexes show enhanced, and sometimes even unexpected, quantum dynamics. The importance of intra- and intermolecular interactions remains a common theme throughout this work, extending to other SMMs of various topology including

  2. Single molecule detection, thermal fluctuation and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    YANAGIDA, Toshio; ISHII, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    Single molecule detection has contributed to our understanding of the unique mechanisms of life. Unlike artificial man-made machines, biological molecular machines integrate thermal noises rather than avoid them. For example, single molecule detection has demonstrated that myosin motors undergo biased Brownian motion for stepwise movement and that single protein molecules spontaneously change their conformation, for switching to interactions with other proteins, in response to thermal fluctuation. Thus, molecular machines have flexibility and efficiency not seen in artificial machines. PMID:28190869

  3. Carbon chain molecules in interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnewisser, G.; Walmsley, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the distribution of long carbon chain molecules in interstellar clouds shows that their abundance is correlated. The various formation schemes for these molecules are discussed. It is concluded that the ion-molecule type formation mechanisms are more promising than their competitors. They have also the advantage of allowing predictions which can be tested by observations. Acetylene C 2 H 2 and diacetylene HCCCCH, may be very abundant in interstellar clouds. (Auth.)

  4. Triple resonance experiments for the simultaneous correlation of H6/H5 and exchangeable protons of pyrimidine nucleotides in 13C,15N-labeled RNA applicable to larger RNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehnert, Jens; Goerlach, Matthias; Schwalbe, Harald

    2003-01-01

    Triple-resonance two-dimensional H6/H5(C4N)H and C6/C5(C4N)H experiments are described that provide through-bond H6/H5 or C6/C5 to imino/amino correlations in pyrimidine bases in 13 C, 15 N-labeled RNA. The experiments simultaneously transfer H6/H5 magnetization by an INEPT step to the C6/C5 nuclei and by homonuclear CC- and heteronuclear CN-TOCSY steps via the intervening C4 nucleus to the N3/N4 nuclei and then by a reverse INEPT step to the imino/amino hydrogens. The sensitivity of these experiments is high as demonstrated using a 30-nucleotide pyrimidine rich RNA at a concentration of 0.9 mM at temperatures of 10 deg. C and 25 deg. C. This indicates the general applicability of the experiments and the possibility to obtain correlations for imino resonances in non-canonical regions of the target RNA

  5. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Energy storage and redistribution in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinze, J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry and spectroscopy of molecules at high levels of excitation; energy and phase randomization in large molecules as probed by laser spectroscopy; intramolecular processes in isolated polyatomic molecules; pulse-probe measurements in low-temperature, low-pressure SF 6 ; the photodissociation dynamics of H 2 S and CF 3 NO; photofragment spectroscopy of the NO 2 dissociation; preparation, laser spectroscopy and predissociation of alkali dimers in supersonic nozzle beams; excited states of small molecules - collisional quenching and photodissociation; quantum-state-resolved scattering of lithium hydride; and molecular negative ions

  7. Perspective: Mechanochemistry of biological and synthetic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E., E-mail: makarov@cm.utexas.edu [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Coupling of mechanical forces and chemical transformations is central to the biophysics of molecular machines, polymer chemistry, fracture mechanics, tribology, and other disciplines. As a consequence, the same physical principles and theoretical models should be applicable in all of those fields; in fact, similar models have been invoked (and often repeatedly reinvented) to describe, for example, cell adhesion, dry and wet friction, propagation of cracks, and action of molecular motors. This perspective offers a unified view of these phenomena, described in terms of chemical kinetics with rates of elementary steps that are force dependent. The central question is then to describe how the rate of a chemical transformation (and its other measurable properties such as the transition path) depends on the applied force. I will describe physical models used to answer this question and compare them with experimental measurements, which employ single-molecule force spectroscopy and which become increasingly common. Multidimensionality of the underlying molecular energy landscapes and the ensuing frequent misalignment between chemical and mechanical coordinates result in a number of distinct scenarios, each showing a nontrivial force dependence of the reaction rate. I will discuss these scenarios, their commonness (or its lack), and the prospects for their experimental validation. Finally, I will discuss open issues in the field.

  8. Perspective: Mechanochemistry of biological and synthetic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of mechanical forces and chemical transformations is central to the biophysics of molecular machines, polymer chemistry, fracture mechanics, tribology, and other disciplines. As a consequence, the same physical principles and theoretical models should be applicable in all of those fields; in fact, similar models have been invoked (and often repeatedly reinvented) to describe, for example, cell adhesion, dry and wet friction, propagation of cracks, and action of molecular motors. This perspective offers a unified view of these phenomena, described in terms of chemical kinetics with rates of elementary steps that are force dependent. The central question is then to describe how the rate of a chemical transformation (and its other measurable properties such as the transition path) depends on the applied force. I will describe physical models used to answer this question and compare them with experimental measurements, which employ single-molecule force spectroscopy and which become increasingly common. Multidimensionality of the underlying molecular energy landscapes and the ensuing frequent misalignment between chemical and mechanical coordinates result in a number of distinct scenarios, each showing a nontrivial force dependence of the reaction rate. I will discuss these scenarios, their commonness (or its lack), and the prospects for their experimental validation. Finally, I will discuss open issues in the field

  9. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  10. Spectroscopy and Chemistry of Cold Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Takamasa

    2012-06-01

    Molecules at low temperatures are expected to behave quite differently from those at high temperatures because pronounced quantum effects emerge from thermal averages. Even at 10 K, a significant enhancement of reaction cross section is expected due to tunneling and resonance effects. Chemistry at this temperature is very important in order to understand chemical reactions in interstellar molecular clouds. At temperatures lower than 1 K, collisions and intermolecular interactions become qualitatively different from those at high temperatures because of the large thermal de Broglie wavelength of molecules. Collisions at these temperatures must be treated as the interference of molecular matter waves, but not as hard sphere collisions. A Bose-Einstein condensate is a significant state of matter as a result of coherent matter wave interaction. Especially, dense para-H_2 molecules are predicted to become a condensate even around 1 K. A convenient method to investigate molecules around 1 K is to dope molecules in cold matrices. Among various matrices, quantum hosts such as solid para-H_2 and superfluid He nano-droplets have been proven to be an excellent host for high-resolution spectroscopy. Rovibrational motion of molecules in these quantum hosts is well quantized on account of the weak interactions and the softness of quantum environment. The linewidths of infrared spectra of molecules in the quantum hosts are extremely narrow compared with those in other matrices. The sharp linewidths allow us to resolve fine spectral structures originated in subtle interactions between guest and host molecules. In this talk, I will describe how the splitting and lineshape of high-resolution spectra of molecules in quantum hosts give us new information on the static and dynamical interactions of molecules in quantum medium. The topics include dynamical response of superfluid environment upon rotational excitation, and possible superfluid phase of para-H_2 clusters. I will also

  11. Improved alternating gradient transport and focusing of neutral molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnins, Juris; Lambertson, Glen; Gould, Harvey

    2001-01-01

    Polar molecules, in strong-field seeking states, can be transported and focused by an alternating sequence of electric field gradients that focus in one transverse direction while defocusing in the other. We show by calculation and numerical simulation, how one may greatly improve the alternating gradient transport and focusing of molecules. We use a new optimized multipole lens design, a FODO lattice beam transport line, and lenses to match the beam transport line to the beam source and the final focus. We derive analytic expressions for the potentials, fields, and gradients that may be used to design these lenses. We describe a simple lens optimization procedure and derive the equations of motion for tracking molecules through a beam transport line. As an example, we model a straight beamline that transports a 560 m/s jet-source beam of methyl fluoride molecules 15 m from its source and focuses it to 2 mm diameter. We calculate the beam transport line acceptance and transmission, for a beam with velocity spread, and estimate the transmitted intensity for specified source conditions. Possible applications are discussed

  12. Small molecules enhance CRISPR genome editing in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen; Liu, Yanxia; Ma, Tianhua; Liu, Kai; Xu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Honglei; La Russa, Marie; Xie, Min; Ding, Sheng; Qi, Lei S

    2015-02-05

    The bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system has emerged as an effective tool for sequence-specific gene knockout through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), but it remains inefficient for precise editing of genome sequences. Here we develop a reporter-based screening approach for high-throughput identification of chemical compounds that can modulate precise genome editing through homology-directed repair (HDR). Using our screening method, we have identified small molecules that can enhance CRISPR-mediated HDR efficiency, 3-fold for large fragment insertions and 9-fold for point mutations. Interestingly, we have also observed that a small molecule that inhibits HDR can enhance frame shift insertion and deletion (indel) mutations mediated by NHEJ. The identified small molecules function robustly in diverse cell types with minimal toxicity. The use of small molecules provides a simple and effective strategy to enhance precise genome engineering applications and facilitates the study of DNA repair mechanisms in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The nano-science of C60 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years, nano-science and its associated nano-technology have emerged into prominence in research institutions across the world. They have brought about new scientific and engineering paradigms, allowing for the manipulation of single atoms and molecules, designing and fabricating new materials, atom-by-atom, and devices that operate on significantly reduced time and length scales. One important area of research in nano-science and nano technology is carbon-based physics in the form of fullerene physics. The C 6 0 molecule, and other cage-like fullerenes, together with carbon nano tubes provide objects that can be combined to generate three-dimensional functional structures for use in the anticipated nano-technology of future. The unique properties of C 6 0 can also be exploited in designing nano-phase thin films with applications in nano-scope device technology and processes such as nano-lithography. This requires a deep understanding of the highly complex process of adsorption of this molecule on a variety of substrates. We review the field of nano-scale nucleation and growth of C 6 0 molecules on some of the technologically important substrates. In addition to experimental results, the results of a set of highly accurate computational simulations are also reported

  14. Modulation and Control of Charge Transport Through Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2017-02-01

    The ability to modulate and control charge transport though single-molecule junction devices is crucial to achieving the ultimate goal of molecular electronics: constructing real-world-applicable electronic components from single molecules. This review aims to highlight the progress made in single-molecule electronics, emphasizing the development of molecular junction electronics in recent years. Among many techniques that attempt to wire a molecule to metallic electrodes, the single-molecule break junction (SMBJ) technique is one of the most reliable and tunable experimental platforms for achieving metal-molecule-metal configurations. It also provides great freedom to tune charge transport through the junction. Soon after the SMBJ technique was introduced, it was extensively used to measure the conductances of individual molecules; however, different conductances were obtained for the same molecule, and it proved difficult to interpret this wide distribution of experimental data. This phenomenon was later found to be mainly due to a lack of precise experimental control and advanced data analysis methods. In recent years, researchers have directed considerable effort into advancing the SMBJ technique by gaining a deeper physical understanding of charge transport through single molecules and thus enhancing its potential applicability in functional molecular-scale electronic devices, such as molecular diodes and molecular transistors. In parallel with that research, novel data analysis methods and approaches that enable the discovery of hidden yet important features in the data are being developed. This review discusses various aspects of molecular junction electronics, from the initial goal of molecular electronics, the development of experimental techniques for creating single-molecule junctions and determining single-molecule conductance, to the characterization of functional current-voltage features and the investigation of physical properties other than charge

  15. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Morigi, Giovanna; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping

  16. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  17. Transport through a Single Octanethiol Molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kockmann, D.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Octanethiol molecules adsorbed on Pt chains are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 77 K. The head of the octanethiol binds to a Pt atom and the tail is lying flat down on the chain. Open-loop current time traces reveal that the molecule wags its tail and attaches to the

  18. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    rotational energies of diatomic molecules. That theory was ... resent the intensity of light emitted by a black body as a function of ... by the vibrational motion of its parts”. Bjerrum was .... −1/4; despite the fact that no molecule is a rigid rotor,.

  19. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    class II distribution. The axolotl has a very poor immune response (as though there are no helper T cells), a wide class II distribution and, for most animals, no cell surface class I molecule. It would be enlightening to understand both the mechanisms for the regulation of the MHC molecules during...

  20. Controlled contact to a C-60 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neel, N.; Kröger, J.; Limot, L.

    2007-01-01

    The tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope is approached towards a C-60 molecule adsorbed at a pentagon-hexagon bond on Cu(100) to form a tip-molecule contact. The conductance rapidly increases to approximate to 0.25 conductance quanta in the transition region from tunneling to co...

  1. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation

  2. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F. M. H.; Bethlem, H. L.; Jongma, R.T.; Meijer, G.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by

  3. A storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields can be used to manipulate the motion of neutral molecules in phase-space, i.e., position-momentum space, via their electric dipole moment. A theoretical background is given on the motion of the molecules in phase-space. As the forces exerted on the

  4. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  5. Nanofluidic single-molecule sorting of DNA: a new concept in separation and analysis of biomolecules towards ultimate level performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Separation and separation-based analysis of biomolecules are fundamentally important techniques in the field of biotechnology. These techniques, however, depend on stochastic processes that intrinsically involve uncertainty, and thus it is not possible to achieve 100% separation accuracy. Theoretically, the ultimate resolution and sensitivity should be realized in a single-molecule system because of the deterministic nature of single-molecule manipulation. Here, we have proposed and experimentally demonstrated the concept of a 'single-molecule sorter' that detects and correctly identifies individual single molecules, realizing the ultimate level of resolution and sensitivity for any separation-based technology. The single-molecule sorter was created using a nanofluidic network consisting of a single inlet channel that branches off into multiple outlet channels. It includes two major functional elements, namely a single-molecule detection and identification element and a flow path switching element to accurately separate single molecules. With this system we have successfully demonstrated the world's first single-molecule sorting using DNA as a sample molecule. In the future, we hope to expand the application of such devices to comprehensive sorting of single-proteins from a single cell. We also believe that in addition to the single-molecule sorting method reported here, other types of single-molecule based processes will emerge and find use in a wide variety of applications.

  6. Reprogramming with Small Molecules instead of Exogenous Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could be employed in the creation of patient-specific stem cells, which could subsequently be used in various basic and clinical applications. However, current iPSC methodologies present significant hidden risks with respect to genetic mutations and abnormal expression which are a barrier in realizing the full potential of iPSCs. A chemical approach is thought to be a promising strategy for safety and efficiency of iPSC generation. Many small molecules have been identified that can be used in place of exogenous transcription factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming efficiency and quality. Recent studies have shown that the use of small molecules results in the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These studies might lead to new areas of stem cell research and medical applications, not only human iPSC by chemicals alone, but also safe generation of somatic stem cells for cell based clinical trials and other researches. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent advances in small molecule approaches for the generation of iPSCs.

  7. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH 2 -PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH 2 -PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His 6 -tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni 2+ -His 6 bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His 6 -tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin β1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His 6 -tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557

  8. Scattering of atoms by molecules adsorbed at solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Zaida.

    1988-01-01

    The formalism of collisional time-correlation functions, appropriate for scattering by many-body targets, is implemented to study energy transfer in the scattering of atoms and ions from molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Double differential cross-sections for the energy and angular distributions of atoms and ions scattered by a molecule adsorbed on a metal surface are derived in the limit of impulsive collisions and within a statistical model that accounts for single and double collisions. They are found to be given by the product of an effective cross-section that accounts for the probability of deflection into a solid angle times a probability per unit energy transfer. A cluster model is introduced for the vibrations of an adsorbed molecule which includes the molecular atoms, the surface atoms binding the molecule, and their nearest neighbors. The vibrational modes of CO adsorbed on a Ni(001) metal surface are obtained using two different cluster models to represent the on-top and bridge-bonding situations. A He/OC-Ni(001) potential is constructed from a strongly repulsive potential of He interacting with the oxygen atom in the CO molecule and a van der Waals attraction accounting for the He interaction with the free Ni(001) surface. A potential is presented for the Li + /OC-Ni(001) where a coulombic term is introduced to account for the image force. Trajectory studies are performed and analyzed in three dimensions to obtain effective classical cross-sections for the He/OC-Ni(001) and Li + /OC-Ni(001) systems. Results for the double differential cross-sections are presented as functions of scattering angles, energy transfer and collisional energy. Temperature dependence results are also analyzed. Extensions of the approach and inclusion of effects such as anharmonicity, collisions at lower energies, and applications of the approach to higher coverages are discussed

  9. Symmetry of crystals and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This book successfully combines a thorough treatment of molecular and crystalline symmetry with a simple and informal writing style. By means of familiar examples the author helps to provide the reader with those conceptual tools necessary for the development of a clear understanding of what are often regarded as 'difficult' topics. Christopher Hammond, University of Leeds This book should tell you everything you need to know about crystal and molecular symmetry. Ladd adopts an integrated approach so that the relationships between crystal symmetry, molecular symmetry and features of chemical interest are maintained and reinforced. The theoretical aspects of bonding and symmetry are also well represented, as are symmetry-dependent physical properties and the applications of group theory. The comprehensive coverage will make this book a valuable resource for a broad range of readers.

  10. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  11. Stability of matter-antimatter molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Lee, Teck-Ghee

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We examine stability of matter-antimatter molecules with four constituents. → The binding of matter-antimatter molecules is a common phenomenon. → Molecules have bound states if ratio of constituent masses greater than ∼4. → We evaluate molecular binding energies and annihilation lifetimes. - Abstract: We examine the stability of matter-antimatter molecules by reducing the four-body problem into a simpler two-body problem with residual interactions. We find that matter-antimatter molecules with constituents (m 1 + ,m 2 - ,m-bar 2 + ,m-bar 1 - ) possess bound states if their constituent mass ratio m 1 /m 2 is greater than about 4. This stability condition suggests that the binding of matter-antimatter molecules is a rather common phenomenon. We evaluate the binding energies and eigenstates of matter-antimatter molecules (μ + e - )-(e + μ - ),(π + e - )-(e + π - ),(K + e - )-(e + K - ),(pe - )-(e + p-bar),(pμ - )-(μ + p-bar), and (K + μ - ) - (μ + K - ), which satisfy the stability condition. We estimate the molecular annihilation lifetimes in their s states.

  12. Two-colour dip spectroscopy of jet-cooled molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mitsuo

    In optical-optical double resonance spectroscopy, the resonance transition from an intermediate state to a final state can be detected by a dip of the signal (fluorescence or ion) associated with the intermediate state. This method probing the signal of the intermediate state may be called `two-colour dip spectroscopy'. Various kinds of two-colour dip spectroscopy such as two-colour fluorescence/ion dip spectroscopy, two-colour ionization dip spectroscopy employing stimulated emission, population labelling spectroscopy and mass-selected ion dip spectroscopy with dissociation were briefly described, paying special attention to their characteristics in excitation, detection and application. They were extensively and successfully applied to jet-cooled large molecules and provided us with new useful information on the energy and dynamics of excited molecules.

  13. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies

  14. Statistical inference in single molecule measurements of protein adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Megan J.; Tsitkov, Stanislav; Hess, Henry

    2018-02-01

    Significant effort has been invested into understanding the dynamics of protein adsorption on surfaces, in particular to predict protein behavior at the specialized surfaces of biomedical technologies like hydrogels, nanoparticles, and biosensors. Recently, the application of fluorescent single molecule imaging to this field has permitted the tracking of individual proteins and their stochastic contribution to the aggregate dynamics of adsorption. However, the interpretation of these results is complicated by (1) the finite time available to observe effectively infinite adsorption timescales and (2) the contribution of photobleaching kinetics to adsorption kinetics. Here, we perform a protein adsorption simulation to introduce specific survival analysis methods that overcome the first complication. Additionally, we collect single molecule residence time data from the adsorption of fibrinogen to glass and use survival analysis to distinguish photobleaching kinetics from protein adsorption kinetics.

  15. Prediction of Physicochemical Properties of Organic Molecules Using Semi-Empirical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Kyung; Kim, Chang Kon; Kim, Miri; Lee, Hai Whang; Cho, Soo Gyeong

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of physicochemical properties of organic molecules is an important process in chemistry and chemical engineering. The MSEP approach developed in our lab calculates the molecular surface electrostatic potential (ESP) on van der Waals (vdW) surfaces of molecules. This approach includes geometry optimization and frequency calculation using hybrid density functional theory, B3LYP, at the 6-31G(d) basis set to find minima on the potential energy surface, and is known to give satisfactory QSPR results for various properties of organic molecules. However, this MSEP method is not applicable to screen large database because geometry optimization and frequency calculation require considerable computing time. To develop a fast but yet reliable approach, we have re-examined our previous work on organic molecules using two semi-empirical methods, AM1 and PM3. This new approach can be an efficient protocol in designing new molecules with improved properties

  16. A New Theoretical Approach to Single-Molecule Fluorescence Optical Studies of RNA Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xinghai; Shan Guangcun; Bao Shuying

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in condensed phases has many important chemical and biological applications. The single-molecule fluorescence measurements contain information about conformational dynamics on a vast range of time scales. Based on the data analysis protocols methodology proposed by X. Sunney Xie, the theoretical study here mainly focuses on the single-molecule studies of single RNA with interconversions among different conformational states, to with a single FRET pair attached. We obtain analytical expressions for fluorescence lifetime correlation functions that relate changes in fluorescence lifetime to the distance-dependent FRET mechanism within the context of the Smoluchowski diffusion model. The present work establishes useful guideline for the single-molecule studies of biomolecules to reveal the complicated folding dynamics of single RNA molecules at nanometer scale.

  17. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  18. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  19. Prospects of using the second-order perturbation theory of the MP2 type in the theory of electron scattering by polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čársky, Petr [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.i.i., Dolejškova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-22

    So far the second-order perturbation theory has been only applied to the hydrogen molecule. No application was attempted for another molecule, probably because of technical difficulties of such calculations. The purpose of this contribution is to show that the calculations of this type are now feasible on larger polyatomic molecules even on commonly used computers.

  20. Nano-manipulation of single DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ., Shanghai; Lv Junhong; Wang Guohua; Wang Ying; Li Minqian; Zhang Yi; Li Bin; Li Haikuo; An Hongjie

    2004-01-01

    Nano-manipulation of single atoms and molecules is a critical technique in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This review paper will focus on the recent development of the manipulation of single DNA molecules based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Precise manipulation has been realized including varied manipulating modes such as 'cutting', 'pushing', 'folding', 'kneading', 'picking up', 'dipping', etc. The cutting accuracy is dominated by the size of the AFM tip, which is usually 10 nm or less. Single DNA fragments can be cut and picked up and then amplified by single molecule PCR. Thus positioning isolation and sequencing can be performed. (authors)

  1. H2 molecules and the intercloud medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.K.; Hollenbach, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    We discuss expected column of densities of H 2 in the intercloud medium and the possible use of molecules as indicators of intercloud physical conditions. We treat molecule formation by the H - process and on graphite grains and show that the Barlow-Silk hypothesis of a 1 eV semichemical hydrogen-graphite bond leads to a large enhancement of the intercloud molecule formation rate. Rotational excitation calculations are presented for both cloud and intercloud conditions which show, in agreement with Jura, that the presently observed optically thin H 2 absorption components are more likely to originate in cold clouds than in the intercloud medium

  2. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  3. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  4. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-07-13

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  5. Molecular Wring Resonances in Chain Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the eigenfrequency of collective twist excitations in chain molecules can be in the megahertz and gigahertz range. Accordingly, resonance states can be obtained at specific frequencies, and phenomena that involve structural properties can take place. Chain molecules can alter the...... their conformation and their ability to function, and a breaking of the chain can result. It is suggested that this phenomenon forms the basis for effects caused by the interaction of microwaves and biomolecules, e.g. microwave assisted hydrolysis of chain molecules....

  6. Small organic molecules on surfaces fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Draxl, Claudia; Ramsey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with basic aspects of polymer electronics and optoelectronics. There is an enormous world-wide effort both in basic scientific research as well as in industrial development in the area of organic electronics. It is becoming increasingly clear that, if devices based on organic materials are ever going to have a significant relevance beyond being a cheap replacement for inorganic semiconductors, there will be a need to understand interface formation, film growth and functionality. A control of these aspects will allow the realisation of totally new device concepts exploiting the enormous flexibility inherent in organic chemistry. In this book we focus on oligomeric/molecular films as we believe that the control of molecular structures and interfaces provides highly defined systems which allow, on the one hand the study of the basic physics and on the other hand to find the important parameters necessary to improve organic devices.

  7. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  8. Molecules decreasing the amount of wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grumberg, P.

    1993-01-01

    This popularization paper reviews the separation of actinides from radioactive wastes by molecules such as crown ethers to reduce storage and the use of amides instead of TBP to reduce secondary wastes produced by combustion

  9. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  10. On theory of single-molecule transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Tien Phuc

    2009-01-01

    The results of the study on single-molecule transistor are mainly investigated in this paper. The structure of constructed single-molecule transistor is similar to a conventional MOSFET. The conductive channel of the transistors is a single-molecule of halogenated benzene derivatives. The chemical simulation software CAChe was used to design and implement for the essential parameter of the molecules utilized as the conductive channel. The GUI of Matlab has been built to design its graphical interface, calculate and plot the output I-V characteristic curves for the transistor. The influence of temperature, length and width of the conductive channel, and gate voltage is considered. As a result, the simulated curves are similar to the traditional MOSFET's. The operating temperature range of the transistors is wider compared with silicon semiconductors. The supply voltage for transistors is only about 1 V. The size of transistors in this research is several nanometers.

  11. Kinematic anharmonicity of internal rotation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataev, V.A.; Pupyshev, V.I.; Godunov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The methods of analysis the strongly coupled vibrations are proposed for a number of molecules of aromatic and heterocyclic carbonyl (and some others) compounds. The qualitative principles are formulated for molecular systems with a significant kinematic anharmonicity.

  12. Analytic vibrational matrix elements for diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanich, J.P.; Ogilvie, J.F.; Tipping, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The vibrational matrix elements and expectation values for a diatomic molecule, including the rotational dependence, are calculated for powers of the reduced displacement in terms of the parameters of the Dunham potential-energy function. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of magnetic dipolar terms in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, R.B.; Brandi, H.S.; Maffeo, B.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic dipolar parameter b for several values of the internuclear distance in the molecule F 2 - is evaluated. The difficulties appearing in the calculations are discussed and a manner to overcome them is presented [pt

  14. Multi-Excitonic Quantum Dot Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, M.; Stinaff, E. A.; Doty, M. F.; Ware, M. E.; Bracker, A. S.; Gammon, D.; Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Korenev, V. L.

    2006-03-01

    With the ability to create coupled pairs of quantum dots, the next step towards the realization of semiconductor based quantum information processing devices can be taken. However, so far little knowledge has been gained on these artificial molecules. Our photoluminescence experiments on single InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules provide the systematics of coupled quantum dots by delineating the spectroscopic features of several key charge configurations in such quantum systems, including X, X^+,X^2+, XX, XX^+ (with X being the neutral exciton). We extract general rules which determine the formation of molecular states of coupled quantum dots. These include the fact that quantum dot molecules provide the possibility to realize various spin configurations and to switch the electron hole exchange interaction on and off by shifting charges inside the molecule. This knowledge will be valuable in developing implementations for quantum information processing.

  15. Optics and molecules on atom chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherneck, M; Holmes, M E; Quinto-Su, P A; Haimberger, C; Kleinert, J; Bigelow, N P

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we will report on four experiments which have been carried out in the last year in our group. All of these experiments are necessary steps towards the trapping and probing of ultracold molecules on a chip surface

  16. Coherent Bichromatic Force Deflection of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Aldridge, Leland; Yu, Phelan; Eyler, Edward E.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the effect of the coherent optical bichromatic force on a molecule, the polar free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). A dual-frequency retroreflected laser beam addressing the X˜2Σ+↔A˜2Π1 /2 electronic transition coherently imparts momentum onto a cryogenic beam of SrOH. This directional photon exchange creates a bichromatic force that transversely deflects the molecules. By adjusting the relative phase between the forward and counterpropagating laser beams we reverse the direction of the applied force. A momentum transfer of 70 ℏk is achieved with minimal loss of molecules to dark states. Modeling of the bichromatic force is performed via direct numerical solution of the time-dependent density matrix and is compared with experimental observations. Our results open the door to further coherent manipulation of molecular motion, including the efficient optical deceleration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules with complex level structures.

  17. Drift correction for single-molecule imaging by molecular constraint field, a distance minimum metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Renmin; Wang, Liansan; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Yongdeng; Zhang, Mingshu; Liu, Zhiyong; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Fa

    2015-01-01

    The recent developments of far-field optical microscopy (single molecule imaging techniques) have overcome the diffraction barrier of light and improve image resolution by a factor of ten compared with conventional light microscopy. These techniques utilize the stochastic switching of probe molecules to overcome the diffraction limit and determine the precise localizations of molecules, which often requires a long image acquisition time. However, long acquisition times increase the risk of sample drift. In the case of high resolution microscopy, sample drift would decrease the image resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel metric based on the distance between molecules to solve the drift correction. The proposed metric directly uses the position information of molecules to estimate the frame drift. We also designed an algorithm to implement the metric for the general application of drift correction. There are two advantages of our method: First, because our method does not require space binning of positions of molecules but directly operates on the positions, it is more natural for single molecule imaging techniques. Second, our method can estimate drift with a small number of positions in each temporal bin, which may extend its potential application. The effectiveness of our method has been demonstrated by both simulated data and experiments on single molecular images

  18. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the molecules CO, HB, HF and LiH are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. It is discussed the possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment. (Author) [pt

  19. Newly detected molecules in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, William M.; Avery, L. W.; Friberg, P.; Matthews, H. E.; Ziurys, L. M.

    Several new interstellar molecules have been identified including C2S, C3S, C5H, C6H and (probably) HC2CHO in the cold, dark cloud TMC-1; and the discovery of the first interstellar phosphorus-containing molecule, PN, in the Orion "plateau" source. Further results include the observations of 13C3H2 and C3HD, and the first detection of HCOOH (formic acid) in a cold cloud.

  20. Electron affinities of atoms, molecules, and radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, A.A.; McCorkle, D.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    We review briefly but comprehensively the theoretical, semiempirical and experimental methods employed to determine electron affinities (EAs) of atoms, molecules and radicals, and summarize the EA data obtained by these methods. The detailed processes underlying the principles of the experimental methods are discussed very briefly. It is, nonetheless, instructive to recapitulate the definition of EA and those of the related quantities, namely, the vertical detachment energy, VDE, and the vertical attachment energy, VAE. The EA of an atom is defined as the difference in total energy between the ground state of the neutral atom (plus the electron at rest at infinity) and its negative ion. The EA of a molecule is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion when both, the neutral molecules and the negative ion, are in their ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states. The VDE is defined as the minimum energy required to eject the electron from the negative ion (in its ground electronic and nuclear state) without changing the internuclear separation; since the vertical transition may leave the neutral molecule in an excited vibrational/rotational state, the VDE, although the same as the EA for atoms is, in general, different (larger than), from the EA for molecules. Similarly, the VAE is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule in its ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion formed by addition of an electron to the neutral molecule without allowing a change in the intermolecular separation of the constituent nuclei; it is a quantity appropriate to those cases where the lowest negative ion state lies above the ground states of the neutral species and is less or equal to EA

  1. Electric dipole moment of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosato, A.

    1983-01-01

    The electric dipole moment of some diatomic molecules is calculated using the Variational Cellular Method. The results obtained for the CO, HB, HF and LiH molecules are compared with other calculations and with experimental data. It is shown that there is strong dependence of the electric dipole moment with respect to the geometry of the cells. The possibility of fixing the geometry of the problem by giving the experimental value of the dipole moment is discussed. (Author) [pt

  2. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed.

  3. The modified connection formulae for the rotational transition cross sections in diatomic molecules for slow collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrovsky, V.N.; Ustimov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The formulae connecting the cross sections for various rotational transitions in diatomic molecules colliding with atomic particles are valid in the framework of the sudden approximation. In order to extend the applicability domain of these formulae to the slow-collision region a semi-empirical correction factor is introduced with an exponential dependence on the translation rotation energy transfer and on the inverse collision velocity. The modified connection formulae are applied to the rotational transitions in an HD molecule colliding with an H 2 molecule. (author)

  4. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  5. Ab initio calculations on collisions of low energy electrons with polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rescigno, T.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Kohn variational method is one of simplest, and oldest, techniques for performing scattering calculations. Nevertheless, a number of formal problems, as well as practical difficulties associated with the computation of certain required matrix elements, delayed its application to electron--molecule scattering problems for many years. This paper will describe the recent theoretical and computational developments that have made the ''complex'' Kohn variational method a practical tool for carrying out calculations of low energy electron--molecule scattering. Recent calculations on a number of target molecules will also be summarized. 41 refs., 7 figs

  6. Controlled Bioactive Molecules Delivery Strategies for Tendon and Ligament Tissue Engineering using Polymeric Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiong Teh, Thomas Kok; Hong Goh, James Cho; Toh, Siew Lok

    2015-01-01

    The interest in polymeric nanofibers has escalated over the past decade given its promise as tissue engineering scaffolds that can mimic the nanoscale structure of the native extracellular matrix. With functionalization of the polymeric nanofibers using bioactive molecules, localized signaling moieties can be established for the attached cells, to stimulate desired biological effects and direct cellular or tissue response. The inherently high surface area per unit mass of polymeric nanofibers can enhance cell adhesion, bioactive molecules loading and release efficiencies, and mass transfer properties. In this review article, the application of polymeric nanofibers for controlled bioactive molecules delivery will be discussed, with a focus on tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Various polymeric materials of different mechanical and degradation properties will be presented along with the nanofiber fabrication techniques explored. The bioactive molecules of interest for tendon and ligament tissue engineering, including growth factors and small molecules, will also be reviewed and compared in terms of their nanofiber incorporation strategies and release profiles. This article will also highlight and compare various innovative strategies to control the release of bioactive molecules spatiotemporally and explore an emerging tissue engineering strategy involving controlled multiple bioactive molecules sequential release. Finally, the review article concludes with challenges and future trends in the innovation and development of bioactive molecules delivery using polymeric nanofibers for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  7. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sotthewes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  8. Bitter and sweet tasting molecules: It's complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pizio, Antonella; Ben Shoshan-Galeczki, Yaron; Hayes, John E; Niv, Masha Y

    2018-04-19

    "Bitter" and "sweet" are frequently framed in opposition, both functionally and metaphorically, in regard to affective responses, emotion, and nutrition. This oppositional relationship is complicated by the fact that some molecules are simultaneously bitter and sweet. In some cases, a small chemical modification, or a chirality switch, flips the taste from sweet to bitter. Molecules humans describe as bitter are recognized by a 25-member subfamily of class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as TAS2Rs. Molecules humans describe as sweet are recognized by a TAS1R2/TAS1R3 heterodimer of class C GPCRs. Here we characterize the chemical space of bitter and sweet molecules: the majority of bitter compounds show higher hydrophobicity compared to sweet compounds, while sweet molecules have a wider range of sizes. Importantly, recent evidence indicates that TAS1Rs and TAS2Rs are not limited to the oral cavity; moreover, some bitterants are pharmacologically promiscuous, with the hERG potassium channel, cytochrome P450 enzymes, and carbonic anhydrases as common off-targets. Further focus on polypharmacology may unravel new physiological roles for tastant molecules. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  10. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    Abstract The idea of using single-molecules as components in electronic devices is fas- cinating. For this idea to come into fruition, a number of technical and theo- retical challenges must be overcome. In this PhD thesis, the electron-phonon interaction is studied for a special class of molecules......, which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  11. Ag-ZnO nanostructure for ANTA explosive molecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Sangani, L. D. Varma [Centre for Advanced Studies in Electronics Science and Technology, School of Physics, University of Hyderabad (India); Gaur, Anshu [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Trento, Via Sommarive9, Trento (Italy); Mohiddon, Md. Ahamad, E-mail: ahamed.vza@gmail.com [National Institute of Technology Andhra Pradesh, Tadepalliguem 534101, AP, India Phone : (+) 91-40-23134382, FAX: (+) 91-40-23010227 (India); Krishna, M. Ghanashyam [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Centre for Advanced Studies in Electronics Science and Technology, School of Physics, University of Hyderabad (India); National Institute of Technology Andhra Pradesh, Tadepalliguem 534101, AP, India Phone : (+) 91-40-23134382, FAX: (+) 91-40-23010227 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Ag/ZnO nanostructure for surface enhanced Raman scattering application in the detection of ANTA explosive molecule is demonstrated. A highly rough ZnO microstructure was achieved by rapid thermal annealing of metallic Zn film. Different thickness Ag nanostructures are decorated over these ZnO microstructures by ion beam sputtering technique. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies carried out over Ag/ZnO substrates have shown three orders higher enhancement compared to bare Ag nanostructure deposited on the same substrate. The reasons behind such huge enhancement are discussed based on the morphology of the sample.

  12. Role of the DIP Molecules in DCC Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    to policies of applicable Federal Law 45 CFR 46. N/A In conducting research utilizing recombinant DNA technology , the investigator(s) adhered to...for 1 h, then with 0.1 mg/ml of proteinase K, 0.1% SDS at 50’C Ihle, 1995; Fraser and Evan, 1996). These molecules overnight. Samples were extracted ...incubated with 20 yg/ml of anti-DCC antibody diluted in PBS-0.1% saponin for 1 h, washed with PBS, blocked Western blotting with 5% normal donkey serum for 1

  13. Our Galactic Neighbor Hosts Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reveal the presence of methyl formate and dimethyl ether in a star-forming region outside our galaxy. This discovery has important implications for the formation and survival of complex organic compounds importantfor the formation of life in low-metallicity galaxies bothyoung and old.No Simple Picture of Complex Molecule FormationALMA, pictured here with the Magellanic Clouds above, has observed organic molecules in our Milky Way Galaxy and beyond. [ESO/C. Malin]Complex organic molecules (those with at least six atoms, one or more of which must be carbon) are the precursors to the building blocks of life. Knowing how and where complex organic molecules can form is a key part of understanding how life came to be on Earth and how it might arise elsewhere in the universe. From exoplanet atmospheres to interstellar space, complex organic molecules are ubiquitous in the Milky Way.In our galaxy, complex organic molecules are often found in the intense environments of hot cores clumps of dense molecular gas surrounding the sites of star formation. However, its not yet fully understood how the complex organic molecules found in hot cores come to be. One possibility is that the compounds condense onto cold dust grains long before the young stars begin heating their natal shrouds. Alternatively, they might assemble themselves from the hot, dense gas surrounding the blazing protostars.Composite infrared and optical image of the N 113 star-forming region in the LMC. The ALMA coverage is indicated by the gray line. Click to enlarge. [Sewio et al. 2018]Detecting Complexity, a Galaxy AwayUsing ALMA, a team of researchers led by Marta Sewio (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) recently detected two complex organic molecules methyl formate and dimethyl ether for the first time in our neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Previous searches for organic molecules in the LMC detected

  14. Theoretical investigations on fluorene-pyridines as electroactive sensor molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, S.; Romaner, L.; Zojer, E.; Kappaun, S.; Slugovc, C.; Kelterer, A.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Organic semiconducting oligomers and polymers are promising candidates for chemical sensing applications. In this work, sensor molecules comprising a sequence of para- and meta-linked fluorene- and pyridine- units are studied. Spectroscopic investigations show that upon protonation of the pyridine rings (i.e., when adding acids to the solutions), one observes a distinct red-shift of the absorption and emission maxima by approximately 0.5 eV. The fact that the polymers are highly emissive in both, the non protonated as well as protonated state makes them particularly interesting candidates for ratio metric sensors based on organic semiconductors. To rationalize the observed behaviour, we calculate the geometric and electronic structures of the relevant molecules at various stages of protonation using both semiempirical as well as density functional theory based methods. In general, we obtain good agreement between theory and experiment and excited state localization is found to play a crucial role in the sensing process. In practice, one can expect the interaction between the proton and the nitrogen of the pyridine unit to be modulated by interaction with the counter-ion as well as by screening through solvent molecules. These effects are accounted for in calculations on smaller model systems. (author)

  15. A review of the immune molecules in the sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhuang; Li, Hui; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Xia; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Cenjie

    2015-05-01

    It is very important to identify and characterize the immune-related genes that respond to pathogens. Until recently, only some of the immune-related genes in sea cucumbers had been characterized. Their expression patterns after pathogen challenges have been analyzed via expressed sequence tag libraries, microarray studies and proteomic approaches. These genes include lectins, antimicrobial peptides, lysozyme, enzymes, clotting protein, pattern recognition proteins, Toll receptors, complement C3 and other humoral factors that might participate in the innate immune system of sea cucumbers. Although the participation of some of these immune molecules in the sea cucumber's innate immune defense against invading pathogens has been demonstrated, the functions of many of the molecules remain unclear. This review focuses on the discovery and functional characterization of the immune-related molecules from the sea cucumber for the first time and provides new insights into the immune mechanisms of the sea cucumber, which opens new possibilities for developing drugs for novel anti-bacterial and antiviral applications in fisheries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Equilibrium Structure of Manganese Trifluoride (MnF3) Molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, M.

    2004-01-01

    The symmetry lowering in manganese trifluoride molecule due to Jahn-Teller distortion was demonstrated in both the experimental and computational results. The molecule does not have D 3 h (or C 3 v) symmetry, rather it has C 2 v symmetry it has been shown from electron-diffraction measurements, that even a molecule of D 3 h symmetry in its equilibrium geometry would appear as having C 3 v symmetry. The manganese trifluoride molecular structures is an example of concerted applications of electron diffraction experiment and computation. It was found two lower energy structures with C 2 v symmetry, one corresponding to the ground state and another corresponding to the transition state. In this work we have calculate the equilibrium structure of the MnF 3 in the C 2 v configuration using the Interionic Force Model. We have compared our results for equilibrium bond lengths and bond angles with measured values from electron diffraction and with the results of quantum chemical calculations. The agreement can be considered as very reasonable

  17. Nanogap Electrodes towards Solid State Single-Molecule Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ajuan; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2015-12-01

    With the establishment of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS)-based integrated circuit technology, it has become more difficult to follow Moore's law to further downscale the size of electronic components. Devices based on various nanostructures were constructed to continue the trend in the minimization of electronics, and molecular devices are among the most promising candidates. Compared with other candidates, molecular devices show unique superiorities, and intensive studies on molecular devices have been carried out both experimentally and theoretically at the present time. Compared to two-terminal molecular devices, three-terminal devices, namely single-molecule transistors, show unique advantages both in fundamental research and application and are considered to be an essential part of integrated circuits based on molecular devices. However, it is very difficult to construct them using the traditional microfabrication techniques directly, thus new fabrication strategies are developed. This review aims to provide an exclusive way of manufacturing solid state gated nanogap electrodes, the foundation of constructing transistors of single or a few molecules. Such single-molecule transistors have the potential to be used to build integrated circuits. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Toward Generalization of Iterative Small Molecule Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jonathan W; Blair, Daniel J; Burke, Martin D

    2018-02-01

    Small molecules have extensive untapped potential to benefit society, but access to this potential is too often restricted by limitations inherent to the customized approach currently used to synthesize this class of chemical matter. In contrast, the "building block approach", i.e., generalized iterative assembly of interchangeable parts, has now proven to be a highly efficient and flexible way to construct things ranging all the way from skyscrapers to macromolecules to artificial intelligence algorithms. The structural redundancy found in many small molecules suggests that they possess a similar capacity for generalized building block-based construction. It is also encouraging that many customized iterative synthesis methods have been developed that improve access to specific classes of small molecules. There has also been substantial recent progress toward the iterative assembly of many different types of small molecules, including complex natural products, pharmaceuticals, biological probes, and materials, using common building blocks and coupling chemistry. Collectively, these advances suggest that a generalized building block approach for small molecule synthesis may be within reach.

  19. Capillary condensation of short-chain molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, Paweł; Pizio, Orest; Sokolowski, Stefan

    2005-05-15

    A density-functional study of capillary condensation of fluids of short-chain molecules confined to slitlike pores is presented. The molecules are modeled as freely jointed tangent spherical segments with a hard core and with short-range attractive interaction between all the segments. We investigate how the critical parameters of capillary condensation of the fluid change when the pore width decreases and eventually becomes smaller than the nominal linear dimension of the single-chain molecule. We find that the dependence of critical parameters for a fluid of dimers and of tetramers on pore width is similar to that of the monomer fluid. On the other hand, for a fluid of chains consisting of a larger number of segments we observe an inversion effect. Namely, the critical temperature of capillary condensation decreases with increasing pore width for a certain interval of values of the pore width. This anomalous behavior is also influenced by the interaction between molecules and pore walls. We attribute this behavior to the effect of conformational changes of molecules upon confinement.

  20. Toward Generalization of Iterative Small Molecule Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jonathan W.; Blair, Daniel J.; Burke, Martin D.

    2018-01-01

    Small molecules have extensive untapped potential to benefit society, but access to this potential is too often restricted by limitations inherent to the customized approach currently used to synthesize this class of chemical matter. In contrast, the “building block approach”, i.e., generalized iterative assembly of interchangeable parts, has now proven to be a highly efficient and flexible way to construct things ranging all the way from skyscrapers to macromolecules to artificial intelligence algorithms. The structural redundancy found in many small molecules suggests that they possess a similar capacity for generalized building block-based construction. It is also encouraging that many customized iterative synthesis methods have been developed that improve access to specific classes of small molecules. There has also been substantial recent progress toward the iterative assembly of many different types of small molecules, including complex natural products, pharmaceuticals, biological probes, and materials, using common building blocks and coupling chemistry. Collectively, these advances suggest that a generalized building block approach for small molecule synthesis may be within reach. PMID:29696152

  1. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.shea@dal.ca; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  2. Photodissociation and excitation of interstellar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dishoeck, E.F. van.

    1984-01-01

    Apart from a rather long introduction containing some elementary astrophysics, quantum chemistry and spectroscopy and an incomplete, historical review of molecular observations, this thesis is divided into three sections. In part A, a rigorous quantum chemical and dynamical study is made of the photodissociation processes in the OH and HCl molecules. In part B, the cross sections obtained in part A are used in various astrophysical problems such as the study of the abundances of the OH and HCl molecules in interstellar clouds, the use of the OH abundance as a measure of the cosmic ray ionization rate, the lifetime of the OH radical in comets and the abundance of OH in the solar photosphere. Part C discusses the excitation of the C 2 molecule under interstellar conditions, its use as a diagnostic probe of the temperature, density and strength of the radiation field in interstellar clouds. Quadrupole moments and oscillator strengths are analyzed. (Auth.)

  3. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S; Yuzyuk, Yury I; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Dovbeshko, Galina I; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm −1 ) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule

  4. Torque Measurement at the Single Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forth, Scott; Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Inman, James; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    Methods for exerting and measuring forces on single molecules have revolutionized the study of the physics of biology. However, it is often the case that biological processes involve rotation or torque generation, and these parameters have been more difficult to access experimentally. Recent advances in the single molecule field have led to the development of techniques which add the capability of torque measurement. By combining force, displacement, torque, and rotational data, a more comprehensive description of the mechanics of a biomolecule can be achieved. In this review, we highlight a number of biological processes for which torque plays a key mechanical role. We describe the various techniques that have been developed to directly probe the torque experienced by a single molecule, and detail a variety of measurements made to date using these new technologies. We conclude by discussing a number of open questions and propose systems of study which would be well suited for analysis with torsional measurement techniques. PMID:23541162

  5. Molecule scattering from insulator and metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, Iryna; Ambaye, Hailemariam; Manson, J R

    2004-01-01

    Calculations are carried out and compared with data for the scattering of CH 4 molecules from a LiF(001) surface and for O 2 scattering from Al(111). The theory is a mixed classical-quantum formalism that includes energy and momentum transfers between the surface and projectile for translational and rotational motions as well as internal mode excitation of the projectile molecule. The translational and rotational degrees of freedom couple most strongly to multiphonon excitations of the surface and are treated with classical dynamics. Internal vibrational excitations of the molecules are treated with a semiclassical formalism with extension to arbitrary numbers of modes and arbitrary quantum numbers. Calculations show good agreement for the dependence on incident translational energy, incident beam angle and surface temperature when compared with data for energy-resolved intensity spectra and angular distributions

  6. Small molecule inhibitors of anthrax edema factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Moayeri, Mahtab; Thai, April; Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; McKasson, Linda; O'Malley, Sean; Leppla, Stephen H; Johnson, Alan T

    2018-01-15

    Anthrax is a highly lethal disease caused by the Gram-(+) bacteria Bacillus anthracis. Edema toxin (ET) is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of disease in humans exposed to B. anthracis. ET is a bipartite toxin composed of two proteins secreted by the vegetative bacteria, edema factor (EF) and protective antigen (PA). Our work towards identifying a small molecule inhibitor of anthrax edema factor is the subject of this letter. First we demonstrate that the small molecule probe 5'-Fluorosulfonylbenzoyl 5'-adenosine (FSBA) reacts irreversibly with EF and blocks enzymatic activity. We then show that the adenosine portion of FSBA can be replaced to provide more drug-like molecules which are up to 1000-fold more potent against EF relative to FSBA, display low cross reactivity when tested against a panel of kinases, and are nanomolar inhibitors of EF in a cell-based assay of cAMP production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. RNA as a small molecule druggable target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Smith, Graham F

    2017-12-01

    Small molecule drugs have readily been developed against many proteins in the human proteome, but RNA has remained an elusive target for drug discovery. Increasingly, we see that RNA, and to a lesser extent DNA elements, show a persistent tertiary structure responsible for many diverse and complex cellular functions. In this digest, we have summarized recent advances in screening approaches for RNA targets and outlined the discovery of novel, drug-like small molecules against RNA targets from various classes and therapeutic areas. The link of structure, function, and small-molecule Druggability validates now for the first time that RNA can be the targets of therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Attosecond electron dynamics in molecules and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    WöRner, Hans Jakob

    The ultrafast motion of electrons and holes following light-matter interaction is fundamental to a broad range of chemical and biophysical processes. In this lecture, I will discuss some of our recent experiments that measure the atomic-scale motion of charge with attosecond temporal resolution (1 as = 10-18s). The first experiment is carried out on isolated, spatially oriented molecules in the gas phase. Using high-harmonic spectroscopy, we resolve the migration of an electron hole across the molecule with a resolution of 100 as and simultaneously demonstrate extensive control over charge migration. In the second class of experiments, we use an attosecond pulse train synchronized with a near-infrared laser pulse to temporally resolve the process of photoemission from molecules in the gas phase and from a liquid-water microjet, resolving electron transport through liquid water on the attosecond time scale.

  9. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  10. A Zeeman slower for diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, M.; Kaebert, P.; Gersema, P.; Siercke, M.; Ospelkaus, S.

    2018-04-01

    We present a novel slowing scheme for beams of laser-coolable diatomic molecules reminiscent of Zeeman slowing of atomic beams. The scheme results in efficient compression of the one-dimensional velocity distribution to velocities trappable by magnetic or magneto-optical traps. We experimentally demonstrate our method in an atomic testbed and show an enhancement of flux below v = 35 m s‑1 by a factor of ≈20 compared to white light slowing. 3D Monte Carlo simulations performed to model the experiment show excellent agreement. We apply the same simulations to the prototype molecule 88Sr19F and expect 15% of the initial flux to be continuously compressed in a narrow velocity window at around 10 m s‑1. This is the first experimentally shown continuous and dissipative slowing technique in molecule-like level structures, promising to provide the missing link for the preparation of large ultracold molecular ensembles.

  11. Levodopa increases oxidative stress and repulsive guidance molecule A levels: a pilot study in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Trommer, Isabel; Muhlack, Siegfried; Mueller, Bernhard K

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to free radicals influences synthesis, degradation and function of proteins, such as repulsive guidance molecule A. Decay of this protein is essential for neuronal maintenance and recovery. Levodopa elevates oxidative stress. Therefore levodopa may impact repulsive guidance molecule A metabolism. Objectives were to investigate plasma concentrations of repulsive guidance molecule A, levodopa, cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine before and 1 h after levodopa application in patients with Parkinson's disease. Cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine as biomarkers for oxidative stress exposure decreased, repulsive guidance molecule A and levodopa rose. Repulsive guidance molecule A remained unchanged in levodopa naïve patients, but particularly went up in patients on a prior chronic levodopa regimen. Decay of cysteine specifically cysteinyl-glycine results from an elevated glutathione generation with rising cysteine consumption respectively from the alternative glutathione transformation to its oxidized form glutathione disulfide after free radical scavenging. Repulsive guidance molecule A rise may inhibit physiologic mechanisms for neuronal survival.

  12. Waved graphene: Unique structure for the adsorption of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Hui

    2017-01-01

    We propose waved graphenes for the strong adsorption of molecules and investigate their potential applications. We find that the physical adsorption of molecules on waved graphene is greatly enhanced by compression. At optimal compression, the physical adsorption energies of H_2, N_2, NO, and CO are increased by 6–9 times, and that for O_2 is more than 2 times. We show that the energy for their chemical adsorption on waved graphene decreases dramatically with the increment of compression. The energy of dissociation of H_2 on flat graphene is 1.63 eV and reduced to 0.06 eV (96% reduction) on waved graphene at a compression of 50%, respectively. The energy for chemical adsorption of O_2 on waved graphenes is extremely reduced from 0.98 eV to −0.57 eV as with compression increasing from 0 to 50%, indicating the transition of endothermic chemical adsorption to exothermic. We further show that the electronic properties of waved graphenes are modified, leading to the change of electrical characters. We see that the waved graphenes may find applications in gas storage, sensor and catalyst because of enhanced physical and chemical adsorption and the induced change of electronic properties. - Highlights: • Adsorption of small molecules on waved graphene is greatly enhanced. • Strong physical adsorption in the trough of waved graphene can be achieved by tuning the curvature. • Chemical adsorption is on the crest of waved graphene. • Exothermic dissociation of H2 and O2 can be realized on waved graphene under high compression. • Wave graphene can be candidates as catalysts and gas storage/sensor.

  13. Waved graphene: Unique structure for the adsorption of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Hui, E-mail: huipan@umac.mo

    2017-03-01

    We propose waved graphenes for the strong adsorption of molecules and investigate their potential applications. We find that the physical adsorption of molecules on waved graphene is greatly enhanced by compression. At optimal compression, the physical adsorption energies of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, NO, and CO are increased by 6–9 times, and that for O{sub 2} is more than 2 times. We show that the energy for their chemical adsorption on waved graphene decreases dramatically with the increment of compression. The energy of dissociation of H{sub 2} on flat graphene is 1.63 eV and reduced to 0.06 eV (96% reduction) on waved graphene at a compression of 50%, respectively. The energy for chemical adsorption of O{sub 2} on waved graphenes is extremely reduced from 0.98 eV to −0.57 eV as with compression increasing from 0 to 50%, indicating the transition of endothermic chemical adsorption to exothermic. We further show that the electronic properties of waved graphenes are modified, leading to the change of electrical characters. We see that the waved graphenes may find applications in gas storage, sensor and catalyst because of enhanced physical and chemical adsorption and the induced change of electronic properties. - Highlights: • Adsorption of small molecules on waved graphene is greatly enhanced. • Strong physical adsorption in the trough of waved graphene can be achieved by tuning the curvature. • Chemical adsorption is on the crest of waved graphene. • Exothermic dissociation of H2 and O2 can be realized on waved graphene under high compression. • Wave graphene can be candidates as catalysts and gas storage/sensor.

  14. Quantum Mechanical Study of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R. C.

    1961-01-01

    This paper, following a brief introduction, is divided into five parts. Part I outlines the theory of the molecular orbital method for the ground, ionized and excited states of molecules. Part II gives a brief summary of the interaction integrals and their tabulation. Part III outlines an automatic program designed for the computation of various states of molecules. Part IV gives examples of the study of ground, ionized and excited states of CO, BH and N2 where the program of automatic computation and molecular integrals have been utilized. Part V enlists some special problems of Molecular Quantum Mechanics are being tackled at New York University.

  15. Selective laser photolysis of simple molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnabi, Hossein.

    1984-01-01

    A two-photon technique is reported for the measurement of relative cross section for the photolysis of simple molecules into particular product channels. In this method two independently tunable dye lasers were used to sequentially dissociate molecules of Cs 2 and Cs-Kr for the wavelengths in the range 420 to 660 nm, and then to excite the resulting products to determine the relative cross sections for the photolysis of Cs 2 and Cs-kr into each of the lowest four of the energetically possible product states

  16. Organic molecules with abnormal geometric parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, Igor V

    2001-01-01

    Organic molecules, the structural parameters of which (carbon-carbon bond lengths, bond and torsion angles) differ appreciably from the typical most frequently encountered values, are discussed. Using many examples of 'record-breaking' molecules, the limits of structural distortions in carbon compounds and their unusual chemical properties are demonstrated. Particular attention is devoted to strained compounds not yet synthesised whose properties have been predicted using quantum-chemical calculations. Factors that ensure the stability of such compounds are outlined. The bibliography includes 358 references.

  17. Design of small-molecule epigenetic modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiyappan, Boobalan

    2013-01-01

    The field of epigenetics has expanded rapidly to reveal multiple new targets for drug discovery. The functional elements of the epigenomic machinery can be catagorized as writers, erasers and readers, and together these elements control cellular gene expression and homeostasis. It is increasingly clear that aberrations in the epigenome can underly a variety of diseases, and thus discovery of small molecules that modulate the epigenome in a specific manner is a viable approach to the discovery of new therapeutic agents. In this Digest, the components of epigenetic control of gene expression will be briefly summarized, and efforts to identify small molecules that modulate epigenetic processes will be described. PMID:24300735

  18. Abrupt relaxation in high-spin molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-R.; Cheng, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    Mean-field model suggests that the rate of resonant quantum tunneling in high-spin molecules is not only field-dependent but also time-dependent. The relaxation-assisted resonant tunneling in high-spin molecules produces an abrupt magnetization change during relaxation. When the applied field is very close to the resonant field, a time-dependent interaction field gradually shifts the energies of different collective spin states, and magnetization tunneling is observed as two energies of the spin states coincide

  19. Hadronic molecules with hidden charm and bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Feng-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the new structures observed since 2003 in experiments in the heavy quarkonium mass region, such as the X(3872 and Zc (3900, are rather close to certain thresholds, and thus can be good candidates of hadronic molecules, which are loose bound systems of hadrons. We will discuss the consequences of heavy quark symmetry for hadronic molecules with heavy quarks. We will also emphasize that the hadronic molecular component of a given structure can be directly probed in long-distance processes, while the short-distance processes are not sensitive to it.

  20. A Circularly Arranged Sextuple Triptycene Gear Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ube, Hitoshi; Yamada, Ryo; Ishida, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Shiro, Motoo; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2017-11-22

    Herein we report the synthesis of a circularly arranged sextuple triptycene gear molecule, hexakis(10-dodecyloxy-9-triptycyl)ethynylbenzene, via the trimerization of the corresponding triyne with a cobalt catalyst. The six triptycene gears are closely engaged with each other as confirmed by single crystal X-ray structure analysis, and their motion in solution was established by NMR spectroscopy. Notably, when one bulky RuCp* complex was attached to one triptycene gear, the whole movement of the six gears was highly restricted via their mechanical engagement. Development of such a multigear molecule would provide a structural basis for molecular motion transmission systems with a switching function.