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Sample records for topolyatomic molecules application

  1. Angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment topolyatomic molecules: application to the 2B1 metastable state of the H2Oand H2S anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, Daniel J.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-01-12

    The angular dependence of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to polyatomic targets is formulated in the local complex potential model, under the assumption that the axial recoil approximation describes the dissociation dynamics. An additional approximation, which is found to be valid in the case of H2O but not in the case of H2S, makes it possible to describe the angular dependence of DEA solely from an analysis of the fixed-nuclei entrance amplitude, without carrying out nuclear dynamics calculations. For H2S, the final-vibrational-state-specific angular dependence of DEA is obtained by incorporating the variation of the angular dependence of the entrance amplitude with nuclear geometry into the nuclear dynamics. Scattering calculations using the complex Kohn method and, for H2S, full quantum calculations of the nuclear dynamics using the Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree method, are performed.

  2. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  3. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows:...... experiments held together with the prospects in localization microscopy and single molecule manipulation experiments gave QDs a promising future in single molecule research....

  4. Single molecule force spectroscopy: methods and applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yi; Hu Jun

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule measurements have transformed our view of biomolecules. Owing to the ability of monitoring the activity of individual molecules, we now see them as uniquely structured, fluctuating molecules that stochastically transition between frequently many substrates, as two molecules do not follow precisely the same trajectory. Indeed, it is this discovery of critical yet short-lived substrates that were often missed in ensemble measurements that has perhaps contributed most to the better understanding of biomolecular functioning resulting from single molecule experiments. In this paper, we give a review on the three major techniques of single molecule force spectroscopy, and their applications especially in biology. The single molecular study of biotin-streptavidin interactions is introduced as a successful example. The problems and prospects of the single molecule force spectroscopy are discussed, too. (authors)

  5. Single molecule SERS: Perspectives of analytical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčková, B.; Pavel, I.; Sládková, M.; Šišková, K.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    834-836, - (2007), s. 42-47 ISSN 0022-2860. [European Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy /28./. Istanbul, 03.09.2006-08.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0688 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) * surface-enhanced resonance Raman (SERRS) * single molecule SERS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.486, year: 2007

  6. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  7. Application of Recognition Tunneling in Single Molecule Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanan

    Single molecule identification is one essential application area of nanotechnology. The application areas including DNA sequencing, peptide sequencing, early disease detection and other industrial applications such as quantitative and quantitative analysis of impurities, etc. The recognition tunneling technique we have developed shows that after functionalization of the probe and substrate of a conventional Scanning Tunneling Microscope with recognition molecules ("tethered molecule-pair" configuration), analyte molecules trapped in the gap that is formed by probe and substrate will bond with the reagent molecules. The stochastic bond formation/breakage fluctuations give insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level. The distinct time domain and frequency domain features of tunneling signals were extracted from raw signals of analytes such as amino acids and their enantiomers. The Support Vector Machine (a machine-learning method) was used to do classification and predication based on the signal features generated by analytes, giving over 90% accuracy of separation of up to seven analytes. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid Peptide/DNA sequencing and molecule identification at single molecule level.

  8. Biosurfactants: promising bioactive molecules for oral-related health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshikh, Mohamed; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-09-01

    Biosurfactants are naturally produced molecules that demonstrate potentially useful properties such as the ability to reduce surface tensions between different phases. Besides having similar properties to their artificial chemical counterparts, they are regarded as environmental friendly, biodegradable and less toxic, which make them desirable candidates for downstream applications. The structure-activity-related properties of the biosurfactants which are directly correlated with potency of the biosurfactants as antimicrobial agents, the ability of the biosurfactants to alter surface energies and their ability to increase bioavailability are particularly what attract researchers to exploit their potential use in the oral-related health applications. Current research into biosurfactant indicates significant future potential for use in cosmetic and therapeutic oral hygiene product formulations and related medical device treatments. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Optical and Transport Properties of Organic Molecules: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubbe, David Alan

    Organic molecules are versatile and tunable building blocks for technology, in nanoscale and bulk devices. In this dissertation, I will consider some important applications for organic molecules involving optical and transport properties, and develop methods and software appropriate for theoretical calculations of these properties. Specifically, we will consider second-harmonic generation, a nonlinear optical process; photoisomerization, in which absorption of light leads to mechanical motion; charge transport in junctions formed of single molecules; and optical excitations in pentacene, an organic semiconductor with applications in photovoltaics, optoelectronics, and flexible electronics. In the Introduction (Chapter 1), I will give an overview of some phenomenology about organic molecules and these application areas, and discuss the basics of the theoretical methodology I will use: density-functional theory (DFT), time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), and many-body perturbation theory based on the GW approximation. In the subsequent chapters, I will further discuss, develop, and apply this methodology. 2. I will give a pedagogical derivation of the methods for calculating response properties in TDDFT, with particular focus on the Sternheimer equation, as will be used in subsequent chapters. I will review the many different response properties that can be calculated (dynamic and static) and the appropriate perturbations used to calculate them. 3. Standard techniques for calculating response use either integer occupations (as appropriate for a system with an energy gap) or fractional occupations due to a smearing function, used to improve convergence for metallic systems. I will present a generalization which can be used to compute response for a system with arbitrary fractional occupations. 4. Chloroform (CHCl3) is a small molecule commonly used as a solvent in measurements of nonlinear optics. I computed its hyperpolarizability for second

  10. Small Molecules: Therapeutic Application in Neuropsychiatric and Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2018-02-13

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have been published, focusing on the potential therapeutic use of small catalytic agents with strong biological properties. So far, most of these works have only regarded specific clinical fields, such as oncology, infectivology and general pathology, in particular with respect to the treatment of significant inflammatory processes. However, interesting data on possible therapeutic applications of small molecules for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative illnesses are emerging, especially with respect to the possibility to modulate the cellular redox state. Indeed, a crucial role of redox dysregulation in the pathogenesis of these disorders has been widely demonstrated by both pre-clinical and clinical studies, being the reduction of the total amount of free radicals a promising novel therapeutic approach for these diseases. In this review, we focused our interest on studies published during the last ten years reporting therapeutic potential of small molecules for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, also based on the biological efficiency of these compounds in detecting intracellular disturbances induced by increased production of reactive oxygen species.

  11. Spectral simulations of polar diatomic molecules immersed in He clusters: application to the ICl (X) molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, P [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Lara-Castells, M P de [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Prosmiti, R [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Barrio, G [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Duran, D [Instituto de Matematicas y Fasica Fundamental (CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006-Madrid (Spain); Gianturco, F A [Department of Chemistry and INFM, The University of Rome, Citta Universitaria, 00185, Rome (Italy); Jellinek, J [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    A recently developed quantum-chemistry-like methodology to study molecules solvated in atomic clusters is applied to the ICl (iodine chloride) polar diatomic molecule immersed in clusters of He atoms. The atoms of the solvent clusters are treated as the 'electrons' and the solvated molecule as a structured 'nucleus' of the combined solvent-solute system. The helium-helium and helium-dopant interactions are represented by parametrized two-body and ab initio three-body potentials, respectively. The ground-state wavefunctions are used to compute the infrared (IR) spectra of the solvated molecule. In agreement with the experimental observations, the computed spectra exhibit considerable differences depending on whether the solvent cluster is comprised of bosonic ({sup 4}He) or fermionic ({sup 3}He) atoms. The source of these differences is attributed to the different spin-statistics of the solvent clusters. The bosonic versus fermionic nature of the solvent is reflected in the IR absorption selection rules. Only P and R branches with single state transitions appear in the spectrum when the molecule is solvated in a bosonic cluster. On the other hand, when the solvent represents a fermionic environment, quasi-degenerate multiplets of spin states contribute to each branch and, in addition, the Q-branch becomes also allowed. Combined, these two factors explain the more congested nature of the spectrum in the fermionic case.

  12. Spectral simulations of polar diatomic molecules immersed in He clusters: application to the ICl (X) molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarreal, P; Lara-Castells, M P de; Prosmiti, R; Delgado-Barrio, G; Lopez-Duran, D; Gianturco, F A; Jellinek, J

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed quantum-chemistry-like methodology to study molecules solvated in atomic clusters is applied to the ICl (iodine chloride) polar diatomic molecule immersed in clusters of He atoms. The atoms of the solvent clusters are treated as the 'electrons' and the solvated molecule as a structured 'nucleus' of the combined solvent-solute system. The helium-helium and helium-dopant interactions are represented by parametrized two-body and ab initio three-body potentials, respectively. The ground-state wavefunctions are used to compute the infrared (IR) spectra of the solvated molecule. In agreement with the experimental observations, the computed spectra exhibit considerable differences depending on whether the solvent cluster is comprised of bosonic ( 4 He) or fermionic ( 3 He) atoms. The source of these differences is attributed to the different spin-statistics of the solvent clusters. The bosonic versus fermionic nature of the solvent is reflected in the IR absorption selection rules. Only P and R branches with single state transitions appear in the spectrum when the molecule is solvated in a bosonic cluster. On the other hand, when the solvent represents a fermionic environment, quasi-degenerate multiplets of spin states contribute to each branch and, in addition, the Q-branch becomes also allowed. Combined, these two factors explain the more congested nature of the spectrum in the fermionic case

  13. Fluorine-18-labelled molecules: synthesis and application in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, F.; Perrio, C.; Barre, L.; Lasne, M.C.; Le Bars, D.

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the more powerful available techniques for medical imaging. It relies on the use of molecules labelled with a positron emitter (β + ). Among those emitters, fluorine-18, available from a cyclotron, is a radionuclide of choice because of its relatively long-half-life (109.8 min) and the relatively low energy of the emitted-positron. The electrophilic form of fluorine-18 ([ 18 F]F 2 or reagents derived from [ 18 F]F 2 ) is mainly used for hydrogen or metal substitutions on aromatic or vinylic carbons. The presence of the stable isotope (fluorine-19) in the radiotracers limits their use in medical imaging. The nucleophilic form of fluorine-18 (alkaline mono-fluoride, K[ 18 F]F, the most used), obtained from irradiation of enriched water, is widely used in aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic substitutions for the synthesis of radiotracers with high specific radioactivity. Some examples of radio-fluorinated tracers used in PET are presented, as well as some of their in vivo applications in human. (authors)

  14. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals

  15. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Wealth of bioactive molecules from marine bacteria and their applications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    By the term, "Bioactive molecules" we generally mean a range of compounds produced by living fauna and flora the effect of which tend to improve the status of man�s health, wealth and overall welfare These molecules could be proteins...

  17. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eRuscito

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012 notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  18. Small-Molecule Binding Aptamers: Selection Strategies, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; DeRosa, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded, synthetic oligonucleotides that fold into 3-dimensional shapes capable of binding non-covalently with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. They are generated via an in vitro process known as the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment, from which candidates are screened and characterized, and then applied in aptamer-based biosensors for target detection. Aptamers for small molecule targets such as toxins, antibiotics, molecular markers, drugs, and heavy metals will be the focus of this review. Their accurate detection is ultimately needed for the protection and wellbeing of humans and animals. However, issues such as the drastic difference in size of the aptamer and small molecule make it challenging to select, characterize, and apply aptamers for the detection of small molecules. Thus, recent (since 2012) notable advances in small molecule aptamers, which have overcome some of these challenges, are presented here, while defining challenges that still exist are discussed

  19. Signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiupeng; Ito, Atsuo; Li Xia; Sogo, Yu; Oyane, Ayako

    2011-01-01

    In this review, the current knowledge of signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation and its biomedical application as a functional coating are described. Although signal molecules regulate a variety of cellular processes, it is difficult to sustain the regulation activity for a long term when the signal molecules are only injected in a free form. The signal molecules-calcium phosphate coprecipitation on a substrate surface is a very promising process to achieve sustained regulation activity of the signal molecules by controlled and localized delivery of the signal molecules to specific body sites (implantation sites). However, the significance of immobilizing signal molecules with calcium phosphate coatings and their biomedical application are not systematically illustrated. For this purpose, the presently existing coprecipitation methods and strategies on biomedical application are summarized and discussed. (topical review)

  20. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhu; Qiliang Li

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent...

  1. Self-Assembly of Small Molecules for Organic Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytun, Taner

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells aim to provide efficient, flexible and lightweight photovoltaics (PV) with simple processing and low-cost. Advances in device optimization, structural and molecular design, as well as mechanistic understanding have helped increase device efficiency and performance. Within the framework of active layer optimization, systematically improving bulk heterojunction (BHJ) morphology could improve the power conversion efficiency of OPVs. However, most strategies aimed at improving morphology focus on annealing methods or the use of solvent additives. Rational approaches in supramolecular self-assembly can potentially offer additional control over the morphology of BHJ active layers and lead to improved power conversion efficiencies. In Chapter 2, the author explores the effect of molecular shape on the assembly of electron donating small molecules, and its ensuing effect on OPV performance. Two tripodal 'star-shaped' donor molecules with diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) side chains were used to generate solution-processed BHJ OPVs. It was found that the tripod molecules neither aggregate in solution nor form crystalline domains in thin films when a branched alkyl solubilizing group is used. On the other hand, linear alkyl chains promote the formation of one-dimensional (1D) nanowires and crystalline domains as well. This work demonstrated that the one-dimensional assembly of donor molecules enhances the performance of the corresponding solution-processed OPVs by 50%. This is attributed to the reduction of trap states in the 1D nanowires, resulting in a significant increase in the fill factor of the devices. In Chapter 3, experiments are described in which the electron donor is a hairpin-shaped molecule containing a trans-1,2-diamidocyclohexane core and two DPP conjugated segments, and a fullerene derivative as the electron acceptor. Self-assembly of the donor molecule is driven by the synergistic interaction between hydrogen bonds and pi

  2. Calculation of electron impact inelastic cross sections and rate coefficients for diatomic molecules. Application to air molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teulet, P.; Sarrette, J.P.; Gomes, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    A method based upon the modified Weighted Total Cross Section (WTCS) theory for the determination of electron impact excitation, ionization and dissociation cross sections and rate coefficients is proposed. An application to the main electronic states of diatomic molecules of the air (O 2 , N 2 and NO) and the corresponding ions (O + 2 , N + 2 and NO + ) is given. The reaction rate coefficients were calculated using one and two kinetic temperatures (θ e and θ g for electrons and heavy particles, respectively) and were fitted in the Arrhenius form in the range 1500-15andpuncsp; omitted000 K. This method can be easily extended to any diatomic molecule. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Single-molecule tracking in living cells using single quantum dot applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Koichi; Nishida, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Revealing the behavior of single molecules in living cells is very useful for understanding cellular events. Quantum dot probes are particularly promising tools for revealing how biological events occur at the single molecule level both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will introduce how single quantum dot applications are used for single molecule tracking. We will discuss how single quantum dot tracking has been used in several examples of complex biological processes, including membrane dynamics, neuronal function, selective transport mechanisms of the nuclear pore complex, and in vivo real-time observation. We also briefly discuss the prospects for single molecule tracking using advanced probes.

  4. Metastable Molecules in the Ground and in Excited States, Theory Development, Implementation and Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bartlett, Rodney J

    2006-01-01

    ... fingerprints for identification. We also make applications of interesting clusters, atmospheric systems, potential interstellar molecules, and to gas phase molecular reactions of the sort that can occur in flames.

  5. High performance photovoltaic applications using solution-processed small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wan, Xiangjian; Long, Guankui

    2013-11-19

    Energy remains a critical issue for the survival and prosperity of humancivilization. Many experts believe that the eventual solution for sustainable energy is the use of direct solar energy as the main energy source. Among the options for renewable energy, photovoltaic technologies that harness solar energy offer a way to harness an unlimited resource and minimum environment impact in contrast with other alternatives such as water, nuclear, and wind energy. Currently, almost all commercial photovoltaic technologies use Si-based technology, which has a number of disadvantages including high cost, lack of flexibility, and the serious environmental impact of the Si industry. Other technologies, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, can overcome some of these issues. Today, polymer-based OPV (P-OPV) devices have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that exceed 9%. Compared with P-OPV, small molecules based OPV (SM-OPV) offers further advantages, including a defined structure for more reproducible performance, higher mobility and open circuit voltage, and easier synthetic control that leads to more diversified structures. Therefore, while largely undeveloped, SM-OPV is an important emerging technology with performance comparable to P-OPV. In this Account, we summarize our recent results on solution-processed SM-OPV. We believe that solution processing is essential for taking full advantage of OPV technologies. Our work started with the synthesis of oligothiophene derivatives with an acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure. Both the backbone conjugation length and electron withdrawing terminal groups play an important role in the light absorption, energy levels and performance of the devices. Among those molecules, devices using a 7-thiophene-unit backbone and a 3-ethylrhodanine (RD) terminal unit produced a 6.1% PCE. With the optimized conjugation length and terminal unit, we borrowed from the results with P-OPV devices to optimize the backbone. Thus we

  6. Application of the method of continued fractions for electron scattering by linear molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Fujimoto, M.M.; Lara, O.; Brasilia Univ., DF

    1995-01-01

    The method of continued fractions (MCF) of Horacek and Sasakawa is adapted for the first time to study low-energy electron scattering by linear molecules. Particularly, we have calculated the reactance K-matrices for an electron scattered by hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion as well as by a polar LiH molecule in the static-exchange level. For all the applications studied herein. the calculated physical quantities converge rapidly, even for a strongly polar molecule such as LiH, to the correct values and in most cases the convergence is monotonic. Our study suggests that the MCF could be an efficient method for studying electron-molecule scattering and also photoionization of molecules. (Author)

  7. Enamel matrix proteins; old molecules for new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngstadaas, S P; Wohlfahrt, J C; Brookes, S J; Paine, M L; Snead, M L; Reseland, J E

    2009-08-01

    Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD) is well recognized in periodontology, where it is used as a local adjunct to periodontal surgery to stimulate regeneration of periodontal tissues lost to periodontal disease. The biological effect of EMD is through stimulation of local growth factor secretion and cytokine expression in the treated tissues, inducing a regenerative process that mimics odontogenesis. The major (>95%) component of EMD is Amelogenins (Amel). No other active components have so far been isolated from EMD, and several studies have shown that purified amelogenins can induce the same effect as the complete EMD. Amelogenins comprise a family of highly conserved extracellular matrix proteins derived from one gene. Amelogenin structure and function is evolutionary well conserved, suggesting a profound role in biomineralization and hard tissue formation. A special feature of amelogenins is that under physiological conditions the proteins self-assembles into nanospheres that constitute an extracellular matrix. In the body, this matrix is slowly digested by specific extracellular proteolytic enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase) in a controlled process, releasing bioactive peptides to the surrounding tissues for weeks after application. Based on clinical and experimental observations in periodontology indicating that amelogenins can have a significant positive influence on wound healing, bone formation and root resorption, several new applications for amelogenins have been suggested. New experiments now confirm that amelogenins have potential for being used also in the fields of endodontics, bone regeneration, implantology, traumatology, and wound care.

  8. Sphingolipids: promising lipid-class molecules with potential applications for industry. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miazek, K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sphingolipids are a group of lipid molecules, the focus on which has been gradually increasing during recent years. This review presents sphingolipids, as valuable compounds with a high potential for industry. Literature. Structures of sphingolipids are described and their natural sources are presented. Different methods for extraction, purification and structural characterization of sphingolipids are evaluated. Activity of sphingolipids towards various microorganisms is discussed and methods for chemical modifications of natural sphingolipids to obtain novel properties are depicted. Finally, applications for implementing sphingolipid molecules in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical or medical industry are proposed. Conclusions. Sphingolipids are molecules of high impact and their importance will inevitably increase in the future.

  9. Electronic absorption spectra and geometry of organic molecules an application of molecular orbital theory

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Absorption Spectra and Geometry of Organic Molecules: An Application of Molecular Orbital Theory focuses on electronic absorption spectra of organic compounds and molecules. The book begins with the discussions on molecular spectra, electronic absorption spectra of organic compounds, and practical measures of absorption intensity. The text also focuses on molecular orbital theory and group theory. Molecular state functions; fundamental postulates of quantum theory; representation of symmetry groups; and symmetry operations and symmetry groups are described. The book also dis

  10. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent endurance and multi-bit storage, outperforming the conventional floating-gate flash memory. Such high performance molecular memory will lead to promising on-chip memory and future portable/wearable electronics applications.

  11. Photodynamic therapy application of PAMAM-porphyrin molecule on stomach cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Tugba; Burgucu, Mehmet Necmi; Sagir, Tugba; Senel, Mehmet; Isik, Sevim; Bölük-basi Ates, Gamze; Tabakoglu, Hasim Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    In this study, effect of a novel LED-based light source developed for 96-well-plates cell culture applications, was tried on AGS stomach cancer cell line, in combination with Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) modified - porhyrin molecule. For each 4 generation of modified PpIX molecule 5 different concentrations tried. According to results PAMAM molecule doesnt have any photosensitizer property also didn't show any toxic effect even if higher concentrations. Morphology and real time monitoring analysis results hold up each other and confirmed that, PpIX molecules with and without modificated high concentrations (>100μM) caused cell death via toxicicity this reason optimal concentration for PAMAM modified PpIX should be between 25 - 50 μm concentration .

  12. Few molecule SERS detection using nanolens based plasmonic nanostructure: application to point mutation detection

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind

    2016-10-27

    Advancements in nanotechnology fabrication techniques allow the possibility to design and fabricate a device with a minimum gap (<10 nm) between the composing nanostructures in order to obtain better control over the creation and spatial definition of plasmonic hot-spots. The present study is intended to show the fabrication of nanolens and their application to single/few molecules detection. Theoretical simulations were performed on different designs of real structures, including comparison of rough and smooth surfaces. Various molecules (rhodamine 6G, benzenethiol and BRCA1/BRCT peptides) were examined in this regard. Single molecule detection was possible for synthetic peptides, with a possible application in early detection of diseases. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Bader's Theory of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and its Applications to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bader's Theory of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and its Applications to Chemical Bonding. P SHYAM VINOD KUMAR, V RAGHAVENDRA and V SUBRAMANIAN. ∗. Chemical ... QTAIM; non-covalent interaction; chemical bonding; H-bonding; electron density. 1. ... the volume element of the system under consideration. The ED ...

  14. Assigned and unassigned distance geometry: applications to biological molecules and nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billinge, Simon J. L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). X-ray Scattering Group; Duxbury, Phillip M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Gonçalves, Douglas S. [Univ. Federal de Santa Catarina,; Lavor, Carlile [Univ. of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. of Applied Mathematics (IMECC-UNICAMP); Mucherino, Antonio [Univ. de Rennes, Rennes (France). Institut de Recherche en Informatique et Systemes Aleatoires

    2016-04-04

    Here, considering geometry based on the concept of distance, the results found by Menger and Blumenthal originated a body of knowledge called distance geometry. This survey covers some recent developments for assigned and unassigned distance geometry and focuses on two main applications: determination of three-dimensional conformations of biological molecules and nanostructures.

  15. Acenes, Heteroacenes and Analogous Molecules for Organic Photovoltaic and Field Effect Transistor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Devin Benjamin

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons composed of benzenoid rings fused in a linear fashion comprise the class of compounds known as acenes. The structures containing three to six ring fusions are brightly colored and possess band gaps and charge transport efficiencies sufficient for semiconductor applications. These molecules have been investigated throughout the past several decades to assess their optoelectronic properties. The absorption, emission and charge transport properties of this series of molecules has been studied extensively to elucidate structure-property relationships. A wide variety of analogous molecules, incorporating heterocycles in place of benzenoid rings, demonstrate similar properties to the parent compounds and have likewise been investigated. Functionalization of acene compounds by placement of groups around the molecule affects the way in which molecules interact in the solid state, in addition to the energetics of the molecule. The use of electron donating or electron withdrawing groups affects the frontier molecular orbitals and thus affects the optical and electronic gaps of the molecules. The use of bulky side groups such as alkylsilylethynyl groups allows for crystal engineering of molecular aggregates, and changing the volume and dimensions of the alkylsilyl groups affects the intermolecular interactions and thus changes the packing motif. In chapter 2, a series of tetracene and pentacene molecules with strongly electron withdrawing groups is described. The investigation focuses on the change in energetics of the frontier molecular orbitals between the base acene and the nitrile and dicyanovinyl derivatives as well as the differences between the pentacene and tetracene molecules. The differences in close packing motifs through use of bulky alkylsilylethynyl groups is also discussed in relation to electron acceptor material design and bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic characteristics. Chapter 3 focuses on molecular acceptor and

  16. An Extended Phenacene-type Molecule, [8]Phenacene: Synthesis and Transistor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hideki; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Hamao, Shino; Goto, Hidenori; Gotoh, Kazuma; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Takaguchi, Yutaka; Gohda, Shin; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    A new phenacene-type molecule, [8]phenacene, which is an extended zigzag chain of coplanar fused benzene rings, has been synthesised for use in an organic field-effect transistor (FET). The molecule consists of a phenacene core of eight benzene rings, which has a lengthy π-conjugated system. The structure was verified by elemental analysis, solid-state NMR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, absorption spectrum and photoelectron yield spectroscopy (PYS). This type of molecule is quite interesting, not only as pure chemistry but also for its potential electronics applications. Here we report the physical properties of [8]phenacene and its FET application. An [8]phenacene thin-film FET fabricated with an SiO2 gate dielectric showed clear p-channel characteristics. The highest μ achieved in an [8]phenacene thin-film FET with an SiO2 gate dielectric is 1.74 cm2 V−1 s−1, demonstrating excellent FET characteristics; the average μ was evaluated as 1.2(3) cm2 V−1 s−1. The μ value in the [8]phenacene electric-double-layer FET reached 16.4 cm2 V−1 s−1, which is the highest reported in EDL FETs based on phenacene-type molecules; the average μ was evaluated as 8(5) cm2 V−1 s−1. The μ values recorded in this study show that [8]phenacene is a promising molecule for transistor applications. PMID:24936854

  17. Electrostatic melting in a single-molecule field-effect transistor with applications in genomic identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, Sefi; Trocchia, Scott M.; Warren, Steven B.; Young, Erik F.; Bouilly, Delphine; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Nuckolls, Colin; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-05-01

    The study of biomolecular interactions at the single-molecule level holds great potential for both basic science and biotechnology applications. Single-molecule studies often rely on fluorescence-based reporting, with signal levels limited by photon emission from single optical reporters. The point-functionalized carbon nanotube transistor, known as the single-molecule field-effect transistor, is a bioelectronics alternative based on intrinsic molecular charge that offers significantly higher signal levels for detection. Such devices are effective for characterizing DNA hybridization kinetics and thermodynamics and enabling emerging applications in genomic identification. In this work, we show that hybridization kinetics can be directly controlled by electrostatic bias applied between the device and the surrounding electrolyte. We perform the first single-molecule experiments demonstrating the use of electrostatics to control molecular binding. Using bias as a proxy for temperature, we demonstrate the feasibility of detecting various concentrations of 20-nt target sequences from the Ebolavirus nucleoprotein gene in a constant-temperature environment.

  18. Molecule database framework: a framework for creating database applications with chemical structure search capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiener, Joos

    2013-12-11

    Research in organic chemistry generates samples of novel chemicals together with their properties and other related data. The involved scientists must be able to store this data and search it by chemical structure. There are commercial solutions for common needs like chemical registration systems or electronic lab notebooks. However for specific requirements of in-house databases and processes no such solutions exist. Another issue is that commercial solutions have the risk of vendor lock-in and may require an expensive license of a proprietary relational database management system. To speed up and simplify the development for applications that require chemical structure search capabilities, I have developed Molecule Database Framework. The framework abstracts the storing and searching of chemical structures into method calls. Therefore software developers do not require extensive knowledge about chemistry and the underlying database cartridge. This decreases application development time. Molecule Database Framework is written in Java and I created it by integrating existing free and open-source tools and frameworks. The core functionality includes:•Support for multi-component compounds (mixtures)•Import and export of SD-files•Optional security (authorization)For chemical structure searching Molecule Database Framework leverages the capabilities of the Bingo Cartridge for PostgreSQL and provides type-safe searching, caching, transactions and optional method level security. Molecule Database Framework supports multi-component chemical compounds (mixtures).Furthermore the design of entity classes and the reasoning behind it are explained. By means of a simple web application I describe how the framework could be used. I then benchmarked this example application to create some basic performance expectations for chemical structure searches and import and export of SD-files. By using a simple web application it was shown that Molecule Database Framework

  19. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  20. Breast Tumor pH: Design, Evaluation, and Application of Novel Reporter Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Disubstituted 5,6-Dihydro-s- Triazolo[3,4-b]-l,3,4-Thiadiazolidines Through the Intramolecular Mannich Reaction , Chin. J. Synth. Chem., 1998, 6(2), 171-178...yields and reaction efficiency and is becoming proficient in high field NMR to characterize the new molecules. Task 2 Months 3-9 Synthesize...New Organic Reactions & the Application of the Known Organic Reactions in the Carbohydrate Synthesis. 5. Synthesis of Bioactive Heterocyclic

  1. Advanced Applications of Vibrational Circular Dichroism: from Small Chiral Molecules to Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukor, Rina K.

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD), first discovered in the early 1970s, and commercialized in the late 1990's, is finally coming of age! No longer a curiosity of the few selected academic groups, it is now used by all major pharmaceutical companies, regulatory agencies, government labs and academic institutions. The main application for the technology has been determination of absolute configuration of small pharmaceutical molecules. In more recent years, this has extended to more complicated molecules such as natural products with many chiral centers and conformational flexibility. Other applications include determination of enantiomeric purity, chiral polymers, and characterization of other biological molecules such as proteins, carohydrates and nucleic acids. One of the most fascinating discoveries in the VCD field has been been unusual enhancement in intensity for proteins that form fibrils. We have demonstrated sensitivity of VCD to in situ solution-phase probe of the process of fibrillogenesis and subsequent development that currently can only be studied in detail with dried samples by such techniques as scanning electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. We have further shown that several different proteins, that in their native state have different secondary structures, have a very similar unique signature of mature fibrils. In this presentation, we will discuss fundamentals of VCD, demonstrate a few examples of different applications and showcase the sensitivity to structure of fibrils, including new results on micro-sampling.

  2. Single-molecule techniques in biophysics: a review of the progress in methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Shepherd, Jack; Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule biophysics has transformed our understanding of biology, but also of the physics of life. More exotic than simple soft matter, biomatter lives far from thermal equilibrium, covering multiple lengths from the nanoscale of single molecules to up to several orders of magnitude higher in cells, tissues and organisms. Biomolecules are often characterized by underlying instability: multiple metastable free energy states exist, separated by levels of just a few multiples of the thermal energy scale k B T, where k B is the Boltzmann constant and T absolute temperature, implying complex inter-conversion kinetics in the relatively hot, wet environment of active biological matter. A key benefit of single-molecule biophysics techniques is their ability to probe heterogeneity of free energy states across a molecular population, too challenging in general for conventional ensemble average approaches. Parallel developments in experimental and computational techniques have catalysed the birth of multiplexed, correlative techniques to tackle previously intractable biological questions. Experimentally, progress has been driven by improvements in sensitivity and speed of detectors, and the stability and efficiency of light sources, probes and microfluidics. We discuss the motivation and requirements for these recent experiments, including the underpinning mathematics. These methods are broadly divided into tools which detect molecules and those which manipulate them. For the former we discuss the progress of super-resolution microscopy, transformative for addressing many longstanding questions in the life sciences, and for the latter we include progress in 'force spectroscopy' techniques that mechanically perturb molecules. We also consider in silico progress of single-molecule computational physics, and how simulation and experimentation may be drawn together to give a more complete understanding. Increasingly, combinatorial techniques are now used, including

  3. Single-molecule techniques in biophysics: a review of the progress in methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Shepherd, Jack; Wollman, Adam J. M.; Leake, Mark C.

    2018-02-01

    Single-molecule biophysics has transformed our understanding of biology, but also of the physics of life. More exotic than simple soft matter, biomatter lives far from thermal equilibrium, covering multiple lengths from the nanoscale of single molecules to up to several orders of magnitude higher in cells, tissues and organisms. Biomolecules are often characterized by underlying instability: multiple metastable free energy states exist, separated by levels of just a few multiples of the thermal energy scale k B T, where k B is the Boltzmann constant and T absolute temperature, implying complex inter-conversion kinetics in the relatively hot, wet environment of active biological matter. A key benefit of single-molecule biophysics techniques is their ability to probe heterogeneity of free energy states across a molecular population, too challenging in general for conventional ensemble average approaches. Parallel developments in experimental and computational techniques have catalysed the birth of multiplexed, correlative techniques to tackle previously intractable biological questions. Experimentally, progress has been driven by improvements in sensitivity and speed of detectors, and the stability and efficiency of light sources, probes and microfluidics. We discuss the motivation and requirements for these recent experiments, including the underpinning mathematics. These methods are broadly divided into tools which detect molecules and those which manipulate them. For the former we discuss the progress of super-resolution microscopy, transformative for addressing many longstanding questions in the life sciences, and for the latter we include progress in ‘force spectroscopy’ techniques that mechanically perturb molecules. We also consider in silico progress of single-molecule computational physics, and how simulation and experimentation may be drawn together to give a more complete understanding. Increasingly, combinatorial techniques are now used, including

  4. Application of Single Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy to Characterize the Penetration of a Large Amphiphilic Molecule in the Stratum Corneum of Human Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Volz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here on the application of laser-based single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM to study the penetration of molecules through the skin. Penetration of topically applied drug molecules is often observed to be limited by the size of the respective drug. However, the molecular mechanisms which govern the penetration of molecules through the outermost layer of the skin are still largely unknown. As a model compound we have chosen a larger amphiphilic molecule (fluorescent dye ATTO-Oxa12 with a molecular weight >700 Da that was applied to excised human skin. ATTO-Oxa12 penetrated through the stratum corneum (SC into the viable epidermis as revealed by TIRFM of cryosections. Single particle tracking of ATTO-Oxa12 within SC sheets obtained by tape stripping allowed us to gain information on the localization as well as the lateral diffusion dynamics of these molecules. ATTO-Oxa12 appeared to be highly confined in the SC lipid region between (intercellular space or close to the envelope of the corneocytes. Three main distinct confinement sizes of 52 ± 6, 118 ± 4, and 205 ± 5 nm were determined. We conclude that for this amphiphilic model compound several pathways through the skin exist.

  5. [The principle and application of the single-molecule real-time sequencing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanhu, Liu; Lu, Wang; Li, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Last decade witnessed the explosive development of the third-generation sequencing strategy, including single-molecule real-time sequencing (SMRT), true single-molecule sequencing (tSMSTM) and the single-molecule nanopore DNA sequencing. In this review, we summarize the principle, performance and application of the SMRT sequencing technology. Compared with the traditional Sanger method and the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, the SMRT approach has several advantages, including long read length, high speed, PCR-free and the capability of direct detection of epigenetic modifications. However, the disadvantage of its low accuracy, most of which resulted from insertions and deletions, is also notable. So, the raw sequence data need to be corrected before assembly. Up to now, the SMRT is a good fit for applications in the de novo genomic sequencing and the high-quality assemblies of small genomes. In the future, it is expected to play an important role in epigenetics, transcriptomic sequencing, and assemblies of large genomes.

  6. Design, Optimization and Application of Small Molecule Biosensor in Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering has painted a great future for the bio-based economy, including fuels, chemicals, and drugs produced from renewable feedstocks. With the rapid advance of genome-scale modeling, pathway assembling and genome engineering/editing, our ability to design and generate microbial cell factories with various phenotype becomes almost limitless. However, our lack of ability to measure and exert precise control over metabolite concentration related phenotypes becomes a bottleneck in metabolic engineering. Genetically encoded small molecule biosensors, which provide the means to couple metabolite concentration to measurable or actionable outputs, are highly promising solutions to the bottleneck. Here we review recent advances in the design, optimization and application of small molecule biosensor in metabolic engineering, with particular focus on optimization strategies for transcription factor (TF based biosensors.

  7. Fluorine-18-labelled molecules: synthesis and application in medical imaging; Les molecules marquees au fluor-18. Synthese et application en imagerie medicale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Groupe de Production des Radiopharmaceutiques, 91 - Orsay (France); Perrio, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Barre, L. [Centre Cyceron, UMR CEA 2E, Groupe de Developpement Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission en Positons, 14 - Caen (France); Lasne, M.C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Dept. Chimie, 75 - Paris (France); Le Bars, D. [GIE Cermep, UMR CNRS 5181, Imagerie du Vivant, Methodologie de Synthese et Molecules Bioactives, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2006-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the more powerful available techniques for medical imaging. It relies on the use of molecules labelled with a positron emitter ({beta}{sup +}). Among those emitters, fluorine-18, available from a cyclotron, is a radionuclide of choice because of its relatively long-half-life (109.8 min) and the relatively low energy of the emitted-positron. The electrophilic form of fluorine-18 ([{sup 18}F]F{sub 2} or reagents derived from [{sup 18}F]F{sub 2}) is mainly used for hydrogen or metal substitutions on aromatic or vinylic carbons. The presence of the stable isotope (fluorine-19) in the radiotracers limits their use in medical imaging. The nucleophilic form of fluorine-18 (alkaline mono-fluoride, K[{sup 18}F]F, the most used), obtained from irradiation of enriched water, is widely used in aliphatic and (hetero)aromatic substitutions for the synthesis of radiotracers with high specific radioactivity. Some examples of radio-fluorinated tracers used in PET are presented, as well as some of their in vivo applications in human. (authors)

  8. Application of Fourier transform infrared ellipsometry to assess the concentration of biological molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Drevillon, Bernard; De Martino, Antonello; Schwartz, Laurent

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry is a noninvasive optical characterization technique mainly used in the semiconductor field to characterize bare substrates and thin films. In particular, it allows the gathering of information concerning the physical structure of the sample, such as roughness and film thickness, as well as its optical response. In the mid-infrared (IR) range each molecule exhibits a characteristic absorption fingerprint, which makes this technique chemically selective. Phase-modulated IR ellipsometry does not require a baseline correction procedure or suppression of atmospheric CO2 and water-vapor absorption bands, thus greatly reducing the subjectivity in data analysis. We have found that ellipsometric measurements of thin films, such as the solid residuals left on a plane surface after evaporation of a liquid drop containing a given compound in solution, are particularly favorable for dosing purposes because the intensity of IR absorptions shows a linear behavior along a wide range of solution concentrations of the given compound. Our aim is to illustrate with a concrete example and to justify theoretically the linearity experimentally found between radiation absorption and molecule concentration. For the example, we prepared aqueous solutions of glycogen, a molecule of huge biological importance currently tested in biochemical analyses, at concentrations ranging from 1 mg/l to 1 g/l, which correspond to those found in physiological conditions. The results of this example are promising for the application of ellipsometry for dosing purposes in biochemistry and biomedicine.

  9. Applications of nuclear physics to a wider context: from molecules to stars passing through hypernuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Lorenzo

    2018-03-01

    In this contribution I will review some of the researches that are currently being pursued in Padova (mainly within the In:Theory and Strength projects), focusing on the interdisciplinary applications of nuclear theory to several other branches of physics, with the aim of contributing to show the centrality of nuclear theory in the Italian scientific scenario and the prominence of this fertile field in fostering new physics. In particular, I will talk about: i) the recent solution of the long-standing “electron screening puzzle” that settles a fundamental controversy in nuclear astrophysics between the outcome of lab experiments on earth and nuclear reactions happening in stars; the application of algebraic methods to very diverse systems such as: ii) the supramolecular complex H2@C60, i.e. a diatomic hydrogen molecule caged in a fullerene and iii) to the spectrum of hypernuclei, i.e. systems made of a Lambda particles trapped in (heavy) nuclei.

  10. A Study of Applications of Machine Learning Based Classification Methods for Virtual Screening of Lead Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Renu; Bapat, Sanket; Jain, Esha; Tambe, Sanjeev S; Karthikeyan, Muthukumarasamy; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-based virtual screening of combinatorial libraries employs a number of statistical modeling and machine learning methods. A comprehensive analysis of the application of these methods for the diversity oriented virtual screening of biological targets/drug classes is presented here. A number of classification models have been built using three types of inputs namely structure based descriptors, molecular fingerprints and therapeutic category for performing virtual screening. The activity and affinity descriptors of a set of inhibitors of four target classes DHFR, COX, LOX and NMDA have been utilized to train a total of six classifiers viz. Artificial Neural Network (ANN), k nearest neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Naïve Bayes (NB), Decision Tree--(DT) and Random Forest--(RF). Among these classifiers, the ANN was found as the best classifier with an AUC of 0.9 irrespective of the target. New molecular fingerprints based on pharmacophore, toxicophore and chemophore (PTC), were used to build the ANN models for each dataset. A good accuracy of 87.27% was obtained using 296 chemophoric binary fingerprints for the COX-LOX inhibitors compared to pharmacophoric (67.82%) and toxicophoric (70.64%). The methodology was validated on the classical Ames mutagenecity dataset of 4337 molecules. To evaluate it further, selectivity and promiscuity of molecules from five drug classes viz. anti-anginal, anti-convulsant, anti-depressant, anti-arrhythmic and anti-diabetic were studied. The TPC fingerprints computed for each category were able to capture the drug-class specific features using the k-NN classifier. These models can be useful for selecting optimal molecules for drug design.

  11. Osteogenic molecules for clinical applications: improving the BMP-collagen system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M Arrabal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the osteogenic growth factors used for bone tissue engineering, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are the most extensively studied for use in orthopaedic surgery. BMP-2 and BMP-7 have been widely investigated for developing therapeutic strategies and are the only two approved for use in several clinical applications. Due to the chemical and biological characteristics of these molecules, their authorised uses are always in combination with a carrier based on collagen type I. Although the use of these growth factors is considered safe in the short term, the very high doses needed to obtain significant osteoinduction make these treatments expensive and their long-term safety uncertain, since they are highly pleiotropic and have the capacity to induce ectopic ossification in the surrounding tissues. Therefore it is necessary to improve the currently used BMP-collagen system in terms of efficiency, biosecurity and costs. There are several strategies to increase the clinical effectiveness of these treatments. In this review we summarize the most promising results and our related work focused on this field through two different approaches: i the development of recombinant BMPs with additional features, and ii complementing these systems with other growth factors or molecules to enhance or accelerate osteogenesis

  12. Exopolysaccharides produced by marine bacteria and their applications as glycosaminoglycan-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarre-Ladrat, Christine; Sinquin, Corinne; Lebellenger, Lou; Zykwinska, Agata; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Although polysaccharides are ubiquitous and the most abundant renewable bio-components, their studies, covered by the glycochemistry and glycobiology fields, remain a challenge due to their high molecular diversity and complexity. Polysaccharides are industrially used in food products; human therapeutics fall into a more recent research field and pharmaceutical industry is looking for more and more molecules with enhanced activities. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) found in animal tissues play a critical role in cellular physiological and pathological processes as they bind many cellular components. Therefore, they present a great potential for the design and preparation of therapeutic drugs. On the other hand, microorganisms producing exopolysaccharides (EPS) are renewable resources meeting well the actual industrial demand. In particular, the diversity of marine microorganisms is still largely unexplored offering great opportunities to discover high value products such as new molecules and biocatalysts. EPS-producing bacteria from the marine environment will be reviewed with a focus on marine-derived EPS from bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Information on chemical and structural features, putative pathways of biosynthesis, novel strategies for chemical and enzymatic modifications and potentialities in the biomedical field will be provided. An integrated approach should be used to increase the basic knowledge on these compounds and their applications; new clean environmentally friendly processes for the production of carbohydrate bio-active compounds should also be proposed for a sustainable industry.

  13. Fluorescent labeling of NASBA amplified tmRNA molecules for microarray applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Parkel, Sven; Palta, Priit; Toome, Kadri; Kaplinski, Lauris; Remm, Maido; Maher, Majella; Kurg, Ants

    2009-05-15

    Here we present a novel promising microbial diagnostic method that combines the sensitivity of Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) with the high information content of microarray technology for the detection of bacterial tmRNA molecules. The NASBA protocol was modified to include aminoallyl-UTP (aaUTP) molecules that were incorporated into nascent RNA during the NASBA reaction. Post-amplification labeling with fluorescent dye was carried out subsequently and tmRNA hybridization signal intensities were measured using microarray technology. Significant optimization of the labeled NASBA protocol was required to maintain the required sensitivity of the reactions. Two different aaUTP salts were evaluated and optimum final concentrations were identified for both. The final 2 mM concentration of aaUTP Li-salt in NASBA reaction resulted in highest microarray signals overall, being twice as high as the strongest signals with 1 mM aaUTP Na-salt. We have successfully demonstrated efficient combination of NASBA amplification technology with microarray based hybridization detection. The method is applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics including environmental monitoring, bio threat detection, industrial process monitoring and clinical microbiology.

  14. Fluorescent labeling of NASBA amplified tmRNA molecules for microarray applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplinski Lauris

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we present a novel promising microbial diagnostic method that combines the sensitivity of Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA with the high information content of microarray technology for the detection of bacterial tmRNA molecules. The NASBA protocol was modified to include aminoallyl-UTP (aaUTP molecules that were incorporated into nascent RNA during the NASBA reaction. Post-amplification labeling with fluorescent dye was carried out subsequently and tmRNA hybridization signal intensities were measured using microarray technology. Significant optimization of the labeled NASBA protocol was required to maintain the required sensitivity of the reactions. Results Two different aaUTP salts were evaluated and optimum final concentrations were identified for both. The final 2 mM concentration of aaUTP Li-salt in NASBA reaction resulted in highest microarray signals overall, being twice as high as the strongest signals with 1 mM aaUTP Na-salt. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated efficient combination of NASBA amplification technology with microarray based hybridization detection. The method is applicative for many different areas of microbial diagnostics including environmental monitoring, bio threat detection, industrial process monitoring and clinical microbiology.

  15. Selective laser spectroscopy of molecules and ions in solids: a history, fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Michael

    2018-03-01

    A history of the development of selective laser spectroscopy is presented, beginning with a pioneering work by Yu. V. Denisov and V. A. Kizel in 1967, who were the first to demonstrate the possibility of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of luminescence spectra of impurity ions in glasses upon monochromatic resonance excitation. Selective excitation of optical centers can be achieved due to existence of zero-phonon transitions corresponding to narrow homogeneous zero-phonon lines in the spectra of impurity centers in solids, which are hidden in broad inhomogeneous optical bands upon usual nonselective excitation. The fundamentals of zero-phonon transition spectroscopy are considered and the mechanism of removing the inhomogeneous broadening of optical spectra of ions and molecules in crystals and amorphous solids under selective laser excitation of luminescence and persistent hole burning in absorption spectra is presented in detail. Various applications of selective laser spectroscopy for fundamental and applied studies are discussed.

  16. Bader's Theory of Atoms in Molecules (AIM) and its Applications to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is now possible to define the structure of molecules quantum mechanically with the help of Bader's Quan- tum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM).1,2 This theory has been widely applied to unravel atom-atom interactions in covalent and non-covalent interactions in molecules,3 molecular clusters,4 small molecular.

  17. Application of Optical Biosensors in Small-Molecule Screening Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Knecht

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have seen remarkable progress and improvements in optical biosensor systems such that those are currently seen as an important and value-adding component of modern drug screening activities. In particular the introduction of microplate-based biosensor systems holds the promise to match the required throughput without compromising on data quality thus representing a sought-after complement to traditional fluidic systems. This article aims to highlight the application of the two most prominent optical biosensor technologies, namely surface plasmon resonance (SPR and optical waveguide grating (OWG, in small-molecule screening and will present, review and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different assay formats on these platforms. A particular focus will be on the specific advantages of the inhibition in solution assay (ISA format in contrast to traditional direct binding assays (DBA. Furthermore we will discuss different application areas for both fluidic as well as plate-based biosensor systems by considering the individual strength of the platforms.

  18. In situ synthesis of graphene molecules on TiO2: application in sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Wu, Ruilian; Adamska, Lyudmyla; Velizhanin, Kirill A; Doorn, Stephen K; Sykora, Milan

    2014-11-26

    We present a method for preparation of graphene molecules (GMs), whereby a polyphenylene precursor functionalized with surface anchoring groups, preadsorbed on surface of TiO2, is oxidatively dehydrogenated in situ via a Scholl reaction. The reaction, performed at ambient conditions, yields surface adsorbed GMs structurally and electronically equivalent to those synthesized in solution. The new synthetic approach reduces the challenges associated with the tendency of GMs to aggregate and provides a convenient path for integration of GMs into optoelectronic applications. The surface synthesized GMs can be effectively reduced or oxidized via an interfacial charge transfer and can also function as sensitizers for metal oxides in light harvesting applications. Sensitized solar cells (SSCs) prepared from mesoscopic TiO2/GM films and an iodide-based liquid electrolyte show photocurrents of ∼2.5 mA/cm2, an open circuit voltage of ∼0.55 V and fill factor of ∼0.65 under AM 1.5 illumination. The observed power conversion efficiency of η=0.87% is the highest reported efficiency for the GM sensitized solar cell. The performance of the devices was reproducible and stable for a period of at least 3 weeks. We also report first external and internal quantum efficiency measurements for GM SSCs, which point to possible paths for further performance improvements.

  19. A rhenium tris-carbonyl derivative as a model molecule for incorporation into phospholipid assemblies for skin applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Estibalitz; Rodríguez, Gelen; Hostachy, Sarah; Clède, Sylvain; Cócera, Mercedes; Sandt, Christophe; Lambert, François; de la Maza, Alfonso; Policar, Clotilde; López, Olga

    2015-07-01

    A rhenium tris-carbonyl derivative (fac-[Re(CO)3Cl(2-(1-dodecyl-1H-1,2,3,triazol-4-yl)-pyridine)]) was incorporated into phospholipid assemblies, called bicosomes, and the penetration of this molecule into skin was monitored using Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR). To evaluate the capacity of bicosomes to promote the penetration of this derivative, the skin penetration of the Re(CO)3 derivative dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a typical enhancer, was also studied. Dynamic light scattering results (DLS) showed an increase in the size of the bicosomes with the incorporation of the Re(CO)3 derivative, and the FTIR microspectroscopy showed that the Re(CO)3 derivative incorporated in bicosomes penetrated deeper into the skin than when dissolved in DMSO. When this molecule was applied on the skin using the bicosomes, 60% of the Re(CO)3 derivative was retained in the stratum corneum (SC) and 40% reached the epidermis (Epi). Otherwise, the application of this molecule via DMSO resulted in 95% of the Re(CO)3 derivative being in the SC and only 5% reaching the Epi. Using a Re(CO)3 derivative with a dodecyl-chain as a model molecule, it was possible to determine the distribution of molecules with similar physicochemical characteristics in the skin using bicosomes. This fact makes these nanostructures promising vehicles for the application of lipophilic molecules inside the skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mixed Matrix Composite Membranes Containing POSS Molecules for Carbon Dioxide Removal Application

    KAUST Repository

    Rini, Eki Listya

    2011-05-10

    CO2 removal by membrane processes is considerably potential for several applications such as natural gas and synthesis gas purification, enhanced oil recovery application, and carbon dioxide capture in combat against global warming. Dense polymeric membranes are commonly utilized for these type of gas separation applications. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of dense polymeric membranes, which commonly characterize by the low gas permeability versus high gas selectivity trade–off or vice versa, is less desirable. In order to meet the increased demand of CO2 removal, a strategy to improve the gas separation performance of a polymeric membrane is investigated in this study. With this regard, mixed matrix membranes in which inorganic non porous fillers are incorporated into a polymeric matrix were prepared to achieve the aforementioned objective. The mixed matrix membranes were prepared from Pebax® block copolymers and PEG POSS® molecules. These hybrid membranes were formed as both dense and multilayer composite membranes. The dense transparent membranes with well–dispersed fillers could be obtained by variation of the solvent mixture. The DSC analyses showed that incorporation of PEG POSS® into Pebax® matrix altered the thermal properties of the matrix. The multilayer composite membranes were then prepared from a PTMSP gutter layer deposited on a PAN porous support and an adjacent hybrid Pebax®/PEG POSS® as the top layer. These hybrid multilayer composite membranes exhibited an enhanced CO2 selectiv4 ity by a factor of two relative to the pure Pebax®. In these hybrid systems, the CO2 separation was presumably enhanced by the high ether oxides content from PEG POSS® that has high affinities for CO2. For particular composition of Pebax® and PEG POSS® concentrations, the PTMSP gutter layer harnessed the CO2 selectivity without losing the CO2 permeation rate. At the same time, these membrane, however, suffered severe adhesion between the gutter layer

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  2. New insights into the microemulsion-based chromatographic NMR resolution mechanism and its application to fragrance/flavor molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Roy E.; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-07-01

    The NMR chromatography method is applied to a class of molecules with similar physical properties. We correlate the separation ability of microemulsions to the physical properties of the analyzed molecules. Flavor and aroma compounds are very widespread. Compositional analysis is in many cases tedious. Any new method of analysis is always useful and challenging. Here we show a new application to a class of fragrance molecules, with only a moderate variation in their chemical and physical characteristics. Up to 11 selected compounds in one mixture are resolved in one spectrum by NMR chromatography, despite the similarity of the compounds. The differences between O/W and W/O microemulsions and their resolution mechanism as applied to fragrance molecules are explained in terms of hydrophilicity and lipophilicity and effective critical packing parameters of the microemulsions. The observed diffusion rates are shown to correlate with solvation parameters. These results can be used to estimate the diffusion rates of molecules to be separated, allowing selection of the microemulsion or NMR chromatography solvent appropriate for each specific application.

  3. Applications of Engineered DNA-Binding Molecules Such as TAL Proteins and the CRISPR/Cas System in Biology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitsugu Fujita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Engineered DNA-binding molecules such as transcription activator-like effector (TAL or TALE proteins and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas (CRISPR/Cas system have been used extensively for genome editing in cells of various types and species. The sequence-specific DNA-binding activities of these engineered DNA-binding molecules can also be utilized for other purposes, such as transcriptional activation, transcriptional repression, chromatin modification, visualization of genomic regions, and isolation of chromatin in a locus-specific manner. In this review, we describe applications of these engineered DNA-binding molecules for biological purposes other than genome editing.

  4. Application of scattering quantum theory for simple chemical reaction calculations. Electron scattering by biatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdneev, S.A.; Shcheglov, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Theory of multiple scattering in the three-body system, which mathematical base is L.D. Fadeev's equations, is applied for calculating the simplest chemical reactions proceeding in electron collision with two-atom molecules. Calculations of cross sections of elastic scattering, excitation, dissociation and dissociative electron attachment to two-atom molecules being in different excited rotational-vibrational states have been performed on the basis of the developed theory

  5. Adhesion molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Preedy, Victor R

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the structure and classification of adhesion molecules in relation to signaling pathways and gene expression. It discusses immunohistochemical localization, neutrophil migration, and junctional, functional, and inflammatory adhesion molecules in pathologies such as leukocyte decompression sickness and ischemia reperfusion injury. Highlighting the medical applications of current research, chapters cover diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome; hypoxia; kidney disease; smoking, atrial fibrillation, and heart disease, the brain and dementia; and tumor proliferation. Finally, it looks at molecular imaging and bioinformatics, high-throughput technologies, and chemotherapy.

  6. Exactly-solvable generalization of the Jaynes-Cummings model and its application to atom-molecule systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Dukelsky, J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Dussel, G.G. [Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-12-01

    We present a family of exactly-solvable models involving the interaction of an ensemble of coupled SU(2) or SU(1,1) systems with a single bosonic field. They arise from the trigonometric Richardson-Gaudin models by replacing one SU(2) or SU(1,1) degree of freedom by an ideal boson. A first application to a system of bosonic atoms and a molecule dimer is reported. (Author) 14 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Symmetry numbers for rigid, flexible, and fluxional molecules: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Michael K; Irikura, Karl K

    2010-12-16

    The use of molecular simulations and ab initio calculations to predict thermodynamic properties of molecules has become routine. Such methods rely upon an accurate representation of the molecular partition function or configurational integral, which in turn often includes a rotational symmetry number. However, the reason for including the symmetry number is unclear to many practitioners, and there is also a need for a general prescription for evaluating the symmetry numbers of flexible molecules, i.e., for molecules with thermally active internal degrees of freedom, such as internal rotors. Surprisingly, we have been unable to find any complete and convincing explanations of these important issues in textbooks or the journal literature. The present paper aims to explain why symmetry numbers are needed and how their values should be determined. Both classical and quantum approaches are provided.

  8. Theoretical study of molecular vibration and Application to linear triatomic molecules: case of OCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianavalomahefa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to give a theoretical approach to the calculation of vibrational energy levels of polyatomic molecules. By using matrix calculation, we have to solve an eigenvalue equation that gives normal vibration frequencies of the system. A basis change introduces normal coordinates of vibration, which diagonalize the Hamiltonian. The harmonic approximation gives a rough evaluation of parameters which describe the system. Then, we introduce nonlinear terms to take into account the anharmonicity of interatomic bounds. Morse oscillator gives good approximation for diatomic molecules. We consider cubic and quartic potential terms for polyatomic molecules. We treat the problem both in classical and quantum approach. The results thus obtained are applied to study longitudinal vibration of carbonyl sulfide. [fr

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the Stark effect for manipulating cold molecules: Application to nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichsel, Bryan J.; Morrison, Michael A.; Shafer-Ray, Neil; Abraham, E. R. I.

    2007-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of cold-molecule collisions involving nitric oxide (NO), we here theoretically assess the first- and second-order perturbation-theory approximations to the Stark shifts; such approximations have been used almost exclusively in previous published research on NO in external electric fields. We perform this assessment by comparison to Stark shifts from the corresponding nonperturbative two-state model, considering field strengths from zero to values typical of current experimental studies of cold molecules. To facilitate the future use of this model, we give expressions for the Stark energies in a generic form that can trivially be applied to any molecules in the class under consideration. To provide insight into the validity of the two-state model, we also experimentally assess the two-state Stark shifts for NO

  10. Photocrosslinkable π-conjugated cruciform molecules for electronic/optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Mai Ha; Nghia Nguyen, Duc; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2011-12-01

    The development of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) has seen much progress using solution-processable organic semiconductors, which can combine high charge transport mobility, stability and patternability. In this work, we report on the design and synthesis of a new type of photopatternable π-conjugated cruciform molecule. These molecules are capable of photopatterning by virtue of photopolymerization of the reactive end-groups (pentadien or acrylate). Their solubility is very good for solution processing. Transistor devices using these molecules provided a maximum field-effect mobility of 3.7×10-3 cm2 V-1 s-1 as well as a high current on/off ratio. Remarkably, it was found that their charge carrier mobilities were well-maintained, even after the photocrosslinking process.

  11. Ninth international conference on hole burning, single molecule and related spectroscopies: science and applications (HBSM 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This conference was organized around 9 sessions: -) single molecule, -) quantum optics, -) hole-burning materials and mechanisms, -) single nano-particle spectroscopy, -) dephasing and spectral diffusion, -) microwave photonics, -) biological systems, -) rare earth doped materials, -) novel laser sources. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  12. Enhanced Electron Attachment to Highly-Excited Molecules and Its Applications in Pulsed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.X.; Ma, C.Y.; McCorkle, D.L.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past several years have shown that electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules have extremely large cross sections. We will discuss the implications of this for pulsed discharges used for H - generation, material processing, and plasma remediation

  13. Ninth international conference on hole burning, single molecule and related spectroscopies: science and applications (HBSM 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This conference was organized around 9 sessions: -) single molecule, -) quantum optics, -) hole-burning materials and mechanisms, -) single nano-particle spectroscopy, -) dephasing and spectral diffusion, -) microwave photonics, -) biological systems, -) rare earth doped materials, -) novel laser sources. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  14. Small Molecule Modulator of p53 Signaling Pathway: Application for Radiosensitizing or Radioprotection Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sang Taek; Cho, Mun Ju; Gwak, Jung Sug; Ryu, Min Jung; Song, Jie Young; Yun, Yeon Sook

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is key molecule to protect the cell against genotoxic stress and..the most frequently mutated..protein..in cancer cells. Lack of functional p53..is accompanied by high rate of genomic instability, rapid tumor progression, resistance to anticancer therapy, and increased angiogenesis. In response to DNA damage, p53 protein rapidly accumulated through attenuated proteolysis and is also activated as transcription factor. Activated p53 up-regulates target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis and then lead to suppression of malignant transformation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. Chemical genetics is a new technology to uncover the signaling networks that regulated biological phenotype using exogenous reagents such as small molecules. Analogous to classical forward genetic screens in model organism, this approach makes use of high throughput, phenotypic assay to identify small molecules that disrupt gene product function in a way that alters a phenotype of interest. Recently, interesting small molecules were identified from cell based high throughput screening and its target protein or mechanism of action were identified by various methods including affinity chromatography, protein array profiling, mRNA or phage display, transcription profiling, and RNA interference

  15. Triphenylamine-Based Push-Pull Molecule for Photovoltaic Applications : From Synthesis to Ultrafast Device Photophysics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozlov, Oleg; Liu, Xiaoming; Luponosov, Yuriy N.; Solodukhin, Alexander N.; Toropynina, Victoria Y.; Min, Jie; Buzin, Mikhail I.; Peregudova, Svetlana M.; Brabec, Christoph J.; Ponomarenko, Sergei A.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2017-01-01

    Small push pull molecules attract much attention as prospective donor materials for organic solar cells (OSCs). By chemical engineering, it is possible to combine a number of attractive properties such as broad absorption, efficient charge separation, and vacuum and solution processabilities in a

  16. Reverse pharmacognosy: identifying biological properties for plants by means of their molecule constituents: application to meranzin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Quoc-Tuan; Lamy, Cécile; Renimel, Isabelle; Sauvan, Nancy; André, Patrice; Himbert, Franck; Morin-Allory, Luc; Bernard, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Reverse pharmacognosy aims at finding biological targets for natural compounds by virtual or real screening and identifying natural resources that contain the active molecules. We report herein a study focused on the identification of biological properties of meranzin, a major component isolated from Limnocitrus littoralis (Miq.) Swingle. Selnergy, an IN SILICO biological profiling software, was used to identify putative binding targets of meranzin. Among the 400 screened proteins, 3 targets were selected: COX1, COX2 and PPARgamma. Binding tests were realised for these 3 protein candidates, as well as two negative controls. The predictions made by Selnergy were consistent with the experimental results, meaning that these 3 targets can be modulated by an extract containing this compound in a suitable concentration. These results demonstrate that reverse pharmacognosy and its inverse docking component is a powerful tool to identify biological properties for natural molecules and hence for plants containing these compounds.

  17. Prediction of Collision Cross-Section Values for Small Molecules: Application to Pesticide Residue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Lubertus; Bade, Richard; Celma, Alberto; Mullin, Lauren; Cleland, Gareth; Stead, Sara; Hernandez, Felix; Sancho, Juan V

    2017-06-20

    The use of collision cross-section (CCS) values obtained by ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry has added a third dimension (alongside retention time and exact mass) to aid in the identification of compounds. However, its utility is limited by the number of experimental CCS values currently available. This work demonstrates the potential of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the prediction of CCS values of pesticides. The predictor, based on eight software-chosen molecular descriptors, was optimized using CCS values of 205 small molecules and validated using a set of 131 pesticides. The relative error was within 6% for 95% of all CCS values for protonated molecules, resulting in a median relative error less than 2%. In order to demonstrate the potential of CCS prediction, the strategy was applied to spinach samples. It notably improved the confidence in the tentative identification of suspect and nontarget pesticides.

  18. Applications of a single-molecule detection in early disease diagnosis and enzymatic reaction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiangwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Various single-molecule techniques were utilized for ultra-sensitive early diagnosis of viral DNA and antigen and basic mechanism study of enzymatic reactions. DNA of human papilloma virus (HPV) served as the screening target in a flow system. Alexa Fluor 532 (AF532) labeled single-stranded DNA probes were hybridized to the target HPV-16 DNA in solution. The individual hybridized molecules were imaged with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) in two ways. In the single-color mode, target molecules were detected via fluorescence from hybridized probes only. This system could detect HPV-16 DNA in the presence of human genomic DNA down to 0.7 copy/cell and had a linear dynamic range of over 6 orders of magnitude. In the dual-color mode, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was employed to achieve zero false-positive count. We also showed that DNA extracts from Pap test specimens did not interfere with the system. A surface-based method was used to improve the throughput of the flow system. HPV-16 DNA was hybridized to probes on a glass surface and detected with a total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope. In the single-probe mode, the whole genome and target DNA were fluorescently labeled before hybridization, and the detection limit is similar to the flow system. In the dual-probe mode, a second probe was introduced. The linear dynamic range covers 1.44-7000 copies/cell, which is typical of early infection to near-cancer stages. The dual-probe method was tested with a crudely prepared sample. Even with reduced hybridization efficiency caused by the interference of cellular materials, we were still able to differentiate infected cells from healthy cells. Detection and quantification of viral antigen with a novel single-molecule immunosorbent assay (SMISA) was achieved. Antigen from human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) was chosen to be the target in this study. The target was sandwiched between a monoclonal capture antibody and a

  19. Detecting level crossings without solving the Hamiltonian. II. Applications to atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Raman, C.

    2007-01-01

    A number of interesting phenomena occur at points where the energy levels of an atom or a molecule (anti) cross as a function of some parameter such as an external field. In a previous paper [M. Bhattacharya and C. Raman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140405 (2006)] we have outlined powerful mathematical techniques useful in identifying the parameter values at which such (avoided) crossings occur. In the accompanying article [M. Bhattacharya and C. Raman, Phys. Rev A 75, 033405 (2007)] we have developed the mathematical basis of these algebraic techniques in some detail. In this article we apply these level-crossing methods to the spectra of atoms and molecules in a magnetic field. In the case of atoms the final result is the derivation of a class of invariants of the Breit-Rabi Hamiltonian of magnetic resonance. These invariants completely describe the parametric symmetries of the Hamiltonian. In the case of molecules we present an indicator which can tell when the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down without using any information about the molecular potentials other than the fact that they are real. We frame our discussion in the context of Feshbach resonances in the atom-pair 23 Na- 85 Rb which are of current interest

  20. Putting prions into focus: application of single molecule detection to the diagnosis of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, A; Bieschke, J; Eigen, M; Kretzschmar, H A

    2000-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by the cerebral deposition of an aggregated pathological isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) which constitutes the principal component of the transmissible agent termed prion. In order to develop a highly sensitive method for the detection of PrP(Sc) aggregates in biological samples such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we used a method based on Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), a technique which allows detection of single fluorescently labeled molecules in solution. Within the FCS setup, fluorescent photons emitted by molecules passing an open volume element defined by the beam of an excitation laser focussed into a diffraction-limited spot are imaged confocally onto a single photon counting detector. Aggregates of PrP(Sc) could be labeled by co-aggregation of probe molecules such as monomeric recombinant PrP or PrP-specific antibodies tagged with a fluorescent dye. In addition to slow diffusion, labeled aggregates are characterized by high fluorescence intensity, which allows detection and quantification by analysis of fluorescence intensity distribution. To improve detection of rare target particles, the accessible volume element was increased by scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). To further improve sensitivity and specificity, two different probes were used simultaneously in a two-color setup. In a diagnostic model system of CSF spiked with purified prion rods, dual-color SIFT was more sensitive than Western blot analysis. In addition, a PrP(Sc)-specific signal was also detected in a number of CSF samples derived from CJD patients but not in controls.

  1. Developments and Applications of Electrophoresis and Small Molecule Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-sensitive native fluorescence detection of proteins with miniaturized one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was achieved with laser side-entry excitation, which provides both high excitation power and low background level. The detection limit for R-phycoerythrin protein spots in 1-D SDS-PAGE was as low as 15 fg, which corresponds to 40 thousand molecules only. The average detection limit of six standard native proteins was 5 pg per band and the dynamic range spanned more than 3 orders of magnitude. Approximately 150 protein spots from 30 ng of total Escherichia coli extraction were detected on a 0.8 cm x 1 cm gel in two-dimensional separation. Estrogen-DNA adducts as 4-OHE1(E2)-1-N3Ade and 4-OHEI(E2)-2-NacCys were hypothesized as early risk assessment of prostate and breast cancers. Capillary electrophoresis, luminescence/absorption spectroscopy and LC-MS were used to characterize and detect these adducts. Monoclonal antibodies against each individual adduct were developed and used to enrich such compounds from urine samples of prostate and breast cancer patients as well as healthy people. Adduct 4-OHE1-1-N3Ade was detected at much higher level in urine from subjects with prostate cancer patients compared to healthy males. The same adduct and 4-OHEI-2-NacCys were also detected at a much higher level in urine from a woman with breast carcinoma than samples from healthy controls. These two DNA adducts may serve as novel biomarkers for early diagnostic of cancers. The adsorption properties of R-phycoerythrin (RPE), on the fused-silica surface were studied using capillary electrophoresis (CE) and single molecule spectroscopy. The band shapes and migration times were measured in CE. Adsorption and desorption events were recorded at the single-molecule level by imaging of the evanescent-field layer using total internal reflection. The adsorbed RPE molecules on the fused-silica prism surface were

  2. Gas phase chemical kinetics at high temperature of carbonaceous molecules: application to circumstellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biennier, L.; Gardez, A.; Saidani, G.; Georges, R.; Rowe, B.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar shells of evolved stars are a theater of extremely rich physical and chemical processes. More than seventy molecules of varied nature have been identified in the envelopes through their spectral fingerprints in the microwave or far infrared regions. Many of them are carbon chain molecules and radicals and a significant number are unique to the circumstellar medium. However, observational data remain scarce and more than half of the detected species have been observed in only one object, the nearby carbon star IRC + 10216. Chemical kinetic models are needed to describe the formation of molecules in evolved circumstellar outflows. Upcoming terrestrial telescopes such as ALMA will increase the spatial resolution by several orders of magnitude and provide a wealth of data. The determination of relevant laboratory kinetics data is critical to keep up with the development of the observations and of the refinement of chemical models. Today, the majority of reactions studied in the laboratory are the ones involved in combustion and concerning light hydrocarbons. Our objective is to provide the scientific community with rate coefficients of reactions between abundant species in these warm environments. Cyanopolyynes from HC_2N to HC_9N have all been detected in carbon rich circumstellar envelopes in up to 10 sources for HC_3N. Neutral-neutral reactions of the CN radical with unsaturated hydrocarbons could be a dominant route in the formation of cyanopolyynes, even at low temperatures. Our approach aims to bridge the temperature gap between resistively heated flow tubes and shock tubes. The present kinetic measurements are obtained using a new reactor combining a high enthalpy source (Moudens et al. 2011) with a flow tube and a pulsed laser photolysis and laser induced fluorescence system to probe the undergoing chemical reactions. The high enthalpy flow tube has been used to measure the rate constant of the reaction of the CN radical with propane, propene

  3. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials and projector augmented-wave data sets: application to diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adllan, Alwaleed Ahmed; Dal Corso, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    We test several ultrasoft pseudopotentials (US-PPs) and projector augmented-wave (PAW) data sets, calculating the bond lengths, the atomization energies and the frequencies of the vibrational stretch modes of various diatomic molecules. The US-PPs and the PAW data sets are constructed with the same recipe and using the local density approximation or the Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation energies. We study the dimers H2, N2, O2, F2, Al2, Si2, P2, S2 and Cl2 and several monohydrides, carbides, nitrides and oxides of boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, iron and nickel. We find that US-PPs and PAW data sets constructed with the same parameters provide almost equivalent results for the bond lengths and the vibrational stretch frequencies while, for some molecules, the PAW method is superior to the US-PP method for the calculation of the atomization energies. Our geometries and vibrational frequencies are compared with the results present in the literature and obtained by localized basis sets. It is found that the agreement is very good, with discrepancies comparable to those due to the use of different localized basis sets.

  4. Dissociative attachment studies of halogen-containing molecules: problems, applications and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrow, P.D.; Gallup, G.A.; Fabrikant, I.I.; Jordan, K.D.

    1996-01-01

    The dissociative attachment (DA) process appears in a surprisingly diverse number of research disciplines. Although gas phase studies have been carried out for approximately 30 years, there are no calculations of the cross sections for this process in molecules larger than diatomics. In this presentation, the authors review briefly the role of DA in several contexts generally unfamiliar to workers in atomic and molecular physics (e.g. surface physics and chemistry, liquid phase, biology and analytical chemistry) and touch on some of the theoretical difficulties. The current work at the University of Nebraska, both experimental and theoretical, on compounds containing a single halogen atom is then presented. Thus the measurements in a series of mono-chloroalkanes are discussed, exploring the influence of the DA cross section of a region of un saturation in the molecule, that is, a double bond placed close to or distant from the C-Cl bond. It is concluded that the DA process can be used to study intramolecular electron transfer and the importance of accurate determination of the resonance lifetime is emphasised. 58 refs., 8 figs

  5. Internet Databases of the Properties, Enzymatic Reactions, and Metabolism of Small Molecules-Search Options and Applications in Food Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkiewicz, Piotr; Darewicz, Małgorzata; Iwaniak, Anna; Bucholska, Justyna; Starowicz, Piotr; Czyrko, Emilia

    2016-12-06

    Internet databases of small molecules, their enzymatic reactions, and metabolism have emerged as useful tools in food science. Database searching is also introduced as part of chemistry or enzymology courses for food technology students. Such resources support the search for information about single compounds and facilitate the introduction of secondary analyses of large datasets. Information can be retrieved from databases by searching for the compound name or structure, annotating with the help of chemical codes or drawn using molecule editing software. Data mining options may be enhanced by navigating through a network of links and cross-links between databases. Exemplary databases reviewed in this article belong to two classes: tools concerning small molecules (including general and specialized databases annotating food components) and tools annotating enzymes and metabolism. Some problems associated with database application are also discussed. Data summarized in computer databases may be used for calculation of daily intake of bioactive compounds, prediction of metabolism of food components, and their biological activity as well as for prediction of interactions between food component and drugs.

  6. Application of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in stabilization process of biological molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossien Salmani

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Co-precipitation method is an easy way to prepare magnetic nanoparticles of iron with a large surface and small particle size, which increases the ability of these particles to act as a suitable carrier for enzyme stabilization. Adequate modification of the surface of these nanoparticles enhances their ability to bind to biological molecules. The immobilized protein or enzyme on magnetic nanoparticles are more stable against structural changes, temperature and pH in comparison with un-stabilized structures, and it is widely used in various sciences, including protein isolation and purification, pharmaceutical science, and food analysis. Stabilization based on the covalent bonds and physical absorption is nonspecific, which greatly limits their functionality. The process of stabilization through bio-mediums provide a new method to overcome the selectivity problem.

  7. Synthesis of new host molecules and applications for imaging by NMR Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traore, T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used today for early medical diagnosis. During the MRI examination, the use of contrast agent allows the obtention of well resolved images. However the lack of sensibility of this technic lead to the utilization of hyper-polarized species ( 3 He, 13 C, 129 Xe) in MRI. The xenon (Xe) is the more promising but due to its weak selectivity, it cannot be used in molecular imaging. So, the development and utilization of host molecules able to encapsulate the xenon and bring it to a targeted biological tissue or organ is necessary. In these conditions, during this thesis, we worked on the elaboration of such molecules, and particularly, in cryptophanes since these compounds have strong affinity for xenon and could be used as tools for MRI by hyper-polarized xenon (Hp Xe). A new route synthesis of cryptophane-111, that has the highest affinity for xenon, was developed; first functionalized derivatives of this compound have been also obtained in order to obtain the first biosensors based on cryptophane-111. The coating of specific ligand on these functionalized compounds could allow targeted MRI. A probe for hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) detection was synthesized. Hydrogen peroxide is implicated in cellular oxidative stress and present in case of neuro-degenerative diseases (Parkinson, Alzheimer). The probe obtained allowed the imaging of H 2 O 2 by MRI Xe for the first time. nano-tubes functionalized with strong concentration of cryptophane have been synthesized in order to increase the sensitivity of the imaging technic that uses xenon. (author) [fr

  8. a New Hybrid Program for Fitting Rotationally Resolved Spectra of Methylamine-Like Molecules: Application to 2-METHYLMALONALDEHYDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Isabelle; Hougen, Jon T.

    2015-06-01

    A new hybrid-model fitting program for methylamine-like molecules has been developed, based on an effective Hamiltonian in which the ammonia-like inversion motion is treated using a tunneling formalism, while the internal-rotation motion is treated using an explicit kinetic energy operator and potential energy function. The Hamiltonian in the computer program is set up as a 2x2 partitioned matrix, where each diagonal block consists of a traditional torsion-rotation Hamiltonian (as in the earlier program BELGI), and the two off-diagonal blocks contain all tunneling terms. This hybrid formulation permits the use of the permutation-inversion group G6 (isomorphic to C3v) for terms in the two diagonal blocks, but requires G12 for terms in the off-diagonal blocks. Our first application of the new program is to 2-methylmalonaldehyde. Microwave data for this molecule were previously fit (essentially to experimental measurement error) using an all-tunneling Hamiltonian formalism to treat both large-amplitude-motions. For 2-methylmalonaldehyde, the hybrid program achieves a fit of nearly the same quality as that obtained by the all-tunneling program, but fits with the hybrid program eliminate a large discrepancy between internal rotation barriers in the OH and OD isotopologues of 2-methylmalonaldehyde that arose in fits with the all-tunneling program. Other molecules for application of the hybrid program will be mentioned. V.V. Ilyushin, E.A. Alekseev, Yung-Ching Chou, Yen-Chu Hsu, J. T. Hougen, F.J. Lovas, L. Picraux, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251 (2008) 56-63

  9. Evaluation of the Electronic Structure of Single-Molecule Junctions Based on Current-Voltage and Thermopower Measurements: Application to C60 Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Isshiki, Yuji; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-02-16

    The electronic structure of molecular junctions has a significant impact on their transport properties. Despite the decisive role of the electronic structure, a complete characterization of the electronic structure remains a challenge. This is because there is no straightforward way of measuring electron spectroscopy for an individual molecule trapped in a nanoscale gap between two metal electrodes. Herein, a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the electronic structure in single-molecule junctions based on the analysis of current-voltage (I-V) and thermoelectric characteristics is described. It is shown that the electronic structure of the prototypical C 60 single-molecule junction can be resolved by analyzing complementary results of the I-V and thermoelectric measurement. This combined approach confirmed that the C 60 single-molecule junction was highly conductive with molecular electronic conductances of 0.033 and 0.003 G 0 and a molecular Seebeck coefficient of -12 μV K -1 . In addition, we revealed that charge transport was mediated by a LUMO whose energy level was located 0.5≈0.6 eV above the Fermi level of the Au electrode. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Molecule-Molecule Inelastic Scattering: Derivations of Equations and Application to N2 + H2 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-12-17

    The mixed quantum classical theory, MQCT, for inelastic scattering of two molecules is developed, in which the internal (rotational, vibrational) motion of both collision partners is treated with quantum mechanics, and the molecule-molecule scattering (translational motion) is described by classical trajectories. The resultant MQCT formalism includes a system of coupled differential equations for quantum probability amplitudes, and the classical equations of motion in the mean-field potential. Numerical tests of this theory are carried out for several most important rotational state-to-state transitions in the N2 + H2 system, in a broad range of collision energies. Besides scattering resonances (at low collision energies) excellent agreement with full-quantum results is obtained, including the excitation thresholds, the maxima of cross sections, and even some smaller features, such as slight oscillations of energy dependencies. Most importantly, at higher energies the results of MQCT are nearly identical to the full quantum results, which makes this approach a good alternative to the full-quantum calculations that become computationally expensive at higher collision energies and for heavier collision partners. Extensions of this theory to include vibrational transitions or general asymmetric-top rotor (polyatomic) molecules are relatively straightforward.

  11. Vibrational Probes: From Small Molecule Solvatochromism Theory and Experiments to Applications in Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Londergan, Casey H; Webb, Lauren J; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-04-18

    The vibrational frequency of a chosen normal mode is one of the most accurately measurable spectroscopic properties of molecules in condensed phases. Accordingly, infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy have provided valuable information on both distributions and ensemble-average values of molecular vibrational frequencies, and these frequencies are now routinely used to investigate structure, conformation, and even absolute configuration of chemical and biological molecules of interest. Recent advancements in coherent time-domain nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy have allowed the study of heterogeneous distributions of local structures and thermally driven ultrafast fluctuations of vibrational frequencies. To fully utilize IR probe functional groups for quantitative bioassays, a variety of biological and chemical techniques have been developed to site-specifically introduce vibrational probe groups into proteins and nucleic acids. These IR-probe-labeled biomolecules and chemically reactive systems are subject to linear and nonlinear vibrational spectroscopic investigations and provide information on the local electric field, conformational changes, site-site protein contacts, and/or function-defining features of biomolecules. A rapidly expanding library of data from such experiments requires an interpretive method with atom-level chemical accuracy. However, despite prolonged efforts to develop an all-encompassing theory for describing vibrational solvatochromism and electrochromism as well as dynamic fluctuations of instantaneous vibrational frequencies, purely empirical and highly approximate theoretical models have often been used to interpret experimental results. They are, in many cases, based on the simple assumption that the vibrational frequency of an IR reporter is solely dictated by electric potential or field distribution around the vibrational chromophore. Such simplified description of vibrational solvatochromism generally referred to as

  12. Biotechnological and Pharmacological Applications of Biotoxins and Other Bioactive Molecules from Dinoflagellates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Assunção

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The long-lasting interest in bioactive molecules (namely toxins produced by (microalga dinoflagellates has risen in recent years. Exhibiting wide diversity and complexity, said compounds are well-recognized for their biological features, with great potential for use as pharmaceutical therapies and biological research probes. Unfortunately, provision of those compounds is still far from sufficient, especially in view of an increasing demand for preclinical testing. Despite the difficulties to establish dinoflagellate cultures and obtain reasonable productivities of such compounds, intensive research has permitted a number of advances in the field. This paper accordingly reviews the characteristics of some of the most important biotoxins (and other bioactive substances produced by dinoflagellates. It also presents and discusses (to some length the main advances pertaining to dinoflagellate production, from bench to large scale—with an emphasis on material published since the latest review available on the subject. Such advances encompass improvements in nutrient formulation and light supply as major operational conditions; they have permitted adaptation of classical designs, and aided the development of novel configurations for dinoflagellate growth—even though shearing-related issues remain a major challenge.

  13. Metabolomic applications in radiation biodosimetry: exploring radiation effects through small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannkuk, Evan L; Fornace, Albert J; Laiakis, Evagelia C

    2017-10-01

    Exposure of the general population to ionizing radiation has increased in the past decades, primarily due to long distance travel and medical procedures. On the other hand, accidental exposures, nuclear accidents, and elevated threats of terrorism with the potential detonation of a radiological dispersal device or improvised nuclear device in a major city, all have led to increased needs for rapid biodosimetry and assessment of exposure to different radiation qualities and scenarios. Metabolomics, the qualitative and quantitative assessment of small molecules in a given biological specimen, has emerged as a promising technology to allow for rapid determination of an individual's exposure level and metabolic phenotype. Advancements in mass spectrometry techniques have led to untargeted (discovery phase, global assessment) and targeted (quantitative phase) methods not only to identify biomarkers of radiation exposure, but also to assess general perturbations of metabolism with potential long-term consequences, such as cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary disease. Metabolomics of radiation exposure has provided a highly informative snapshot of metabolic dysregulation. Biomarkers in easily accessible biofluids and biospecimens (urine, blood, saliva, sebum, fecal material) from mouse, rat, and minipig models, to non-human primates and humans have provided the basis for determination of a radiation signature to assess the need for medical intervention. Here we provide a comprehensive description of the current status of radiation metabolomic studies for the purpose of rapid high-throughput radiation biodosimetry in easily accessible biofluids and discuss future directions of radiation metabolomics research.

  14. Predicting Melting Points of Organic Molecules: Applications to Aqueous Solubility Prediction Using the General Solubility Equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, J L; van Mourik, T; Mitchell, J B O

    2015-11-01

    In this work we make predictions of several important molecular properties of academic and industrial importance to seek answers to two questions: 1) Can we apply efficient machine learning techniques, using inexpensive descriptors, to predict melting points to a reasonable level of accuracy? 2) Can values of this level of accuracy be usefully applied to predicting aqueous solubility? We present predictions of melting points made by several novel machine learning models, previously applied to solubility prediction. Additionally, we make predictions of solubility via the General Solubility Equation (GSE) and monitor the impact of varying the logP prediction model (AlogP and XlogP) on the GSE. We note that the machine learning models presented, using a modest number of 2D descriptors, can make melting point predictions in line with the current state of the art prediction methods (RMSE≥40 °C). We also find that predicted melting points, with an RMSE of tens of degrees Celsius, can be usefully applied to the GSE to yield accurate solubility predictions (log10 S RMSE<1) over a small dataset of drug-like molecules. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Analysis of Point Based Image Registration Errors With Applications in Single Molecule Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, E A K; Ober, R J

    2013-12-15

    We present an asymptotic treatment of errors involved in point-based image registration where control point (CP) localization is subject to heteroscedastic noise; a suitable model for image registration in fluorescence microscopy. Assuming an affine transform, CPs are used to solve a multivariate regression problem. With measurement errors existing for both sets of CPs this is an errors-in-variable problem and linear least squares is inappropriate; the correct method being generalized least squares. To allow for point dependent errors the equivalence of a generalized maximum likelihood and heteroscedastic generalized least squares model is achieved allowing previously published asymptotic results to be extended to image registration. For a particularly useful model of heteroscedastic noise where covariance matrices are scalar multiples of a known matrix (including the case where covariance matrices are multiples of the identity) we provide closed form solutions to estimators and derive their distribution. We consider the target registration error (TRE) and define a new measure called the localization registration error (LRE) believed to be useful, especially in microscopy registration experiments. Assuming Gaussianity of the CP localization errors, it is shown that the asymptotic distribution for the TRE and LRE are themselves Gaussian and the parameterized distributions are derived. Results are successfully applied to registration in single molecule microscopy to derive the key dependence of the TRE and LRE variance on the number of CPs and their associated photon counts. Simulations show asymptotic results are robust for low CP numbers and non-Gaussianity. The method presented here is shown to outperform GLS on real imaging data.

  16. Design, synthesis and evaluation of fluorescent molecules for optical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Corinne Mazur

    Results on two separate projects will be discussed. The first project has resulted in the identification of two fluorescent photochromic spiropyrans which reversibly bind certain metal ions in solution. This represents an improvement upon other fluorescent metal ion sensors which are not conveniently reversible. These spiropyrans display complex thermochromism, photochromism, and metal ion-dependent changes in fluorescence emission properties. In the presence of certain Group IIb and alkaline earth metal ions, the fluorescence emission of these molecules increases up to 20-fold upon binding. Reversible detection of nanomolar levels of Zn2+ and Hg2+ has been achieved using these spiropyran- based fluorescent sensors and, to our knowledge, one of these spiropyrans is the first example of a photoreversible fluorescent metal ion sensor. Second, in an effort to improve upon the spectroscopic characteristics of donor-acceptor tetrahydrochrysene systems that were previously prepared as fluorescent ligands for the estrogen receptor, we have synthesized two aza analogs as receptor ligand prototypes and characterized their absorbance and fluorescence spectra. The UV spectra of these heterocycles were quite insensitive to solvent polarity, but showed marked red shifts under acidic or basic conditions. These heterocycles displayed complex fluorescence spectra, with emission bands around 400 nm in aprotic medium that shifted to longer wavelength in protic solvents. In many cases, acid and base caused strong red shifts in the emission, with large alterations in quantum yield; in some cases emission bands were shifted as far as 600 nm. Thus, these two azatetrahydrochrysenes show greater environmental sensitivity than do the previously reported donor-acceptor fluorescent ligands.

  17. Analytical GIAO and hybrid-basis integral derivatives: application to geometry optimization of molecules in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I; Reine, Simen S; Helgaker, Trygve

    2012-07-14

    Analytical integral evaluation is a central task of modern quantum chemistry. Here we present a general method for evaluating differentiated integrals over standard Gaussian and mixed Gaussian/plane-wave hybrid orbitals. The main idea is to have a representation of basis sets that is flexible enough to enable differentiated integrals to be reinterpreted as standard integrals over modified basis functions. As an illustration of the method, we report a very simple implementation of Hartree-Fock level geometrical derivatives in finite magnetic fields for gauge-origin independent atomic orbitals, within the London program. As a quantum-chemical application, we optimize the structure of helium clusters and some well-known covalently bound molecules (water, ammonia and benzene) subject to strong magnetic fields.

  18. Synthetic strategies for controlling inter- and intramolecular interactions: Applications in single-molecule fluorescence imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and palladium catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Nicholas R.

    The field of synthetic organic chemistry has reached such maturity that, with sufficient effort and resources, the synthesis of virtually any small molecule which exhibits reasonable stability at room temperature can be realized. While representing a monumental achievement for the field, the ability to exert precise control over molecular structure is just a means to an end, and it is frequently the responsibility of the synthetic chemist to determine which molecules should actually be synthesized. For better or worse, there exists no competitive free market in academia for new molecules, and as a result, the decision of which compounds should be synthesized is seldom driven by the forces of supply and demand; rather, it is guided by the synthetic chemist's interest in an anticipated structure-function relationship or in the properties of a previously unstudied class of molecules. As a consequence, there exists a pervasive need for chemists with synthetic expertise in fields (e.g., molecular imaging) and subdisciplines of chemistry (e.g., physical chemistry) in which the identification of promising synthetic targets dramatically outpaces the synthetic output in that field or subdiscipline, and ample opportunities are available for synthetic chemists who choose to pursue such cross-disciplinary research. This thesis describes synthetic efforts that leverage these opportunities to realize applications in biological imaging and in palladium catalysis. In Part I, the synthesis and characterization of three novel luminophores and their imaging applications are discussed. The first is a molecular beacon that utilizes a fluorophorefluorophore pair which exhibits H-dimer quenching in the closed conformation. This probe offers several advantages over conventional fluorophore-quencher molecular beacons in the detection of oligonucleotides, both in bulk and at the single-molecule level. Secondly, a fluorescent, Cy3-Cy5 covalent heterodimer is reported, which on account of the

  19. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Hong, Seok-Cheol [Seoul, KR; Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A.; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  20. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is a very stable and inert molecule due to the formation of a triple bond between the two atoms. Surpris- ingly isoelectronic molecules are quite reactive making dinitrogen very useful and unique. Dinitrogen (N. 2. ) is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for.

  1. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  2. A linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized dye laser for application in laser cooling of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, D P; Xia, Y; Yin, Y N; Yang, X X; Fang, Y F; Li, X J; Yin, J P

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate a robust and versatile solution for locking the continuous-wave dye laser for applications in laser cooling of molecules which need linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized lasers. The dye laser is first stabilized with respect to a reference cavity by Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique which results in a single frequency with the linewidth 200 kHz and short-term stabilization, by stabilizing the length of the reference cavity to a stabilized helium-neon laser we simultaneously transfer the ± 2 MHz absolute frequency stability of the helium-neon laser to the dye laser with long-term stabilization. This allows the dye laser to be frequency chirped with the maximum 60 GHz scan range while its frequency remains locked. It also offers the advantages of locking at arbitrary dye laser frequencies, having a larger locking capture range and frequency scanning range to be implemented via software. This laser has been developed for the purpose of laser cooling a molecular magnesium fluoride beam.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  4. Peptide-coated semiconductor quantum dots and their applications in biological imaging of single molecules in live cells and organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinaud, Fabien Florent

    2007-12-01

    A new surface chemistry has been developed for the solubilization and biofunctionalization of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals fluorescent probes, also known as quantum dots. This chemistry is based on the surface coating of quantum dots with custom-designed polycysteine peptides and yields water-soluble, small, monodispersed and colloidally stable probes that remain bright and photostable in complex biological milieus. This peptide coating strategy was successfully tested on several types of core and core-shell quantum dots emitting from the visible (e.g. CdSe/ZnS) to the NIR spectrum range (e.g. CdTe/CdSe/ZnS). By taking advantage of the versatile physico-chemical properties of peptides, a peptide "toolkit" was designed and employed to impart several biological functions to individual quantum dots and control their biochemical activity at the nanometer scale. These biofunctionalized peptide-coated quantum dots were exploited in very diverse biological applications. Near-infrared emitting quantum dot probes were engineered with optimized blood circulation and biodistribution properties for in vivo animal imaging. Visible emitting quantum dots were used for single molecule tracking of raft-associated GPI-anchored proteins in live cells. This last application revealed the presence of discrete and non-caveolar lipid microdomains capable of impeding free lateral diffusions in the plasma membrane of Hela cells. Imaging and tracking of peptide-coated quantum dots provided the first direct evidence that microdomains having the composition and behavior expected for lipid rafts can induce molecular compartmentalization in the membrane of living cells.

  5. Total internal partition sums for 166 isotopologues of 51 molecules important in planetary atmospheres: Application to HITRAN2016 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Roller, Christopher; Lopes, Eldon; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Császár, Attila G.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Huang, Xinchuan; Schwenke, David W.; Lee, Timothy J.; Drouin, Brian J.; Tashkun, Sergei A.; Perevalov, Valery I.; Kochanov, Roman V.

    2017-12-01

    Total internal partition sums (TIPS) are reported for 166 isotopologues of 51 molecules important in planetary atmospheres. Molecules 1 to 50 are taken from the HITRAN2016 list, and, in some cases, additional isotopologues are considered for some of the molecules. Molecules 51-53 are C3H4, CH3, and CS2, respectively. TIPS are not reported for the O atom and CF4; thus, while there are 53 species in the list, data are reported for 51 molecules. The TIPS are determined by various methods from 1 K to a Tmax that ensures the TIPS reported have converged. These data are provided with HITRAN2016 and a new version of the TIPS code is available in both FORTRAN and python languages.

  6. Physical manipulation of single-molecule DNA using microbead and its application to analysis of DNA-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an individual DNA manipulation using an optical trapping for a microbead. This manipulation system is based on a fluorescent microscopy equipped with an IR laser. Both ends of linear DNA molecule were labeled with a biotin and a thiol group, respectively. Then the biotinylated end was attached to a microbead, and the other was immobilized on a thiol-linkable glass surface. We controlled the form of an individual DNA molecule by moving the focal point of IR laser, which trapped the microbead. In addition, we applied single-molecule approach to analyze DNA hydrolysis. We also used microchannel for single-molecule observation of DNA hydrolysis. The shortening of DNA in length caused by enzymatic hydrolysis was observed in real-time. The single-molecule DNA manipulation should contribute to elucidate detailed mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions

  7. Systemic application of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 3 protects skeletal muscle from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Aurelia; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Forbes, Thomas L; Potter, Richard F; Lawendy, Abdel-Rahman

    2017-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) is a limb- and life-threatening complication of acute limb ischemia and musculoskeletal trauma. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) have recently been shown to protect microvascular perfusion and to reduce inflammation and injury in various ischemic animal models. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of water-soluble CORM-3 on the extent of IR-induced muscle injury. Wistar rats were randomized into three groups: sham (no ischemia), IR + CORM-3 (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally), and IR + inactive CORM-3 (iCORM-3; 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally). No-flow ischemia was induced by the application of a tourniquet to the hind limb for 2 hours; tourniquet release commenced the reperfusion phase. Both CORM-3 and iCORM-3 were injected immediately after tourniquet release. Temporal changes in microvascular perfusion, cellular tissue injury (ethidium bromide and bisbenzimide staining), and inflammatory response (leukocyte recruitment) within the extensor digitorum longus muscle were assessed using intravital video microscopy every 15 minutes for a total of 90 minutes after initiation of reperfusion. Systemic levels of tumor necrosis factor-α were also measured. Hind limb IR resulted in (1) a significant no-reflow phenomenon followed by progressive increase in microvascular perfusion deficit (21% ± 2% continuously perfused capillaries in IR vs 76% ± 4% in sham [P reperfusion [P injury (ethidium bromide and bisbenzimide staining of 0.52 ± 0.07 in IR vs 0.05 ± 0.03 in sham at 90 minutes of reperfusion [P reperfusion [P injury, and inflammatory activation. CORM-3 displays potent protective and anti-inflammatory effects in an experimental model of hind limb IR, suggesting a potential therapeutic application of CORMs in treatment of ischemic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  9. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  10. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  11. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  12. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  13. New models for intermolecular repulsion and their application to Van Der Waals complexes and crystals of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.H.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Model intermolecular potentials are required for simulations of molecules in the gas, liquid, or solid phase. The widely used isotropic atom-atom model potentials are empirically fitted and based on the assumptions of transferability, combining rules and that atoms in molecules are spherical. This thesis develops a non-empirical method of modelling repulsion by applying the overlap model, which we show as a general non-empirical method of deriving repulsion potentials for a specific molecule. In this thesis, the repulsion parameters for an exponential atom-atom model potential are obtained from the ab initio charge density of a small organic molecule by making the assumption that the repulsion is proportional to the overlap of a pair of molecules. The proportionality constant is fixed by a limited number of intermolecular perturbation theory (IMPT) calculations. To complete the model potential, the electrostatic interaction is represented by a distributed multipole analysis, and the Slater-Kirkwood formula is used for the dispersion. These non-empirical potentials can reproduce experimental crystal structure when applied to crystal structure prediction of an oxyboryl derivative. A detailed study on further improving the overlap model was carried out for phenol-water, by including other minor intermolecular contributions of charge-transfer and penetration. High quality ab initio calculations on the complex were performed for use in comparison. To compare with experimental data, diffusion Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the potential, so that the effects of anharmonic zero-point motion on structure and energy of the system are included. When the system is too large for an IMPT calculation, the proportionality constant can be determined empirically by fitting the cell volume as shown in our study of crystal structures of chlorothalonil. This is used with an anisotropic repulsion model that has been derived for Cl and N atoms in chlorothalonil. This model

  14. Multiconformation, Density Functional Theory-Based pKa Prediction in Application to Large, Flexible Organic Molecules with Diverse Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochevarov, Art D; Watson, Mark A; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Philipp, Dean M

    2016-12-13

    We consider the conformational flexibility of molecules and its implications for micro- and macro-pK a . The corresponding formulas are derived and discussed against the background of a comprehensive scientific and algorithmic description of the latest version of our computer program Jaguar pK a , a density functional theory-based pK a predictor, which is now capable of acting on multiple conformations explicitly. Jaguar pK a is essentially a complex computational workflow incorporating research and technologies from the fields of cheminformatics, molecular mechanics, quantum mechanics, and implicit solvation models. The workflow also makes use of automatically applied empirical corrections which account for the systematic errors resulting from the neglect of explicit solvent interactions in the algorithm's implicit solvent model. Applications of our program to large, flexible organic molecules representing several classes of functional groups are shown, with a particular emphasis in illustrations laid on drug-like molecules. It is demonstrated that a combination of aggressive conformational search and an explicit consideration of multiple conformations nearly eliminates the dependence of results on the initially chosen conformation. In certain cases this leads to unprecedented accuracy, which is sufficient for distinguishing stereoisomers that have slightly different pK a values. An application of Jaguar pK a to proton sponges, the pK a of which are strongly influenced by steric effects, showcases the advantages that pK a predictors based on quantum mechanical calculations have over similar empirical programs.

  15. In Situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars by Gas Chromatography : Application to the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Arnaud; Sternberg, R.; Freissinet, C.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P.; Garnier, C.; Rodier, C.; Phillipon, C.; El bekri, J.; Stambouli, M.; Goesmann, F.; Raulin, F.; MOMA GC-team

    2009-09-01

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of the future Mars exploratory missions. With this aim the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars 2016 next coming European Space Agency mission is designed to the in situ analysis of organic molecules of exobiological interest in the Martian soil such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to extract from the soil, separate and detect organic compounds we have developed a sample processing system allowing the Gas Chromatographic analysis, within space compatible operating conditions, of the refractory organic compounds able to be contained at trace level in the Martian soil. The sample processing is performed in the oven dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample ( 200mg). The internal temperature can be ranged from 20 to 1000 °C. The extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 5 to 20 min. Then, the chemical derivatization or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is achieved directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the target volatile molecules are trapped in a cold or chemical trap and promptly desorbed in the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer. Organic compounds such as amino and carboxylic acids contained in Martian analogue soil (Atacama) have been detected by using our sample processing system.

  16. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.raupp@kit.edu; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm [Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hummel, Helga [Philips Technologie GmbH Innovative Technologies, Aachen (Germany); Bruns, Michael [Institute for Applied Materials and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  17. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Peters

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl-4,4’-diamine and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline-(4-phenylphenoxyaluminum, originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  18. Inelastic Scattering of Identical Molecules within Framework of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory: Application to Rotational Excitations in H2 + H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-06-09

    Theoretical foundation is laid out for description of permutation symmetry in the inelastic scattering processes that involve collisions of two identical molecules, within the framework of the mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT). In this approach, the rotational (and vibrational) states of two molecules are treated quantum-mechanically, whereas their translational motion (responsible for scattering) is treated classically. This theory is applied to H2 + H2 system, and the state-to-state transition cross sections are compared versus those obtained from the full-quantum calculations and experimental results from the literature. Good agreement is found in all cases. It is also found that results of MQCT, where the Coriolis coupling is included classically, are somewhat closer to exact full-quantum results than results of the other approximate quantum methods, where those coupling terms are neglected. These new developments allow applications of MQCT to a broad variety of molecular systems and processes.

  19. Electron-molecule collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Takayanagi, Kazuo

    1984-01-01

    Scattering phenomena play an important role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made through collision experiments. Amongst diverse kinds of collision systems, this book sheds light on the collision of an electron with a molecule. The electron-molecule collision provides a basic scattering problem. It is scattering by a nonspherical, multicentered composite particle with its centers having degrees of freedom of motion. The molecule can even disintegrate, Le., dissociate or ionize into fragments, some or all of which may also be molecules. Although it is a difficult problem, the recent theoretical, experimental, and computational progress has been so significant as to warrant publication of a book that specializes in this field. The progress owes partly to technical develop­ ments in measurements and computations. No less important has been the great and continuing stimulus from such fields of application as astrophysics, the physics of the earth's upper atmosphere, laser physics, radiat...

  20. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule Matters - Dinitrogen. A G Samuelson J Jabadurai. Volume 16 Issue 12 ... Author Affiliations. A G Samuelson1 J Jabadurai1. Department of Inroganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  1. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  4. Application of the weak-field asymptotic theory to the analysis of tunneling ionization of linear molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars Bojer; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru

    2012-01-01

    Hartree-Fock wave functions for the diatomics, and a Hartree-Fock quantum chemistry wave function for CO2. The structure factors are expanded in terms of standard functions and the associated structure coefficients, allowing the determination of the ionization rate for any orientation of the molecule...... with respect to the field, are tabulated. Our results, which are exact in the weak-field limit for H2+ and, in addition, under the Hartree-Fock approximation for the diatomics, are compared with results from the recent literature....

  5. Different approaches toward an automatic structural alignment of drug molecules: Applications to sterol mimics, thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebe, Gerhard; Mietzner, Thomas; Weber, Frank

    1994-12-01

    A relative comparison of the binding properties of different drug molecules requires their mutual superposition with respect to various alignment criteria. In order to validate the results of different alignment methods, the crystallographically observed binding geometries of ligands in the pocket of a common protein receptor have been used. The alignment function in the program SEAL that calculates the mutual superposition of molecules has been optimized with respect to these references. Across the reference data set, alignments could be produced that show mean rms deviations of approximately 1 Å compared to the experimental situation. For structures with obvious skeletal similarities a multiple-flexible fit, linking common pharmacophoric groups by virtual springs, has been incorporated into the molecular mechanics program MOMO. In order to combine conformational searching with comparative alignments, the optimized SEAL approach has been applied to sets of conformers generated by MIMUMBA, a program for conformational analysis. Multiple-flexible fits have been calculated for inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis. Sets of different thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors have been conformationally analyzed and subsequently aligned by a combined MIMUMBA/SEAL approach. Since for these examples crystallographic data on their mutual alignment are available, an objective assessment of the computed results could be performed. Among the generated conformers, one geometry could be selected for the thrombin and thermolysin inhibitors that approached reasonably well the experimentally observed alignment.

  6. Rational design of tetraphenylethylene-based luminescent down-shifting molecules: photophysical studies and photovoltaic applications in a CdTe solar cell from small to large units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Li, Zhipeng; Ablekim, Tursunjan; Ren, Tianhui; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-12-21

    A rational design strategy of novel fluorophores for luminescent down-shifting (LDS) application was proposed and tested in this paper. Three new fluorophores (1a-c) with specific intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics were synthesized as LDS molecules for increasing the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell. Photophysical studies of their solution and solid states, and photovoltaic measurements of their PMMA solid films applied on a CdTe solar cell suggested that the specific spectroscopic properties and Jsc enhancement effects of these molecules were highly related to their chemical structures. The Jsc enhancement effects of these fluorophores were measured on both a CdTe small cell and a large panel. An increase in the output Jsc by as high as 5.69% for a small cell and 8.88% for a large panel was observed. Compared to a traditional LDS molecule, Y083, these fluorophores exhibited more superior capabilities of LDS.

  7. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  8. Applications of the quasi-elastic light scattering to the study of dynamic properties of charged macro-molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouesin-Menez, Renee

    1979-01-01

    The object of this research thesis is to study the modifications of dynamic properties of a macromolecule under the influence of variations of its medium, by using a frequency analysis of the spectrum of light scattered by a solution of particles. Thus, an important part of this thesis addresses the study and development of the scattering method and of its analysis by 'photon pulses', and the development and adjustment of an electrophoretic device to study light scattering by molecules submitted to an electric field. Then, hydrodynamic characteristics of some macromolecules have been measured with or without electric field. The studied molecular systems have been: calibrated spheres of latex polystyrene, a globular protein (bovine serum albumin), a polysaccharide (under the form of a rigid short stick), a flexible linear polyelectrolyte (polymethacrylate), and two DNA samples

  9. Solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation without empty electronic states: Applications to solids, nanostructures and molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Dario; Ping, Yuan; Lu, Deyu; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    A method to solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation that avoids the explicit calculation of empty electronic states and the storage and inversion of dielectric matrices has been recently introduced [1-3]. This approach is suitable to compute the absorption spectra of large systems in a wide energy range and without relying on the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. We show the accuracy and scalability of this method by presenting calculations of absorption spectra of solids, molecules and nanostructures, including Si quantum dots and nanowires. In the case of nanowires, we discuss the influence of size and surface reconstruction on the optical properties.[4pt] [1] D. Rocca, D. Lu, and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)[0pt] [2] D. Rocca, Y. Ping, R. Gebauer, and G. Galli, submitted to PRB [0pt] [3] Y. Ping, D. Rocca, D. Lu, and G. Galli, submitted to PRB

  10. Property evaluations and application for separation of small molecules of a nanodiamond-polymer composite monolithic column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengqing; Wei, Aile; Wang, Xixi; Liu, Haiyan; Bai, Ligai; Yan, Hongyuan

    2016-07-01

    A nanodiamond-polymer composite monolithic column was first prepared successfully with modified nanodiamond (ND) as monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linker, 1-dodecanol as porogenic agent and benzoyl peroxide/dimethylacetamide (BPO/DMA) as initiator at 35°C for 2.5h. There was a sharp increase of specific surface area with ND added about 22 times from 0mg (3.90m(2)/g) to 7mg (81.2m(2)/g) determined with BET. Characterizations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier-transform infrared spectra (FIRT) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) were used to determine the microstructure, group composition, pore size distribution (≃1.56μm) and porosity (≃0.7484μm) of the monolith. An excellent column stability was confirmed by permeability (1.258x10(-10)cm(2)) and good linearity (R(2)=0.998) corresponding to backpressures measured at different flow rates. The highest swelling ability of the composite was about (5%) and classical RPLC of the column obtained occurred with the acetonitrile concentration increasing from 20% to 85% in the mobile phase, above which another retention model of normal-phase chromatography appeared. The items of the eddy dispersion and the absorption-release kinetics were the decisional factors of the composite column compared with the factors of longitudinal diffusion, and the skeleton-eluent mass transfer resistance due to the finite diffusivity. Good separation of neutral and basic small molecules was obtained (24,350 plates/m for neutral molecules and 22,300 plates/m for basic ones) with the hydrophobicity retention mechanism, but not for the acidic ones except to regulate the pH of the mobile phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Formation and emission characteristics of CN molecules in laser induced low pressure He plasma and its applications to N analysis in coal and fossilization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahna, Kurnia; Idroes, Rinaldi; Idris, Nasrullah; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Pardede, Marincan; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-03-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of an experimental study on the laser induced plasma emission of a number of CN free samples (urea, sucrose) with 40 mJ pulse energy using He and N₂ ambient gases. It is shown that the CN emission has its exclusive sources in the molecules produced as the result of chemical bonding either between the ablated C and N ions in the He plasma or between the ablated C and dissociated N from the N₂ ambient gas. The emission intensities in both cases are found to have the highest values at the low gas pressure of 2 kPa. The emission in He gas is shown to exhibit the typical characteristics related to a shockwave generated excitation mechanism. The experiments using He ambient gas further demonstrate the feasible laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application to quantitative and sensitive N analysis of coal and promising application for practical in situ carbon dating of fossils.

  12. Exogenous application of double-stranded RNA molecules from TMV p126 and CP genes confers resistance against TMV in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakalla, Naga Charan; Kaldis, Athanasios; Berbati, Margarita; Masarapu, Hema; Voloudakis, Andreas E

    2016-10-01

    External application of dsRNA molecules from Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) p126 and CP genes confers significant resistance against TMV infection. Exogenously applied dsRNA exhibits a rapid systemic trafficking in planta , and it is processed successfully by DICER-like proteins producing small interfering RNAs. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific, post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism, induced by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which protects eukaryotic cells against invasive nucleic acids like viruses and transposons. In the present study, we used a non-transgenic strategy to induce RNAi in Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi plants against TMV. DsRNA molecules for the p126 (TMV silencing suppressor) and coat protein (CP) genes were produced by a two-step PCR approach followed by in vitro transcription. The application of TMV p126 dsRNA onto tobacco plants induced greater resistance against TMV infection as compared to CP dsRNA (65 vs. 50 %). This study also reported the fast systemic spread of TMV p126 dsRNA from the treated (local) to non-treated (systemic) leaves beginning from 1 h post-application, confirmed by both conventional and real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, we employed a stem-loop RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of a putative viral siRNA for up to 9 days in local leaves and up to 6 days in systemic leaves post-application. The approach employed could represent a simple and environmentally safe way for the control of plant viruses in future agriculture.

  13. Computational investigation and synthesis of a sol-gel imprinted material for sensing application of some biologically active molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atta, Nada F., E-mail: Nada_fah1@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt); Hamed, Maher M.; Abdel-Mageed, Ali M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt)

    2010-05-14

    A hybrid sol-gel material was molecularly imprinted with a group of neurotransmitters. Imprinted material is a sol-gel thin film that is spin coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Imprinted films were characterized electrochemically using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the encapsulated molecules were extracted from the films and complementary molecular cavities are formed that enable their rebind. The films were tested in their corresponding template solutions for rebinding using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Computational approach for exploring the primary intermolecular forces between templates and hydrolyzed form of the precursor monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were carried out using Hartree-Fock method (HF). Interaction energy values were computed for each adduct formed between a monomer and a template. Analysis of the optimized conformations of various adducts could explain the mode of interaction between the templates and the monomer units. We found that interaction via the amino group is the common mode among the studied compounds and the results are in good agreement with the electrochemical measurements.

  14. Adsorption of NO2 molecules on armchair phosphorene nanosheet for nano sensor applications - A first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, V; Chandiramouli, R

    2017-08-01

    The electronic and NO 2 adsorption properties of hydrogenated armchair phosphorene nanosheet device is investigated through density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium Green's function method (NEGF). The armchair phosphorene nanosheet is used for the detection of NO 2 gas in phosphorene molecular device. The DOS spectrum demonstrates the change in peak maxima due to transfer of electrons between NO 2 gas and phosphorene base material. The change in the peak amplitude is observed along the valance band as well as in the conduction band in the transmission spectrum of phosphorene device. I-V characteristics support the change in the current upon adsorption of NO 2 gas molecule on phosphorene molecular device. Using formation energy, structural stability of phosphorene nanosheet has been studied. The adsorption properties of NO 2 on phosphorene nanosheet have also been investigated with the help of adsorption energy, Mulliken charge and Bader charge analysis. In order to ascertain the selectivity of NO 2 gas along phosphorene molecular device in the ambient condition, the adsorption behavior of O 2 and CO 2 is also studied. The findings of the present work confirm that phosphorene molecular device can be used as a NO 2 gas sensor and also the influence of Al substitution in phosphorene nanosheet device is explored and reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of Auger effect in DNA when bound to molecules containing platinum. A possible application to hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Usami, N.; Sasaki, I.; Frohlich, H.; Le Sech, C.

    2003-01-01

    Complexes made of DNA and Cyclo-Pt bound to plasmid DNA, were placed in aqueous solution and irradiated with monochromatic X-rays in the range E=8.5-13 keV, including the resonant photoabsorption energy of the L III shell of the platinum atom. The number of single- and double-strand breaks (ssb and dsb) induced by irradiation on a supercoiled DNA plasmid was measured by the production of circular-nicked and linear forms. In order to disentangle the contribution of the direct effects imparted to ionization, and the indirect effects due to a free radical attack, experiments have been performed in the presence of a small concentration (64 mmol l -1) of hydroxyl free radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). An enhancement of the number of ssb and dsb is observed when the plasmids contain the Pt intercalating molecules. Even when off-resonant X-rays are used, the strand break efficiency remains higher than expected based upon the absorption cross-section, as if the Pt bound to DNA is increasing the yield of strand breaks. A mechanism is suggested, involving photoelectrons generated from the ionization of water which efficiently ionize Pt atoms. This observation may provide an insight to understanding the effects of new radiotherapy protocols, associated chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin and ordinary radiotherapy for tumoral treatments.

  16. Transition metal-induced activation of alkynes leading to metal carbene species: synthetic application to new {pi}-conjugated molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo, T; Ohe, K [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: ohe@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-03-15

    The in situ generation of furylcarbene complexes by means of transition metals was applied to catalytic carbene reactions, such as Wittig-type olefination and cycloisomerization reactions. In the presence of [Rh(OAc){sub 2}]{sub 2} as a catalyst and triphenylphosphine as a carbene accepter, carbonyl-ene-ynes 1a reacted with benzaldehyde to give a 2-styrylfuran derivative 3a. The reaction involving phosphine-ylide formation followed by Wittig-type olefination with aldehydes was applied to synthesis of furfurylidene-containing p-extended conjugated molecules. A Ruthenium catalyst underwent cycloisomerization of 1,2-bis(carbonylenyl)acetylene 10a,b to afford 2,2'-bifuran structures. The crystal structure of 5,5'-diphenyl-2,2'-bifuran 11b was determined by X-ray crystallography. The ORTEP drawings of 11b exhibited transoid and highly planar structure. The emission bands of the bisfuran 11b were observed at 414 and 440 nm, its quantum yield (84%) was higher than that of a similar 5,5'-diphenyl-2,2'-bithiophene.

  17. Optoelectronic figure of merit of a metal nanoparticle—quantum dot (MNP-QD) hybrid molecule for assessing its suitability for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchi, Harini; Mallawaarachchi, Sudaraka; Hattori, Haroldo T.; Zhu, Weiren; Premaratne, Malin

    2018-02-01

    Recently, many have studied various configurations of metal nanoparticle-quantum dot (MNP-QD) hybrid molecules based on different metals and tunable parameters. In this paper, we aim to incite the interest in using MNP-QD nanohybrids, which possess sensing capabilities superior to those of the individual constituents, for sensing applications that rely on scattered light. When assessing whether a given MNP-QD configuration is suited for an application, sometimes it is hard to assess the pros and cons of a given configuration against other candidates. Here we propose a simple, elegant relative figure of merit (RFoM), which focuses on maximizing the scattered intensity and the refractive index sensitivity of the nanohybrid, to rank the suitability of viable MNP-QD configurations for a particular sensing application. We use the proposed RFoM to analyse the optical spectra of noble, transition, post transition and alkali metal based MNP-QD nanohybrids using the representative metals Au, Ag, Cu, Al and Na, adopting a generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) method based cavity QED approach. Based on our observations, we suggest how the usage of MNP-QD nanohybrids could improve the conventionally studied tumour targeting applications. Moreover, we propose potential substitutes for noble metals conventionally considered for MNP-QD nanohybrids.

  18. Prototyping of thermoplastic microfluidic chips and their application in high-performance liquid chromatography separations of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sam; De Vos, Jelle; Dores-Sousa, José Luís; Wouters, Bert; Desmet, Gert; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2017-11-10

    The present paper discusses practical aspects of prototyping of microfluidic chips using cyclic olefin copolymer as substrate and the application in high-performance liquid chromatography. The developed chips feature a 60mm long straight separation channel with circular cross section (500μm i.d.) that was created using a micromilling robot. To irreversibly seal the top and bottom chip substrates, a solvent-vapor-assisted bonding approach was optimized, allowing to approximate the ideal circular channel geometry. Four different approaches to establish the micro-to-macro interface were pursued. The average burst pressure of the microfluidic chips in combination with an encasing holder was established at 38MPa and the maximum burst pressure was 47MPa, which is believed to be the highest ever report for these polymer-based microfluidic chips. Porous polymer monolithic frits were synthesized in-situ via UV-initiated polymerization and their locations were spatially controlled by the application of a photomask. Next, high-pressure slurry packing was performed to introduce 3μm silica reversed-phase particles as the stationary phase in the separation channel. Finally, the application of the chip technology is demonstrated for the separation of alkyl phenones in gradient mode yielding baseline peak widths of 6s by applying a steep gradient of 1.8min at a flow rate of 10μL/min. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  20. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  1. Transport and fate of labelled molecules after application of 14C-gibberellic acid to the young leaves of tomato plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couillerot, J.-P.; Bonnemain, J.-L.

    1975-01-01

    After application of 14 C-GA 3 to the distal leaflet of young leaves (2.5 cm long) of tomato plants, labelled molecules are exported by the donor leaflet. In the first stage, the transport was basipetal, and preferably took place in the tissues of foliar traces; the tracers moved toward the roots at an average speed greater than 4 cm.h -1 . One part of the tracers seemed to accumulate in the elongating internodes, whereas a more important part went into the vessels and then was driven upwards to the leaves by the transpiration stream. A high concentration of tracers was localized in the extremity of some leaflets. The guttated fluid contained labelled molecules having for the most part a Rsub(t) value similar or nearly similar to the Rsub(f) value of GA 3 according to the solvent systems. The exportation of 14 C, which was at first very low, continued during the development of the donor leaf [fr

  2. Silica diatom shells tailored with Au nanoparticles enable sensitive analysis of molecules for biological, safety and environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2018-04-19

    Diatom shells are a natural, theoretically unlimited material composed of silicon dioxide, with regular patterns of pores penetrating through their surface. For their characteristics, diatom shells show promise to be used as low cost, highly efficient drug carriers, sensor devices or other micro-devices. Here, we demonstrate diatom shells functionalized with gold nanoparticles for the harvesting and detection of biological analytes (bovine serum albumin—BSA) and chemical pollutants (mineral oil) in low abundance ranges, for applications in bioengineering, medicine, safety, and pollution monitoring.

  3. Application of image-based particle size and shape characterization systems in the development of small molecule pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Tobyn, Mike; Hamey, Rhye

    2015-05-01

    With the introduction of Quality by Design (QbD) to the pharmaceutical industry, there has been an increased focus on understanding the nature of particles and composites, with the aim of understanding and modeling how they interact in complex systems, leading to robust dosage forms. Particle characterization tools have evolved and now enable a greater level of understanding of powder systems and blends. Tools that can elucidate the size and shape of particulate systems can provide significantly more information about the nature of the particles being analyzed, than a conventional particle size measurement. Although accurate size and shape analysis has always been regarded as the "gold standard" in understanding the nature of particulate systems, neither imaging systems nor IT infrastructure was sufficiently developed to allow this to be performed with sufficient accuracy in a timely manner. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into developments in the field of size and shape analysis of pharmaceutical systems, and how these can now realistically be used as robust development tools. Examples of current uses of such technologies will be explored as well as investigating future applications such as combined image/spectroscopic analyses to track single components within blended systems. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. Photophysical Behavior of Modified Xanthenic Dyes Embedded into Silsesquioxane Hybrid Films: Application in Photooxidation of Organic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina V. Waiman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric materials based on a bridged silsesquioxane with pendant dodecyl chains were synthesized and modified with different xanthenic dyes with the aim of developing a material with potential application in photooxidation of organic compounds. The employed dyes constitute a family of novel xanthenic chromophores with outstanding properties as singlet oxygen photosensitizers. The hybrid matrix was chosen for its enhanced properties such as flexibility and chemical resistance. The employed dyes were easily incorporated into the hybrid polymer obtaining homogeneous, transparent, and low-refractive-index materials. The polymeric films were characterized using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, and laser flash photolysis techniques. The ability of these materials to produce singlet oxygen was tested following the photooxidation of 9,10-dimethylanthracene which is a well-known chemical trap for singlet oxygen. High photooxidation efficiencies were observed for these materials, which present the advantage of being easily removed/collected from the solution where photooxidation takes place. While photobleaching of the incorporated dyes is commonly observed in the solution, it takes place very slowly when dyes are embedded in the hybrid matrix. These properties bode well for the potential use of these materials in novel wastewater purification strategies.

  5. FINDSITE(X): a structure-based, small molecule virtual screening approach with application to all identified human GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2012-06-04

    We have developed FINDSITE(X), an extension of FINDSITE, a protein threading based algorithm for the inference of protein binding sites, biochemical function and virtual ligand screening, that removes the limitation that holo protein structures (those containing bound ligands) of a sufficiently large set of distant evolutionarily related proteins to the target be solved; rather, predicted protein structures and experimental ligand binding information are employed. To provide the predicted protein structures, a fast and accurate version of our recently developed TASSER(VMT), TASSER(VMT)-lite, for template-based protein structural modeling applicable up to 1000 residues is developed and tested, with comparable performance to the top CASP9 servers. Then, a hybrid approach that combines structure alignments with an evolutionary similarity score for identifying functional relationships between target and proteins with binding data has been developed. By way of illustration, FINDSITE(X) is applied to 998 identified human G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). First, TASSER(VMT)-lite provides updates of all human GPCR structures previously modeled in our lab. We then use these structures and the new function similarity detection algorithm to screen all human GPCRs against the ZINC8 nonredundant (TC identity > 30% to the target from the binding data library) on a 168 human GPCR set with known binding data, the average enrichment factor in the top 1% of the compound library (EF(0.01)) is 22.7, whereas EF(0.01) by FINDSITE is 7.1. For virtual screening when just the target and its native ligands are excluded, the average EF(0.01) reaches 41.4. We also analyze off-target interactions for the 168 protein test set. All predicted structures, virtual screening data and off-target interactions for the 998 human GPCRs are available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/skolnick/webservice/gpcr/index.html .

  6. Ammonia as a preferred additive in chiral and achiral applications of supercritical fluid chromatography for small, drug-like molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Manuel; Murphy, Brent; Goetzinger, Wolfgang

    2012-01-13

    Supercritical fluid chromatography is routinely utilized by analytical separations groups in the pharmaceutical industry to efficiently handle separations for discovery medicinal chemistry purposes. Purifications are performed on samples ranging from a few milligrams up to hundreds of grams. Basic additives dissolved into the liquid component of the SFC mobile phase are commonly used to improve peak shape and efficiency in achiral and chiral separations. While for purposes of analysis there is minimal consequence to additive introduction in the mobile phase, for preparative separations one needs to consider the potential effect of an additive's presence when concentrated with the desired compound. Following an SFC purification using an additive-containing modifier, the resulting fractions will contain an easily evaporated modifier, and after its evaporation perhaps still significant levels of the less volatile additive. Depending on the aqueous solubility and basicity of the final product, the process of removing basic amine additives can be time-consuming and can result in reduced yields. NMR analysis following preparative isolation and evaporation often reveals the fact of insufficient removal of the chromatographic additive even after aqueous work up steps. In this study, ammonia is evaluated as an alternative additive to strong bases such as diethylamine (DEA) in SFC purification and analysis and to the authors' knowledge no previous publication has been written describing the application of methanolic ammonia as an additive for SFC separations. Dimethylethylamine (DMEA), a more volatile additive than DEA, is also evaluated relative to ammonia for its potential to simplify the isolation process after purification and in terms of chromatographic performance. The loss in concentration of ammonia in methanol modifier over time due to evaporation and effects of that loss are also described. Furthermore, for ammonia the analytical benefit is shown to extend to on

  7. Electron Accumulative Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buades, Ana B; Sanchez Arderiu, Víctor; Olid-Britos, David; Viñas, Clara; Sillanpää, Reijo; Haukka, Matti; Fontrodona, Xavier; Paradinas, Markos; Ocal, Carmen; Teixidor, Francesc

    2018-02-28

    With the goal to produce molecules with high electron accepting capacity and low reorganization energy upon gaining one or more electrons, a synthesis procedure leading to the formation of a B-N(aromatic) bond in a cluster has been developed. The research was focused on the development of a molecular structure able to accept and release a specific number of electrons without decomposing or change in its structural arrangement. The synthetic procedure consists of a parallel decomposition reaction to generate a reactive electrophile and a synthesis reaction to generate the B-N(aromatic) bond. This procedure has paved the way to produce the metallacarboranylviologen [M(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )-NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-M'(C 2 B 9 H 11 )(C 2 B 9 H 10 )] (M = M' = Co, Fe and M = Co and M' = Fe) and semi(metallacarboranyl)viologen [3,3'-M(8-(NC 5 H 4 -C 5 H 4 N-1,2-C 2 B 9 H 10 )(1',2'-C 2 B 9 H 11 )] (M = Co, Fe) electron cumulative molecules. These molecules are able to accept up to five electrons and to donate one in single electron steps at accessible potentials and in a reversible way. By targeted synthesis and corresponding electrochemical tests each electron transfer (ET) step has been assigned to specific fragments of the molecules. The molecules have been carefully characterized, and the electronic communication between both metal centers (when this situation applies) has been definitely observed through the coplanarity of both pyridine fragments. The structural characteristics of these molecules imply a low reorganization energy that is a necessary requirement for low energy ET processes. This makes them electronically comparable to fullerenes, but on their side, they have a wide range of possible solvents. The ET from one molecule to another has been clearly demonstrated as well as their self-organizing capacity. We consider that these molecules, thanks to their easy synthesis, ET, self-organizing capacity, wide range of solubility, and easy processability, can

  8. Single-Molecule Nanomagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2010-04-01

    Single-molecule magnets straddle the classical and quantum mechanical worlds, displaying many fascinating phenomena. They may have important technological applications in information storage and quantum computation. We review the physical properties of two prototypical molecular nanomagnets, Mn12-acetate and Fe8: Each behaves as a rigid, spin-10 object and exhibits tunneling between up and down directions. As temperature is lowered, the spin-reversal process evolves from thermal activation to pure quantum tunneling. At low temperatures, magnetic avalanches occur in which the magnetization of an entire sample rapidly reverses. We discuss the important role that symmetry-breaking fields play in driving tunneling and in producing Berry-phase interference. Recent experimental advances indicate that quantum coherence can be maintained on timescales sufficient to allow a meaningful number of quantum computing operations to be performed. Efforts are under way to create monolayers and to address and manipulate individual molecules.

  9. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  10. Enantio-specific C(sp3)-H activation catalyzed by ruthenium nanoparticles: application to isotopic labeling of molecules of biological interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taglang, Celine

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic labeling with deuterium and tritium is extensively used in chemistry, biology and pharmaceutical research. Numerous methods of labeling by isotopic exchange allow high isotopic enrichments but generally require harsh conditions (high temperatures, acidity). As a consequence, a general, regioselective and smooth labeling method that might be applicable to a wide diversity of substrates remains to develop. In the first part of this thesis, we demonstrated that the use of ruthenium nanoparticles, synthesized by Pr. Bruno Chaudret's team (INSA Toulouse), allowed the mild (2 bar of deuterium gas at 55 C), effective and selective H/D exchange reaction of a large variety of nitrogen-containing compounds, such as pyridines, indoles and primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl amines. The usefulness and the efficiency of this novel methodology was demonstrated by the deuteration of eight nitrogen-containing molecules of biological interest without altering their chemical and stereochemical properties. However, the conservation of the original stereochemistry of an activated chiral C-H center remains a major issue. We studied the reactivity of RuNP(at)PVP on different categories of nitrogen-containing substrates (amines, aminoacids and peptides) in water or in organic solvents. Our results showed that C-H activation of chiral carbons C(sp3) took place efficiently, selectively and, in all cases, with total retention of configuration. The wide range of applications of this procedure was demonstrated by the labeling of three chiral amines, fourteen aminoacids, three aromatic amino esters and four peptides. Moreover, our collaboration with Pr. Romuald Poteau's team (INSA Toulouse) led to the identification of two mechanisms by ab initio simulation in agreement with our experimental results: the σ-bond metathesis mechanism and the oxidative addition mechanism. These two mechanisms imply two vicinal ruthenium atoms leading to the formation an original

  11. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  13. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan ... Author Affiliations. E Arunan1. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  14. Theory of low-energy electron-molecule collision physics in the coupled-channel method and application to e-CO2 scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.A.

    1976-08-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering based on the fixed-nuclei approximation in a body-fixed reference frame is formulated and applied to e-CO 2 collisions in the energy range from 0.07 to 10.0 eV. The procedure used is a single-center coupled-channel method which incorporates a highly accurate static interaction potential, an approximate local exchange potential, and an induced polarization potential. Coupled equations are solved by a modification of the integral equations algorithm; several partial waves are required in the region of space near the nuclei, and a transformation procedure is developed to handle the consequent numerical problems. The potential energy is converged by separating electronic and nuclear contributions in a Legendre-polynomial expansion and including a large number of the latter. Formulas are derived for total elastic, differential, momentum transfer, and rotational excitation cross sections. The Born and asymptotic decoupling approximations are derived and discussed in the context of comparison with the coupled-channel cross sections. Both are found to be unsatisfactory in the energy range under consideration. An extensive discussion of the technical aspects of calculations for electron collisions with highly nonspherical targets is presented, including detailed convergence studies and a discussion of various numerical difficulties. The application to e-CO 2 scattering produces converged results in good agreement with observed cross sections. Various aspects of the physics of this collision are discussed, including the 3.8 eV shape resonance, which is found to possess both p and f character, and the anomalously large low-energy momentum transfer cross sections, which are found to be due to Σ/sub g/ symmetry. Comparison with static and static-exchange approximations are made

  15. The preparation of a poly (pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether-co-poly ethylene imine) organic monolithic capillary column and its application in hydrophilic interaction chromatography for polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Shu, Yan; Yang, Zihui; Lv, Xumei; Tan, Wangming; Chen, Yingzhuang; Ma, Ming; Chen, Bo

    2017-10-02

    An easy single-step thermal treatment "one-pot" approach for the preparation of poly (pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether-co-poly ethylene imine) organic monolithic capillary columns was developed successfully. The column was prepared by the epoxy-amine ring-opening polymerization of pentaerythritol tetraglycidyl ether (PTE) with poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) using acetonitrile (ACN) and polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600) as the porogenic system at 60 °C for 12 h. The obtained monolith was homogeneous and permeable. It achieved the high-efficiency separation of polar molecules including amides, nucleosides, bases, phenols, and benzoic acids in capillary liquid chromatography (cLC). The highest column efficiency reached ca. 101,000 plates/m (for guanine) on monolith poly(PTE-co-PEI) at 0.64 mm/s, and satisfactory chromatographic performance with column efficiencies ranged from 45,500 to 97,000 plates/m was achieved for the four amides. A typical hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) retention mechanism was observed with high organic solvent contents (>60% ACN). Also, the polymer-based monolithic column was successfully applied to separate the tumor markers. Furthermore, the poly(PTE-co-PEI) monolith could be easily modified with 1, 2-epoxydodecane, which reacted with the amino groups presented on the surface of the poly(PTE-co-PEI) monolith. Hydrophobic interactions were observed during the separation of alkylbenzenes and anilines on the post-modified poly(PTE-co-PEI) monolith. Together, these results confirm the feasibility of the epoxy-amine ring-opening polymerization reaction during the fabrication of a monolithic column with high efficiency for cLC applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  17. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Corannulene - A Bucky Bowl. H Surya Prakash Rao. The structure, properties and synthesis of a bowl shaped molecule, which resembles a fragment of fullerene, are described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have ...

  18. Synthesis, characterization of bay-substituted perylene diimide based D-A-D type small molecules and their applications as a non-fullerene electron acceptor in polymer solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Ganesamoorthy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a series of bay substituted perylene diimide based donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D type small molecule acceptor derivatives such as S-I, S-II, S-III and S-IV for small molecule based organic solar cell (SM-OSC applications. The electron rich thiophene derivatives such as thiophene, 2-hexylthiophene, 2,2′-bithiophene, and 5-hexyl-2,2′-bithiophene were used as a donor (D, and perylene diimide was used as an acceptor (A. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by FT-IR, NMR, and HR-MS. The small molecules showed wide and strong absorption in the UV-vis region up to 750 nm, which reduced the optical band gap to <2 eV. The calculated highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO were comparable with those of the PC61BM. Scanning electron microscope (SEM studies confirmed the aggregation of the small molecules, S-I to S-IV. Small molecules showed thermal stability up to 300 °C. In bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs, the S-I based device showed a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE of 0.12% with P3HT polymer donor. The PCE was declined with respect to the number of thiophene units and the flexible alkyl chain in the bay position. Keywords: Perylene diimide, Donor–acceptor, Small molecule, Non-fullerene, Suzuki coupling

  19. Single-crystalline EuF3 hollow hexagonal microdisks: synthesis and application as a background-free matrix for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of small molecules and polyethylene glycols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiming; Geng, Zhirong; Shao, Dalin; Mei, Yuhua; Wang, Zhilin

    2009-09-15

    Single-crystalline EuF(3) hexagonal microdisks with hollow interior were fabricated to serve as a background-free matrix for analysis of small molecules and polyethylene glycols (PEGs) by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The long-lived excited state of europium ions can transfer energy to high-energy vibrations of organic molecules, which provides the potential technological application in MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of small molecules and PEGs. The efficiency of the hollow microdisks as a novel matrix of low molecular weight compounds was verified by analysis of small peptide, amino acid, organic compounds, and hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD). The advantage of this matrix in comparison with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) was demonstrated by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of an amino acid mixture and a peptide mixture. This matrix is successfully used for analysis of PEGs (PEG 2000, PEG 4000, PEG 8000, PEG 15000, and PEG 30000), suggesting a potential for monitoring reactions and for synthetic polymer quality control. The upper limit of detectable mass range was approximately 35,000 Da (PEG 30000). It is believed that this work will not only offer a new technique for high-speed analysis of small molecules and PEGs but also open a new field for applications of rare earth fluorides.

  20. DNA molecules and human therapeutics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors ...

  1. Molecular electronics: the single molecule switch and transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected

  2. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons are summarized. A brief history of the subject is given, and a few good candidates are discussed. Some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states are studied. It is shown that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches. A few more recent molecule candidates which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures are also discussed. (author). 50 refs

  3. A Mott-like State of Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerr, S.; Volz, T.; Syassen, N.; Bauer, D. M.; Hansis, E.; Rempe, G.

    2006-01-01

    We prepare a quantum state where each site of an optical lattice is occupied by exactly one molecule. This is the same quantum state as in a Mott insulator of molecules in the limit of negligible tunneling. Unlike previous Mott insulators, our system consists of molecules which can collide inelastically. In the absence of the optical lattice these collisions would lead to fast loss of the molecules from the sample. To prepare the state, we start from a Mott insulator of atomic 87Rb with a central region, where each lattice site is occupied by exactly two atoms. We then associate molecules using a Feshbach resonance. Remaining atoms can be removed using blast light. Our method does not rely on the molecule-molecule interaction properties and is therefore applicable to many systems

  4. Tunneling Ionization of Diatomic Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Jens Søren Sieg

    2016-01-01

    When a molecule is subject to a strong laser field, there is a probability that an electron can escape, even though the electrons are bound by a large potential barrier. This is possible because electrons are quantum mechanical in nature, and they are therefore able to tunnel through potential...... of tunneling ionizaion of molecules is presented and the results of numerical calculations are shown. One perhaps surprising result is, that the frequently used Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down for weak fields when describing tunneling ionization. An analytic theory applicable in the weak-field limit...

  5. Nuclei quadrupole coupling constants in diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.I.; Rebane, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    An approximate relationship between the constants of quadrupole interaction of nuclei in a two-atom molecule is found. It enabled to establish proportionality of oscillatory-rotation corrections to these constants for both nuclei in the molecule. Similar results were obtained for the factors of electrical dipole-quadrupole screening of nuclei. Applicability of these relationships is proven by the example of lithium deuteride molecule. 4 refs., 1 tab

  6. Symbolic derivation of high-order Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation energies using computer algebra: Application to vibrational-rotational analysis of diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, John M. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-01-01

    Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation theory is an effective and popular tool for describing low-lying vibrational and rotational states of molecules. This method, in conjunction with ab initio techniques for computation of electronic potential energy surfaces, can be used to calculate first-principles molecular vibrational-rotational energies to successive orders of approximation. Because of mathematical complexities, however, such perturbation calculations are rarely extended beyond the second order of approximation, although recent work by Herbert has provided a formula for the nth-order energy correction. This report extends that work and furnishes the remaining theoretical details (including a general formula for the Rayleigh-Schroedinger expansion coefficients) necessary for calculation of energy corrections to arbitrary order. The commercial computer algebra software Mathematica is employed to perform the prohibitively tedious symbolic manipulations necessary for derivation of generalized energy formulae in terms of universal constants, molecular constants, and quantum numbers. As a pedagogical example, a Hamiltonian operator tailored specifically to diatomic molecules is derived, and the perturbation formulae obtained from this Hamiltonian are evaluated for a number of such molecules. This work provides a foundation for future analyses of polyatomic molecules, since it demonstrates that arbitrary-order perturbation theory can successfully be applied with the aid of commercially available computer algebra software.

  7. Molecules cooled below the Doppler limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Hambach, M.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical trapping and sub-Doppler cooling have been essential to most experiments with quantum degenerate gases, optical lattices, atomic fountains and many other applications. A broad set of new applications await ultracold molecules, and the extension of laser cooling to molecules has begun. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been demonstrated for a single molecular species, SrF, but the sub-Doppler temperatures required for many applications have not yet been reached. Here we demonstrate a MOT of a second species, CaF, and we show how to cool these molecules to 50 μK, well below the Doppler limit, using a three-dimensional optical molasses. These ultracold molecules could be loaded into optical tweezers to trap arbitrary arrays for quantum simulation, launched into a molecular fountain for testing fundamental physics, and used to study collisions and chemistry between atoms and molecules at ultracold temperatures.

  8. Investigation of the adsorption of ozone molecules on TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites by DFT computations: Applications to gas sensor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Amirali; Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption of O3 molecule on the undoped and N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites was studied using first principles density functional theory calculations. O3 interaction with TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites is considered so as to investigate WSe2 effects on the adsorption process. WSe2 favors the adsorption of O3 on TiO2 particles. In other words, WSe2 is conducive to the interaction of O3 molecule with fivefold coordinated titanium sites of TiO2. The effects of vdW interactions were taken into account in order to obtain equilibrium geometries of O3 molecules at TiO2/WSe2 interfaces. For all adsorption configurations, the binding site was positioned on the fivefold coordinated titanium atoms. The results show that the interactions between O3 and TiO2 in TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites are stronger than those between O3 and bare TiO2, suggesting that WSe2 helps to strengthen the interaction of ozone molecule with TiO2 particles. The results also indicate that the adsorption of the O3 molecule on the N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposite is more energetically favorable than the adsorption of O3 on the pristine one, representing that the N-doped nanocomposites are more sensitive than the undoped ones. Our DFT results clearly show that the N-doped TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposite would be a promising O3 gas sensor. The electronic structure of the adsorption system was also investigated, including analysis of the total and projected density of states, and charge density differences of the TiO2/WSe2 with adsorbed O3 molecules. The charge density difference calculations indicate that the charges were accumulated over the adsorbed O3 molecule. Besides, the N-doped nanocomposites have better sensing response than the pristine ones. This work was devoted to provide the theory basis for the design and development of novel and advanced O3 sensors based on modified TiO2/WSe2 nanocomposites.

  9. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  10. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V.

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  11. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  12. Multiple photon infrared processes in polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Butcher, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews current understanding of the process of multiple photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules, whereby in the presence of an intense infrared laser field a molecule may absorb upwards of 30 photons. The application of this process to new photochemistry and in particular laser isotope separation is also discussed. (author)

  13. Signaling Molecules and Pulp Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gottfried; Widbiller, Matthias; Galler, Kerstin M

    2017-09-01

    Signaling molecules play an essential role in tissue engineering because they regulate regenerative processes. Evidence exists from animal studies that single molecules such as members of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily and factors that induce the growth of blood vessels (vascular endothelial growth factor), nerves (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), or fibroblasts (fibroblast growth factor) may induce reparative dentin formation. Mainly the formation of atubular dentin (osteodentin) has been described after the application of single molecules or combinations of recombinant growth factors on healthy exposed pulps or in pulp regeneration. Generally, such preparations have not received regulatory approval on the market so far. Only the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors together with cell transplantation is presently tested clinically. Besides approaches with only 1 or few combined molecules, the exploitation of tissue-derived growth factors depicts a third promising way in dental pulp tissue engineering. Preparations such as platelet-rich plasma or platelet-rich fibrin provide a multitude of endogenous signaling molecules, and special regulatory approval for the market does not seem necessary. Furthermore, dentin is a perfect reservoir of signaling molecules that can be mobilized by treatment with demineralizing agents such as EDTA. This conditions the dentin surface and allows for contact differentiation of pulp stem cells into odontoblastlike cells, protects dentin from resorption, and enhances cell growth as well as attachment to dentin. By ultrasonic activation, signaling molecules can be further released from EDTA pretreated dentin into saline, thus avoiding cytotoxic EDTA in the final preparation. The use of dentin-derived growth factors offers a number of advantages because they are locally available and presumably are most fit to induce signaling processes in dental pulp. However, better characterization and standardization of the

  14. Full-dimensional vibrational calculations of five-atom molecules using a combination of Radau and Jacobi coordinates: Applications to methane and fluoromethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jun [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhaojun, E-mail: zhangzhj@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Dong H., E-mail: zhangdh@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Lauvergnat, David, E-mail: David.Lauvergnat@u-psud.fr [CNRS, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (UMR 8000), Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Gatti, Fabien, E-mail: gatti@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt (UMR 5253), CC 1501, Université Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier, Cedex 05 (France)

    2016-05-28

    Full quantum mechanical calculations of vibrational energies of methane and fluoromethane are carried out using a polyspherical description combining Radau and Jacobi coordinates. The Hamiltonian is built in a potential-optimized discrete variable representation, and vibrational energies are solved using an iterative eigensolver. This new approach can be applied to a large variety of molecules. In particular, we show that it is able to accurately and efficiently compute eigenstates for four different molecules : CH{sub 4}, CHD{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}F. Very good agreement is obtained with the results reported previously in the literature with different approaches and with experimental data.

  15. Application of a generalisation of the Kohn variational method to the calculation of cross sections for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E.A.G.

    1984-01-01

    The phaseshift corresponding to the lowest partial wave and the associated approximation to the total cross section are calculated for low-energy positron-hydrogen-molecule scattering using a generalisation of the Kohn variational method. The trial wavefunction is expressed in terms of confocal elliptical coordinates. Except at incident positron energies below about 2 eV, reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained below the positronium formation threshold at 8.63 eV. (author)

  16. A high-yield, one-step synthesis of surfactant-free gold nanostars and numerical study for single-molecule SERS application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S.; Ringane, A. B.; Arya, A.; Das, G. M.; Dantham, V. R., E-mail: dantham@iitp.ac.in; Laha, R. [Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Department of Physics (India); Hussian, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Department of Chemistry (India)

    2016-08-15

    We report a high-yield synthesis of star-shaped gold nanostructures in one step, using a new surfactant-free wet chemistry method. Compared to the existing reports, these nanostars were found to have longer and sharper spikes anchored uniformly on the surface of the spherical core, allowing at least a few hot spots irrespective of the incident light polarization. The average experimental values of core radius and spike length were found to be 88.5 and 72 nm, respectively. Using these values in numerical simulations, the local electric field enhancement (η) and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrum were obtained. Moreover, the single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor was found to vary from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 13} depending on the excitation wavelengths. Our theoretical calculations suggest that these nanostructures can be used to fabricate efficient SERS-based biosensors for the detection of single molecules in real time and for predicting structural information of single molecules.

  17. Development of a Sample Processing System (SPS) for the in situ search of organic compounds on Mars : application to the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Sternberg, R.; Garnier, C.; Fressinet, C.; Szopa, C.; El Bekri, J.; Coll, P.; Rodier, C.; Raulin, F.; Goesmann, F.

    2008-09-01

    The search for past or present life signs is one of the primary goals of the future Mars exploratory missions. With this aim the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) module of the ExoMars 2013 next coming European space mission is designed to the in situ analysis, in the Martian soil, of organic molecules of exobiological interest such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the frame of the MOMA experiment we have been developing a Sample Processing System (SPS) compatible with gas chromatography (GC) analysis. The main goal of SPS is to allow the extraction and the gas chromatography separation of the refractory organic compounds from a solid matrix at trace level within space compatible operating conditions. The SPS is a mini-reactor, containing the solid sample (~500mg), able to increase (or decrease) the internal temperature from 20 to 500 °C within 13 sec. The extraction step is therefore performed by using thermodesorption, the best yield of extraction being obtained at 300°C for 10 to 20 min. It has to be noticed that the temperature could be increased up to 500°C without a significant lost of efficiency if the heating run time is kept below 3 min. After the thermodesorption the chemical derivatization of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA and DMF [buch et al.]. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the targeted volatile molecules are transferred through a heated transfer line in the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer for the detection. The SPS is a "one step/one pot" sample preparation system which should allow the MOMA experiment to detect the refractory molecules absorbed in the Martian soil at a detection limit below the ppb level. A. Buch, R. Sternberg, C. Szopa, C. Freissinet, C. Garnier, J. El Bekri

  18. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  19. Electrondriven processes in polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKoy, Vincent [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    This project developed and applied scalable computational methods to obtain information about low-energy electron collisions with larger polyatomic molecules. Such collisions are important in modeling radiation damage to living systems, in spark ignition and combustion, and in plasma processing of materials. The focus of the project was to develop efficient methods that could be used to obtain both fundamental scientific insights and data of practical value to applications.

  20. Electrocatalytic activation of small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, YuPing

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemsitry and electrocatalysis are useful techniques for energy conversion and energy storage applications. In this project, the electrocatalytic activation of small molecules, H₂O, methanol and ethanol, and CO₂, has been studied as potential methods for energy storage and conversion. A hexaniobate Lindqvist ion assisted Co and Ni nanostructure deposition method has been developed. Efficient catalytic activity towards water oxidation has been observed with high TOF values obtained ...

  1. Aligning molecules with intense nonresonant laser fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Safvan, C.P.; Sakai, H.

    1999-01-01

    Molecules in a seeded supersonic beam are aligned by the interaction between an intense nonresonant linearly polarized laser field and the molecular polarizability. We demonstrate the general applicability of the scheme by aligning I2, ICl, CS2, CH3I, and C6H5I molecules. The alignment is probed...... by mass selective two dimensional imaging of the photofragment ions produced by femtosecond laser pulses. Calculations on the degree of alignment of I2 are in good agreement with the experiments. We discuss some future applications of laser aligned molecules....

  2. The status of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 → 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f o (1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures. (Author)

  3. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  4. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0005 Ultracold Polar Molecules Jeremy Hutson UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM Final Report 04/01/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved...DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-Jan-2010 to 14-Jul-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report on Grant FA8655-10-1-3033 on Ultracold Polar Molecules 5a...formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging

  5. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D)> HBr (0.83 D) > HI (0.45 D) [8]. Hence, these molecules can and do induce a dipole moment in the rare gas atoms when the two interact. The induced dipole moment is proportional to the inducing field E and the proportionality constant is the polariz- ability, i.e., μ i. = αE. However, as mentioned above, dispersion.

  6. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  7. Vibrational analysis of pyramidal XY3-type molecules based on high-level ab initio potential energy surfaces: application to NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Thiel, W.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Carvajal, M.; Jensen, P.

    Variational calculations of the vibrational energies of the non-rigid and semirigid XY3 molecules, as ammonia and phosphine respectively, have been carried out [1,2]. In the procedure used is emphasized the umbrella motion due to the corresponding coordinate, for pyramidal non-rigid XY3 molecules, is the responsible of the torsional tunneling between different minima of the Potential Energy Surfaces. For the NH3 analytical potential energy surfaces were constructed from CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio data augmented by the results obtained by extrapolating CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVXZ (X=T,Q,5) results to the complete basis set limit and adding corrections for core-valence correlation and relativistic effects. The vibrational energies were calculated by employing a kinetic energy operator expressed in terms of linearized internal coordinates. The exact internal coordinates were expressed as sixth-order Taylor expansions in the linearized coordinates. In the present work we show the latter improvement in the calculated vibrational energies with respect to the latter report [1]. This work is supported by the European Commission through contract no. HPRN-CT-2000-00022 ``Spectroscopy of Highly Excited Rovibrational States''.

  8. Small molecule probes for cellular death machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qian, Lihui; Yuan, Junying

    2017-08-01

    The past decade has witnessed a significant expansion of our understanding about the regulated cell death mechanisms beyond apoptosis. The application of chemical biological approaches had played a major role in driving these exciting discoveries. The discovery and use of small molecule probes in cell death research has not only revealed significant insights into the regulatory mechanism of cell death but also provided new drug targets and lead drug candidates for developing therapeutics of human diseases with huge unmet need. Here, we provide an overview of small molecule modulators for necroptosis and ferroptosis, two non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms, and discuss the molecular pathways and relevant pathophysiological mechanisms revealed by the judicial applications of such small molecule probes. We suggest that the development and applications of small molecule probes for non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms provide an outstanding example showcasing the power of chemical biology in exploring novel biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. - Tunneling Matrix Formalism for - and Two-Methyl Molecules Based on the Extended Permutation-Inversion Group Idea and its Application to the Analyses of the Methyl-Torsional Rotational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Nobukimi; Kobayashi, Kaori; Fujitake, Masaharu

    2016-06-01

    Recently we reanalyzed the microwave absorption spectra of the trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule, state by state, in the ground vibrational, O-methyl torsional, C-methyl torsional and skeletal torsional states with the use of an IAM-like tunneling matrix formalism based on an extended permutation-inversion (PI) group idea, whose results appeared in Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy recently. Since a single rho-axis does not exist in trans-ethyl methyl ether that has two methyl-tops and the IAM formalism is not available as in the case of the one methyl-top molecule, we adopted instead an IAM-like (in other word, partial IAM) formalism. We will show the outline of the present formalism and the results of the spectral analyses briefly. We also would like to review the IAM formalism for the one top molecules based on the extended PI group, and show the result of the application to the spectral analysis. If possible, we would like to compare the IAM and IAM-like formalisms based on the extended PI group with the ERHAM formalism developed by Groner, especially, in the form of Hamiltonian matrix elements, and discuss about similarity and difference.

  10. Laser cooling of a diatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, E S; Barry, J F; Demille, D

    2010-10-14

    It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques produced ultracold atoms, leading to rapid advances in a wide array of fields. Laser cooling has not yet been extended to molecules because of their complex internal structure. However, this complexity makes molecules potentially useful for a wide range of applications. For example, heteronuclear molecules possess permanent electric dipole moments that lead to long-range, tunable, anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. The combination of the dipole-dipole interaction and the precise control over molecular degrees of freedom possible at ultracold temperatures makes ultracold molecules attractive candidates for use in quantum simulations of condensed-matter systems and in quantum computation. Also, ultracold molecules could provide unique opportunities for studying chemical dynamics and for tests of fundamental symmetries. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of the polar molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). Using an optical cycling scheme requiring only three lasers, we have observed both Sisyphus and Doppler cooling forces that reduce the transverse temperature of a SrF molecular beam substantially, to a few millikelvin or less. At present, the only technique for producing ultracold molecules is to bind together ultracold alkali atoms through Feshbach resonance or photoassociation. However, proposed applications for ultracold molecules require a variety of molecular energy-level structures (for example unpaired electronic spin, Omega doublets and so on). Our method provides an alternative route to ultracold molecules. In particular, it bridges the gap between ultracold (submillikelvin) temperatures and the ∼1-K temperatures attainable with directly cooled molecules (for example with cryogenic buffer-gas cooling or decelerated supersonic beams). Ultimately, our technique should allow the production of large samples of molecules at ultracold temperatures for species that are chemically

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atoms in a molecule generally prefer, particularly among the neighbouring ones, certain optimmn geometrical relationships. These are manifested in specific ranges of bond lengths, bond angles, torsion angles etc. As it always happens, chemists are interested in making molecules where these 'standard relationships' are ...

  12. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclo bu tadiene (1) has been one of the most popular molecules for experimentalists and theoreticians. This molecule is unstable as . it is antiaromatic ( 4,n electrons in a cyclic array). Even though some highly substituted cyclobutadienes, for example, compound 2 and the Fe(CO)3 complex of cyclobutadiene (3) are ...

  13. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Algebraic theory of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Iachello, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The Wave Mechanics of Diatomic Molecules. 2. Summary of Elements of Algebraic Theory. 3. Mechanics of Molecules. 4. Three-Body Algebraic Theory. 5. Four-Body Algebraic Theory. 6. Classical Limit and Coordinate Representation. 8. Prologue to the Future. Appendices. Properties of Lie Algebras; Coupling of Algebras; Hamiltonian Parameters

  15. Molecule of the Month.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described here. Chemistry of aromatic molecules has a long history. Many molecules made up of multiple benzene-like rings have been isolated or made in the laboratory over the years. These are called polycondensed aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH for short). ... a bowl like symmetric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon of the.

  16. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  17. Electrons in Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    “What are electrons doing in molecules?” This is a deceptively simple question that scientists have been trying to answer for more than eighty years. With the advent of quantum mechanics in 1926, it became clear that we must understand the dynamics of electronic motion in atoms, molecules and solids in order to explain ...

  18. ISOLATED MOLECULES IN METALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, some results obtained on the formation of isolated molecules of composition SnOx in silver and SnFx in copper-are reviewed. Hyperfine interaction and ion beam interaction techniques were used for the identification of these molecules.

  19. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nature is an excellent synthetic organic chemist. Using mild reaction conditions and a few elemental combinations, a large variety of complex molecules are made in and around us. The atoms are put together in precise arrangements to enable the molecules to carry out different tasks with remarkable specificity.

  20. High harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dian; Zhu, Xiaosong; Liu, Xi; Li, Liang; Zhang, Xiaofan; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-09-18

    Axial chiral molecules, whose stereogenic element is an axis rather than a chiral center, have attracted widespread interest due to their important application, such as asymmetric synthesis and chirality transfer. We investigate high harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules with bichromatic counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields. High harmonic generation from three typical molecules: (Sa)-3-chloropropa-1,2-dien-1-ol, propadiene, and (Ra)-2,3-pentadiene is simulated with time-dependent density-functional theory and strong field approximation. We found that harmonic spectra for 3D oriented axial chiral molecules exhibit obvious circular dichroism. However, the circular dichroism of High harmonic generation from an achiral molecule is much trivial. Moreover, the dichroism of high harmonic generation still exists when axial chiral molecules are 1D oriented,such as (Sa) -3-chloropropa-1,2-dien-1-ol. For a special form of axial chiral molecules with the formula abC=C=Cab (a, b are different substituents), like (Ra)-2,3-pentadiene, the dichroism discriminations disappear when the molecules are only in 1D orientation. The circular dichroism of high harmonic generation from axial chiral molecules is well explained by the trajectory analysis based on the semiclassical three-step mechanism.

  1. Self-Assembly of "Chalcone" Type Push-Pull Dye Molecules into Organic Single Crystalline Microribbons and Rigid Microrods for Vis/NIR Range Photonic Cavity Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattikunta, Radhika; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Mohiddon, Mahamad Ahamad; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2016-11-04

    A novel supramolecular fluorescent donor-acceptor type dye molecule, (2E,4E)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(pyren-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (HPPD) self-assembles in a mixture of ethanol/chloroform through intermolecular π-π stacking (distance ca. 3.384 Å) to form J-aggregated single-crystalline microribbons displaying Fabry-Pèrot (F-P) type visible-range optical resonance. The corresponding borondifluoride dye (HPPD-BF), with a reduced HOMO-LUMO gap, self-assembles into crystalline microrods acting as an F-P type resonator in the near-infrared (NIR) range. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Inclusion of exact exchange in the noniterative partial-differential-equation method of electron-molecule scattering - Application to e-N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, C. A.; Onda, K.; Temkin, A.

    1985-01-01

    The noniterative partial-differential-equation (PDE) approach to electron-molecule scattering of Onda and Temkin (1983) is modified to account for the effects of exchange explicitly. The exchange equation is reduced to a set of inhomogeneous equations containing no integral terms and solved noniteratively in a difference form; a method for propagating the solution to large values of r is described; the changes in the polarization potential of the original PDE method required by the inclusion of exact static exchange are indicated; and the results of computations for e-N2 scattering in the fixed-nuclei approximation are presented in tables and graphs and compared with previous calculations and experimental data. Better agreement is obtained using the modified PDE method.

  3. New naphtho[1,2-b:5,6-b‧]difuran based two-dimensional conjugated small molecules for photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongjian; Luan, Xiangfeng; Qiu, Lixia; Li, Hang; Liu, Ye; Zou, Yingping

    2017-10-01

    Two new A-D-A small molecules with alkoxyphenyl and alkylthiophenyl-substituted naphtho[1,2-b:5,6-b‧]difuran (NDF) as the central building block named NDFPO-DPP and NDFPS-DPP were synthesized and firstly used as donor materials in organic solar cells (OSCs). The effects of the alkoxyphenyl and alkylthiophenyl side chains on the NDF unit have been investigated. With a single atom variation from O to S, NDFPS-DPP exhibited lower HOMO energy levels than its counterpart NDFPO-DPP, which resulted in enhanced Voc. The device based on NDFPO-DPP with thermal annealing exhibited a better PCE of 3.10% due to the higher and more balanced hole and electron mobilities. The investigations show that NDF could be a promising building block in OSCs via rational molecular structure design and device optimizations.

  4. Effective charge model in the theory of infrared intensities and its application for study of charge di.stribution in the molecules of organometallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksanyan, V.T.; Samvelyan, S.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    General principles of plotting the parametric theory of IR spectrum intensities of polyatomic molecules are outlined. The development of the effective charges model in this theory is considered and the mathematical formalism of the first approximation of the method of effective atom charges is described in detail. The results of calculations of charges distribution in the Mo(CO) 6 , W(CO) 6 , Cp 2 V, Cp 2 Ru and others (Cp-cyclopentadiene), performed in the frame work of the outlined scheme are presented. It is shown that in the investigated carbonyles the effective charge on oxygen and metal atoms is negative, on carbon atom - positive. In dicyclopentavienyl complexes the effective charge on the metal atom is positive and is not over 0.6e; charge values on hydrogen and carbon atoms do not exceed, 0.10-0.15e. The notions of ''electrovalence'' of coordination bond and charge distribution in the case of metallocenes are not correlated

  5. Study of ions - molecules reactions in the gas phase with collision reaction cell devices: Applications to the direct resolution of spectroscopic interferences in ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, G.

    2008-12-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry emerged as the most widespread mass spectrometry technique in inorganic analytical chemistry for determining the concentration of a given isotope or an isotope ratio. The problem of spectroscopic interferences, inherent to this technique, finds a solution through the use of reaction cell devices. An in situ interference removal is feasible with the addition of a well selected gas in the cell. The understanding of the chemistry of ions-molecules interactions in the gas phase is however fundamental to optimize the efficiency of such devices. An accurate knowledge of experimental conditions in the reaction zone according to instrumental parameters appears crucial in order to interpret observed reactivities. This preliminary study is then used for the resolution of two nuclear field characteristic interferences. (author)

  6. Application of R-matrix theory to resonant reactive electron-molecule scattering: Vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment of N2 and F2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.F.; Light, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Based on the R-matrix approach of Schneider et al. [J. Phys. B 12, L 365 (1979)] to reactive electron-molecule scattering, a new propagative R-matrix method (PRMM) is presented which is more appropriate for polyatomic systems. The new method should be useful in other calculations where complicated integrals need to be propagated. We also introduce an effective R-matrix model (ERMM) in which the usual resonance parameters (potential and width) can be used as input in model R-matrix calculations. The PRMM and ERMM have been applied to the electron-N 2 system and the electron-F 2 system. The results agree very well with previous calculations for both vibrationally inelastic scattering and dissociative attachment when identical potentials and parameters are used

  7. Molecular eigenstate spectroscopy: Application to the intramolecular dynamics of some polyatomic molecules in the 3000 to 7000 cm{sup {minus}1} region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) appears to be a universal property of polyatomic molecules in energy regions where the vibrational density of states is greater than about 5 to 30 states per cm{sup {minus}1}. Interest in IVR stems from its central importance to the spectroscopy, photochemistry, and reaction kinetics of these molecules. A bright state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which may be a C-H stretching vibration, carries the oscillator strength from the ground state. This bright state may mix with bath rotational-vibrational levels to form a clump of molecular eigenstates, each of which carries a portion of the oscillator strength from the ground state. In this work the authors explicitly resolve transitions to each of these molecular eigenstates. Detailed information about the nature of IVR is contained in the frequencies and intensities of the observed discrete transitions. The primary goal of this research is to probe the coupling mechanisms by which IVR takes place. The most fundamental distinction to be made is between anharmonic coupling which is independent of molecular rotation and rotationally-mediated coupling. The authors are also interested in the rate at which IVR takes place. Measurements are strictly in the frequency domain but information is obtained about the decay of the zero order state, {var_phi}{sub s}, which could be prepared in a hypothetical experiment as a coherent excitation of the clump of molecular eigenstates. As the coherent superposition dephases, the energy would flow from the initially prepared mode into nearby overtones and combinations of lower frequency vibrational modes. The decay of the initially prepared mode is related to a pure sequence infrared absorption spectrum by a Fourier transform.

  8. Physics of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Joachain, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a unified account of the physics of atoms and molecules at a level suitable for second- and third-year undergraduate students of physics and physical chemistry. Following a brief historical introduction to the subject the authors outline the ideas and approximation methods of quantum mechanics to be used later in the book. Six chapters look at the structure of atoms and the interactions between atoms and electromagnetic radiation. The authors then move on to describe the structure of molecules and molecular spectra. Three chapters deal with atomic collisions, the scattering of electrons by atoms and the scattering of atoms by atoms. The concluding chapter considers a few of the many important applications of atomic physics within astrophysics, laser technology, and nuclear fusion. Problems are given at the end of each chapter, with hints at the solutions in an appendix. Other appendices include various special topics and derivations together with useful tables of units. (author)

  9. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, Amy S. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  10. Electron correlation in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, S

    2007-01-01

    Electron correlation effects are of vital significance to the calculation of potential energy curves and surfaces, the study of molecular excitation processes, and in the theory of electron-molecule scattering. This text describes methods for addressing one of theoretical chemistry's central problems, the study of electron correlation effects in molecules.Although the energy associated with electron correlation is a small fraction of the total energy of an atom or molecule, it is of the same order of magnitude as most energies of chemical interest. If the solution of quantum mechanical equatio

  11. Single Molecule Studies on Dynamics in Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Täuber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single molecule (SM methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC. Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  12. Single molecule studies on dynamics in liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täuber, Daniela; von Borczyskowski, Christian

    2013-09-26

    Single molecule (SM) methods are able to resolve structure related dynamics of guest molecules in liquid crystals (LC). Highly diluted small dye molecules on the one hand explore structure formation and LC dynamics, on the other hand they report about a distortion caused by the guest molecules. The anisotropic structure of LC materials is used to retrieve specific conformation related properties of larger guest molecules like conjugated polymers. This in particular sheds light on organization mechanisms within biological cells, where large molecules are found in nematic LC surroundings. This review gives a short overview related to the application of highly sensitive SM detection schemes in LC.

  13. Fluorescence Quenching of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots by Using Black Hole Quencher Molecules Intermediated With Peptide for Biosensing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sreenadh Sasidharan; Yukawa, Hiroshi; Onoshima, Daisuke; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2015-12-17

    Quantum dots (QDs) have recently been investigated as fluorescent probes for detecting a very small number of biomolecules and live cells; however, the establishment of molecular imaging technology with on-off control of QD fluorescence remains to be established. Here we have achieved the fluorescence off state of QDs with the conjugation of black hole quencher (BHQ) molecules intermediated with peptide by using streptavidin-QDs585 and biotin-pep-BHQ-1. The fluorescence of streptavidin-QDs585 was decreased by the addition of biotin-pep-BHQ-1 in a dose-dependent manner. It has been suggested that the decrease in QDs585 fluorescence occurred through a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism from the analysis of fluorescence intensity and lifetime of streptavidin-QDs585 and QDs585-pep-BHQ-1. QDs585 fluorescence could be quenched by more than 60% efficiency in this system. The sequence of intermediate peptide (pep) was GPLGVRGK, which can be cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by cancer cells. QDs585-pep-BHQ-1 is thus expected to detect the MMP production by the recovery of QDs585 fluorescence as a new bioanalytical agent for molecular imaging.

  14. Preparation and Evaluation of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-hexanediol diacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) Monolithic Column and its Applications in the Separation of Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yamin; Liu, Haiyan; Wei, Aile; Qin, Junxiao; Zhang, Shiqi; Zhang, Wen; Bai, Ligai

    2016-11-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-hexanediol diacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) [poly(NIPAAm-co-HDDA-co-EDMA)] monolithic column was prepared via in situ polymerization reaction. In order to investigate the porous properties of the monoliths prepared, the morphology was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy; the chemical group of the monolithic column was confirmed by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy method. The surface area was 39.1 m 2 /g by the nitrogen adsorption-desorption experiment. With methanol as the mobile phase, the permeability of the monolithic column was calculated as 3.2330 × 10 -14 m 2 Then it was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography. The results indicted that poly(NIPAAm-co-HDDA-co-EDMA) monolithic column was good to separate small molecules by controlling the temperature. Column efficiency for p-chloronitrobenzene was 4,680 plates/m. Repeatability was defined by determining run-to-run and column-to-column variation of the retention times of aromatic compounds, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD = standard deviation/mean × 100%), and the values were <0.58% and 3.1%, respectively. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Molar mass, radius of gyration and second virial coefficient from new static light scattering equations for dilute solutions: application to 21 (macro)molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illien, Bertrand; Ying, Ruifeng

    2009-05-11

    New static light scattering (SLS) equations for dilute binary solutions are derived. Contrarily to the usual SLS equations [Carr-Zimm (CZ)], the new equations have no need for the experimental absolute Rayleigh ratio of a reference liquid and solely rely on the ratio of scattered intensities of solutions and solvent. The new equations, which are based on polarizability equations, take into account the usual refractive index increment partial differential n/partial differential rho(2) complemented by the solvent specific polarizability and a term proportional to the slope of the solution density rho versus the solute mass concentration rho(2) (density increment). Then all the equations are applied to 21 (macro)molecules with a wide range of molar mass (0.2equations clearly achieve a better agreement with supplier M values. For macromolecules (M>500 kg mol(-1)), for which the scattered intensity is no longer independent of the scattering angle, the new equations give the same value of the radius of gyration as the CZ equation and consistent values of the second virial coefficient.

  16. Stability of a frequency-comb-based transfer-lock using a passive Fabry-Perot resonator and its application to spectroscopy of ultracold molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sambit Bikas; Lam, Mark; Dieckmann, Kai

    2017-04-01

    In this poster, we demonstrate a transfer-lock laser frequency stabilization that utilizes a frequency comb (FC) and a radio frequency counter referenced to a GPS frequency standard to compensate for the frequency drifts of two lasers, which are locked to a single passive Fabry-Perot resonator (FPR). The method requires only one optical phase lock with the FC and allows transfer locking of lasers at wavelengths beyond the usable range of the FC. To attain a large frequency tuning range for the lasers, we implement optical serrodyning. We further demonstrate an efficient scheme to suppress residual amplitude modulation, thereby improving the stability of the Pound-Drever-Hall lock used in this case. The absolute frequency stability was found to be better than 2 ×10-13 on timescales up to 300 s. Hence, together with the frequency stability on short timescales provided by the FPR, this scheme facilitates coherent Raman spectroscopy as needed for an example for the production of ultracold dipolar heteronuclear molecules.

  17. Time dependence of the field energy densities surrounding sources: Application to scalar mesons near point sources and to electromagnetic fields near molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persico, F.; Power, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The time dependence of the dressing-undressing process, i.e., the acquiring or losing by a source of a boson field intensity and hence of a field energy density in its neighborhood, is considered by examining some simple soluble models. First, the loss of the virtual field is followed in time when a point source is suddenly decoupled from a neutral scalar meson field. Second, an initially bare point source acquires a virtual meson cloud as the coupling is switched on. The third example is that of an initially bare molecule interacting with the vacuum of the electromagnetic field to acquire a virtual photon cloud. In all three cases the dressing-undressing is shown to take place within an expanding sphere of radius r = ct centered at the source. At each point in space the energy density tends, for large times, to that of the ground state of the total system. Differences in the time dependence of the dressing between the massive scalar field and the massless electromagnetic field are discussed. The results are also briefly discussed in the light of Feinberg's ideas on the nature of half-dressed states in quantum field theory

  18. Population distribution of flexible molecules from maximum entropy analysis using different priors as background information: application to the Φ, Ψ-conformational space of the α-(1-->2)-linked mannose disaccharide present in N- and O-linked glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säwén, Elin; Massad, Tariq; Landersjö, Clas; Damberg, Peter; Widmalm, Göran

    2010-08-21

    The conformational space available to the flexible molecule α-D-Manp-(1-->2)-α-D-Manp-OMe, a model for the α-(1-->2)-linked mannose disaccharide in N- or O-linked glycoproteins, is determined using experimental data and molecular simulation combined with a maximum entropy approach that leads to a converged population distribution utilizing different input information. A database survey of the Protein Data Bank where structures having the constituent disaccharide were retrieved resulted in an ensemble with >200 structures. Subsequent filtering removed erroneous structures and gave the database (DB) ensemble having three classes of mannose-containing compounds, viz., N- and O-linked structures, and ligands to proteins. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the disaccharide revealed a two-state equilibrium with a major and a minor conformational state, i.e., the MD ensemble. These two different conformation ensembles of the disaccharide were compared to measured experimental spectroscopic data for the molecule in water solution. However, neither of the two populations were compatible with experimental data from optical rotation, NMR (1)H,(1)H cross-relaxation rates as well as homo- and heteronuclear (3)J couplings. The conformational distributions were subsequently used as background information to generate priors that were used in a maximum entropy analysis. The resulting posteriors, i.e., the population distributions after the application of the maximum entropy analysis, still showed notable deviations that were not anticipated based on the prior information. Therefore, reparameterization of homo- and heteronuclear Karplus relationships for the glycosidic torsion angles Φ and Ψ were carried out in which the importance of electronegative substituents on the coupling pathway was deemed essential resulting in four derived equations, two (3)J(COCC) and two (3)J(COCH) being different for the Φ and Ψ torsions, respectively. These Karplus relationships are denoted

  19. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  20. Quantum dot molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapidly growing field of quantum dot molecules (QDMs). It offers state-of-the-art coverage of novel techniques and connects fundamental physical properties with device design.

  1. Small Molecule Organic Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Nathan

    Organic optoelectronics include a class of devices synthesized from carbon containing 'small molecule' thin films without long range order crystalline or polymer structure. Novel properties such as low modulus and flexibility as well as excellent device performance such as photon emission approaching 100% internal quantum efficiency have accelerated research in this area substantially. While optoelectronic organic light emitting devices have already realized commercial application, challenges to obtain extended lifetime for the high energy visible spectrum and the ability to reproduce natural white light with a simple architecture have limited the value of this technology for some display and lighting applications. In this research, novel materials discovered from a systematic analysis of empirical device data are shown to produce high quality white light through combination of monomer and excimer emission from a single molecule: platinum(II) bis(methyl-imidazolyl)toluene chloride (Pt-17). Illumination quality achieved Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates (x = 0.31, y = 0.38) and color rendering index (CRI) > 75. Further optimization of a device containing Pt-17 resulted in a maximum forward viewing power efficiency of 37.8 lm/W on a plain glass substrate. In addition, accelerated aging tests suggest high energy blue emission from a halogen-free cyclometalated platinum complex could demonstrate degradation rates comparable to known stable emitters. Finally, a buckling based metrology is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of small molecule organic thin films towards understanding the deposition kinetics responsible for an elastic modulus that is both temperature and thickness dependent. These results could contribute to the viability of organic electronic technology in potentially flexible display and lighting applications. The results also provide insight to organic film growth kinetics responsible for optical

  2. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  3. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  4. MOLECULES IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO + , HCN, HNC, and N 2 H + , and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13 CO and H 13 CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (∼100 km s –1 ), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO + do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13 C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  5. Hadron Molecules Revisted

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longacre, R. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Hadron Molecules are particles made out of hadrons that are held together by self interactions. In this report we discuss seven such molecules and their self interactions. The f0(980), a0(980), f1(1400), ΔN(2150) and π1(1400) molecular structure is given. We predict that two more states the $K\\bar{K}K$(1500) and a1(1400) should be found.

  6. Trapping and manipulating single molecules of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju

    This thesis presents the development and application of nanoscale techniques to trap and manipulate biomolecules, with a focus on DNA. These methods combine single-molecule microscopy and nano- and micro-fabrication to study biophysical properties of DNA and proteins. The Dimple Machine is a lab-on-a-chip device that can isolate and confine a small number of molecules from a bulk solution. It traps molecules in nanofabricated chambers, or "dimples", and the trapped molecules are then studied on a fluorescence microscope at the single-molecule level. The sampling of bulk solution by dimples is representative, reproducible, and automated, enabling highthroughput single-molecule experiments. The device was applied to study hybridization of oligonucleotides, particularly in the context of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics in nanoconfinement. The DNA Pulley is a system to study protein binding and the local mechanical properties of DNA. A molecule of DNA is tethered to a surface on one end, and a superparamagnetic bead is attached to the other. A magnet pulls the DNA taut, and a silicon nitride knife with a nanoscale blade scans the DNA along its contour. Information on the local properties of the DNA is extracted by tracking the bead with nanometer precision in a white-light microscope. The system can detect proteins bound to DNA and localize their recognition sites, as shown with a model protein, EcoRI restriction enzyme. Progress on the measurements of nano-mechanical properties of DNA is included.

  7. Biological mechanisms, one molecule at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    The last 15 years have witnessed the development of tools that allow the observation and manipulation of single molecules. The rapidly expanding application of these technologies for investigating biological systems of ever-increasing complexity is revolutionizing our ability to probe the mechanisms of biological reactions. Here, we compare the mechanistic information available from single-molecule experiments with the information typically obtained from ensemble studies and show how these two experimental approaches interface with each other. We next present a basic overview of the toolkit for observing and manipulating biology one molecule at a time. We close by presenting a case study demonstrating the impact that single-molecule approaches have had on our understanding of one of life's most fundamental biochemical reactions: the translation of a messenger RNA into its encoded protein by the ribosome. PMID:21685361

  8. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  9. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic absorption spectrum of a molecule often depends on the solvent used. The change in position (and, sometimes, intensity) of the UV/Vis band accompanying a change in the polarity of the medium is called solvatochromism. The phenomenon has its origins in intermolecular solute–solvent interactions, such as ...

  10. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Molecule of the Month Isomers of Benzene - Still Pursuing Dreams. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 80-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. A Dicopper (II) Complex Hydrolyzes the Phosphate Diester Bond! R N Mukherjee is with the Department of. Chemistry at Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur. 1 DNA: Deoxyribonucleic Acid;. RNA: Ribonucleic Acid; HPNP: 2-Hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate; Phosphodiester: Di- ester of ...

  12. Molecule-based magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design of molecule-based magnets has also been extended to the design of poly-functional molecular magnets, such as those exhibiting second-order optical nonlinearity, liquid crystallinity, or chirality simultaneously with long-range magnetic order. Solubility, low density and biocompatibility are attractive features of ...

  13. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Faraday opened up a new chapter in chemistry when he isolated benzene from the distillate of coal tar. The deceptively simple molecule with the formula C6H6 has triggered many experiments and theoretical proposals. The correct ring struc- ture, shown in 1 (see Figure 1), was assigned by Kekule after his.

  14. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1232-1237. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coordination polymers and molecular systems in which metal ions serve as the source of the ... cobalt, nickel and gadolinium which are themselves ferromagnetic in their bulk state (Box 1). ... their complexes, organic free and ion radicals and molecules such as 02 and NO are good examples of paramagnetic systems.

  16. Excitons: Molecules in flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Forming molecules from atoms is commonplace in dense atomic gases. But it now seems that some two-dimensional materials provide a suitable environment for creating complex molecular states from the hydrogen-like electron-hole pairs that form in semiconductors.

  17. Quantum Interference of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    C60, the third allotropic form of carbon was discovered in 1985 by Kroto and colleagues. These carbon mole- cules have a structure of a truncated icosahedron (see. Figure 5). The truncated icosahedron has 12 pentagon and 20 hexagon rings and has 60 vertices { the shape of a soccer ball. These molecules have been ...

  18. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Molecules to Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Molecules to Materials Liquid Crystals and Molecular Conductors. T P Radhakrishnan. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 6-23. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  1. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  2. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Molecule of the Month Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 66-71. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Molecule of the Month - A Stable Dibismuthene - A Compound with a Bi-Bi Double Bond. V Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 ... Author Affiliations. V Chandrasekhar1. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India.

  4. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  5. Development of Chiral LC-MS Methods for small Molecules and Their Applications in the Analysis of Enantiomeric Composition and Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Meera Jay [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop sensitive LC-MS methods for enantiomeric separation and detection, and then apply these methods for determination of enantiomeric composition and for the study of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a chiral nutraceutical. Our first study, evaluated the use of reverse phase and polar organic mode for chiral LC-API/MS method development. Reverse phase methods containing high water were found to decrease ionization efficiency in electrospray, while polar organic methods offered good compatibility and low limits of detection with ESI. The use of lower flow rates dramatically increased the sensitivity by an order of magnitude. Additionally, for rapid chiral screening, the coupled Chirobiotic column afforded great applicability for LC-MS method development. Our second study, continued with chiral LC-MS method development in this case for the normal phase mode. Ethoxynonafluorobutane, a fluorocarbon with low flammability and no flashpoint, was used as a substitute solvent for hexane/heptane mobile phases for LC-APCI/MS. Comparable chromatographic resolutions and selectivities were found using ENFB substituted mobile phase systems, although, peak efficiencies were significantly diminished. Limits of detection were either comparable or better for ENFB-MS over heptane-PDA detection. The miscibility of ENFB with a variety of commonly used organic modifiers provided for flexibility in method development. For APCI, lower flow rates did not increase sensitivity as significantly as was previously found for ESI-MS detection. The chiral analysis of native amino acids was evaluated using both APCI and ESI sources. For free amino acids and small peptides, APCI was found to have better sensitivities over ESI at high flow rates. For larger peptides, however, sensitivity was greatly improved with the use of electrospray. Additionally, sensitivity was enhanced with the use of non-volatile additives, This optimized method was then

  6. Laser Control of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Letkhov, V S

    2007-01-01

    This text treats laser light as a universal tool to control matter at the atomic and molecular level, one of the most exciting applications of lasers. Lasers can heat matter, cool atoms to ultra-low temperatures where they show quantum collective behaviour, and can act selectively on specific atoms and molecules for their detection and separation.

  7. Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Hyun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 μm) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 μm was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial

  8. Decomposition of Chemical Chain Molecules with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansli, Murat; Tasal, Erol

    2016-10-01

    Chemical chain molecules' decomposition is an interesting subject area for the atmospheric pressure plasma applications. The effects of the atmospheric pressure argon plasma on 4-((2-methoxyphenyl)Diazenyl)Benzene-1,3,-Diol molecule at room temperature are investigated. This molecule is one of the industrial dye molecules used widely. When considering the ecological life, this molecule will be very harmful and danger. We suggest a different, easy and useful decomposing method for such molecules. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet was principally treated for this decomposing of the molecule. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) was used to characterization of the molecule after the plasma application to molecule in liquid phase with ethanol and methanol solvents. The atmospheric-pressure plasma jet of argon (Ar) as non-equilibrium has been formed by ac-power generator with frequency - 24 kHz and voltage - 12 kV. Characterizations for solutions prepared with ethanol and methanol solvents of molecule have been examined after applying (duration: 3 minutes) the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The molecule was broken at 6C-7N =8N-9C stretching peak after the plasma treatment. The new plasma photo-products for ethanol and methanol solutions were produced as 6C-7N-8N =9C (strong, varying) and 12C =17O (strong, wide) stretching peaks.

  9. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  10. Cold guided beams of polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motsch, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experiments characterizing cold guided beams of polar molecules which are produced by electrostatic velocity filtering. This filtering method exploits the interaction between the polar molecules and the electric field provided by an electrostatic quadrupole guide to extract efficiently the slow molecules from a thermal reservoir. For molecules with large and linear Stark shifts such as deuterated ammonia (ND 3 ) or formaldehyde (H 2 CO), fluxes of guided molecules of 10 10 -10 11 molecules/s are produced. The velocities of the molecules in these beams are in the range of 10-200 m/s and correspond to typical translational temperatures of a few Kelvin. The maximum velocity of the guided molecules depends on the Stark shift, the molecular mass, the geometry of the guide, and the applied electrode voltage. Although the source is operated in the near-effusive regime, the number density of the slowest molecules is sensitive to collisions. A theoretical model, taking into account this velocity-dependent collisional loss of molecules in the vicinity of the nozzle, reproduces the density of the guided molecules over a wide pressure range. A careful adjustment of pressure allows an increase in the total number of molecules, whilst yet minimizing losses due to collisions of the sought-for slow molecules. This is an important issue for future applications. Electrostatic velocity filtering is suited for different molecular species. This is demonstrated by producing cold guided beams of the water isotopologs H 2 O, D 2 O, and HDO. Although these are chemically similar, they show linear and quadratic Stark shifts, respectively, when exposed to external electric fields. As a result, the flux of HDO is larger by one order of magnitude, and the flux of the individual isotopologs shows a characteristic dependence on the guiding electric field. The internal-state distribution of guided molecules is studied with a newly developed diagnostic method: depletion

  11. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  12. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C 6 H 5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH 3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, LG.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules are discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to hot molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules (electron affinity), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies

  14. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  15. An electrostatic elliptical mirror for neutral polar molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Flórez, A. Isabel González; Meek, Samuel A.; Haak, Henrik; Conrad, Horst; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Meijer, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Focusing optics for neutral molecules finds application in shaping and steering molecular beams. Here we present an electrostatic elliptical mirror for polar molecules consisting of an array of microstructured gold electrodes deposited on a glass substrate. Alternating positive and negative voltages applied to the electrodes create a repulsive potential for molecules in low-field-seeking states. The equipotential lines are parallel to the substrate surface, which is bent in an elliptical shap...

  16. Watching single molecules dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  17. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  18. Playing with molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Recent philosophy of science has seen a number of attempts to understand scientific models by looking to theories of fiction. In previous work, I have offered an account of models that draws on Kendall Walton's 'make-believe' theory of art. According to this account, models function as 'props' in games of make-believe, like children's dolls or toy trucks. In this paper, I assess the make-believe view through an empirical study of molecular models. I suggest that the view gains support when we look at the way that these models are used and the attitude that users take towards them. Users' interaction with molecular models suggests that they do imagine the models to be molecules, in much the same way that children imagine a doll to be a baby. Furthermore, I argue, users of molecular models imagine themselves viewing and manipulating molecules, just as children playing with a doll might imagine themselves looking at a baby or feeding it. Recognising this 'participation' in modelling, I suggest, points towards a new account of how models are used to learn about the world, and helps us to understand the value that scientists sometimes place on three-dimensional, physical models over other forms of representation.

  19. Passing Current through Touching Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schull, G.; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2009-01-01

    The charge flow from a single C-60 molecule to another one has been probed. The conformation and electronic states of both molecules on the contacting electrodes have been characterized using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope. While the contact conductance of a single molecule between two...

  20. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  1. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations. Based on invited talk at the International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology 2006.

  2. Multiphoton processes in isolated atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudbo, A.S.

    1979-11-01

    The theory of coherent excitation of a multilevel quantum mechanical system is developed. Damping of the system is taken into account by the use of a density matrix formalism. General properties of the wave function and/or the density matrix are discussed. The physical implications for the behavior of the system are described, together with possible applications of the formalism, including the infrared multiphoton excitation of molecules, and optical pumping in alkali atoms. Experimental results are presented on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of molecules, followed by a discussion of the general features of this process. The experimental results were obtained using a crossed laser and molecular beam method, and the emphasis is on determining the properties of the dissociating molecule and the dissociation products. The dissociation process is shown to be described very well by the standard statistical theory (RRKM theory) of unimolecular reactions, a brief presentation of which is also included

  3. Single molecule transcription profiling with AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Mishra, Bud; Pittenger, Bede; Magonov, Sergei; Troke, Joshua; Teitell, Michael A; Gimzewski, James K

    2007-01-01

    Established techniques for global gene expression profiling, such as microarrays, face fundamental sensitivity constraints. Due to greatly increasing interest in examining minute samples from micro-dissected tissues, including single cells, unorthodox approaches, including molecular nanotechnologies, are being explored in this application. Here, we examine the use of single molecule, ordered restriction mapping, combined with AFM, to measure gene transcription levels from very low abundance samples. We frame the problem mathematically, using coding theory, and present an analysis of the critical error sources that may serve as a guide to designing future studies. We follow with experiments detailing the construction of high density, single molecule, ordered restriction maps from plasmids and from cDNA molecules, using two different enzymes, a result not previously reported. We discuss these results in the context of our calculations

  4. Quantum effects at low-energy atom–molecule interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of quantum interference in inter-conversion between cold atoms and diatomic molecules are analysed in this study. Within the framework of Fano's theory, continuum bound anisotropic dressed state formalism of atom–molecule quantum dynamics is presented. This formalism is applicable in photo- and ...

  5. AC trapping and high-resolution spectroscopy of ammonia molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhoven, J. van

    2006-01-01

    Cold molecules are potentially beneficial for several areas of research. They have applications in spectroscopy, collision studies and, for instance, the study of the effects of dipole-dipole interactions in BECs. One method to decelerate and thereby cool down neutral dipolar molecules is to use a

  6. SPECTRUM-GENERATING ALGEBRA FOR X(3) MOLECULES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIEPERINK, AEL; LEVIATAN, A

    1995-01-01

    A spectrum-generating algebra for a unified description of rotations and vibrations in polyatomic molecules is introduced. An application to nonlinear X(3) molecules shows that this model (i) incorporates exactly the relevant point group, (ii) provides a complete classification of oblate top states,

  7. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  8. Energy-resolved positron annihilation for molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, L.D.; Gilbert, S.J.; Surko, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study designed to address the long-standing question regarding the origin of very large positron annihilation rates observed for many molecules. We report a study of the annihilation, resolved as a function of positron energy (ΔE∼25 meV, full width at half maximum) for positron energies from 50 meV to several eV. Annihilation measurements are presented for a range of hydrocarbon molecules, including a detailed study of alkanes, C n H 2n+2 , for n=1-9 and 12. Data for other molecules are also presented: C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 ; CD 4 ; isopentane; partially fluorinated and fluorinated methane (CH x F 4-x ); 1-fluorohexane (C 6 H 13 F) and 1-fluorononane (C 9 H 19 F). A key feature of the results is very large enhancements in the annihilation rates at positron energies corresponding to the excitation of molecular vibrations in larger alkane molecules. These enhancements are believed to be responsible for the large annihilation rates observed for Maxwellian distributions of positrons in molecular gases. In alkane molecules larger than ethane (C 2 H 6 ), the position of these peaks is shifted downward by an amount ∼20 meV per carbon. The results presented here are generally consistent with a physical picture recently considered in detail by Gribakin [Phys. Rev. A 61, 022720 (2000)]. In this model, the incoming positron excites a vibrational Feshbach resonance and is temporarily trapped on the molecule, greatly enhancing the probability of annihilation. The applicability of this model and the resulting enhancement in annihilation rate relies on the existence of positron-molecule bound states. In accord with this reasoning, the experimental results presented here provide the most direct evidence to date that positrons bind to neutral molecules. The shift in the position of the resonances is interpreted as a measure of the binding energy of the positron to the molecule. Other features of the results are also discussed, including large

  9. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single-molecule

  10. Single-molecule manipulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Siyun; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-25

    Compared to conventional ensemble methods, studying macromolecules at single-molecule level can reveal extraordinary clear and even surprising views for a biological reaction. In the past 20 years, single-molecule techniques have been undergoing a very rapid development, and these cutting edge technologies have revolutionized the biological research by facilitating single-molecule manipulation and detection. Here we give a brief review about these advanced techniques, including optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy (AFM), hydrodynamic flow-stretching assay, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET). We are trying to describe their basic principles and provide a few examples of applications for each technique. This review aims to give a rather introductory survey of single-molecule techniques for audiences with biological or biophysical background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Molecules in the Spotlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  12. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs, and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures – an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and...

  13. Lanthanide single molecule magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jinkui; Zhang, Peng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China). Changchun Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2015-10-01

    This book begins by providing basic information on single-molecule magnets (SMMs), covering the magnetism of lanthanide, the characterization and relaxation dynamics of SMMs and advanced means of studying lanthanide SMMs. It then systematically introduces lanthanide SMMs ranging from mononuclear and dinuclear to polynuclear complexes, classifying them and highlighting those SMMs with high barrier and blocking temperatures - an approach that provides some very valuable indicators for the structural features needed to optimize the contribution of an Ising type spin to a molecular magnet. The final chapter presents some of the newest developments in the lanthanide SMM field, such as the design of multifunctional and stimuli-responsive magnetic materials as well as the anchoring and organization of the SMMs on surfaces. In addition, the crystal structure and magnetic data are clearly presented with a wealth of illustrations in each chapter, helping newcomers and experts alike to better grasp ongoing trends and explore new directions.

  14. Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T V; Suleimanov, Yu V; Aquilanti, V; Krems, R V

    2009-01-01

    We present an accurate quantum mechanical study of molecule-molecule collisions in the presence of a magnetic field. The work focuses on the analysis of elastic scattering and spin relaxation in collisions of O 2 ( 3 Σ g - ) molecules at cold (∼0.1 K) and ultracold (∼10 -6 K) temperatures. Our calculations show that magnetic spin relaxation in molecule-molecule collisions is extremely efficient except at magnetic fields below 1 mT. The rate constant for spin relaxation at T=0.1 K and a magnetic field of 0.1 T is found to be as large as 6.1x10 -11 cm -3 s -1 . The magnetic field dependence of elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections at ultracold temperatures is dominated by a manifold of Feshbach resonances with the density of ∼100 resonances per Tesla for collisions of molecules in the absolute ground state. This suggests that the scattering length of ultracold molecules in the absolute ground state can be effectively tuned in a very wide range of magnetic fields. Our calculations demonstrate that the number and properties of the magnetic Feshbach resonances are dramatically different for molecules in the absolute ground and excited spin states. The density of Feshbach resonances for molecule-molecule scattering in the low-field-seeking Zeeman state is reduced by a factor of 10.

  15. An electrostatic elliptical mirror for neutral polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Flórez, A Isabel; Meek, Samuel A; Haak, Henrik; Conrad, Horst; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Meijer, Gerard

    2011-11-14

    Focusing optics for neutral molecules finds application in shaping and steering molecular beams. Here we present an electrostatic elliptical mirror for polar molecules consisting of an array of microstructured gold electrodes deposited on a glass substrate. Alternating positive and negative voltages applied to the electrodes create a repulsive potential for molecules in low-field-seeking states. The equipotential lines are parallel to the substrate surface, which is bent in an elliptical shape. The mirror is characterized by focusing a beam of metastable CO molecules and the results are compared to the outcome of trajectory simulations.

  16. Single Molecule Spectroscopy in Chemistry, Physics and Biology Nobel Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Gräslund, Astrid; Widengren, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    Written by the leading experts in the field, this book describes the development and current state-of-the-art in single molecule spectroscopy. The application of this technique, which started 1989, in physics, chemistry and biosciences is displayed.

  17. Trichloroacetimidates as Alkylating Reagents and Their Application in the Synthesis of Pyrroloindoline Natural Products and Synthesis of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arijit A.

    was applied towards the synthesis of natural products and their analogs. The pyrroloindoline ring system is found in many alkaloids and cyclic peptides which mainly differ in the substitution at the C3a position. To provide rapid access to these natural products a diversity-oriented strategy was established via displacement of C3a-trichloroacetimidate pyrroloindoline. Carbon, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen nucleophiles were all shown to undergo substitution reactions with these trichloroacetimidates in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst. In order to demonstrate the utility of this new method it was applied towards the synthesis of arundinine and a formal synthesis of psychotriasine. Current investigations involve the application of this method towards the synthesis of a complex pyrroloindoline natural product kapakahine C and the progress made therein has been discussed. The reactivity of trichloroacetimidates was also investigated for the selective C3-alkylation of 2,3-disubstituted indoles to provide indolenines. Indolenines serve as useful intermediates in the synthesis of many complex alkaloids. Different benzylic and allylic trichloroacetimidates were shown to provide 3,3'-disubstituted indolenines with high yields in the presence of catalytic amounts of Lewis acids. Various substituted indoles were evaluated under these reaction conditions. This methodology was also applied towards the synthesis of the core tetracyclic ring system found in communesin natural products. In addition to the above work, synthesis of small molecule inhibitors of Src Homology 2 Domain-Containing Inositol Phosphatase (SHIP) has also been described. Aberrations in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) cellular signaling pathway can lead to diseased cellular states like cancer. Herein we have reported stereoselective synthesis of two quinoline based small molecule SHIP inhibitors. The lead compounds and their analogs were tested for their activities against SHIP by Malachite green assay

  18. Theory of low-energy electron-molecule collision physics in the coupled-channel method and application to e-CO/sub 2/ scattering. [0. 01 to 10 eV, potentials, partial waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, M.A.

    1976-08-01

    A theory of electron-molecule scattering based on the fixed-nuclei approximation in a body-fixed reference frame is formulated and applied to e-CO/sub 2/ collisions in the energy range from 0.07 to 10.0 eV. The procedure used is a single-center coupled-channel method which incorporates a highly accurate static interaction potential, an approximate local exchange potential, and an induced polarization potential. Coupled equations are solved by a modification of the integral equations algorithm; several partial waves are required in the region of space near the nuclei, and a transformation procedure is developed to handle the consequent numerical problems. The potential energy is converged by separating electronic and nuclear contributions in a Legendre-polynomial expansion and including a large number of the latter. Formulas are derived for total elastic, differential, momentum transfer, and rotational excitation cross sections. The Born and asymptotic decoupling approximations are derived and discussed in the context of comparison with the coupled-channel cross sections. Both are found to be unsatisfactory in the energy range under consideration. An extensive discussion of the technical aspects of calculations for electron collisions with highly nonspherical targets is presented, including detailed convergence studies and a discussion of various numerical difficulties. The application to e-CO/sub 2/ scattering produces converged results in good agreement with observed cross sections. Various aspects of the physics of this collision are discussed, including the 3.8 eV shape resonance, which is found to possess both p and f character, and the anomalously large low-energy momentum transfer cross sections, which are found to be due to ..sigma../sub g/ symmetry. Comparison with static and static-exchange approximations are made.

  19. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce [Pullman, WA; Burke, Charles Cullen [Moscow, ID

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  20. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  1. Isatin, a versatile molecule: studies in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.iq@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-05-15

    Isatin is a small, versatile and widely applicable pharmacological molecule. These characteristics make isatin and its derivatives attractive to many research groups as resources for chemical and pharmacological studies. Although it has a relatively simple structure, isatin is a useful chemical scaffold for a variety of chemical transformations. This article discusses several studies performed by Brazilian groups, including investigations of its structural changes, biological assay designs and new methods for the synthesis of isatin. (author)

  2. Gibbs Free Energy of Hydrolytic Water Molecule in Acyl-Enzyme Intermediates of a Serine Protease: A Potential Application for Computer-Aided Discovery of Mechanism-Based Reversible Covalent Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Yosuke; Yamaotsu, Noriyuki; Hirono, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    In order to predict the potencies of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors, the relationships between calculated Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule in acyl-trypsin intermediates and experimentally measured catalytic rate constants (k cat ) were investigated. After obtaining representative solution structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, hydration thermodynamics analyses using WaterMap™ were conducted. Consequently, we found for the first time that when Gibbs free energy of the hydrolytic water molecule was lower, logarithms of k cat were also lower. The hydrolytic water molecule with favorable Gibbs free energy may hydrolyze acylated serine slowly. Gibbs free energy of hydrolytic water molecule might be a useful descriptor for computer-aided discovery of mechanism-based reversible covalent inhibitors of hydrolytic enzymes.

  3. Single molecule tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  4. Small Molecule Subgraph Detector (SMSD toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Finding one small molecule (query in a large target library is a challenging task in computational chemistry. Although several heuristic approaches are available using fragment-based chemical similarity searches, they fail to identify exact atom-bond equivalence between the query and target molecules and thus cannot be applied to complex chemical similarity searches, such as searching a complete or partial metabolic pathway. In this paper we present a new Maximum Common Subgraph (MCS tool: SMSD (Small Molecule Subgraph Detector to overcome the issues with current heuristic approaches to small molecule similarity searches. The MCS search implemented in SMSD incorporates chemical knowledge (atom type match with bond sensitive and insensitive information while searching molecular similarity. We also propose a novel method by which solutions obtained by each MCS run can be ranked using chemical filters such as stereochemistry, bond energy, etc. Results In order to benchmark and test the tool, we performed a 50,000 pair-wise comparison between KEGG ligands and PDB HET Group atoms. In both cases the SMSD was shown to be more efficient than the widely used MCS module implemented in the Chemistry Development Kit (CDK in generating MCS solutions from our test cases. Conclusion Presently this tool can be applied to various areas of bioinformatics and chemo-informatics for finding exhaustive MCS matches. For example, it can be used to analyse metabolic networks by mapping the atoms between reactants and products involved in reactions. It can also be used to detect the MCS/substructure searches in small molecules reported by metabolome experiments, as well as in the screening of drug-like compounds with similar substructures. Thus, we present a robust tool that can be used for multiple applications, including the discovery of new drug molecules. This tool is freely available on http://www.ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/software/SMSD/

  5. Theoretical Investigations Regarding Single Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Georg Lind

    Neoclassical Valence Bond Theory, Quantum Transport, Quantum Interference, Kondo Effect, and Electron Pumping. Trap a single organic molecule between two electrodes and apply a bias voltage across this "molecular junction". When electrons pass through the molecule, the different electron paths can...... interfere destructively or constructively. Destructive interference effects in electron transport could potentially improve thermo-electrics, organic logic circuits and energy harvesting. We have investigated destructive interference in off-resonant transport through organic molecules, and have found a set...

  6. Biofuels: from microbes to molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Xuefeng

    2014-01-01

    .... The production of different biofuel molecules including hydrogen, methane, ethanol, butanol, higher chain alcohols, isoprenoids and fatty acid derivatives, from genetically engineered microbes...

  7. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Orellana, P. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  8. Magnetism: Molecules to Materials IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joel S.; Drillon, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic phenomena and materials are everywhere. Our understanding of magnetic behavior, once thought to be mature, has enjoyed new impetus from contributions ranging from molecular chemistry, materials chemistry and sciences to solid state physics. New phenomena are explored that open promising perspectives for commercial applications in future - carrying out chemical reactions in magnetic fields is just one of those. The spectrum spans molecule-based - organic, (bio)inorganic, and hybrid - compounds, metallic materials as well as their oxides forming thin films, nanoparticles, wires etc. Reflecting contemporary knowledge, this open series of volumes provides a much-needed comprehensive overview of this growing interdisciplinary field. Topical reviews written by foremost scientists explain the trends and latest advances in a clear and detailed way. By maintaining the balance between theory and experiment, the book provides a guide for both advanced students and specialists to this research area. It will help evaluate their own experimental observations and serve as a basis for the design of new magnetic materials. A unique reference work, indispensable for everyone concerned with the phenomena of magnetism!

  9. Extending Single-Molecule Microscopy Using Optical Fourier Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys the recent application of optical Fourier processing to the long-established but still expanding field of single-molecule imaging and microscopy. A variety of single-molecule studies can benefit from the additional image information that can be obtained by modulating the Fourier, or pupil, plane of a widefield microscope. After briefly reviewing several current applications, we present a comprehensive and computationally efficient theoretical model for simulating single-molecule fluorescence as it propagates through an imaging system. Furthermore, we describe how phase/amplitude-modulating optics inserted in the imaging pathway may be modeled, especially at the Fourier plane. Finally, we discuss selected recent applications of Fourier processing methods to measure the orientation, depth, and rotational mobility of single fluorescent molecules. PMID:24745862

  10. Bioinspired assembly of small molecules in cell milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Xu, Bing

    2017-05-09

    Self-assembly, the autonomous organization of components to form patterns or structures, is a prevalent process in nature at all scales. Particularly, biological systems offer remarkable examples of diverse structures (as well as building blocks) and processes resulting from self-assembly. The exploration of bioinspired assemblies not only allows for mimicking the structures of living systems, but it also leads to functions for applications in different fields that benefit humans. In the last several decades, efforts on understanding and controlling self-assembly of small molecules have produced a large library of candidates for developing the biomedical applications of assemblies of small molecules. Moreover, recent findings in biology have provided new insights on the assemblies of small molecules to modulate essential cellular processes (such as apoptosis). These observations indicate that the self-assembly of small molecules, as multifaceted entities and processes to interact with multiple proteins, can have profound biological impacts on cells. In this review, we illustrate that the generation of assemblies of small molecules in cell milieu with their interactions with multiple cellular proteins for regulating cellular processes can result in primary phenotypes, thus providing a fundamentally new molecular approach for controlling cell behavior. By discussing the correlation between molecular assemblies in nature and the assemblies of small molecules in cell milieu, illustrating the functions of the assemblies of small molecules, and summarizing some guiding principles, we hope this review will stimulate more molecular scientists to explore the bioinspired self-assembly of small molecules in cell milieu.

  11. Molecule of the Month -92 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reason, anandamide and other similar endogenous molecules are referred to as endocannabinoids, although structurally they do not have any resemblance to the cannabinoids such as THC and similar molecules isolated from the Cannabis plant. Since they mimic the activity ofTHC) which is a cannabinoid, they are said.

  12. Quantum transport through single molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio Oliveros, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes three-terminal transport measurements through single molecules. The interest in this field stems from the dream that single molecules will form the building blocks for future nanoscale electronic devices. The advantages are their small size -nanometers-, and their synthetic

  13. FlavorDB: a database of flavor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neelansh; Sethupathy, Apuroop; Tuwani, Rudraksh; Nk, Rakhi; Dokania, Shubham; Iyer, Arvind; Gupta, Ayushi; Agrawal, Shubhra; Singh, Navjot; Shukla, Shubham; Kathuria, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; Kanji, Rakesh; Jain, Anupam; Kaur, Avneet; Nagpal, Rashmi; Bagler, Ganesh

    2018-01-04

    Flavor is an expression of olfactory and gustatory sensations experienced through a multitude of chemical processes triggered by molecules. Beyond their key role in defining taste and smell, flavor molecules also regulate metabolic processes with consequences to health. Such molecules present in natural sources have been an integral part of human history with limited success in attempts to create synthetic alternatives. Given their utility in various spheres of life such as food and fragrances, it is valuable to have a repository of flavor molecules, their natural sources, physicochemical properties, and sensory responses. FlavorDB (http://cosylab.iiitd.edu.in/flavordb) comprises of 25,595 flavor molecules representing an array of tastes and odors. Among these 2254 molecules are associated with 936 natural ingredients belonging to 34 categories. The dynamic, user-friendly interface of the resource facilitates exploration of flavor molecules for divergent applications: finding molecules matching a desired flavor or structure; exploring molecules of an ingredient; discovering novel food pairings; finding the molecular essence of food ingredients; associating chemical features with a flavor and more. Data-driven studies based on FlavorDB can pave the way for an improved understanding of flavor mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  15. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  16. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations (i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface) is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules.

  17. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations [i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface] is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules

  18. Single molecule Studies of DNA Mismatch Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Dorothy A.; Weninger, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair involves is a widely conserved set of proteins that is essential to limit genetic drift in all organisms. The same system of proteins plays key roles in many cancer related cellular transactions in humans. Although the basic process has been reconstituted in vitro using purified components, many fundamental aspects of DNA mismatch repair remain hidden due in part to the complexity and transient nature of the interactions between the mismatch repair proteins and DNA substrates. Single molecule methods offer the capability to uncover these transient but complex interactions and allow novel insights into mechanisms that underlie DNA mismatch repair. In this review, we discuss applications of single molecule methodology including electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, particle tracking, FRET, and optical trapping to studies of DNA mismatch repair. These studies have led to formulation of mechanistic models of how proteins identify single base mismatches in the vast background of matched DNA and signal for their repair. PMID:24746644

  19. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  20. Electron attachment to excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Datskos, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Studies on electron attachment to molecules rotationally/vibrationally excited thermally or via infrared-laser excitation showed that the effect of internal energy of a molecule on its electron attachment properties depends on the mode--dissociative or nondissociative--of electron attachment. They quantified the effect of the internal energy of the molecule on the rate of destruction (by autodissociation or by autodetachment) of its parent transient anion. Generally, increases in ro-vibrational molecular energy increase the cross section for dissociative electron attachment and decrease the effective cross section for parent anion formation due mainly to increased autodetachment. These findings and their understanding are discussed. A discussion is given, also, of recent investigations of electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, especially photoenhanced dissociative electron attachment to long- and short-lived excited electronic states of molecules produced directly or indirectly by laser irradiation. These studies showed that the cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to electronically excited molecules usually are many orders of magnitude larger than those for the ground-state molecules. The new techniques that have been developed for such studies are briefly described also

  1. DNA analysis by single molecule stretching in nanofluidic biochips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abad, E.; Juarros, A.; Retolaza, A.

    2011-01-01

    Stretching single DNA molecules by confinement in nanofluidic channels has attracted a great interest during the last few years as a DNA analysis tool. We have designed and fabricated a sealed micro/nanofluidic device for DNA stretching applications, based on the use of the high throughput Nano......Imprint Lithography (NIL) technology combined with a conventional anodic bonding of the silicon base and Pyrex cover. Using this chip, we have performed single molecule imaging on a bench-top fluorescent microscope system. Lambda phage DNA was used as a model sample to characterize the chip. Single molecules of λ...... a method to determining DNA size. The results of this work prove that the developed fabrication process is a good alternative for the fabrication of single molecule DNA biochips and it allows developing a variety of innovative bio/chemical sensors based on single-molecule DNA sequencing devices....

  2. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, J. H., E-mail: judith.ojeda@uptc.edu.co [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile); Grupo de Física de Materiales, Escuela de Física, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja (Colombia); Rey-González, R. R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta investigación, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7D Arica (Chile)

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  3. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries.

  4. Triacylglycerol: nourishing molecule in endurance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rich molecules as an energy sourceobtained from host cell debris remains interesting. Additionally, the potential of M. tuberculosis to survive under differentstress conditions leading to its dormant state in pathogenesis remains elusive. The exact ...

  5. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  6. Experimental decoherence in molecule interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackermueller, L.; Hornberger, K.; Stibor, A.; Zeilinger, A.; Arndt, M.; Kiesewetter, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We present three mechanisms of decoherence that occur quite naturally in matter wave interferometer with large molecules. One way molecules can lose coherence is through collision with background gas particles. We observe a loss of contrast with increasing background pressure for various types of gases. We can understand this phenomenon quantitatively with a new model for collisional decoherence which corrects older models by a factor of 2 π;. The second experiment studies the thermal emission of photons related to the high internal energy of the interfering molecules. When sufficiently many or sufficiently short photons are emitted inside the interferometer, the fringe contrast is lost. We can continuously vary the temperature of the molecules and compare the loss of contrast with a model based on decoherence theory. Again we find good quantitative agreement. A third mechanism that influences our interference pattern is dephasing due to vibrations of the interference gratings. By adding additional vibrations we study this effect in more detail. (author)

  7. Electron Scattering From Atoms, Molecules, Nuclei, and Bulk Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Whelan, Colm T

    2005-01-01

    Topics that are covered include electron scattering in the scanning TEM; basic theory of inelastic electron imaging; study of confined atoms by electron excitation; helium bubbles created in extreme pressure with application to nuclear safety; lithium ion implantation; electron and positron scattering from clusters; electron scattering from physi- and chemi-absorbed molecules on surfaces; coincidence studies; electron scattering from biological molecules; electron spectroscopy as a tool for environmental science; electron scattering in the presence of intense fields; electron scattering from astrophysical molecules; electon interatctions an detection of x-ray radiation.

  8. Proposal for Laser Cooling of Complex Polyatomic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Doyle, John M

    2016-11-18

    An experimentally feasible strategy for direct laser cooling of polyatomic molecules with six or more atoms is presented. Our approach relies on the attachment of a metal atom to a complex molecule, where it acts as an active photon cycling site. We describe a laser cooling scheme for alkaline earth monoalkoxide free radicals taking advantage of the phase space compression of a cryogenic buffer-gas beam. Possible applications are presented including laser cooling of chiral molecules and slowing of molecular beams using coherent photon processes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Spectroscopy and reactions of molecules important in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research includes: (1) hot hydrogen atom reactions in terms of the nature of products produced, mechanism of the reactions and the implication and application of such reactions for molecules existing in interstellar clouds, in planetary atmospheres, and in chemical evolution; (2) photochemical reactions that can lead to molecules important in chemical evolution, interstellar clouds and as constituents in planetary atmospheres; and (3) spectroscopic and theoretical properties of biomolecules and their precursors and where possible, use these to understand their photochemical behavior.

  10. Resonant inelastic collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houfek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we give a review of applications of the nonlocal resonance theory which has been successfully used for treating the nuclear dynamics of low-energy electron collisions with diatomic molecules over several decades. We give examples and brief explanations of various structures observed in the cross sections of vibrational excitation and dissociative electron attachment to diatomic molecules such as threshold peaks, boomerang oscillations below the dissociative attachment threshold, or outer-well resonances.

  11. Photoionization of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, J.A.R.

    1976-01-01

    A literature review on the present state of knowledge in photoionization is presented. Various experimental techniques that have been developed to study photoionization, such as fluorescence and photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, are examined. Various atoms and molecules were chosen to illustrate these techniques, specifically helium and xenon atoms and hydrogen molecules. Specialized photoionization such as in positive and negative ions, excited states, and free radicals is also treated. Absorption cross sections and ionization potentials are also discussed

  12. Low pressure tritiation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.F.; Powers, J.C.; Lively, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of tritiating sensitive biological molecules by depositing molecules of the substance to be tritiated on a supporting substrate in an evacuated vacuum chamber near, but not in the path of, an electron beam which traverses the chamber, admitting tritium gas into the chamber, and subjecting the tritium to the electron beam. Vibrationally excited tritium gas species are generated which collide and react with the substance thus incorporating tritium atoms into the substance. (U.K.)

  13. Zero-mode waveguide nanophotonic structures for single molecule characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Garrison M.; Han, Donghoon; Bohn, Paul W.

    2018-05-01

    Single-molecule characterization has become a crucial research tool in the chemical and life sciences, but limitations, such as limited concentration range, inability to control molecular distributions in space, and intrinsic phenomena, such as photobleaching, present significant challenges. Recent developments in non-classical optics and nanophotonics offer promising routes to mitigating these restrictions, such that even low affinity (K D ~ mM) biomolecular interactions can be studied. Here we introduce and review specific nanophotonic devices used to support single molecule studies. Optical nanostructures, such as zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs), are usually fabricated in thin gold or aluminum films and serve to confine the observation volume of optical microspectroscopy to attoliter to zeptoliter volumes. These simple nanostructures allow individual molecules to be isolated for optical and electrochemical analysis, even when the molecules of interest are present at high concentration (µM–mM) in bulk solution. Arrays of ZMWs may be combined with optical probes such as single molecule fluorescence, single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for distributed analysis of large numbers of single-molecule reactions or binding events in parallel. Furthermore, ZMWs may be used as multifunctional devices, for example by combining optical and electrochemical functions in a single discrete architecture to achieve electrochemical ZMWs. In this review, we will describe the optical properties, fabrication, and applications of ZMWs for single-molecule studies, as well as the integration of ZMWs into systems for chemical and biochemical analysis.

  14. Dynamic Colloidal Molecules Maneuvered by Light-Controlled Janus Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yirong; Mou, Fangzhi; Feng, Yizheng; Che, Shengping; Li, Wei; Xu, Leilei; Guan, Jianguo

    2017-07-12

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a dynamic colloidal molecule that is capable of moving autonomously and performing swift, reversible, and in-place assembly dissociation in a high accuracy by manipulating a TiO 2 /Pt Janus micromotor with light irradiation. Due to the efficient motion of the TiO 2 /Pt Janus motor and the light-switchable electrostatic interactions between the micromotor and colloidal particles, the colloidal particles can be captured and assembled one by one on the fly, subsequently forming into swimming colloidal molecules by mimicking space-filling models of simple molecules with central atoms. The as-demonstrated dynamic colloidal molecules have a configuration accurately controlled and stabilized by regulating the time-dependent intensity of UV light, which controls the stop-and-go motion of the colloidal molecules. The dynamic colloidal molecules are dissociated when the light irradiation is turned off due to the disappearance of light-switchable electrostatic interaction between the motor and the colloidal particles. The strategy for the assembly of dynamic colloidal molecules is applicable to various charged colloidal particles. The simulated optical properties of a dynamic colloidal molecule imply that the results here may provide a novel approach for in-place building functional microdevices, such as microlens arrays, in a swift and reversible manner.

  15. Novel Fluorescent Dyes for Single DNA Molecule Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zarkov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To answer the demands of scientific and medical imaging issues, the family of nucleic acid fluorescent dyes is constantly enlarging. Most of the developed dyes reveal high qualities in bulk solution assays but are inefficient to produce a strong and sufficiently stable signal to enable the application of single-molecule techniques. Therefore, we tested 12 novel monomeric and homodimeric cyanine dyes for potential single DNA molecule imaging. Although their qualities in bulk solutions have already been described, nothing was known about their behavior on a single-molecule level. All 12 dyes demonstrated strong emission when intercalated into single DNA molecules and stretched on a silanized surface, which makes them the perfect choice for fluorescent microscopy imaging. A comparison of their fluorescence intensity and photostability with the most applicable dyes in single-molecule techniques, fluorescent dyes YOYO-1 and POPO-3, was carried out. They all exhibited a strong signal, comparable to that of YOYO-1. However, in contrast to YOYO-1, which is visualized under a green filter only, their emission permits red filter visualization. As their photostability highly exceeds that of similar spectrum POPO-3 dye, the studied dyes stand out as the best choice for a broad range of solid surface single-molecule applications when yellow to red DNA backbone fluorescence is needed.

  16. Defining RNA-Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Luo, Yiling; Tran, Tuan; Haniff, Hafeez S; Nakai, Yoshio; Fallahi, Mohammad; Martinez, Gustavo J; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-22

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif-small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif-small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule-RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  17. Thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Minoru

    1981-02-01

    The energetics of ions and the thermal ion-molecule reactions in oxygen-containing molecules have been studied with a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It was found that the translational energy of ion can be easily obtained from analysis of the decay curve using the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The condensation-elimination reactions proceeded via cross- and homo-elimination mechanism in which the nature of intermediate-complex could be correlated with the nature of reactant ion. It was elucidated that behavior of poly-atomic oxygen-containing ions on the condensation-elimination reactions is considerably influenced by their oxonium ion structures having functional groups. In addition, the rate constants of the condensation-elimination reactions have affected with the energy state of reactant ion and the dipole moment and/or the polarizability of neutral molecule. It was clarified that the rate constants of the ion-molecule clustering reactions in poly-atomic oxygen-containing molecules such as cyclic ether of six member rings are very large and the cluster ions are stable owing to the large number of vibrational degree of freedom in the cluster ions. (author)

  18. Quantum theory of anharmonic effects in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Konstantin V

    2012-01-01

    Presented in a clear and straightforward analysis, this book explores quantum mechanics and the application of quantum mechanics to interpret spectral phenomena. Specifically, the book discusses the relation between spectral features in mid or rear infrared regions, or in Raman scattering spectrum, and interactions between molecules or molecular species such as molecular ions, and their respective motions in gaseous or crystalline conditions. Beginning with an overview of conventional methods and problems which arise in molecular spectroscopy, the second half of the book suggests original t

  19. Gaseous Electronics Tables, Atoms, and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2011-01-01

    With the constant emergence of new research and application possibilities, gaseous electronics is more important than ever in disciplines including engineering (electrical, power, mechanical, electronics, and environmental), physics, and electronics. The first resource of its kind, Gaseous Electronics: Tables, Atoms, and Molecules fulfills the author's vision of a stand-alone reference to condense 100 years of research on electron-neutral collision data into one easily searchable volume. It presents most--if not all--of the properly classified experimental results that scientists, researchers,

  20. Small molecules targeting heterotrimeric G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2018-05-05

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface receptors regulating many human and animal physiological functions. Their implication in human pathophysiology is obvious with almost 30-40% medical drugs commercialized today directly targeting GPCRs as molecular entities. However, upon ligand binding GPCRs signal inside the cell through many key signaling, adaptor and regulatory proteins, including various classes of heterotrimeric G proteins. Therefore, G proteins are considered interesting targets for the development of pharmacological tools that are able to modulate their interaction with the receptors, as well as their activation/deactivation processes. In this review, old attempts and recent advances in the development of small molecules that directly target G proteins will be described with an emphasis on their utilization as pharmacological tools to dissect the mechanisms of activation of GPCR-G protein complexes. These molecules constitute a further asset for research in the "hot" areas of GPCR biology, areas such as multiple G protein coupling/signaling, GPCR-G protein preassembly, and GPCR functional selectivity or bias. Moreover, this review gives a particular focus on studies in vitro and in vivo supporting the potential applications of such small molecules in various GPCR/G protein-related diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of the generator coordinates method to the intra-molecular proton tunneling in the malonaldehyde molecule; Aplicacao do metodo das coordenadas geradoras ao processo de tunelamento do proton intramolecular na molecula de malonaldeido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andre Campos Kersten

    1995-12-31

    The effects of different vibrational modes on the isomerization process of polyatomic molecules, or solvent`s effects on reaction rates are object of up-to-date interest. In general, such many body phenomena are, in principle, multidimensional, and they first require a reduction of relevant degrees of freedom. In order to investigated, some aspects of the intra-molecular proton tunneling on a malonaldehyde molecule, we use the Generator Coordinate Method. The model used to describe such a process is the so-called System-Bath model, where the system is the reaction coordinate and the bath are the intrinsic degrees of freedom (vibrational modes of the molecule), which are described by a harmonic oscillator set linearly coupled to the system. The reduction of the multidimensional problem to the effective unidimensional one is done using a energy related variational principle on the intrinsic degrees of freedom. we obtained analytically a effective Hamiltonian where the effects of the various degrees of freedom reveal themselves in the appearance of a effective mass and in changes of the shape of the potential barrier. The analyticity of the method was crucial on identifying clearly the roles played by the different physical parameters involved. (author) 17 refs., 29 figs.

  2. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Peter; Rohde, Bernhard

    2012-07-06

    Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach "Molecule Cloud". The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using

  3. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large

  4. Molecule-by-Molecule Writing Using a Focused Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Dorp, Willem F.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    atoms also be written with an electron beam? We verify this with focused electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID), a direct-write technique that has the current record for the smallest feature written by (electron) optical lithography. We show that the deposition of an organometallic precursor...... on graphene can be followed molecule-by-molecule with FEBID. The results show that mechanisms that are inherent to the process inhibit a further increase in control over the process. Hence, our results present the resolution limit of (electron) optical lithography techniques. The writing of isolated...

  5. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  6. Physics of Complex Polymeric Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Joshua Walter

    The statistical physics of complex polymers with branches and circuits is the topic of this dissertation. An important motivation are large, single-stranded (ss) RNA molecules. Such molecules form complex ``secondary" and ``tertiary" structures that can be represented as branched polymers with circuits. Such structures are in part directly determined by the nucleotide sequence and in part subject to thermal fluctuations. The polymer physics literature on molecules in this class has mostly focused on randomly branched polymers without circuits while there has been minimal research on polymers with specific structures and on polymers that contain circuits. The dissertation is composed of three parts: Part I studies branched polymers with thermally fluctuating structure confined to a potential well as a simple model for the encapsidation of viral RNA. Excluded volume interactions were ignored. In Part II, I apply Flory theory to the study of the encapsidation of viral ss RNA molecules with specific branched structures, but without circuits, in the presence of excluded volume interaction. In Part III, I expand on Part II and consider complex polymers with specific structure including both branching and circuits. I introduce a method based on the mathematics of Laplacian matrices that allows me to calculate density profiles for such molecules, which was not possible within Flory theory.

  7. Imaging prototypical aromatic molecules on insulating surfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Vogel, R.

    2018-01-01

    Insulating substrates allow for in-plane contacted molecular electronics devices where the molecule is in contact with the insulator. For the development of such devices it is important to understand the interaction of molecules with insulating surfaces. As substrates, ionic crystals such as KBr, KCl, NaCl and CaF2 are discussed. The surface energies of these substrates are small and as a consequence intrinsic properties of the molecules, such as molecule–molecule interaction, become more important relative to interactions with the substrates. As prototypical molecules, three variants of graphene-related molecules are used, pentacene, C60 and PTCDA. Pentacene is a good candidate for molecular electronics applications due to its high charge carrier mobility. It shows mainly an upright standing growth mode and the morphology of the islands is strongly influenced by dewetting. A new second flat-lying phase of the molecule has been observed. Studying the local work function using the Kelvin method reveals details such as line defects in the center of islands. The local work function differences between the upright-standing and flat-lying phase can only be explained by charge transfer that is unusual on ionic crystalline surfaces. C60 nucleation and growth is explained by loosely bound molecules at kink sites as nucleation sites. The stability of C60 islands as a function of magic numbers is investigated. Peculiar island shapes are obtained from unusual dewetting processes already at work during growth, where molecules ‘climb’ to the second molecular layer. PTCDA is a prototypical semiconducting molecule with strong quadrupole moment. It grows in the form of elongated islands where the top and the facets can be molecularly resolved. In this way the precise molecular arrangement in the islands is revealed.

  8. Dissociation and decay of ultracold sodium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaiyama, T.; Abo-Shaeer, J.R.; Xu, K.; Chin, J.K.; Ketterle, W.

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of ultracold molecules was studied by ramping an external magnetic field through a Feshbach resonance. The observed dissociation energies directly yielded the strength of the atom-molecule coupling. They showed nonlinear dependence on the ramp speed. This was explained by a Wigner threshold law which predicts that the decay rate of the molecules above threshold increases with the density of states. In addition, inelastic molecule-molecule and molecule-atom collisions were characterized

  9. Double photoionisation spectra of molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eland, John

    2017-01-01

    This book contains spectra of the doubly charged positive ions (dications) of some 75 molecules, including the major constituents of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and prototypes of major chemical groups. It is intended to be a new resource for research in all areas of molecular spectroscopy involving high energy environments, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial. All the spectra have been produced by photoionisation using laboratory lamps or synchrotron radiation and have been measured using the magnetic bottle time-of-flight technique by coincidence detection of correlated electron pairs. Full references to published work on the same species are given, though for several molecules these are the first published spectra. Double ionisation energies are listed and discussed in relation to the molecular electronic structure of the molecules. A full introduction to the field of molecular double ionisation is included and the mechanisms by which double photoionisation can occur are examined in detail. A p...

  10. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  11. Magnetic Molecules from Chemist's Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, David

    2002-03-01

    A single-molecule magnet (SMM) is a molecule that functions as a nanoscale, single-domain magnetic particle that, below its blocking temperature, exhibits magnetization hysteresis [1]. SMMs have attracted considerable interest because they : (1) can serve as the smallest nanomagnet, monodisperse in size, shape and anisotropy; (2) exhibit quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM); and (3) may function as memory devices in a quantum computer. SMM’s are synthetically designed nanomagnets, built from a core containing metal ion unpaired spin carriers bridged by oxide or other simple ions which is surrounded by organic ligands. Many systematic changes can be made in the structure of these molecular nanomagnets. Manganese-containing SMM’s are known with from Mn4 to Mn_30 compositions. The magnetic bistability, which is desirable for data storage applications, is achievable at temperatures below 3K. The largest spin of the ground state of a SMM is presently S = 13. Appreciable largely uniaxial magnetoanisotropy in the ground state leads to magnetic bistability. Rather than a continuum of higher energy states separating the “spin-up” and “spin-down” ground states, the quantum nature of the molecular nanomagnets result in a well defined ladder of discrete quantum states. Recent studies have definitively shown that, under conditions that can be controlled via the application of external perturbations, quantum tunneling may occur through the energy separating the “spin-up” and “spin-down” states. The tunneling is due to weak symmetry breaking perturbations that give rise to long-lived quantum states consisting of coherent superpositions of the “spin-up” and “spin-down” states. It is the ability to manipulate these coherent states that makes SMMs particularly attractive for quantum computation. Reference: [1] G. Christou, D. Gatteschi, D. N. Hendrickson, R. Sessoli, “Single-molecule Magnets”, M.R.S. Bull. 25, 66 (2001).

  12. Deep learning for single-molecule science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Tim; Slabaugh, Gregory; Alonso, Eduardo; Al-Arif, SM Masudur R.

    2017-10-01

    Exploring and making predictions based on single-molecule data can be challenging, not only due to the sheer size of the datasets, but also because a priori knowledge about the signal characteristics is typically limited and poor signal-to-noise ratio. For example, hypothesis-driven data exploration, informed by an expectation of the signal characteristics, can lead to interpretation bias or loss of information. Equally, even when the different data categories are known, e.g., the four bases in DNA sequencing, it is often difficult to know how to make best use of the available information content. The latest developments in machine learning (ML), so-called deep learning (DL) offer interesting, new avenues to address such challenges. In some applications, such as speech and image recognition, DL has been able to outperform conventional ML strategies and even human performance. However, to date DL has not been applied much in single-molecule science, presumably in part because relatively little is known about the ‘internal workings’ of such DL tools within single-molecule science as a field. In this Tutorial, we make an attempt to illustrate in a step-by-step guide how one of those, a convolutional neural network (CNN), may be used for base calling in DNA sequencing applications. We compare it with a SVM as a more conventional ML method, and discuss some of the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. In particular, a ‘deep’ neural network has many features of a ‘black box’, which has important implications on how we look at and interpret data.

  13. Single-molecule nanopore enzymology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wloka, Carsten; Maglia, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Biological nanopores are a class of membrane proteins that open nanoscale water-conduits in biological membranes. When they are reconstituted in artificial membranes and a bias voltage is applied across the membrane, the ionic current passing through individual nanopores can be used to monitor chemical reactions, to recognize individual molecules and, of most interest, to sequence DNA. More recently, proteins and enzymes have started being analysed with nanopores. Monitoring enzymatic reactions with nanopores, i.e. nanopore enzymology, has the unique advantage that it allows long-timescale observations of native proteins at the single-molecule level. Here we describe the approaches and challenges in nanopore enzymology. PMID:28630164

  14. Teaching lasers to control molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson, R.S.; Rabitz, H.

    1992-01-01

    We simulate a method to teach a laser pulse sequences to excite specified molecular states. We use a learning procedure to direct the production of pulses based on ''fitness'' information provided by a laboratory measurement device. Over a series of pulses the algorithm learns an optimal sequence. The experimental apparatus, which consists of a laser, a sample of molecules and a measurement device, acts as an analog computer that solves Schroedinger's equation n/Iexactly, in real time. We simulate an apparatus that learns to excite specified rotational states in a diatomic molecule

  15. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M. (Assiut Univ. (Egypt))

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author).

  16. Laser-coolable polyatomic molecules with heavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, T. A.; Zaitsevskii, A. V.; Eliav, E.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, a few diatomic and polyatomic molecules have been identified as prospective systems for Doppler/Sisyphus cooling. Doppler/Sisyphus cooling allows us to decrease the kinetic energy of molecules down to μK temperatures with high efficiency and allows their capture in molecular traps, including magneto-optical traps. Trapped molecules can be used for creating molecular fountains and/or performing controlled chemical reactions, high-precision spectra measurements, and a wealth of other applications. Polyatomic molecules with heavy nuclei are of considerable interest for the ‘new physics’ search outside of the Standard Model and other applications including cold chemistry and photochemistry, quantum informatics, etc. Here, we focus on the radium monohydroxide molecule (RaOH), which is on the one hand amenable to laser cooling and on the other hand opens excellent possibilities for { P }-odd and { P },{ T }-odd effects research. At present, RaOH is the heaviest polyatomic molecule proposed for direct cooling with lasers.

  17. Wave equation of a nonlinear triatomic molecule and the adiabatic correction to the Born--Oppenheimer approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardo, R.D.; Wolfsberg, M.

    1977-01-01

    The wave equation for a nonlinear polyatomic molecule is formulated in molecule-fixed coordinates by a method originally due to Hirschfelder and Wigner. Application is made to a triatomic molecule, and the wave equation is explicitly presented in a useful molecule-fixed coordinate system. The formula for the adiabatic correction to the Born--Oppenheimer approximation for a triatomic molecule is obtained. The extension of the present formulation to larger polyatomic molecules is pointed out. Some terms in the triatomic molecule wave equation are discussed in detail

  18. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  19. A single-electron picture based on the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method: application to the anisotropic ionization and subsequent high-harmonic generation of the CO molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, S.; Kato, T.; Oyamada, T.; Koseki, S.; Ohmura, H.; Kono, H.

    2018-02-01

    The mechanisms of anisotropic near-IR tunnel ionization and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a CO molecule are theoretically investigated by using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method developed for the simulation of multielectron dynamics of molecules. The multielectron dynamics obtained by numerically solving the equations of motion (EOMs) in the MCTDHF method is converted to a single orbital picture in the natural orbital representation where the first-order reduced density matrix is diagonalized. The ionization through each natural orbital is examined and the process of HHG is classified into different optical paths designated by a combinations of initial, intermediate and final natural orbitals. The EOMs for natural spin-orbitals are also derived within the framework of the MCTDHF, which maintains the first-order reduced density matrix to be a diagonal one throughout the time propagation of a many-electron wave function. The orbital dependent, time-dependent effective potentials that govern the dynamics of respective time-dependent natural orbitals are deduced from the derived EOMs, of which the temporal variation can be used to interpret the motion of the electron density associated with each natural spin-orbital. The roles of the orbital shape, multiorbital ionization, linear Stark effect and multielectron interaction in the ionization and HHG of a CO molecule are revealed by the effective potentials obtained. When the laser electric field points to the nucleus O from C, tunnel ionization from the C atom side is enhanced; a hump structure originating from multielectron interaction is then formed on the top of the field-induced distorted barrier of the HOMO effective potential. This hump formation, responsible for the directional anisotropy of tunnel ionization, restrains the influence of the linear Stark effect on the energy shifts of bound states.

  20. Laser induced alignment of molecules dissolved in Helium nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2013-05-01

    Laser induced alignment, the method to confine the principal axes of molecules along axes fixed in the laboratory frame, is now used in a range of applications in physics and chemistry. With a few exceptions all studies have focused on isolated molecules in the gas phase. In this talk we present experimental studies of laser induced alignment of molecules embedded in the solvent of a superfluid helium nanodroplet. Alignment is conducted in both the adiabatic and the nonadiabtic regime where the alignment pulse is much longer or shorter, respectively, than the rotational period of the molecules. In the nonadiabatic limit, induced by a few-hundred femtosecond long laser pulse, we show that methyliodide molecules reach an alignment maximum 20 ps after the alignment pulse and gradually loose the alignment completely in another 60 ps. This dynamics is completely different from that of isolated methyliodide molecules where alignment occurs in regularly spaced (by 33.3 ps), narrow time windows, termed revivals. Adiabatic alignment, induced by 10 ns laser pulses, resembles the gas phase behavior although the observed degree of alignment falls below that of isolated molecules. Work done in collaboration with Dominik Pentkehner, Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University; Jens Hedegaard Nielsen, Department of Physics, Aarhus University; Alkwin Slenczka, Department of Chemistry, Regensburg University; and Klaus Mølmer, Department of Physics, Aarhus University.

  1. Simulating electric field interactions with polar molecules using spectroscopic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Alec; Zak, Emil J; Chubb, Katy L; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yachmenev, Andrey

    2017-03-24

    Ro-vibrational Stark-associated phenomena of small polyatomic molecules are modelled using extensive spectroscopic data generated as part of the ExoMol project. The external field Hamiltonian is built from the computed ro-vibrational line list of the molecule in question. The Hamiltonian we propose is general and suitable for any polar molecule in the presence of an electric field. By exploiting precomputed data, the often prohibitively expensive computations associated with high accuracy simulations of molecule-field interactions are avoided. Applications to strong terahertz field-induced ro-vibrational dynamics of PH 3 and NH 3 , and spontaneous emission data for optoelectrical Sisyphus cooling of H 2 CO and CH 3 Cl are discussed.

  2. A density functional tight binding/force field approach to the interaction of molecules with rare gas clusters: application to (C6H6)(+/0)Ar(n) clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftner, Christophe; Simon, Aude; Korchagina, Kseniia; Rapacioli, Mathias; Spiegelman, Fernand

    2014-01-21

    We propose in the present paper a SCC-DFTB/FF (Self-Consistent-Charge Density Functional based Tight Binding/Force-Field) scheme adapted to the investigation of molecules trapped in rare gas environments. With respect to usual FF descriptions, the model involves the interaction of quantum electrons in a molecule with rare gas atoms in an anisotropic scheme. It includes polarization and dispersion contributions and can be used for both neutral and charged species. Parameters for this model are determined for hydrocarbon-argon complexes and the model is validated for small hydrocarbons. With the future aim of studying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Ar matrices, extensive benchmark calculations are performed on (C6H6)(+/0)Arn clusters against DFT and CCSD(T) calculations for the smaller sizes, and more generally against other experimental and theoretical data. Results on the structures and energetics (isomer ordering and energy separation, cohesion energy per Ar atom) are presented in detail for n = 1-8, 13, 20, 27, and 30, for both neutrals and cations. We confirm that the clustering of Ar atoms leads to a monotonous decrease of the ionization potential of benzene for n ⩽ 20, in line with previous experimental and FF data.

  3. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 10. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Some Exotic Red Pigments of Plant Origin. N R Krishnaswamy C N ... Keywords. Pigments of red sandalwood; Safflower; chica red; Brazil wood; Dragon's blood; Miro wood and Kamala dye.

  4. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...

  5. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  6. Molecule of the Month -66 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecule of the Month. Adamantane - A Plastic Piece of Diamond. J Chandrasekhar is with the Department of. Organic Chemistry, Indian. Institute of Science,. Banga1ore. (1). The challenging goal of making other substances with all the properties of diamond continues to be pursued, with some success. J Chandrasekhar.

  7. Microbes, molecules, maladies and man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbes, molecules, maladies and man. Adriano G Duse. Dedication: To Professor Hendrik J Koornhof, mentor, friend and man with immense knowledge, insight, wisdom and compassion, who has been a true inspiration to all those who have had the privilege to know him. The planet Earth was formed, in a molten state, ...

  8. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule. Kushal Chakraborty is a doctoral student at. Department of Life. Sciences and Biology at. Jadavpur University. Presently he is working on the stimulatory effects of various kinds of NSAIDs on different kinds of cells and isolation of that protein from those cells. Keywords. Nitric oxide ...

  9. Characterization of macrophage adhesion molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Savage, B.

    1988-01-01

    Macrophage adhesion molecule (MAM), an abundant surface molecule which functions in the adhesion and spreading of guinea pig macrophages on surfaces, is characterized as a heterodimer of the trypsin- and plasmin-sensitive glycopeptide gp160 (MAM-α) and the glycopeptide gp93 (MAM-β). The density of MAM molecules is estimated at 630,000 per macrophage on the basis of quantitative binding of 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody. The glycopeptide subunits display microheterogeneity on isoelectrofocusing; the pI is 5.8-6.3 for gp160 (MAM-α) and 6.4-7.0 for gp93 (MAM-β). A neutrophil gp160, gp93 molecule was shown to be indistinguishable from macrophage MAM on the basis of electrophoresis, isoelectrofocusing, and reactivity with 10 monoclonal antibodies. A related heterodimer of gp93 associated with a larger, antigenically different glycopeptide (gp180, gp93)was identified on circulating lymphocytes. Cumulative properties indicate that MAM is the guinea pig analog of human Mo1 and mouse Mac-1

  10. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 7. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Sweet Stimulants of the Olfactory Nerves - Muscone, Civetone and Related Compounds. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 7 July 2013 pp 673-683 ...

  11. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 3. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Hunting with Poisoned Arrows: Story of Curare. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 3 March 2013 pp 218-225 ...

  12. Nucleic Acids as Information Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity that aims at enabling students to recognize that DNA and RNA are information molecules whose function is to store, copy, and make available the information in biological systems, without feeling overwhelmed by the specialized vocabulary and the minutia of the central dogma. (JRH)

  13. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 5. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Using a Natural Product to Catch Fish! The Chemistry of Rotenoids. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 5 May 2013 pp 428-439 ...

  14. Hybrid molecule/superconductor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDevitt, J.T.; Haupt, S.G.; Riley, D.R.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, J.P., Jones, C.

    1993-01-01

    The fabrication of electronic devices from molecular materials has attracted much attention recently. Schottky diodes, molecular transistors, metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes, MIS field effect transistors and light emitting diodes have all been prepared utilizing such substances. The active elements in these devices have been constructed by depositing the molecular phase onto the surface of a metal, semiconductor or insulating substrate. With the recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity, new opportunities now exist for the study of molecule/superconductor interactions as well as for the construction of novel hybrid molecule/superconductor devices. In this paper, methods for preparing the initial two composite molecule/semiconductor devices will be reported. Consequently, light sensors based on dye-coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor junctions as well as molecular switches fashioned from conductive polymer coated superconductor microbridges will be discussed. Moreover, molecule/superconductor energy and electron transfer phenomena will be illustrated also for the first time

  15. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 1. Fascinating Organic Molecules from Nature - Colours in Flight - Pigments from Bird Feathers and Butterfly Wings. N R Krishnaswamy C N Sundaresan. Series Article Volume 18 Issue 1 January 2013 pp 12-21 ...

  16. Molecule of the Month -92 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anandamide is the trivial name given to the molecule N- arachidonylethanolamine or arachidonylethanolamide (Struc- ture 1). It is the amide formed by the condensation reaction of arachidonic acid - a 20-carbon linear-chain fatty acid contain- ing 4 unconjugated double bonds - with the amino group of 2- ethanolamine.

  17. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  18. Dialkylresorcinols as bacterial signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-13

    It is well recognized that bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules, a process termed quorum sensing. The best understood quorum sensing systems are those that use acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) for communication. The prototype of those systems consists of a LuxI-like AHL synthase and a cognate LuxR receptor that detects the signal. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR receptors, yet lack any LuxI-type synthase, and thus these receptors are referred to as LuxR orphans or solos. In addition to the well-known AHLs, little is known about the signaling molecules that are sensed by LuxR solos. Here, we describe a novel cell-cell communication system in the insect and human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica. We identified the LuxR homolog PauR to sense dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs) instead of AHLs as signals. The DarABC synthesis pathway produces the molecules, and the entire system emerged as important for virulence. Moreover, we have analyzed more than 90 different Photorhabdus strains by HPLC/MS and showed that these DARs and CHDs are specific to the human pathogen P. asymbiotica. On the basis of genomic evidence, 116 other bacterial species are putative DAR producers, among them many human pathogens. Therefore, we discuss the possibility of DARs as novel and widespread bacterial signaling molecules and show that bacterial cell-cell communication goes far beyond AHL signaling in nature.

  19. Lighting the World with Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 8. Lighting the World with Molecules. S Ramasesha. General Article Volume 14 Issue 8 August 2009 pp 782-798. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/014/08/0782-0798. Keywords.

  20. Sensitivity of BN nano-cages to caffeine and nicotine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Alireza; Baei, Mohammad T.; Tazikeh Lemeski, E.; Shahini, Malihe

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules over B12N12 and B16N16 nano-cages were investigated by using first-principles calculations to define whether BN nano-cages are applicable for filtering or sensing caffeine and nicotine molecules. The chemisorption energy of nicotine molecule on BN nano-cages is very stronger than caffeine molecule. Upon the adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules, the electronic properties of the BN nano-cages can be significantly changed, being too much sensitized on the caffeine and nicotine adsorptions.

  1. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  2. Fluorescent Biosensors Based on Single-Molecule Counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2016-09-20

    fluorescence signals by specific in vitro/in vivo fluorescent labeling, and consequently, the fluorescent molecules indicate the presence of target molecules. The resultant fluorescence signals may be simply counted by either microfluidic device-integrated confocal microscopy or total internal reflection fluorescence-based single-molecule imaging. We have developed a series of single-molecule counting-based biosensors which can be classified as separation-free and separation-assisted assays. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the applications of single-molecule counting-based biosensors for sensitive detection of various target biomolecules such as DNAs, miRNAs, proteins, enzymes, and intact cells, which may function as the disease-related biomarkers. Moreover, we give a summary of future directions to expand the usability of single-molecule counting-based biosensors including (1) the development of more user-friendly and automated instruments, (2) the discovery of new fluorescent labels and labeling strategies, and (3) the introduction of new concepts for the design of novel biosensors. Due to their high sensitivity, good selectivity, rapidity, and simplicity, we believe that the single-molecule counting-based fluorescent biosensors will indubitably find wide applications in biological research, clinical diagnostics, and drug discovery.

  3. The effect of H2O gas on volatilities of planet-forming major elements. I - Experimental determination of thermodynamic properties of Ca-, Al-, and Si-hydroxide gas molecules and its application to the solar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Akihiko

    1992-01-01

    The vapor pressures of Ca(OH)2(g), Al(OH)3(g), and Si(OH)4(g) molecules in equilibrium with solid calcium-, aluminum, and silicon-oxides, respectively, were determined, and were used to derive the heats of formation and entropies of these species, which are expected to be abundant under the currently postulated physical conditions in the primordial solar nebula. These data, in conjunction with thermodynamic data from literature, were used to calculate the relative abundances of M, MO(x), and M(OH)n gas species and relative volatilities of Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Al for ranges of temperature, total pressure, and H/O abundance ratio corresponding to the plausible ranges of physical conditions in the solar nebula. The results are used to explain how Ca and Al could have evaporated from Ca,Al-rich inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites, while Si, Mg, and Fe condensed onto them during the preaccretion alteration of CAIs.

  4. Development of new microscope unit for single molecule spectroscopy under various ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Kaji, T; Ueda, R; Otomo, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces techniques we previously developed for single molecule spectroscopy and continues on to describe our studies on dipole orientation imaging of single molecules under various ambient conditions. In these studies, we successfully obtained defocused images of single perylene diimide (PDI) molecules under air, high-vacuum, and pure N 2 gas conditions by utilizing the advantages of our new microscope unit. The studies are positioned as one of the important applications of our microscope unit for single molecule spectroscopy. We expect a wide range of applications for this unit for various microscope measurements for many types of materials.

  5. Materials science: Magnetic molecules back in the race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessoli, Roberta

    2017-08-01

    Single-molecule magnets have potential data-storage applications, but will need to work at a much higher temperature than has been possible. Two studies suggest that this goal could be met in the near future. See Letter p.439

  6. DNA molecules and human therapeutics | Danquah | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors, display ...

  7. Density-functional theory of atoms and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Parr, Robert G

    1995-01-01

    Provides an account of the fundamental principles of the density-functional theory of the electronic structure of matter and its applications to atoms and molecules. This book contains a discussion of the chemical potential and its derivatives. It is intended for physicists, chemists, and advanced students in chemistry.

  8. Single-molecule magnet engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Bendix, Jesper; Clérac, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    Tailoring the specific magnetic properties of any material relies on the topological control of the constituent metal ion building blocks. Although this general approach does not seem to be easily applied to traditional inorganic bulk magnets, coordination chemistry offers a unique tool...... to delicately tune, for instance, the properties of molecules that behave as "magnets", the so-called single-molecule magnets (SMMs). Although many interesting SMMs have been prepared by a more or less serendipitous approach, the assembly of predesigned, isolatable molecular entities into higher nuclearity...... complexes constitutes an elegant and fascinating strategy. This Feature article focuses on the use of building blocks or modules (both terms being used indiscriminately) to direct the structure, and therefore also the magnetic properties, of metal ion complexes exhibiting SMM behaviour. This journal is...

  9. Photoionization bands of rubidium molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakić, M.; Pichler, G.

    2018-03-01

    We studied the absorption spectrum of dense rubidium vapor generated in a T-type sapphire cell with a special emphasis on the structured photoionization continuum observed in the 200-300 nm spectral region. The photoionization spectrum has a continuous atomic contribution with a pronounced Seaton-Cooper minimum at about 250 nm and a molecular photoionization contribution with many broad bands. We discuss the possible origin of the photoionization bands as stemming from the absorption from the ground state of the Rb2 molecule to excited states of Rb2+* and to doubly excited autoionizing states of Rb2** molecule. All these photoionization bands are located above the Rb+ and Rb2+ ionization limits.

  10. The influence of morphology on excitons in single conjugated molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Alexander

    The electronic properties of pi-conjugated molecules are strongly related to their molecular shape and morphology of assembly in three-dimensional space. Understanding the various structure-property relationships is relevant to the applications of these materials in optoelectronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors and photovoltaic cells. The fact that conjugated systems interact with visible light opens these materials to a plethora of noninvasive spectroscopic investigation techniques. In this work, electronic properties of different pi-conjugated systems are studied spectroscopically on the ensemble and the single molecule levels. Single molecule spectroscopy is advantageous in that it allows the investigation of the individual nuclear building blocks that contribute to the properties of the ensemble. Additionally, transient photoluminescence spectroscopy methods can provide useful insight into the temporal evolution of the emissive states. In combination with these methods, novel pi-conjugated model molecules are used to probe processes related to exciton dynamics. For the first time, the spatial localization of excited states is probed experimentally in a molecule with a circular chromophoric structure. In addition, a set of model molecules with different geometries is employed to study exciton relaxation in pi-conjugated systems. The molecular morphology is utilized to distinguish between processes such as nuclear reorganization and torsional relaxation. Furthermore, single molecule spectroscopy is used to study the electronic structure of individual polymer chains in the photovoltaic cell material poly-(3-hexylthiophene). Optical spectra of this polymer are known to change with the morphology of the bulk film. Single molecule studies reveal that individual polymer chains exhibit similar behavior and indicate that spectral diversity is an intrinsic property of single P3HT molecules. The main results of this work are the

  11. Physics of Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Bransden, B H

    2003-01-01

    New edition of a well-established second and third year textbook for Physics degree students, covering the physical structure and behaviour of atoms and molecules. The aim of this new edition is to provide a unified account of the subject within an undergraduate framework, taking the opportunity to make improvements based on the teaching experience of users of the first edition, and cover important new developments in the subject.

  12. Cellular Adhesion and Adhesion Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    SELLER, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, cell adhesion and cell adhesion molecules have been shown to be important for many normal biological processes, including embryonic cell migration, immune system functions and wound healing. It has also been shown that they contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of common human disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and tumor cell metastasis in cancer. In this review, the basic mechanisms of cellular adhesion and the structural and functional features of adhes...

  13. Optical highlighter molecules in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandeep Robert; Patterson, George H

    2012-02-01

    The development of advanced optical methods has played a key role in propelling progress in neurobiology. Genetically-encoded fluorescent molecules found in nature have enabled labeling of individual neurons to study their physiology and anatomy. Here we discuss the recent use of both native and synthetic optical highlighter proteins to address key problems in neurobiology, including questions relevant to synaptic function, neuroanatomy, and the organization of neural circuits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intersystem crossing in complex molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappalardo, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The general question of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing is addressed in the context of large organic molecules, i.e., ''complex'' molecules capable of self-relaxation in the absence of collisions. Examples of spectral properties of such molecules in the vapor phase are discussed, relying on extensive Russian literature in this area. Formal expressions for the relaxation rate in the electronic excited states are derived on the basis of the formalism of collision theory, and are applied to the specific case of intersystem crossing. The derivation of the ''energy-gap'' law for triplet-singlet conversion in aromatic hydrocarbons is briefly outlined. The steep rise of internal conversion rates as a function of excess excitation energy, and its competition with the intersystem crossing process, are reviewed for the case of naphthalene vapor. A general expression for the spin-orbit interaction Hamiltonian in molecular systems is outlined. Experimental observations on singlet-triplet conversion rates and the factors that can drastically affect such rates are discussed, with emphasis on the ''in- ternal'' and ''external'' heavy-atom effects. Basic relations of ESR spectroscopy and magnetophotoselection are reviewed. Technological implications of the singlet-triplet crossing in complex molecules are discussed in the context of chelate lasers, dye lasers and luminescent displays. Effects related to singlet-triplet crossing, and generally to excited-state energy-transfer in biological systems, are exemplified by the role of aromatic amino-acids in the phosphorescence of proteins, by some recent studies of energy-transfer in models of biomembranes, and by the clustering of triplet-energy donor-acceptor pairs in micelles

  15. Laser Methods in the Study of Nuclei, Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2005-01-01

    The VIth International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research was held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan in Poland from May 24 to 27, 2004. Its title this year was "Laser methods in the study of nuclei, atoms and molecules". Some topics are reviewed from a viewpoint of the atomic physics contribution to nuclear physics and its applications. It is suggested how this meeting should be organized in the future by taking the new geopolitics into account.

  16. A Single Molecule Investigation of the Photostability of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Kulatunga, Pasad; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are very attractive probes for multi-color fluorescence applications. We report here however that single QDs that are subject to continuous blue excitation from a 100W mercury arc lamp will undergo a continuous blue-switching of the emission wavelength eventually reaching a per...... is especially detrimental for multi-color single molecule applications, as we regularly observe spectral blue-shifts of 50 nm, or more even after only ten seconds of illumination....

  17. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  18. Investigation of polyelectrolyte desorption by single molecule force spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedsam, C; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E

    2004-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy has evolved into a powerful method for the investigation of intra- and intermolecular interactions at the level of individual molecules. Many examples, including the investigation of the dynamic properties of complex biological systems as well as the properties of covalent bonds or intermolecular transitions within individual polymers, are reported in the literature. The technique has recently been extended to the systematic investigation of desorption processes of individual polyelectrolyte molecules adsorbed on generic surfaces. The stable covalent attachment of polyelectrolyte molecules to the AFM-tip provides the possibility of performing long-term measurements with the same set of molecules and therefore allows the in situ observation of the impact of environmental changes on the adsorption behaviour of individual molecules. Different types of interactions, e.g. electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions, that determine the adsorption process could be identified and characterized. The experiments provided valuable details that help to understand the nature and the properties of non-covalent interactions, which is helpful with regard to biological systems as well as for technical applications. Apart from this, desorption experiments can be utilized to characterize the properties of surfaces or polymer coatings. Therefore they represent a versatile tool that can be further developed in terms of various aspects

  19. Single-molecule measurements and dynamical simulations of protein molecules near silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Kawano, Satoyuki; Takahashi, Hiroto; Sazaki, Gen; Nakajima, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between protein molecules and inorganic substrates were studied both experimentally and numerically to obtain fundamental insight into the assembly of biomacromolecules for engineering applications. We experimentally traced individual fluorescent-labelled lysozyme (F-lysozyme) molecules, diffusing in the vicinity of interfaces between a protein solution and oxidized Si(1 0 0) and glass plates. The results indicate that diffusion coefficients of F-lysozyme molecules on both substrates are more than three orders of magnitude smaller than those in a bulk solution. The molecular dynamics simulations reveal a drastically diminished diffusion coefficient of lysozyme on the substrates of pure Si(1 1 1) and oxidized Si(1 0 0) with a hydroxy-terminated surface compared with that in bulk solution due to molecular adsorption behaviour on the substrate, which is in good agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, full atomistic description of the behaviour provides detailed information of deformation due to the adsorption process. Lysozyme on pure Si(1 1 1) undergoes substantial deformation whereas that on oxidized Si(1 0 0) does not, which indicates the importance of substrate surface condition to preserve the structure, i.e. functionality of adsorbed biomolecules

  20. Reactions of substituted aromatic molecules on the silicon(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutler, Sarah Kathryn

    Organic molecules possess unique physical and electronic properties that could be incorporated as components in new technologies, such as molecular electronics, biosensors and DNA chip arrays. While the properties of individual molecules often can be measured and predicted, the technological value of organic molecules for these types of applications requires the ability to understand and manipulate how physical and electronic properties are affected by bonding to a surface. Consequently, integration of organic systems with existing silicon-based technology necessitates a thorough investigation of the interfacial chemistry involved in adsorption processes. On a molecular scale, the delocalized electrons of a conjugated system could be used to carry charge from one point to another. Therefore, the interaction of pi-conjugated molecules with the technologically important Si(001) surface is of particular interest. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy were used to investigate the bonding selectivity of several model aromatic molecules. Analysis of the infrared spectra of benzene, toluene and xylene suggest that these simple aromatic molecules covalently bond with the Si(001) surface, resulting in a loss of aromaticity. Studies of aromatic rings with other, more reactive substituent groups containing sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, iodine or carbon atoms, indicate that the majority of these molecules preferentially adsorb to the surface through the substituent group. Careful consideration of the role played by both the electron-rich substituent groups and the silicon dimers in controlling selectivity leads to new insights regarding adsorption mechanisms. This knowledge, in turn, provides a method for selecting and designing molecules that will preferentially chemisorb on the Si(001) surface in a highly predictable manner. Preliminary studies correlating the chemical identity of the

  1. Mechanochemical synthesis of small organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumar Achar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the growing interest in renewable energy and global warming, it is important to minimize the usage of hazardous chemicals in both academic and industrial research, elimination of waste, and possibly recycle them to obtain better results in greener fashion. The studies under the area of mechanochemistry which cover the grinding chemistry to ball milling, sonication, etc. are certainly of interest to the researchers working on the development of green methodologies. In this review, a collection of examples on recent developments in organic bond formation reactions like carbon–carbon (C–C, carbon–nitrogen (C–N, carbon–oxygen (C–O, carbon–halogen (C–X, etc. is documented. Mechanochemical syntheses of heterocyclic rings, multicomponent reactions and organometallic molecules including their catalytic applications are also highlighted.

  2. Mechanochemical synthesis of small organic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achar, Tapas Kumar; Bose, Anima; Mal, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    With the growing interest in renewable energy and global warming, it is important to minimize the usage of hazardous chemicals in both academic and industrial research, elimination of waste, and possibly recycle them to obtain better results in greener fashion. The studies under the area of mechanochemistry which cover the grinding chemistry to ball milling, sonication, etc. are certainly of interest to the researchers working on the development of green methodologies. In this review, a collection of examples on recent developments in organic bond formation reactions like carbon-carbon (C-C), carbon-nitrogen (C-N), carbon-oxygen (C-O), carbon-halogen (C-X), etc. is documented. Mechanochemical syntheses of heterocyclic rings, multicomponent reactions and organometallic molecules including their catalytic applications are also highlighted.

  3. CO-releasing molecule (CORM) conjugate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Anna Christin; Kunz, Peter C; Janiak, Christoph

    2016-11-15

    The development of CORMs (CO-releasing molecules) as a prodrug for CO administration in living organisms has attracted significant attention. CORMs offer the promising possibility of a safe and controllable release of CO in low amounts triggered by light, ligands, enzymes, etc. For the targeting of specific tissues or diseases and to prevent possible side effects from metals and other residues after CO release, these CORMs are attached to biocompatible systems, like peptides, polymers, nanoparticles, dendrimers, protein cages, non-wovens, tablets, and metal-organic frameworks. We discuss in this review the known CORM carrier conjugates, in short CORM conjugates, with covalently-bound or incorporated CORMs for medicinal and therapeutic applications. Most conjugates are nontoxic, show increasing half-lives of CO release, and make use of the EPR-effect, but still show problems because of a continuous background of CO release and the absence of an on/off-switch for the CO release.

  4. Molecules in strong laser fields. In depth study of H2 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Manohar

    2009-01-01

    A method for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) describing the electronic motion of the molecules exposed to very short intense laser pulses has been developed. The time-dependent electronic wavefunction is expanded in terms of a superposition of field-free eigenstates. The field-free eigenstates are calculated in two ways. In the first approach, which is applicable to two electron systems like H 2 , fully correlated field-free eigenstates are obtained in complete dimensionality using configuration-interaction calculation where the one-electron basis functions are built from B splines. In the second approach, which is even applicable to larger molecules, the field-free eigenstates are calculated within the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation using density functional theory. In general, the method can be divided into two parts, in the first part the field-free eigenstates are calculated and then in the second part a time propagation for the laser pulse parameters is performed. The H 2 molecule is the testing ground for the implementation of both the methods. The reliability of the configuration interaction (CI) based method for the solution of TDSE (CI-TDSE) is tested by comparing results in the low-intensity regime to the prediction of lowest-order perturbation theory. Another test for the CI-TDSE method is in the united atom limit for the H 2 molecule. By selecting a very small value of the internuclear distance close to zero for the H 2 molecule, Helium atom is obtained. Once the functionality and the reliability of the method is established, it is used for obtaining accurate results for molecular hydrogen exposed to intense laser fields. The results for the standard 800 nm Titanium-Sapphire laser and its harmonics at 400 nm and 266 nm are shown. The results for a scan over a wide range of incident photon energies as well as dependence on the internuclear distance are presented. The photoelectron spectra including above

  5. Molecules in strong laser fields. In depth study of H{sub 2} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awasthi, Manohar

    2009-10-29

    A method for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) describing the electronic motion of the molecules exposed to very short intense laser pulses has been developed. The time-dependent electronic wavefunction is expanded in terms of a superposition of field-free eigenstates. The field-free eigenstates are calculated in two ways. In the first approach, which is applicable to two electron systems like H{sub 2}, fully correlated field-free eigenstates are obtained in complete dimensionality using configuration-interaction calculation where the one-electron basis functions are built from B splines. In the second approach, which is even applicable to larger molecules, the field-free eigenstates are calculated within the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation using density functional theory. In general, the method can be divided into two parts, in the first part the field-free eigenstates are calculated and then in the second part a time propagation for the laser pulse parameters is performed. The H{sub 2} molecule is the testing ground for the implementation of both the methods. The reliability of the configuration interaction (CI) based method for the solution of TDSE (CI-TDSE) is tested by comparing results in the low-intensity regime to the prediction of lowest-order perturbation theory. Another test for the CI-TDSE method is in the united atom limit for the H{sub 2} molecule. By selecting a very small value of the internuclear distance close to zero for the H{sub 2} molecule, Helium atom is obtained. Once the functionality and the reliability of the method is established, it is used for obtaining accurate results for molecular hydrogen exposed to intense laser fields. The results for the standard 800 nm Titanium-Sapphire laser and its harmonics at 400 nm and 266 nm are shown. The results for a scan over a wide range of incident photon energies as well as dependence on the internuclear distance are presented. The photoelectron spectra including

  6. The fabrication of monolithic capillary column based on poly (bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and its applications for the separation of small molecules in high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenjing; Wang, Lijuan; Bai, Ligai; Yang, Gengliang

    2013-07-05

    A new polymeric monolith was synthesized in fused-silica capillary by in situ polymerization technique. In the polymerization, bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin (VER) was used as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as the crosslinking monomer, 1,4-butanediol, 1-propanol and water as the co-porogens, and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The conditions of polymerization have been optimized. Morphology of the prepared poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith was investigated by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM); pore properties were assayed by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. The optimized poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith showed a uniform structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. Then, the column was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the mixture of benzene derivatives. The best column efficiency achieved for phenol was 235790 theoretical plates per meter. Baseline separations of benzene derivatives and halogenated benzene compounds under optimized isocratic mode conditions were achieved with high column efficiency. The column showed good reproducibility: the relative standard deviation (RSD) values based on the retention times (n=3) for run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch were less than 0.98, 1.68, 5.48%, respectively. Compared with poly (BMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column, the proposed monolith exhibited more efficiency in the separation of small molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayed, F.; Mashaghi, A.; Tans, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an

  8. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    The dissertation describes the use of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffuse Scattering (TR-XDS) to study photo-induced structural changes in molecules in solution. The application of the technique is exemplified with experiments on two bimetallic molecules. The main focus is on the data-flow and process of...... in the purpose built CSPAD detector is presented and applied to the data to highlight the relevance of this work. Thereby showing the ability to capture a molecular movie on the sub-ps time-scale....

  9. Adhesion molecules in breast carcinoma: a challenge to the pathologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rossetti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of adhesion molecules is very important both in the activation of carcinogenesis and in the differentiation of subtypes of breast carcinoma, aiding in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic choice in these tumors. Therefore, understanding the functions and interrelationships among these molecules is crucial to the pathologist, who often uses these factors as a resource to differentiate tumors and further classify them according to a molecular point of view. Our goal is to describe the applicability and the difficulties encountered by the pathologist in the diagnosis of breast carcinoma, discussing the most commonly used markers of adhesion in routine analyses.

  10. Classification of Feshbach resonances in electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, D.

    1976-01-01

    Certain systematics are derived which often enable a simple determination of resonance configurations in electron-molecule scattering by making a comparison between resonance spectra and known Rydberg-state spectra. The determination of resonance grandparent states and the systematics of the binding energies of pairs of Rydberg electrons in diatomic molecules, the systematics of the binding energies of electrons with various values of n and l to parent Rydberg states, and an application of guidelines provided by the above systematics to new systems are treated. 19 refs

  11. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  12. Photodetachment and Doppler laser cooling of anionic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sebastian; Fesel, Julian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    We propose to extend laser-cooling techniques, so far only achieved for neutral molecules, to molecular anions. A detailed computational study is performed for {{{C}}}2- molecules stored in Penning traps using GPU based Monte Carlo simulations. Two cooling schemes—Doppler laser cooling and photodetachment cooling—are investigated. The sympathetic cooling of antiprotons is studied for the Doppler cooling scheme, where it is shown that cooling of antiprotons to subKelvin temperatures could becomes feasible, with impacts on the field of antimatter physics. The presented cooling schemes also have applications for the generation of cold, negatively charged particle sources and for the sympathetic cooling of other molecular anions.

  13. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent molecules in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarkova, S A; Lloyd, C; Khaira, S K; Berk, D

    2003-01-01

    The possibilities of the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for studying the molecular dynamics in living cells are demonstrated. The method provides point measurements of extremely low concentrations of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion coefficients with a high time resolution in a microscopic volume, which is especially important in pharmacological investigations. A biological model of the interaction of liposomes with a cellular membrane is considered. The diffusion coefficients of fluorescent molecules are measured directly in the living cell cytoplasm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. The molecule-metal interface

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Norbert; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2013-01-01

    Reviewing recent progress in the fundamental understanding of the molecule-metal interface, this useful addition to the literature focuses on experimental studies and introduces the latest analytical techniques as applied to this interface.The first part covers basic theory and initial principle studies, while the second part introduces readers to photoemission, STM, and synchrotron techniques to examine the atomic structure of the interfaces. The third part presents photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution UV photoelectron spectroscopy and electron spin resonance to study the electroni

  15. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  16. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born Strasse 2A, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Johnsson, P. [FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, NL-1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Lund University, Post Office Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Lucchini, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR-IFN, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lucchese, R. R. [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  17. Proteins Are the Body's Worker Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Molecule of the Month section of the RCSB Protein Data Bank . (http://www.pdb.org) Molecule of the Month ... helices and beta sheets. Image courtesy of RCSB Protein Data Bank ( http://www.pdb.org ) Click for larger image ...

  18. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gencaga, Deniz; Knuth, Kevin H.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  19. Controlled contact to a C-60 molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neel, N.; Kröger, J.; Limot, L.

    2007-01-01

    The tip of a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope is approached towards a C-60 molecule adsorbed at a pentagon-hexagon bond on Cu(100) to form a tip-molecule contact. The conductance rapidly increases to approximate to 0.25 conductance quanta in the transition region from tunneling...... the tip-molecule distance....

  20. Surface-confined electroactive molecules for multistate charge storage information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Torrent, M; Rovira, C; Veciana, J

    2013-01-18

    Bi-stable molecular systems with potential for applications in binary memory devices are raising great interest for device miniaturization. Particular appealing are those systems that operate with electrical inputs since they are compatible with existing electronic technologies. The processing of higher memory densities in these devices could be accomplished by increasing the number of memory states in each cell, although this strategy has not been much explored yet. Here we highlight the recent advances devoted to the fabrication of charge-storage molecular surface-confined devices exhibiting multiple states. Mainly, this goal has been realized immobilizing a variety (or a combination) of electroactive molecules on a surface, although alternative approaches employing non-electroactive systems have also been described. Undoubtedly, the use of molecules with chemically tunable properties and nanoscale dimensions are raising great hopes for the devices of the future in which molecules can bring new perspectives such as multistability.

  1. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  2. Orienting Asymmetric Molecules by Laser Fields with Twisted Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershnabel, E.; Averbukh, I. Sh.

    2018-02-01

    We study interaction of generic asymmetric molecules with laser fields having twisted polarization, using a pair of strong time-delayed short laser pulses with crossed linear polarizations as an example. We show that such an excitation not only provides unidirectional rotation of the most polarizable molecular axis, but also induces a directed torque along this axis, which results in a transient orientation of the molecules. The asymmetric molecules are chiral in nature and different molecular enantiomers experience the orienting action in opposite directions causing out-of-phase oscillations of their dipole moments. The resulting microwave radiation was recently suggested to be used for analysis or discrimination of chiral molecular mixtures. We reveal the mechanism behind this laser-induced orientation effect, show that it is classical in nature, and envision further applications of light with twisted polarization.

  3. Adsorption of small gas molecules on pure and Al-doped graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of small gas molecules (CCl 4 , CH 4 , NH 3 , CO 2 , N 2 , CO, NO 2 CCl 2 F 2 , SO 2 , CF 4 , H 2 ) on pure and aluminium-doped graphene were investigated by using the density functional theory to explore their potential applications as sensors. It has been found that all gas molecules show much stronger ...

  4. Dipolar collisions of polar molecules in the quantum regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, K-K; Ospelkaus, S; Wang, D; Quéméner, G; Neyenhuis, B; de Miranda, M H G; Bohn, J L; Ye, J; Jin, D S

    2010-04-29

    Ultracold polar molecules offer the possibility of exploring quantum gases with interparticle interactions that are strong, long-range and spatially anisotropic. This is in stark contrast to the much studied dilute gases of ultracold atoms, which have isotropic and extremely short-range (or 'contact') interactions. Furthermore, the large electric dipole moment of polar molecules can be tuned using an external electric field; this has a range of applications such as the control of ultracold chemical reactions, the design of a platform for quantum information processing and the realization of novel quantum many-body systems. Despite intense experimental efforts aimed at observing the influence of dipoles on ultracold molecules, only recently have sufficiently high densities been achieved. Here we report the experimental observation of dipolar collisions in an ultracold molecular gas prepared close to quantum degeneracy. For modest values of an applied electric field, we observe a pronounced increase in the loss rate of fermionic potassium-rubidium molecules due to ultracold chemical reactions. We find that the loss rate has a steep power-law dependence on the induced electric dipole moment, and we show that this dependence can be understood in a relatively simple model based on quantum threshold laws for the scattering of fermionic polar molecules. In addition, we directly observe the spatial anisotropy of the dipolar interaction through measurements of the thermodynamics of the dipolar gas. These results demonstrate how the long-range dipolar interaction can be used for electric-field control of chemical reaction rates in an ultracold gas of polar molecules. Furthermore, the large loss rates in an applied electric field suggest that creating a long-lived ensemble of ultracold polar molecules may require confinement in a two-dimensional trap geometry to suppress the influence of the attractive, 'head-to-tail', dipolar interactions.

  5. JSME: a free molecule editor in JavaScript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfait, Bruno; Ertl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A molecule editor, i.e. a program facilitating graphical input and interactive editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. Today, when a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. One of the most popular tools for molecular structure input on the web is the JME applet. Since its release nearly 15 years ago, however the web environment has changed and Java applets are facing increasing implementation hurdles due to their maintenance and support requirements, as well as security issues. This prompted us to update the JME editor and port it to a modern Internet programming language - JavaScript. The actual molecule editing Java code of the JME editor was translated into JavaScript with help of the Google Web Toolkit compiler and a custom library that emulates a subset of the GUI features of the Java runtime environment. In this process, the editor was enhanced by additional functionalities including a substituent menu, copy/paste, drag and drop and undo/redo capabilities and an integrated help. In addition to desktop computers, the editor supports molecule editing on touch devices, including iPhone, iPad and Android phones and tablets. In analogy to JME the new editor is named JSME. This new molecule editor is compact, easy to use and easy to incorporate into web pages. A free molecule editor written in JavaScript was developed and is released under the terms of permissive BSD license. The editor is compatible with JME, has practically the same user interface as well as the web application programming interface. The JSME editor is available for download from the project web page http://peter-ertl.com/jsme/

  6. Freezing shortens the lifetime of DNA molecules under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Ju; Cui, Yujia; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Wei, Wesley H; Chang, Rong-Shing; Shu, Wun-Yi; Hsu, Ian C

    2017-12-01

    DNA samples are commonly frozen for storage. However, freezing can compromise the integrity of DNA molecules. Considering the wide applications of DNA molecules in nanotechnology, changes to DNA integrity at the molecular level may cause undesirable outcomes. However, the effects of freezing on DNA integrity have not been fully explored. To investigate the impact of freezing on DNA integrity, samples of frozen and non-frozen bacteriophage lambda DNA were studied using optical tweezers. Tension (5-35 pN) was applied to DNA molecules to mimic mechanical interactions between DNA and other biomolecules. The integrity of the DNA molecules was evaluated by measuring the time taken for single DNA molecules to break under tension. Mean lifetimes were determined by maximum likelihood estimates and variances were obtained through bootstrapping simulations. Under 5 pN of force, the mean lifetime of frozen samples is 44.3 min with 95% confidence interval (CI) between 36.7 min and 53.6 min while the mean lifetime of non-frozen samples is 133.2 min (95% CI: 97.8-190.1 min). Under 15 pN of force, the mean lifetimes are 10.8 min (95% CI: 7.6-12.6 min) and 78.5 min (95% CI: 58.1-108.9 min). The lifetimes of frozen DNA molecules are significantly reduced, implying that freezing compromises DNA integrity. Moreover, we found that the reduced DNA structural integrity cannot be restored using regular ligation process. These results indicate that freezing can alter the structural integrity of the DNA molecules.

  7. Single-molecule imaging towards precise detection of individual photophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Toshiro; Oda, Masaru; Mashimo, Kei; Tachibana, Fumi; Horiuchi, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    We present our recent study of single fluorescent molecules with specific structure, i.e. tetramethylrhodamine derivative linked with a propyl chain onto silica glass surface. For fluorescent reagent in its synthesis, we used a mixture of two kinds of isomers, which provides a sample with single molecules photophysically different each other even if chemically the same. The isomeric structural difference so introduced in the molecules will provide rather small but probably distinctive photophysical difference, for example, in non-radiative relaxation rates, which we try to detect out with our improved single-molecule microscope imaging technique. To make clear the detectability of such weak inter- or intra-molecular interactions microscopically is significant for versatile applications of single-molecule detections in life science. Our present observation at room temperatures shows so far that such decoupled contributions can be discriminated in the histograms of the intensities of the observed fluorescent spots as broader but separated multi-component structures in the distribution under specific experimental configurations. We will discuss some of the prerequisite for such detections; suitable spatio-temporal resolutions with sufficient S/N ratio, algorithms for data analysis, etc. but also precise sample operations are inevitable

  8. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  9. Current-induced switching in transport through anisotropic magnetic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Niels; Arrachea, Liliana; Lozano, Gustavo S.; Nunner, Tamara S.; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-03-01

    Anisotropic single-molecule magnets may be thought of as molecular switches, with possible applications to molecular spintronics. In this paper, we consider current-induced switching in single-molecule junctions containing an anisotropic magnetic molecule. We assume that the carriers interact with the magnetic molecule through the exchange interaction and focus on the regime of high currents in which the molecular spin dynamics is slow compared to the time which the electrons spend on the molecule. In this limit, the molecular spin obeys a nonequilibrium Langevin equation which takes the form of a generalized Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and which we derive microscopically by means of a nonequilibrium Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We exploit this Langevin equation to identify the relevant switching mechanisms and to derive the current-induced switching rates. As a by-product, we also derive S-matrix expressions for the various torques entering into the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation which generalize previous expressions in the literature to nonequilibrium situations.

  10. A small molecule for a big transformation: Topical application of a 20-nucleotide-long antisense fragment of the DIAP-2 gene inhibits the development of Drosophila melanogaster female imagos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyadar Palmah M.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several genes have been identified to play important roles associated with sex selection in Drosophila melanogaster. An essential part is attributed to the sex-lethal gene that depends on the expression of the X:A (number of chromosomes to autosomes ratio signal controlling both sex selection and dosage compensation processes in D. melanogaster. Interestingly, for sex selection in D. melanogaster there are no documented data addressing the role of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP genes and their signaling influence on this biological process. In this study, we found that topical application of a 20-nucleotide-long antisense DNA fragment (oligoDIAP-2 from the death-associated inhibitor of apoptosis (DIAP-2 gene interferes with D. melanogaster development and significantly decreases the number of female imagos and their biomass. We show that the applied antisense oligoDIAP-2 fragment downregulates the target DIAP-2 gene whose normal concentration is necessary for the development of female D. melanogaster. These data correspond to the results on downregulation of the target host IAP-Z gene of Lymantria dispar L. female imagos after topical treatment with an 18-nucleotide-long antisense DNA fragment from the L. dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus IAP-3 gene at the larval stage. The observed novel phenomenon linking the downregulation of insect IAP genes and the low rate of female imago development could have practical application, especially in insect pest control and molecular pathology.

  11. Optoelectronics of Molecules and Polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Moliton, André

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices are being developed at an extraordinary rate. Organic light emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices and electro-optical modulators are pivotal to the future of displays, photosensors and solar cells, and communication technologies. This book details the theories underlying the relevant mechanisms in organic materials and covers, at a basic level, how the organic components are made. The first part of this book introduces the fundamental theories used to detail ordered solids and localised energy levels. The methods used to determine energy levels in perfectly ordered molecular and macromolecular systems are discussed, making sure that the effects of quasi-particles are not missed. The function of excitons and their transfer between two molecules are studied, and the problems associated with interfaces and charge injection into resistive media are presented. The second part details technological aspects such as the fabrication of devices based on organic materials by dry etching. The princ...

  12. Dissociation Energies of Diatomic Molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qun-Chao, Fan; Wei-Guo, Sun

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dissociation energies of 10 electronic states of alkali molecules of KH, 7 LiD, 7 LiH, 6 LiH, NaK, NaLi and NaRb are studied using the highest three accurate vibrational energies of each electronic state, and an improved parameter-free analytical formula which is obtained starting from the LeRoy–Bernstein vibrational energy expression near the dissociation limit. The results show that as long as the highest three vibrational energies are accurate, the current analytical formula will give accurate theoretical dissociation energies D e theory , which are in excellent agreement with the experimental dissociation energies D e expt . (atomic and molecular physics)

  13. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  14. Nonadiabatic calculations on hydrogen molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, Jacek; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Since its infancy quantum mechanics has treated hydrogen molecule as a test bed. Contemporary spectroscopy is able to supply the dissociation energy (D0) of H2 with the accuracy of 3 . 7 .10-4cm-1 , while current theoretical predictions are 10-3cm-1 in error. Both the uncertainties are already smaller than the quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects contributing to D0, which poses a particular challenge to theoreticians. Undoubtedly, in order to increase the predictive power of theory one has to not only account for the multitude of the tiny relativistic and QED effects but, especially, significantly increase precision of the largest component of D0--the nonrelativistic contribution. We approach the problem of solving the Schroedinger equation, equipped with new methodology, with the target precision of D0 set at the level of 10-7cm-1 .

  15. Entangled exciton states in quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Manfred

    2002-03-01

    Currently there is strong interest in quantum information processing(See, for example, The Physics of Quantum Information, eds. D. Bouwmeester, A. Ekert and A. Zeilinger (Springer, Berlin, 2000).) in a solid state environment. Many approaches mimic atomic physics concepts in which semiconductor quantum dots are implemented as artificial atoms. An essential building block of a quantum processor is a gate which entangles the states of two quantum bits. Recently a pair of vertically aligned quantum dots has been suggested as optically driven quantum gate(P. Hawrylak, S. Fafard, and Z. R. Wasilewski, Cond. Matter News 7, 16 (1999).)(M. Bayer, P. Hawrylak, K. Hinzer, S. Fafard, M. Korkusinski, Z.R. Wasilewski, O. Stern, and A. Forchel, Science 291, 451 (2001).): The quantum bits are individual carriers either on dot zero or dot one. The different dot indices play the same role as a "spin", therefore we call them "isospin". Quantum mechanical tunneling between the dots rotates the isospin and leads to superposition of these states. The quantum gate is built when two different particles, an electron and a hole, are created optically. The two particles form entangled isospin states. Here we present spectrocsopic studies of single self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules that support the feasibility of this proposal. The evolution of the excitonic recombination spectrum with varying separation between the dots allows us to demonstrate coherent tunneling of carriers across the separating barrier and the formation of entangled exciton states: Due to the coupling between the dots the exciton states show a splitting that increases with decreasing barrier width. For barrier widths below 5 nm it exceeds the thermal energy at room temperature. For a given barrier width, we find only small variations of the tunneling induced splitting demonstrating a good homogeneity within a molecule ensemble. The entanglement may be controlled by application of electromagnetic field. For

  16. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  17. Biological Nanopores: Confined Spaces for Electrochemical Single-Molecule Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2018-02-20

    Nanopore sensing is developing into a powerful single-molecule approach to investigate the features of biomolecules that are not accessible by studying ensemble systems. When a target molecule is transported through a nanopore, the ions occupying the pore are excluded, resulting in an electrical signal from the intermittent ionic blockade event. By statistical analysis of the amplitudes, duration, frequencies, and shapes of the blockade events, many properties of the target molecule can be obtained in real time at the single-molecule level, including its size, conformation, structure, charge, geometry, and interactions with other molecules. With the development of the use of α-hemolysin to characterize individual polynucleotides, nanopore technology has attracted a wide range of research interest in the fields of biology, physics, chemistry, and nanoscience. As a powerful single-molecule analytical method, nanopore technology has been applied for the detection of various biomolecules, including oligonucleotides, peptides, oligosaccharides, organic molecules, and disease-related proteins. In this Account, we highlight recent developments of biological nanopores in DNA-based sensing and in studying the conformational structures of DNA and RNA. Furthermore, we introduce the application of biological nanopores to investigate the conformations of peptides affected by charge, length, and dipole moment and to study disease-related proteins' structures and aggregation transitions influenced by an inhibitor, a promoter, or an applied voltage. To improve the sensing ability of biological nanopores and further extend their application to a wider range of molecular sensing, we focus on exploring novel biological nanopores, such as aerolysin and Stable Protein 1. Aerolysin exhibits an especially high sensitivity for the detection of single oligonucleotides both in current separation and duration. Finally, to facilitate the use of nanopore measurements and statistical analysis

  18. Chip-based microtrap arrays for cold polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shunyong; Wei, Bin; Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2017-12-01

    Compared to the atomic chip, which has been a powerful platform to perform an astonishing range of applications from rapid Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) production to the atomic clock, the molecular chip is only in its infant stages. Recently a one-dimensional electric lattice was demonstrated to trap polar molecules on a chip. This excellent work opens up the way to building a molecular chip laboratory. Here we propose a two-dimensional (2D) electric lattice on a chip with concise and robust structure, which is formed by arrays of squared gold wires. Arrays of microtraps that originate in the microsize electrodes offer a steep gradient and thus allow for confining both light and heavy polar molecules. Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations are performed using two types of sample molecules, N D3 and SrF, to justify the possibility of our proposal. The height of the minima of the potential wells is about 10 μm above the surface of the chip and can be easily adjusted in a wide range by changing the voltages applied on the electrodes. These microtraps offer intriguing perspectives for investigating cold molecules in periodic potentials, such as quantum computing science, low-dimensional physics, and some other possible applications amenable to magnetic or optical lattice. The 2D adjustable electric lattice is expected to act as a building block for a future gas-phase molecular chip laboratory.

  19. Single molecule microscopy in 3D cell cultures and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Florian M; Kaemmerer, Elke; Meckel, Tobias

    2014-12-15

    From the onset of the first microscopic visualization of single fluorescent molecules in living cells at the beginning of this century, to the present, almost routine application of single molecule microscopy, the method has well-proven its ability to contribute unmatched detailed insight into the heterogeneous and dynamic molecular world life is composed of. Except for investigations on bacteria and yeast, almost the entire story of success is based on studies on adherent mammalian 2D cell cultures. However, despite this continuous progress, the technique was not able to keep pace with the move of the cell biology community to adapt 3D cell culture models for basic research, regenerative medicine, or drug development and screening. In this review, we will summarize the progress, which only recently allowed for the application of single molecule microscopy to 3D cell systems and give an overview of the technical advances that led to it. While initially posing a challenge, we finally conclude that relevant 3D cell models will become an integral part of the on-going success of single molecule microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Single vesicle biochips for ultra-miniaturized nanoscale fluidics and single molecule bioscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Andreas Lauge; Lohr, Christina; Christensen, Sune M.

    2013-01-01

    , their fabrication via controlled self-assembly, and their characterization using fluorescence microscopy. We also highlight their applications in selected fields such as nanofluidics and single molecule bioscience. Despite their great potential for improved biocompatibility, extreme miniaturization and high...

  1. Characteristic Contrast in Δfmin Maps of Organic Molecules Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J; Hapala, Prokop; Rombouts, Jeroen A; van der Lit, Joost; Smith, Daniël; Mutombo, Pingo; Švec, Martin; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy can provide detailed information about the geometric and electronic structure of molecules with submolecular spatial resolution. However, an essential capability to realize the full potential of these techniques for chemical applications is

  2. Revisiting the Central Dogma One Molecule at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Cheng, Wei; Meija, Yara

    2011-01-01

    The faithful relay and timely expression of genetic information depend on specialized molecular machines, many of which function as nucleic acid translocases. The emergence over the last decade of single-molecule fluorescence detection and manipulation techniques with nm and Å resolution, and their application to the study of nucleic acid translocases are painting an increasingly sharp picture of the inner workings of these machines, the dynamics and coordination of their moving parts, their thermodynamic efficiency, and the nature of their transient intermediates. Here we present an overview of the main results arrived at by the application of single-molecule methods to the study of the main machines of the central dogma. PMID:21335233

  3. Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules: First annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Our first goal was to investigate the phenomenon of aerodynamic focusing in supersonic free jets, in order to assess its potential technological uses in /open quotes/direct writing/close quotes/ and other energy-related applications. Our research program divides itself naturally into two chapters: on focusing microscopic particles, and on focusing individual molecules of heavy vapors carried in jets of He and H 2 . In both lines we combine diverse experimental and theoretical methods of attack. 3 refs., 4 figs

  4. Exactly solvable models for atom-molecule Hamiltonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukelsky, J; Dussel, G G; Esebbag, C; Pittel, S

    2004-07-30

    We present a family of exactly solvable generalizations of the Jaynes-Cummings model involving the interaction of an ensemble of SU(2) or SU(1,1) quasispins with a single boson field. They are obtained from the trigonometric Richardson-Gaudin models by replacing one of the SU(2) or SU(1,1) degrees of freedom by an ideal boson. The application to a system of bosonic atoms and molecules is reported.

  5. Dysprosium Acetylacetonato Single-Molecule Magnet Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Nakanishi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dy single-molecule magnets (SMMs, which have several potential uses in a variety of applications, such as quantum computing, were encapsulated in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by using a capillary method. Encapsulation was confirmed by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In alternating current magnetic measurements, the magnetic susceptibilities of the Dy acetylacetonato complexes showed clear frequency dependence even inside the MWCNTs, meaning that this hybrid can be used as magnetic materials in devices.

  6. Electron scattering from molecules and molecular aggregates of biological relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2017-09-01

    In this Topical Review we survey the current state of the art in the study of low energy electron collisions with biologically relevant molecules and molecular clusters. We briefly describe the methods and techniques used in the investigation of these processes and summarise the results obtained so far for DNA constituents and their model compounds, amino acids, peptides and other biomolecules. The applications of the data obtained is briefly described as well as future required developments.

  7. Single Molecule Screening of Disease DNA Without Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The potential of single molecule detection as an analysis tool in biological and medical fields is well recognized today. This fast evolving technique will provide fundamental sensitivity to pick up individual pathogen molecules, and therefore contribute to a more accurate diagnosis and a better chance for a complete cure. Many studies are being carried out to successfully apply this technique in real screening fields. In this dissertation, several attempts are shown that have been made to test and refine the application of the single molecule technique as a clinical screening method. A basic applicability was tested with a 100% target content sample, using electrophoretic mobility and multiple colors as identification tools. Both electrophoretic and spectral information of individual molecule were collected within a second, while the molecule travels along the flow in a capillary. Insertion of a transmission grating made the recording of the whole spectrum of a dye-stained molecule possible without adding complicated instrumental components. Collecting two kinds of information simultaneously and combining them allowed more thorough identification, up to 98.8% accuracy. Probing mRNA molecules with fluorescently labeled cDNA via hybridization was also carried out. The spectral differences among target, probe, and hybrid were interpreted in terms of dispersion distances after transmission grating, and used for the identification of each molecule. The probes were designed to have the least background when they are free, but have strong fluorescence after hybridization via fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The mRNA-cDNA hybrids were further imaged in whole blood, plasma, and saliva, to test how far a crude preparation can be tolerated. Imaging was possible with up to 50% of clear bio-matrix contents, suggesting a simple lysis and dilution would be sufficient for imaging for some cells. Real pathogen DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-I6 in human genomic DNA

  8. NMR of dielectrically oriented molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruessink, B.H.

    1986-01-01

    General information on experimental aspects of EFNMR is given. It is shown that the complete 14 N quadrupole tensor (qct) of pyridine and pyrimidine in the liquid state is accessible to EFNMR. Information obtained about 17 O qct in liquid nitromethane, is compared with results from other techniques. The 33 S qct in liquid sulfolane is investigated. The EFNMR results, combined with those from spin-lattice relaxation time measurements and from Hartree-Fock-Slater MO calculations, allowed the complete assignment of the 33 S qct. The quadrupole coupling of both 10 B and 11 B in a carborane compound is investigated and, together with the results of spin-lattice relaxation time measurements, detailed information about the assignment of the boron qct's could be derived. EFNMR studies of apolar molecules are described. A limitation in EFNMR is the inhomogeneity (delta B) of the magnetic field, which is introduced by the use of non-spinning sample cells. A way out is the detection of zero quantum transitions, their widths being independent of delta B. The results and prospectives of this approach are shown for the simple three spin 1/2 system of acrylonitrile in which the small dipolar proton-proton couplings could be revealed via zero quantum transitions. (Auth.)

  9. Single-Molecule Stochastic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hayashi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic resonance (SR is a well-known phenomenon in dynamical systems. It consists of the amplification and optimization of the response of a system assisted by stochastic (random or probabilistic noise. Here we carry out the first experimental study of SR in single DNA hairpins which exhibit cooperatively transitions from folded to unfolded configurations under the action of an oscillating mechanical force applied with optical tweezers. By varying the frequency of the force oscillation, we investigate the folding and unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins in a periodically driven bistable free-energy potential. We measure several SR quantifiers under varied conditions of the experimental setup such as trap stiffness and length of the molecular handles used for single-molecule manipulation. We find that a good quantifier of the SR is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the spectral density of measured fluctuations in molecular extension of the DNA hairpins. The frequency dependence of the SNR exhibits a peak at a frequency value given by the resonance-matching condition. Finally, we carry out experiments on short hairpins that show how SR might be useful for enhancing the detection of conformational molecular transitions of low SNR.

  10. NMR studies of oriented molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, S.W.

    1981-11-01

    Deuterium and proton magnetic resonance are used in experiments on a number of compounds which either form liquid crystal mesophases themselves or are dissolved in a liquid crystal solvent. Proton multiple quantum NMR is used to simplify complicated spectra. The theory of nonselective multiple quantum NMR is briefly reviewed. Benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal are used to demonstrate several outcomes of the theory. Experimental studies include proton and deuterium single quantum (..delta..M = +-1) and proton multiple quantum spectra of several molecules which contain the biphenyl moiety. 4-Cyano-4'-n-pentyl-d/sub 11/-biphenyl (5CB-d/sub 11/) is studied as a pure compound in the nematic phase. The obtained chain order parameters and dipolar couplings agree closely with previous results. Models for the effective symmetry of the biphenyl group in 5CB-d/sub 11/ are tested against the experimental spectra. The dihedral angle, defined by the planes containing the rings of the biphenyl group, is found to be 30 +- 2/sup 0/ for 5DB-d/sub 11/. Experiments are also described for 4,4'-d/sub 2/-biphenyl, 4,4' - dibromo-biphenyl, and unsubstituted biphenyl.

  11. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  12. Absorption characteristics of bacteriorhodopsin molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    alent level diagram by considering the lifetime of the intermediate states. Assuming that only and. Е states are appreciably populated at any instant of time, the level diagram is further simplified to two-level system. ... Among the biological materials proposed for photonic applications [1–6], bacteri- orhodopsin (BR), a pigment ...

  13. Modulation of intermolecular interactions in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie Jeanne

    Polynuclear manganese clusters exhibiting interesting magnetic and quantum properties have been an area of intense research since the discovery of the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) in 1993. These molecules, below their blocking temperature, function as single-domain magnetic particles which exhibit classical macroscale magnetic properties as well as quantum mechanical phenomena such as quantum tunnelling of magnetization (QTM) and quantum phase interference. The union of classical and quantum behavior in these nanomaterials makes SMMs ideal candidates for high-density information storage and quantum computing. However, environmental coupling factors (nuclear spins, phonons, neighboring molecules) must be minimized if such applications are ever to be fully realized. The focus of this work is making small structural changes in well-known manganese SMMs in order to drastically enhance the overall magnetic and quantum properties of the system. Well-isolated molecules of high crystalline quality should lead to well-defined energetic and spectral properties as well. An advantage of SMMs over bulk magnetic materials is that they can be chemically altered from a "bottom-up" approach providing a synthetic tool for tuning magnetic properties. This systematic approach is utilized in the work presented herein by incorporating bulky ligands and/or counterions to "isolate" the magnetic core of [Mn4] dicubane SMMs. Reducing intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice (neighboring molecules, solvate molecules, dipolar interactions) is an important step toward developing viable quantum computing devices. Detailed bulk magnetic studies as well as single crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency EPR studies on these sterically-isolated complexes show enhanced, and sometimes even unexpected, quantum dynamics. The importance of intra- and intermolecular interactions remains a common theme throughout this work, extending to other SMMs of various topology including

  14. Stability of two-electron diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, Alejandro; Serra, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the ground state behaviour of two-electron diatomic molecules. The ground state stability diagram for diatomic molecules in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation is obtained and the behaviour of the ground state near the stability line is studied. Two different cases are analysed: the homonuclear two-centre two-electron molecule with the internuclear distance as a free parameter and the diatomic two-electron molecule (in this case, the internuclear distance is determined by equilibrium conditions). Analytical and numerical results for these systems are presented

  15. Conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Teresa; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Pascarella, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Water molecules occurring in the interior of protein structures often are endowed with key structural and functional roles. We report the results of a systematic analysis of conserved water molecules in bacterial serine hydroxymethyltransferases (SHMTs). SHMTs are an important group of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes that catalyze the reversible conversion of l-serine and tetrahydropteroylglutamate to glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydropteroylglutamate. The approach utilized in this study relies on two programs, ProACT2 and WatCH. The first software is able to categorize water molecules in a protein crystallographic structure as buried, positioned in clefts or at the surface. The other program finds, in a set of superposed homologous proteins, water molecules that occur approximately in equivalent position in each of the considered structures. These groups of molecules are referred to as 'clusters' and represent structurally conserved water molecules. Several conserved clusters of buried or cleft water molecules were found in the set of 11 bacterial SHMTs we took into account for this work. The majority of these clusters were not described previously. Possible structural and functional roles for the conserved water molecules are envisaged. This work provides a map of the conserved water molecules helpful for deciphering SHMT mechanism and for rational design of molecular engineering experiments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Ribosome display for improved biotherapeutic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Achim; Hosse, Ralf J; Power, Barbara E

    2006-02-01

    Ribosome display presents an innovative in vitro technology for the rapid isolation and evolution of high-affinity peptides or proteins. Displayed proteins are bound to and recovered from target molecules in multiple rounds of selection in order to enrich for specific binding proteins. No transformation step is necessary, which could lead to a loss of library diversity. A cycle of display and selection can be performed in one day, enabling the existing gene repertoire to be rapidly scanned. Proteins isolated from the panning rounds can be further modified through random or directed molecular evolution for affinity maturation, as well as selected for characteristics such as protein stability, folding and functional activity. Recently, the field of display technologies has become more prominent due to the generation of new scaffolds for ribosome display, isolation of high-affinity human antibodies by phage display, and their implementation in the discovery of novel protein-protein interactions. Applications for this technology extend into the broad field of antibody engineering, proteomics, and synthetic enzymes for diagnostics and therapeutics in cancer, autoimmune and infectious diseases, neurodegenerative diseases and inflammatory disorders. This review highlights the role of ribosome display in drug discovery, discusses advantages and disadvantages of the system, and attempts to predict the future impact of ribosome display technology on the development of novel engineered biopharmaceutical products for biological therapies.

  17. Perspective: Mechanochemistry of biological and synthetic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of mechanical forces and chemical transformations is central to the biophysics of molecular machines, polymer chemistry, fracture mechanics, tribology, and other disciplines. As a consequence, the same physical principles and theoretical models should be applicable in all of those fields; in fact, similar models have been invoked (and often repeatedly reinvented) to describe, for example, cell adhesion, dry and wet friction, propagation of cracks, and action of molecular motors. This perspective offers a unified view of these phenomena, described in terms of chemical kinetics with rates of elementary steps that are force dependent. The central question is then to describe how the rate of a chemical transformation (and its other measurable properties such as the transition path) depends on the applied force. I will describe physical models used to answer this question and compare them with experimental measurements, which employ single-molecule force spectroscopy and which become increasingly common. Multidimensionality of the underlying molecular energy landscapes and the ensuing frequent misalignment between chemical and mechanical coordinates result in a number of distinct scenarios, each showing a nontrivial force dependence of the reaction rate. I will discuss these scenarios, their commonness (or its lack), and the prospects for their experimental validation. Finally, I will discuss open issues in the field

  18. Bacterial antagonist mediated protein molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Urbizu, Lucia Paola; Sparo, Mónica Delfina; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial antagonism mediated by ribosomally synthesised peptides has gained considerable attention in recent years because of its potential applications in the control of undesirable microbiota. These peptides, generally referred to as bacteriocins, are defined as a heterogeneous group of ribosomally synthesised, proteinaceous substances (with or without further modifications) extracellularly secreted by many Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. Their mode of activity is primarily ...

  19. Structure formation in bis(terpyridine) derivative adlayers: molecule-substrate versus molecule-molecule interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoster, Harry E; Roos, Matthias; Breitruck, Achim; Meier, Christoph; Tonigold, Katrin; Waldmann, Thomas; Ziener, Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Behm, R Jürgen

    2007-11-06

    The influence of the substrate and the deposition conditions-vapor deposition versus deposition from solution-on the structures formed upon self-assembly of deposited bis(terpyridine) derivative (2,4'-BTP) monolayers on different hexagonal substrates, including highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), Au(111), and (111)-oriented Ag thin films, was investigated by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and by model calculations of the intermolecular energies and the lateral corrugation of the substrate-adsorbate interaction. Similar quasi-quadratic network structures with almost the same lattice constants obtained on all substrates are essentially identical to the optimum configuration expected from an optimization of the adlayer structure with C-H...N-type bridging bonds as a structure-determining factor, which underlines a key role of the intermolecular interactions in adlayer order. Slight distortions from the optimum values to form commensurate adlayer structures on the metal substrates and the preferential orientation of the adlayer with respect to the substrate are attributed to the substrate-adsorbate interactions, specifically, the lateral corrugation in the substrate-adsorbate interaction upon lateral displacement and rotation of the adsorbed BTP molecules. The fact that similar adlayer structures are obtained on HOPG under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (solid|gas interface) and on HOPG in trichlorobenzene (solid|liquid interface) indicates that the intermolecular interactions are not severely affected by the solvent.

  20. The nano-science of C60 molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years, nano-science and its associated nano-technology have emerged into prominence in research institutions across the world. They have brought about new scientific and engineering paradigms, allowing for the manipulation of single atoms and molecules, designing and fabricating new materials, atom-by-atom, and devices that operate on significantly reduced time and length scales. One important area of research in nano-science and nano technology is carbon-based physics in the form of fullerene physics. The C 6 0 molecule, and other cage-like fullerenes, together with carbon nano tubes provide objects that can be combined to generate three-dimensional functional structures for use in the anticipated nano-technology of future. The unique properties of C 6 0 can also be exploited in designing nano-phase thin films with applications in nano-scope device technology and processes such as nano-lithography. This requires a deep understanding of the highly complex process of adsorption of this molecule on a variety of substrates. We review the field of nano-scale nucleation and growth of C 6 0 molecules on some of the technologically important substrates. In addition to experimental results, the results of a set of highly accurate computational simulations are also reported

  1. Detection of individual gas molecules adsorbed on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, F; Geim, A K; Morozov, S V; Hill, E W; Blake, P; Katsnelson, M I; Novoselov, K S

    2007-09-01

    The ultimate aim of any detection method is to achieve such a level of sensitivity that individual quanta of a measured entity can be resolved. In the case of chemical sensors, the quantum is one atom or molecule. Such resolution has so far been beyond the reach of any detection technique, including solid-state gas sensors hailed for their exceptional sensitivity. The fundamental reason limiting the resolution of such sensors is fluctuations due to thermal motion of charges and defects, which lead to intrinsic noise exceeding the sought-after signal from individual molecules, usually by many orders of magnitude. Here, we show that micrometre-size sensors made from graphene are capable of detecting individual events when a gas molecule attaches to or detaches from graphene's surface. The adsorbed molecules change the local carrier concentration in graphene one by one electron, which leads to step-like changes in resistance. The achieved sensitivity is due to the fact that graphene is an exceptionally low-noise material electronically, which makes it a promising candidate not only for chemical detectors but also for other applications where local probes sensitive to external charge, magnetic field or mechanical strain are required.

  2. Modulation and Control of Charge Transport Through Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Xu, Bingqian

    2017-02-01

    The ability to modulate and control charge transport though single-molecule junction devices is crucial to achieving the ultimate goal of molecular electronics: constructing real-world-applicable electronic components from single molecules. This review aims to highlight the progress made in single-molecule electronics, emphasizing the development of molecular junction electronics in recent years. Among many techniques that attempt to wire a molecule to metallic electrodes, the single-molecule break junction (SMBJ) technique is one of the most reliable and tunable experimental platforms for achieving metal-molecule-metal configurations. It also provides great freedom to tune charge transport through the junction. Soon after the SMBJ technique was introduced, it was extensively used to measure the conductances of individual molecules; however, different conductances were obtained for the same molecule, and it proved difficult to interpret this wide distribution of experimental data. This phenomenon was later found to be mainly due to a lack of precise experimental control and advanced data analysis methods. In recent years, researchers have directed considerable effort into advancing the SMBJ technique by gaining a deeper physical understanding of charge transport through single molecules and thus enhancing its potential applicability in functional molecular-scale electronic devices, such as molecular diodes and molecular transistors. In parallel with that research, novel data analysis methods and approaches that enable the discovery of hidden yet important features in the data are being developed. This review discusses various aspects of molecular junction electronics, from the initial goal of molecular electronics, the development of experimental techniques for creating single-molecule junctions and determining single-molecule conductance, to the characterization of functional current-voltage features and the investigation of physical properties other than charge

  3. Transport through a Single Octanethiol Molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kockmann, D.; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Octanethiol molecules adsorbed on Pt chains are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy at 77 K. The head of the octanethiol binds to a Pt atom and the tail is lying flat down on the chain. Open-loop current time traces reveal that the molecule wags its tail and attaches to the

  4. Molecule-oriented programming in Java

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Molecule-oriented programming is introduced as a programming style carrying some perspective for Java. A sequence of examples is provided. Supporting the development of the molecule-oriented programming style several matters are introduced and developed: profile classes allowing the representation

  5. Tumor suppressor molecules and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.; Barber, Jack R.

    2004-09-07

    The invention provides substantially pure tumor suppressor nucleic acid molecules and tumor suppressor polypeptides. The invention also provides hairpin ribozymes and antibodies selective for these tumor suppressor molecules. Also provided are methods of detecting a neoplastic cell in a sample using detectable agents specific for the tumor suppressor nucleic acids and polypeptides.

  6. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  7. Infrared emission from electronically excited biacetyl molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, E.; Kommandeur, J.

    1971-01-01

    The infrared emission of electronically excited biacetyl molecules in the gas phase at low pressure was observed. Some experimental details are given, and it is shown that the emission derives from biacetyl molecules in their triplet state. The emission is dependent on the wavelength of excitation.

  8. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. Glycogen is large molecules wherein Glucose residues. linked by α-(1- 4) glycosidic bonds into chains and chains. branch via α-(1- 6) linkage. Branching points are about every fourth residue – allows. glucose ...

  9. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    with a kinetic energy proportional to the excess energy of that particle, subsequently called a photon. After one has recognized the quantum laws of nature, or the ... think of molecules as static entities, but Clausius had proposed a dynamic model in which molecules vibrated and rotated, in accordance with the recognition by ...

  10. The First Quantum Theory of Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In 1912, Bjerrum published the first quantum theory of molecules, to treat the vibrational and rotational energies of diatomic molecules. That theory was incorrect but prepared the next stages of development of quantum mechanics. The first quantum theory, which appeared in 1900, is considered to involve the derivation of a ...

  11. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F. M. H.; Bethlem, H. L.; Jongma, R.T.; Meijer, G.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by

  12. A storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields can be used to manipulate the motion of neutral molecules in phase-space, i.e., position-momentum space, via their electric dipole moment. A theoretical background is given on the motion of the molecules in phase-space. As the forces exerted on the

  13. Oscillator strength of instantaneous diatomic sodium molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perny, G.

    1991-10-01

    We introduce definitely the notion of instantaneous molecules, real or fictitious, in spite of its utilization in certain fields of the supraconductivity, genetics and advanced medical research. Calculation of the oscillator strength of instantaneous sodium diatomic molecules gives (f{sub mol})sup(Na{sub 2(i)})=6,86. This method is transposable at lithium and other Ia elements. (orig.).

  14. Oscillator strength of instantaneous diatomic sodium molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perny, G.

    1991-12-01

    We introduce definitely the notion of instantaneous molecules, real or fictitious, in spite of its utilization in certain fields of the supraconductivity, genetics and advanced medical research. Calculation of the oscillator strength of instantaneous sodium diatomic molecules gives [ f mol]Na 2( i)=6,86. This method is transposable at lithium and other Ia elements.

  15. Targeted delivery as key for the success of small osteoinductive molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmayor, Elizabeth R

    2015-11-01

    Molecules such as growth factors, peptides and small molecules can guide cellular behavior and are thus important for tissue engineering. They are rapidly emerging as promising compounds for the regeneration of tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Growth factors have disadvantages such as high cost, short half-life, supraphysiological amounts needed, etc. Therefore, small molecules may be an alternative. These molecules have been discovered using high throughput screening. Small osteoinductive molecules exhibit several advantages over growth factors owing to their small sizes, such as high stability and non-immunogenicity. These molecules may stimulate directly signaling pathways that are important for osteogenesis. However, systemic application doesn't induce osteogenesis in most cases. Therefore, local administration is needed. This may be achieved by using a bone graft material providing additional osteoconductive properties. These graft materials can also act by themselves as a delivery matrix for targeted and local delivery. Furthermore, vascularization is necessary in the process of osteogenesis. Many of the small molecules are also capable of promoting vascularization of the tissue to be regenerated. Thus, in this review, special attention is given to molecules that are capable of inducing both angiogenesis and osteogenesis simultaneously. Finally, more recent preclinical and clinical uses in bone regeneration of those molecules are described, highlighting the needs for the clinical translation of these promising compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanofluidic single-molecule sorting of DNA: a new concept in separation and analysis of biomolecules towards ultimate level performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Separation and separation-based analysis of biomolecules are fundamentally important techniques in the field of biotechnology. These techniques, however, depend on stochastic processes that intrinsically involve uncertainty, and thus it is not possible to achieve 100% separation accuracy. Theoretically, the ultimate resolution and sensitivity should be realized in a single-molecule system because of the deterministic nature of single-molecule manipulation. Here, we have proposed and experimentally demonstrated the concept of a 'single-molecule sorter' that detects and correctly identifies individual single molecules, realizing the ultimate level of resolution and sensitivity for any separation-based technology. The single-molecule sorter was created using a nanofluidic network consisting of a single inlet channel that branches off into multiple outlet channels. It includes two major functional elements, namely a single-molecule detection and identification element and a flow path switching element to accurately separate single molecules. With this system we have successfully demonstrated the world's first single-molecule sorting using DNA as a sample molecule. In the future, we hope to expand the application of such devices to comprehensive sorting of single-proteins from a single cell. We also believe that in addition to the single-molecule sorting method reported here, other types of single-molecule based processes will emerge and find use in a wide variety of applications.

  17. Quantum transport of the single metallocene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Chang, Jing; Wei, Rong-Kai; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    The Quantum transport of three single metallocene molecule is investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. We find that the three metallocen molecules structure become stretched along the transport direction, the distance between two Cp rings longer than the other theory and experiment results. The lager conductance is found in nickelocene molecule, the main transmission channel is the electron coupling between molecule and the electrodes is through the Ni dxz and dyz orbitals and the s, dxz, dyz of gold. This is also confirmed by the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance at Fermi level. In addition, negative differential resistance effect is found in the ferrocene, cobaltocene molecules, this is also closely related with the evolution of the transmission spectrum under applied bias.

  18. Towards witnessing quantum effects in complex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, T; Taylor, R A; Vedral, V

    2015-01-01

    Whether many-body objects like organic molecules can exhibit full quantum behaviour, including entanglement, is an open fundamental question. We present a generic theoretical protocol for entangling two organic molecules, such as dibenzoterrylene in anthracene. The availability of organic dye molecules with two-level energy structures characterised by sharp and intense emission lines are characteristics that position them favourably as candidates for quantum information processing technologies involving single-photons. Quantum entanglement can in principle be generated between several organic molecules by carefully interfering their photoluminescence spectra. Major milestones have been achieved in the last 10 years showcasing entanglement in diverse systems including ions, cold atoms, superconductors, photons, quantum dots and NV-centres in diamond, but not yet in molecules.

  19. Visualizing Chemical Bonds in Synthetic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Laura C.; Ruth, Anthony; Green, David B.; Janko, Boldizsar; Gomes, Kenjiro K.

    The use of synthetic quantum systems makes it possible to study phenomena that cannot be probed by conventional experiments. We created synthetic molecules using atomic manipulation and directly imaged the chemical bonds using tunneling spectroscopy. These synthetic systems allow us to probe the structure and electronic properties of chemical bonds in molecules, including those that would be unstable in nature, with unprecedented detail. The experimental images of electronic states in our synthetic molecules show a remarkable match to the charge distribution predicted by density functional theory calculations. The statistical analysis of the spectroscopy of these molecules can be adapted in the future to quantify aromaticity, which has been difficult to quantify universally thus far due to vague definitions. We can also study anti-aromatic molecules which are unstable naturally, to illuminate the electronic consequences of antiaromaticity.

  20. Electron scattering on molecules: search for semi-empirical indications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedus, Kamil; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.

    2017-06-01

    Reliable cross-sections for electron-molecule collisions are urgently needed for numerical modeling of various processes important from technological point of view. Unfortunately, a significant progress in theory and experiment over the last decade is not usually accompanied by the convergence of cross-sections measured at different laboratories and calculated with different methods. Moreover the most advanced contemporary theories involve such large basis sets and complicated equations that they are not easily applied to each specific molecule for which data are needed. For these reasons the search for semi-empirical indications in angular and energy dependencies of scattering cross-section becomes important. In this paper we make a brief review of the applicability of the Born-dipole approximation for elastic, rotational, vibrational and ionization processes that can occur during electron-molecule collisions. We take into account the most recent experimental findings as the reference points. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and Their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, and Grzegorz Karwasz.

  1. Reprogramming with Small Molecules instead of Exogenous Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs could be employed in the creation of patient-specific stem cells, which could subsequently be used in various basic and clinical applications. However, current iPSC methodologies present significant hidden risks with respect to genetic mutations and abnormal expression which are a barrier in realizing the full potential of iPSCs. A chemical approach is thought to be a promising strategy for safety and efficiency of iPSC generation. Many small molecules have been identified that can be used in place of exogenous transcription factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming efficiency and quality. Recent studies have shown that the use of small molecules results in the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells from mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. These studies might lead to new areas of stem cell research and medical applications, not only human iPSC by chemicals alone, but also safe generation of somatic stem cells for cell based clinical trials and other researches. In this paper, we have reviewed the recent advances in small molecule approaches for the generation of iPSCs.

  2. Heterobifunctional crosslinkers for tethering single ligand molecules to scanning probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Kienberger, Ferry; Hahn, Christoph D.; Buchinger, Gerhard M.; Egwim, Innocent O.C.; Haselgruebler, Thomas; Ebner, Andreas; Romanin, Christoph; Klampfl, Christian; Lackner, Bernd; Prinz, Heino; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    Single molecule recognition force microscopy (SMRFM) is a versatile atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to probe specific interactions of cognitive molecules on the single molecule level. It allows insights to be gained into interaction potentials and kinetic barriers and is capable of mapping interaction sites with nm positional accuracy. These applications require a ligand to be attached to the AFM tip, preferably by a distensible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain between the measuring tip and the ligand molecule. The PEG chain greatly facilitates specific binding of the ligand to immobile receptor sites on the sample surface. The present study contributes to tip-PEG-ligand tethering in three ways: (i) a convenient synthetic route was found to prepare NH 2 -PEG-COOH which is the key intermediate for long heterobifunctional crosslinkers; (ii) a variety of heterobifunctional PEG derivatives for tip-PEG-ligand linking were prepared from NH 2 -PEG-COOH; (iii) in particular, a new PEG crosslinker with one thiol-reactive end and one terminal nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group was synthesized and successfully used to tether His 6 -tagged protein molecules to AFM tips via noncovalent NTA-Ni 2+ -His 6 bridges. The new crosslinker was applied to link a recombinant His 6 -tagged fragment of the very-low density lipoprotein receptor to the AFM tip whereupon specific docking to the capsid of human rhinovirus particles was observed by force microscopy. In a parallel study, the specific interaction of the small GTPase Ran with the nuclear import receptor importin β1 was studied in detail by SMRFM, using the new crosslinker to link His 6 -tagged Ran to the measuring tip [Nat. Struct. Biol. (2003), 10, 553-557

  3. Programmable colloidal molecules from sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Songbo; Leemann, Jessica; Buttinoni, Ivo; Isa, Lucio; Wolf, Heiko

    2016-04-01

    The assembly of artificial nanostructured and microstructured materials which display structures and functionalities that mimic nature's complexity requires building blocks with specific and directional interactions, analogous to those displayed at the molecular level. Despite remarkable progress in synthesizing "patchy" particles encoding anisotropic interactions, most current methods are restricted to integrating up to two compositional patches on a single "molecule" and to objects with simple shapes. Currently, decoupling functionality and shape to achieve full compositional and geometrical programmability remains an elusive task. We use sequential capillarity-assisted particle assembly which uniquely fulfills the demands described above. This is a new method based on simple, yet essential, adaptations to the well-known capillary assembly of particles over topographical templates. Tuning the depth of the assembly sites (traps) and the surface tension of moving droplets of colloidal suspensions enables controlled stepwise filling of traps to "synthesize" colloidal molecules. After deposition and mechanical linkage, the colloidal molecules can be dispersed in a solvent. The template's shape solely controls the molecule's geometry, whereas the filling sequence independently determines its composition. No specific surface chemistry is required, and multifunctional molecules with organic and inorganic moieties can be fabricated. We demonstrate the "synthesis" of a library of structures, ranging from dumbbells and triangles to units resembling bar codes, block copolymers, surfactants, and three-dimensional chiral objects. The full programmability of our approach opens up new directions not only for assembling and studying complex materials with single-particle-level control but also for fabricating new microscale devices for sensing, patterning, and delivery applications.

  4. Computer-aided design of small molecules for chemical genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    De novo design provides an in silico toolkit for the design of novel molecular structures to a set of specified structural constraints, and is thus ideally suited for creating molecules for chemical genomics. The design process involves manipulation of the input, modification of structural constraints, and further processing of the de novo-generated molecules using various modular toolkits. The development of a theoretical framework for each of these stages will provide novel practical solutions to the problem of creating compounds with maximal chemical diversity. This chapter describes the fundamental problems encountered in the application of novel chemical design technologies to chemical genomics by means of a formal representation. Formal representations help to outline and clarify ideas and hypotheses that can then be explored using mathematical algorithms. It is only by developing this rigorous foundation, that in silico design can progress in a rational way.

  5. Electronic structure of molecules using relativistic effective core potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Starting with one-component Cowan-Griffin relativistic Hartree-Fock orbitals, which successfully incorporate the mass-velocity and Darwin terms present in more complicated wavefunctions such as Dirac-Hartree-Fock, one can derive relativistic effective core potentials (RECP's) to carry out molecular calculations. These potentials implicitly include the dominant relativistic terms for molecules while allowing one to use the traditional quantum chemical techniques for studying the electronic structure of molecules. The effects of spin-orbit coupling can then be included using orbitals from such calculations using an effective 1-electron, 1-center spin-orbit operator. Applications to molecular systems involving heavy atoms, show good agreement with available spectroscopic data on molecular geometries and excitation energies

  6. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results.

  7. Production, Manipulation, and Applications of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-30

    new class of unconventional critical phenomena characterized by singularities only in dynamical quantities, ways to experimentally probe such states and...24] Ching-Kit Chan, Guin-Dar Lin, Susanne F. Yelin, and Mikhail D. Lukin. Quantum interference between independent reservoirs in open quantum systems

  8. Small organic molecules on surfaces fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Draxl, Claudia; Ramsey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with basic aspects of polymer electronics and optoelectronics. There is an enormous world-wide effort both in basic scientific research as well as in industrial development in the area of organic electronics. It is becoming increasingly clear that, if devices based on organic materials are ever going to have a significant relevance beyond being a cheap replacement for inorganic semiconductors, there will be a need to understand interface formation, film growth and functionality. A control of these aspects will allow the realisation of totally new device concepts exploiting the enormous flexibility inherent in organic chemistry. In this book we focus on oligomeric/molecular films as we believe that the control of molecular structures and interfaces provides highly defined systems which allow, on the one hand the study of the basic physics and on the other hand to find the important parameters necessary to improve organic devices.

  9. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  10. Lactoferrin binding molecules in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, C J; Vanderpuye, O A; McIntyre, J A; Faulk, W P

    1990-10-01

    During ejaculation, the iron binding protein lactoferrin binds to sperm and forms a major component of sperm-coating antigens. Physicochemical properties of lactoferrin in seminal plasma (SP) and on sperm differ from those of purified lactoferrin. These differences have been attributed to the binding of unknown seminal macromolecules to lactoferrin. We have studied lactoferrin binding molecules in SP. The SP samples were coated onto microtiter plates and tested for binding of biotinylated lactoferrin. SP was found to specifically bind biotinylated lactoferrin. This binding was competitively inhibited by coincubation with unlabeled lactoferrin but was not affected by control incubations done with human IgG or transferrin. Lactoferrin binding molecules in SP were biochemically characterized by using SDS-PAGE and ligand blotting. Biotinylated lactoferrin bound to SP molecules of approximately 120, 60 and 30 kDa. No binding was observed with biotinylated transferrin. The presence of molecules that associate with lactoferrin in SP was further studied by using crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Lactoferrin in SP immunoprecipitated as two peaks, one of which corresponded to purified lactoferrin. These results suggest that some lactoferrin molecules in SP are free and that others are associated with lactoferrin binding molecules. Binding of lactoferrin to lactoferrin binding molecules appears to change its physicochemical properties and thus could influence its biologic activity and its affinity to sperm.

  11. Modeling the adiabatic creation of ultracold polar 23Na40K molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeßelberg, Frauke; Buchheim, Nikolaus; Lu, Zhen-Kai; Schneider, Tobias; Luo, Xin-Yu; Tiemann, Eberhard; Bloch, Immanuel; Gohle, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    In this work we model and realize stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) in the diatomic 23Na40K molecule from weakly bound Feshbach molecules to the rovibronic ground state via the |vd=5 ,J =Ω =1 〉 excited state in the d3Π electronic potential. We demonstrate how to set up a quantitative model for polar molecule production by taking into account the rich internal structure of the molecules and the coupling laser phase noise. We find excellent agreement between the model predictions and the experiment, demonstrating the applicability of the model in the search for an ideal STIRAP transfer path. In total we produce 5000 fermionic ground-state molecules. The typical phase-space density of the sample is 0.03 and induced dipole moments of up to 0.54 D can be observed.

  12. Effects of molecule anchoring and dispersion on nanoscopic friction under electrochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wijn, A S; Fasolino, A; Filippov, A E; Urbakh, M

    2016-01-01

    The application of electric fields is a promising strategy for in situ control of friction. While there have recently been many experimental studies on friction under the influence of electric fields, theoretical understanding is very limited. Recently, we introduced a simple theoretical model for friction under electrochemical conditions that focused on the interaction of a force microscope tip with adsorbed molecules whose orientation was dependent on the applied electric field. Here we focus on the effects of anchoring of the molecules on friction. We show that anchoring affects the intensity and width of the peak in the friction that occurs near a reorientation transition of adsorbed molecules, and explain this by comparing the strength of molecule–molecule and molecule–tip interactions. We derive a dispersion relation for phonons in the layer of adsorbed molecules and demonstrate that it can be used to understand important features of the frictional response. (paper)

  13. Single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy: concluding remarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Niek F

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is all about molecules: control, synthesis, interaction and reaction of molecules. All too easily on a blackboard, one draws molecules, their structures and dynamics, to create an insightful picture. The dream is to see these molecules in reality. This is exactly what "Single Molecule Detection" provides: a look at molecules in action at ambient conditions; a breakthrough technology in chemistry, physics and biology. Within the realms of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Faraday Discussion on "Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy" was a very appropriate topic for presentation, deliberation and debate. Undoubtedly, the Faraday Discussions have a splendid reputation in stimulating scientific debates along the traditions set by Michael Faraday. Interestingly, back in the 1830's, Faraday himself pursued an experiment that led to the idea that atoms in a compound were joined by an electrical component. He placed two opposite electrodes in a solution of water containing a dissolved compound, and observed that one of the elements of the compound accumulated on one electrode, while the other was deposited on the opposite electrode. Although Faraday was deeply opposed to atomism, he had to recognize that electrical forces were responsible for the joining of atoms. Probably a direct view on the atoms or molecules in his experiment would have convinced him. As such, Michael Faraday might have liked the gathering at Burlington House in September 2015 (). Surely, with the questioning eyes of his bust on the 1st floor corridor, the non-believer Michael Faraday has incited each passer-by to enter into discussion and search for deeper answers at the level of single molecules. In these concluding remarks, highlights of the presented papers and discussions are summarized, complemented by a conclusion on future perspectives.

  14. Detecting high-density ultracold molecules using atom–molecule collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun-Ren; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Chen, Hung-Bin; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing single-photon photoassociation, we have achieved ultracold rubidium molecules with a high number density that provides a new efficient approach toward molecular quantum degeneracy. A new detection mechanism for ultracold molecules utilizing inelastic atom–molecule collision is demonstrated. The resonant coupling effect on the formation of the X 1 Σ + g ground state 85 Rb 2 allows for a sufficient number of more deeply bound ultracold molecules, which induced an additional trap loss and heating of the co-existing atoms owing to the inelastic atom–molecule collision. Therefore, after the photoassociation process, the ultracold molecules can be investigated using the absorption image of the ultracold rubidium atoms mixed with the molecules in a crossed optical dipole trap. The existence of the ultracold molecules was then verified, and the amount of accumulated molecules was measured. This method detects the final produced ultracold molecules, and hence is distinct from the conventional trap loss experiment, which is used to study the association resonance. It is composed of measurements of the time evolution of an atomic cloud and a decay model, by which the number density of the ultracold 85 Rb 2 molecules in the optical trap was estimated to be >5.2 × 10 11 cm −3 . (paper)

  15. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-07-13

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  16. Single Molecule Biophysics Experiments and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yang, Haw; Silbey, Robert J; Rice, Stuart A; Dinner, Aaron R

    2011-01-01

    Discover the experimental and theoretical developments in optical single-molecule spectroscopy that are changing the ways we think about molecules and atoms The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. This latest volume explores the advent of optical single-molecule spectroscopy, and how atomic force microscopy has empowered novel experiments on individual biomolecules, opening up new frontiers in molecular and cell biology and leading to new theoretical approaches

  17. Nanopore analytics: sensing of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2009-08-01

    In nanopore analytics, individual molecules pass through a single nanopore giving rise to detectable temporary blockades in ionic pore current. Reflecting its simplicity, nanopore analytics has gained popularity and can be conducted with natural protein as well as man-made polymeric and inorganic pores. The spectrum of detectable analytes ranges from nucleic acids, peptides, proteins, and biomolecular complexes to organic polymers and small molecules. Apart from being an analytical tool, nanopores have developed into a general platform technology to investigate the biophysics, physicochemistry, and chemistry of individual molecules (critical review, 310 references).

  18. Molecular Wring Resonances in Chain Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the eigenfrequency of collective twist excitations in chain molecules can be in the megahertz and gigahertz range. Accordingly, resonance states can be obtained at specific frequencies, and phenomena that involve structural properties can take place. Chain molecules can alter...... their conformation and their ability to function, and a breaking of the chain can result. It is suggested that this phenomenon forms the basis for effects caused by the interaction of microwaves and biomolecules, e.g. microwave assisted hydrolysis of chain molecules....

  19. Electron attachment to Van der Waals molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Y.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of recent experimental studies of low-energy electron attachment to O 2 , N 2 O and other molecules in dense gases and in sonic nozzle beams with emphasis on the important role of pre-existing van der Waals molecules in the attachment mechanism. The experimental results particularly for O 2 are compared with recent theories. A survey is also given briefly of recent studies on electron solvation and localization in the condensed phase from the viewpoint of the studies on electron interaction with van der Waals molecules. (Auth.)

  20. Nano-manipulation of single DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jun; Shanghai Jiaotong Univ., Shanghai; Lv Junhong; Wang Guohua; Wang Ying; Li Minqian; Zhang Yi; Li Bin; Li Haikuo; An Hongjie

    2004-01-01

    Nano-manipulation of single atoms and molecules is a critical technique in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This review paper will focus on the recent development of the manipulation of single DNA molecules based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). Precise manipulation has been realized including varied manipulating modes such as 'cutting', 'pushing', 'folding', 'kneading', 'picking up', 'dipping', etc. The cutting accuracy is dominated by the size of the AFM tip, which is usually 10 nm or less. Single DNA fragments can be cut and picked up and then amplified by single molecule PCR. Thus positioning isolation and sequencing can be performed. (authors)

  1. Conformational States of the Spiropyran Molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The form of the potential surface of the ground state was investigated on the basis of indoline spiropyran. As a result of this work the rotamers of an open-ring form of the spiropyran molecule were discovered, and the existence of the most probable rotamers was justified. The 3D potential surface of the ground state of the spiropyran molecule was built. The route of the isomerization of the molecule was discovered and values of barriers for this reaction were found. The part of the isomerization route that is responsible for changing the hybridization of spiroatom from sp3 to sp2 was found.

  2. Synthesis of many different types of organic small molecules using one automated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junqi; Ballmer, Steven G; Gillis, Eric P; Fujii, Seiko; Schmidt, Michael J; Palazzolo, Andrea M E; Lehmann, Jonathan W; Morehouse, Greg F; Burke, Martin D

    2015-03-13

    Small-molecule synthesis usually relies on procedures that are highly customized for each target. A broadly applicable automated process could greatly increase the accessibility of this class of compounds to enable investigations of their practical potential. Here we report the synthesis of 14 distinct classes of small molecules using the same fully automated process. This was achieved by strategically expanding the scope of a building block-based synthesis platform to include even C(sp3)-rich polycyclic natural product frameworks and discovering a catch-and-release chromatographic purification protocol applicable to all of the corresponding intermediates. With thousands of compatible building blocks already commercially available, many small molecules are now accessible with this platform. More broadly, these findings illuminate an actionable roadmap to a more general and automated approach for small-molecule synthesis. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Controlled release of hydrophilic guest molecules from photoresponsive nucleolipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yawei; Yan, Yongfeng; Wang, Mingqing; Chen, Cuixia; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2013-07-10

    Amphiphilic hybrid nucleolipids bear the structural and functional hallmarks of both lipids and nucleic acids and hold great potential for biotechnological applications. However, further tailoring of their structures and properties for specific applications represents a major challenge. We here report a novel design and synthesis of a light-responsive nucleolipid by introducing an o-nitrobenzyl group that acts as a linker between a nucleotide and a lipid. The nucleolipid was applied readily to preparing smart vesicles and encapsulating hydrophilic guest molecules 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) in their inner aqueous phase. Upon light irradiation, their vesicular structure was disrupted as a result of the photolytic degradation of the nucleotide, resulting in CF release. Furthermore, temporally controlled CF release from these vesicles could be readily realized by turning on and off light. By demonstrating the molecular assembly and photodisassembly cycle, this report aims to stimulate further research exploring practical applications of nucleolipids.

  4. Examining resonant inelastic spontaneous scattering of classical Laguerre-Gauss beams from molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S.

    2013-04-01

    This paper treats theoretically the spontaneous resonant inelastic scattering of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams from the vibrations of complex polyatomic molecules within the semiclassical framework. We develop an interaction Hamiltonian that accounts for the position of the molecule within the excitation beam to derive the effective differential scattering cross section of a classical LG beam from a molecule using the frequency-domain third-order nonlinear optical response function. To gain physical insight, we utilize a model vibronic molecule to study the changes to this scattering process. For specific molecular parameters including vibrational frequency and relative displacement of the involved electronic states, this investigation shows that an incident LG beam asymmetrically enhances one of two participating excitation transitions causing modulation of the interference present in the scattering process. This modulation allows a pathway to coherent control of resonant inelastic scattering from complex, polyatomic molecules. We discuss the possible application of this control to the resonant x-ray inelastic scattering (RIXS) of small polyatomic molecules central to applications ranging from single-molecule electronics to solar energy science.

  5. Drift correction for single-molecule imaging by molecular constraint field, a distance minimum metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Renmin; Wang, Liansan; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Yongdeng; Zhang, Mingshu; Liu, Zhiyong; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Fa

    2015-01-01

    The recent developments of far-field optical microscopy (single molecule imaging techniques) have overcome the diffraction barrier of light and improve image resolution by a factor of ten compared with conventional light microscopy. These techniques utilize the stochastic switching of probe molecules to overcome the diffraction limit and determine the precise localizations of molecules, which often requires a long image acquisition time. However, long acquisition times increase the risk of sample drift. In the case of high resolution microscopy, sample drift would decrease the image resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel metric based on the distance between molecules to solve the drift correction. The proposed metric directly uses the position information of molecules to estimate the frame drift. We also designed an algorithm to implement the metric for the general application of drift correction. There are two advantages of our method: First, because our method does not require space binning of positions of molecules but directly operates on the positions, it is more natural for single molecule imaging techniques. Second, our method can estimate drift with a small number of positions in each temporal bin, which may extend its potential application. The effectiveness of our method has been demonstrated by both simulated data and experiments on single molecular images

  6. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  7. Glycerine associated molecules with herbicide for controlling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycerine associated molecules with herbicide for controlling Adenocalymma peregrinum in cultivated pastures. Rejanne Lima Arruda, Melquezedeque do Vale Nunes, Paulo Roberto da Silva, Fernando Ferreira Leao, Renato de Almeida Sarmento, Thomas Viera Nunes, Eduardo Andrea Lemus Erasmo ...

  8. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    (NCS1). The NMR solution structure of NCS1, in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy and mutational analysis, suggested a novel role for the C-terminal tail in regulating conformational stability. On the single-molecule level, the C-domain folded through a partially folded intermediate state....... This knowledge-gap is partly due to our inability to unveil the details of folding mechanisms that can be buried in the ensemble-averaged output of traditional bulk methods. Single-molecule techniques have provided a perspective beyond the ensemble average and enable studying the folding trajectories of protein...... molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical...

  9. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  10. Watching single protein molecules in action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri

    . This knowledge-gap is partly due to our inability to unveil the details of folding mechanisms that can be buried in the ensemble-averaged output of traditional bulk methods. Single-molecule techniques have provided a perspective beyond the ensemble average and enable studying the folding trajectories of protein...... molecules in unprecedented detail. These methods can, in principle, detect rare folding or misfolding events, and ultimately lead to a reconstruction of the free energy landscape. In this thesis, the folding mechanism of both single- and double-domain proteins is unraveled using single-molecule optical......, with transition states located almost halfway between the native and unfolded states. When pulled from the N- and C-termini, both experiments and simulations suggested that the molecule populates a transition state that resembles that observed during chemical denaturation, with respect to structure and position...

  11. nourishing molecule in endurance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pratap C Mali

    2018-01-24

    rich molecules as an energy source obtained from host cell debris remains interesting. Additionally, the potential of M. tuberculosis to survive under different stress conditions leading to its dormant state in pathogenesis remains ...

  12. Kinematic anharmonicity of internal rotation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataev, V.A.; Pupyshev, V.I.; Godunov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The methods of analysis the strongly coupled vibrations are proposed for a number of molecules of aromatic and heterocyclic carbonyl (and some others) compounds. The qualitative principles are formulated for molecular systems with a significant kinematic anharmonicity.

  13. Coherent Bichromatic Force Deflection of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Aldridge, Leland; Yu, Phelan; Eyler, Edward E.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the effect of the coherent optical bichromatic force on a molecule, the polar free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). A dual-frequency retroreflected laser beam addressing the X˜2Σ+↔A˜2Π1 /2 electronic transition coherently imparts momentum onto a cryogenic beam of SrOH. This directional photon exchange creates a bichromatic force that transversely deflects the molecules. By adjusting the relative phase between the forward and counterpropagating laser beams we reverse the direction of the applied force. A momentum transfer of 70 ℏk is achieved with minimal loss of molecules to dark states. Modeling of the bichromatic force is performed via direct numerical solution of the time-dependent density matrix and is compared with experimental observations. Our results open the door to further coherent manipulation of molecular motion, including the efficient optical deceleration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules with complex level structures.

  14. The modified connection formulae for the rotational transition cross sections in diatomic molecules for slow collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrovsky, V.N.; Ustimov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The formulae connecting the cross sections for various rotational transitions in diatomic molecules colliding with atomic particles are valid in the framework of the sudden approximation. In order to extend the applicability domain of these formulae to the slow-collision region a semi-empirical correction factor is introduced with an exponential dependence on the translation rotation energy transfer and on the inverse collision velocity. The modified connection formulae are applied to the rotational transitions in an HD molecule colliding with an H 2 molecule. (author)

  15. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed.

  16. Studies of gas phase ion/molecule reactions by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleingeld, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    An important field in which Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance has useful applications is that of gas phase ion chemistry, the subject of this thesis. First, the general picture of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase is discussed. Next, some positive ion-molecule reactions are described, whereas the remaining chapters deal with negative ion-molecule reactions. Most of these studies have been performed using the FT-ICR method. Reactions involving H 3 O - and NH 4 - ions are described whereas the other chapters deal with larger organic complexes. (Auth.)

  17. A-D-A small molecules for solution-processed organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wang; Wan, Xiangjian; Li, Miaomiao; Wang, Yunchuang; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-03-25

    A-D-A small molecules have drawn more and more attention in solution-processed organic solar cells due to the advantages of a diversity of structures, easy control of energy levels, etc. Recently, a power conversion efficiency of nearly 10% has been achieved through careful material design and device optimization. This feature article reviews recent representative progress in the design and application of A-D-A small molecules in organic photovoltaic cells.

  18. Adsorption of small gas molecules on pure and Al-doped graphene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... Abstract. The interaction of small gas molecules (CCl4, CH4, NH3, CO2, N2, CO, NO2, CCl2F2, SO2, CF4, H2) on pure and aluminium-doped graphene were investigated by using the density functional theory to explore their potential applications as sensors. It has been found that all gas molecules show ...

  19. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  20. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    , the adult frog Xenopus has a vigorous immune system with many similarities to mammals, a ubiquitous class I molecule, but a much wider class II tissue distribution than human, mouse and chicken. The Xenopus tadpole has a much more restricted immune response, no cell surface class I molecules and a mammalian...... chain on the surface of erythrocytes, those in association with beta 2m and those in association with a disulfide-linked homodimer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Udgivelsesdato: 1990-Feb...