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Sample records for top-down mass spectrometric

  1. Mild performic acid oxidation enhances chromatographic and top down mass spectrometric analyses of histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, James J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Streeky, James A; Kelleher, Neil L; Mizzen, Craig A

    2007-09-01

    Recent developments in top down mass spectrometry have enabled closely related histone variants and their modified forms to be identified and quantitated with unprecedented precision, facilitating efforts to better understand how histones contribute to the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription and other nuclear processes. It is therefore crucial that intact MS profiles accurately reflect the levels of variants and modified forms present in a given cell type or cell state for the full benefit of such efforts to be realized. Here we show that partial oxidation of Met and Cys residues in histone samples prepared by conventional methods, together with oxidation that can accrue during storage or during chip-based automated nanoflow electrospray ionization, confounds MS analysis by altering the intact MS profile as well as hindering posttranslational modification localization after MS/MS. We also describe an optimized performic acid oxidation procedure that circumvents these problems without catalyzing additional oxidations or altering the levels of posttranslational modifications common in histones. MS and MS/MS of HeLa cell core histones confirmed that Met and Cys were the only residues oxidized and that complete oxidation restored true intact abundance ratios and significantly enhanced MS/MS data quality. This allowed for the unequivocal detection, at the intact molecule level, of novel combinatorially modified forms of H4 that would have been missed otherwise. Oxidation also enhanced the separation of human core histones by reverse phase chromatography and decreased the levels of salt-adducted forms observed in ESI-FTMS. This method represents a simple and easily automated means for enhancing the accuracy and sensitivity of top down analyses of combinatorially modified forms of histones that may also be of benefit for top down or bottom up analyses of other proteins.

  2. Top Down Tandem Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a Chemically Modified Rough-Type Lipopolysaccharide Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyler, Benjamin L.; Khan, Mohd M.; Smith, Donald F.; Harberts, Erin M.; Kilgour, David P. A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Cross, Alan S.; Goodlett, David R.

    2018-02-01

    Recent advances in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biology have led to its use in drug discovery pipelines, including vaccine and vaccine adjuvant discovery. Desirable characteristics for LPS vaccine candidates include both the ability to produce a specific antibody titer in patients and a minimal host inflammatory response directed by the innate immune system. However, in-depth chemical characterization of most LPS extracts has not been performed; hence, biological activities of these extracts are unpredictable. Additionally, the most widely adopted workflow for LPS structure elucidation includes nonspecific chemical decomposition steps before analyses, making structures inferred and not necessarily biologically relevant. In this work, several different mass spectrometry workflows that have not been previously explored were employed to show proof-of-principle for top down LPS primary structure elucidation, specifically for a rough-type mutant (J5) E. coli-derived LPS component of a vaccine candidate. First, ion mobility filtered precursor ions were subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID) to define differences in native J5 LPS v. chemically detoxified J5 LPS (dLPS). Next, ultra-high mass resolving power, accurate mass spectrometry was employed for unequivocal precursor and product ion empirical formulae generation. Finally, MS3 analyses in an ion trap instrument showed that previous knowledge about dissociation of LPS components can be used to reconstruct and sequence LPS in a top down fashion. A structural rationale is also explained for differential inflammatory dose-response curves, in vitro, when HEK-Blue hTLR4 cells were administered increasing concentrations of native J5 LPS v. dLPS, which will be useful in future drug discovery efforts. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Profiling Changes in Histone Post-translational Modifications by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

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    Zhou, Mowei; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Zhang, Zhaorui; Connolly, Lanelle; Freitag, Michael; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2016-11-11

    Top-down mass spectrometry is a valuable tool for charactering post-translational modifications on histones for understanding of gene control and expression. In this protocol, we describe a top-down workflow using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry for fast global profiling of changes in histone proteoforms between a wild-type and a mutant of a fungal species. The proteoforms exhibiting different abundances can be subjected to further targeted studies by other mass spectrometric or biochemical assays. This method can be generally adapted for preliminary screening for changes in histone modifications between samples such as wild-type vs. mutant, and control vs. disease.

  4. Identification of Ultramodified Proteins Using Top-Down Mass Spectra

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    Liu, Xiaowen; Hengel, Shawna M.; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-11-05

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an important role in various biological processes through changing protein structure and function. Some ultramodified proteins (like histones) have multiple PTMs forming PTM patterns that define the functionality of a protein. While bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in identifying individual PTMs within short peptides, it is unable to identify PTM patterns spread along entire proteins in a coordinated fashion. In contrast, top-down MS analyzes intact proteins and reveals PTM patterns along the entire proteins. However, while recent advances in instrumentation have made top-down MS accessible to many laboratories, most computational tools for top-down MS focus on proteins with few PTMs and are unable to identify complex PTM patterns. We propose a new algorithm, MS-Align-E, that identifies both expected and unexpected PTMs in ultramodified proteins. We demonstrate that MS-Align-E identifies many protein forms of histone H4 and benchmark it against the currently accepted software tools.

  5. Identification of hemoglobin variants by top-down mass spectrometry using selected diagnostic product ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Hartmer, Ralf; Jabs, Wolfgang; Beris, Photis; Clerici, Lorella; Stoermer, Carsten; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis; Tsybin, Yury O; Scherl, Alexander; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Hemoglobin disorder diagnosis is a complex procedure combining several analytical steps. Due to the lack of specificity of the currently used protein analysis methods, the identification of uncommon hemoglobin variants (proteoforms) can become a hard task to accomplish. The aim of this work was to develop a mass spectrometry-based approach to quickly identify mutated protein sequences within globin chain variants. To reach this goal, a top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry method was developed for hemoglobin β chain analysis. A diagnostic product ion list was established with a color code strategy allowing to quickly and specifically localize a mutation in the hemoglobin β chain sequence. The method was applied to the analysis of rare hemoglobin β chain variants and an (A)γ-β fusion protein. The results showed that the developed data analysis process allows fast and reliable interpretation of top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectra by nonexpert users in the clinical area.

  6. Application of Tandem Two-Dimensional Mass Spectrometry for Top-Down Deep Sequencing of Calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Federico; Chiron, Lionel; Lynch, Alice M; Barrow, Mark P; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B

    2018-06-04

    Two-dimensional mass spectrometry (2DMS) involves simultaneous acquisition of the fragmentation patterns of all the analytes in a mixture by correlating their precursor and fragment ions by modulating precursor ions systematically through a fragmentation zone. Tandem two-dimensional mass spectrometry (MS/2DMS) unites the ultra-high accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) MS/MS and the simultaneous data-independent fragmentation of 2DMS to achieve extensive inter-residue fragmentation of entire proteins. 2DMS was recently developed for top-down proteomics (TDP), and applied to the analysis of calmodulin (CaM), reporting a cleavage coverage of about ~23% using infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) as fragmentation technique. The goal of this work is to expand the utility of top-down protein analysis using MS/2DMS in order to extend the cleavage coverage in top-down proteomics further into the interior regions of the protein. In this case, using MS/2DMS, the cleavage coverage of CaM increased from ~23% to ~42%. Graphical Abstract Two-dimensional mass spectrometry, when applied to primary fragment ions from the source, allows deep-sequencing of the protein calmodulin.

  7. Approach to characterization of the higher order structure of disulfide-containing proteins using hydrogen/deuterium exchange and top-down mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanbo; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2014-08-05

    Top-down hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection has recently matured to become a potent biophysical tool capable of providing valuable information on higher order structure and conformational dynamics of proteins at an unprecedented level of structural detail. However, the scope of the proteins amenable to the analysis by top-down HDX MS still remains limited, with the protein size and the presence of disulfide bonds being the two most important limiting factors. While the limitations imposed by the physical size of the proteins gradually become more relaxed as the sensitivity, resolution and dynamic range of modern MS instrumentation continue to improve at an ever accelerating pace, the presence of the disulfide linkages remains a much less forgiving limitation even for the proteins of relatively modest size. To circumvent this problem, we introduce an online chemical reduction step following completion and quenching of the HDX reactions and prior to the top-down MS measurements of deuterium occupancy of individual backbone amides. Application of the new methodology to the top-down HDX MS characterization of a small (99 residue long) disulfide-containing protein β2-microglobulin allowed the backbone amide protection to be probed with nearly a single-residue resolution across the entire sequence. The high-resolution backbone protection pattern deduced from the top-down HDX MS measurements carried out under native conditions is in excellent agreement with the crystal structure of the protein and high-resolution NMR data, suggesting that introduction of the chemical reduction step to the top-down routine does not trigger hydrogen scrambling either during the electrospray ionization process or in the gas phase prior to the protein ion dissociation.

  8. Different top-down approaches to estimate measurement uncertainty of whole blood tacrolimus mass concentration values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo-Bonnin, Raül; Blanco-Font, Aurora; Canalias, Francesca

    2018-05-08

    Values of mass concentration of tacrolimus in whole blood are commonly used by the clinicians for monitoring the status of a transplant patient and for checking whether the administered dose of tacrolimus is effective. So, clinical laboratories must provide results as accurately as possible. Measurement uncertainty can allow ensuring reliability of these results. The aim of this study was to estimate measurement uncertainty of whole blood mass concentration tacrolimus values obtained by UHPLC-MS/MS using two top-down approaches: the single laboratory validation approach and the proficiency testing approach. For the single laboratory validation approach, we estimated the uncertainties associated to the intermediate imprecision (using long-term internal quality control data) and the bias (utilizing a certified reference material). Next, we combined them together with the uncertainties related to the calibrators-assigned values to obtain a combined uncertainty for, finally, to calculate the expanded uncertainty. For the proficiency testing approach, the uncertainty was estimated in a similar way that the single laboratory validation approach but considering data from internal and external quality control schemes to estimate the uncertainty related to the bias. The estimated expanded uncertainty for single laboratory validation, proficiency testing using internal and external quality control schemes were 11.8%, 13.2%, and 13.0%, respectively. After performing the two top-down approaches, we observed that their uncertainty results were quite similar. This fact would confirm that either two approaches could be used to estimate the measurement uncertainty of whole blood mass concentration tacrolimus values in clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comprehensive Characterization of Swine Cardiac Troponin T Proteoforms by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ziqing; Guo, Fang; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Sun, Ruixiang; Zhang, Han; Hu, Yang; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Ge, Ying

    2018-04-01

    Cardiac troponin T (cTnT) regulates the Ca2+-mediated interaction between myosin thick filaments and actin thin filaments during cardiac contraction and relaxation. cTnT is released into the blood following injury, and increased serum levels of the protein are used clinically as a biomarker for myocardial infarction. Moreover, mutations in cTnT are causative in a number of familial cardiomyopathies. With the increasing use of large animal (swine) model to recapitulate human diseases, it is essential to characterize species-dependent protein sequence variants, alternative RNA splicing, and post-translational modifications (PTMs), but challenges remain due to the incomplete database and lack of validation of the predicted splicing isoforms. Herein, we integrated top-down mass spectrometry (MS) with online liquid chromatography (LC) and immunoaffinity purification to comprehensively characterize miniature swine cTnT proteoforms, including those arising from alternative RNA splicing and PTMs. A total of seven alternative splicing isoforms of cTnT were identified by LC/MS from swine left ventricular tissue, with each isoform containing un-phosphorylated and mono-phosphorylated proteoforms. The phosphorylation site was localized to Ser1 for the mono-phosphorylated proteoforms of cTnT1, 3, 4, and 6 by online MS/MS combining collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Offline MS/MS on Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer with CAD and electron capture dissociation (ECD) was then utilized to achieve deep sequencing of mono-phosphorylated cTnT1 (35.2 kDa) with a high sequence coverage of 87%. Taken together, this study demonstrated the unique advantage of top-down MS in the comprehensive characterization of protein alternative splicing isoforms together with PTMs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Top-down proteomics with mass spectrometry imaging: a pilot study towards discovery of biomarkers for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ye

    Full Text Available In the developing mammalian brain, inhibition of NMDA receptor can induce widespread neuroapoptosis, inhibit neurogenesis and cause impairment of learning and memory. Although some mechanistic insights into adverse neurological actions of these NMDA receptor antagonists exist, our understanding of the full spectrum of developmental events affected by early exposure to these chemical agents in the brain is still limited. Here we attempt to gain insights into the impact of pharmacologically induced excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in infancy on the brain proteome using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI. Our goal was to study changes in protein expression in postnatal day 10 (P10 rat brains following neonatal exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801. Analysis of rat brains exposed to vehicle or MK801 and comparison of their MALDI MS images revealed differential relative abundances of several proteins. We then identified these markers such as ubiquitin, purkinje cell protein 4 (PEP-19, cytochrome c oxidase subunits and calmodulin, by a combination of reversed-phase (RP HPLC fractionation and top-down tandem MS platform. More in-depth large scale study along with validation experiments will be carried out in the future. Overall, our findings indicate that a brief neonatal exposure to a compound that alters excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain has a long term effect on protein expression patterns during subsequent development, highlighting the utility of MALDI-MSI as a discovery tool for potential biomarkers.

  11. Combinatorial modification of human histone H4 quantitated by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with top down mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, James J; Bullock, Courtney R; LeDuc, Richard D; Mizzen, Craig A; Kelleher, Neil L

    2008-05-30

    Quantitative proteomics has focused heavily on correlating protein abundances, ratios, and dynamics by developing methods that are protein expression-centric (e.g. isotope coded affinity tag, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification, etc.). These methods effectively detect changes in protein abundance but fail to provide a comprehensive perspective of the diversity of proteins such as histones, which are regulated by post-translational modifications. Here, we report the characterization of modified forms of HeLa cell histone H4 with a dynamic range >10(4) using a strictly Top Down mass spectrometric approach coupled with two dimensions of liquid chromatography. This enhanced dynamic range enabled the precise characterization and quantitation of 42 forms uniquely modified by combinations of methylation and acetylation, including those with trimethylated Lys-20, monomethylated Arg-3, and the novel dimethylated Arg-3 (each <1% of all H4 forms). Quantitative analyses revealed distinct trends in acetylation site occupancy depending on Lys-20 methylation state. Because both modifications are dynamically regulated through the cell cycle, we simultaneously investigated acetylation and methylation kinetics through three cell cycle phases and used these data to statistically assess the robustness of our quantitative analysis. This work represents the most comprehensive analysis of histone H4 forms present in human cells reported to date.

  12. A mass graph-based approach for the identification of modified proteoforms using top-down tandem mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Qiang; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Paša-Tolic, Ljiljana; Liu, Yunlong; Liu, Xiaowen

    2017-05-01

    Although proteomics has rapidly developed in the past decade, researchers are still in the early stage of exploring the world of complex proteoforms, which are protein products with various primary structure alterations resulting from gene mutations, alternative splicing, post-translational modifications, and other biological processes. Proteoform identification is essential to mapping proteoforms to their biological functions as well as discovering novel proteoforms and new protein functions. Top-down mass spectrometry is the method of choice for identifying complex proteoforms because it provides a 'bird's eye view' of intact proteoforms. The combinatorial explosion of various alterations on a protein may result in billions of possible proteoforms, making proteoform identification a challenging computational problem. We propose a new data structure, called the mass graph, for efficient representation of proteoforms and design mass graph alignment algorithms. We developed TopMG, a mass graph-based software tool for proteoform identification by top-down mass spectrometry. Experiments on top-down mass spectrometry datasets showed that TopMG outperformed existing methods in identifying complex proteoforms. http://proteomics.informatics.iupui.edu/software/topmg/. xwliu@iupui.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Low-Molecular-Weight Human Plasma Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

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    Cheon, Dong Huey; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-04

    While human plasma serves as a great source for disease diagnosis, low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteome (mass spectrometry to analyze the LMW proteoforms present in four types of human plasma samples pooled from three healthy controls (HCs) without immunoaffinity depletion and with depletion of the top two, six, and seven high-abundance proteins. The LMW proteoforms were first fractionated based on molecular weight using gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE). Then, the GELFrEE fractions containing up to 30 kDa were subjected to nanocapillary-LC-MS/MS, and the high-resolution MS and MS/MS data were processed using ProSightPC 3.0. As a result, a total of 442 LMW proteins and cleaved products, including those with post-translational modifications and single amino acid variations, were identified. From additional comparative analysis of plasma samples without immunoaffinity depletion between HCs and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients via top-down approach, tens of LMW proteoforms, including platelet factor 4, were found to show >1.5-fold changes between the plasma samples of HCs and CRC patients, and six of the LMW proteins were verified by Western blot analysis.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Human Salivary Gland-Derived Intact Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Si; Brown, Joseph N.; Tolic, Nikola; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Haizhen; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-05-31

    There are several notable challenges inherent to fully characterizing the entirety of the human saliva proteome using bottom-up approaches, including polymorphic isoforms, post-translational modifications, unique splice variants, deletions, and truncations. To address these challenges, we have developed a top-down based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, which cataloged 20 major human salivary proteins with a total of 83 proteoforms, containing a broad range of post-translational modifications. Among these proteins, several previously reported disease biomarker proteins were identified at the intact protein level, such as beta-2 microglobulin (B2M). In addition, intact glycosylated proteoforms of several saliva proteins were also characterized, including intact N-glycosylated protein prolactin inducible protein (PIP) and O-glycosylated acidic protein rich protein (aPRP). These characterized proteoforms constitute an intact saliva proteoform database, which was used for quantitative comparison of intact salivary proteoforms among six healthy individuals. Human parotid (PS) and submandibular/sublingual gland (SMSL) secretion samples (2 μg of protein each) from six healthy individuals were compared using RPLC coupled with the 12T FTICR mass spectrometer. Significantly different protein and PTM patterns were resolved with high reproducibility between PS and SMSL glands. The results from this study provide further insight into the potential mechanisms of PTM pathways in oral glandular secretion, expanding our knowledge of this complex yet easily accessible fluid. Intact protein LC-MS approach presented herein can potentially be applied for rapid and accurate identification of biomarkers from only a few microliters of human glandular saliva.

  15. Enhancing Protein Disulfide Bond Cleavage by UV Excitation and Electron Capture Dissociation for Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Li, Huilin; Zhang, Xing; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Julian, Ryan R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of ion pre-activation with 266 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation combined with electron capture dissociation (ECD) is demonstrated to enhance top-down mass spectrometry sequence coverage of disulfide bond containing proteins. UV-based activation can homolytically cleave a disulfide bond to yield two separated thiol radicals. Activated ECD experiments of insulin and ribonuclease A containing three and four disulfide bonds, respectively, were performed. UV-activation in comb...

  16. Top Down proteomics: Facts and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherman, Adam D.; Skinner, Owen S.; Kelleher, Neil L., E-mail: n-kelleher@northwestern.edu

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • Top Down versus Bottom Up proteomics analysis. • Separations methods for Top Down proteomics. • Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation and fragmentation. • Native mass spectrometry. - Abstract: The rise of the “Top Down” method in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has ushered in a new age of promise and challenge for the characterization and identification of proteins. Injecting intact proteins into the mass spectrometer allows for better characterization of post-translational modifications and avoids several of the serious “inference” problems associated with peptide-based proteomics. However, successful implementation of a Top Down approach to endogenous or other biologically relevant samples often requires the use of one or more forms of separation prior to mass spectrometric analysis, which have only begun to mature for whole protein MS. Recent advances in instrumentation have been used in conjunction with new ion fragmentation using photons and electrons that allow for better (and often complete) protein characterization on cases simply not tractable even just a few years ago. Finally, the use of native electrospray mass spectrometry has shown great promise for the identification and characterization of whole protein complexes in the 100 kDa to 1 MDa regime, with prospects for complete compositional analysis for endogenous protein assemblies a viable goal over the coming few years.

  17. Top Down proteomics: Facts and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catherman, Adam D.; Skinner, Owen S.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Top Down versus Bottom Up proteomics analysis. • Separations methods for Top Down proteomics. • Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation and fragmentation. • Native mass spectrometry. - Abstract: The rise of the “Top Down” method in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has ushered in a new age of promise and challenge for the characterization and identification of proteins. Injecting intact proteins into the mass spectrometer allows for better characterization of post-translational modifications and avoids several of the serious “inference” problems associated with peptide-based proteomics. However, successful implementation of a Top Down approach to endogenous or other biologically relevant samples often requires the use of one or more forms of separation prior to mass spectrometric analysis, which have only begun to mature for whole protein MS. Recent advances in instrumentation have been used in conjunction with new ion fragmentation using photons and electrons that allow for better (and often complete) protein characterization on cases simply not tractable even just a few years ago. Finally, the use of native electrospray mass spectrometry has shown great promise for the identification and characterization of whole protein complexes in the 100 kDa to 1 MDa regime, with prospects for complete compositional analysis for endogenous protein assemblies a viable goal over the coming few years

  18. Structural Characterization of a Thrombin-Aptamer Complex by High Resolution Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiang; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has evolved as an invaluable tool for the characterization of intact native proteins and non-covalently bound protein complexes. Here we report the structural characterization by high resolution native top-down MS of human thrombin and its complex with the Bock thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), a 15-nucleotide DNA with high specificity and affinity for thrombin. Accurate mass measurements revealed that the predominant form of native human α-thrombin contains a glycosylation mass of 2205 Da, corresponding to a sialylated symmetric biantennary oligosaccharide structure without fucosylation. Native MS showed that thrombin and TBA predominantly form a 1:1 complex under near physiological conditions (pH 6.8, 200 mM NH4OAc), but the binding stoichiometry is influenced by the solution ionic strength. In 20 mM ammonium acetate solution, up to two TBAs were bound to thrombin, whereas increasing the solution ionic strength destabilized the thrombin-TBA complex and 1 M NH4OAc nearly completely dissociated the complex. This observation is consistent with the mediation of thrombin-aptamer binding through electrostatic interactions and it is further consistent with the human thrombin structure that contains two anion binding sites on the surface. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) top-down MS of the thrombin-TBA complex performed with a high resolution 15 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer showed the primary binding site to be at exosite I located near the N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain, consistent with crystallographic data. High resolution native top-down MS is complementary to traditional structural biology methods for structurally characterizing native proteins and protein-DNA complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Profiling of Histone Post-Translational Modifications in Mouse Brain with High-Resolution Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

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    Zhou, Mowei; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-12-21

    Histones play central roles in most chromosomal functions and both their basic biology and roles in disease have been the subject of intense study. Since multiple PTMs along the entire protein sequence are potential regulators of histones, a top-down approach, where intact proteins are analyzed, is ultimately required for complete characterization of proteoforms. However, significant challenges remain for top-down histone analysis primarily because of deficiencies in separation/resolving power and effective identification algorithms. Here, we used state of the art mass spectrometry and a bioinformatics workflow for targeted data analysis and visualization. The workflow uses ProMex for intact mass deconvolution, MSPathFinder as search engine, and LcMsSpectator as a data visualization tool. ProMex sums across retention time to maximize sensitivity and accuracy for low abundance species in MS1deconvolution. MSPathFinder searches the MS2 data against protein sequence databases with user-defined modifications. LcMsSpectator presents the results from ProMex and MSPathFinder in a format that allows quick manual evaluation of critical attributes for high-confidence identifications. When complemented with the open-modification tool TopPIC, this workflow enabled identification of novel histone PTMs including tyrosine bromination on histone H4 and H2A, H3 glutathionylation, and mapping of conventional PTMs along the entire protein for many histone subunits.

  20. Combined Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Top-down Microproteomics Reveals Evidence of a Hidden Proteome in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Vivian; Franck, Julien; Leblanc, Eric; Narducci, Fabrice; Robin, Yves-Marie; Gimeno, Jean-Pascal; Quanico, Jusal; Wisztorski, Maxence; Kobeissy, Firas; Jacques, Jean-François; Roucou, Xavier; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2017-07-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that proteins can be translated from alternative open reading frames (altORFs), increasing the size of the actual proteome. Top-down mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows the identification of intact proteins containing post-translational modifications (PTMs) as well as truncated forms translated from reference ORFs or altORFs. Top-down tissue microproteomics was applied on benign, tumor and necrotic-fibrotic regions of serous ovarian cancer biopsies, identifying proteins exhibiting region-specific cellular localization and PTMs. The regions of interest (ROIs) were determined by MALDI mass spectrometry imaging and spatial segmentation. Analysis with a customized protein sequence database containing reference and alternative proteins (altprots) identified 15 altprots, including alternative G protein nucleolar 1 (AltGNL1) found in the tumor, and translated from an altORF nested within the GNL1 canonical coding sequence. Co-expression of GNL1 and altGNL1 was validated by transfection in HEK293 and HeLa cells with an expression plasmid containing a GNL1-FLAG (V5) construct. Western blot and immunofluorescence experiments confirmed constitutive co-expression of altGNL1-V5 with GNL1-FLAG. Taken together, our approach provides means to evaluate protein changes in the case of serous ovarian cancer, allowing the detection of potential markers that have never been considered. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Data on endogenous bovine ovarian follicular cells peptides and small proteins obtained through Top-down High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Labas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The endogenous peptides and small proteins extracted from bovine ovarian follicular cells (oocytes, cumulus and granulosa cells were identified by Top-down High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (TD-HR-MS/MS in order to annotate peptido- and proteoforms detected using qualitative and quantitative profiling method based on ICM-MS (Intact Cell Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. The description and analysis of these Top-down MS data in the context of oocyte quality biomarkers research are available in the original research article of Labas et al. (2017 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2017.03.027 [1]. Raw data derived from this peptidomic/proteomic analysis have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (dataset identifier PXD004892. Here, we described the inventory of all identified peptido- and proteoforms including their biochemical and structural features, and functional annotation of correspondent proteins. This peptide/protein inventory revealed that TD-HR-MS/MS was appropriate method for both global and targeted proteomic analysis of ovarian tissues, and it can be further employed as a reference for other studies on follicular cells including single oocytes.

  2. All is not lost: Deriving a top-down mass budget of plastic at sea.

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    Koelmans, Bart; Kooi, Merel; Law, Kara Lavender; Sebille, van Erik

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the global mass inventory is one of the main challenges in present research on plastic marine debris. Especially the fragmentation and vertical transport processes of oceanic plastic are poorly understood. However, whereas fragmentation rates are unknown, information on plastic

  3. All is not lost: Deriving a top-down mass budget of plastic at sea.

    OpenAIRE

    Koelmans, Bart; Kooi, Merel; Law, Kara Lavender; Sebille, van, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the global mass inventory is one of the main challenges in present research on plastic marine debris. Especially the fragmentation and vertical transport processes of oceanic plastic are poorly understood. However, whereas fragmentation rates are unknown, information on plastic emissions, concentrations of plastics in the ocean surface layer (OSL) and fragmentation mechanisms is available. Here, we apply a systems engineering analytical approach and propose a tentative 'whole oc...

  4. All is not lost: deriving a top-down mass budget of plastic at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmans, Albert A.; Kooi, Merel; Lavender Law, Kara; van Sebille, Erik

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the global mass inventory is one of the main challenges in present research on plastic marine debris. Especially the fragmentation and vertical transport processes of oceanic plastic are poorly understood. However, whereas fragmentation rates are unknown, information on plastic emissions, concentrations of plastics in the ocean surface layer (OSL) and fragmentation mechanisms is available. Here, we apply a systems engineering analytical approach and propose a tentative ‘whole ocean’ mass balance model that combines emission data, surface area-normalized plastic fragmentation rates, estimated concentrations in the OSL, and removal from the OSL by sinking. We simulate known plastic abundances in the OSL and calculate an average whole ocean apparent surface area-normalized plastic fragmentation rate constant, given representative radii for macroplastic and microplastic. Simulations show that 99.8% of the plastic that had entered the ocean since 1950 had settled below the OSL by 2016, with an additional 9.4 million tons settling per year. In 2016, the model predicts that of the 0.309 million tons in the OSL, an estimated 83.7% was macroplastic, 13.8% microplastic, and 2.5% was < 0.335 mm ‘nanoplastic’. A zero future emission simulation shows that almost all plastic in the OSL would be removed within three years, implying a fast response time of surface plastic abundance to changes in inputs. The model complements current spatially explicit models, points to future experiments that would inform critical model parameters, and allows for further validation when more experimental and field data become available.

  5. Enhancing Protein Disulfide Bond Cleavage by UV Excitation and Electron Capture Dissociation for Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Li, Huilin; Zhang, Xing; Loo, Rachel R Ogorzalek; Julian, Ryan R; Loo, Joseph A

    2015-11-15

    The application of ion pre-activation with 266 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation combined with electron capture dissociation (ECD) is demonstrated to enhance top-down mass spectrometry sequence coverage of disulfide bond containing proteins. UV-based activation can homolytically cleave a disulfide bond to yield two separated thiol radicals. Activated ECD experiments of insulin and ribonuclease A containing three and four disulfide bonds, respectively, were performed. UV-activation in combination with ECD allowed the three disulfide bonds of insulin to be cleaved and the overall sequence coverage to be increased. For the larger sized ribonuclease A with four disulfide bonds, irradiation from an infrared laser (10.6 µm) to disrupt non-covalent interactions was combined with UV-activation to facilitate the cleavage of up to three disulfide bonds. Preferences for disulfide bond cleavage are dependent on protein structure and sequence. Disulfide bonds can reform if the generated radicals remain in close proximity. By varying the time delay between the UV-activation and the ECD events, it was determined that disulfide bonds reform within 10-100 msec after their UV-homolytic cleavage.

  6. Salivary Cystatins: Exploring New Post-Translational Modifications and Polymorphisms by Top-Down High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Barbara; Liori, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Vincenzoni, Federica; Iavarone, Federica; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene; Olianas, Alessandra

    2017-11-03

    Cystatins are a complex family of cysteine peptidase inhibitors. In the present study, various proteoforms of cystatin A, cystatin B, cystatin S, cystatin SN, and cystatin SA were detected in the acid-soluble fraction of human saliva and characterized by a top-down HPLC-ESI-MS approach. Proteoforms of cystatin D were also detected and characterized by an integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy. The proteoforms derive from coding sequence polymorphisms and post-translational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation, N-terminal processing, and oxidation. This study increases the current knowledge of salivary cystatin proteoforms and provides the basis to evaluate possible qualitative/quantitative variations of these proteoforms in different pathological states and reveal new potential salivary biomarkers of disease. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD007170.

  7. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  8. Top-Down and Bottom-Up Identification of Proteins by Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry of Healthy and Diseased Human Liver Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Martin, Nicholas J.; Lalor, Patricia F.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2014-09-01

    Liquid extraction surface analysis mass spectrometry (LESA MS) has the potential to become a useful tool in the spatially-resolved profiling of proteins in substrates. Here, the approach has been applied to the analysis of thin tissue sections from human liver. The aim was to determine whether LESA MS was a suitable approach for the detection of protein biomarkers of nonalcoholic liver disease (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), with a view to the eventual development of LESA MS for imaging NASH pathology. Two approaches were considered. In the first, endogenous proteins were extracted from liver tissue sections by LESA, subjected to automated trypsin digestion, and the resulting peptide mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (bottom-up approach). In the second (top-down approach), endogenous proteins were extracted by LESA, and analyzed intact. Selected protein ions were subjected to collision-induced dissociation (CID) and/or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry. The bottom-up approach resulted in the identification of over 500 proteins; however identification of key protein biomarkers, liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1), and its variant (Thr→Ala, position 94), was unreliable and irreproducible. Top-down LESA MS analysis of healthy and diseased liver tissue revealed peaks corresponding to multiple (~15-25) proteins. MS/MS of four of these proteins identified them as FABP1, its variant, α-hemoglobin, and 10 kDa heat shock protein. The reliable identification of FABP1 and its variant by top-down LESA MS suggests that the approach may be suitable for imaging NASH pathology in sections from liver biopsies.

  9. Integrated Bottom-Up and Top-Down Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Characterization of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Degradation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu Annie; Wu, Di; Auclair, Jared R; Salisbury, Joseph P; Sarin, Richa; Tang, Yang; Mozdzierz, Nicholas J; Shah, Kartik; Zhang, Anna Fan; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Agar, Jeffery N; Love, J Christopher; Love, Kerry R; Hancock, William S

    2017-12-05

    With the advent of biosimilars to the U.S. market, it is important to have better analytical tools to ensure product quality from batch to batch. In addition, the recent popularity of using a continuous process for production of biopharmaceuticals, the traditional bottom-up method, alone for product characterization and quality analysis is no longer sufficient. Bottom-up method requires large amounts of material for analysis and is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Additionally, in this analysis, digestion of the protein with enzymes such as trypsin could induce artifacts and modifications which would increase the complexity of the analysis. On the other hand, a top-down method requires a minimum amount of sample and allows for analysis of the intact protein mass and sequence generated from fragmentation within the instrument. However, fragmentation usually occurs at the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of the protein with less internal fragmentation. Herein, we combine the use of the complementary techniques, a top-down and bottom-up method, for the characterization of human growth hormone degradation products. Notably, our approach required small amounts of sample, which is a requirement due to the sample constraints of small scale manufacturing. Using this approach, we were able to characterize various protein variants, including post-translational modifications such as oxidation and deamidation, residual leader sequence, and proteolytic cleavage. Thus, we were able to highlight the complementarity of top-down and bottom-up approaches, which achieved the characterization of a wide range of product variants in samples of human growth hormone secreted from Pichia pastoris.

  10. Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Core Histones by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Reveals Unique Algae-Specific Variants and Post-Translational Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aliyya; Eikani, Carlo K; Khan, Hana; Iavarone, Anthony T; Pesavento, James J

    2018-01-05

    The unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has played an instrumental role in the development of many new fields (bioproducts, biofuels, etc.) as well as the advancement of basic science (photosynthetic apparati, flagellar function, etc.). Chlamydomonas' versatility ultimately derives from the genes encoded in its genome and the way that the expression of these genes is regulated, which is largely influenced by a family of DNA binding proteins called histones. We characterize C. reinhardtii core histones, both variants and their post-translational modifications, by chromatographic separation, followed by top-down mass spectrometry (TDMS). Because TDMS has not been previously used to study Chlamydomonas proteins, we show rampant artifactual protein oxidation using established nuclei purification and histone extraction methods. After addressing oxidation, both histones H3 and H4 are found to each have a single polypeptide sequence that is minimally acetylated and methylated. Surprisingly, we uncover a novel monomethylation at lysine 79 on histone H4 present on all observed molecules. Histone H2B and H2A are found to have two and three variants, respectively, and both are minimally modified. This study provides an updated assessment of the core histone proteins in the green alga C. reinhardtii by top-down mass spectrometry and lays the foundation for further investigation of these essential proteins.

  11. Top-down and bottom-up characterization of nitrated birch pollen allergen Bet v 1a with CZE hyphenated to an Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusenkov, Sergey; Stutz, Hanno

    2018-02-01

    Tyrosine (Tyr) residues of the major pollen allergen of birch Betula verrucosa, Bet v 1a, were nitrated by peroxynitrite. This modification enhances the allergenicity. Modified tyrosines were identified by analyzing intact allergen variants in combination with top-down and bottom-up approaches. Therefore, a laboratory-built sheath-liquid assisted ESI interface was applied for hyphenation of CE to an Orbitrap mass spectrometer to localize individual nitration sites. The major focus was on identification of primary nitration sites. The top-down approach unambiguously identified Tyr 5 as the most prominent modification site. Fragments from the allergen core and the C-terminal part carried up to three potential nitration sites, respectively. Thus, a bottom-up approach with tryptic digest was used as a complementary strategy which allowed for the unambiguous localization of nitration sites within the respective peptides. Nitration propensity for individual Tyr residues was addressed by comparison of MS signals of nitrated peptides relative to all cognates of homolog primary sequence. Combined data identified surface exposed Tyr 5 and Tyr 66 as major nitration sites followed by less accessible Tyr 158 whereas Tyr 81, 83 and 150 possess a lower nitration tendency and are apparently modified in variants with higher nitration levels. © 2018 The Authors. Electrophoresis published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  12. An integrated native mass spectrometry and top-down proteomics method that connects sequence to structure and function of macromolecular complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Campuzano, Iain D. G.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2018-02-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a crucial technique for the analysis of protein complexes. Native MS has traditionally examined protein subunit arrangements, while proteomics MS has focused on sequence identification. These two techniques are usually performed separately without taking advantage of the synergies between them. Here we describe the development of an integrated native MS and top-down proteomics method using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) to analyse macromolecular protein complexes in a single experiment. We address previous concerns of employing FTICR MS to measure large macromolecular complexes by demonstrating the detection of complexes up to 1.8 MDa, and we demonstrate the efficacy of this technique for direct acquirement of sequence to higher-order structural information with several large complexes. We then summarize the unique functionalities of different activation/dissociation techniques. The platform expands the ability of MS to integrate proteomics and structural biology to provide insights into protein structure, function and regulation.

  13. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry with top-down electron capture dissociation for characterizing structural transitions of a 17 kDa protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jingxi; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H; Konermann, Lars

    2009-09-09

    Amide H/D exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) is widely used for protein structural studies. Traditionally, this technique involves protein labeling in D(2)O, followed by acid quenching, proteolytic digestion, and analysis of peptide deuteration levels by HPLC/MS. There is great interest in the development of alternative HDX approaches involving the top-down fragmentation of electrosprayed protein ions, instead of relying on enzymatic cleavage and solution-phase separations. A number of recent studies have demonstrated that electron capture dissociation (ECD) results in fragmentation of gaseous protein ions with little or no H/D scrambling. However, the successful application of this approach for in-depth protein conformational studies has not yet been demonstrated. The current work uses horse myoglobin as a model system for assessing the suitability of HDX-MS with top-down ECD for experiments of this kind. It is found that ECD can pinpoint the locations of protected amides with an average resolution of less than two residues for this 17 kDa protein. Native holo-myoglobin (hMb) shows considerable protection from exchange in all of its helices, whereas loops are extensively deuterated. Fraying is observable at some helix termini. Removal of the prosthetic heme group from hMb produces apo-myoglobin (aMb). Both hMb and aMb share virtually the same HDX protection pattern in helices A-E, whereas helix F is unfolded in aMb. In addition, destabilization is evident for some residues close to the beginning of helix G, the end of helix H, and the C-terminus of the protein. The structural changes reported herein are largely consistent with earlier NMR data for sperm whale myoglobin, although small differences between the two systems are evident. Our findings demonstrate that the level of structural information obtainable with top-down ECD for small to medium-sized proteins considerably surpasses that of traditional HDX-MS experiments, while at the same time greatly reducing

  14. MALDI-ISD Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Hemoglobin Variants: a Top-Down Approach to the Characterization of Hemoglobinopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théberge, Roger; Dikler, Sergei; Heckendorf, Christian; Chui, David H. K.; Costello, Catherine E.; McComb, Mark E.

    2015-08-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are the most common inherited disorders in humans and are thus the target of screening programs worldwide. Over the past decade, mass spectrometry (MS) has gained a more important role as a clinical means to diagnose variants, and a number of approaches have been proposed for characterization. Here we investigate the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF MS) with sequencing using in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) for the characterization of Hb variants. We explored the effect of matrix selection using super DHB or 1,5-diaminonaphthalene on ISD fragment ion yield and distribution. MALDI-ISD MS of whole blood using super DHB simultaneously provided molecular weights for the alpha and beta chains, as well as extensive fragmentation in the form of sequence defining c-, (z + 2)-, and y-ion series. We observed sequence coverage on the first 70 amino acids positions from the N- and C-termini of the alpha and beta chains in a single experiment. An abundant beta chain N-terminal fragment ion corresponding to βc34 was determined to be a diagnostic marker ion for Hb S (β6 Glu→Val, sickle cell), Hb C (β6 Glu→Lys), and potentially for Hb E (β26 Glu→Lys). The MALDI-ISD analysis of Hb S and HbSC yielded mass shifts corresponding to the variants, demonstrating the potential for high-throughput screening. Characterization of an alpha chain variant, Hb Westmead (α122 His→Gln), generated fragments that established the location of the variant. This study is the first clinical application of MALDI-ISD MS for the determination and characterization of hemoglobin variants.

  15. Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To develop and validate a simple, efficient and reliable Liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantitative determination of two dermatological drugs, ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  16. Mass spectrometric researches in isotope cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalan, K.

    1979-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of solar system processes, past and present, based on mass spectrometric researches on meteorites and moon samples are reviewed. The topics include the following : (1) Duration of nebular condensation, (2) Terminal stages of nucleosynthesis, (3) Planetary formation and evolution, (4) Heterogeneities in the solar nebula and (5) Solar wind composition. (auth.)

  17. Top-down cellular pyramids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A Y; Rosenfeld, A

    1983-10-01

    A cellular pyramid is an exponentially tapering stack of arrays of processors (cells), where each cell is connected to its neighbors (siblings) on its own level, to a parent on the level above, and to its children on the level below. It is shown that in some situations, if information flows top-down only, from fathers to sons, then a cellular pyramid may be no faster than a one-level cellular array; but it may be possible to use simpler cells in the pyramid case. 23 references.

  18. Mass spectrometric analysis of lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Ramasubramanian, P.A.; Shah, P.M.; Almoula, A.I.; Acharya, S.N.; Parab, A.R.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.; Ramaniah, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    The details of investigations carried out on the isotopic analysis of lithium using surface ionisation mass spectrometry are presented. Various parameters affecting the precision in isotopic analysis of lithium are discussed. A precision of 1% is achieved in the relative isotope abundance measurement. (author)

  19. Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.

    2013-01-01

    The release of man-made radionuclides into the environment results in contamination that carries specific isotopic signatures according to the release scenarios and the previous usage of materials and facilities. In order to trace the origin of such contamination and/or to assess the potential impact on the public and environmental health, it is necessary to determine the isotopic composition and activity concentrations of radionuclides in environmental samples in an accurate and timely fashion. Mass spectrometric techniques, such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) belong to the most powerful methods for analysis of nuclear and related samples in nuclear safeguards, forensics, and environmental monitoring. This presentation will address the potential of mass spectrometric analysis of actinides at ultra-trace concentration levels, isotopic analysis of micro-samples, age determination of nuclear materials as well as identification and quantification of elemental and isotopic signatures of nuclear samples in general. (author)

  20. Intact cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry on single bovine oocyte and follicular cells combined with top-down proteomics: A novel approach to characterise markers of oocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Valérie; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Bouguereau, Laura; Gargaros, Audrey; Spina, Lucie; Marestaing, Aurélie; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2018-03-20

    Intact cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (ICM-MS) was adapted to bovine follicular cells from individual ovarian follicles to obtain the protein/peptide signatures (top-down workflow using high resolution MS/MS (TD HR-MS) was performed on the protein extracts from oocytes, CC and GC. The TD HR-MS proteomic approach allowed for: (1) identification of 386 peptide/proteoforms encoded by 194 genes; and (2) characterisation of proteolysis products likely resulting from the action of kallikreins and caspases. In total, 136 peaks observed by ICM-MS were annotated by TD HR-MS (ProteomeXchange PXD004892). Among these, 16 markers of maturation were identified, including IGF2 binding protein 3 and hemoglobin B in the oocyte, thymosins beta-4 and beta-10, histone H2B and ubiquitin in CC. The combination of ICM-MS and TD HR-MS proved to be a suitable strategy to identify non-invasive markers of oocyte quality using limited biological samples. Intact cell MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry on single oocytes and their surrounding cumulus cells, coupled to an optimised top-down HR-MS proteomic approach on ovarian follicular cells, was used to identify specific markers of oocyte meiotic maturation represented by whole low molecular weight proteins or products of degradation by specific proteases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Synthetic Organic Pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Naeko; Takahashi, Mitsuko; Sakurai, Katsumi; Tanaka, Nobuko; Okubo, Ichiro; Kawakami, Tsuyoshi

    2018-04-18

    Though synthetic organic colorants are used in various applications nowadays, there is the concern that impurities by-produced during the manufacturing and degradation products in some of these colorants are persistent organic pollutants and carcinogens. Thus, it is important to identify the synthetic organic colorants in various products, such as commercial paints, ink, cosmetics, food, textile, and plastics. Dyes, which are soluble in water and other solvents, could be analyzed by chromatographic methods. In contrast, it is difficult to analyze synthetic organic pigments by these methods because of their insolubility. This review is an overview of mass spectrometric analysis of synthetic organic pigments by various ionization methods. We highlight a recent study of textile samples by atmospheric pressure solid analysis probe MS. Furthermore, the mass spectral features of synthetic organic pigments and their separation from other components such as paint media and plasticizers are discussed.

  2. A Routine 'Top-Down' Approach to Analysis of the Human Serum Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Silva, Arlene M; Hyett, Jon A; Coorssen, Jens R

    2017-06-06

    Serum provides a rich source of potential biomarker proteoforms. One of the major obstacles in analysing serum proteomes is detecting lower abundance proteins owing to the presence of hyper-abundant species (e.g., serum albumin and immunoglobulins). Although depletion methods have been used to address this, these can lead to the concomitant removal of non-targeted protein species, and thus raise issues of specificity, reproducibility, and the capacity for meaningful quantitative analyses. Altering the native stoichiometry of the proteome components may thus yield a more complex series of issues than dealing directly with the inherent complexity of the sample. Hence, here we targeted method refinements so as to ensure optimum resolution of serum proteomes via a top down two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) approach that enables the routine assessment of proteoforms and is fully compatible with subsequent mass spectrometric analyses. Testing included various fractionation and non-fractionation approaches. The data show that resolving 500 µg protein on 17 cm 3-10 non-linear immobilised pH gradient strips in the first dimension followed by second dimension resolution on 7-20% gradient gels with a combination of lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergents markedly improves the resolution and detection of proteoforms in serum. In addition, well established third dimension electrophoretic separations in combination with deep imaging further contributed to the best available resolution, detection, and thus quantitative top-down analysis of serum proteomes.

  3. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis and Insecticidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Original Research Article. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis and ... into a natural fumigant/insecticide for the control of stored product insects. Keywords: Mallotus ..... stability as well as reduce cost. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.

  4. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Nematicidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Nematicidal Essential Oil of Valeriana ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... have a potential to be developed to natural nematicides for the control of cereal cyst nematodes.

  5. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometric Analysis and Insecticidal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... apelta aerial parts was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) to determine its composition. ... into a natural fumigant/insecticide for the control of stored product insects.

  6. Understanding microelectronics a top-down approach

    CERN Document Server

    Maloberti, Franco

    2011-01-01

    The microelectronics evolution has given rise to many modern benefits but has also changed design methods and attitudes to learning. Technology advancements shifted focus from simple circuits to complex systems with major attention to high-level descriptions. The design methods moved from a bottom-up to a top-down approach. For today's students, the most beneficial approach to learning is this top-down method that demonstrates a global view of electronics before going into specifics. Franco Maloberti uses this approach to explain the fundamentals of electronics, such as processing functions,

  7. Top-down modulation, emotion, and hallucination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, A; Kahn, RS

    2002-01-01

    We argue that the pivotal role assigned by Northoff to the principle of top-down modulation in catatonia might successfully be applied to other symptoms of schizophrenia, for example, hallucinations. Second, we propose that Northoffs account would benefit from a more comprehensive analysis of the

  8. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N{sub c} with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Vikas; Sil, Karunava [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India); McGill University, Physics Department, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large-N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N{sub c} = number of D5(D5)-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi:10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi:10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large-N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature. (orig.)

  9. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and N_c with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok; Sil, Karunava

    2017-10-01

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large- N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N_c = number of D5(\\overline{D5})-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi: 10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi: 10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large- N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature.

  10. Delocalized SYZ mirrors and confronting top-down SU(3)-structure holographic meson masses at finite g and Nc with P(article) D(ata) G(roup) values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Vikas; Sil, Karunava; Misra, Aalok

    2017-01-01

    Meson spectroscopy at finite gauge coupling - whereat any perturbative QCD computation would break down - and finite number of colors, from a top-down holographic string model, has thus far been entirely missing in the literature. This paper fills this gap. Using the delocalized type IIA SYZ mirror (with SU(3) structure) of the holographic type IIB dual of large-N thermal QCD of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) as constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at finite coupling and number of colors (N c = number of D5(D5)-branes wrapping a vanishing two-cycle in the top-down holographic construct of Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187. arXiv:0902.1540 [hep-th], 2010) = O(1) in the IR in the MQGP limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001. arXiv:1306.4339 [hep-th], 2013) at the end of a Seiberg-duality cascade), we obtain analytical (not just numerical) expressions for the vector and scalar meson spectra and compare our results with previous calculations of Sakai and Sugimoto (Prog Theor Phys 113:843. doi:10.1143/PTP.113.843 arXiv:hep-th/0412141, 2005) and Dasgupta et al. (JHEP 1507:122. doi:10.1007/JHEP07(2015)122 arXiv:1409.0559 [hep-th], 2015), and we obtain a closer match with the Particle Data Group (PDG) results of Olive et al. (Particle Data Group) (Chin Phys C 38:090001, 2014). Through explicit computations, we verify that the vector and scalar meson spectra obtained by the gravity dual with a black hole for all temperatures (small and large) are nearly isospectral with the spectra obtained by a thermal gravity dual valid for only low temperatures; the isospectrality is much closer for vector mesons than scalar mesons. The black-hole gravity dual (with a horizon radius smaller than the deconfinement scale) also provides the expected large-N suppressed decrease in vector meson mass with increase of temperature. (orig.)

  11. Populating the Landscape: a top down approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William; Hertog, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We put forward a framework for cosmology that combines the string landscape with no boundary initial conditions. In this framework, amplitudes for alternative histories for the universe are calculated with final boundary conditions only. This leads to a top down approach to cosmology, in which the histories of the universe depend on the precise question asked. We study the observational consequences of no boundary initial conditions on the landscape, and outline a scheme to test the theory. This is illustrated in a simple model landscape that admits several alternative inflationary histories for the universe. Only a few of the possible vacua in the landscape will be populated. We also discuss in what respect the top down approach differs from other approaches to cosmology in the string landscape, like eternal inflation.

  12. Computer networking a top-down approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kurose, James

    2017-01-01

    Unique among computer networking texts, the Seventh Edition of the popular Computer Networking: A Top Down Approach builds on the author’s long tradition of teaching this complex subject through a layered approach in a “top-down manner.” The text works its way from the application layer down toward the physical layer, motivating readers by exposing them to important concepts early in their study of networking. Focusing on the Internet and the fundamentally important issues of networking, this text provides an excellent foundation for readers interested in computer science and electrical engineering, without requiring extensive knowledge of programming or mathematics. The Seventh Edition has been updated to reflect the most important and exciting recent advances in networking.

  13. Entanglement entropy in top-down models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Peter A.R.; Taylor, Marika [Mathematical Sciences and STAG Research Centre, University of Southampton,Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-26

    We explore holographic entanglement entropy in ten-dimensional supergravity solutions. It has been proposed that entanglement entropy can be computed in such top-down models using minimal surfaces which asymptotically wrap the compact part of the geometry. We show explicitly in a wide range of examples that the holographic entanglement entropy thus computed agrees with the entanglement entropy computed using the Ryu-Takayanagi formula from the lower-dimensional Einstein metric obtained from reduction over the compact space. Our examples include not only consistent truncations but also cases in which no consistent truncation exists and Kaluza-Klein holography is used to identify the lower-dimensional Einstein metric. We then give a general proof, based on the Lewkowycz-Maldacena approach, of the top-down entanglement entropy formula.

  14. Entanglement entropy in top-down models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Peter A.R.; Taylor, Marika

    2016-01-01

    We explore holographic entanglement entropy in ten-dimensional supergravity solutions. It has been proposed that entanglement entropy can be computed in such top-down models using minimal surfaces which asymptotically wrap the compact part of the geometry. We show explicitly in a wide range of examples that the holographic entanglement entropy thus computed agrees with the entanglement entropy computed using the Ryu-Takayanagi formula from the lower-dimensional Einstein metric obtained from reduction over the compact space. Our examples include not only consistent truncations but also cases in which no consistent truncation exists and Kaluza-Klein holography is used to identify the lower-dimensional Einstein metric. We then give a general proof, based on the Lewkowycz-Maldacena approach, of the top-down entanglement entropy formula.

  15. Identification of ultramodified proteins using top-down spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Hengel, Shawna M.; Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-04-10

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play an important role in various biological processes through changing protein structure and function. Some ultramodified proteins (like histones) have multiple PTMs forming PTM patterns that define the functionality of a protein. While bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS) has been successful in identifying individual PTMs within short peptides, it is unable to identify PTM patterns spread along entire proteins in a coordinated fashion. In contrast, top-down MS analyzes intact proteins and reveals PTM patterns along the entire proteins. However, while recent advances in instrumentation have made top-down MS accessible to many laboratories, most computational tools for top-down MS focus on proteins with few PTMs and are unable to identify complex PTM patterns. We propose a new algorithm, MS-Align-E, that identifies both expected and unexpected PTMs in ultramodified proteins. We demonstrate that MS-Align-E identifies many protein forms of histone H4 and benchmark it against the currently accepted software tools.

  16. Mass spectrometric investigation of vinyl-substituted organic boron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarielashvili, V.O.; Ordzhonikidze, K.G.; Parulava, L.P.; Vakhaniya, G.V.

    1992-01-01

    Mass spectrometric investigation of vinyl-substituted organic compounds was conducted. Ionization was performed by electron shock. Possibility of determining boron isotope content is all analyzed organic boron vinyl-substituted compounds by direct method is shown. This simplifies sufficiently and lowers the price of analysis, improves its accuracy and rapidity

  17. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Highly Reactive Glycosyl Halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos Kovács

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly reactive glycosyl chlorides and bromides have been analysed by a routine mass spectrometric method using electrospray ionization and lithium salt adduct-forming agents in anhydrous acetonitrile solution, providing salient lithiated molecular ions [M+Li]+, [2M+Li]+ etc. The role of other adduct-forming salts has also been evaluated. The lithium salt method is useful for accurate mass determination of these highly sensitive compounds.

  18. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    OpenAIRE

    Synal Hans-Arno

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which however can be completely eliminated in charge changing proces...

  19. Neutron activation and mass spectrometric measurement of /sup 129/I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebin, R.S. Jr.; Brauer, F.P.; Kaye, J.H.; Rapids, M.S.; Stoffels, J.J.

    1987-11-01

    An integrated procedure has been developed for measurement of /sup 129/I by neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry. An iodine isolation procedure previously used for neutron activation has been modified to provide separated iodine suitable for mass spectrometric measurement as well. Agreement between both methods has been achieved within error limits. The measurement limit by each method is about 10/sup 7/ atoms (2 fg) of /sup 129/I. 13 refs,. 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric analysis of geochemical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Johnson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass-spectrometric-analysis techniques can be used to study a wide variety of problems involving decomposition processes and identification of released volatile components. A recording vacuum thermoanalyzer has been coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The rapid scan capabilities of the quadrupole mass spectrometer are used to identify the gaseous components released. The capability of the thermogravimetric-quadrupole mass spectrometer to provide analytical data for identification of the released volatile components, for determination of their sequence of release and for correlation of thermal-decomposition studies is illustrated by an analysis of the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite.

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  2. Mass spectrometric analysis for nuclear safeguards

    OpenAIRE

    BOULYGA S.; KONEGGER-KAPPEL S.; RICHTER Stephan; SANGELY L.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is currently being implemented in a wide spectrum of research and industrial areas, such as material sciences, cosmo- and geochemistry, biology and medicine, to name just a few. Research and development in nuclear safeguards is closely related to the general field of “Peace Research”; representing a specific application area for analytical sciences in general and for mass spectrometry in particular. According to Albert Einstein “peace cannot be kept by force. It only can be ...

  3. Quantitative mass-spectrometric analysis of hydrogen helium isotope mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, U.

    1998-12-01

    This work deals with the mass-spectrometric method for the quantitative analysis of hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures, with special attention to fusion plasma diagnostics. The aim was to use the low-resolution mass spectrometry, a standard measuring method which is well established in science and industry. This task is solved by means of the vector mass spectrometry, where a mass spectrum is repeatedly measured, but with stepwise variation of the parameter settings of a quadruple mass spectrometer. In this way, interfering mass spectra can be decomposed and, moreover, it is possible to analyze underestimated mass spectra of complex hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures. In this work experimental investigations are presented which show that there are different parameters which are suitable for the UMS-method. With an optimal choice of the parameter settings hydrogen-helium-isotope mixtures can be analyzed with an accuracy of 1-3 %. In practice, a low sensitivity for small helium concentration has to be noted. To cope with this task, a method for selective hydrogen pressure reduction has been developed. Experimental investigations and calculations show that small helium amounts (about 1 %) in a hydrogen atmosphere can be analyzed with an accuracy of 3 - 10 %. Finally, this work deals with the effects of the measuring and calibration error on the resulting error in spectrum decomposition. This aspect has been investigated both in general mass-spectrometric gas analysis and in the analysis of hydrogen-helium-mixtures by means of the vector mass spectrometry. (author)

  4. Deep imaging: how much of the proteome does current top-down technology already resolve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise P Wright

    Full Text Available Effective proteome analyses are based on interplay between resolution and detection. It had been claimed that resolution was the main factor limiting the use of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Improved protein detection now indicates that this is unlikely to be the case. Using a highly refined protocol, the rat brain proteome was extracted, resolved, and detected. In order to overcome the stain saturation threshold, high abundance protein species were excised from the gel following standard imaging. Gels were then imaged again using longer exposure times, enabling detection of lower abundance, less intensely stained protein species. This resulted in a significant enhancement in the detection of resolved proteins, and a slightly modified digestion protocol enabled effective identification by standard mass spectrometric methods. The data indicate that the resolution required for comprehensive proteome analyses is already available, can assess multiple samples in parallel, and preserve critical information concerning post-translational modifications. Further optimization of staining and detection methods promises additional improvements to this economical, widely accessible and effective top-down approach to proteome analysis.

  5. Mass-spectrometric measurements for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The need of an on-site inspection device to provide isotopic ratio measurements led to the development of a quadrupole mass spectrometer mounted in a van. This mobile laboratory has the ability, through the use of the resin bead technique, to acquire, prepare, and analyze samples of interest to nuclear safeguards. Precision of the measurements is about 1 to 2%

  6. Mass spectrometric analysis of simple hydrogen compounds; Analyse de composes hydrogenes simples au spectrometre de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nief, C; Botter, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    A uranium furnace is inserted in the gas inlet line of a mass spectrometer between the leak and the source. The line is fed with simple hydrogen compounds (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S) which are in this way reduced to hydrogen gas. Memory effects are largely avoided by heating the sample line to 90 deg. C. The speed of the isotopic analysis is only slightly less than that of hydrogen gas itself; the accuracy is better due to the reduction of fractionating effects in the leak. For the absolute measurements of deuterium in water, the presence of H{sub 3}{sup +} is a problem. Water samples, prepared by mixing an unknown light water sample with different amounts of heavy water, are equilibrated with hydrogen sulphide and analysis of the two phases of each sample enables the zero of the concentration scale to be determined from the point of intersection of the two curves obtained by plotting mixture composition against the observed isotope ratio in the two phases. The whole experiment can be carried out in the apparatus described which analyses hydrogen in H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}O in the same way. (author) [French] Un four a uranium est insere dans la ligne d'introduction de gaz d'un spectrometre de masse entre la fuite et la source. La ligne est alimentee par des composes hydrogenes simples (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S) qui sont de cette facon transformes en hydrogene gazeux. On evite dans une large mesure les effets de memoire en chauffant la ligne de l'echantillon jusqu'a 90 deg. C. La vitesse de l'analyse isotopique est seulement legerement inferieure a celle de l'hydrogene gazeux lui-meme; la precision est meilleure du fait de la reduction des effets de fractionnement dans la fuite. Pour les mesures absolues du deuterium dans l'eau, la presence de H{sub 3}{sup +} pose un probleme. Les echantillons d'eau, prepares en melangeant un echantillon inconnu d'eau legere a differentes quantites d'eau lourde, sont equilibres par de l'hydrogene sulfure et l'analyse de

  7. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  8. Mass spectrometric study of Nd2S3 vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenochka, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors conduct a mass-spectrometric study of neodymium(III) sulfide vaporization. The chemical composition of the samples was stoichiometric and the samples were vaporized from tantalum effusion cells. When the vapor over Nd 2 S 3 is ionized by electrons the mass spectra shows monovalent cations of Nd, S, NdS, and NdO. The enthalpy of vaporization if Nd atoms from Nd 2 S 3 at average experimental temperatures and the standard enthalpy of reaction is shown. Also presented is the enthalpy of vaporization of NdS molecules from Nd 2 S 3 at average experimental temperatures and the standard enthalpy of reaction

  9. Particle desorption mass spectrometric surface characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing 252 Cf-Particle Desorption Mass Spectrometry (PDMS) to characterize the surface region of solid samples has been evaluated. The PDMS experiment was adapted to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment and was configured so as to allow the analysis of thick as well as thin samples. This apparatus included an in situ sputter cleaning/depth profiling facility. The mass resolution was variable from 300 to 200 at 133 daltons by changing the drift length from 27 cm to 20 cm. Desorbed ions were focused by using either a dual grid assembly or an einzel lens. The overall instrumental transmission efficiency with the einzel lens operative was approximately 50%. The applicability of 252 Cf-PDMS to samples that were thick and insulating was demonstrated in the analysis of geological specimens. Pollucite, Microcline, Amblygonite, and Lepidolite were analyzed without complications associated with sample thickness or charge accumulation. Substitution occurring between the alkali metals in the environment was observed by PDMS and was corroborated by SIMS, XPS, and EMP analyses. The analysis of NBM SRM glasses addressed the suitability of combining the PDMS technique was sputter etching. This application demonstrated the ability of this technique to sense changes in the chemical environment brought about by sputter cleaning. The analysis of these samples also allowed the estimation of detection limits for lithium, rubidium, and cesium in a glass matrix as 300 ppm, 400 ppm, and 400 ppm, respectively. Sputter depth profiling combined with 252 Cf-PDMS analysis of an aluminum layer on a silicon substrate established the utility of the PDMS technique in surface characterization

  10. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synal, H.-A., E-mail: synal@phys.ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schulze-Koenig, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L. [ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, Building HPK, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV {sup 14}C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  11. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14 C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  12. Mass spectrometric detection of radiocarbon for dating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.-A.; Schulze-König, T.; Seiler, M.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiocarbon is still the most important nuclide measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The related capabilities for dating and tracer studies are eminent not only in archaeology but also drive important applications in the earth and environmental sciences as well as in biomedical research. So far, standard mass spectrometric systems have not been capable of radiocarbon dating because of interfering molecular isobars which, however, can be completely eliminated in charge changing processes at high ion beam energies (MeV) [1,2]. Here, we present a novel type mass spectrometry system for radiocarbon analyses. Radiocarbon dating was performed using 45 keV 14C ions from the ion source and a molecule dissociation unit kept at ground potential. This proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of mass spectrometric radiocarbon dating without an accelerator. The results obtained will be the basis of an optimized design for a radiocarbon dating instrument comparable in size, complexity and cost to standard mass spectrometers.

  13. Top-down and middle-down approach by fraction collection enrichment using off-line capillary electrophoresis - mass spectrometry coupling: Application to monoclonal antibody Fc/2 charge variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchi, Michael; Said, Nassur; Beck, Alain; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; François, Yannis-Nicolas

    2017-05-19

    The characterization of complex protein mixtures represents one of the biggest challenge in many research fields such as biological or biopharmaceutical sciences. Out of all categories, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and related products drawn the most interest due to their strong therapeutic potency and specificity. Because of their intrinsic complexity due to a large number of micro-heterogeneities, there is a crucial need for analytical methods to provide comprehensive in-depth characterization of these proteins. In this work, we developed a methodology using CE-UV/MALDI-MS to perform top-down or middle-down characterization after fraction collection enrichment applied to intact protein and mAbs samples. The performance of the method was evaluated with the rapid separation of three intact protein mixture. Good robustness of CZE separation and quality of MALDI-MS spectra and MALDI-ISD spectra of each protein confirms the usefulness of sample enrichment to obtain adequate quantity of deposed protein for top-down analysis and the proof of principle of the method. In a second step, the method was applied to the middle-down characterization of Fc/2 cetuximab variants. Identification of around 9% sequence coverage of Fc/2 cetuximab fragments allows to conclude on the feasibility of the strategy for middle-down characterization of Fc/2 cetuximab variants using CE-UV/MALDI-MS. Moreover, MALDI-ISD fragmentation of Fc/2 cetuximab variants confirm separation phenomenon based on the formation of Fc/2 dimers with and without C-terminal truncation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Top-Down Influence in Young Children's Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabagliati, Hugh; Pylkkanen, Liina; Marcus, Gary F.

    2013-01-01

    Language is rife with ambiguity. Do children and adults meet this challenge in similar ways? Recent work suggests that while adults resolve syntactic ambiguities by integrating a variety of cues, children are less sensitive to top-down evidence. We test whether this top-down insensitivity is specific to syntax or a general feature of children's…

  15. Informed-Proteomics: open-source software package for top-down proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jungkap; Piehowski, Paul D.; Wilkins, Christopher; Zhou, Mowei; Mendoza, Joshua; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Gibbons, Bryson C.; Shaw, Jared B.; Shen, Yufeng; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Tolić, Nikola; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae

    2017-08-07

    Top-down proteomics involves the analysis of intact proteins. This approach is very attractive as it allows for analyzing proteins in their endogenous form without proteolysis, preserving valuable information about post-translation modifications, isoforms, proteolytic processing or their combinations collectively called proteoforms. Moreover, the quality of the top-down LC-MS/MS datasets is rapidly increasing due to advances in the liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry instrumentation and sample processing protocols. However, the top-down mass spectra are substantially more complex compare to the more conventional bottom-up data. To take full advantage of the increasing quality of the top-down LC-MS/MS datasets there is an urgent need to develop algorithms and software tools for confident proteoform identification and quantification. In this study we present a new open source software suite for top-down proteomics analysis consisting of an LC-MS feature finding algorithm, a database search algorithm, and an interactive results viewer. The presented tool along with several other popular tools were evaluated using human-in-mouse xenograft luminal and basal breast tumor samples that are known to have significant differences in protein abundance based on bottom-up analysis.

  16. Mass spectrometric investigation of fluorated europium. beta. -diketonates. [Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Rasshinina, T.A.; Suboch, V.P. (AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziki; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    Ternary complexes of europium with two organic ligands - fluorated ..beta..-diketone and organic base - in the aqueous phase at electron shock are investigated; regroupings that take place in them are established. Mass-spectrometric investigation has shown that complexes with ..beta..-diketones, containing in oxygen atom in a fluorated radical, eliminate stable molecules of difluorophosgen, CoF/sub 2/. For the complexes studied under the above conditions the Co molecule elimination is also typical which is accompanied by the formation of ions with a metal-carbon bond.

  17. Mass spectrometric investigation of fluorated europium β-diketonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Rasshinina, T.A.; Suboch, V.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    1983-01-01

    Ternary complexes of europium with two organic lidands - fluorated β-diketone and organic base - in the aqueous phase at electron shock are investigated; regroupings that take place in them are established. Mass-spectrometric investigation has shown that complexes with β-diketones, containing in oxygen atom in a fluorated radical, eliminate stable molecules of difluorophosgen, CoF 2 . For the complexes studied under the above conditions the Co molecule elimination is also typical which is accompanied by the formation of ions with a metal-carbon bond

  18. Mass spectrometric methods for trace analysis of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, U.; Schulten, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    A brief outline is given of the principles of mass spectrometry (MS) and the fundamentals of qualitative and quantitative mass spectrometric analysis emphasizing recent developments and results. Classical methods of the analysis of solids, i.e. spark-source MS and thermal ionization MS, as well as recent methods of metal analysis are described. Focal points in this survey of recently developed techniques include secondary ion MS, laser probe MS, plasma ion source MS, gas discharge MS and field desorption MS. Here, a more detailed description is given and the merits of these emerging methods are discussed more explicitly. In particular, the results of the field desorption techniques in elemental analyses are reviewed and critically evaluated

  19. The top-down reflooding model in the Cathare code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartak, J.; Bestion, D.; Haapalehto, T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-down reflooding model was developed for the French best-estimate thermalhydraulic code CATHARE. The paper presents the current state of development of this model. Based on a literature survey and on compatibility considerations with respect to the existing CATHARE bottom reflooding package, a falling film top-down reflooding model was developed and implemented into CATHARE version 1.3E. Following a brief review of previous work, the paper describes the most important features of the model. The model was validated with the WINFRITH single tube top-down reflooding experiment and with the REWET - II simultaneous bottom and top-down reflooding experiment in rod bundle geometry. The results demonstrate the ability of the new package to describe the falling film rewetting phenomena and the main parametric trends both in a simple analytical experimental setup and in a much more complex rod bundle reflooding experiment. (authors). 9 figs., 28 refs

  20. Top-Down Beta Enhances Bottom-Up Gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Craig G; Thompson, William H; Bosman, Conrado A; Fries, Pascal

    2017-07-12

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that the bottom-up signaling of a visual stimulus is subserved by interareal gamma-band synchronization, whereas top-down influences are mediated by alpha-beta band synchronization. These processes may implement top-down control of stimulus processing if top-down and bottom-up mediating rhythms are coupled via cross-frequency interaction. To test this possibility, we investigated Granger-causal influences among awake macaque primary visual area V1, higher visual area V4, and parietal control area 7a during attentional task performance. Top-down 7a-to-V1 beta-band influences enhanced visually driven V1-to-V4 gamma-band influences. This enhancement was spatially specific and largest when beta-band activity preceded gamma-band activity by ∼0.1 s, suggesting a causal effect of top-down processes on bottom-up processes. We propose that this cross-frequency interaction mechanistically subserves the attentional control of stimulus selection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Contemporary research indicates that the alpha-beta frequency band underlies top-down control, whereas the gamma-band mediates bottom-up stimulus processing. This arrangement inspires an attractive hypothesis, which posits that top-down beta-band influences directly modulate bottom-up gamma band influences via cross-frequency interaction. We evaluate this hypothesis determining that beta-band top-down influences from parietal area 7a to visual area V1 are correlated with bottom-up gamma frequency influences from V1 to area V4, in a spatially specific manner, and that this correlation is maximal when top-down activity precedes bottom-up activity. These results show that for top-down processes such as spatial attention, elevated top-down beta-band influences directly enhance feedforward stimulus-induced gamma-band processing, leading to enhancement of the selected stimulus. Copyright © 2017 Richter, Thompson et al.

  1. Top-Down Approach for the Social Capital Development

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Syed Akhter Hussain; Shah, Tari shah; Ahmed, Eatzaz

    2011-01-01

    This study provides the compatibility of top-down approach of the collectivist society with the algebraic representation of social capital matrix [22], which establishes algebraic based model having capability of interpreting the state intervention in building social capital. The study also suggests a policy framework for the developing economic strategies and effective planing at government level regarding social capital development in perspective of top-down approach.

  2. Top-down approach to biological therapy of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Simon; Neurath, Markus F

    2017-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated condition with a potentially disabling and destructive course. Despite growing data on when to use a therapeutic 'top-down' strategy, clinical management of this complex disorder is still challenging. Currently, the discussion of 'top-down' strategy in CD mostly includes biological therapy alone or in combination. Areas covered: This article is based on a review of existing literature regarding the use of biological therapy in a 'top-down' approach for the treatment of Crohn's disease. The authors reviewed all the major databases including MEDLINE as well as DDW and ECCO abstracts, respectively. Expert opinion: A 'top-down' therapeutic approach in Crohn's disease is strongly supported by existing data in patients with several risk factors for a severe course of disease. Moreover, there is an increasing amount of published data recommending a more individualised therapeutic strategy to identify candidates for 'top-down' treatment, based on enhanced diagnostics using biomarkers. Emerging therapeutic approaches besides existing therapy concepts using biologicals may possibly redefine the 'top-down' therapeutic strategy for Crohn's disease in the future.

  3. Mass spectrometric study of vaporization of cesium tellurate and tellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, G.A.; Fokina, L.A.; Mouldagalieva, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The process of vaporization of cesium tellurate and tellurite was studied by the Knudsen effusion method with a mass spectrometric analysis of the vapor composition. The thermal dissociation of Cs 2 TeO 4 to Cs 2 TeO 3 and the congruent vaporization of Cs 2 TeO 3 were established. Thermodynamic functions for gaseous Cs 2 TeO 3 have been calculated. The standard enthalpy of sublimation Δ s H (298.15)=268.1±13.0 kJ mol -1 was determined by the 2nd and 3rd laws of thermodynamics. The enthalpy of formation Δ f H (298.15)=-725.1±13.0 kJ mol -1 for gaseous Cs 2 TeO 3 and the enthalpy of atomization Δ at H (298.15)=1841.3±15.0 kJ mol -1 have been computed. ((orig.))

  4. Mass spectrometric identification of isoforms of PR proteins in xylem sap of fungus-infected tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L.; Vossen, Jack H.; de Boer, Albert D.; Houterman, Petra M.; Speijer, Dave; Back, Jaap W.; de Koster, Chris G.; Cornelissen, Ben J. C.

    2002-01-01

    The protein content of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) xylem sap was found to change dramatically upon infection with the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. Peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometric sequencing were used to identify the most abundant proteins appearing during

  5. Determination of iodine to compliment mass spectrometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-11-01

    The dose of iodine-129 to facility personnel and the general public as a result of past, present, and future activities at DOE sites is of continuing interest, WINCO received about 160 samples annually in a variety of natural matrices, including snow, milk, thyroid tissue, and sagebrush, in which iodine-129 is determined in order to evaluate this dose, Currently, total iodine and the isotopic ratio of iodine-127 to iodine-129 are determined by mass spectrometry. These two measurements determine the concentration of iodine-129 in each sample, These measurements require at least 16 h of mass spectrometer operator time for each sample. A variety of methods are available which concentrate and determine small quantities of iodine. Although useful, these approaches would increase both time and cost. The objective of this effort was to determine total iodine by an alternative method in order to decrease the load on mass spectrometry by 25 to 50%. The preparation of each sample for mass spectrometric analysis involves a common step--collection of iodide on an ion exchange bed. This was the focal point of the effort since the results would be applicable to all samples

  6. Functional proteomics with new mass spectrometric and bioinformatics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesners, P.W.A.

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive range of mass spectrometric tools is required to investigate todays life science applications and a strong focus is on addressing the needs of functional proteomics. Application examples are given showing the streamlined process of protein identification from low femtomole amounts of digests. Sample preparation is achieved with a convertible robot for automated 2D gel picking, and MALDI target dispensing. MALDI-TOF or ESI-MS subsequent to enzymatic digestion. A choice of mass spectrometers including Q-q-TOF with multipass capability, MALDI-MS/MS with unsegmented PSD, Ion Trap and FT-MS are discussed for their respective strengths and applications. Bioinformatics software that allows both database work and novel peptide mass spectra interpretation is reviewed. The automated database searching uses either entire digest LC-MS n ESI Ion Trap data or MALDI MS and MS/MS spectra. It is shown how post translational modifications are interactively uncovered and de-novo sequencing of peptides is facilitated

  7. Mass Spectrometric C-14 Detection Techniques: Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synal, H.

    2013-12-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) has been established as the best-suited radiocarbon detection technique. In the past years, significant progress with AMS instrumentation has been made resulting in a boom of new AMS facilities around the World. Today, carbon only AMS systems predominantly utilize 1+ charge state and molecule destruction in multiple ion gas collisions in stripper gas cell. This has made possible a significant simplification of the instruments, a reduction of ion energies and related to this less required space of the installations. However, state-of-the-art AMS instruments have still not reached a development stage where they can be regarded as table-top systems. In this respect, more development is needed to further advance the applicability of radiocarbon not only in the traditional fields of dating but also in biomedical research and new fields in Earth and environmental sciences. In a the proof-of-principle experiment the feasibility of radiocarbon detection over the entire range of dating applications was demonstrated using a pure mass spectrometer and ion energies below 50 keV. Now an experimental platform has been completed to test performance and to explore operation and measurement conditions of pure mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection. This contribution will overview the physical principles, which make this development possible and discuss key parameters of the instrumental design and performance of such an instrument.

  8. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  9. Status of mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection at ETHZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Martin; Maxeiner, Sascha; Wacker, Lukas; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-15

    A prototype of a mass spectrometric radiocarbon detection instrument without accelerator stage was built for the first time and set into operation at ETH Zurich. The system is designed as an experimental platform to optimize performance of {sup 14}C detection at low ion energies and to study the most relevant processes that may limit system performance. The optimized stripper unit incorporates differential pumping to maintain a low gas outflow and a revised tube design to better match the phase space volume of the ion beam at low energies. The system is fully operational and has demonstrated true radiocarbon dating capabilities. The overall beam transmission through the stripper tube is about 40% for the 1{sup +} charge state. Radiocarbon analyses with an overall precision of 0.6% were obtained on a single sample under regular measurement conditions. By analyzing multiple targets of the same sample material an uncertainty level of 0.3% has been reached. The background level corresponds to a radiocarbon age of 40,000 years.

  10. Impact of top-down control during mental fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, Monicque M.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of mental fatigue, as induced by time on task, on top-down control involved in planning goal-directed behavior and conflict resolution was examined, using an S1-S2 paradigm. S2 stimuli consisted of compatible and incompatible stimuli, placing dissimilar demands on automatic and

  11. Flipped Top-Down is Systematic Bottom-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaytsev, V.; Sturm, A.; Clark, T.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an experience report in course design for a versatile group of computer science students where their needs were surfaced and met by the combination of strict top-down exposure to course material and the flipped classroom model of lecturing.

  12. Piezoresistive effect in top-down fabricated silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Richter, Jacob; Hansen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated silicon test chips to investigate the piezoresistive properties of both crystalline and polycrystalline nanowires using a top-down approach, in order to comply with conventional fabrication techniques. The test chip consists of 5 silicon nanowires and a reference...

  13. Top-Down Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Analysis of Protein Structures Using Ultraviolet Photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Nicholas I; Huguet, Romain; Zhang, Terry; Viner, Rosa; Zabrouskov, Vlad; Pan, Jingxi; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H

    2018-03-06

    Top-down hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) analysis using electron capture or transfer dissociation Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) is a powerful method for the analysis of secondary structure of proteins in solution. The resolution of the method is a function of the degree of fragmentation of backbone bonds in the proteins. While fragmentation is usually extensive near the N- and C-termini, electron capture (ECD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation methods sometimes lack good coverage of certain regions of the protein, most often in the middle of the sequence. Ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) is a recently developed fast-fragmentation technique, which provides extensive backbone fragmentation that can be complementary in sequence coverage to the aforementioned electron-based fragmentation techniques. Here, we explore the application of electrospray ionization (ESI)-UVPD FTMS on an Orbitrap Fusion Lumos Tribrid mass spectrometer to top-down HDX analysis of proteins. We have incorporated UVPD-specific fragment-ion types and fragment-ion mixtures into our isotopic envelope fitting software (HDX Match) for the top-down HDX analysis. We have shown that UVPD data is complementary to ETD, thus improving the overall resolution when used as a combined approach.

  14. 'Top-down' BACT analysis - Recommended approach and recent determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, J.R.; Fagan, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    New EPA requirements for 'top-down' best available control technology (BACT) analyses have resulted in determinations that require more stringent control technologies. Accordingly, these permit decisions include nitrogen oxide (NO x ), sulfur dioxide, and particulate emission limits significantly lower than applicable New Source Performance Standards. However, with careful consideration of acceptable site-specific impacts, obtaining a reasonable BACT determination is still possible. This paper presents a step-by-step approach for conducting a top-down BACT analysis, and summarizes important considerations that will lead to a more effective BACT analysis. In addition, recent permit decisions regarding NO x emission rate and control technology requirements for combined cycle combustion turbine and coal fueled power plants are summarized and examined to ascertain the basis for decisions. Guidance from this paper will help applicants in preparing an accurate and comprehensive BACT analysis for their proposed projects

  15. The Interplay of Top-Down and Bottom-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Till; Brown, Carol V.; Ozturk, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The exchange of patient health information across different organizations involved in healthcare delivery has potential benefits for a wide range of stakeholders. However, many governments in Europe and in the U.S. have, despite both top-down and bottom-up initiatives, experienced major barriers...... in achieving sustainable models for implementing health information exchange (HIE) throughout their healthcare systems. In the case of the U.S., three years after stimulus funding allocated as part of the 2009 HITECH Act, the extent to which government funding will be needed to sustain health information...... organizations (HIOs) that facilitate HIE across regional stakeholders remains an unanswered question. This research investigates the impacts of top-down and bottom-up initiatives on the evolutionary paths of HIOs in two contingent states in the U.S. (New Jersey and New York) which had different starting...

  16. Populating the landscape: A top-down approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    We put forward a framework for cosmology that combines the string landscape with no boundary initial conditions. In this framework, amplitudes for alternative histories for the universe are calculated with final boundary conditions only. This leads to a top-down approach to cosmology, in which the histories of the universe depend on the precise question asked. We study the observational consequences of no boundary initial conditions on the landscape, and outline a scheme to test the theory. This is illustrated in a simple model landscape that admits several alternative inflationary histories for the universe. Only a few of the possible vacua in the landscape will be populated. We also discuss in what respect the top-down approach differs from other approaches to cosmology in the string landscape, like eternal inflation

  17. Novel concepts and strategies in anticancer metallodrug development : towards oral activity, peptide conjugation and mass spectrometric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, S.

    2013-07-01

    including top-down electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Mass spectrometry is an invaluable tool in the analysis of molecular interactions between metallodrugs and biomolecules, such as DNA or proteins and their constituents. Furthermore, the molecular reactivity may give insight into the mode of action of a particular metallodrug or family of metallodrugs. Within the frame of this Ph.D. thesis, mass spectrometric techniques have been used to characterize the reactivity of representative (thio)pyr(id)onato RuII–p-cymene metallodrugs towards amino acids, nucleotides and proteins and an inverse correlation was found between extent of protein binding and antiproliferative activity, at least for these families of metallodrugs. Furthermore, the analysis of metallation sites of metallodrugs on proteins by mass spectrometric methods poses significant challenges in many cases due to low adduct detection efficiencies. Top-down mass spectrometric analysis is a promising approach to determine oxaliplatin binding sites on ubiquitin and different fragmentation techniques were investigated with the combination of higher energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry yielding the highest information content. This approach led to the confirmation of methionine-1 as the primary and histidine-68 as the secondary binding site. (author) [German] Manche auf Ruthenium und Osmium als Zentralatomen basierende Koordinationsverbindungen haben sich als vielversprechende tumorhemmende Wirkstoffkandidaten erwiesen. Derzeit stellen organometallische RuII und OsII Komplexverbindungen—durch einen η6-koordinierenden Arenliganden stabilisiert—die bis dato modernste Forschungsstrategie dar, um solche Wirkstoffe zu erhalten. Im Rahmen dieser Dissertation wurden neuartige, tumorhemmende RuII– und OsII–Aren Verbindungen entdeckt und in Bezug auf ihre molekularen Wechselwirkungen mit Biomolekülen untersucht. Letzteres wurde vorab

  18. Top Down Proteomics Reveals Mature Proteoforms Expressed in Subcellular Fractions of the Echinococcus granulosus Preadult Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzatto, Karina R; Kim, Kyunggon; Ntai, Ioanna; Paludo, Gabriela P; Camargo de Lima, Jeferson; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-11-06

    Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease, a neglected zoonosis responsible for high morbidity and mortality. Several molecular mechanisms underlying parasite biology remain poorly understood. Here, E. granulosus subcellular fractions were analyzed by top down and bottom up proteomics for protein identification and characterization of co-translational and post-translational modifications (CTMs and PTMs, respectively). Nuclear and cytosolic extracts of E. granulosus protoscoleces were fractionated by 10% GELFrEE and proteins under 30 kDa were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. By top down analysis, 186 proteins and 207 proteoforms were identified, of which 122 and 52 proteoforms were exclusively detected in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, respectively. CTMs were evident as 71% of the proteoforms had methionine excised and 47% were N-terminal acetylated. In addition, in silico internal acetylation prediction coupled with top down MS allowed the characterization of 9 proteins differentially acetylated, including histones. Bottom up analysis increased the overall number of identified proteins in nuclear and cytosolic fractions to 154 and 112, respectively. Overall, our results provided the first description of the low mass proteome of E. granulosus subcellular fractions and highlighted proteoforms with CTMs and PTMS whose characterization may lead to another level of understanding about molecular mechanisms controlling parasitic flatworm biology.

  19. The Ups and Downs of Repeated Cleavage and Internal Fragment Production in Top-Down Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Yana A.; Riggs, Dylan; Fornelli, Luca; Compton, Philip D.; Julian, Ryan R.

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of whole proteins by mass spectrometry, or top-down proteomics, has several advantages over methods relying on proteolysis. For example, proteoforms can be unambiguously identified and examined. However, from a gas-phase ion-chemistry perspective, proteins are enormous molecules that present novel challenges relative to peptide analysis. Herein, the statistics of cleaving the peptide backbone multiple times are examined to evaluate the inherent propensity for generating internal versus terminal ions. The raw statistics reveal an inherent bias favoring production of terminal ions, which holds true regardless of protein size. Importantly, even if the full suite of internal ions is generated by statistical dissociation, terminal ions are predicted to account for at least 50% of the total ion current, regardless of protein size, if there are three backbone dissociations or fewer. Top-down analysis should therefore be a viable approach for examining proteins of significant size. Comparison of the purely statistical analysis with actual top-down data derived from ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) and higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) reveals that terminal ions account for much of the total ion current in both experiments. Terminal ion production is more favored in UVPD relative to HCD, which is likely due to differences in the mechanisms controlling fragmentation. Importantly, internal ions are not found to dominate from either the theoretical or experimental point of view. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Top-down proteomics for the analysis of proteolytic events - Methods, applications and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholey, Andreas; Becker, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics is an indispensable tool for almost all research areas relevant for the understanding of proteolytic processing, ranging from the identification of substrates, products and cleavage sites up to the analysis of structural features influencing protease activity. The majority of methods for these studies are based on bottom-up proteomics performing analysis at peptide level. As this approach is characterized by a number of pitfalls, e.g. loss of molecular information, there is an ongoing effort to establish top-down proteomics, performing separation and MS analysis both at intact protein level. We briefly introduce major approaches of bottom-up proteomics used in the field of protease research and highlight the shortcomings of these methods. We then discuss the present state-of-the-art of top-down proteomics. Together with the discussion of known challenges we show the potential of this approach and present a number of successful applications of top-down proteomics in protease research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis as a Regulatory Event in Pathophysiology edited by Stefan Rose-John. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mass Spectrometric Characteristics of Prenylated Indole Derivatives from Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. NH-SL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2017-03-22

    Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze the mass spectrometric characteristics of the isolated compounds as well as the crude extracts. As a result, three other analogs were detected, and their structures were deduced according to the similar fragmentation patterns. This is the first systematic report on the mass spectrometric characteristics of prenylated indole derivatives.

  2. Structure elucidation of metabolite x17299 by interpretation of mass spectrometric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qibo; Ford, Lisa A; Evans, Anne M; Toal, Douglas R

    2017-01-01

    A major bottleneck in metabolomic studies is metabolite identification from accurate mass spectrometric data. Metabolite x17299 was identified in plasma as an unknown in a metabolomic study using a compound-centric approach where the associated ion features of the compound were used to determine the true molecular mass. The aim of this work is to elucidate the chemical structure of x17299, a new compound by de novo interpretation of mass spectrometric data. An Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer was used for acquisition of mass spectra up to MS 4 at high resolution. Synthetic standards of N,N,N -trimethyl-l-alanyl-l-proline betaine (l,l-TMAP), a diastereomer, and an enantiomer were chemically prepared. The planar structure of x17299 was successfully proposed by de novo mechanistic interpretation of mass spectrometric data without any laborious purification and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. The proposed structure was verified by deuterium exchanged mass spectrometric analysis and confirmed by comparison to a synthetic standard. Relative configuration of x17299 was determined by direct chromatographic comparison to a pair of synthetic diastereomers. Absolute configuration was assigned after derivatization of x17299 with a chiral auxiliary group followed by its chromatographic comparison to a pair of synthetic standards. The chemical structure of metabolite x17299 was determined to be l,l-TMAP.

  3. Top-Down Enterprise Application Integration with Reference Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem-Jan van den Heuvel

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available For Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP systems such as SAP R/3 or IBM SanFrancisco, the tailoring of reference models for customizing the ERP systems to specific organizational contexts is an established approach. In this paper, we present a methodology that uses such reference models as a starting point for a top-down integration of enterprise applications. The re-engineered models of legacy systems are individually linked via cross-mapping specifications to the forward-engineered reference model's specification. The actual linking of reference and legacy models is done with a methodology for connecting (new business objects with (old legacy systems.

  4. Developing Multi-Level Institutions from Top-Down Ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Dowsley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The academic literature contains numerous examples of the failures of both top-down and bottom-up common pool resource management frameworks. Many authors agree that management regimes instead need to utilize a multi-level governance approach to meet diverse objectives in management. However, many currently operating systems do not have that history. This paper explores the conversion of ancestral top-down regimes to complex systems involving multiple scales, levels and objectives through the management of the polar bear (Ursus maritimus in its five range countries. The less successful polar bear management systems continue to struggle with the challenges of developing institutions with the capacity to learn and change, addressing multiple objectives while recognizing the conservation backbone to management, and matching the institutional scale with biophysical, economic and social scales. The comparatively successful institutions incorporate these features, but reveal on-going problems with vertical links that are partially dealt with through the creation of links to other groups.

  5. Top-down contextual knowledge guides visual attention in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummeltshammer, Kristen; Amso, Dima

    2017-10-26

    The visual context in which an object or face resides can provide useful top-down information for guiding attention orienting, object recognition, and visual search. Although infants have demonstrated sensitivity to covariation in spatial arrays, it is presently unclear whether they can use rapidly acquired contextual knowledge to guide attention during visual search. In this eye-tracking experiment, 6- and 10-month-old infants searched for a target face hidden among colorful distracter shapes. Targets appeared in Old or New visual contexts, depending on whether the visual search arrays (defined by the spatial configuration, shape and color of component items in the search display) were repeated or newly generated throughout the experiment. Targets in Old contexts appeared in the same location within the same configuration, such that context covaried with target location. Both 6- and 10-month-olds successfully distinguished between Old and New contexts, exhibiting faster search times, fewer looks at distracters, and more anticipation of targets when contexts repeated. This initial demonstration of contextual cueing effects in infants indicates that they can use top-down information to facilitate orienting during memory-guided visual search. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Top-Down Control of Diesel-Degrading Prokaryotic Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Caroline; Böttjer, Daniela; Talarmin, Agathe; Guigue, Catherine; Conan, Pascal; Pujo-Pay, Mireille; Ghiglione, Jean-François

    2015-08-01

    Biostimulation through the addition of inorganic nutrients has been the most widely practiced bioremediation strategy in oil-polluted marine waters. However, little attention has so far been paid to the microbial food web and the impact of top-down control that directly or indirectly influences the success of the bioremediation. We designed a mesocosm experiment using pre-filtered (diesel fuel. Prokaryotes, HNF and VLP abundances showed a predator-prey succession, with a co-development of HNF and VLP. In the polluted system, we observed a stronger impact of viral lysis on prokaryotic abundances than in the control. Analysis of the diversity revealed that a bloom of Vibrio sp. occurred in the polluted mesocosm. That bloom was rapidly followed by a less abundant and more even community of predation-resistant bacteria, including known hydrocarbon degraders such as Oleispira spp. and Methylophaga spp. and opportunistic bacteria such as Percisivirga spp., Roseobacter spp. and Phaeobacter spp. The shift in prokaryotic dominance in response to viral lysis provided clear evidence of the 'killing the winner' model. Nevertheless, despite clear effects on prokaryotic abundance, activity and diversity, the diesel degradation was not impacted by top-down control. The present study investigates for the first time the functioning of a complex microbial network (including VLP) using a nutrient-based biostimulation strategy and highlights some key processes useful for tailoring bioremediation.

  7. Afterimages are biased by top-down information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, Sandra; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2015-01-01

    The afterimage illusion refers to a complementary colored image continuing to appear in the observer's vision after the exposure to the original image has ceased. It is assumed to be a phenomenon of the primary visual pathway, caused by overstimulation of photoreceptors of the retina. The aim of the present study was to investigate the nature of afterimage perceptions; mainly whether it is a mere physical, that is, low-level effect or whether it can be modulated by top-down processes, that is, high-level processes. Participants were first exposed to five either strongly female or male faces (Experiment 1), objects highly associated with female or male gender (Experiment 2) or female versus male names (Experiment 3), followed by a negativated image of a gender-neutral face which had to be fixated for 20s to elicit an afterimage. Participants had to rate their afterimages according to sexual dimorphism, showing that the afterimage of the gender-neutral face was perceived as significantly more female in the female priming condition compared with the male priming condition, independently of the priming quality (faces, objects, and names). Our results documented, in addition to previously presumed bottom-up mechanisms, a prominent influence of top-down processing on the perception of afterimages via priming mechanisms (female primes led to more female afterimage perception). © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Goal-directed control with cortical units that are gated by both top-down feedback and oscillatory coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Robert R.; Grayden, David B.; Thomas, Doreen A.; Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony N.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is able to flexibly select behaviors that adapt to both its environment and its present goals. This cognitive control is understood to occur within the hierarchy of the cortex and relies strongly on the prefrontal and premotor cortices, which sit at the top of this hierarchy. Pyramidal neurons, the principal neurons in the cortex, have been observed to exhibit much stronger responses when they receive inputs at their soma/basal dendrites that are coincident with inputs at their apical dendrites. This corresponds to inputs from both lower-order regions (feedforward) and higher-order regions (feedback), respectively. In addition to this, coherence between oscillations, such as gamma oscillations, in different neuronal groups has been proposed to modulate and route communication in the brain. In this paper, we develop a simple, but novel, neural mass model in which cortical units (or ensembles) exhibit gamma oscillations when they receive coherent oscillatory inputs from both feedforward and feedback connections. By forming these units into circuits that can perform logic operations, we identify the different ways in which operations can be initiated and manipulated by top-down feedback. We demonstrate that more sophisticated and flexible top-down control is possible when the gain of units is modulated by not only top-down feedback but by coherence between the activities of the oscillating units. With these types of units, it is possible to not only add units to, or remove units from, a higher-level unit's logic operation using top-down feedback, but also to modify the type of role that a unit plays in the operation. Finally, we explore how different network properties affect top-down control and processing in large networks. Based on this, we make predictions about the likely connectivities between certain brain regions that have been experimentally observed to be involved in goal-directed behavior and top-down attention. PMID:25152715

  9. Goal-directed control with cortical units that are gated by both top-down feedback and oscillatory coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R. Kerr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The brain is able to flexibly select behaviors that adapt to both its environment and its present goals. This cognitive control is understood to occur within the hierarchy of the cortex and relies strongly on the prefrontal and premotor cortices, which sit at the top of this hierarchy. Pyramidal neurons, the principal neurons in the cortex, have been observed to exhibit much stronger responses when they receive inputs at their soma/basal dendrites that are coincident with inputs at their apical dendrites. This corresponds to inputs from both lower-order regions (feedforward and higher-order regions (feedback, respectively. In addition to this, coherence between oscillations, such as gamma oscillations, in different neuronal groups has been proposed to modulate and route communication in the brain. In this paper, we develop a simple, but novel, neural mass model in which cortical units (or ensembles exhibit gamma oscillations when they receive coherent oscillatory inputs from both feedforward and feedback connections. By forming these units into circuits that can perform logic operations, we identify the different ways in which operations can be initiated and manipulated by top-down feedback. We demonstrate that more sophisticated and flexible top-down control is possible when the gain of units is modulated by not only top-down feedback but by coherence between the activities of the oscillating units. With these types of units, it is possible to not only add units to, or remove units from, a higher-level unit's logic operation using top-down feedback, but also to modify the type of role that a unit plays in the operation. Finally, we explore how different network properties affect top-down control and processing in large networks. Based on this, we make predictions about the likely connectivities between certain brain regions that have been experimentally observed to be involved in goal-directed behavior and top-down attention.

  10. Conflict-Triggered Top-Down Control: Default Mode, Last Resort, or No Such Thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    The conflict monitoring account posits that globally high levels of conflict trigger engagement of top-down control; however, recent findings point to the mercurial nature of top-down control in high conflict contexts. The current study examined the potential moderating effect of associative learning on conflict-triggered top-down control…

  11. An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-04-15

    Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

  12. On the Origin of Microheterogeneity : A Mass Spectrometric Study of Dimethyl Sulfoxide-Water Binary Mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shin, Dong Nam; Wijnen, Jan W.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Wakisaka, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the microscopic solvent structure of dimethyl sulfoxide-water mixtures and its influence on the solvation structure of solute from a clustering point of View, by means of a specially designed mass spectrometric system. It was observed that the propensity to the cluster formation is

  13. Retrospective detection of exposure to organophosphorus anti-cholinesterases: Mass spectrometric analysis of phosphylated human butyrylcholinesterase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fidder, A.; Hulst, A.G.; Noort, D.; Ruiter, R. de; Schans, M.J. van der; Benschop, H.P.; Langenberg, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a novel and general procedure is presented for detection of organophosphate-inhibited human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE), which is based on electrospray tandem mass spectrometric analysis of phosphylated nonapeptides obtained after pepsin digestion of the enzyme. The utility of this

  14. Mass spectrometric identification of isocyanate-induced modifications of keratins in human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, A.G.; Verstappen, D.R.W.; Riet-van Oeveren, D. van der; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Noort, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the current paper we show that exposure of human callus to isocyanates leads to covalent modifications within keratin proteins. Mass spectrometric analyses of pronase digests of keratin isolated from exposed callus show that both mono- and di-adducts (for di-isocyanates) are predominantly formed

  15. Top-Down Historical Phonology of Rote-Meto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Edwards

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the historical phonology of the Rote-Meto languages through a top-down perspective. It describes the sound changes which have taken place between Proto-Malayo-Polynesian and the present-day languages. This reveals a number of shared innovations between Meto and the languages of west Rote, as well as changes shared by the other languages of Rote. Thus, a West Rote-Meto subgroup is identified, as well as a Nuclear Rote subgroup. Within Austronesian, there are phonological innovations shared between Rote-Meto and a number of languages of Timor and surrounding islands. This provides evidence for a Timor-Wetar-Babar subgroup, though this group does not include all languages of Timor.

  16. Combining bottom-up and top-down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, Christoph; Rutherford, Thomas F.

    2008-01-01

    We motivate the formulation of market equilibrium as a mixed complementarity problem which explicitly represents weak inequalities and complementarity between decision variables and equilibrium conditions. The complementarity format permits an energy-economy model to combine technological detail of a bottom-up energy system with a second-best characterization of the over-all economy. Our primary objective is pedagogic. We first lay out the complementarity features of economic equilibrium and demonstrate how we can integrate bottom-up activity analysis into a top-down representation of the broader economy. We then provide a stylized numerical example of an integrated model - within both static and dynamic settings. Finally, we present illustrative applications to three themes figuring prominently on the energy policy agenda of many industrialized countries: nuclear phase-out, green quotas, and environmental tax reforms

  17. Combining bottom-up and top-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph [Department of Economics, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim (Germany); Rutherford, Thomas F. [Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2008-03-15

    We motivate the formulation of market equilibrium as a mixed complementarity problem which explicitly represents weak inequalities and complementarity between decision variables and equilibrium conditions. The complementarity format permits an energy-economy model to combine technological detail of a bottom-up energy system with a second-best characterization of the over-all economy. Our primary objective is pedagogic. We first lay out the complementarity features of economic equilibrium and demonstrate how we can integrate bottom-up activity analysis into a top-down representation of the broader economy. We then provide a stylized numerical example of an integrated model - within both static and dynamic settings. Finally, we present illustrative applications to three themes figuring prominently on the energy policy agenda of many industrialized countries: nuclear phase-out, green quotas, and environmental tax reforms. (author)

  18. Factors That Modulate Neurogenesis: A Top-Down Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDage, Lara D

    2016-08-24

    Although hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult brain has been conserved across the vertebrate lineage, laboratory studies have primarily examined this phenomenon in rodent models. This approach has been successful in elucidating important factors and mechanisms that can modulate rates of hippocampal neurogenesis, including hormones, environmental complexity, learning and memory, motor stimulation, and stress. However, recent studies have found that neurobiological research on neurogenesis in rodents may not easily translate to, or explain, neurogenesis patterns in nonrodent systems, particularly in species examined in the field. This review examines some of the evolutionary and ecological variables that may also modulate neurogenesis patterns. This 'top-down' and more naturalistic approach, which incorporates ecology and natural history, particularly of nonmodel species, may allow for a more comprehensive understanding of the functional significance of neurogenesis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Piezoresistance of top-down suspended Si nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koumela, A; Mercier, D; Dupre, C; Jourdan, G; Marcoux, C; Ollier, E; Duraffourg, L; Purcell, S T

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the gauge factor of suspended, top-down silicon nanowires are presented. The nanowires are fabricated with a CMOS compatible process and with doping concentrations ranging from 2 x 10 20 down to 5 x 10 17 cm -3 . The extracted gauge factors are compared with results on identical non-suspended nanowires and with state-of-the-art results. An increase of the gauge factor after suspension is demonstrated. For the low doped nanowires a value of 235 is measured. Particular attention was paid throughout the experiments to distinguishing real resistance change due to strain modulation from resistance fluctuations due to charge trapping. Furthermore, a numerical model correlating surface charge density with the gauge factor is presented. Comparison of the simulations with experimental measurements shows the validity of this approach. These results contribute to a deeper understanding of the piezoresistive effect in Si nanowires.

  20. The measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of helium isotope in trace samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Mingliang

    1989-01-01

    An experiment study on the measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of helium isotope in the trace gaseous sample is discussed by using the gas purification line designed by the authors and model VG-5400 static-vacuum noble gas mass spectrometer imported and air helium as a standard. The results show that the amount of He and Ne in natural gas sample is 99% after purification. When the amount of He in Mass Spectrometer is more than 4 x 10 -7 cm 3 STP, it's sensitivity remains stable, about 10 -4 A/cm 3 STP He and the precision of 3 He/ 4 He ratio within the following 17 days is 1.32%. The 'ABA' pattern and experiment condition in the measurement of mass spectrometric peak height ratio of He isotope are presented

  1. Mass-spectrometric investigation of rare earth acetylacetonates dipivaloylmethanates and their adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrishzhuk, E.M.; Dzyubenko, N.G.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    Peculiarities of fragmentation of molecular ions of rare earth acetylacetonates and dipivaloylmethanates under mass-spectrometric investigation of these compounds as well as their adducts with o-phenanthroline, α,α'-dipyridyl, triphenylphosphine oxide are considered in the given review. Similar data for identical derivants of some transitions metals are presented. Data on potentials of appearance and dissociation energy of basic ions in mass-spectra of the studied β-diketonates are analyzed

  2. Assessing the Gap Between Top-down and Bottom-up Measured Methane Emissions in Indianapolis, IN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K.; Lamb, B. K.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Salmon, O. E.; Lavoie, T. N.; Lauvaux, T.; Ferrara, T.; Howard, T.; Edburg, S. L.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Releases of methane (CH4) from the natural gas supply chain in the United States account for approximately 30% of the total US CH4 emissions. However, there continues to be large questions regarding the accuracy of current emission inventories for methane emissions from natural gas usage. In this paper, we describe results from top-down and bottom-up measurements of methane emissions from the large isolated city of Indianapolis. The top-down results are based on aircraft mass balance and tower based inverse modeling methods, while the bottom-up results are based on direct component sampling at metering and regulating stations, surface enclosure measurements of surveyed pipeline leaks, and tracer/modeling methods for other urban sources. Mobile mapping of methane urban concentrations was also used to identify significant sources and to show an urban-wide low level enhancement of methane levels. The residual difference between top-down and bottom-up measured emissions is large and cannot be fully explained in terms of the uncertainties in top-down and bottom-up emission measurements and estimates. Thus, the residual appears to be, at least partly, attributed to a significant wide-spread diffusive source. Analyses are included to estimate the size and nature of this diffusive source.

  3. Reconciling Top-Down and Bottom-Up Estimates of Oil and Gas Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches that use aircraft, tower, or satellite-based measurements of well-mixed air to quantify regional methane emissions have typically estimated higher emissions from the natural gas supply chain when compared to bottom-up inventories. A coordinated research campaign in October 2013 used simultaneous top-down and bottom-up approaches to quantify total and fossil methane emissions in the Barnett Shale region of Texas. Research teams have published individual results including aircraft mass-balance estimates of regional emissions and a bottom-up, 25-county region spatially-resolved inventory. This work synthesizes data from the campaign to directly compare top-down and bottom-up estimates. A new analytical approach uses statistical estimators to integrate facility emission rate distributions from unbiased and targeted high emission site datasets, which more rigorously incorporates the fat-tail of skewed distributions to estimate regional emissions of well pads, compressor stations, and processing plants. The updated spatially-resolved inventory was used to estimate total and fossil methane emissions from spatial domains that match seven individual aircraft mass balance flights. Source apportionment of top-down emissions between fossil and biogenic methane was corroborated with two independent analyses of methane and ethane ratios. Reconciling top-down and bottom-up estimates of fossil methane emissions leads to more accurate assessment of natural gas supply chain emission rates and the relative contribution of high emission sites. These results increase our confidence in our understanding of the climate impacts of natural gas relative to more carbon-intensive fossil fuels and the potential effectiveness of mitigation strategies.

  4. Terverticillate Penicillia studied by direct electrospray mass spectrometric profiling of crude extracts: I. Chemosystematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsgaard, Jørn; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    1997-01-01

    ) and Yeast Extract Sucrose agar (YES) directly into the electrospray source of the mass spectrometer. A data matrix was made from each substrate by transferring the complete centroid mass spectrum from 200 to 700 amu as 501 variables to individual columns. No attempt was made to identify ions in the mass......A chemosystematic study of 339 isolates from all known terverticillate Penicillium taxa was performed using electrospray mass spectrometric analysis of extractable metabolites. The mass profiles were made by injecting crude plug extracts made from cultures grown on Czapek Yeast Autolysate agar (CYA...

  5. The interlaboratory experiment IDA-72 on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Drosselmeyer, E.

    1975-07-01

    Volume II of the report on the IDA-72 experiment contains papers written by different authors on a number of special topics connected with the preparation, performance and evaluation of the interlaboratory test. In detail the sampling procedures for active samples of the reprocessing plant and the preparation of inactive reference and spike solution from standard material are described as well as new methods of sample conditioning by evaporation. An extra chapter is devoted to the chemical sample treatment as a preparation for mass spectrometric analysis of the U and Pu content of the solutions. Special topics are also methods for mass discrimination corrections, α-spectrometer measurements as a supplement for the determination of Pu-238 and the comparison of concentration determinations by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis with those performed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The last part of this volume contains papers connected with the computerized statistical evaluation of the high number of data. (orig.) [de

  6. Mirion--a software package for automatic processing of mass spectrometric images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, C; Leisner, A; Hester, A; Maass, K; Guenther, S; Bouschen, W; Spengler, B

    2013-08-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) techniques are of growing interest for the Life Sciences. In recent years, the development of new instruments employing ion sources that are tailored for spatial scanning allowed the acquisition of large data sets. A subsequent data processing, however, is still a bottleneck in the analytical process, as a manual data interpretation is impossible within a reasonable time frame. The transformation of mass spectrometric data into spatial distribution images of detected compounds turned out to be the most appropriate method to visualize the results of such scans, as humans are able to interpret images faster and easier than plain numbers. Image generation, thus, is a time-consuming and complex yet very efficient task. The free software package "Mirion," presented in this paper, allows the handling and analysis of data sets acquired by mass spectrometry imaging. Mirion can be used for image processing of MSI data obtained from many different sources, as it uses the HUPO-PSI-based standard data format imzML, which is implemented in the proprietary software of most of the mass spectrometer companies. Different graphical representations of the recorded data are available. Furthermore, automatic calculation and overlay of mass spectrometric images promotes direct comparison of different analytes for data evaluation. The program also includes tools for image processing and image analysis.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of tropomyosin isoforms in skeletal muscles by top-down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yutong; Peng, Ying; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wei, Liming; Hacker, Timothy A; Larsson, Lars; Ge, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are heterogeneous in nature and are capable of performing various functions. Tropomyosin (Tpm) is a major component of the thin filament in skeletal muscles and plays an important role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation. Tpm is known to consist of multiple isoforms resulting from different encoding genes and alternative splicing, along with post-translational modifications. However, a systematic characterization of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles is still lacking. Therefore, we employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to identify and characterize Tpm isoforms present in different skeletal muscles from multiple species, including swine, rat, and human. Our study revealed that Tpm1.1 and Tpm2.2 are the two major Tpm isoforms in swine and rat skeletal muscles, whereas Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2, and Tpm3.12 are present in human skeletal muscles. Tandem MS was utilized to identify the sequences of the major Tpm isoforms. Furthermore, quantitative analysis revealed muscle-type specific differences in the abundance of un-modified and modified Tpm isoforms in rat and human skeletal muscles. This study represents the first systematic investigation of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles, which not only demonstrates the capabilities of top-down MS for the comprehensive characterization of skeletal myofilament proteins but also provides the basis for further studies on these Tpm isoforms in muscle-related diseases.

  8. Electrochemistry-assisted top-down characterization of disulfide-containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2012-04-17

    Covalent disulfide bond linkage in a protein represents an important challenge for mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down protein structure analysis as it reduces the backbone cleavage efficiency for MS/MS dissociation. This study presents a strategy for solving this critical issue via integrating electrochemistry (EC) online with a top-down MS approach. In this approach, proteins undergo electrolytic reduction in an electrochemical cell to break disulfide bonds and then undergo online ionization into gaseous ions for analysis by electron-capture dissociation (ECD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). The electrochemical reduction of proteins allows one to remove disulfide bond constraints and also leads to increased charge numbers of the resulting protein ions. As a result, sequence coverage was significantly enhanced, as exemplified by β-lactoglobulin A (24 vs 75 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively) and lysozyme (5 vs 66 backbone cleavages before and after electrolytic reduction, respectively). This methodology is fast and does not need chemical reductants, which would have an important impact in high-throughput proteomics research.

  9. Vaporization of niobium dioxide by mass-effusion and mass-spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamegashira, N.; Matsui, T.; Harada, M.; Naito, K.

    1981-01-01

    The congruence of the vaporization process of NbO, NbO 2 , Nb 12 O 29 and Nb 2 O 5 in the niobium-oxygen system was investigated from the phase change of the solid residue after vaporization, and it was observed that only the NbO 2 phase vaporizes congruently. The vapor pressures over NbO 2 (s) were measured by means of a combination of mass-effusion (weight loss measurement) and mass-spectrometric methods in the temperature range 1953-2323 K. By applying the second and the third law treatments of thermodynamics to the partial pressures of the gaseous species NbO 2 (g), NbO(g) and O(g), the enthalpies of vaporization for the reactions NbO 2 (s,1)=NbO 2 (g) and NbO 2 (s,1)=NbO(g)+O(g), were calculated. From these data the enthalpies of formation and the dissociation energies of NbO 2 (g) and NbO(g) were also determined. The uncertainties included in the third law treatment were discussed, and the results calculated by the third law treatment using the most reliable data available at present were presented. (orig.)

  10. A top-down perspective on dopamine, motivation and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anthony G; Vacca, Giada; Ahn, Soyon

    2008-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) activity, in the form of increased neural firing or enhanced release of transmitter from nerve terminals and varicosities, is linked to a number of important psychological processes including: movement; hedonic reactions to positive reward; provision of an error detection signal during the acquisition of new learning; response to novel stimuli; provision of reinforcement signals essential for acquisition of new action patterns; and incentive motivation. This review focuses primarily on our research linking dynamic changes in DA efflux on the timescale of minutes, with incentive motivation, as revealed by brain dialysis experiments in behaving animals. Recent experiments on sensory-specific satiety and successive positive and negative contrast are discussed along with the distinction between preparatory behaviors that precede contact with biologically significant stimuli and subsequent consummatory behaviors. The relationship between DA efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and foraging for food based on working memory is also discussed in support of the conjecture that DA may serve as a link between motivation and memory functions. Evidence in support of 'top-down' regulation of dopaminergic activity in the mesocorticolimbic DA pathways is reviewed briefly to introduce a mechanism by which activation of ascending DA projections in this manner might optimize dopaminergic modulation of executive function within regions such as the mPFC. Collectively, these processes could ensure coordination between cognitive processes that assess current opportunities and the motivational systems that select and engage patterns of approach behavior that bring organisms into contact with the essentials for survival.

  11. Stability of Polymer Ultrathin Films (Top-Down Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Jayanta Kumar; Beuvier, Thomas; Unni, Aparna Beena; Chavez Panduro, Elvia Anabela; Vignaud, Guillaume; Delorme, Nicolas; Chebil, Mohamed Souheib; Grohens, Yves; Gibaud, Alain

    2015-08-25

    In polymer physics, the dewetting of spin-coated polystyrene ultrathin films on silicon remains mysterious. By adopting a simple top-down method based on good solvent rinsing, we are able to prepare flat polystyrene films with a controlled thickness ranging from 1.3 to 7.0 nm. Their stability was scrutinized after a classical annealing procedure above the glass transition temperature. Films were found to be stable on oxide-free silicon irrespective of film thickness, while they were unstable (2.9 nm) on 2 nm oxide-covered silicon substrates. The Lifshitz-van der Waals intermolecular theory that predicts the domains of stability as a function of the film thickness and of the substrate nature is now fully reconciled with our experimental observations. We surmise that this reconciliation is due to the good solvent rinsing procedure that removes the residual stress and/or the density variation of the polystyrene films inhibiting thermodynamically the dewetting on oxide-free silicon.

  12. New FORTRAN computer programs to acquire and process isotopic mass-spectrometric data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1982-08-01

    The computer programs described in New Computer Programs to Acquire and Process Isotopic Mass Spectrometric Data have been revised. This report describes in some detail the operation of these programs, which acquire and process isotopic mass spectrometric data. Both functional and overall design aspects are addressed. The three basic program units - file manipulation, data acquisition, and data processing - are discussed in turn. Step-by-step instructions are included where appropriate, and each subsection is described in enough detail to give a clear picture of its function. Organization of file structure, which is central to the entire concept, is extensively discussed with the help of numerous tables. Appendices contain flow charts and outline file structure to help a programmer unfamiliar with the programs to alter them with a minimum of lost time

  13. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade boron carbide powder and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Total Carbon by Combustion and Gravimetry 7-17 Total Boron by Titrimetry 18-28 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 29-38 Chloride and Fluoride Separation by Pyrohydrolysis 39-45 Chloride by Constant-Current Coulometry 46-54 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 55-63 Water by Constant-Voltage Coulometry 64-72 Impurities by Spectrochemical Analysis 73-81 Soluble Boron by Titrimetry 82-95 Soluble Carbon by a Manometric Measurement 96-105 Metallic Impurities by a Direct Reader Spectrometric Method 106-114

  14. Combining Top-down and Bottom-up Accountability: Evidence from a Bribery Experiment.

    OpenAIRE

    Danila Serra

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring corruption typically relies on top-down interventions aimed at increasing the probability of external controls and the severity of punishment. An alternative approach to fighting corruption is to induce bottom-up pressure for reform. Recent studies have shown that both top-down and bottom-up mechanisms are rarely able to keep service providers accountable. This paper investigates the effectiveness of an accountability system that combines bottom-up monitoring and top-down auditing ...

  15. Top-Down Budgeting—An Instrument to Strengthen Budget Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gösta Ljungman

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the rationale for a top-down approach to budget preparation and approval, and discusses some factors that have to be considered when reorienting the budget process along these lines. The paper argues that the sequence in which budgetary decisions are taken matters, and that a strong top-down approach strengthens fiscal discipline and improves policy prioritization and coordination. Top-down budgeting also alters the division of roles and responsibilities between the centra...

  16. Conflict-Triggered Top-Down Control: Default Mode, Last Resort, or No Such Thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    The conflict monitoring account posits that globally high levels of conflict trigger engagement of top-down control; however, recent findings point to the mercurial nature of top-down control in high conflict contexts. The current study examined the potential moderating effect of associative learning on conflict-triggered top-down control engagement by testing the Associations as Antagonists to Top-Down Control (AATC) hypothesis. In 4 experiments, list-wide proportion congruence was manipulated, and conflict-triggered top-down control engagement was examined by comparing interference for 50% congruent items across mostly congruent (low conflict) and mostly incongruent (high conflict) lists. Despite the fact that global levels of conflict were varied identically across experiments, evidence of conflict-triggered top-down control engagement was selective to those experiments in which responses could not be predicted on the majority of trials via simple associative learning, consistent with the AATC hypothesis. In a fifth experiment, older adults showed no evidence of top-down control engagement under conditions in which young adults did, a finding that refined the interpretation of the patterns observed in the prior experiments. Collectively, these findings suggest that top-down control engagement in high conflict contexts is neither the default mode nor an unused (or non-existent) strategy. Top-down control is best characterized as a last resort that is engaged when reliance on one’s environment, and in particular associative responding, is unproductive for achieving task goals. PMID:24274385

  17. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs

  18. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, S L [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Oligomers in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Azurin Solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokolová, L.; Williamson, H.; Sýkora, Jan; Hof, Martin; Gray, H. B.; Brutschy, B.; Vlček, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 16 (2011), s. 4790-4800 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10124; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : mass spectrometry * oligomers * pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin solutions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  20. Mass-spectrometric exploration of proteome structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aebersold, Ruedi; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    , the structures and functions of selected proteins have been studied using biochemical and biophysical methods. However, the properties and behaviour of the proteome as an integrated system have largely remained elusive. Powerful mass-spectrometry-based technologies now provide unprecedented insights...

  1. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and their metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongfa; Chan, Kenneth K; Wang, Jeffrey J

    2005-01-01

    A detailed multi-stage (MSn) fragmentation study of cyclophosphamide (CP), ifosfamide (IF) and their major metabolites, using an ion-trap mass spectrometer and a Q-TOF mass spectrometer, was performed with the aid of specifically deuterium-labeled analogs. The analytes showed good responses in positive-ion electrospray mass spectrometry as [MH]+ ions. Tandem mass spectra revealed a wealth of structurally specific ions, allowing characterization of the fragmentation pathways of these analytes. The major fragmentation pathways of the protonated CP and IF are elimination of ethylene from C5 and C6 of 1,3,2-oxazaphosphorine-2-oxide via a McLafferty rearrangement, and cleavage of the P-N bond. However, their activated 4-OOH and 4-OH metabolites primarily underwent hydrogen peroxide elimination and dehydration, respectively, followed by fragmentation pathways similar to those of CP and IF. These results should prove useful in structural elucidation of future analogs of CP and IF, and/or of their metabolites. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mass spectrometric analysis of helium in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, Hiroto; Wada, Yukio; Asakura, Yoshiro; Tsuji, Nobuo; Sato, Hitoshi; Tsutsumi, Kenichi

    1974-01-01

    Vacuum fusion mass-spectrometry was adopted for the analysis of helium in stainless steel. Samples were heated in a vacuum crucible, and helium in the samples was extracted and collected into a reservoir tank. The gas was then introduced through an orifice into a mass spectrometer, where the amount of helium was determined. The maspeq 070 quadrupole type mass spectrometer made by Shimazu Seisakusho, Ltd. was used. The resolving power was 150, and the mass range of the apparatus was 0-150. The determination limit of helium was about 2 x 10 -3 μg when standard helium gas was analyzed, and was about 10 -2 μg when the helium in stainless steel was analyzed. The relative standard deviation of helium intensity in repetitive measurement was about 2% in the amount of helium of 0.05 μg. Helium was injected into stainless steel by means of alpha particle irradiation with a cyclotron. The amount of helium in stainless steel was then determined. The energy of alpha particles was 34 MeV, and the beam area was 10 mm x 10 mm. The experimental data were higher than the expected value in one case, and were lower in the other case. This difference was attributable to the fluctuation of alpha particle beam, misplacement of sample plates, and unevenness of the alpha beam. (Fukutomi, T.)

  3. Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Essential Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the essential oil composition of the flower of Jasminum officinale L. var. grandifloroum L. (Jasminum grandiflorum) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods: The optimum GC-MS conditions used for the analysis were 250 oC inlet temperature, 150 oC MSD detector temperature, ...

  4. Classification of terverticillate Penicillia by electrospray mass spectrometric profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsgaard, Jørn; Hansen, Michael Edberg; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2004-01-01

    429 isolates of 58 species belonging to Penicillium subgenus Penicillium are classified from direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry (diMS) analysis of crude extracts by automated data processing. The study shows that about 70% of the species can be classified correctly into species using...

  5. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieffer, Gregg Martin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a

  6. Top-Down Proteomics and Direct Surface Sampling of Neonatal Dried Blood Spots: Diagnosis of Unknown Hemoglobin Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rebecca L.; Griffiths, Paul; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2012-11-01

    We have previously shown that liquid microjunction surface sampling of dried blood spots coupled with high resolution top-down mass spectrometry may be used for screening of common hemoglobin variants HbS, HbC, and HbD. In order to test the robustness of the approach, we have applied the approach to unknown hemoglobin variants. Six neonatal dried blood spot samples that had been identified as variants, but which could not be diagnosed by current screening methods, were analyzed by direct surface sampling top-down mass spectrometry. Both collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry were employed. Four of the samples were identified as β-chain variants: two were heterozygous Hb D-Iran, one was heterozygous Hb Headington, and one was heterozygous Hb J-Baltimore. The fifth sample was identified as the α-chain variant heterozygous Hb Phnom Penh. Analysis of the sixth sample suggested that it did not in fact contain a variant. Adoption of the approach in the clinic would require speed in both data collection and interpretation. To address that issue, we have compared manual data analysis with freely available data analysis software (ProsightPTM). The results demonstrate the power of top-down proteomics for hemoglobin variant analysis in newborn samples.

  7. Mass spectrometric production of heterogeneous metal clusters using Knudsen cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljković Filip M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry or high-temperature method of mass spectrometry for decades gives new information about saturated vapor of hardly volatile compounds and it is an important method in the discovery of many new molecules, radicals, ions and clusters present in the gas phase. Since pioneering works until now, this method has been successfully applied to a large number of systems (ores, oxides, ceramics, glass materials, borides, carbides, sulfides, nitrates, metals, fullerenes, etc which led to the establishment of various research branches such as chemistry of clusters. This paper describes the basic principles of Knudsen cell use for both identification of chemical species created in the process of evaporation and determination of their ionization energies. Depending on detected ions intensities and the partial pressure of each gaseous component, as well as on changes in partial pressure with temperature, Knudsen cell mass spectrometry enables the determination of thermodynamic parameters of the tested system. A special attention is paid to its application in the field of small heterogeneous and homogeneous clusters of alkali metals. Furthermore, experimental results for thermodynamic parameters of some clusters, as well as capabilities of non-standard ways of using Knudsen cells in the process of synthesis of new clusters are presented herein. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172019

  8. Mass-spectrometric study of thermodynamics of lithium molybdate evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanas, E.K.; Samojlova, O.I.; Astakhova, G.K.; Ovchinnikova, O.A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaporation of lithium molybdate in 1403-1504 K range was investigated by the method og high-temperature mass-spectrometry. It was established that Li 2 MoO 4 (g), Li 2 O(g), MoO 3 (g) molecules were present during Li 2 MoO 4 (l) evaporation in gaseous phase. Heat of formation of Li 2 MoO 4 (g) molecule was calculated. Heat of LiMoO 4 (sol) sublimation was determined with the use of thermodynamics law [ru

  9. Mass spectrometric diagnosis of an atmospheric pressure helium microplasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, K; Oh, J-S; Walsh, J L; Bradley, J W

    2013-01-01

    Ambient molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) has been used to study how different capillary widths (530 µm and 2.4 mm) and excitation waveforms (continuous wave kHz and pulsed dc) affect the ionic composition of atmospheric pressure plasma jets. It is shown from time-averaged ion intensities that reducing the width of the jet capillary results in a significant increase in the variety of both positive and negative ions detected within the discharge. We discuss this in terms of changes in flow velocity and the onset of turbulence within the plasma plume. Changing the mode of excitation had little effect on the ionic species detected from the microplasma jet; however, there was a notable shift in dominance towards higher mass ions when operated in a continuous wave kHz mode. The temporal evolution of the ions within the microplasma jet was observed for both excitation sources, operated at 5 and 15 kHz. Positive ions were created during periods correlated with the positive and negative peaks in discharge current, while negative ions were predominantly created at times when the discharge current peak was negative. This phenomenon was independent of the driving waveform. For pulsed dc excitation, considerably fewer positive ions were created in periods related to the negative current peaks, especially at higher frequencies. We propose a simple explanation for these processes based on ideas of streamer propagation and the influence of self-induced electric fields in the plasma plume. (paper)

  10. Mass spectrometric analyses of organophosphate insecticide oxon protein adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Charles M; Prins, John M; George, Kathleen M

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) insecticides continue to be used to control insect pests. Acute and chronic exposures to OP insecticides have been documented to cause adverse health effects, but few OP-adducted proteins have been correlated with these illnesses at the molecular level. Our aim was to review the literature covering the current state of the art in mass spectrometry (MS) used to identify OP protein biomarkers. We identified general and specific research reports related to OP insecticides, OP toxicity, OP structure, and protein MS by searching PubMed and Chemical Abstracts for articles published before December 2008. A number of OP-based insecticides share common structural elements that result in predictable OP-protein adducts. The resultant OP-protein adducts show an increase in molecular mass that can be identified by MS and correlated with the OP agent. Customized OP-containing probes have also been used to tag and identify protein targets that can be identified by MS. MS is a useful and emerging tool for the identification of proteins that are modified by activated organophosphate insecticides. MS can characterize the structure of the OP adduct and also the specific amino acid residue that forms the key bond with the OP. Each protein that is modified in a unique way by an OP represents a unique molecular biomarker that with further research can lead to new correlations with exposure.

  11. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Preliminary Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Uranium on Environmental Swipe Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Chang-Sik; Jeong, Youn-Joong; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Shin, Hyung-Seon; Cha, Hyun-Ju; Ahn, Gil-Hoon; Park, Il-Jin; Min, Gyung-Sik

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions of safeguards samples are very useful to investigate the history of nuclear activities. To strengthen the capabilities of environmental sampling analysis in the ROK through MOST/DOE collaboration, round robin test for uranium and plutonium was designed in 2003. As the first round robin test, a set of dried uranium-containing solutions (∼35ng and (∼300ng) was distributed to the participating laboratories in November of 2003, with results reported in April of 2004. The KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute) and ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) are currently in the process of analyzing uranium on cotton swipes for the second round robin test. As a preliminary test for the second round, KBSI intends to analyze home-made swipe samples into which international uranium standards are added. Here we describe technical steps of sample preparation and mass spectrometry at KBSI, and report some results of the preliminary test

  13. Mass spectrometric based approaches in urine metabolomics and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Mona M; Adamko, Darryl J; El-Aneed, Anas

    2017-03-01

    Urine metabolomics has recently emerged as a prominent field for the discovery of non-invasive biomarkers that can detect subtle metabolic discrepancies in response to a specific disease or therapeutic intervention. Urine, compared to other biofluids, is characterized by its ease of collection, richness in metabolites and its ability to reflect imbalances of all biochemical pathways within the body. Following urine collection for metabolomic analysis, samples must be immediately frozen to quench any biogenic and/or non-biogenic chemical reactions. According to the aim of the experiment; sample preparation can vary from simple procedures such as filtration to more specific extraction protocols such as liquid-liquid extraction. Due to the lack of comprehensive studies on urine metabolome stability, higher storage temperatures (i.e. 4°C) and repetitive freeze-thaw cycles should be avoided. To date, among all analytical techniques, mass spectrometry (MS) provides the best sensitivity, selectivity and identification capabilities to analyze the majority of the metabolite composition in the urine. Combined with the qualitative and quantitative capabilities of MS, and due to the continuous improvements in its related technologies (i.e. ultra high-performance liquid chromatography [UPLC] and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography [HILIC]), liquid chromatography (LC)-MS is unequivocally the most utilized and the most informative analytical tool employed in urine metabolomics. Furthermore, differential isotope tagging techniques has provided a solution to ion suppression from urine matrix thus allowing for quantitative analysis. In addition to LC-MS, other MS-based technologies have been utilized in urine metabolomics. These include direct injection (infusion)-MS, capillary electrophoresis-MS and gas chromatography-MS. In this article, the current progresses of different MS-based techniques in exploring the urine metabolome as well as the recent findings in providing

  14. Towards a routine application of Top-Down approaches for label-free discovery workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Pierre-Olivier; Vialaret, Jerome; Wessels, Hans J C T; van Gool, Alain J; Lehmann, Sylvain; Gabelle, Audrey; Wood, Jason; Bern, Marshall; Paape, Rainer; Suckau, Detlev; Kruppa, Gary; Hirtz, Christophe

    2018-03-20

    Thanks to proteomics investigations, our vision of the role of different protein isoforms in the pathophysiology of diseases has largely evolved. The idea that protein biomarkers like tau, amyloid peptides, ApoE, cystatin, or neurogranin are represented in body fluids as single species is obviously over-simplified, as most proteins are present in different isoforms and subjected to numerous processing and post-translational modifications. Measuring the intact mass of proteins by MS has the advantage to provide information on the presence and relative amount of the different proteoforms. Such Top-Down approaches typically require a high degree of sample pre-fractionation to allow the MS system to deliver optimal performance in terms of dynamic range, mass accuracy and resolution. In clinical studies, however, the requirements for pre-analytical robustness and sample size large enough for statistical power restrict the routine use of a high degree of sample pre-fractionation. In this study, we have investigated the capacities of current-generation Ultra-High Resolution Q-Tof systems to deal with high complexity intact protein samples and have evaluated the approach on a cohort of patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease. Statistical analysis has shown that several proteoforms can be used to distinguish Alzheimer disease patients from patients suffering from other neurodegenerative disease. Top-down approaches have an extremely high biological relevance, especially when it comes to biomarker discovery, but the necessary pre-fractionation constraints are not easily compatible with the robustness requirements and the size of clinical sample cohorts. We have demonstrated that intact protein profiling studies could be run on UHR-Q-ToF with limited pre-fractionation. The proteoforms that have been identified as candidate biomarkers in the-proof-of concept study are derived from proteins known to play a role in the pathophysiology process of Alzheimer disease

  15. Transferring Codified Knowledge: Socio-Technical versus Top-Down Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Gustavo; Trivelato, Luiz F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyse and evaluate the transfer process of codified knowledge (CK) performed under two different approaches: the "socio-technical" and the "top-down". It is argued that the socio-technical approach supports the transfer of CK better than the top-down approach. Design/methodology/approach: Case study methodology was…

  16. Bottom-up vs. top-down effects on terrestrial insect herbivores: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Mayra C; Murphy, Shannon M

    2018-01-01

    Primary consumers are under strong selection from resource ('bottom-up') and consumer ('top-down') controls, but the relative importance of these selective forces is unknown. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the strength of top-down and bottom-up forces on consumer fitness, considering multiple predictors that can modulate these effects: diet breadth, feeding guild, habitat/environment, type of bottom-up effects, type of top-down effects and how consumer fitness effects are measured. We focused our analyses on the most diverse group of primary consumers, herbivorous insects, and found that in general top-down forces were stronger than bottom-up forces. Notably, chewing, sucking and gall-making herbivores were more affected by top-down than bottom-up forces, top-down forces were stronger than bottom-up in both natural and controlled (cultivated) environments, and parasitoids and predators had equally strong top-down effects on insect herbivores. Future studies should broaden the scope of focal consumers, particularly in understudied terrestrial systems, guilds, taxonomic groups and top-down controls (e.g. pathogens), and test for more complex indirect community interactions. Our results demonstrate the surprising strength of forces exerted by natural enemies on herbivorous insects, and thus the necessity of using a tri-trophic approach when studying insect-plant interactions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Establishing a campylobacter-free pig population through a top-down approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijtens, M.J.B.M.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Plas, J. van der

    2000-01-01

    Fattening pigs are often infected with campylobacter. To eliminate campylobacter from the pig population, a top-down approach, involving the breeding and reproduction farms, seems appropriate. In order to investigate the effectiveness of a top-down approach, sows' faeces from the following farms

  18. A review on the mass spectrometric studies of americium: Present status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Suresh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    The manuscript reviews the various mass spectrometric techniques for analysis and chemical studies of Americium. These methods include thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the determination of Am isotope ratios and concentration in nuclear fuel samples of interest in nuclear technology, and in complex biological and environmental samples. Ultra-sensitive mass spectrometric techniques of resonance-ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS), and accelerator-based mass spectrometry (AMS) are also discussed. The novel applications of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) to understand the solution chemistry of Am and other actinides are presented. These studies are important in view of the world-wide efforts to develop novel complexing agents to separate lanthanides and minor actinides (Am, Np, and Cm) for partitioning and transmutation of minor actinides from the point of view of nuclear waste management. These mass spectrometry experiments are also of great interest to examine the covalent character of actinides with increasing atomic number. Studies on gas-phase chemistry of Am and its oxides with Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS), Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), and laser-based experiments with reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (R-ToF) are highlighted. These studies are important to understand the fundamental chemistry of 5f electrons in actinides. Requirement of certified isotopic reference materials of Am to improve the accuracy of experimental nuclear data (e.g., the half-life of 243 Am) is emphasized. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mass spectrometric detection of 27-hydroxycholesterol in breast cancer exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg-Larsen, Hanne; Lund, Kaja; Seterdal, Kristina Erikstad; Solheim, Stian; Vehus, Tore; Solberg, Nina; Krauss, Stefan; Lundanes, Elsa; Wilson, Steven Ray

    2017-05-01

    Exosomes from cancer cells are rich sources of biomarkers and may contain elevated levels of lipids of diagnostic value. 27-Hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC) is associated with proliferation and metastasis in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the levels of 27-OHC, and other sidechain-hydroxylated oxysterols in exosomes. To study both cytoplasmic and exosomal oxysterol samples of limited size, we have developed a capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform that outperforms our previously published systems regarding chromatographic resolution, analysis time and sensitivity. In the analyzed samples, the quantified level of cytoplasmic 27-OHC using this platform fitted with mRNA levels of 27-OHC's corresponding enzyme, CYP27A1. We find clearly increased levels of 27-OHC in exosomes (i.e., enrichment) from an ER+ breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) compared to exosomes derived from an estrogen receptor (ER-) breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) and other control exosomes (non-cancerous cell line (HEK293) and human pooled serum). The exosomal oxysterol profile did not reflect cytoplasmic oxysterol profiles in the cells of origin; cytoplasmic 27-OHC was low in ER+ MCF-7 cells while high in MDA-MB-231 cells. Other control cancer cells showed varied cytoplasmic oxysterol levels. Hence, exosome profiling in cancer cells might provide complementary information with the possibility of diagnostic value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass spectrometric studies of fast pyrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenstein, John; Hurt, Matt; Murria, Priya; Easton, McKay; Choudhari, Harshavardhan; Yang, Linan; Riedeman, James; Carlsen, Mark; Nash, John; Agrawal, Rakesh; Delgass, W.; Ribeiro, Fabio; Kenttämaa, Hilkka

    2015-01-01

    A fast pyrolysis probe/linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer combination was used to study the primary fast pyrolysis products (those that first leave the hot pyrolysis surface) of cellulose, cellobiose, cellotriose, cellotetraose, cellopentaose, and cellohexaose, as well as of cellobiosan, cellotriosan, and cellopentosan, at 600°C. Similar products with different branching ratios were found for the oligosaccharides and cellulose, as reported previously. However, identical products (with the exception of two) with similar branching ratios were measured for cellotriosan (and cellopentosan) and cellulose. This result demonstrates that cellotriosan is an excellent small-molecule surrogate for studies of the fast pyrolysis of cellulose and also that most fast pyrolysis products of cellulose do not originate from the reducing end. Based on several observations, the fast pyrolysis of cellulose is suggested to initiate predominantly via two competing processes: the formation of anhydro-oligosaccharides, such as cellobiosan, cellotriosan, and cellopentosan (major route), and the elimination of glycolaldehyde (or isomeric) units from the reducing end of oligosaccharides formed from cellulose during fast pyrolysis.

  1. Sample handling for mass spectrometric proteomic investigations of human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Høgdall, Claus; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; T'jampens, Davy; Hellmann, Marja-Leena; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Fung, Eric T; Høgdall, Estrid

    2008-09-01

    Because of its non-invasive sample collection method, human urine is an attractive biological material both for discovering biomarkers and for use in future screening trials for different diseases. Before urine can be used for these applications, standardized protocols for sample handling that optimize protein stability are required. In this explorative study, we examine the influence of different urine collection methods, storage temperatures, storage times, and repetitive freeze-thaw procedures on the protein profiles obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Prospectively collected urine samples from 11 women were collected as either morning or midday specimens. The effects of storage temperature, time to freezing, and freeze-thaw cycles were assessed by calculating the number, intensity, and reproducibility of peaks visualized by SELDI-TOF-MS. On the CM10 array, 122 peaks were detected and 28 peaks were found to be significantly different between urine types, storage temperature and time to freezing. On the IMAC-Cu array, 65 peaks were detected and 1 peak was found to be significantly different according to time to freezing. No significant differences were demonstrated for freeze-thaw cycles. Optimal handling and storage conditions are necessary in clinical urine proteomic investigations. Collection of urine with a single and consistently performed protocol is needed to reduce analytical bias. Collecting only one urine type, which is stored for a limited period at 4°C until freezing at -80°C prior to analysis will provide the most stable profiles. Copyright © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometric study of cyclohexene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Cao, Maoqi; Wei, Bin; Ding, Mengmeng; Shan, Xiaobin; Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi

    2016-02-01

    In this work, photoionization and dissociation of cyclohexene have been studied by means of coupling a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. The adiabatic ionization energy of cyclohexene as well as the appearance energies of its fragment ions C6 H9 (+) , C6 H7 (+) , C5 H7 (+) , C5 H5 (+) , C4 H6 (+) , C4 H5 (+) , C3 H5 (+) and C3 H3 (+) were derived from the onset of the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves. The optimized structures for the transition states and intermediates on the ground state potential energy surfaces related to photodissociation of cyclohexene were characterized at the ωB97X-D/6-31+g(d,p) level. The coupled cluster method, CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ, was employed to calculate the corresponding energies with the zero-point energy corrections by the ωB97X-D/6-31+g(d,p) approach. Combining experimental and theoretical results, possible formation pathways of the fragment ions were proposed and discussed in detail. The retro-Cope rearrangement was found to play a crucial role in the formation of C4 H6 (+) , C4 H5 (+) and C3 H5 (+) . Intramolecular hydrogen migrations were observed as dominant processes in most of the fragmentation pathways of cyclohexene. The present research provides a clear picture of the photoionization and dissociation processes of cyclohexene in the 8- to 15.5-eV photon energy region. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A Caenorhabditis elegans Mass Spectrometric Resource for Neuropeptidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bael, Sven; Zels, Sven; Boonen, Kurt; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2018-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important signaling molecules used by nervous systems to mediate and fine-tune neuronal communication. They can function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in neural circuits, or they can be released as neurohormones to target distant cells and tissues. Neuropeptides are typically cleaved from larger precursor proteins by the action of proteases and can be the subject of post-translational modifications. The short, mature neuropeptide sequences often entail the only evolutionarily reasonably conserved regions in these precursor proteins. Therefore, it is particularly challenging to predict all putative bioactive peptides through in silico mining of neuropeptide precursor sequences. Peptidomics is an approach that allows de novo characterization of peptides extracted from body fluids, cells, tissues, organs, or whole-body preparations. Mass spectrometry, often combined with on-line liquid chromatography, is a hallmark technique used in peptidomics research. Here, we used an acidified methanol extraction procedure and a quadrupole-Orbitrap LC-MS/MS pipeline to analyze the neuropeptidome of Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified an unprecedented number of 203 mature neuropeptides from C. elegans whole-body extracts, including 35 peptides from known, hypothetical, as well as from completely novel neuropeptide precursor proteins that have not been predicted in silico. This set of biochemically verified peptide sequences provides the most elaborate C. elegans reference neurpeptidome so far. To exploit this resource to the fullest, we make our in-house database of known and predicted neuropeptides available to the community as a valuable resource. We are providing these collective data to help the community progress, amongst others, by supporting future differential and/or functional studies.

  4. A Caenorhabditis elegans Mass Spectrometric Resource for Neuropeptidomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bael, Sven; Zels, Sven; Boonen, Kurt; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2018-05-01

    Neuropeptides are important signaling molecules used by nervous systems to mediate and fine-tune neuronal communication. They can function as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in neural circuits, or they can be released as neurohormones to target distant cells and tissues. Neuropeptides are typically cleaved from larger precursor proteins by the action of proteases and can be the subject of post-translational modifications. The short, mature neuropeptide sequences often entail the only evolutionarily reasonably conserved regions in these precursor proteins. Therefore, it is particularly challenging to predict all putative bioactive peptides through in silico mining of neuropeptide precursor sequences. Peptidomics is an approach that allows de novo characterization of peptides extracted from body fluids, cells, tissues, organs, or whole-body preparations. Mass spectrometry, often combined with on-line liquid chromatography, is a hallmark technique used in peptidomics research. Here, we used an acidified methanol extraction procedure and a quadrupole-Orbitrap LC-MS/MS pipeline to analyze the neuropeptidome of Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified an unprecedented number of 203 mature neuropeptides from C. elegans whole-body extracts, including 35 peptides from known, hypothetical, as well as from completely novel neuropeptide precursor proteins that have not been predicted in silico. This set of biochemically verified peptide sequences provides the most elaborate C. elegans reference neurpeptidome so far. To exploit this resource to the fullest, we make our in-house database of known and predicted neuropeptides available to the community as a valuable resource. We are providing these collective data to help the community progress, amongst others, by supporting future differential and/or functional studies. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Mass spectrometric detection of siRNA in plasma samples for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie; Thomas, Andreas; Walpurgis, Katja; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2010-10-01

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules can effect the expression of any gene by inducing the degradation of mRNA. Therefore, these molecules can be of interest for illicit performance enhancement in sports by affecting different metabolic pathways. An example of an efficient performance-enhancing gene knockdown is the myostatin gene that regulates muscle growth. This study was carried out to provide a tool for the mass spectrometric detection of modified and unmodified siRNA from plasma samples. The oligonucleotides are purified by centrifugal filtration and the use of an miRNA purification kit, followed by flow-injection analysis using an Exactive mass spectrometer to yield the accurate masses of the sense and antisense strands. Although chromatography and sensitive mass spectrometric analysis of oligonucleotides are still challenging, a method was developed and validated that has adequate sensitivity (limit of detection 0.25-1 nmol mL(-1)) and performance (precision 11-21%, recovery 23-67%) for typical antisense oligonucleotides currently used in clinical studies.

  6. Determination of plutonium-241 half-life by mass spectrometric measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiyama, Takashi; Wada, Yukio; Onishi, Koichi

    1982-01-01

    Much data for Pu-241 half-life have been reported, but these values range from 13.8 years to 15.1 years depending on investigators. In order to define the half-life of Pu-241, the half-life was calculated by analyzing the mass spectrometry data obtained in the author's laboratory over the past six years on Plutonium Isotopic Standard Reference Materials prepared at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). The sample used for this work consisted of SRM-947 and SRM-948 prepared at NBS. Before mass spectrometric analysis, the plutonium aliquot was separated from its Am-241 daughter by anion exchange chromatography, since Am-241 is not distinguished from Pu-241 in the mass spectrometer. 241 Pu/ 239 Pu and 241 Pu/ 240 Pu ratios were calculated from the values of mass spectrometric measurement. From the relation of log N to time, the half-life of Pu-241 was determined, based on the slope using a least squares fit. The half-life of Pu-241 was estimated to be 14.29+-0.15 years. (Yoshitake, I.)

  7. Sequential mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium employing resin bead technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakumar, K.L.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Chitambar, S.A.; Jain, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sequential mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium employing anion exchange resin bead technique is reported using a high sensitive single stage magnetic analyser instrument, the routinely employed rhenium double filament assembly and 0.5M HNO 3 as a wetting agent for loading the resin beads. A precision of bettter than 0.3per cent (2sigma) is obtained on the isotopic ratio measurements. However, extreme care has to be exercised to carry the resin bead experiments under ultra clean conditions so as to avoid pick up of contamination. (author)

  8. Depression-biased reverse plasticity rule is required for stable learning at top-down connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra S Burbank

    Full Text Available Top-down synapses are ubiquitous throughout neocortex and play a central role in cognition, yet little is known about their development and specificity. During sensory experience, lower neocortical areas are activated before higher ones, causing top-down synapses to experience a preponderance of post-synaptic activity preceding pre-synaptic activity. This timing pattern is the opposite of that experienced by bottom-up synapses, which suggests that different versions of spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP rules may be required at top-down synapses. We consider a two-layer neural network model and investigate which STDP rules can lead to a distribution of top-down synaptic weights that is stable, diverse and avoids strong loops. We introduce a temporally reversed rule (rSTDP where top-down synapses are potentiated if post-synaptic activity precedes pre-synaptic activity. Combining analytical work and integrate-and-fire simulations, we show that only depression-biased rSTDP (and not classical STDP produces stable and diverse top-down weights. The conclusions did not change upon addition of homeostatic mechanisms, multiplicative STDP rules or weak external input to the top neurons. Our prediction for rSTDP at top-down synapses, which are distally located, is supported by recent neurophysiological evidence showing the existence of temporally reversed STDP in synapses that are distal to the post-synaptic cell body.

  9. Depression-Biased Reverse Plasticity Rule Is Required for Stable Learning at Top-Down Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Kendra S.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Top-down synapses are ubiquitous throughout neocortex and play a central role in cognition, yet little is known about their development and specificity. During sensory experience, lower neocortical areas are activated before higher ones, causing top-down synapses to experience a preponderance of post-synaptic activity preceding pre-synaptic activity. This timing pattern is the opposite of that experienced by bottom-up synapses, which suggests that different versions of spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) rules may be required at top-down synapses. We consider a two-layer neural network model and investigate which STDP rules can lead to a distribution of top-down synaptic weights that is stable, diverse and avoids strong loops. We introduce a temporally reversed rule (rSTDP) where top-down synapses are potentiated if post-synaptic activity precedes pre-synaptic activity. Combining analytical work and integrate-and-fire simulations, we show that only depression-biased rSTDP (and not classical STDP) produces stable and diverse top-down weights. The conclusions did not change upon addition of homeostatic mechanisms, multiplicative STDP rules or weak external input to the top neurons. Our prediction for rSTDP at top-down synapses, which are distally located, is supported by recent neurophysiological evidence showing the existence of temporally reversed STDP in synapses that are distal to the post-synaptic cell body. PMID:22396630

  10. Anterior Cingulate Cortex Input to the Claustrum Is Required for Top-Down Action Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. White

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cognitive abilities, such as volitional attention, operate under top-down, executive frontal cortical control of hierarchically lower structures. The circuit mechanisms underlying this process are unresolved. The claustrum possesses interconnectivity with many cortical areas and, thus, is hypothesized to orchestrate the cortical mantle for top-down control. Whether the claustrum receives top-down input and how this input may be processed by the claustrum have yet to be formally tested, however. We reveal that a rich anterior cingulate cortex (ACC input to the claustrum encodes a preparatory top-down information signal on a five-choice response assay that is necessary for optimal task performance. We further show that ACC input monosynaptically targets claustrum inhibitory interneurons and spiny glutamatergic projection neurons, the latter of which amplify ACC input in a manner that is powerfully constrained by claustrum inhibitory microcircuitry. These results demonstrate ACC input to the claustrum is critical for top-down control guiding action. : White et al. show that anterior cingulate cortex (ACC input to the claustrum encodes a top-down preparatory signal on a 5-choice response assay that is critical for task performance. Claustrum microcircuitry amplifies top-down ACC input in a frequency-dependent manner for eventual propagation to the cortex for cognitive control of action. Keywords: 5CSRTT, optogenetics, fiber photometry, microcircuit, attention, bottom-up, sensory cortices, motor cortices

  11. The downfall of TBA-354 - a possible explanation for its neurotoxicity via mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntshangase, Sphamandla; Shobo, Adeola; Kruger, Hendrik G; Asperger, Arndt; Niemeyer, Dagmar; Arvidsson, Per I; Govender, Thavendran; Baijnath, Sooraj

    2017-10-13

    1. TBA-354 was a promising antitubercular compound with activity against both replicating and static Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), making it the focal point of many clinical trials conducted by the TB Alliance. However, findings from these trials have shown that TBA-354 results in mild signs of reversible neurotoxicity; this left the TB Alliance with no other choice but to stop the research. 2. In this study, mass spectrometric methods were used to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and spatial distribution of TBA-354 in the brain using a validated liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS) and mass spectrometric imaging (MSI), respectively. Healthy female Sprague-Dawley rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) doses of TBA-354 (20 mg/kg bw). 3. The concentrationtime profiles showed a gradual absorption and tissue penetration of TBA-354 reaching the C max at 6 h post dose, followed by a rapid elimination. MSI analysis showed a time-dependent drug distribution, with highest drug concentration mainly in the neocortical regions of the brain. 4. The distribution of TBA-354 provides a possible explanation for the motor dysfunction observed in clinical trials. These results prove the importance of MSI as a potential tool in preclinical evaluations of suspected neurotoxic compounds.

  12. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Bauer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA and independent (DIA mass spectrometric (MS workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3 of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014 [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964.

  13. Determination of trace quantities of uranium in rocks mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, Mauricio Hiromitu

    1980-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation on the thermionic emission of uranium deposited on a single flat type rhenium filament has been carried out. The study was aimed at determining the influence of various forms of deposition on the emission sensitivity and thermal stability of U + , UO + and UO 2 + ions. Based on these investigations, a technique, involving an addition of a small quantity of colloidal suspension of graphite on top of the uranyl nitrate sample deposited, was chosen because of its higher, emission sensitivity for uranium metal ions. The experimental parameters of the technique were optimised and the technique was employed in the determination of trace quantities of uranium in rock samples using mass spectrometric isotope dilution method. For the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis National Bureau of Standards uranium isotopic standard NBS-U 970 was employed as a tracer, where as the mass discrimination effect in the uranium isotope analysis was corrected using the uranium isotopic standard NBS-U500. Uranium was determined in each of the seven granite samples from Wyoming, USA and two USGS standard rocks. The precision of the analysis was found to be ±1% . The uranium values obtained on the rock samples were compared with the analyses of other investigators. Influence of the sample splitting on the uranium analysis was discussed in the light of the analytical results obtained.(author)

  14. GNU polyxmass: a software framework for mass spectrometric simulations of linear (bio-polymeric analytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusconi Filippo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, a variety of (bio-polymers can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. The detailed interpretation of the spectra requires a huge number of "hypothesis cycles", comprising the following three actions 1 put forth a structural hypothesis, 2 test it, 3 (invalidate it. This time-consuming and painstaking data scrutiny is alleviated by using specialized software tools. However, all the software tools available to date are polymer chemistry-specific. This imposes a heavy overhead to researchers who do mass spectrometry on a variety of (bio-polymers, as each polymer type will require a different software tool to perform data simulations and analyses. We developed a software to address the lack of an integrated software framework able to deal with different polymer chemistries. Results The GNU polyxmass software framework performs common (bio-chemical simulations–along with simultaneous mass spectrometric calculations–for any kind of linear bio-polymeric analyte (DNA, RNA, saccharides or proteins. The framework is organized into three modules, all accessible from one single binary program. The modules let the user to 1 define brand new polymer chemistries, 2 perform quick mass calculations using a desktop calculator paradigm, 3 graphically edit polymer sequences and perform (bio-chemical/mass spectrometric simulations. Any aspect of the mass calculations, polymer chemistry reactions or graphical polymer sequence editing is configurable. Conclusion The scientist who uses mass spectrometry to characterize (bio-polymeric analytes of different chemistries is provided with a single software framework for his data prediction/analysis needs, whatever the polymer chemistry being involved.

  15. Mapping practices of project management – merging top-down and bottom-up perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for studying different accounts of project management practices based on network mapping and analysis. Drawing upon network mapping and visualization as an analytical strategy top-down and bottom-up accounts of project management practice are analysed...... and compared. The analysis initially reveals a substantial difference between the top-down and bottom-up accounts of practice. Furthermore it identifies a soft side of project management that is central in the bottom-up account but absent from the top-down. Finally, the study shows that network mapping...

  16. A New Approach to Programming Language Education for Beginners with Top-Down Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Saito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are two basic approaches in learning new programming language: a bottom-up approach and a top-down approach. It has been said that if a learner has already acquired one language, the top-down approach is more efficient to learn another while, for a person who has absolutely no knowledge of any programming languages; the bottom-up approach is preferable. The major problem of the bottom-up approach is that it requires longer period to acquire the language. For quicker learning, this paper applies a top-down approach for a beginners who has not yet acquired any programming languages.

  17. Gas chromatography of organic microcontaminants using atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection combined in one instrument (GC-AED/MS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, H.G.J.; Hankemeier, T.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of an atomic-emission detector and mass-spectrometric detector to a single gas chromatograph. Splitting of the column effluent enables simultaneous detection by atomic-emission detection (AED) and mass spectrometry (MS) and yields a powerful system for the target

  18. How mass spectrometric approaches applied to bacterial identification have revolutionized the study of human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégory, Dubourg; Chaudet, Hervé; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2018-03-01

    Describing the human hut gut microbiota is one the most exciting challenges of the 21 st century. Currently, high-throughput sequencing methods are considered as the gold standard for this purpose, however, they suffer from several drawbacks, including their inability to detect minority populations. The advent of mass-spectrometric (MS) approaches to identify cultured bacteria in clinical microbiology enabled the creation of the culturomics approach, which aims to establish a comprehensive repertoire of cultured prokaryotes from human specimens using extensive culture conditions. Areas covered: This review first underlines how mass spectrometric approaches have revolutionized clinical microbiology. It then highlights the contribution of MS-based methods to culturomics studies, paying particular attention to the extension of the human gut microbiota repertoire through the discovery of new bacterial species. Expert commentary: MS-based approaches have enabled cultivation methods to be resuscitated to study the human gut microbiota and thus to fill in the blanks left by high-throughput sequencing methods in terms of culturing minority populations. Continued efforts to recover new taxa using culture methods, combined with their rapid implementation in genomic databases, would allow for an exhaustive analysis of the gut microbiota through the use of a comprehensive approach.

  19. Task-related modulation of anterior theta and posterior alpha EEG reflects top-down preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hae-Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prestimulus EEG alpha activity in humans has been considered to reflect ongoing top-down preparation for the performance of subsequent tasks. Since theta oscillations may be related to poststimulus top-down processing, we investigated whether prestimulus EEG theta activity also reflects top-down cognitive preparation for a stimulus. Results We recorded EEG data from 15 healthy controls performing a color and shape discrimination task, and used the wavelet transformation to investigate the time course and power of oscillatory activity in the signals. We observed a relationship between both anterior theta and posterior alpha power in the prestimulus period and the type of subsequent task. Conclusions Since task-differences were reflected in both theta and alpha activities prior to stimulus onset, both prestimulus theta (particularly around the anterior region and prestimulus alpha (particularly around the posterior region activities may reflect prestimulus top-down preparation for the performance of subsequent tasks.

  20. What does distractibility in ADHD reveal about mechanisms for top-down attentional control?

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman-Hill, Stacia R.; Wagman, Meryl R.; Gex, Saskia E.; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to clarify whether distractibility in ADHD might arise from increased sensory-driven interference or from inefficient top-down control. We employed an attentional filtering paradigm in which discrimination difficulty and distractor salience (amount of image “graying”) were parametrically manipulated. Increased discrimination difficulty should add to the load of top-down processes, whereas increased distractor salience should produce stronger sensory interference. W...

  1. Mass Spectrometric Calibration of Controlled Fluoroform Leak Rate Devices Technique and Uncertainty Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balsley, S D; Laduca, C A

    2003-01-01

    Controlled leak rate devices of fluoroform on the order of 10 sup - sup 8 atm centre dot cc sec sup - sup 1 at 25 C are used to calibrate QC-1 War Reserve neutron tube exhaust stations for leak detection sensitivity. Close-out calibration of these tritium-contaminated devices is provided by the Gas Dynamics and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Organization 14406, which is a tritium analytical facility. The mass spectrometric technique used for the measurement is discussed, as is the first principals calculation (pressure, volume, temperature and time). The uncertainty of the measurement is largely driven by contributing factors in the determination of P, V and T. The expanded uncertainty of the leak rate measurement is shown to be 4.42%, with a coverage factor of 3 (k=3).

  2. Identification of volatiles by headspace gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Yeatman, Dustin Tate; Shan, Xiaoqin; Kahl, Joseph H

    2013-10-01

    Volatiles are frequently abused as inhalants. The methods used for identification are generally nonspecific if analyzed concurrently with ethanol or require an additional analytical procedure that employs mass spectrometry. A previously published technique utilizing a capillary flow technology splitter to simultaneously quantitate and confirm ethyl alcohol by flame ionization and mass spectrometric detection after headspace sampling and gas chromatographic separation was evaluated for the detection of inhalants. Methanol, isopropanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, toluene, methyl ethyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol, isobutyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1,1-trifluoroethane, 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (Norflurane, HFC-134a), chloroethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-11), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-12), dichlorofluoromethane (Freon®-21), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon®-22) and 1,2-dichlorotetrafluoroethane (Freon®-114) were validated for qualitative identification by this method. The validation for qualitative identification included evaluation of matrix effects, sensitivity, carryover, specificity, repeatability and ruggedness/robustness.

  3. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

  4. Top-down knowledge modulates onset capture in a feedforward manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefanie I; Lewis, Amanda J; Axtens, Jenna E

    2017-04-01

    How do we select behaviourally important information from cluttered visual environments? Previous research has shown that both top-down, goal-driven factors and bottom-up, stimulus-driven factors determine which stimuli are selected. However, it is still debated when top-down processes modulate visual selection. According to a feedforward account, top-down processes modulate visual processing even before the appearance of any stimuli, whereas others claim that top-down processes modulate visual selection only at a late stage, via feedback processing. In line with such a dual stage account, some studies found that eye movements to an irrelevant onset distractor are not modulated by its similarity to the target stimulus, especially when eye movements are launched early (within 150-ms post stimulus onset). However, in these studies the target transiently changed colour due to a colour after-effect that occurred during premasking, and the time course analyses were incomplete. The present study tested the feedforward account against the dual stage account in two eye tracking experiments, with and without colour after-effects (Exp. 1), as well when the target colour varied randomly and observers were informed of the target colour with a word cue (Exp. 2). The results showed that top-down processes modulated the earliest eye movements to the onset distractors (feedforward account of top-down modulation.

  5. Top-down (Prior Knowledge) and Bottom-up (Perceptual Modality) Influences on Spontaneous Interpersonal Synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Christina L; Gorman, Jamie C; Hessler, Eric E

    2016-04-01

    Coordination with others is such a fundamental part of human activity that it can happen unintentionally. This unintentional coordination can manifest as synchronization and is observed in physical and human systems alike. We investigated the role of top-down influences (prior knowledge of the perceptual modality their partner is using) and bottom-up factors (perceptual modality combination) on spontaneous interpersonal synchronization. We examine this phenomena with respect to two different theoretical perspectives that differently emphasize top-down and bottom-up factors in interpersonal synchronization: joint-action/shared cognition theories and ecological-interactive theories. In an empirical study twelve dyads performed a finger oscillation task while attending to each other's movements through either visual, auditory, or visual and auditory perceptual modalities. Half of the participants were given prior knowledge of their partner's perceptual capabilities for coordinating across these different perceptual modality combinations. We found that the effect of top-down influence depends on the perceptual modality combination between two individuals. When people used the same perceptual modalities, top-down influence resulted in less synchronization and when people used different perceptual modalities, top-down influence resulted in more synchronization. Furthermore, persistence in the change in behavior as a result of having perceptual information about each other ('social memory') was stronger when this top-down influence was present.

  6. Mass spectrometric behaviour of carboxylated polyethylene glycols and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frańska, Magdalena; Zgoła, Agnieszka; Rychłowska, Joanna; Szymański, Andrzej; Łukaszewski, Zenon; Frański, Rafał

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometric behaviour of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols (PEGCs and CPEGCs) and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates (OPECs) are discussed. The tendency for ionisation (deprotonation, protonation and cationisation by alkali metal cations) of carboxylated PEGs was compared with that of non-carboxylated correspondents by using both secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrospray ionisation (ESI). The fragmentation of the PEGCs and CPEGCs is discussed and also compared with their neutral correspondents, PEGs. The B/E mass spectra were recorded, using secondary ion mass spectrometry as a method for generation, for deprotonated and protonated molecules and molecules cationised by alkali metal cations. The fragmentation behaviour of PEGs is found to be different from that of CPEGCs, The presence of carboxylic groups may be confirmed not only by the determination of molecular weights of the ethoxylates studied, but also on the basis of the fragment ions formed. The metastable decomposition of the [OPEC-H](-) ions proceed through the cleavage of the bond between the octylphenol moiety and the ethoxylene chain leading to the octylphenoxy anions. It permits determination of the mass of the hydrophobic moiety of the studied carboxylated alkylphenol ethoxylate. ESI mass spectra recorded in the negative ion mode were found to be more suitable for the determination of the average molecular weight of carboxylated ethoxylates than SI mass spectra.

  7. Knudsen cell mass spectrometric study of the Cs2IOH(g) molecule thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roki, F-Z.; Ohnet, M-N.; Fillet, S.; Chatillon, C.; Nuta, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The pronounced ionic character leads to only dissociative ionization processes. • Ions formed are same as those coming from pure dimmers. • De-convolution of the ions origin needs accurate thermodynamic values for the pure gas phase. • Mass spectrometric interpretation has to be performed gradually and as a function of suitable condensed compositions. • Thermal functions have to be fully estimated. -- Abstract: The gas phase of the CsI + CsOH system is analyzed by high temperature Knudsen cell mass spectrometry in order to confirm the existence of the Cs 2 IOH(g) complex molecule. The mass spectrometric analysis is quite complex since such molecules undergo dissociative ionization into fragment ions that mix with the same ions from dimers of the pure compounds in the same vapor phase. Varying the chemical conditions for vaporization by using different CsI + CsOH mixture contents showed that the ionization of the Cs 2 IOH(g) molecule led to five different fragment ions, Cs 2 OH + , Cs 2 I + , Cs + , CsOH + and CsI + . This complex ionization pattern was studied in relation with previous assessed values for the vaporization of CsOH and CsI pure compounds in which monomer and dimer molecules are predominant. The equilibrium constant for the reaction CsI(g) + CsOH(g) = Cs 2 IOH(g) was determined and, after modeling the structure of the Cs 2 IOH molecule, the enthalpy of formation was determined using the third law of thermodynamics, as follows: Δ f H°(Cs 2 IOH, g, 298.15 K) = −578 ± 14.7 kJ · mole −1

  8. Sr isotope geochemistry of East Alpine mineral deposits and mass spectrometric analyses of fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grum, W.

    1995-05-01

    Strontium isotope geochemistry and deformational history of selected carbonate-hosted deposits from different tectonic positions in the Eastern Alps were studied. In this context an equipment has been constructed to analyze the composition of volatile components of fluid inclusions (FI). Based on the results of Sr-isotopic investigations two groups of deposits are discriminated: Deposits formed by formation waters and/or metamorphogenic fluids: Tux (magnesite, scheelite), Otterzug (barite), Lassing (magnesite), Rabenwald (talc), Laussa and Mooseck (fluorite). The mineralizing fluids are derived from different sedimentary rock series and therefore 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-ratios vary between 0.707 and 0.719. Deposits situated along fault zones: Lassing (talc), Gasteiner Tal (Silberpfennig area; gold), Schlaining (stibnite) and Waldenstein (specularite). Sr isotope ratios of the mineralizing fluids from Lassing, Waldenstein and Schlaining ranges from 0.7112 to 0.7127 and are therefore thought to have scavenged the East Alpine crystalline. The mineralizing solutions of the Gasteiner Tal deposit may either have equilibrated with low radiogenic sedimentary or with (ultra-)basic rocks. A cracking chamber has been constructed in order to open FI by cracking for mass spectrometric analysis of volatile components. Gases are analysed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The desorption of gas from metal and sample surfaces during cracking can be neglected. The amount of gas released from the mineral lattices was studied. With that fast method ore bearing from barren host rocks have been distinguished by different composition of the FI at the Brixlegg barite mineralization (Eastern Alps). Within the Galway fluorite deposit (Ireland) different fluids were involved and mass spectrometric analysis were carried out to characterize these different fluids and to identify their origin. (author)

  9. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  10. Top-down approach to unified supergravity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempfling, R.

    1994-03-01

    We introduce a new approach for studying unified supergravity models. In this approach all the parameters of the grand unified theory (GUT) are fixed by imposing the corresponding number of low energy observables. This determines the remaining particle spectrum whose dependence on the low energy observables can now be investigated. We also include some SUSY threshold corrections that have previously been neglected. In particular the SUSY threshold corrections to the fermion masses can have a significant impact on the Yukawa coupling unification. (orig.)

  11. Assessing a Top-Down Modeling Approach for Seasonal Scale Snow Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, C. H.; Lute, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanistic snow models are commonly applied to assess changes to snowpacks in a warming climate. Such assessments involve a number of assumptions about details of weather at daily to sub-seasonal time scales. Models of season-scale behavior can provide contrast for evaluating behavior at time scales more in concordance with climate warming projections. Such top-down models, however, involve a degree of empiricism, with attendant caveats about the potential of a changing climate to affect calibrated relationships. We estimated the sensitivity of snowpacks from 497 Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) stations in the western U.S. based on differences in climate between stations (spatial analog). We examined the sensitivity of April 1 snow water equivalent (SWE) and mean snow residence time (SRT) to variations in Nov-Mar precipitation and average Nov-Mar temperature using multivariate local-fit regressions. We tested the modeling approach using a leave-one-out cross-validation as well as targeted two-fold non-random cross-validations contrasting, for example, warm vs. cold years, dry vs. wet years, and north vs. south stations. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) values for the validations were strong for April 1 SWE, ranging from 0.71 to 0.90, and still reasonable, but weaker, for SRT, in the range of 0.64 to 0.81. From these ranges, we exclude validations where the training data do not represent the range of target data. A likely reason for differences in validation between the two metrics is that the SWE model reflects the influence of conservation of mass while using temperature as an indicator of the season-scale energy balance; in contrast, SRT depends more strongly on the energy balance aspects of the problem. Model forms with lower numbers of parameters generally validated better than more complex model forms, with the caveat that pseudoreplication could encourage selection of more complex models when validation contrasts were weak. Overall, the split sample validations

  12. Mass spectrometric confirmation criterion for product-ion spectra generated in flow-injection analysis. Environmental application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, R.B.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    2001-01-01

    The suitability of a confirmation criterion recently recommended in the Netherlands for gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS), was evaluated for flow-injection analysis (FIA) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation MS-MS detection. The main feature of the criterion is

  13. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric method for the determination of oak moss allergens atranol and chloroatranol in perfumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossi, Rossana; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Bernard, Guillaume

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a validated liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for quantitative analysis of the potential oak moss allergens atranol and chloroatranol in perfumes and similar products. The method employs LC-MS-MS with electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative mode...

  14. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  15. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here

  16. Gas Chromatographic Mass Spectrometric Determination of Myo-inositol in Humans Utilizing a Deuterated Internal Standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jan Rud; Larsen, Elfinn; Harbo, Helge

    1982-01-01

    The isotopic dilution technique was used for determining the content of myo-inositol in human urine, plasma and haemolysed erythrocyte samples. A deuterated myo-inositol, synthesized from inosose-2 by base-catalysed exchange of hydrogens by deuterium, followed by reduction of the inosose with 2H2......, was added as internal standard to the samples at an early stage in the analytical procedure. After separation and derivatization to the hexa-acetate, the gas chromatographic mass spectrometric analysis was carried out. A 25 m fused silica capillary column coated with methyl silicone was used, and the ions...... selected for monitoring were m/z 210 and m/z 214, which are characteristic and abundant fragment ions from unlabelled and hexadeuterated myo-inositolhexa-acetate, respectively. Calibration curves from water, urine, plasma and haemolysed erythrocytes show parallel, linear responses in the ratio between...

  17. Mass spectrometric isotope dilution analyses of palladium, silver, cadmium and tellurium in carbonaceous chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss, R.D.; Rosman, K.J.R.; De Laeter, J.

    1984-01-01

    The mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique was used to measure the elemental abundances of Pd, Ag, Cd and Te in Orgueil (C1), Ivuna (C1), Murray (C2) and Allende (C3) chondrites. The Pd abundance of 554 ppb for the Cl chondrites is almost identical to the recommended value of Anders and Ebihara (1982); that for Cd (712 ppb) is approximately 5% higher, whereas that for Ag (198 ppb) is approximately 10% lower than the recommended values. A smooth distribution for the abundances of the odd-A nuclides between 65 128 Te and 130 Te to lie approximately 30% above the r-process peak at A = 130, whereas the new value fits smoothly into the general trend. (author)

  18. Mass spectrometric analysis of EPO IEF-PAGE interfering substances in nitrile examination gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Direct detection of doping with recombinant erythropoietins (rhEPO) is accomplished by isoelectric focusing (IEF) or sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In a recent publication, Lasne et al. (Electrophoresis 2011, 32, 1444) showed that improper use of nitrile examination gloves during sample collection, sample preparation, and IEF-PAGE may lead to distorted or absent EPO IEF-profiles. In order to clarify which substances are responsible for this observation, a mass spectrometric study on water extractable compounds found in nitrile gloves was performed. Several substance classes were shown to be present, among them polyethylene glycols (PEG), anionic and nonionic surfactants, as well as alcohol ethoxylates and plasticizers. It could be demonstrated that alkylbenzenesulfonates, the main category of detectable anionic detergents, and among them sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and its homologs, are the prime reason for the interference of nitrile gloves with EPO IEF-PAGE. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF THUNNUS GENUS FOUR SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pepe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An accurate identification of similar fish species is necessary to prevent illegal substitution and is imposed by labeling regulations in UE countries (1. The genus Thunnus comprises many species of different quality and commercial value. The increasing trade of fish preparations of the species included in this genus and the consequent loss of the external anatomical and morphological features enables fraudulent substitutions. This study reports data relating to the proteomic analysis of four tuna species (T. thynnus, T. alalunga, T. albacares, T. obesus. Sarcoplasmic proteins were studied by mono and two dimensional electrophoresis. The most significant proteins for the characterization of the species were analyzed by mass spectrometric techniques. As reported in a previous study (2, an accurate identification of the species seems possible, owing to the polymorphism displayed by the species of the Thunnus genus.

  20. Mass-Spectrometric Studies of Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes of Organic Silicon Compounds Containing Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Takashi; Ansari, S. G.; Yoneyama, Koji; Nakajima, Teppei; Masuda, Atsushi; Matsumura, Hideki; Nakamura, Megumi; Umemoto, Hironobu

    2006-02-01

    The mechanism of catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) processes for hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and trisdimethylaminosilane (TDMAS), which are used as source gases to prepare SiNx or SiCxNy films, was studied using three different mass spectrometric techniques: ionization by Li+ ion attachment, vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and electron impact. The results for HMDS show that Si-N bonds dissociate selectively, although Si-C bonds are weaker, and (CH3)3SiNH should be one of the main precursors of deposited films. This decomposition mechanism did not change when NH3 was introduced, but the decomposition efficiency was slightly increased. Similar results were obtained for TDMAS.

  1. Mass spectrometric 230Th-234U-238U dating of the Devils Hole calcite vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.R.; Simmons, K.R.; Szabo, B.J.; Riggs, A.C.; Winograd, I.J.; Landwehr, J.M.; Hoffman, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Devils Hole calcite vein contains a long-term climatic record, but requires accurate chronologic control for its interpretation. Mass-spectrometric U-series ages for samples from core DH-11 yielding 230 Th ages with precisions ranging from less than 1,000 years (2σ) for samples younger than ∼140 ka (thousands of years ago) to less than 50,000 years for the oldest samples (∼566 ka). The 234 U/ 238 U ages could be determined to a precision of ∼20,000 years for all ages. Calcite accumulated continuously from 566 ka until ∼60 ka at an average rate of 0.7 millimeter per 10 3 years. The precise agreement between replicate analyses and the concordance of the 230 Th/ 238 U and 234 U/ 238 U ages for the oldest samples indicate that the DH-11 samples were closed systems and validate the dating technique in general

  2. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here.

  3. Hybrid Donor-Dot Devices made using Top-down Ion Implantation for Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, Edward; Bishop, Nathan; Carroll, Malcolm

    2012-02-01

    We present progress towards fabricating hybrid donor -- quantum dots (QD) for quantum computing. These devices will exploit the long coherence time of the donor system and the surface state manipulation associated with a QD. Fabrication requires detection of single ions implanted with 10's of nanometer precision. We show in this talk, 100% detection efficiency for single ions using a single ion Geiger mode avalanche (SIGMA) detector integrated into a Si MOS QD process flow. The NanoImplanter (nI) a focused ion beam system is used for precision top-down placement of the implanted ion. This machine has a 10 nm resolution combined with a mass velocity filter, allowing for the use of multi-species liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) to implant P and Sb ions, and a fast blanking and chopping system for single ion implants. The combination of the nI and integration of the SIGMA with the MOS QD process flow establishes a path to fabricate hybrid single donor-dot devices. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. A Generalizable Top-Down Nanostructuring Method of Bulk Oxides: Sequential Oxygen-Nitrogen Exchange Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lanlee; Kang, Byungwuk; Han, Suyoung; Kim, Hee-Eun; Lee, Moo Dong; Bang, Jin Ho

    2018-05-27

    A thermal reaction route that induces grain fracture instead of grain growth is devised and developed as a top-down approach to prepare nanostructured oxides from bulk solids. This novel synthesis approach, referred to as the sequential oxygen-nitrogen exchange (SONE) reaction, exploits the reversible anion exchange between oxygen and nitrogen in oxides that is driven by a simple two-step thermal treatment in ammonia and air. Internal stress developed by significant structural rearrangement via the formation of (oxy)nitride and the creation of oxygen vacancies and their subsequent combination into nanopores transforms bulk solid oxides into nanostructured oxides. The SONE reaction can be applicable to most transition metal oxides, and when utilized in a lithium-ion battery, the produced nanostructured materials are superior to their bulk counterparts and even comparable to those produced by conventional bottom-up approaches. Given its simplicity and scalability, this synthesis method could open a new avenue to the development of high-performance nanostructured electrode materials that can meet the industrial demand of cost-effectiveness for mass production. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Auditory top-down control and affective theory of mind in schizophrenia with and without hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominger, Christian; Bleier, Angelika; Fitz, Werner; Marksteiner, Josef; Fink, Andreas; Papousek, Ilona; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2016-07-01

    Social cognitive impairments may represent a core feature of schizophrenia and above all are a strong predictor of positive psychotic symptoms. Previous studies could show that reduced inhibitory top-down control contributes to deficits in theory of mind abilities and is involved in the genesis of hallucinations. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between auditory inhibition, affective theory of mind and the experience of hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, 20 in-patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls completed a social cognition task (the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test) and an inhibitory top-down Dichotic Listening Test. Schizophrenia patients with greater severity of hallucinations showed impaired affective theory of mind as well as impaired inhibitory top-down control. More dysfunctional top-down inhibition was associated with poorer affective theory of mind performance, and seemed to mediate the association between impairment to affective theory of mind and severity of hallucinations. The findings support the idea of impaired theory of mind as a trait marker of schizophrenia. In addition, dysfunctional top-down inhibition may give rise to hallucinations and may further impair affective theory of mind skills in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Face processing pattern under top-down perception: a functional MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Liu, Jiangang; Zhao, Jizheng; Zhang, Hui; Shi, Guangming

    2009-02-01

    Although top-down perceptual process plays an important role in face processing, its neural substrate is still puzzling because the top-down stream is extracted difficultly from the activation pattern associated with contamination caused by bottom-up face perception input. In the present study, a novel paradigm of instructing participants to detect faces from pure noise images is employed, which could efficiently eliminate the interference of bottom-up face perception in topdown face processing. Analyzing the map of functional connectivity with right FFA analyzed by conventional Pearson's correlation, a possible face processing pattern induced by top-down perception can be obtained. Apart from the brain areas of bilateral fusiform gyrus (FG), left inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) and left superior temporal sulcus (STS), which are consistent with a core system in the distributed cortical network for face perception, activation induced by top-down face processing is also found in these regions that include the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC), right oribitofrontal cortex (OFC), left precuneus, right parahippocampal cortex, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), right frontal pole, bilateral premotor cortex, left inferior parietal cortex and bilateral thalamus. The results indicate that making-decision, attention, episodic memory retrieving and contextual associative processing network cooperate with general face processing regions to process face information under top-down perception.

  7. Mass spectrometric study of rhamnolipid biosurfactants and their interactions with cell membrane phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashynska V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the formation of supramolecular complexes of biogenous rhamnolipids with membrane phospholipids that is considered as a molecular mechanism of the biosurfactants antimicrobial action. Method. In the present work rhamnolipid biosurfactant samples produced by Pseudomonas sp. PS-17 strain have been investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the first time. Results. As a result of the study, characteristic mass spectra of the rhamnolipid samples were obtained, that can be used as reference spectra for mass spectrometric identification of the compounds in any biological or industrial samples. At the next stage of the experiments the pair systems, containing the biosurfactants and a membrane phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, have been tested. The cationized noncovalent complexes of the rhamnolipids with the phospholipid were observed in the spectra. Conclusions. The results obtained testify to the consideration that rhamnolipids (similar to other membranotropic agents can form stable supramolecular complexes with membrane phospholipids that are able to evoke the biosurfactants antimicrobial action. A great potential of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the biosurfactants identification and study has been demonstrated in the work.

  8. Resolution of a protein sequence ambiguity by X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, L.J.; Lattman, E.E.; Wolkow, C.; Woods, A.; Chevrier, M.; Cotter, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Ambiguities in amino acid sequences are a potential problem in X-ray crystallographic studies of proteins. Amino acid side chains often cannot be reliably identified from the electron density. Many protein crystal structures that are now being solved are simple variants of a known wild-type structure. Thus, cloning artifacts or other untoward events can readily lead to cases in which the proposed sequence is not correct. An example is presented showing that mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool for analyzing suspected errors. The X-ray crystal structure of an insertion mutant of Staphylococcal nuclease has been solved to 1.67 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.170. A single residue has been inserted in the C-terminal α helix. The inserted amino acid was believed to be an alanine residue, but the final electron density maps strongly indicated that a glycine had been inserted instead. To confirm the observations from the X-ray data, matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry was employed to verify the glycine insertion. This mass spectrometric technique has sufficient mass accuracy to detect the methyl group that distinguishes glycine from alanine and can be extended to the more common situation in which crystallographic measurements suggest a problem with the sequence, but cannot pinpoint its location or nature. (orig.)

  9. Resolution of a protein sequence ambiguity by X-ray crystallographic and mass spectrometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, L.J.; Lattman, E.E. (Dept. of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Wolkow, C.; Woods, A.; Chevrier, M.; Cotter, R.J. (Middle Atlantic Mass Spectrometry Lab., Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Ambiguities in amino acid sequences are a potential problem in X-ray crystallographic studies of proteins. Amino acid side chains often cannot be reliably identified from the electron density. Many protein crystal structures that are now being solved are simple variants of a known wild-type structure. Thus, cloning artifacts or other untoward events can readily lead to cases in which the proposed sequence is not correct. An example is presented showing that mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool for analyzing suspected errors. The X-ray crystal structure of an insertion mutant of Staphylococcal nuclease has been solved to 1.67 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R value of 0.170. A single residue has been inserted in the C-terminal {alpha} helix. The inserted amino acid was believed to be an alanine residue, but the final electron density maps strongly indicated that a glycine had been inserted instead. To confirm the observations from the X-ray data, matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry was employed to verify the glycine insertion. This mass spectrometric technique has sufficient mass accuracy to detect the methyl group that distinguishes glycine from alanine and can be extended to the more common situation in which crystallographic measurements suggest a problem with the sequence, but cannot pinpoint its location or nature. (orig.).

  10. Top-down approach for the direct characterization of low molecular weight heparins using LC-FT-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Zaia, Joseph; Linhardt, Robert J

    2012-10-16

    Low molecular heparins (LMWHs) are structurally complex, heterogeneous, polydisperse, and highly negatively charged mixtures of polysaccharides. The direct characterization of LMWH is a major challenge for currently available analytical technologies. Electrospray ionization (ESI) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a powerful tool for the characterization complex biological samples in the fields of proteomics, metabolomics, and glycomics. LC-MS has been applied to the analysis of heparin oligosaccharides, separated by size exclusion, reversed phase ion-pairing chromatography, and chip-based amide hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). However, there have been limited applications of ESI-LC-MS for the direct characterization of intact LMWHs (top-down analysis) due to their structural complexity, low ionization efficiency, and sulfate loss. Here we present a simple and reliable HILIC-Fourier transform (FT)-ESI-MS platform to characterize and compare two currently marketed LMWH products using the top-down approach requiring no special sample preparation steps. This HILIC system relies on cross-linked diol rather than amide chemistry, affording highly resolved chromatographic separations using a relatively high percentage of acetonitrile in the mobile phase, resulting in stable and high efficiency ionization. Bioinformatics software (GlycReSoft 1.0) was used to automatically assign structures within 5-ppm mass accuracy.

  11. Standard test methods for chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) powder

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical and mass spectrometric analysis of nuclear-grade gadolinium oxide powders to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Carbon by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion Selective Electrode C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Loss of Weight on Ignition 7-13 Sulfur by CombustionIodometric Titration Impurity Elements by a Spark-Source Mass Spectrographic C761 Test Methods for Chemical, Mass Spectrometric, Spectrochemical,Nuclear, and Radiochemical Analysis of Uranium Hexafluoride C1287 Test Method for Determination of Impurities In Uranium Dioxide By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Gadolinium Content in Gadolinium Oxid...

  12. Topic model-based mass spectrometric data analysis in cancer biomarker discovery studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minkun; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Di Poto, Cristina; Ferrarini, Alessia; Yu, Guoqiang; Ressom, Habtom W

    2016-08-18

    A fundamental challenge in quantitation of biomolecules for cancer biomarker discovery is owing to the heterogeneous nature of human biospecimens. Although this issue has been a subject of discussion in cancer genomic studies, it has not yet been rigorously investigated in mass spectrometry based proteomic and metabolomic studies. Purification of mass spectometric data is highly desired prior to subsequent analysis, e.g., quantitative comparison of the abundance of biomolecules in biological samples. We investigated topic models to computationally analyze mass spectrometric data considering both integrated peak intensities and scan-level features, i.e., extracted ion chromatograms (EICs). Probabilistic generative models enable flexible representation in data structure and infer sample-specific pure resources. Scan-level modeling helps alleviate information loss during data preprocessing. We evaluated the capability of the proposed models in capturing mixture proportions of contaminants and cancer profiles on LC-MS based serum proteomic and GC-MS based tissue metabolomic datasets acquired from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver cirrhosis as well as synthetic data we generated based on the serum proteomic data. The results we obtained by analysis of the synthetic data demonstrated that both intensity-level and scan-level purification models can accurately infer the mixture proportions and the underlying true cancerous sources with small average error ratios (data, we found more proteins and metabolites with significant changes between HCC cases and cirrhotic controls. Candidate biomarkers selected after purification yielded biologically meaningful pathway analysis results and improved disease discrimination power in terms of the area under ROC curve compared to the results found prior to purification. We investigated topic model-based inference methods to computationally address the heterogeneity issue in samples analyzed by LC/GC-MS. We observed

  13. Characterization of plant polysaccharides from Dendrobium officinale by multiple chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huiying; Zhang, Keke; Jiang, Qing; Dai, Diya; Li, Hongli; Bi, Wentao; Chen, David Da Yong

    2018-04-27

    Plant polysaccharides have numerous medicinal functions. Due to the differences in their origins, regions of production, and cultivation conditions, the quality and the functions of polysaccharides can vary significantly. They are macromolecules with large molecular weight (MW) and complex structure, and pose great challenge for the analytical technology used. Taking Dendrobium officinale (DO) from various origins and locations as model samples. In this investigation, mechanochemical extraction method was used to successfully extract polysaccharides from DO using water as solvent, the process is simple, fast (40 s) and with high yield. The MWs of the intact saccharides from calibration curve and light scattering measurement were determined and compared after separation with size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The large polysaccharide was acid hydrolyzed to oligosaccharides and the products were efficiently separated and identified using liquid chromatography coupled to a high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS 2 ). Obvious differences were observed among LC-MS 2 chromatograms of digested products, and the chemical structures for the products were proposed based on accurate mass values. More importantly, isomeric digested carbohydrate compounds were explored and characterized. All the chromatographic and mass spectrometric results in this study provided a multi-dimensional characterization, fingerprint analysis, and molecular structure level assessment of plant polysaccharides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison between bottom-up and top-down approaches in the estimation of measurement uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hyung; Choi, Jee-Hye; Youn, Jae Saeng; Cha, Young Joo; Song, Woonheung; Park, Ae Ja

    2015-06-01

    Measurement uncertainty is a metrological concept to quantify the variability of measurement results. There are two approaches to estimate measurement uncertainty. In this study, we sought to provide practical and detailed examples of the two approaches and compare the bottom-up and top-down approaches to estimating measurement uncertainty. We estimated measurement uncertainty of the concentration of glucose according to CLSI EP29-A guideline. Two different approaches were used. First, we performed a bottom-up approach. We identified the sources of uncertainty and made an uncertainty budget and assessed the measurement functions. We determined the uncertainties of each element and combined them. Second, we performed a top-down approach using internal quality control (IQC) data for 6 months. Then, we estimated and corrected systematic bias using certified reference material of glucose (NIST SRM 965b). The expanded uncertainties at the low glucose concentration (5.57 mmol/L) by the bottom-up approach and top-down approaches were ±0.18 mmol/L and ±0.17 mmol/L, respectively (all k=2). Those at the high glucose concentration (12.77 mmol/L) by the bottom-up and top-down approaches were ±0.34 mmol/L and ±0.36 mmol/L, respectively (all k=2). We presented practical and detailed examples for estimating measurement uncertainty by the two approaches. The uncertainties by the bottom-up approach were quite similar to those by the top-down approach. Thus, we demonstrated that the two approaches were approximately equivalent and interchangeable and concluded that clinical laboratories could determine measurement uncertainty by the simpler top-down approach.

  15. Does Top-Down Feedback Modulate the Encoding of Orthographic Representations During Visual-Word Recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Manuel; Marcet, Ana; Vergara-Martínez, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In masked priming lexical decision experiments, there is a matched-case identity advantage for nonwords, but not for words (e.g., ERTAR-ERTAR words when top-down feedback is minimized. We employed a task that taps prelexical orthographic processes: the masked prime same-different task. For "same" trials, results showed faster response times for targets when preceded by a briefly presented matched-case identity prime than when preceded by a mismatched-case identity prime. Importantly, this advantage was similar in magnitude for nonwords and words. This finding constrains the interplay of bottom-up versus top-down mechanisms in models of visual-word identification.

  16. Integrated Assessment of Energy Policies: A Decomposition of Top-Down and Bottom-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph (Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany)); Rutherford, Thomas F. (ETH Zuerich (Switzerland))

    2008-01-15

    The formulation of market equilibrium problems as mixed complementarity problems (MCP) permits integration of bottom-up programming models of the energy system into top-down general equilibrium models of the overall economy. Yet, in practise the MCP approach loses analytical tractability of income effects, when the energy system includes upper and lowrbounds on many decision variables . We therefore advocate the use of complementarity methods to solve only the top-down economic equilibrium model and employ quadratic programming to solve the underlying bottom-up energy supply model. A simple iterative procedure reconciles the equilibrium prices and quantities between both models.

  17. ''Top-down'' versus ''side-on'' viewing of the inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faires, L.M.; Bieniewski, T.M.; Apel, C.T.; Niemczyk, T.M.

    1985-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma is viewed by a ''top-down'' optical configuration, and the analytical performance is compared to conventional ''side-on'' viewing in terms of sensitivity, detection limits, linear dynamical range, self-reversal effects, and multielement performance. This comparison is made for a selection of eleven atom and ion lines of eight elements. The results of this study indicate distinct advantages in ''top-down'' viewing including improved sensitivity, lower detection limits, better signal-to-background ratios, and better compromise viewing position for multielement analysis. An exception to these advantages is increased self-absorption effects observed for the alkali elements

  18. Venom Proteomics of Indonesian King Cobra, Ophiophagus hannah: Integrating Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petras, Daniel; Heiss, Paul; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Calvete, Juan J

    2015-06-05

    We report on the first application of top-down mass spectrometry in snake venomics. De novo sequence tags generated by, and ProSight Lite supported analysis of, combined collisional based dissotiations (CID and HCD) recorded in a hybrid LTQ Orbitrap instrument in data-dependent mode identified a number of proteins from different toxin families, namely, 11 three-finger toxins (7-7.9 kDa), a Kunitz-type inhibitor (6.3 kDa), ohanin (11.9 kDa), a novel phospholipase A2 molecule (13.8 kDa), and the cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) ophanin (25 kDa) from Indonesian king cobra venom. Complementary bottom-up MS/MS analyses contributed to the completion of a locus-resolved venom phenotypic map for Ophiophagus hannah, the world's longest venomous snake and a species of medical concern across its wide distribution range in forests from India to Southeast Asia. Its venom composition, comprising 32-35 proteins/peptides from 10 protein families, is dominated by α-neurotoxins and convincingly explains the main neurotoxic effects of human envenoming caused by king cobra bite. The integration of efficient chromatographic separation of the venom's components and locus-resolved toxin identification through top-down and bottom-up MS/MS-based species-specific database searching and de novo sequencing holds promise that the future will be bright for the field of venom research.

  19. Mass spectrometric identification of phospholipids in human tears and tear lipocalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Austin W; Glasgow, Ben J

    2012-04-02

    The purpose of this article was to identify by mass spectrometry phosphocholine lipids in stimulated human tears and determine the molecules bound to tear lipocalin or other proteins. Tear proteins were separated isocratically from pooled stimulated human tears by gel filtration fast performance liquid chromatography. Separation of tear lipocalin was confirmed by SDS tricine gradient PAGE. Protein fractions were extracted with chloroform/methanol and analyzed with electrospray ionization MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in precursor ion scan mode for select leaving groups. For quantification, integrated ion counts were derived from standard curves of authentic compounds of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylserine. Linear approximation was possible from integration of the mass spectrometrically obtained ion peaks at 760 Da for the PC standard. Tears contained 194 ng/mL of the major intact PC (34:2), m/z 758.6. Ten other monoisotopic phosphocholines were found in tears. A peak at 703.3 Da was assigned as a sphingomyelin. Four lysophosphatidylcholines (m/z 490-540) accounted for about 80% of the total integrated ion count. The [M+H](+) compound, m/z 496.3, accounted for 60% of the signal intensity. Only the tear lipocalin-bearing fractions showed phosphocholines (104 ng/mL). Although the intact phospholipids bound to tear lipocalin corresponded precisely in mass and relative signal intensity to that found in tears, we did not identify phosphocholines between m/z 490 and 540 in any of the gel-filtration fractions. Phospholipids, predominantly lysophospholipids, are present in tears. The higher mass intact PCs in tears are native ligands of tear lipocalin.

  20. Targeted selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometric immunoassay for insulin-like growth factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric E Niederkofler

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 is an important biomarker of human growth disorders that is routinely analyzed in clinical laboratories. Mass spectrometry-based workflows offer a viable alternative to standard IGF1 immunoassays, which utilize various pre-analytical preparation strategies. In this work we developed an assay that incorporates a novel sample preparation method for dissociating IGF1 from its binding proteins. The workflow also includes an immunoaffinity step using antibody-derivatized pipette tips, followed by elution, trypsin digestion, and LC-MS/MS separation and detection of the signature peptides in a selected reaction monitoring (SRM mode. The resulting quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA exhibited good linearity in the range of 1 to 1,500 ng/mL IGF1, intra- and inter-assay precision with CVs of less than 10%, and lowest limits of detection of 1 ng/mL. The linearity and recovery characteristics of the assay were also established, and the new method compared to a commercially available immunoassay using a large cohort of human serum samples. The IGF1 SRM MSIA is well suited for use in clinical laboratories.

  1. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric determination of carbon isotope composition in unpurified samples: methamphetamine example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, I A; Liu, R H; Legendre, M G; Piotrowski, E G; Furner, R L

    1986-10-01

    A gas chromatograph/quadrupole mass spectrometer system, operated in electron impact/selected ion monitoring mode, is used to determine the intensity ratio of the m/z 59 and the m/z 58 ions of the [C3H8N]+ fragment derived from methamphetamine samples synthesized with varying amounts of 13C-labeled methylamine. Crude products are introduced into the gas chromatograph without prior cleanup. The ratios measured were in excellent agreement with those calculated. A change in 0.25% use of 13C-methylamine is sufficient for product differentiation. The feasibility of using isotope labeling and subsequent mass spectrometric isotope ratio measurement as the basis of a compound tracing mechanism is discussed. Specifically, if methamphetamine samples manufactured from legal sources are asked to incorporate distinct 13C compositions, their sources can be traced when samples are diverted into illegal channels. Samples derived from illicit preparations can also be traced if the manufacturers of a precursor (methylamine in this case) incorporate distinct 13C compositions in their products.

  2. Standard methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    All methods described for subsampling and analysis of UF 6 are in routine use at United States Atomic Energy Commission installations. A gravimetric method is included for U and titrimetric methods, for Cl 2 and U. Mass spectrometric methods are given for both double and single standard procedures for U-isotopic content and for semiquantitative determination of hydrocarbons, chlorocarbons, and partially substituted halohydrocarbons. Spectroscopic methods are described for 232 U, fission products, Pu, and Np. In some instances an ion exchange- or extraction-separation is specified prior to the spectroscopic determination. Mass spectroscopic procedures for 31 trace elements are included, as are spectrophotometric methods for Br 2 , Si, P, Ti, V, W, Th, and Mo. Following a preliminary separation for some elements, emission spectroscopic procedures are described for B, Si, Ru, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, Zr, V, Th, rare earths, and other elements. Procedures for the determination of Sb, Ru, Al, Cd, Co, Ca, Cr, Fe, Pb, Mg, Mn, Ni, K, Na, and Zn by atomic absorption methods are included. The preparation of high-purity U 3 O 8 by the hydrolysis of UF 6 to UO 2 F 2 which upon drying and pyrohydrolysis yields U 3 O 8 is described

  3. A Top Down Strategy To Enhance Information Technologies into Israeli Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guri-Rosenblit, Sara

    2002-01-01

    The integration of information technologies (IT) into Israeli higher education through a top-down strategy has created systemic change. The use of IT in Israeli universities varies in terms of access-outreach, teaching-learning processes, study materials production, data and information retrieval, administrative functions, the creation of…

  4. Top-down design and verification methodology for analog mixed-signal integrated circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beviz, P.

    2016-01-01

    The current report contains the introduction of a novel Top-Down Design and Verification methodology for AMS integrated circuits. With the introduction of new design and verification flow, more reliable and efficient development of AMS ICs is possible. The assignment incorporated the research on the

  5. Efficacy of top-down approaches to post-conflict social coexistence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides an assessment of the work done by the Organ on National Healing, Reconciliation and Integration (ONHRI) in post- 2008 Zimbabwe. ONHRI was employed by the Zimbabwean government (precisely as Government of National Unity) to ensure national healing and integration. The efficacy of top-down ...

  6. Functional dissociations in top-down control dependent neural repetition priming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, P.; Schnaidt, M.; Fell, J.; Ruhlmann, J.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying top-down control of repetition priming. Here, we use functional brain imaging to investigate these mechanisms. Study and repetition tasks used a natural/man-made forced choice task. In the study phase subjects were required to respond to either

  7. Bottom-up and top-down emotion generation: implications for emotion regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya K.; Pereira, Sean C.; Gross, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Emotion regulation plays a crucial role in adaptive functioning and mounting evidence suggests that some emotion regulation strategies are often more effective than others. However, little attention has been paid to the different ways emotions can be generated: from the ‘bottom-up’ (in response to inherently emotional perceptual properties of the stimulus) or ‘top-down’ (in response to cognitive evaluations). Based on a process priming principle, we hypothesized that mode of emotion generation would interact with subsequent emotion regulation. Specifically, we predicted that top-down emotions would be more successfully regulated by a top-down regulation strategy than bottom-up emotions. To test this hypothesis, we induced bottom-up and top-down emotions, and asked participants to decrease the negative impact of these emotions using cognitive reappraisal. We observed the predicted interaction between generation and regulation in two measures of emotional responding. As measured by self-reported affect, cognitive reappraisal was more successful on top-down generated emotions than bottom-up generated emotions. Neurally, reappraisal of bottom-up generated emotions resulted in a paradoxical increase of amygdala activity. This interaction between mode of emotion generation and subsequent regulation should be taken into account when comparing of the efficacy of different types of emotion regulation, as well as when reappraisal is used to treat different types of clinical disorders. PMID:21296865

  8. Phenomenology without conscious access is a form of consciousness without top-down attention

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Christof; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2007-01-01

    We agree with Block's basic hypothesis postulating the existence of phenomenal consciousness without cognitive access. We explain such states in terms of consciousness without top-down, endogenous attention and speculate that their correlates may be a coalition of neurons that are consigned to the back of cortex, without access to working memory and planning in frontal cortex.

  9. Decoding of top-down cognitive processing for SSVEP-controlled BMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byoung-Kyong; Dähne, Sven; Ahn, Min-Hee; Noh, Yung-Kyun; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2016-11-01

    We present a fast and accurate non-invasive brain-machine interface (BMI) based on demodulating steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) in electroencephalography (EEG). Our study reports an SSVEP-BMI that, for the first time, decodes primarily based on top-down and not bottom-up visual information processing. The experimental setup presents a grid-shaped flickering line array that the participants observe while intentionally attending to a subset of flickering lines representing the shape of a letter. While the flickering pixels stimulate the participant’s visual cortex uniformly with equal probability, the participant’s intention groups the strokes and thus perceives a ‘letter Gestalt’. We observed decoding accuracy of 35.81% (up to 65.83%) with a regularized linear discriminant analysis; on average 2.05-fold, and up to 3.77-fold greater than chance levels in multi-class classification. Compared to the EEG signals, an electrooculogram (EOG) did not significantly contribute to decoding accuracies. Further analysis reveals that the top-down SSVEP paradigm shows the most focalised activation pattern around occipital visual areas; Granger causality analysis consistently revealed prefrontal top-down control over early visual processing. Taken together, the present paradigm provides the first neurophysiological evidence for the top-down SSVEP BMI paradigm, which potentially enables multi-class intentional control of EEG-BMIs without using gaze-shifting.

  10. Top-down control of visual perception: attention in natural vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2008-01-01

    Top-down perceptual influences can bias (or pre-empt) perception. In natural scenes, the receptive fields of neurons in the inferior temporal visual cortex (IT) shrink to become close to the size of objects. This facilitates the read-out of information from the ventral visual system, because the information is primarily about the object at the fovea. Top-down attentional influences are much less evident in natural scenes than when objects are shown against blank backgrounds, though are still present. It is suggested that the reduced receptive-field size in natural scenes, and the effects of top-down attention contribute to change blindness. The receptive fields of IT neurons in complex scenes, though including the fovea, are frequently asymmetric around the fovea, and it is proposed that this is the solution the IT uses to represent multiple objects and their relative spatial positions in a scene. Networks that implement probabilistic decision-making are described, and it is suggested that, when in perceptual systems they take decisions (or 'test hypotheses'), they influence lower-level networks to bias visual perception. Finally, it is shown that similar processes extend to systems involved in the processing of emotion-provoking sensory stimuli, in that word-level cognitive states provide top-down biasing that reaches as far down as the orbitofrontal cortex, where, at the first stage of affective representations, olfactory, taste, flavour, and touch processing is biased (or pre-empted) in humans.

  11. Top-Down Cognitive and Linguistic Influences on the Suppression of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Marian

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Auditory sensation is often thought of as a bottom-up process, yet the brain exerts top-down control to affect how and what we hear. We report the discovery that the magnitude of top-down influence varies across individuals as a result of differences in linguistic background and executive function. Participants were 32 normal-hearing individuals (23 female varying in language background (11 English monolinguals, 10 Korean-English late bilinguals, and 11 Korean-English early bilinguals, as well as cognitive abilities (working memory, cognitive control. To assess efferent control over inner ear function, participants were presented with speech-sounds (e.g., /ba/, /pa/ in one ear while spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs were measured in the contralateral ear. SOAEs are associated with the amplification of sound in the cochlea, and can be used as an index of top-down efferent activity. Individuals with bilingual experience and those with better cognitive control experienced larger reductions in the amplitude of SOAEs in response to speech stimuli, likely as a result of greater efferent suppression of amplification in the cochlea. This suppression may aid in the critical task of speech perception by minimizing the disruptive effects of noise. In contrast, individuals with better working memory exert less control over the cochlea, possibly due to a greater capacity to process complex stimuli at later stages. These findings demonstrate that even peripheral mechanics of auditory perception are shaped by top-down cognitive and linguistic influences.

  12. Early Top-Down Influences on Bistable Perception Revealed by Event-Related Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael A.; Gavin, William J.; Nerger, Janice L.

    2008-01-01

    A longstanding debate exists in the literature concerning bottom-up vs. top-down influences on bistable perception. Recently, a technique has been developed to measure early changes in brain activity (via ERPs) related to perceptual reversals (Kornmeier & Bach, 2004). An ERP component, the reversal negativity (RN) has been identified, and is…

  13. Top-down cascades in lakes and oceans: Different perspectives but same story?

    KAUST Repository

    Hessen, Dag Olav; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2014-01-01

    While top-down cascades from fish to phytoplankton have been a core topic in limnology for the past four decades, it has attracted far less interest in marine ecology. This is partly for historical reasons, since lake studies have been motivated

  14. Introducing Electronic Textbooks as Daily-Use Technology in Schools: A Top-Down Adoption Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Thomas K. F.

    2017-01-01

    This study took frequency of use and the adoption process into account to define the participants and external variables of the research model. School electronic textbooks are a daily-use technology and they are adopted in a compulsory, top-down way. Their introduction can evoke feelings of anxiety among teachers because of a possible increase in…

  15. A top-down approach to fabrication of high quality vertical heterostructure nanowire arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Minghua; Ding, K.; Hill, M.T.; Ning, C.Z.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel top-down approach for fabricating nanowires with unprecedented complexity and optical quality by taking advantage of a nanoscale self-masking effect. We realized vertical arrays of nanowires of 20-40 nm in diameter with 16 segments of complex longitudinal InGaAsP/InP

  16. A Top-Down Approach to Construct Execution Views of a Large Software-Intensive System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callo Arias, T.B.; America, P.H.M.; Avgeriou, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a top-down approach to construct execution views of a large and complex software intensive system. Execution viewsdescribe what the software does at runtime and how it does it. The presented approach represents a reverse architecting solution that follows a set of pre-defined

  17. Biodiversity mediates top-down control in eelgrass ecosystems: a global comparative-experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J Emmett; Reynolds, Pamela L; Boström, Christoffer; Coyer, James A; Cusson, Mathieu; Donadi, Serena; Douglass, James G; Eklöf, Johan S; Engelen, Aschwin H; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Fredriksen, Stein; Gamfeldt, Lars; Gustafsson, Camilla; Hoarau, Galice; Hori, Masakazu; Hovel, Kevin; Iken, Katrin; Lefcheck, Jonathan S; Moksnes, Per-Olav; Nakaoka, Masahiro; O'Connor, Mary I; Olsen, Jeanine L; Richardson, J Paul; Ruesink, Jennifer L; Sotka, Erik E; Thormar, Jonas; Whalen, Matthew A; Stachowicz, John J

    2015-07-01

    Nutrient pollution and reduced grazing each can stimulate algal blooms as shown by numerous experiments. But because experiments rarely incorporate natural variation in environmental factors and biodiversity, conditions determining the relative strength of bottom-up and top-down forcing remain unresolved. We factorially added nutrients and reduced grazing at 15 sites across the range of the marine foundation species eelgrass (Zostera marina) to quantify how top-down and bottom-up control interact with natural gradients in biodiversity and environmental forcing. Experiments confirmed modest top-down control of algae, whereas fertilisation had no general effect. Unexpectedly, grazer and algal biomass were better predicted by cross-site variation in grazer and eelgrass diversity than by global environmental gradients. Moreover, these large-scale patterns corresponded strikingly with prior small-scale experiments. Our results link global and local evidence that biodiversity and top-down control strongly influence functioning of threatened seagrass ecosystems, and suggest that biodiversity is comparably important to global change stressors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  18. Comparing Top-Down with Bottom-Up Approaches: Teaching Data Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsiang-Jui; Kung, LeeAnn; Gardiner, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual database design is a difficult task for novice database designers, such as students, and is also therefore particularly challenging for database educators to teach. In the teaching of database design, two general approaches are frequently emphasized: top-down and bottom-up. In this paper, we present an empirical comparison of students'…

  19. Top-down and bottom-up definitions of human failure events in human reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids

    2014-01-01

    In the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) used in the nuclear industry, human failure events (HFEs) are determined as a subset of hardware failures, namely those hardware failures that could be triggered by human action or inaction. This approach is top-down, starting with hardware faults and deducing human contributions to those faults. Elsewhere, more traditionally human factors driven approaches would tend to look at opportunities for human errors first in a task analysis and then identify which of those errors is risk significant. The intersection of top-down and bottom-up approaches to defining HFEs has not been carefully studied. Ideally, both approaches should arrive at the same set of HFEs. This question is crucial, however, as human reliability analysis (HRA) methods are generalized to new domains like oil and gas. The HFEs used in nuclear PRAs tend to be top-down - defined as a subset of the PRA - whereas the HFEs used in petroleum quantitative risk assessments (QRAs) often tend to be bottom-up - derived from a task analysis conducted by human factors experts. The marriage of these approaches is necessary in order to ensure that HRA methods developed for top-down HFEs are also sufficient for bottom-up applications.

  20. Bottom-up and Top-down: An alternate classification of LD authoring approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sodhi, Tim; Miao, Yongwu; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Sodhi, T., Miao, Y., Brouns, F., & Koper, E. J. R. (2007). Bottom-up and Top-down: An alternate classification of LD authoring approaches. Paper presented at the TENCompetence Open Workshop on Current research on IMS Learning Design and Lifelong Competence Development Infrastructures. June, 21-22,

  1. MOD/R : A knowledge assisted approach towards top-down only CMOS VLSI design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaanenburg, L.; Beunder, M.; Beune, F.A.; Gerez, Sabih H.; Holstein, B.; Luchtmeyer, R.C.C.; Smit, Jaap; van der Werf, A.; Willems, H.

    1985-01-01

    MOD/R models all views on the design space in relations. This is achieved by eliminating the package constraints, as are apparent in PCB oriented hardware description languages. Assisted by knowledge engineering it allows for a top-down, mostly hierarchical decomposition, virtually eliminating the

  2. Dietary self-control influences top-down guidance of attention to food cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higgs, S.; Dolmans, D.; Humphreys, G.W.; Rutters, F.

    2015-01-01

    Motivational objects attract attention due to their rewarding properties, but less is known about the role that top-down cognitive processes play in the attention paid to motivationally relevant objects and how this is affected by relevant behavioural traits. Here we assess how thinking about food

  3. The distributed neural system for top-down letter processing: an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangang; Feng, Lu; Li, Ling; Tian, Jie

    2011-03-01

    This fMRI study used Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) to investigate top-down letter processing with an illusory letter detection task. After an initial training that became increasingly difficult, participant was instructed to detect a letter from pure noise images where there was actually no letter. Such experimental paradigm allowed for isolating top-down components of letter processing and minimizing the influence of bottom-up perceptual input. A distributed cortical network of top-down letter processing was identified by analyzing the functional connectivity patterns of letter-preferential area (LA) within the left fusiform gyrus. Such network extends from the visual cortex to high level cognitive cortexes, including the left middle frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, left superior parietal gyrus, bilateral precuneus, and left inferior occipital gyrus. These findings suggest that top-down letter processing contains not only regions for processing of letter phonology and appearance, but also those involved in internal information generation and maintenance, and attention and memory processing.

  4. VLSI top-down design based on the separation of hierarchies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaanenburg, L.; Broekema, A.; Leenstra, J.; Huys, C.

    1986-01-01

    Despite the presence of structure, interactions between the three views on VLSI design still lead to lengthy iterations. By separating the hierarchies for the respective views, the interactions are reduced. This separated hierarchy allows top-down design with functional abstractions as exemplified

  5. Cu2+-assisted two dimensional charge-mass double focusing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis of histone variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyang; Tang, Xuemei; Ding, Mengjie; Zhong, Hongying

    2014-12-10

    Abundant isoforms and dynamic posttranslational modifications cause the separation and identification of histone variants to be experimentally challenging. To meet this need, we employ two-dimensional electrophoretic gel separation followed by mass spectrometric detection which takes advantage of the chelation of Cu(2+) with amino acid residues exposed on the surfaces of the histone proteins. Acid-extracted rat liver histones were first mixed with CuSO4 solution and then separated in one dimension with triton-acid-urea (TAU) gel electrophoresis and in a second dimension using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separations result from both the changes in charge and mass upon Cu(2+) chelation. Identities of each separated gel bands were obtained by using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). It was found that the migration of H3 histone isoforms of rat liver is markedly affected by the use of Cu(2+) ions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of accelerator mass spectrometric measurement with liquid scintillation counting measurement for the determination of 14C in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuike, Kaeko; Yamada, Yoshimune; Amano, Hikaru

    2010-01-01

    The concentrations of organically-bound 14 C in tree-ring cellulose of a Japanese Black Pine grown in Shika-machi (37.0 deg. N, 136.8 deg. E) and those of a Japanese Cedar grown in Kanazawa (36.5 deg. N, 136.7 deg. E), Japan, were analyzed for the ring-years from 1989 to 1998 by the accelerator mass spectrometric measurement. The results were compared with those of the same samples analyzed by the liquid scintillation counting measurement to determine the reliability of liquid scintillation counting measurement. An important result of this study is that the sensitivity and reproducibility of accelerator mass spectrometric measurement was almost equal to that of liquid scintillation counting measurement.

  7. The Role of Top-down Attention in the Cocktail Party: Revisiting Cherry's Experiment after Sixty Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchegiani, Letizia; Karadogan, Seliz; Andersen, Taja

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the role of top-down task drive attention in the cocktail party problem. In a recently proposed computational model of top-down attention it is possible to simulate the cocktail party problem and make predictions about sensitivity to confounders under different levels of attention....... Based on such simulations we expect that under strong top-down attention pattern recognition is improved as the model can compensate for noise and confounders. We next investigate the role of temporal and spectral overlaps and speech intelligibility in humans, and how the presence of a task influences...... computational top-down attention model....

  8. Non-destructive Inspection of Top-Down Construction Joints of Column in SRC Structure using Ultrasonic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seok Kyun; Baek, Un Chan; Lee, Han Bum; Kim, Myoung Mo

    2000-01-01

    The joint treatment of concrete is one of the technical problems in top down construction method. Joints created with the top down construction result in serious weakness from the aspects of both structural and water-barrier function. Ultrasonic method was used for the inspection of top down construction joints of a various column in SRC structure in this study. The advantages and limitations of this method for non-destructive inspection in top down construction joints are investigated. As a result, it has been verified that the semi-direct measurement method is more effective than the other methods for detecting the voids of construction joints using ultrasonic method

  9. Mass spectrometric analysis of electrophoretically separated allergens and proteases in grass pollen diffusates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geczy Carolyn L

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollens are important triggers for allergic asthma and seasonal rhinitis, and proteases released by major allergenic pollens can injure airway epithelial cells in vitro. Disruption of mucosal epithelial integrity by proteases released by inhaled pollens could promote allergic sensitisation. Methods Pollen diffusates from Kentucky blue grass (Poa pratensis, rye grass (Lolium perenne and Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon were assessed for peptidase activity using a fluorogenic substrate, as well as by gelatin zymography. Following one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Coomassie-stained individual bands/spots were excised, subjected to tryptic digestion and analysed by mass spectrometry, either MALDI reflectron TOF or microcapillary liquid chromatography MS-MS. Database searches were used to identify allergens and other plant proteins in pollen diffusates. Results All pollen diffusates tested exhibited peptidase activity. Gelatin zymography revealed high Mr proteolytic activity at ~ 95,000 in all diffusates and additional proteolytic bands in rye and Bermuda grass diffusates, which appeared to be serine proteases on the basis of inhibition studies. A proteolytic band at Mr ~ 35,000 in Bermuda grass diffusate, which corresponded to an intense band detected by Western blotting using a monoclonal antibody to the timothy grass (Phleum pratense group 1 allergen Phl p 1, was identified by mass spectrometric analysis as the group 1 allergen Cyn d 1. Two-dimensional analysis similarly demonstrated proteolytic activity corresponding to protein spots identified as Cyn d 1. Conclusion One- and two-dimensional electrophoretic separation, combined with analysis by mass spectrometry, is useful for rapid determination of the identities of pollen proteins. A component of the proteolytic activity in Bermuda grass diffusate is likely to be related to the allergen Cyn d 1.

  10. Reply to "On Vaporization of liquid Pb-Li eutectic alloy from 1000 K to 1200 K- A high temperature mass spectrometric study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Uttam; Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2018-03-01

    This communication is in response to a letter to editor commenting on the authors' earlier paper "Vaporization of liquid Pb-Li eutectic alloy from 1000 K to 1200 K - A high temperature mass spectrometric study".

  11. The gas-chromatographic and gas-chromatographic-mass-spectrometric identification of halogen-containing organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaspov, B. V.; Zenkevich, I. G.; Rodin, A. A.

    1989-09-01

    The problem of identifying halogen-containing organic compounds in their gas-chromatographic and gas-chromatographic-mass-spectrometric (GC-MS) determination in different materials has been examined. Particular attention has been paid not to the complete characterisation of methods for carrying out this analysis but to the most important problem of increasing the selectivity at the stages of sampling, separation, and interpretation of the gas-chromatographic and GC-MS information. The bibliography contains 292 references.

  12. Determination of deuterium in metal by vacuum fusion-mass spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Yukio; Akiyama, Shigeo; Ochiai, Ken-ichi; Asakura, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Ken-ichi

    1976-01-01

    A specimen of deuterium-enriched Zircaloy was prepared to study a method for the determination of deuterium in metal. The measuring apparatus consists of vacuum fusion section (10 -5 -10 -4 Torr), gas extracting and collecting section, the section of introducing both standard D 2 and HD gases into a gas holder, and mass spectrometric analysis section. The deuterium in Zircaloy can be extracted by 100% for 5 min. at 1600 0 C. The main components of the extracted gas are H 2 , D 2 , HD, CO, H 2 O and N 2 . Deuterium is determined by the calculation from the determinations of D 2 and HD. The amounts of D 2 and HD gases in the specimen were obtained from the calibration curve prepared and the spectrum intensity of D 2 + and HD + resulted from specimen analysis. As a result of the analysis of D 2 -enriched Zircaloy, it has been found that the precision of the determination is within the coefficient variation of about 3% for the extracted D 2 gas amount of 10 -3 -10 -2 ml (STP), including the deuterium segregation in the specimen, and the determination limit was 1 x 10 -5 ml (STP). (Kobatake, H.)

  13. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric determination of patulin in apple juice using atmospheric pressure photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Masahiko; Daishima, Shigeki; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a comparison between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and the recently introduced atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) technique for the liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric (LC/MS) determination of patulin in clear apple juice. A column switching technique for on-line extraction of clear apple juice was developed. The parameters investigated for the optimization of APPI were the ion source parameters fragmentor voltage, capillary voltage, and vaporizer temperature, and also mobile phase composition and flow rate. Furthermore, chemical noise and signal suppression of analyte signals due to sample matrix interference were investigated for both APCI and APPI. The results indicated that APPI provides lower chemical noise and signal suppression in comparison with APCI. The linear range for patulin in apple juice (correlation coefficient >0.999) was 0.2-100 ng mL(-1). Mean recoveries of patulin in three apple juices ranged from 94.5 to 103.2%, and the limit of detection (S/N = 3), repeatability and reproducibility were 1.03-1.50 ng mL(-1), 3.9-5.1% and 7.3-8.2%, respectively. The total analysis time was 10.0 min. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Quantum dots assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric detection of carbohydrates: qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-04-01

    A quantum dots (QDs) assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (QDA-LDI-MS) strategy was proposed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a series of carbohydrates. The adsorption of carbohydrates on the modified surface of different QDs as the matrices depended mainly on the formation of hydrogen bonding, which led to higher MS intensity than those with conventional organic matrix. The effects of QDs concentration and sample preparation method were explored for improving the selective ionization process and the detection sensitivity. The proposed approach offered a new dimension to the application of QDs as matrices for MALDI-MS research of carbohydrates. It could be used for quantitative measurement of glucose concentration in human serum with good performance. The QDs served as a matrix showed the advantages of low background, higher sensitivity, convenient sample preparation and excellent stability under vacuum. The QDs assisted LDI-MS approach has promising application to the analysis of carbohydrates in complex biological samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Sequence-specific capture of protein-DNA complexes for mass spectrometric protein identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsien Wu

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene transcription is fundamental to the existence of complex multicellular organisms such as humans. Although it is widely recognized that much of gene regulation is controlled by gene-specific protein-DNA interactions, there presently exists little in the way of tools to identify proteins that interact with the genome at locations of interest. We have developed a novel strategy to address this problem, which we refer to as GENECAPP, for Global ExoNuclease-based Enrichment of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics. In this approach, formaldehyde cross-linking is employed to covalently link DNA to its associated proteins; subsequent fragmentation of the DNA, followed by exonuclease digestion, produces a single-stranded region of the DNA that enables sequence-specific hybridization capture of the protein-DNA complex on a solid support. Mass spectrometric (MS analysis of the captured proteins is then used for their identification and/or quantification. We show here the development and optimization of GENECAPP for an in vitro model system, comprised of the murine insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 promoter region and FoxO1, a member of the forkhead rhabdomyosarcoma (FoxO subfamily of transcription factors, which binds specifically to the IGFBP1 promoter. This novel strategy provides a powerful tool for studies of protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions.

  16. Vaporization study on vanadium-oxygen solid solution by mass spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchorndhevakul, W.; Matsui, Tsuneo; Naito, Keiji

    1986-01-01

    The vapor pressures over vanadium-oxygen solid solution (0.001 ≤ O/V ≤ 0.145) were measured by mass-spectrometric method in the temperature range of 1,855 ∼ 2,117 K. The main vapor species were observed to be V(g) and VO(g). The vapor pressure of V(g) is higher than that of VO(g) over the solid solutions with all O/V ratios except for O/V = 0.145. The vapor pressure of V(g) is nearly independent of O/V ratio. The vapor pressure of VO(g) decreases with decreasing O/V ratio. The oxygen partial pressure was calculated as a function of temperature and O/V ratio from the vapor pressures of V(g) and VO(g), from which the partial molar enthalpy and entropy of oxygen in the solid solution were determined. The partial molar enthalpy of oxygen was observed to be independent of composition, suggesting the presence of very weak interaction between interstitial oxygens. The compositional dependence of the partial molar entropy of oxygen can be explained by assuming the occupation of the octahedral site in bcc vanadium lattice by the interstitial oxygens. The excess partial molar entropy of oxygen was compared with the value derived from the sum of the contributions from the volume expansion, electronic heat capacity and vibrational terms. (author)

  17. Mass spectrometric investigation of neutral and charged constituents in saturated vapor over PrI3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motalov, V.B.; Vorobiev, D.E.; Kudin, L.S.; Markus, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric technique was used to study vapor species over praseodymium triiodide. The monomer, PrI 3 , and dimer, Pr 2 I 6 , molecules and the negative ions, PrI 4 - and Pr 2 I 7 - , were observed in saturated vapor in the temperature range from 856 K to 1048 K. The partial vapor pressures of neutral constituents were determined and the enthalpies of sublimation obtained using the second and the third laws of thermodynamics (Δ s H deg. (298.15 K) = 291 ± 4 kJ mol -1 for PrI 3 , and Δ s H deg. (298.15 K) = 400 ± 30 kJ mol -1 for Pr 2 I 6 ). The equilibrium constants for various ion molecular reactions were measured and the enthalpies of reactions obtained. The enthalpies of formation, Δ f H deg. (298.15 K) kJ mol -1 , of gaseous molecules and ions were calculated and are as follows: -374 ± 6 (PrI 3 ), -929 ± 30 (Pr 2 I 6 ), -867 ± 30 (PrI 4 - ), -1432 ± 50 (Pr 2 I 7 - )

  18. The interlaboratory experiment IDA-72 on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Drosselmeyer, E.

    1975-07-01

    Within the framework of the Safeguards Project of the Federal Republic of Germany at the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe an analytical intercomparison program was carried out in cooperation with 22 laboratories of 13 countries or international organizations. The main objective was the acquisition of basic data on the errors involved in the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis if it is applied to the determination of uranium and plutonium in diluted active feed solutions of reprocessing plants in routine operation. The results were evaluated by statistical methods mainly in regard to the calculation of the estimates of the variances for the different error components contributing to the total error of this analytical technique. Furthermore, the performance of two new methods for sample conditioning suggested by the International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, and the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (EURATOM), Karlsruhe, was successfully tested. The results of some investigations on the stability of diluted high active feed solutions and on comparison analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are also included. Data on the analytical efforts (manhours) invested in this study are reported as well as general experiences made in the organization and performance of an experiment on such an extended international level. (orig.) [de

  19. Analysis of Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides by Capillary GC with Mass Spectrometric Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Hrouzková

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals, among them many pesticides, alter the normal functioning of the endocrine system of both wildlife and humans at very low concentration levels. Therefore, the importance of method development for their analysis in food and the environment is increasing. This also covers contributions in the field of ultra-trace analysis of multicomponent mixtures of organic pollutants in complex matrices. With this fact conventional capillary gas chromatography (CGC and fast CGC with mass spectrometric detection (MS has acquired a real importance in the analysis of endocrine disrupting pesticide (EDP residues. This paper provides an overview of GC methods, including sample preparation steps, for analysis of EDPs in a variety of matrices at ultra-trace concentration levels. Emphasis is put on separation method, mode of MS detection and ionization and obtained limits of detection and quantification. Analysis time is one of the most important aspects that should be considered in the choice of analytical methods for routine analysis. Therefore, the benefits of developed fast GC methods are important.

  20. Mass Spectrometric Identification and Differentiation of Botulinum Neurotoxins through Toxin Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, Suzanne R; Barr, John R

    2013-08-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism, which can be lethal if untreated. There are seven known serotypes of BoNT, A-G, defined by their response to antisera. Many serotypes are distinguished into differing subtypes based on amino acid sequence and immunogenic properties, and some subtypes are further differentiated into toxin variants. Toxin characterization is important as different types of BoNT can respond differently to medical countermeasures for botulism, and characterization of the toxin can aid in epidemiologic and forensic investigations. Proteomic techniques have been established to determine the serotype, subtype, or toxin variant of BoNT. These techniques involve digestion of the toxin into peptides, tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis of the peptides, and database searching to identify the BoNT protein. These techniques demonstrate the capability to detect BoNT and its neurotoxin-associated proteins, and differentiate the toxin from other toxins which are up to 99.9% identical in some cases. This differentiation can be accomplished from toxins present in a complex matrix such as stool, food, or bacterial cultures and no DNA is required.

  1. Mass Spectrometric Methodologies for Investigating the Metabolic Signatures of Parkinson's Disease: Current Progress and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Emily L; Koelmel, Jeremy P; Yost, Richard A; Okun, Michael S; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Garrett, Timothy J

    2018-03-06

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting from the loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra as well as degeneration of motor and nonmotor basal ganglia circuitries. Typically known for classical motor deficits (tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia), early stages of the disease are associated with a large nonmotor component (depression, anxiety, apathy, etc.). Currently, there are no definitive biomarkers of PD, and the measurement of dopamine metabolites does not allow for detection of prodromal PD nor does it aid in long-term monitoring of disease progression. Given that PD is increasingly recognized as complex and heterogeneous, involving several neurotransmitters and proteins, it is of importance that we advance interdisciplinary studies to further our knowledge of the molecular and cellular pathways that are affected in PD. This approach will possibly yield useful biomarkers for early diagnosis and may assist in the development of disease-modifying therapies. Here, we discuss preanalytical factors associated with metabolomics studies, summarize current mass spectrometric methodologies used to evaluate the metabolic signature of PD, and provide future perspectives of the rapidly developing field of MS in the context of PD.

  2. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Noncovalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-12-01

    "Native" mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven to be increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode, and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD of the hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chains) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains.

  3. Mass spectrometric methods for studying nutrient mineral and trace element absorption and metabolism in humans using stable isotopes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crews, H.M.; Eagles, J.; Mellon, F.A.; Luten, J.B.; McGaw, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for determining stable isotopes of nutrient minerals and trace elements in human metabolic studies are described and discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the techniques of electron ionization, fast atom bombardment, thermal ionization, and inductively coupled plasma and gas chromatography mass spectrometry are evaluated with reference to their accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and convenience, and the demands of human nutrition research. Examples of specific applications are described and the significance of current developments in mass spectrometry are discussed with reference to present and probable future research needs. (Author)

  4. Mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios and its corrections for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongguo

    1989-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of magnesium isotopic ratios by the use of uranyl nitrate added to magnesium samples to act as a binding agent is reported. Prebaking empty filaments and preheating filaments with deposited magnesium samples on its surface in a vacuum are employed to reduce the Na signal from the thenium-ribbon. Methods for correcting magnesium isotopic ratios for electron multiplier discrimination and mass fractionation are described in detail. The results of the determination of natural magnesium isotopic ratios are 25 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.12660 (1±0.01%) and 26 Mg/ 24 Mg = 0.13938 (1±0.10%). The magnesium isotopic ratios of rich - 26 Mg-2 sample and rich- 25 Mg-1 sample are 24 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.003463 (1±0.2%), 25 Mg/ 26 Mg = 0.001656 (±0.2%) and 24 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.006716 (1±0.2%), 26 Mg/ 25 Mg = 0.007264 (1±0.2%) respectively

  5. Rapid Mass Spectrometric Analysis of a Novel Fucoidan, Extracted from the Brown Alga Coccophora langsdorfii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav D. Anastyuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel highly sulfated (35% fucoidan fraction Cf2 , which contained, along with fucose, galactose and traces of xylose and uronic acids was purified from the brown alga Coccophora langsdorfii. Its structural features were predominantly determined (in comparison with fragments of known structure by a rapid mass spectrometric investigation of the low-molecular-weight fragments, obtained by “mild” (5 mg/mL and “exhaustive” (maximal concentration autohydrolysis. Tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra (MALDI-TOF/TOFMS of fucooligosaccharides with even degree of polymerization (DP, obtained by “mild” autohydrolysis, were the same as that observed for fucoidan from Fucus evanescens, which have a backbone of alternating (1 → 3- and (1 → 4 linked sulfated at C-2 and sometimes at C-4 of 3-linked α-L-Fucp residues. Fragmentation patterns of oligosaccharides with odd DP indicated sulfation at C-2 and at C-4 of (1 → 3 linked α-L-Fucp residues on the reducing terminus. Minor sulfation at C-3 was also suggested. The “exhaustive” autohydrolysis allowed us to observe the “mixed” oligosaccharides, built up of fucose/xylose and fucose/galactose. Xylose residues were found to occupy both the reducing and nonreducing termini of FucXyl disaccharides. Nonreducing galactose residues as part of GalFuc disaccharides were found to be linked, possibly, by 2-type of linkage to fucose residues and were found to be sulfated, most likely, at position C-2.

  6. A comparative study of carbocyanine dyes measured with TOF-SIMS and other mass spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriaensen, L.; Vangaever, F.; Gijbels, R.

    2004-01-01

    A series of cationic, zwitterionic and anionic carbocyanine dyes have been measured with TOF-SIMS under Ga + bombardment. In contrast to the cationic dyes, which give very intense molecular ion and characteristic fragment signals in the positive mode, the anionic dyes produce only a few fragment signals of low intensity. Even in the negative mode no molecular ions of the anionic dyes are seen in the recorded spectra. Actually, none of the studied molecules produces negative SIMS spectra containing molecular information. A comparative study was made between TOF-SIMS and other mass spectrometric techniques, namely, fast atom bombardment (FAB), electro spray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). The measurements show that MALDI, ESI as well as FAB all give rise to spectra containing molecular ion signals, either in the positive, in the negative or in both modes. Unlike with TOF-SIMS, this observation also applies to the anionic dyes. Characteristic fragments of the dyes are present in all the recorded spectra. However, TOF-SIMS appears to induce more fragment ions in comparison with the other techniques. ESI, for instance, produces hardly any molecular fragments. Finally, the kind of fragment ions recorded depends upon the technique used, though some signals are produced by various techniques. For these carbocyanine dyes there is no clear correlation between the mass spectra obtained with TOF-SIMS and spectra obtained with the other techniques. This points to different desorption/ionization mechanisms, and makes it difficult, in practice, to make predictions on the feasibility of TOF-SIMS, starting from results of the other MS techniques

  7. High-resolution ultrahigh-pressure long column reversed-phase liquid chromatography for top-down proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Piehowski, Paul D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Kim, Sangtae; Zhao, Rui; Qu, Yi; Robinson, E. W.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2017-05-01

    We report development of an approach providing high-resolution RPLC of proteins and its utility for mass spectrometry-based top-down proteomics. A chromatographic peak capacity of ~450 was achieved for proteins and large polypeptides having MWs up to 43 kDa in the context of proteomics applications. RPLC column lengths from 20 to 200 cm, particle sizes from 1.5 to 5 m, bonding alkyl chains from C1 to C2, C4, C8, and C18, and particle surface structures that spanned porous, superficially porous (porous shell, core-shell), and nonporous were investigated at pressures up to14K psi. Column length was found as the most important factor for >20 kDa proteins in gradient RPLC, and shortening column length degraded RPLC resolution and sensitivity regardless of the size and surface structure of the packing particles used. The alkyl chains bonded to the silica particle surface significantly affected the RPLC recovery and efficiency, and short alkyl C1-C4 phases provided higher sensitivity and resolution than C8 and C18 phases. Long gradient separations (e.g., >10 hours) with long columns (e.g., 100 cm) were particularly effective in conjunction with use of high accuracy mass spectrometers (e.g., the Orbitrap Elite) for top-down proteomics with improved proteoform coverage by allowing multiple HCD, CID, and ETD dissociation modes. It was also found that HCD produced small fragments useful for proteoform identification, while low energy CID and ETD often complemented HCD by providing large fragments.

  8. Relative importance of plant-mediated bottom-up and top-down forces on herbivore abundance on Brassica oleracea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.; Broekgaarden, C.; Kabouw, P.; Oude Lenferink, K.; Poelman, E.H.; Vet, L.E.M.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    1. Arthropod communities are structured by complex interactions between bottom-up (resource-based) and top-down (natural enemy-based) forces. Their relative importance in shaping arthropod communities, however, continues to be under debate. Bottom-up and top-down forces can be affected by

  9. The generation of myricetin-nicotinamide nanococrystals by top down and bottom up technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyu; Hong, Chao; Li, Guowen; Ma, Ping; Xie, Yan

    2016-09-30

    Myricetin-nicotinamide (MYR-NIC) nanococrystal preparation methods were developed and optimized using both top down and bottom up approaches. The grinding (top down) method successfully achieved nanococrystals, but there were some micrometer range particles and aggregation. The key consideration of the grinding technology was to control the milling time to determine a balance between the particle size and distribution. In contrast, a modified bottom up approach based on a solution method in conjunction with sonochemistry resulted in a uniform MYR-NIC nanococrystal that was confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and differential scanning calorimeter, and the particle dissolution rate and amount were significantly greater than that of MYR-NIC cocrystal. Notably, this was a simple method without the addition of any non-solvent. We anticipate our findings will provide some guidance for future nanococrystal preparation as well as its application in both chemical and pharmaceutical area.

  10. Semi top-down method combined with earth-bank, an effective method for basement construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, B. Q.; Tam, Ng M.

    2018-04-01

    Choosing an appropriate method of deep excavation not only plays a decisive role in technical success, but also in economics of the construction project. Presently, we mainly base on to key methods: “Bottom-up” and “Top-down” construction method. Right now, this paper presents an another method of construction that is “Semi Top-down method combining with earth-bank” in order to take the advantages and limit the weakness of the above methods. The Bottom-up method was improved by using the earth-bank to stabilize retaining walls instead of the bracing steel struts. The Top-down method was improved by using the open cut method for the half of the earthwork quantities.

  11. Mechanisms of knowledge flows in bottom-up and top-down cluster initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dyba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge flows are widely believed to be a phenomenon of clusters, and inducing them is one of the chief objectives in establishing and promoting cluster initiatives (CI. However, not many studies discuss how these flows and their effects may differ depending on the mode of CI creation and on the role of public authorities in this process. The main aim of this article is to compare mechanisms of knowledge flows in bottom-up and top-down cluster initiatives. The results of an empirical research involving two case studies in western Poland, obtained through the use of Social Network Analysis (SNA, allowed stating that in bottom-up cluster initiatives firms which were innovation leaders played a prime role in disseminating technological and business knowledge, while in the top-down initiatives the most important were representatives of universities and research centres as well as formal coordinators of cooperation. Policy implications stemming from these results were identified.

  12. Enhanced stimulated emission in ZnO thin films using microdisk top-down structuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomenyo, K.; Kostcheev, S.; Lérondel, G. [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6281, Université de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, CS 42060, 10004 Troyes Cedex (France); Gadallah, A.-S. [Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS UMR 6281, Université de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, CS 42060, 10004 Troyes Cedex (France); Department of Laser Sciences and Interactions, National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Rogers, D. J. [Nanovation, 8, route de Chevreuse, 78117 Châteaufort (France)

    2014-05-05

    Microdisks were fabricated in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films using a top-down approach combining electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. These microdisk structured thin films exhibit a stimulated surface emission between 3 and 7 times higher than that from a reference film depending on the excitation power density. Emission peak narrowing, reduction in lasing threshold and blue-shifting of the emission wavelength were observed along with enhancement in the emitted intensity. Results indicate that this enhancement is due to an increase in the internal quantum efficiency combined with an amplification of the stimulated emission. An analysis in terms of waveguiding is presented in order to explain these effects. These results demonstrate that very significant gains in emission can be obtained through conventional microstructuration without the need for more onerous top-down nanostructuration techniques.

  13. A top-down approach to fabrication of high quality vertical heterostructure nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Sun, Minghua; Ding, Kang; Hill, Martin T; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate a novel top-down approach for fabricating nanowires with unprecedented complexity and optical quality by taking advantage of a nanoscale self-masking effect. We realized vertical arrays of nanowires of 20-40 nm in diameter with 16 segments of complex longitudinal InGaAsP/InP structures. The unprecedented high quality of etched wires is evidenced by the narrowest photoluminescence linewidth ever produced in similar wavelengths, indistinguishable from that of the corresponding wafer. This top-down, mask-free, large scale approach is compatible with the established device fabrication processes and could serve as an important alternative to the bottom-up approach, significantly expanding ranges and varieties of applications of nanowire technology.

  14. Learning affects top down and bottom up modulation of eye movements in decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orquin, Jacob Lund; Bagger, Martin; Mueller Loose, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Repeated decision making is subject to changes over time such as decreases in decision time and information use and increases in decision accuracy. We show that a traditional strategy selection view of decision making cannot account for these temporal dynamics without relaxing main assumptions...... about what defines a decision strategy. As an alternative view we suggest that temporal dynamics in decision making are driven by attentional and perceptual processes and that this view has been expressed in the information reduction hypothesis. We test the information reduction hypothesis by integrating...... it in a broader framework of top down and bottom up processes and derive the predictions that repeated decisions increase top down control of attention capture which in turn leads to a reduction in bottom up attention capture. To test our hypotheses we conducted a repeated discrete choice experiment with three...

  15. A balance of bottom-up and top-down in linking climate policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jessica F.; Sterner, Thomas; Wagner, Gernot

    2014-12-01

    Top-down climate negotiations embodied by the Kyoto Protocol have all but stalled, chiefly because of disagreements over targets and objections to financial transfers. To avoid those problems, many have shifted their focus to linkage of bottom-up climate policies such as regional carbon markets. This approach is appealing, but we identify four obstacles to successful linkage: different levels of ambition; competing domestic policy objectives; objections to financial transfers; and the difficulty of close regulatory coordination. Even with a more decentralized approach, overcoming the 'global warming gridlock' of the intergovernmental negotiations will require close international coordination. We demonstrate how a balance of bottom-up and top-down elements can create a path toward an effective global climate architecture.

  16. Analysis of solids by spark-source mass spectrometry; Analyse des solides au spectrometre de masse a etincelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefani, R; Desjardins, M; Brun, J C; Cornu, A; Bourguillot, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Spark source mass spectrometer MS7 has been designed to determine traces of impurities in solids without standards. An atlas of 12 000 lines, assembled in the Grenoble laboratory, allows a quick investigation of mass spectra, notwithstanding their complexity due to multiply charged and polyatomic darkening. Photometric measurements increase accuracy calibration curve is known for each photo-plate. Further, reproducibility is better, if random fluctuations of matrix line darkening are corrected. So far, in a concentration range of 0,01 to 1 000 ppm (atomic), reproducibility is approximately 20 per cent, but absolute value of results depends on 'sensitivity coefficients'. (authors) [French] Le spectrometre de masse a etincelles, de type MS7, est destine a l'analyse chimique de traces dans les solides, sans echantillons etalons. L'emploi de catalogues de 12 000 raies, elabores au laboratoire, permet un depouillement rapide des spectres, malgre leur complexite due aux ionisations multiples et aux associations d'atomes. Le niveau d'apparition d'une impurete donne une estimation de sa teneur, mais la valeur du renseignement depend de la preparation des electrodes et de la connaissance plus ou moins approfondie des processus d'ionisation dans l'etincelle et de noircissement des emulsions photographiques. Les mesures photometriques augmentent la precision des resultats, si l'on determine systematiquement la courbe de noircissement de chaque plaque. De meme la reproductibilite est amelioree si l'on tient compte des fluctuations statistiques du noircissement de l'emulsion par les ions de la matrice. Actuellement, les concentrations mesurees dans le domaine de 0,01 a 1000 ppm atomiques sont reproductibles a 20 pour cent pres, mais leur valeur absolue n'est assuree qu'a un coefficient 3 pres. Des etudes sont en cours pour calibrer l'appareil en valeur absolue, par une determination des coefficients de sensibilite a partir d'echantillons etalons. (auteurs)

  17. Top down and bottom up selection drives variations in frequency and form of a visual signal

    OpenAIRE

    Yeh, Chien-Wei; Blamires, Sean J.; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I.-Min

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and form of visual signals can be shaped by selection from predators, prey or both. When a signal simultaneously attracts predators and prey, selection may favour a strategy that minimizes risks while attracting prey. Accordingly, varying the frequency and form of the silken decorations added to their web may be a way that Argiope spiders minimize predation while attracting prey. Nonetheless, the role of extraneous factors renders the influences of top down and bottom up selecti...

  18. Dissociable effects of top-down and bottom-up attention during episodic encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R.; Hutchinson, J. Benjamin; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the formation of memories for life’s experiences—episodic memory—is influenced by how we attend to those experiences, yet the neural mechanisms by which attention shapes episodic encoding are still unclear. We investigated how top-down and bottom-up attention contribute to memory encoding of visual objects in humans by manipulating both types of attention during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of episodic memory formation. We show that dorsal parietal cortex—specifically, intraparietal sulcus (IPS)—was engaged during top-down attention and was also recruited during the successful formation of episodic memories. By contrast, bottom-up attention engaged ventral parietal cortex—specifically, temporoparietal junction (TPJ)—and was also more active during encoding failure. Functional connectivity analyses revealed further dissociations in how top-down and bottom-up attention influenced encoding: while both IPS and TPJ influenced activity in perceptual cortices thought to represent the information being encoded (fusiform/lateral occipital cortex), they each exerted opposite effects on memory encoding. Specifically, during a preparatory period preceding stimulus presentation, a stronger drive from IPS was associated with a higher likelihood that the subsequently attended stimulus would be encoded. By contrast, during stimulus processing, stronger connectivity with TPJ was associated with a lower likelihood the stimulus would be successfully encoded. These findings suggest that during encoding of visual objects into episodic memory, top-down and bottom-up attention can have opposite influences on perceptual areas that subserve visual object representation, suggesting that one manner in which attention modulates memory is by altering the perceptual processing of to-be-encoded stimuli. PMID:21880922

  19. Top-Down Influences on Local Networks: Basic Theory with Experimental Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh eSrinivasan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The response of a population of sensory neurons to an external stimulus depends not only on the receptive field properties of the neurons, but also the level of arousal and attention or goal-oriented cognitive biases that guide information processing. These top-down effects on the sensory neurons bias the output of the neurons and affect behavioral outcomes such as stimulus detection, discrimination, and response time. In any physiological study, neural dynamics are observed in a specific brain state; the background state partly determines neuronal excitability. Experimental studies in humans and animal models have also demonstrated that slow oscillations (typically in the alpha or theta bands modulate the fast oscillations (gamma band associated with local networks of neurons. Cross-frequency interaction is of interest as a mechanism for top-down or bottom-up interactions between systems at different spatial scales. We develop a generic model of top-down influences on local networks appropriate for comparison with EEG. EEG provides excellent temporal resolution to investigate neuronal oscillations but is space-averaged on the cm scale. Thus, appropriate EEG models are developed in terms of population synaptic activity. We used the Wilson-Cowan population model to investigate fast (gamma band oscillations generated by a local network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We modified the Wilson-Cowan equations to make them more physiologically realistic by explicitly incorporating background state variables into the model. We found that the population response is strongly influenced by the background state. We apply the model to reproduce the modulation of gamma rhythms by theta rhythms as has been observed in animal models and human ECoG and EEG studies. The concept of a dynamic background state presented here using the Wilson-Cowan model can be readily applied to incorporate top-down modulation in more detailed models of specific sensory

  20. Experimental evidence for enhanced top-down control of freshwater macrophytes with nutrient enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S; Nolet, Bart A

    2014-11-01

    The abundance of primary producers is controlled by bottom-up and top-down forces. Despite the fact that there is consensus that the abundance of freshwater macrophytes is strongly influenced by the availability of resources for plant growth, the importance of top-down control by vertebrate consumers is debated, because field studies yield contrasting results. We hypothesized that these bottom-up and top-down forces may interact, and that consumer impact on macrophyte abundance depends on the nutrient status of the water body. To test this hypothesis, experimental ponds with submerged vegetation containing a mixture of species were subjected to a fertilization treatment and we introduced consumers (mallard ducks, for 8 days) on half of the ponds in a full factorial design. Over the whole 66-day experiment fertilized ponds became dominated by Elodea nuttallii and ponds without extra nutrients by Chara globularis. Nutrient addition significantly increased plant N and P concentrations. There was a strong interactive effect of duck presence and pond nutrient status: macrophyte biomass was reduced (by 50%) after the presence of the ducks on fertilized ponds, but not in the unfertilized ponds. We conclude that nutrient availability interacts with top-down control of submerged vegetation. This may be explained by higher plant palatability at higher nutrient levels, either by a higher plant nutrient concentration or by a shift towards dominance of more palatable plant species, resulting in higher consumer pressure. Including nutrient availability may offer a framework to explain part of the contrasting field observations of consumer control of macrophyte abundance.

  1. Preferential effect of isoflurane on top-down vs. bottom-up pathways in sensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Aeyal; Grady, Sean M; Krause, Bryan M; Uhlrich, Daniel J; Manning, Karen A; Banks, Matthew I

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of loss of consciousness (LOC) under anesthesia is unknown. Because consciousness depends on activity in the cortico-thalamic network, anesthetic actions on this network are likely critical for LOC. Competing theories stress the importance of anesthetic actions on bottom-up "core" thalamo-cortical (TC) vs. top-down cortico-cortical (CC) and matrix TC connections. We tested these models using laminar recordings in rat auditory cortex in vivo and murine brain slices. We selectively activated bottom-up vs. top-down afferent pathways using sensory stimuli in vivo and electrical stimulation in brain slices, and compared effects of isoflurane on responses evoked via the two pathways. Auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferent stimulation in brain slices evoked short latency current sinks in middle layers, consistent with activation of core TC afferents. By contrast, visual stimuli in vivo and stimulation of CC and matrix TC afferents in brain slices evoked responses mainly in superficial and deep layers, consistent with projection patterns of top-down afferents that carry visual information to auditory cortex. Responses to auditory stimuli in vivo and core TC afferents in brain slices were significantly less affected by isoflurane compared to responses triggered by visual stimuli in vivo and CC/matrix TC afferents in slices. At a just-hypnotic dose in vivo, auditory responses were enhanced by isoflurane, whereas visual responses were dramatically reduced. At a comparable concentration in slices, isoflurane suppressed both core TC and CC/matrix TC responses, but the effect on the latter responses was far greater than on core TC responses, indicating that at least part of the differential effects observed in vivo were due to local actions of isoflurane in auditory cortex. These data support a model in which disruption of top-down connectivity contributes to anesthesia-induced LOC, and have implications for understanding the neural basis of consciousness.

  2. Mature forms of the major seed storage albumins in sunflower: A mass spectrometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Bastian; Colgrave, Michelle L; Mylne, Joshua S; Rosengren, K Johan

    2016-09-16

    Seed storage albumins are abundant, water-soluble proteins that are degraded to provide critical nutrients for the germinating seedling. It has been established that the sunflower albumins encoded by SEED STORAGE ALBUMIN 2 (SESA2), SESA20 and SESA3 are the major components of the albumin-rich fraction of the common sunflower Helianthus annuus. To determine the structure of sunflowers most important albumins we performed a detailed chromatographic and mass spectrometric characterization to assess what post-translational processing they receive prior to deposition in the protein storage vacuole. We found that SESA2 and SESA20 each encode two albumins. The first of the two SESA2 albumins (SESA2-1) exists as a monomer of 116 or 117 residues, differing by a threonine at the C-terminus. The second of the two SESA2 albumins (SESA2-2) is a monomer of 128 residues. SESA20 encodes the albumin SESA20-2, which is a 127-residue monomer, whereas SESA20-1 was not abundant enough to be structurally described. SESA3, which has been partly characterized previously, was found in several forms with methylation of its asparagine residues. In contrast to other dicot albumins, which are generally matured into a heterodimer, all the dominant mature sunflower albumins SESA2, SESA20-2, SESA3 and its post-translationally modified analogue SESA3-a are monomeric. Sunflower plants have been bred to thrive in various climate zones making them favored crops to meet the growing worldwide demand by humans for protein. The abundance of seed storage proteins makes them an important source of protein for animal and human nutrition. This study explores the structures of the dominant sunflower napin-type seed storage albumins to understand what structures evolution has favored in the most abundant proteins in sunflower seed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Warming increases the top-down effects and metabolism of a subtidal herbivore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey A. Carr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecological theory and experiments indicate that warming can increase the relative strength of top-down effects via alterations to metabolic rates in several different systems, thereby resulting in decreased plant biomass at higher temperatures. However, the general influence of increased environmental temperature on top-down effects is not well understood in systems where organisms experience relatively large variation in temperature. Rapid ocean temperature changes are pervasive throughout the Galápagos Islands due to upwelling and downwelling of internal waves, ENSO events and seasonality. We measured the effect of large, but not uncommon, water temperature variation on the metabolism and grazing rate of a common subtidal herbivore and on photosynthesis of their algal prey in the Galápagos Islands in July 2012. We found that green urchin consumption and metabolism were greater at the higher temperature treatment (28°C, resulting in significantly less algal biomass. Our result that warming increased green urchin metabolic rates, even in a highly dynamic system, provides further support for a mechanistic link between environmental temperature and feeding rates. And further, our findings suggest individual response to temperature results in changes in top-down effects. And if this response is maintained over longer-time scales of days to weeks, this could translate to alterations of larger-scale ecological patterns, such as primary producer community composition and structure.

  4. A top-down design methodology and its implementation for VCSEL-based optical links design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiguang; Cao, Mingcui; Cai, Zilong

    2005-01-01

    In order to find the optimal design for a given specification of an optical communication link, an integrated simulation of electronic, optoelectronic, and optical components of a complete system is required. It is very important to be able to simulate at both system level and detailed model level. This kind of model is feasible due to the high potential of Verilog-AMS language. In this paper, we propose an effective top-down design methodology and employ it in the development of a complete VCSEL-based optical links simulation. The principle of top-down methodology is that the development would proceed from the system to device level. To design a hierarchical model for VCSEL based optical links, the design framework is organized in three levels of hierarchy. The models are developed, and implemented in Verilog-AMS. Therefore, the model parameters are fitted to measured data. A sample transient simulation demonstrates the functioning of our implementation. Suggestions for future directions in top-down methodology used for optoelectronic systems technology are also presented.

  5. The Primary Visual Cortex Is Differentially Modulated by Stimulus-Driven and Top-Down Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekisz, Marek; Bogdan, Wojciech; Ghazaryan, Anaida; Waleszczyk, Wioletta J.; Kublik, Ewa; Wróbel, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Selective attention can be focused either volitionally, by top-down signals derived from task demands, or automatically, by bottom-up signals from salient stimuli. Because the brain mechanisms that underlie these two attention processes are poorly understood, we recorded local field potentials (LFPs) from primary visual cortical areas of cats as they performed stimulus-driven and anticipatory discrimination tasks. Consistent with our previous observations, in both tasks, we found enhanced beta activity, which we have postulated may serve as an attention carrier. We characterized the functional organization of task-related beta activity by (i) cortical responses (EPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the optic chiasm and (ii) intracortical LFP correlations. During the anticipatory task, peripheral stimulation that was preceded by high-amplitude beta oscillations evoked large-amplitude EPs compared with EPs that followed low-amplitude beta. In contrast, during the stimulus-driven task, cortical EPs preceded by high-amplitude beta oscillations were, on average, smaller than those preceded by low-amplitude beta. Analysis of the correlations between the different recording sites revealed that beta activation maps were heterogeneous during the bottom-up task and homogeneous for the top-down task. We conclude that bottom-up attention activates cortical visual areas in a mosaic-like pattern, whereas top-down attentional modulation results in spatially homogeneous excitation. PMID:26730705

  6. A Top Down Strategy to Enhance Information Technologies into Israeli Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Guri-Rosenblit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the integration of the new information technologies (IT into Israeli higher education, and most particularly its research universities through a top-down strategy, initiated by the Israeli Council for Higher Education since the end of 1999. This top-down strategy has created a systemic change that will affect the many layers of university activities rather than in a random, sporadic manner undertaken by enthusiastic individuals. This article discusses the built-in contradictions and dilemmas in the process of adapting distance teaching methods by conventional universities in Israel (as well as in other higher education systems. It examines the merits of a top-down strategy aimed to implement the IT through a macro-level, systemic approach, and analyses the differential uses of the IT in Israeli higher education institutions, relating to variables of: access-outreach; teaching-learning processes; study materials production; data and information retrieval; administrative functions; the creation of researchers' communities; inter-institutional collaboration; and associated costs. The article concludes with some suggestions for effective implementation of the IT in different types of higher education institutions in a comprehensive and systematic manner, that will take into account their academic ethos and organizational infrastructure, and cater to the unique needs and characteristics of their relevant constituencies.

  7. Top-down influences of written text on perceived clarity of degraded speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Peelle, Jonathan E; Carlyon, Robert P; Davis, Matthew H

    2014-02-01

    An unresolved question is how the reported clarity of degraded speech is enhanced when listeners have prior knowledge of speech content. One account of this phenomenon proposes top-down modulation of early acoustic processing by higher-level linguistic knowledge. Alternative, strictly bottom-up accounts argue that acoustic information and higher-level knowledge are combined at a late decision stage without modulating early acoustic processing. Here we tested top-down and bottom-up accounts using written text to manipulate listeners' knowledge of speech content. The effect of written text on the reported clarity of noise-vocoded speech was most pronounced when text was presented before (rather than after) speech (Experiment 1). Fine-grained manipulation of the onset asynchrony between text and speech revealed that this effect declined when text was presented more than 120 ms after speech onset (Experiment 2). Finally, the influence of written text was found to arise from phonological (rather than lexical) correspondence between text and speech (Experiment 3). These results suggest that prior knowledge effects are time-limited by the duration of auditory echoic memory for degraded speech, consistent with top-down modulation of early acoustic processing by linguistic knowledge. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. How to inhibit a distractor location? Statistical learning versus active, top-down suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Benchi; Theeuwes, Jan

    2018-05-01

    Recently, Wang and Theeuwes (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 44(1), 13-17, 2018a) demonstrated the role of lingering selection biases in an additional singleton search task in which the distractor singleton appeared much more often in one location than in all other locations. For this location, there was less capture and selection efficiency was reduced. It was argued that statistical learning induces plasticity within the spatial priority map such that particular locations that are high likely to contain a distractor are suppressed relative to all other locations. The current study replicated these findings regarding statistical learning (Experiment 1) and investigated whether similar effects can be obtained by cueing the distractor location in a top-down way on a trial-by-trial basis. The results show that top-down cueing of the distractor location with long (1,500 ms; Experiment 2) and short stimulus-onset symmetries (SOAs) (600 ms; Experiment 3) does not result in suppression: The amount of capture nor the efficiency of selection was affected by the cue. If anything, we found an attentional benefit (instead of the suppression) for the short SOA. We argue that through statistical learning, weights within the attentional priority map are changed such that one location containing a salient distractor is suppressed relative to all other locations. Our cueing experiments show that this effect cannot be accomplished by active, top-down suppression. Consequences for recent theories of distractor suppression are discussed.

  9. 3D virtual human rapid modeling method based on top-down modeling mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Taotao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to satisfy the vast custom-made character demand of 3D virtual human and the rapid modeling in the field of 3D virtual reality, a new virtual human top-down rapid modeling method is put for-ward in this paper based on the systematic analysis of the current situation and shortage of the virtual hu-man modeling technology. After the top-level realization of virtual human hierarchical structure frame de-sign, modular expression of the virtual human and parameter design for each module is achieved gradu-al-level downwards. While the relationship of connectors and mapping restraints among different modules is established, the definition of the size and texture parameter is also completed. Standardized process is meanwhile produced to support and adapt the virtual human top-down rapid modeling practice operation. Finally, the modeling application, which takes a Chinese captain character as an example, is carried out to validate the virtual human rapid modeling method based on top-down modeling mechanism. The result demonstrates high modelling efficiency and provides one new concept for 3D virtual human geometric mod-eling and texture modeling.

  10. Top-down attention affects sequential regularity representation in the human visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Motohiro; Widmann, Andreas; Schröger, Erich

    2010-08-01

    Recent neuroscience studies using visual mismatch negativity (visual MMN), an event-related brain potential (ERP) index of memory-mismatch processes in the visual sensory system, have shown that although sequential regularities embedded in successive visual stimuli can be automatically represented in the visual sensory system, an existence of sequential regularity itself does not guarantee that the sequential regularity will be automatically represented. In the present study, we investigated the effects of top-down attention on sequential regularity representation in the visual sensory system. Our results showed that a sequential regularity (SSSSD) embedded in a modified oddball sequence where infrequent deviant (D) and frequent standard stimuli (S) differing in luminance were regularly presented (SSSSDSSSSDSSSSD...) was represented in the visual sensory system only when participants attended the sequential regularity in luminance, but not when participants ignored the stimuli or simply attended the dimension of luminance per se. This suggests that top-down attention affects sequential regularity representation in the visual sensory system and that top-down attention is a prerequisite for particular sequential regularities to be represented. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sustainability and Uncertainty: Bottom-Up and Top-Down Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Klint Jensen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The widely used concept of sustainability is seldom precisely defined, and its clarification involves making up one’s mind about a range of difficult questions. One line of research (bottom-up takes sustaining a system over time as its starting point and then infers prescriptions from this requirement. Another line (top-down takes an economical interpretation of the Brundtland Commission’s suggestion that the present generation’s needsatisfaction should not compromise the need-satisfaction of future generations as its starting point. It then measures sustainability at the level of society and infers prescriptions from this requirement. These two approaches may conflict, and in this conflict the top-down approach has the upper hand, ethically speaking. However, the implicit goal in the top-down approach of justice between generations needs to be refined in several dimensions. But even given a clarified ethical goal, disagreements can arise. At present we do not know what substitutions will be possible in the future. This uncertainty clearly affects the prescriptions that follow from the measure of sustainability. Consequently, decisions about how to make future agriculture sustainable are decisions under uncertainty. There might be different judgments on likelihoods; but even given some set of probabilities, there might be disagreement on the right level of precaution in face of the uncertainty.

  12. Top-down control of arousal and sleep: Fundamentals and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, Lukas; Frase, Lukas; Piosczyk, Hannah; Selhausen, Peter; Zittel, Sulamith; Jahn, Friederike; Kuhn, Marion; Feige, Bernd; Mainberger, Florian; Klöppel, Stefan; Riemann, Dieter; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Baglioni, Chiara; Sterr, Annette; Nissen, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Mammalian sleep emerges from attenuated activity in the ascending reticular arousal system (ARAS), the main arousal network of the brain. This system originates in the brainstem and activates the thalamus and cortex during wakefulness via a well-characterized 'bottom-up' pathway. Recent studies propose that a less investigated cortico-thalamic 'top-down' pathway also regulates sleep. The present work integrates the current evidence on sleep regulation with a focus on the 'top-down' pathway and explores the potential to translate this information into clinically relevant interventions. Specifically, we elaborate the concept that arousal and sleep continuity in humans can be modulated by non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques that increase or decrease cortical excitability. Based on preclinical studies, the modulatory effects of the stimulation are thought to extend to subcortical arousal networks. Further exploration of the 'top-down' regulation of sleep and its modulation through non-invasive brain stimulation techniques may contribute to the development of novel treatments for clinical conditions of disrupted arousal and sleep, which are among the major health problems worldwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Propulsion integration of hypersonic air-breathing vehicles utilizing a top-down design methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brad Kenneth

    In recent years, a focus of aerospace engineering design has been the development of advanced design methodologies and frameworks to account for increasingly complex and integrated vehicles. Techniques such as parametric modeling, global vehicle analyses, and interdisciplinary data sharing have been employed in an attempt to improve the design process. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new approach to integrated vehicle design known as the top-down design methodology. In the top-down design methodology, the main idea is to relate design changes on the vehicle system and sub-system level to a set of over-arching performance and customer requirements. Rather than focusing on the performance of an individual system, the system is analyzed in terms of the net effect it has on the overall vehicle and other vehicle systems. This detailed level of analysis can only be accomplished through the use of high fidelity computational tools such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) or Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The utility of the top-down design methodology is investigated through its application to the conceptual and preliminary design of a long-range hypersonic air-breathing vehicle for a hypothetical next generation hypersonic vehicle (NHRV) program. System-level design is demonstrated through the development of the nozzle section of the propulsion system. From this demonstration of the methodology, conclusions are made about the benefits, drawbacks, and cost of using the methodology.

  14. Interactive effects of trait and state affect on top-down control of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Juyoen; Miller, Gregory A; McDavitt, Jenika R B; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Crocker, Laura D; Infantolino, Zachary P; Towers, David N; Warren, Stacie L; Heller, Wendy

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have investigated how attentional control is affected by transient affective states while taking individual differences in affective traits into consideration. In this study, participants completed a color-word Stroop task immediately after undergoing a positive, neutral or negative affective context manipulation (ACM). Behavioral performance was unaffected by any ACM considered in isolation. For individuals high in trait negative affect (NA), performance was impaired by the negative but not the positive or neutral ACM. Neuroimaging results indicate that activity in primarily top-down control regions of the brain (inferior frontal gyrus and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) was suppressed in the presence of emotional arousal (both negative and positive ACMs). This effect appears to have been exacerbated or offset by co-occurring activity in other top-down control regions (parietal) and emotion processing regions (orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and nucleus accumbens) as a function of the valence of state affect (positive or negative) and trait affect (trait NA or trait PA). Neuroimaging results are consistent with behavioral findings. In combination, they indicate both additive and interactive influences of trait and state affect on top-down control of attention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Energetic conditions promoting top-down control of prey by predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N Marshall

    Full Text Available Humans remove large amounts of biomass from natural ecosystems, and large bodied high trophic level animals are especially sensitive and vulnerable to exploitation. The effects of removing top-predators on food webs are often difficult to predict because of limited information on species interaction strengths. Here we used a three species predator-prey model to explore relationships between energetic properties of trophodynamic linkages and interaction strengths to provide heuristic rules that indicate observable energetic conditions that are most likely to lead to stable and strong top-down control of prey by predator species. We found that strong top-down interaction strengths resulted from low levels of energy flow from prey to predators. Strong interactions are more stable when they are a consequence of low per capita predation and when predators are subsidized by recruitment. Diet composition also affects stability, but the relationship depends on the form of the functional response. Our results imply that for generalist satiating predators, strong top-down control on prey is most likely for prey items that occupy a small portion of the diet and when density dependent recruitment is moderately high.

  16. Sleep deprivation selectively disrupts top-down adaptation to cognitive conflict in the Stroop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevers, Wim; Deliens, Gaetane; Hoffmann, Sophie; Notebaert, Wim; Peigneux, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation is known to exert detrimental effects on various cognitive domains, including attention, vigilance and working memory. Seemingly at odds with these findings, prior studies repeatedly failed to evidence an impact of prior sleep deprivation on cognitive interference in the Stroop test, a hallmark paradigm in the study of cognitive control abilities. The present study investigated further the effect of sleep deprivation on cognitive control using an adapted version of the Stroop test that allows to segregate top-down (attentional reconfiguration on incongruent items) and bottom-up (facilitated processing after repetitions in responses and/or features of stimuli) components of performance. Participants underwent a regular night of sleep or a night of total sleep deprivation before cognitive testing. Results disclosed that sleep deprivation selectively impairs top-down adaptation mechanisms: cognitive control no longer increased upon detection of response conflict at the preceding trial. In parallel, bottom-up abilities were found unaffected by sleep deprivation: beneficial effects of stimulus and response repetitions persisted. Changes in vigilance states due to sleep deprivation selectively impact on cognitive control in the Stroop test by affecting top-down, but not bottom-up, mechanisms that guide adaptive behaviours. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  17. Top-down cascades in lakes and oceans: Different perspectives but same story?

    KAUST Repository

    Hessen, Dag Olav

    2014-05-16

    While top-down cascades from fish to phytoplankton have been a core topic in limnology for the past four decades, it has attracted far less interest in marine ecology. This is partly for historical reasons, since lake studies have been motivated by the ability to regulate algal blooms induced by cultural eutrophication, while marine studies have been more oriented towards fish yield and thus bottom-up processes. Also freshwaters are closed ecosystems with lower diversity and complexity, making models and predictions on trophic levels and interactions comparatively simpler. Here, we compare some key properties of freshwater and marine top-down cascades and argue that despite some striking differences, the large number of freshwater studies may pose valuable insights also for marine systems. Moreover, we argue that there is an urgent need for more focus on top-down cascades in marine systems that address how top predators or fishing may propagate through the food web and impact autotrophic biomass, production, C-sequestration and thus ultimately the global carbon cycle and climate. © 2014 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  18. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk [Sensor Tech Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H]{sup -} for TNT and DNT or [M]{sup ·-}. for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO]{sup -}. These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available.

  19. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Eight Common Chemical Explosives Using Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sehwan; Lee, Jihyeon; KIm, Jeongkwon; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sungsuk

    2013-01-01

    Eight representative explosives (ammonium perchlorate (AP), ammonium nitrate (AN), trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), cyclonite (RDX), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and hexanitrostilbene (HNS)) were comprehensively analyzed with an ion trap mass spectrometer in negative ion mode using direct infusion electrospray ionization. MS/MS experiments were performed to generate fragment ions from the major parent ion of each explosive. Explosives in salt forms such as AP or AN provided cluster parent ions with their own anions. Explosives with an aromatic ring were observed as either [M.H] - for TNT and DNT or [M] ·- . for HNS, while explosives without an aromatic ring such as RDX, HMX, and PETN were detected as an adduct ion with a formate anion, i. e., [M+HCOO] - . These findings provide a guideline for the rapid and accurate detection of explosives once portable MS instruments become more readily available

  20. Mapping Proteoforms and Protein Complexes From King Cobra Venom Using Both Denaturing and Native Top-down Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Rafael D; Skinner, Owen S; Fornelli, Luca; Domont, Gilberto B; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing whole proteins by top-down proteomics avoids a step of inference encountered in the dominant bottom-up methodology when peptides are assembled computationally into proteins for identification. The direct interrogation of whole proteins and protein complexes from the venom of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) provides a sharply clarified view of toxin sequence variation, transit peptide cleavage sites and post-translational modifications (PTMs) likely critical for venom lethality. A tube-gel format for electrophoresis (called GELFrEE) and solution isoelectric focusing were used for protein fractionation prior to LC-MS/MS analysis resulting in 131 protein identifications (18 more than bottom-up) and a total of 184 proteoforms characterized from 14 protein toxin families. Operating both GELFrEE and mass spectrometry to preserve non-covalent interactions generated detailed information about two of the largest venom glycoprotein complexes: the homodimeric l-amino acid oxidase (∼130 kDa) and the multichain toxin cobra venom factor (∼147 kDa). The l-amino acid oxidase complex exhibited two clusters of multiproteoform complexes corresponding to the presence of 5 or 6 N-glycans moieties, each consistent with a distribution of N-acetyl hexosamines. Employing top-down proteomics in both native and denaturing modes provides unprecedented characterization of venom proteoforms and their complexes. A precise molecular inventory of venom proteins will propel the study of snake toxin variation and the targeted development of new antivenoms or other biotherapeutics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Top-down proteomics reveals a unique protein S-thiolation switch in Salmonella Typimurium in response to infection-like conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Wu, Si; Meng, Da; Liu, Xiaowen; Brewer, Heather M.; Kaiser, Brooke LD; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Cort, John R.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-18

    Characterization of the mature protein complement in cells is crucial for a better understanding of cellular processes on a systems-wide scale. Bottom-up proteomic approaches often lead to loss of critical information about an endogenous protein’s actual state due to post translational modifications (PTMs) and other processes. Top-down approaches that involve analysis of the intact protein can address this concern but present significant analytical challenges related to the separation quality needed, measurement sensitivity, and speed that result in low throughput and limited coverage. Here we used single-dimension ultra high pressure liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to investigate the comprehensive ‘intact’ proteome of the Gram negative bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium. Top-down proteomics analysis revealed 563 unique proteins including 1665 proteoforms generated by PTMs, representing the largest microbial top-down dataset reported to date. Our analysis not only confirmed several previously recognized aspects of Salmonella biology and bacterial PTMs in general, but also revealed several novel biological insights. Of particular interest was differential utilization of the protein S-thiolation forms S-glutathionylation and S-cysteinylation in response to infection-like conditions versus basal conditions, which was corroborated by changes in corresponding biosynthetic pathways. This differential utilization highlights underlying metabolic mechanisms that modulate changes in cellular signaling, and represents to our knowledge the first report of S-cysteinylation in Gram negative bacteria. The demonstrated utility of our simple proteome-wide intact protein level measurement strategy for gaining biological insight should promote broader adoption and applications of top-down proteomics approaches.

  2. Importance of optimizing chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometric parameters for supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujito, Yuka; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2017-07-28

    Supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry (SFC/MS) has great potential in high-throughput and the simultaneous analysis of a wide variety of compounds, and it has been widely used in recent years. The use of MS for detection provides the advantages of high sensitivity and high selectivity. However, the sensitivity of MS detection depends on the chromatographic conditions and MS parameters. Thus, optimization of MS parameters corresponding to the SFC condition is mandatory for maximizing performance when connecting SFC to MS. The aim of this study was to reveal a way to decide the optimum composition of the mobile phase and the flow rate of the make-up solvent for MS detection in a wide range of compounds. Additionally, we also showed the basic concept for determination of the optimum values of the MS parameters focusing on the MS detection sensitivity in SFC/MS analysis. To verify the versatility of these findings, a total of 441 pesticides with a wide polarity range (logP ow from -4.21 to 7.70) and pKa (acidic, neutral and basic). In this study, a new SFC-MS interface was used, which can transfer the entire volume of eluate into the MS by directly coupling the SFC with the MS. This enabled us to compare the sensitivity or optimum MS parameters for MS detection between LC/MS and SFC/MS for the same sample volume introduced into the MS. As a result, it was found that the optimum values of some MS parameters were completely different from those of LC/MS, and that SFC/MS-specific optimization of the analytical conditions is required. Lastly, we evaluated the sensitivity of SFC/MS using fully optimized analytical conditions. As a result, we confirmed that SFC/MS showed much higher sensitivity than LC/MS when the analytical conditions were fully optimized for SFC/MS; and the high sensitivity also increase the number of the compounds that can be detected with good repeatability in real sample analysis. This result indicates that SFC/MS has potential for

  3. Encouraging top-down attention in visual search:A developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lookadoo, Regan; Yang, Yingying; Merrill, Edward C

    2017-10-01

    Four experiments are reported in which 60 younger children (7-8 years old), 60 older children (10-11 years old), and 60 young adults (18-25 years old) performed a conjunctive visual search task (15 per group in each experiment). The number of distractors of each feature type was unbalanced across displays to evaluate participants' ability to restrict search to the smaller subset of features. The use of top-down attention processes to restrict search was encouraged by providing external aids for identifying and maintaining attention on the smaller set. In Experiment 1, no external assistance was provided. In Experiment 2, precues and instructions were provided to focus attention on that subset. In Experiment 3, trials in which the smaller subset was represented by the same feature were presented in alternating blocks to eliminate the need to switch attention between features from trial to trial. In Experiment 4, consecutive blocks of the same subset features were presented in the first or second half of the experiment, providing additional consistency. All groups benefited from external support of top-down attention, although the pattern of improvement varied across experiments. The younger children benefited most from precues and instruction, using the subset search strategy when instructed. Furthermore, younger children benefited from blocking trials only when blocks of the same features did not alternate. Older participants benefited from the blocking of trials in both Experiments 3 and 4, but not from precues and instructions. Hence, our results revealed both malleability and limits of children's top-down control of attention.

  4. Top-down attention based on object representation and incremental memory for knowledge building and inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ban, Sang-Woo; Lee, Minho

    2013-10-01

    Humans can efficiently perceive arbitrary visual objects based on an incremental learning mechanism with selective attention. This paper proposes a new task specific top-down attention model to locate a target object based on its form and color representation along with a bottom-up saliency based on relativity of primitive visual features and some memory modules. In the proposed model top-down bias signals corresponding to the target form and color features are generated, which draw the preferential attention to the desired object by the proposed selective attention model in concomitance with the bottom-up saliency process. The object form and color representation and memory modules have an incremental learning mechanism together with a proper object feature representation scheme. The proposed model includes a Growing Fuzzy Topology Adaptive Resonance Theory (GFTART) network which plays two important roles in object color and form biased attention; one is to incrementally learn and memorize color and form features of various objects, and the other is to generate a top-down bias signal to localize a target object by focusing on the candidate local areas. Moreover, the GFTART network can be utilized for knowledge inference which enables the perception of new unknown objects on the basis of the object form and color features stored in the memory during training. Experimental results show that the proposed model is successful in focusing on the specified target objects, in addition to the incremental representation and memorization of various objects in natural scenes. In addition, the proposed model properly infers new unknown objects based on the form and color features of previously trained objects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Top-down modulation on perceptual decision with balanced inhibition through feedforward and feedback inhibitory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Te Wang

    Full Text Available Recent physiological studies have shown that neurons in various regions of the central nervous systems continuously receive noisy excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs in a balanced and covaried fashion. While this balanced synaptic input (BSI is typically described in terms of maintaining the stability of neural circuits, a number of experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that BSI plays a proactive role in brain functions such as top-down modulation for executive control. Two issues have remained unclear in this picture. First, given the noisy nature of neuronal activities in neural circuits, how do the modulatory effects change if the top-down control implements BSI with different ratios between inhibition and excitation? Second, how is a top-down BSI realized via only excitatory long-range projections in the neocortex? To address the first issue, we systematically tested how the inhibition/excitation ratio affects the accuracy and reaction times of a spiking neural circuit model of perceptual decision. We defined an energy function to characterize the network dynamics, and found that different ratios modulate the energy function of the circuit differently and form two distinct functional modes. To address the second issue, we tested BSI with long-distance projection to inhibitory neurons that are either feedforward or feedback, depending on whether these inhibitory neurons do or do not receive inputs from local excitatory cells, respectively. We found that BSI occurs in both cases. Furthermore, when relying on feedback inhibitory neurons, through the recurrent interactions inside the circuit, BSI dynamically and automatically speeds up the decision by gradually reducing its inhibitory component in the course of a trial when a decision process takes too long.

  6. Top-down modulation on perceptual decision with balanced inhibition through feedforward and feedback inhibitory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Te; Lee, Chung-Ting; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Lo, Chung-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Recent physiological studies have shown that neurons in various regions of the central nervous systems continuously receive noisy excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs in a balanced and covaried fashion. While this balanced synaptic input (BSI) is typically described in terms of maintaining the stability of neural circuits, a number of experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that BSI plays a proactive role in brain functions such as top-down modulation for executive control. Two issues have remained unclear in this picture. First, given the noisy nature of neuronal activities in neural circuits, how do the modulatory effects change if the top-down control implements BSI with different ratios between inhibition and excitation? Second, how is a top-down BSI realized via only excitatory long-range projections in the neocortex? To address the first issue, we systematically tested how the inhibition/excitation ratio affects the accuracy and reaction times of a spiking neural circuit model of perceptual decision. We defined an energy function to characterize the network dynamics, and found that different ratios modulate the energy function of the circuit differently and form two distinct functional modes. To address the second issue, we tested BSI with long-distance projection to inhibitory neurons that are either feedforward or feedback, depending on whether these inhibitory neurons do or do not receive inputs from local excitatory cells, respectively. We found that BSI occurs in both cases. Furthermore, when relying on feedback inhibitory neurons, through the recurrent interactions inside the circuit, BSI dynamically and automatically speeds up the decision by gradually reducing its inhibitory component in the course of a trial when a decision process takes too long.

  7. Top-down modulation of human early visual cortex after stimulus offset supports successful postcued report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergent, Claire; Ruff, Christian C; Barbot, Antoine; Driver, Jon; Rees, Geraint

    2011-08-01

    Modulations of sensory processing in early visual areas are thought to play an important role in conscious perception. To date, most empirical studies focused on effects occurring before or during visual presentation. By contrast, several emerging theories postulate that sensory processing and conscious visual perception may also crucially depend on late top-down influences, potentially arising after a visual display. To provide a direct test of this, we performed an fMRI study using a postcued report procedure. The ability to report a target at a specific spatial location in a visual display can be enhanced behaviorally by symbolic auditory postcues presented shortly after that display. Here we showed that such auditory postcues can enhance target-specific signals in early human visual cortex (V1 and V2). For postcues presented 200 msec after stimulus termination, this target-specific enhancement in visual cortex was specifically associated with correct conscious report. The strength of this modulation predicted individual levels of performance in behavior. By contrast, although later postcues presented 1000 msec after stimulus termination had some impact on activity in early visual cortex, this modulation no longer related to conscious report. These results demonstrate that within a critical time window of a few hundred milliseconds after a visual stimulus has disappeared, successful conscious report of that stimulus still relates to the strength of top-down modulation in early visual cortex. We suggest that, within this critical time window, sensory representation of a visual stimulus is still under construction and so can still be flexibly influenced by top-down modulatory processes.

  8. Top-down instead of bottom-up estimates of uncertainty in INAA results?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.; De Nadai Fernandes, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    The initial publication of the ISO Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) and many related documents has resulted in a worldwide awareness of the importance of a realistic estimate of the value reported after the +/- sign. The evaluation of uncertainty in measurement, as introduced by the GUM, is derived from the principles applied in physical measurements. Many testing laboratories have already experienced large problems in applying these principles in e.g. (bio)chemical measurements, resulting in time-consuming evaluations and costly additional experiments. Other, more pragmatic and less costly approaches have been proposed to obtain a realistic estimate of the range in which the true value of the measurement may be found with a certain degree of probability. One of these approaches, the 'top-down method', is based on the standard deviation in the results of intercomparison data. This approach is much easier for tests for which it is either difficult to establish a full measurement equation, or if e.g. matrix-matching reference materials are absent. It has been demonstrated that the GUM 'bottom-up' approach of evaluating uncertainty in measurement can easily be applied in instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as all significant sources of uncertainty can be evaluated. INAA is therefore a valuable technique to test the validity of the top-down approach. In this contribution, examples of the top-down evaluation of uncertainty in INAA derived from participation in intercomparison rounds and proficiency testing schemes will be presented. The results will be compared with the bottom-up evaluation of uncertainty, and ease of applicability, validity and usefullness of both approaches will be discussed.

  9. Network model of top-down influences on local gain and contextual interactions in visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piëch, Valentin; Li, Wu; Reeke, George N; Gilbert, Charles D

    2013-10-22

    The visual system uses continuity as a cue for grouping oriented line segments that define object boundaries in complex visual scenes. Many studies support the idea that long-range intrinsic horizontal connections in early visual cortex contribute to this grouping. Top-down influences in primary visual cortex (V1) play an important role in the processes of contour integration and perceptual saliency, with contour-related responses being task dependent. This suggests an interaction between recurrent inputs to V1 and intrinsic connections within V1 that enables V1 neurons to respond differently under different conditions. We created a network model that simulates parametrically the control of local gain by hypothetical top-down modification of local recurrence. These local gain changes, as a consequence of network dynamics in our model, enable modulation of contextual interactions in a task-dependent manner. Our model displays contour-related facilitation of neuronal responses and differential foreground vs. background responses over the neuronal ensemble, accounting for the perceptual pop-out of salient contours. It quantitatively reproduces the results of single-unit recording experiments in V1, highlighting salient contours and replicating the time course of contextual influences. We show by means of phase-plane analysis that the model operates stably even in the presence of large inputs. Our model shows how a simple form of top-down modulation of the effective connectivity of intrinsic cortical connections among biophysically realistic neurons can account for some of the response changes seen in perceptual learning and task switching.

  10. Perceptual learning to reduce sensory eye dominance beyond the focus of top-down visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingping P; He, Zijiang J; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2012-05-15

    Perceptual learning is an important means for the brain to maintain its agility in a dynamic environment. Top-down focal attention, which selects task-relevant stimuli against competing ones in the background, is known to control and select what is learned in adults. Still unknown, is whether the adult brain is able to learn highly visible information beyond the focus of top-down attention. If it is, we should be able to reveal a purely stimulus-driven perceptual learning occurring in functions that are largely determined by the early cortical level, where top-down attention modulation is weak. Such an automatic, stimulus-driven learning mechanism is commonly assumed to operate only in the juvenile brain. We performed perceptual training to reduce sensory eye dominance (SED), a function that taps on the eye-of-origin information represented in the early visual cortex. Two retinal locations were simultaneously stimulated with suprathreshold, dichoptic orthogonal gratings. At each location, monocular cueing triggered perception of the grating images of the weak eye and suppression of the strong eye. Observers attended only to one location and performed orientation discrimination of the gratings seen by the weak eye, while ignoring the highly visible gratings at the second, unattended, location. We found SED was not only reduced at the attended location, but also at the unattended location. Furthermore, other untrained visual functions mediated by higher cortical levels improved. An automatic, stimulus-driven learning mechanism causes synaptic alterations in the early cortical level, with a far-reaching impact on the later cortical levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid evolution leads to differential population dynamics and top-down control in resurrected Daphnia populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitom, Eyerusalem; Kilsdonk, Laurens J; Brans, Kristien; Jansen, Mieke; Lemmens, Pieter; De Meester, Luc

    2018-01-01

    There is growing evidence of rapid genetic adaptation of natural populations to environmental change, opening the perspective that evolutionary trait change may subsequently impact ecological processes such as population dynamics, community composition, and ecosystem functioning. To study such eco-evolutionary feedbacks in natural populations, however, requires samples across time. Here, we capitalize on a resurrection ecology study that documented rapid and adaptive evolution in a natural population of the water flea Daphnia magna in response to strong changes in predation pressure by fish, and carry out a follow-up mesocosm experiment to test whether the observed genetic changes influence population dynamics and top-down control of phytoplankton. We inoculated populations of the water flea D. magna derived from three time periods of the same natural population known to have genetically adapted to changes in predation pressure in replicate mesocosms and monitored both Daphnia population densities and phytoplankton biomass in the presence and absence of fish. Our results revealed differences in population dynamics and top-down control of algae between mesocosms harboring populations from the time period before, during, and after a peak in fish predation pressure caused by human fish stocking. The differences, however, deviated from our a priori expectations. An S-map approach on time series revealed that the interactions between adults and juveniles strongly impacted the dynamics of populations and their top-down control on algae in the mesocosms, and that the strength of these interactions was modulated by rapid evolution as it occurred in nature. Our study provides an example of an evolutionary response that fundamentally alters the processes structuring population dynamics and impacts ecosystem features.

  12. Mass spectrometric protein characterization in proteome analysis using GELoader tip micro-columns packed with various chromatographic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    In the early 90'ies mass spectrometry (MS) was introduced as a tool for identifying proteins in protein sequence databases. Since then it has become an integrated tool in protein characterization and is today routinely used to identify proteins separated by gel electrophoresis. A two-tiered mass spectrometric protein identification strategy has recently been proposed. In the first strategy peptide mass maps obtained from the protein of interest are compared with theoretically derived peptide mass maps from proteins in protein sequence databases. If the protein cannot be identified by this strategy, tandem mass spectrometric sequencing is used to generate enough sequence data to identify the protein in protein sequence databases or expressed sequence tag (EST) databases. However, the above strategies primarily identify a protein relatively to the DNA sequence, in which no information about e.g. post-translational modifications (PTMs) is stored. PTMs are known to modify the function, location, solubility and activity of proteins in the cell, and they are therefore very important for understanding living cells. More than 200 different PTMs are known, of which glycosylation, phosphorylation and proteolytic processing are the most common ones. Mass spectrometric analysis of PTMs on gel-separated proteins requires a higher amount of protein than for identification only. In addition, higher sequence coverage from the peptide mass maps or pre-purification of the modified peptides prior to MS analysis, is necessary for detection of putative modified peptides. In this study a multi-tiered strategy, in which GELoader tip micro-columns packed with increasingly more hydrophobic chromatographic material are used in combination with mass spectrometry, is described. The ultimate aim was to gain increased sequence coverage from peptide mixtures derived from gel-separated proteins, in order to locate modified peptides. Graphite powder is described as an alternative to traditional

  13. Integrating Top-down and Bottom-up Cybersecurity Guidance using XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Joshua

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a markup-based approach for synthesizing disparate information sources and discusses a software implementation of the approach. The implementation makes it easier for people to use two complementary, but differently structured, guidance specifications together: the (top-down) Cybersecurity Framework and the (bottom-up) National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-53 security control catalog. An example scenario demonstrates how the software implementation can help a security professional select the appropriate safeguards for restricting unauthorized access to an Industrial Control System. The implementation and example show the benefits of this approach and suggest its potential application to disciplines other than cybersecurity.

  14. Integrating Top-down and Bottom-up Cybersecurity Guidance using XML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubell, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a markup-based approach for synthesizing disparate information sources and discusses a software implementation of the approach. The implementation makes it easier for people to use two complementary, but differently structured, guidance specifications together: the (top-down) Cybersecurity Framework and the (bottom-up) National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-53 security control catalog. An example scenario demonstrates how the software implementation can help a security professional select the appropriate safeguards for restricting unauthorized access to an Industrial Control System. The implementation and example show the benefits of this approach and suggest its potential application to disciplines other than cybersecurity. PMID:27795810

  15. How can physics underlie the mind? top-down causation in the human context

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, George

    2016-01-01

    Physics underlies all complexity, including our own existence: how is this possible? How can our own lives emerge from interactions of electrons, protons, and neutrons? This book considers the interaction of physical and non-physical causation in complex systems such as living beings, and in particular in the human brain, relating this to the emergence of higher levels of complexity with real causal powers. In particular it explores the idea of top-down causation, which is the key effect allowing the emergence of true complexity and also enables the causal efficacy of non-physical entities, including the value of money, social conventions, and ethical choices.

  16. Unsupervised tattoo segmentation combining bottom-up and top-down cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Josef D.; Zhao, Nan; Yuan, Jiangbo; Liu, Xiuwen

    2011-06-01

    Tattoo segmentation is challenging due to the complexity and large variance in tattoo structures. We have developed a segmentation algorithm for finding tattoos in an image. Our basic idea is split-merge: split each tattoo image into clusters through a bottom-up process, learn to merge the clusters containing skin and then distinguish tattoo from the other skin via top-down prior in the image itself. Tattoo segmentation with unknown number of clusters is transferred to a figureground segmentation. We have applied our segmentation algorithm on a tattoo dataset and the results have shown that our tattoo segmentation system is efficient and suitable for further tattoo classification and retrieval purpose.

  17. Gauging the ungauged basin: a top-down approach in a large semiarid watershed in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Barthold

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A major research challenge in ungauged basins is to quickly assess the dominant hydrological processes of watersheds. In this paper we present a top-down approach from first field reconnaissance to perceptual model development, model conceptualization, evaluation, rejection and eventually, to a more substantial field campaign to build upon the initial modeling. This approach led us from an initial state where very little was known about catchment behavior towards a more complete view of catchment hydrological processes, including the preliminary identification of water sources and an assessment of the effectiveness of our sampling design.

  18. Study on Top-Down Estimation Method of Software Project Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-guang; L(U) Ting-jie; ZHAO Yu-mei

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies a new software project planning method under some actual project data in order to make software project plans more effective. From the perspective of system theory, our new method regards a software project plan as an associative unit for study. During a top-down estimation of a software project, Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) method and analogy method are combined to estimate its size, then effort estimation and specific schedules are obtained according to distributions of the phase effort. This allows a set of practical and feasible planning methods to be constructed. Actual data indicate that this set of methods can lead to effective software project planning.

  19. What to measure next to improve decision making? On top-down task driven feature saliency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Karadogan, Seliz; Marchegiani, Letizia

    2011-01-01

    Top-down attention is modeled as decision making based on incomplete information. We consider decisions made in a sequential measurement situation where initially only an incomplete input feature vector is available, however, where we are given the possibility to acquire additional input values...... among the missing features. The procecure thus poses the question what to do next? We take an information theoretical approach implemented for generality in a generative mixture model. The framework allows us reduce the decision about what to measure next in a classification problem to the estimation...

  20. Public engagement as a field of tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders; Lassen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    In the ongoing debate about climate change, public engagement is given increasing prominence as a possible solution to a general lack of citizen participation in climate change mitigation efforts. Recent years have seen a surge in public engagement initiatives in many countries in the Western world....... These initiatives often have to deal with dilemmas between participatory aspects and other considerations such as planning efficiency, dilemmas that potentially bring about tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies. Literature on climate change issues has addressed the failure of public response, which has...... knowledge and information about climate change has not significantly changed people’s behaviour towards higher involvement....

  1. Supervisor Localization: A Top-Down Approach to Distributed Control of Discrete-Event Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, K.; Wonham, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    A purely distributed control paradigm is proposed for discrete-event systems (DES). In contrast to control by one or more external supervisors, distributed control aims to design built-in strategies for individual agents. First a distributed optimal nonblocking control problem is formulated. To solve it, a top-down localization procedure is developed which systematically decomposes an external supervisor into local controllers while preserving optimality and nonblockingness. An efficient localization algorithm is provided to carry out the computation, and an automated guided vehicles (AGV) example presented for illustration. Finally, the 'easiest' and 'hardest' boundary cases of localization are discussed.

  2. Bottom-up and top-down effects on plant communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, Lara; Zelikova, Tamara Jane; Sanders, Nate

    2016-01-01

    -down) and soil nitrogen (bottom-up) were manipulated over six years in an existing old-field community. We tracked plant α and β diversity - within plot richness and among plot biodiversity- and aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) over the course of the experiment. We found that bottom-up factors...... affected ANPP while top-down factors influenced plant community structure. Across years, while N reduction lowered ANPP by 10%, N reduction did not alter ANPP relative to control plots. Further, N reduction lowered ANPP by 20% relative to N addition plots. On the other hand, the reduction of insect...... community composition via shifts in plant dominance....

  3. Experience with a top-down versus bottom-up nuclear engineering educational paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear engineering courses are generally taught from a top-down pedagogical perspective; i.e., one begins with a body of knowledge drawn from advanced nuclear science, engineering, and experience and from this distills a selected part to match the intellectual capacity of the class. This pedagogical approach has evidently been most effect at the graduate level of instruction as evidenced by the ready entry of masters and doctoral students into the professions. A schematic depiction of this approach is suggested and is extended to the undergraduate level of nuclear engineering education

  4. Top down arsenic uncertainty measurement in water and sediments from Guarapiranga dam (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, M. G.; Lange, C. N.; Monteiro, L. R.; Furusawa, H. A.; Marques, J. R.; Stellato, T. B.; Soares, S. M. V.; da Silva, T. B. S. C.; da Silva, D. B.; Cotrim, M. E. B.; Pires, M. A. F.

    2018-03-01

    Total arsenic measurements assessment regarding legal threshold demands more than average and standard deviation approach. In this way, analytical measurement uncertainty evaluation was conducted in order to comply with legal requirements and to allow the balance of arsenic in both water and sediment compartments. A top-down approach for measurement uncertainties was applied to evaluate arsenic concentrations in water and sediments from Guarapiranga dam (São Paulo, Brazil). Laboratory quality control and arsenic interlaboratory tests data were used in this approach to estimate the uncertainties associated with the methodology.

  5. Top-down approach for nanophase reconstruction in bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jaemin; Hwang, In-Wook; Lee, Kwanghee

    2014-09-01

    "Top-Down" nanophase reconstruction via a post-additive soaking process is first presented with various BHJ binary composites. By simply rinsing as-cast BHJ films with a solvent mixture containing a few traces of a nanophase-control reagent such as 1,8-diiodooctane, oversized fullerene-rich clusters (>100 nm in dia-meter) in the BHJ film are instataneously disassembled and entirely reorganized into finely intermixed donor/acceptor nanophases (ca. 10 nm) with a 3D compositional homogeneity, without surface segregation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium Sample Handling 8 to 10 Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Ceric Sulfate Titration Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Nitrogen by Distillation Spectrophotometry Using Nessler Reagent 11 to 18 Carbon (Total) by Direct Combustion–Thermal Conductivity 19 to 30 Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis 31 to 38 Sulfur by Distillation Spectrophotometry 39 to 47 Plutonium Isotopic Analysis by Mass Spectrometry Rare Earth Elements by Spectroscopy 48 to 55 Trace Elements by Carrier–Distillation Spectroscopy 56 to 63 Impurities by ICP-AES Impurity Elements by Spark-Source Mass Spectrography 64 to 70 Moisture by the Coulomet...

  7. Evaluation of errors for mass-spectrometric analysis with surface-ionization type mass-spectrometer (statistical evaluation of mass-discrimination effect)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The surface-ionization type mass-spectrometer is widely used as an apparatus for quality assurance, accountability and safeguarding of nuclear materials, and for this analysis it has become an important factor to statistically evaluate an analytical error which consists of a random error and a systematic error. The major factor of this systematic error was the mass-discrimination effect. In this paper, various assays for evaluating the factor of variation on the mass-discrimination effect were studied and the data obtained were statistically evaluated. As a result of these analyses, it was proved that the factor of variation on the mass-discrimination effect was not attributed to the acid concentration of sample, sample size on the filament and supplied voltage for a multiplier, but mainly to the filament temperature during the mass-spectrometric analysis. The mass-discrimination effect values β which were usually calculated from the measured data of uranium, plutonium or boron isotopic standard sample were not so significant dependently of the difference of U-235, Pu-239 or B-10 isotopic abundance. Furthermore, in the case of U and Pu, measurement conditions and the mass range of these isotopes were almost similar, and these values β were not statistically significant between U and Pu. On the other hand, the value β for boron was about a third of the value β for U or Pu, but compared with the coefficient of the correction on the mass-discrimination effect for the difference of mass-number, ΔM, these coefficient values were almost the same among U, Pu, and B.As for the isotopic analysis error of U, Pu, Nd and B, it was proved that the isotopic abundance of these elements and the isotopic analysis error were in a relationship of quadratic curves on a logarithmic-logarithmic scale

  8. A gas/liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the rapid screening of 250 pesticides in aqueous matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramouli, B.; Harvan, D.; Brittain, S.; Hass, R. [Eno River Labs, LLC. Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Pesticide residues in food present a potentially serious and significant cause for concern. Many pesticides have been associated with significant health effects to the nervous and endocrine systems and some have been deemed carcinogenic. There are many well-established techniques for pesticide analysis. However, commercial pesticide methods have traditionally only been available for specific pesticide families, such as chlorinated pesticides or herbicides, and at detection limits ranging from 0.05 ppb to 1 ppm in aqueous matrices. Techniques that can quickly screen for the presence/absence of pesticide residues in food matrices are critical in ensuring the safety of food and water. This paper outlines a combined Gas Chromatographic-High Resolution Mass Spectrometric (GC-HRMS) and Liquid Chromatographic Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) screening assay for 250 pesticides that was developed for use in water, and soda samples at screening levels ranging from 0.1-5 ppb. The pesticides selected have been identified by the European Union as being of concern and the target of possible legislation. The list encompasses a variety of pesticide classes and compound groupings.

  9. In situ monitoring of molecular changes during cell differentiation processes in marine macroalgae through mass spectrometric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ralf W; Crecelius, Anna C; Schubert, Ulrich S; Wichard, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was employed to discriminate between cell differentiation processes in macroalgae. One of the key developmental processes in the algal life cycle is the production of germ cells (gametes and zoids). The gametogenesis of the marine green macroalga Ulva mutabilis (Chlorophyta) was monitored by metabolomic snapshots of the surface, when blade cells differentiate synchronously into gametangia and giving rise to gametes. To establish MSI for macroalgae, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), a known algal osmolyte, was determined. MSI of the surface of U. mutabilis followed by chemometric data analysis revealed dynamic metabolomic changes during cell differentiation. DMSP and a total of 55 specific molecular biomarkers, which could be assigned to important stages of the gametogenesis, were detected. Our research contributes to the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying macroalgal cell differentiation. Graphical abstract Molecular changes during cell differentiation of the marine macroalga Ulva were visualized by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI).

  10. PTSD symptom severity is associated with increased recruitment of top-down attentional control in a trauma-exposed sample

    OpenAIRE

    White, Stuart F.; Costanzo, Michelle E.; Blair, James R.; Roy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent neuroimaging work suggests that increased amygdala responses to emotional stimuli and dysfunction within regions mediating top down attentional control (dorsomedial frontal, lateral frontal and parietal cortices) may be associated with the emergence of anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This report examines amygdala responsiveness to emotional stimuli and the recruitment of top down attention systems as a function of task demands in a populat...

  11. The Impact of Top-Down Prediction on Emotional Face Processing in Social Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Ran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that people with social anxiety show abnormal processing of emotional faces. To investigate the impact of top-down prediction on emotional face processing in social anxiety, brain responses of participants with high and low social anxiety (LSA were recorded, while they performed a variation of the emotional task, using high temporal resolution event-related potential techniques. Behaviorally, we reported an effect of prediction with higher accuracy for predictable than unpredictable faces. Furthermore, we found that participants with high social anxiety (HSA, but not with LSA, recognized angry faces more accurately than happy faces. For the P100 and P200 components, HSA participants showed enhanced brain activity for angry faces compared to happy faces, suggesting a hypervigilance to angry faces. Importantly, HSA participants exhibited larger N170 amplitudes in the right hemisphere electrodes than LSA participants when they observed unpredictable angry faces, but not when the angry faces were predictable. This probably reflects the top-down prediction improving the deficiency at building a holistic face representation in HSA participants.

  12. Top down and bottom up selection drives variations in frequency and form of a visual signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Wei; Blamires, Sean J; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I-Min

    2015-03-30

    The frequency and form of visual signals can be shaped by selection from predators, prey or both. When a signal simultaneously attracts predators and prey selection may favour a strategy that minimizes risks while attracting prey. Accordingly, varying the frequency and form of the silken decorations added to their web may be a way that Argiope spiders minimize predation while attracting prey. Nonetheless, the role of extraneous factors renders the influences of top down and bottom up selection on decoration frequency and form variation difficult to discern. Here we used dummy spiders and decorations to simulate four possible strategies that the spider Argiope aemula may choose and measured the prey and predator attraction consequences for each in the field. The strategy of decorating at a high frequency with a variable form attracted the most prey, while that of decorating at a high frequency with a fixed form attracted the most predators. These results suggest that mitigating the cost of attracting predators while maintaining prey attraction drives the use of variation in decoration form by many Argiope spp. when decorating frequently. Our study highlights the importance of considering top-down and bottom up selection pressure when devising evolutionary ecology experiments.

  13. Investigating emotional top down modulation of ambiguous faces by single pulse TMS on early visual cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Adam Yaple

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Top-down processing is a mechanism in which memory, context and expectation are used to perceive stimuli. For this study we investigated how emotion content, induced by music mood, influences perception of happy and sad emoticons. Using single pulse TMS we stimulated right occipital face area (rOFA, primary visual cortex (V1 and vertex while subjects performed a face-detection task and listened to happy and sad music. At baseline, incongruent audio-visual pairings decreased performance, demonstrating dependence of emotion while perceiving ambiguous faces. However, performance of face identification decreased during rOFA stimulation regardless of emotional content. No effects were found between Cz and V1 stimulation. These results suggest that while rOFA is important for processing faces regardless of emotion, V1 stimulation had no effect. Our findings suggest that early visual cortex activity may not integrate emotional auditory information with visual information during emotion top-down modulation of faces.

  14. Dietary self-control influences top-down guidance of attention to food cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Suzanne; Dolmans, Dirk; Humphreys, Glyn W; Rutters, Femke

    2015-01-01

    Motivational objects attract attention due to their rewarding properties, but less is known about the role that top-down cognitive processes play in the attention paid to motivationally relevant objects and how this is affected by relevant behavioral traits. Here we assess how thinking about food affects attentional guidance to food items and how this is modulated by traits relating to dietary self-control. Participants completed two tasks in which they were presented with an initial cue (food or non-food) to either hold in working memory (memory task) or to merely attend to (priming task). Holding food items in working memory strongly affected attention when the memorized cue re-appeared in the search display. Tendency towards disinhibited eating was associated with greater attention to food versus non-food pictures in both the priming and working memory tasks, consistent with greater attention to food cues per se. Successful dieters, defined as those high in dietary restraint and low in tendency to disinhibition, showed reduced attention to food when holding food-related information in working memory. These data suggest a strong top-down effect of thinking about food on attention to food items and indicate that the suppression of food items in working memory could be a marker of dieting success.

  15. Top-down control of invertebrates by Ninespine Stickleback in Arctic ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Sarah M.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Kane, William J.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite their widespread presence in northern-latitude ecosystems, the ecological role of Ninespine Stickleback Pungitius pungitius is not well understood. Ninespine Stickleback can occupy both top and intermediate trophic levels in freshwater ecosystems, so their role in food webs as a predator on invertebrates and as a forage fish for upper level consumers probably is substantial. We introduced Ninespine Sticklebacks to fishless ponds to elucidate their potential effects as a predator on invertebrate communities in Arctic lentic freshwaters. We hypothesized that Ninespine Stickleback would affect freshwater invertebrate communities in a top-down manner. We predicted that the addition of Ninespine Sticklebacks to fishless ponds would: 1) reduce invertebrate taxonomic richness, 2) decrease overall invertebrate abundance, 3) reduce invertebrate biomass, and 4) decrease average invertebrate body size. We tested our hypothesis at 2 locations by adding Ninespine Stickleback to isolated ponds and compared invertebrate communities over time between fish-addition and fishless control ponds. Ninespine Sticklebacks exerted strong top-down pressure on invertebrate communities mainly by changing invertebrate taxonomic richness and biomass and, to a lesser extent, abundance and average invertebrate size. Our results supported the hypothesis that Ninespine Stickleback may help shape lentic food webs in the Arctic.

  16. Development Policy in Thailand: From Top-down to Grass Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Matthew; Yutthaphonphinit, Phattaraphon; Seubsman, Sam-Ang; Sleigh, Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Top-down industrial development strategies initially dominated the developing world after the second World War but were eventually found to produce inequitable economic growth. For a decade or more, governments and international development agencies have embraced the idea of participatory grass roots development as a potential solution. Here we review Thailand's experience with development strategies and we examine the current focus on participatory approaches. Thai government planning agencies have adopted "people centred development" and a "sufficiency economy", particularly emphasised since the disruptions caused by the 1997 Asian financial crisis. They aim to address the inequitable sharing of the benefits of decades of rapid growth that was particularly unfair for the rural poor. Thai policies aim to decentralise power to the local level, allowing civil society and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) more of a voice in national decision making and promoting sustainable farming practices aimed at enriching rural communities. An example of this change in Thai government policy is the Community Worker Accreditation Scheme which is aiming to develop human resources at the local level by training community based leaders and supporting networks of community organisations. This enables autonomous local development projects led by trained and accredited individuals and groups. The political tensions notable in Thailand at present are part of this modern transition driven by conflicting models of top-down (industrial) development and the bottom-up (participatory) development ideals described above. Once resolved, Thailand will have few obstacles to moving to a new economic level.

  17. Top-down modulation in human visual cortex predicts the stability of a perceptual illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindertsma, Thomas; Hillebrand, Arjan; van Dijk, Bob W.; Lamme, Victor A. F.; Donner, Tobias H.

    2014-01-01

    Conscious perception sometimes fluctuates strongly, even when the sensory input is constant. For example, in motion-induced blindness (MIB), a salient visual target surrounded by a moving pattern suddenly disappears from perception, only to reappear after some variable time. Whereas such changes of perception result from fluctuations of neural activity, mounting evidence suggests that the perceptual changes, in turn, may also cause modulations of activity in several brain areas, including visual cortex. In this study, we asked whether these latter modulations might affect the subsequent dynamics of perception. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure modulations in cortical population activity during MIB. We observed a transient, retinotopically widespread modulation of beta (12–30 Hz)-frequency power over visual cortex that was closely linked to the time of subjects' behavioral report of the target disappearance. This beta modulation was a top-down signal, decoupled from both the physical stimulus properties and the motor response but contingent on the behavioral relevance of the perceptual change. Critically, the modulation amplitude predicted the duration of the subsequent target disappearance. We propose that the transformation of the perceptual change into a report triggers a top-down mechanism that stabilizes the newly selected perceptual interpretation. PMID:25411458

  18. Chronic alcohol exposure disrupts top-down control over basal ganglia action selection to produce habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Rafael; Baltz, Emily T; Gremel, Christina M

    2018-01-15

    Addiction involves a predominance of habitual control mediated through action selection processes in dorsal striatum. Research has largely focused on neural mechanisms mediating a proposed progression from ventral to dorsal lateral striatal control in addiction. However, over reliance on habit striatal processes may also arise from reduced cortical input to striatum, thereby disrupting executive control over action selection. Here, we identify novel mechanisms through which chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal (CIE) disrupts top-down control over goal-directed action selection processes to produce habits. We find CIE results in decreased excitability of orbital frontal cortex (OFC) excitatory circuits supporting goal-directed control, and, strikingly, selectively reduces OFC output to the direct output pathway in dorsal medial striatum. Increasing the activity of OFC circuits restores goal-directed control in CIE-exposed mice. Our findings show habitual control in alcohol dependence can arise through disrupted communication between top-down, goal-directed processes onto basal ganglia pathways controlling action selection.

  19. Top-down beta rhythms support selective attention via interlaminar interaction: a model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung H Lee

    Full Text Available Cortical rhythms have been thought to play crucial roles in our cognitive abilities. Rhythmic activity in the beta frequency band, around 20 Hz, has been reported in recent studies that focused on neural correlates of attention, indicating that top-down beta rhythms, generated in higher cognitive areas and delivered to earlier sensory areas, can support attentional gain modulation. To elucidate functional roles of beta rhythms and underlying mechanisms, we built a computational model of sensory cortical areas. Our simulation results show that top-down beta rhythms can activate ascending synaptic projections from L5 to L4 and L2/3, responsible for biased competition in superficial layers. In the simulation, slow-inhibitory interneurons are shown to resonate to the 20 Hz input and modulate the activity in superficial layers in an attention-related manner. The predicted critical roles of these cells in attentional gain provide a potential mechanism by which cholinergic drive can support selective attention.

  20. ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION FROM THE TOP DOWN TO S.C. ARTEGO S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORU CÎRNU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vertical communication within the organization is twofold: top down and bottom up. The communication from the top down starts from the top management and continuous vertical hierarchy downward until the execution personnel from the base. This type of organizational communication aims to inform, advise, to guide, to train and evaluate subordinates, and to provide all necessary information on the objectives and organizational policies. Often, managers are overly optimistic about the clarity and complete vertical communication. In fact, they are usually managers who frequently recorded failures in the communication of important information or adequate training of subordinates. Starting from previous research more laboriou, among which we mention the GLOBE Study of American Professor Robert House or one conducted in our country (the study Comoros team coordinated by Professor Constantin Rosca, we did a study of smaller scale (at company level the vertical communication and efficiency of communication modalities of this type of managerial act. In this regard, a research performed at S. C. ARTEGO S.A. watched and how communication is done from top to bottom line information and training of personnel. The research, based on a questionnaire, which preserves the anonymity of respondents had interesting results, we stood to attention and present them in what follows. It was surprising to find that certain legal limits for working climat, especially causes of stress are almost unknown, even if some subjects gave positive answers to questions of this nature.

  1. Enhanced visual awareness for morality and pajamas? Perception vs. memory in 'top-down' effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Chaz; Scholl, Brian J

    2015-03-01

    A raft of prominent findings has revived the notion that higher-level cognitive factors such as desire, meaning, and moral relevance can directly affect what we see. For example, under conditions of brief presentation, morally relevant words reportedly "pop out" and are easier to identify than morally irrelevant words. Though such results purport to show that perception itself is sensitive to such factors, much of this research instead demonstrates effects on visual recognition--which necessarily involves not only visual processing per se, but also memory retrieval. Here we report three experiments which suggest that many alleged top-down effects of this sort are actually effects on 'back-end' memory rather than 'front-end' perception. In particular, the same methods used to demonstrate popout effects for supposedly privileged stimuli (such as morality-related words, e.g. "punishment" and "victim") also yield popout effects for unmotivated, superficial categories (such as fashion-related words, e.g. "pajamas" and "stiletto"). We conclude that such effects reduce to well-known memory processes (in this case, semantic priming) that do not involve morality, and have no implications for debates about whether higher-level factors influence perception. These case studies illustrate how it is critical to distinguish perception from memory in alleged 'top-down' effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Top-down or bottom-up modelling. An application to CO2 abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroui, F.; Van Leeuwen, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    In four articles a comparison is made of bottom-up, or engineers'' models, and top-down models, which comprise macro-econometric models, computable general equilibrium models and also models in the system dynamics tradition. In the first article the history of economic modelling is outlined. In the second article the multi-sector macro-economic Computable General Equilibrium model for the Netherlands is described. It can be used to study the long-term effects of fiscal policy measures on economic and environmental indicators, in particular the effects on the level of CO2-emissions. The aim of article 3 is to describe the structure of the electricity supply industry in the UK and how it can be represented in a bottom-up sub-model within a more general E3 sectoral model of the UK economy. The objective of the last paper (4) is mainly a methodological discussion about integrating top-down and bottom-up models which can be used to assess CO2 abatement policies impacts on economic activity

  3. Playing shooter and driving videogames improves top-down guidance in visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sijing; Spence, Ian

    2013-05-01

    Playing action videogames is known to improve visual spatial attention and related skills. Here, we showed that playing action videogames also improves classic visual search, as well as the ability to locate targets in a dual search that mimics certain aspects of an action videogame. In Experiment 1A, first-person shooter (FPS) videogame players were faster than nonplayers in both feature search and conjunction search, and in Experiment 1B, they were faster and more accurate in a peripheral search and identification task while simultaneously performing a central search. In Experiment 2, we showed that 10 h of play could improve the performance of nonplayers on each of these tasks. Three different genres of videogames were used for training: two action games and a 3-D puzzle game. Participants who played an action game (either an FPS or a driving game) achieved greater gains on all search tasks than did those who trained using the puzzle game. Feature searches were faster after playing an action videogame, suggesting that players developed a better target template to guide search in a top-down manner. The results of the dual search suggest that, in addition to enhancing the ability to divide attention, playing an action game improves the top-down guidance of attention to possible target locations. The results have practical implications for the development of training tools to improve perceptual and cognitive skills.

  4. Congruency effects in the remote distractor paradigm: evidence for top-down modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Sabine; Kerzel, Dirk

    2009-08-10

    In three experiments, we examined effects of target-distractor similarity in the remote distractor effect (RDE). Observers made saccades to peripheral targets that were either gray or green. Foveal or peripheral distractors were presented at the same time. The distractors could either share the target's defining property (congruent) or be different from the target (incongruent). Congruent distractors slowed down saccadic reaction times more than incongruent distractors. The increase of the RDE with target-distractor congruency depended on task demands. The more participants had to rely on the target property to locate the target, the larger the congruency effect. We conclude that the RDE can be modulated in a top-down manner. Alternative explanations such as persisting memory traces for the target property or differences in stimulus arrangement were considered but discarded. Our claim is in line with models of saccade generation which assume that the structures underlying the RDE (e.g. the superior colliculus) receive bottom-up as well as top-down information.

  5. Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector EnergyEfficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wie McGrory, Laura; Coleman, Philip; Fridley, David; Harris,Jeffrey; Villasenor Franco, Edgar

    2006-05-10

    The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexicoand China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector)program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designingenergy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years ofpursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced fewresults, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 tofocus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum.Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leadingto an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federallevel. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China wassuccessfully initiated and led at the central government level withstrategic support from international experts. The very different successtrajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons fordesigning country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives.Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasinginitiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiencyperformance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsementlabeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simplepilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosenproducts), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasingprograms are likely to be more successful where there is high-levelpolitical endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supportedby a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led)purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to settheir own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks ofcities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasingofficials.

  6. Depression and anxious apprehension distinguish frontocingulate cortical activity during top-down attentional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silton, Rebecca Levin; Heller, Wendy; Engels, Anna S; Towers, David N; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Edgar, J Christopher; Sass, Sarah M; Stewart, Jennifer L; Sutton, Bradley P; Banich, Marie T; Miller, Gregory A

    2011-05-01

    A network consisting of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPFC) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) has been implicated in top-down attentional control. Few studies have systematically investigated how this network is altered in psychopathology, despite evidence that depression and anxiety are associated with attentional control impairments. Functional MRI and dense-array event-related brain potential (ERP) data were collected in separate sessions from 100 participants during a color-word Stroop task. Functional MRI results guided ERP source modeling to characterize the time course of activity in LDLPFC (300-440 ms) and dACC (520-680 ms). At low levels of depression, LDLPFC activity was indirectly related to Stroop interference and only via dACC activity. In contrast, at high levels of depression, dACC did not play an intervening role, and increased LDLPFC activity was directly related to decreased Stroop interference. Specific to high levels of anxious apprehension, higher dACC activity was related to more Stroop interference. Results indicate that depression and anxious apprehension modulate temporally and functionally distinct aspects of the frontocingulate network involved in top-down attention control.

  7. Comparing effectiveness of top-down and bottom-up strategies in containing influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achla Marathe

    Full Text Available This research compares the performance of bottom-up, self-motivated behavioral interventions with top-down interventions targeted at controlling an "Influenza-like-illness". Both types of interventions use a variant of the ring strategy. In the first case, when the fraction of a person's direct contacts who are diagnosed exceeds a threshold, that person decides to seek prophylaxis, e.g. vaccine or antivirals; in the second case, we consider two intervention protocols, denoted Block and School: when a fraction of people who are diagnosed in a Census Block (resp., School exceeds the threshold, prophylax the entire Block (resp., School. Results show that the bottom-up strategy outperforms the top-down strategies under our parameter settings. Even in situations where the Block strategy reduces the overall attack rate well, it incurs a much higher cost. These findings lend credence to the notion that if people used antivirals effectively, making them available quickly on demand to private citizens could be a very effective way to control an outbreak.

  8. Automatic Polyp Detection via A Novel Unified Bottom-up and Top-down Saliency Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yixuan; Li, Dengwang; Meng, Max Q-H

    2017-07-31

    In this paper, we propose a novel automatic computer-aided method to detect polyps for colonoscopy videos. To find the perceptually and semantically meaningful salient polyp regions, we first segment images into multilevel superpixels. Each level corresponds to different sizes of superpixels. Rather than adopting hand-designed features to describe these superpixels in images, we employ sparse autoencoder (SAE) to learn discriminative features in an unsupervised way. Then a novel unified bottom-up and top-down saliency method is proposed to detect polyps. In the first stage, we propose a weak bottom-up (WBU) saliency map by fusing the contrast based saliency and object-center based saliency together. The contrast based saliency map highlights image parts that show different appearances compared with surrounding areas while the object-center based saliency map emphasizes the center of the salient object. In the second stage, a strong classifier with Multiple Kernel Boosting (MKB) is learned to calculate the strong top-down (STD) saliency map based on samples directly from the obtained multi-level WBU saliency maps. We finally integrate these two stage saliency maps from all levels together to highlight polyps. Experiment results achieve 0.818 recall for saliency calculation, validating the effectiveness of our method. Extensive experiments on public polyp datasets demonstrate that the proposed saliency algorithm performs favorably against state-of-the-art saliency methods to detect polyps.

  9. Dietary self-control influences top-down guidance of attention to food cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne eHiggs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivational objects attract attention due to their rewarding properties, but less is known about the role that top-down cognitive processes play in the attention paid to motivationally relevant objects and how this is affected by relevant behaviour traits. Here we assess how thinking about food affects attentional guidance to food items and how this is modulated by traits relating to dietary self-control. Participants completed two tasks in which they were presented with an initial cue (food or non-food to either hold in working memory (memory task or to merely attend to (priming task. Holding food items in working memory strongly affected attention when the memorized cue re-appeared in the search display. Tendency towards disinhibited eating was associated with greater attention to food versus non-food pictures in both the priming and working memory tasks, consistent with greater attention to food cues per se. Successful dieters, defined as those high in dietary restraint and low in tendency to disinhibition, showed reduced attention to food when holding food-related information in working memory. These data suggest a strong top-down effect of thinking about food on attention to food items and indicate that the suppression of food items in working memory could be a marker of dieting success.

  10. Neurophysiological bases of exponential sensory decay and top-down memory retrieval: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, Ariel; Dehaene, Stanislas; Mindlin, Gabriel B; Sigman, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral observations suggest that multiple sensory elements can be maintained for a short time, forming a perceptual buffer which fades after a few hundred milliseconds. Only a subset of this perceptual buffer can be accessed under top-down control and broadcasted to working memory and consciousness. In turn, single-cell studies in awake-behaving monkeys have identified two distinct waves of response to a sensory stimulus: a first transient response largely determined by stimulus properties and a second wave dependent on behavioral relevance, context and learning. Here we propose a simple biophysical scheme which bridges these observations and establishes concrete predictions for neurophsyiological experiments in which the temporal interval between stimulus presentation and top-down allocation is controlled experimentally. Inspired in single-cell observations, the model involves a first transient response and a second stage of amplification and retrieval, which are implemented biophysically by distinct operational modes of the same circuit, regulated by external currents. We explicitly investigated the neuronal dynamics, the memory trace of a presented stimulus and the probability of correct retrieval, when these two stages were bracketed by a temporal gap. The model predicts correctly the dependence of performance with response times in interference experiments suggesting that sensory buffering does not require a specific dedicated mechanism and establishing a direct link between biophysical manipulations and behavioral observations leading to concrete predictions.

  11. Neurophysiological bases of exponential sensory decay and top-down memory retrieval: a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Zylberberg

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral observations suggest that multiple sensory elements can be maintained for a short time, forming a perceptual buffer which fades after a few hundred milliseconds. Only a subset of this perceptual buffer can be accessed under top-down control and broadcasted to working memory and consciousness. In turn, single-cell studies in awake-behaving monkeys have identified two distinct waves of response to a sensory stimulus: a first transient response largely determined by stimulus properties and a second wave dependent on behavioral relevance, context and learning. Here we propose a simple biophysical scheme which bridges these observations and establishes concrete predictions for neurophsyiological experiments in which the temporal interval between stimulus presentation and top-down allocation is controlled experimentally. Inspired in single-cell observations, the model involves a first transient response and a second stage of amplification and retrieval, which are implemented biophysically by distinct operational modes of the same circuit, regulated by external currents. We explicitly investigated the neuronal dynamics, the memory trace of a presented stimulus and the probability of correct retrieval, when these two stages were bracketed by a temporal gap. The model predicts correctly the dependence of performance with response times in interference experiments suggesting that sensory buffering does not require a specific dedicated mechanism and establishing a direct link between biophysical manipulations and behavioral observations leading to concrete predictions.

  12. Bottom-up and top-down attentional contributions to the size congruity effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Kenith V; Puri, Amrita M; Faulkenberry, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    The size congruity effect refers to the interaction between the numerical and physical (i.e., font) sizes of digits in a numerical (or physical) magnitude selection task. Although various accounts of the size congruity effect have attributed this interaction to either an early representational stage or a late decision stage, only Risko, Maloney, and Fugelsang (Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 75, 1137-1147, 2013) have asserted a central role for attention. In the present study, we used a visual search paradigm to further study the role of attention in the size congruity effect. In Experiments 1 and 2, we showed that manipulating top-down attention (via the task instructions) had a significant impact on the size congruity effect. The interaction between numerical and physical size was larger for numerical size comparison (Exp. 1) than for physical size comparison (Exp. 2). In the remaining experiments, we boosted the feature salience by using a unique target color (Exp. 3) or by increasing the display density by using three-digit numerals (Exps. 4 and 5). As expected, a color singleton target abolished the size congruity effect. Searching for three-digit targets based on numerical size (Exp. 4) resulted in a large size congruity effect, but search based on physical size (Exp. 5) abolished the effect. Our results reveal a substantial role for top-down attention in the size congruity effect, which we interpreted as support for a shared-decision account.

  13. Spectrometric techniques 4

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume IV discusses three widely diversified areas of spectrometric techniques. The book focuses on three spectrometric methods. Chapter 1 discusses the phenomenology and applications of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS), the most commonly used optical technique that exploit the Raman effect. The second chapter is concerned with diffraction gratings and mountings for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectral Region. Chapter 3 accounts the uses of mass spectrometry, detectors, types of spectrometers, and ion sources. Physicists and chemists will find the book a go

  14. 2DB: a Proteomics database for storage, analysis, presentation, and retrieval of information from mass spectrometric experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmer, Jens; Kuhlgert, Sebastian; Hippler, Michael

    2008-07-07

    The amount of information stemming from proteomics experiments involving (multi dimensional) separation techniques, mass spectrometric analysis, and computational analysis is ever-increasing. Data from such an experimental workflow needs to be captured, related and analyzed. Biological experiments within this scope produce heterogenic data ranging from pictures of one or two-dimensional protein maps and spectra recorded by tandem mass spectrometry to text-based identifications made by algorithms which analyze these spectra. Additionally, peptide and corresponding protein information needs to be displayed. In order to handle the large amount of data from computational processing of mass spectrometric experiments, automatic import scripts are available and the necessity for manual input to the database has been minimized. Information is in a generic format which abstracts from specific software tools typically used in such an experimental workflow. The software is therefore capable of storing and cross analysing results from many algorithms. A novel feature and a focus of this database is to facilitate protein identification by using peptides identified from mass spectrometry and link this information directly to respective protein maps. Additionally, our application employs spectral counting for quantitative presentation of the data. All information can be linked to hot spots on images to place the results into an experimental context. A summary of identified proteins, containing all relevant information per hot spot, is automatically generated, usually upon either a change in the underlying protein models or due to newly imported identifications. The supporting information for this report can be accessed in multiple ways using the user interface provided by the application. We present a proteomics database which aims to greatly reduce evaluation time of results from mass spectrometric experiments and enhance result quality by allowing consistent data handling

  15. 2DB: a Proteomics database for storage, analysis, presentation, and retrieval of information from mass spectrometric experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hippler Michael

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of information stemming from proteomics experiments involving (multi dimensional separation techniques, mass spectrometric analysis, and computational analysis is ever-increasing. Data from such an experimental workflow needs to be captured, related and analyzed. Biological experiments within this scope produce heterogenic data ranging from pictures of one or two-dimensional protein maps and spectra recorded by tandem mass spectrometry to text-based identifications made by algorithms which analyze these spectra. Additionally, peptide and corresponding protein information needs to be displayed. Results In order to handle the large amount of data from computational processing of mass spectrometric experiments, automatic import scripts are available and the necessity for manual input to the database has been minimized. Information is in a generic format which abstracts from specific software tools typically used in such an experimental workflow. The software is therefore capable of storing and cross analysing results from many algorithms. A novel feature and a focus of this database is to facilitate protein identification by using peptides identified from mass spectrometry and link this information directly to respective protein maps. Additionally, our application employs spectral counting for quantitative presentation of the data. All information can be linked to hot spots on images to place the results into an experimental context. A summary of identified proteins, containing all relevant information per hot spot, is automatically generated, usually upon either a change in the underlying protein models or due to newly imported identifications. The supporting information for this report can be accessed in multiple ways using the user interface provided by the application. Conclusion We present a proteomics database which aims to greatly reduce evaluation time of results from mass spectrometric experiments and enhance

  16. 2D FT-ICR MS of Calmodulin: A Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Federico; van Agthoven, Maria; Chiron, Lionel; Soulby, Andrew J; Wootton, Christopher A; Lam, Yuko P Y; Barrow, Mark P; Delsuc, Marc-André; O'Connor, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) allows data-independent fragmentation of all ions in a sample and correlation of fragment ions to their precursors through the modulation of precursor ion cyclotron radii prior to fragmentation. Previous results show that implementation of 2D FT-ICR MS with infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) has turned this method into a useful analytical tool. In this work, IRMPD tandem mass spectrometry of calmodulin (CaM) has been performed both in one-dimensional and two-dimensional FT-ICR MS using a top-down and bottom-up approach. 2D IRMPD FT-ICR MS is used to achieve extensive inter-residue bond cleavage and assignment for CaM, using its unique features for fragment identification in a less time- and sample-consuming experiment than doing the same thing using sequential MS/MS experiments. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Analysis of hairy root culture of Rauvolfia serpentina using direct analysis in real time mass spectrometric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudanan, K P; Banerjee, Suchitra; Khanuja, Suman P S; Chattopadhyay, Sunil K

    2008-06-01

    The applicability of a new mass spectrometric technique, DART (direct analysis in real time) has been studied in the analysis of the hairy root culture of Rauvolfia serpentina. The intact hairy roots were analyzed by holding them in the gap between the DART source and the mass spectrometer for measurements. Two nitrogen-containing compounds, vomilenine and reserpine, were characterized from the analysis of the hairy roots almost instantaneously. The confirmation of the structures of the identified compounds was made through their accurate molecular formula determinations. This is the first report of the application of DART technique for the characterization of compounds that are expressed in the hairy root cultures of Rauvolfia serpentina. Moreover, this also constitutes the first report of expression of reserpine in the hairy root culture of Rauvolfia serpentina. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fohlman, J; Peterson, P A [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cell Research; Kamensky, I; Hakansson, P; Sundqvist, B [Tandemacceleratorlaboratoriet, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1982-07-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitative these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra.

  19. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  20. Vitamin D-metabolites from human plasma and mass spectrometric analysis by fast heavy ion induced desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fohlman, J.; Peterson, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    D-vitamin metabolites have been isolated from human serum employing chromatographic techniques. The serum carrier protein for vitamin D (DBP) was first isolated by immunosorbent chromatography. Lipid ligands associated with DBP were then extracted with hexane and separated by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of vitamin D metabolites by their absorbance of ultraviolet light is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor all vitamin D derivatives from a few millilitres of serum. Therefore, further analyses are necessary to quantitative these compounds. We have begun to develop a mass spectrometric method to achieve a reliable, quantitative procedure. As a first step towards this goal a number of pure samples of vitamin D compounds have been studied in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer based on fast heavy ion induced desorption. All vitamin D compounds examined could be detected and identified by their molecular ion and fragment spectra. (orig.)

  1. Agricultural ammonia emissions in China: reconciling bottom-up and top-down estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Current estimates of agricultural ammonia (NH3 emissions in China differ by more than a factor of 2, hindering our understanding of their environmental consequences. Here we apply both bottom-up statistical and top-down inversion methods to quantify NH3 emissions from agriculture in China for the year 2008. We first assimilate satellite observations of NH3 column concentration from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES using the GEOS-Chem adjoint model to optimize Chinese anthropogenic NH3 emissions at the 1∕2°  ×  2∕3° horizontal resolution for March–October 2008. Optimized emissions show a strong summer peak, with emissions about 50 % higher in summer than spring and fall, which is underestimated in current bottom-up NH3 emission estimates. To reconcile the latter with the top-down results, we revisit the processes of agricultural NH3 emissions and develop an improved bottom-up inventory of Chinese NH3 emissions from fertilizer application and livestock waste at the 1∕2°  ×  2∕3° resolution. Our bottom-up emission inventory includes more detailed information on crop-specific fertilizer application practices and better accounts for meteorological modulation of NH3 emission factors in China. We find that annual anthropogenic NH3 emissions are 11.7 Tg for 2008, with 5.05 Tg from fertilizer application and 5.31 Tg from livestock waste. The two sources together account for 88 % of total anthropogenic NH3 emissions in China. Our bottom-up emission estimates also show a distinct seasonality peaking in summer, consistent with top-down results from the satellite-based inversion. Further evaluations using surface network measurements show that the model driven by our bottom-up emissions reproduces the observed spatial and seasonal variations of NH3 gas concentrations and ammonium (NH4+ wet deposition fluxes over China well, providing additional credibility to the improvements we have made to our

  2. Characterizing the effects of feature salience and top-down attention in the early visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltoratski, Sonia; Ling, Sam; McCormack, Devin; Tong, Frank

    2017-07-01

    The visual system employs a sophisticated balance of attentional mechanisms: salient stimuli are prioritized for visual processing, yet observers can also ignore such stimuli when their goals require directing attention elsewhere. A powerful determinant of visual salience is local feature contrast: if a local region differs from its immediate surround along one or more feature dimensions, it will appear more salient. We used high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI) at 7T to characterize the modulatory effects of bottom-up salience and top-down voluntary attention within multiple sites along the early visual pathway, including visual areas V1-V4 and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Observers viewed arrays of spatially distributed gratings, where one of the gratings immediately to the left or right of fixation differed from all other items in orientation or motion direction, making it salient. To investigate the effects of directed attention, observers were cued to attend to the grating to the left or right of fixation, which was either salient or nonsalient. Results revealed reliable additive effects of top-down attention and stimulus-driven salience throughout visual areas V1-hV4. In comparison, the LGN exhibited significant attentional enhancement but was not reliably modulated by orientation- or motion-defined salience. Our findings indicate that top-down effects of spatial attention can influence visual processing at the earliest possible site along the visual pathway, including the LGN, whereas the processing of orientation- and motion-driven salience primarily involves feature-selective interactions that take place in early cortical visual areas. NEW & NOTEWORTHY While spatial attention allows for specific, goal-driven enhancement of stimuli, salient items outside of the current focus of attention must also be prioritized. We used 7T fMRI to compare salience and spatial attentional enhancement along the early visual hierarchy. We report additive effects of

  3. The case for refining bottom-up methane emission inventories using top-down measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bryce F. J.; Iverach, Charlotte P.; Ginty, Elisa; Bashir, Safdar; Lowry, Dave; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2017-04-01

    Bottom-up global methane emission estimates are important for guiding policy development and mitigation strategies. Such inventories enable rapid and consistent proportioning of emissions by industrial sectors and land use at various scales from city to country to global. There has been limited use of top-down measurements to guide refining emission inventories. Here we compare the EDGAR gridmap data version 4.2 with over 5000 km of daytime ground level mobile atmospheric methane surveys in eastern Australia. The landscapes and industries surveyed include: urban environments, dryland farming, intensive livestock farming (both beef and lamb), irrigation agriculture, open cut and underground coal mining, and coal seam gas production. Daytime mobile methane surveys over a 2-year period show that at the landscape scale there is a high level of repeatability for the mole fraction of methane measured in the ground level atmosphere. Such consistency in the mole fraction of methane indicates that these data can be used as a proxy for flux. A scatter plot of the EDGAR emission gridmap Log[ton substance / 0.1 degree x 0.1 degree / year] versus the median mole fraction of methane / 0.1 degree x 0.1 degree in the ground level atmosphere highlights that the extent of elevated methane emissions associated with coal mining in the Hunter coalfields, which covers an area of 56 km by 24 km, has been under-represented in the EDGAR input data. Our results also show that methane emissions from country towns (population poor information on the extent of urban gas leaks. Given the uncertainties associated with the base land use and industry data for each country, we generalise the Australian observations to the global inventory with caution. The extensive comparison of top-down measurements versus the EDGAR version 4.2 methane gridmaps highlights the need for adjustments to the base resource data and/or the emission factors applied for coal mining, especially emissions from underground

  4. Evaluations of carbon fluxes estimated by top-down and bottom-up approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K.; Sasai, T.; Kato, S.; Hiraki, K.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Yokota, T.; Nasahara, K.; Matsunaga, T.

    2013-12-01

    There are two types of estimating carbon fluxes using satellite observation data, and these are referred to as top-down and bottom-up approaches. Many uncertainties are however still remain in these carbon flux estimations, because the true values of carbon flux are still unclear and estimations vary according to the type of the model (e.g. a transport model, a process based model) and input data. The CO2 fluxes in these approaches are estimated by using different satellite data such as the distribution of CO2 concentration in the top-down approach and the land cover information (e.g. leaf area, surface temperature) in the bottom-up approach. The satellite-based CO2 flux estimations with reduced uncertainty can be used efficiently for identifications of large emission area and carbon stocks of forest area. In this study, we evaluated the carbon flux estimates from two approaches by comparing with each other. The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) has been observing atmospheric CO2 concentrations since 2009. GOSAT L4A data product is the monthly CO2 flux estimations for 64 sub-continental regions and is estimated by using GOSAT FTS SWIR L2 XCO2 data and atmospheric tracer transport model. We used GOSAT L4A CO2 flux as top-down approach estimations and net ecosystem productions (NEP) estimated by the diagnostic type biosphere model BEAMS as bottom-up approach estimations. BEAMS NEP is only natural land CO2 flux, so we used GOSAT L4A CO2 flux after subtraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and oceanic CO2 flux. We compared with two approach in temperate north-east Asia region. This region is covered by grassland and crop land (about 60 %), forest (about 20 %) and bare ground (about 20 %). The temporal variation for one year period was indicated similar trends between two approaches. Furthermore we show the comparison of CO2 flux estimations in other sub-continental regions.

  5. Merging Bottom-Up with Top-Down: Continuous Lamellar Networks and Block Copolymer Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian Patrick

    Block copolymer lithography is an emerging nanopatterning technology with capabilities that may complement and eventually replace those provided by existing optical lithography techniques. This bottom-up process relies on the parallel self-assembly of macromolecules composed of covalently linked, chemically distinct blocks to generate periodic nanostructures. Among the myriad potential morphologies, lamellar structures formed by diblock copolymers with symmetric volume fractions have attracted the most interest as a patterning tool. When confined to thin films and directed to assemble with interfaces perpendicular to the substrate, two-dimensional domains are formed between the free surface and the substrate, and selective removal of a single block creates a nanostructured polymeric template. The substrate exposed between the polymeric features can subsequently be modified through standard top-down microfabrication processes to generate novel nanostructured materials. Despite tremendous progress in our understanding of block copolymer self-assembly, continuous two-dimensional materials have not yet been fabricated via this robust technique, which may enable nanostructured material combinations that cannot be fabricated through bottom-up methods. This thesis aims to study the effects of block copolymer composition and processing on the lamellar network morphology of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) and utilize this knowledge to fabricate continuous two-dimensional materials through top-down methods. First, block copolymer composition was varied through homopolymer blending to explore the physical phenomena surrounding lamellar network continuity. After establishing a framework for tuning the continuity, the effects of various processing parameters were explored to engineer the network connectivity via defect annihilation processes. Precisely controlling the connectivity and continuity of lamellar networks through defect engineering and

  6. Top-Down Control of Visual Alpha Oscillations: Sources of Control Signals and Their Mechanisms of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Rajagovindan, Rajasimhan; Han, Sahng-Min; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Alpha oscillations (8–12 Hz) are thought to inversely correlate with cortical excitability. Goal-oriented modulation of alpha has been studied extensively. In visual spatial attention, alpha over the region of visual cortex corresponding to the attended location decreases, signifying increased excitability to facilitate the processing of impending stimuli. In contrast, in retention of verbal working memory, alpha over visual cortex increases, signifying decreased excitability to gate out stimulus input to protect the information held online from sensory interference. According to the prevailing model, this goal-oriented biasing of sensory cortex is effected by top-down control signals from frontal and parietal cortices. The present study tests and substantiates this hypothesis by (a) identifying the signals that mediate the top-down biasing influence, (b) examining whether the cortical areas issuing these signals are task-specific or task-independent, and (c) establishing the possible mechanism of the biasing action. High-density human EEG data were recorded in two experimental paradigms: a trial-by-trial cued visual spatial attention task and a modified Sternberg working memory task. Applying Granger causality to both sensor-level and source-level data we report the following findings. In covert visual spatial attention, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the right hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the right frontal eye field (FEF) and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) being the main sources of top-down influences. During retention of verbal working memory, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the left hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) being the main source of top-down influences. In both experiments, top-down influences are mediated by alpha oscillations, and the biasing effect is likely achieved via an inhibition

  7. Application and evaluation of the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique in the determination of rare earths in geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, N.M.P. de.

    1988-01-01

    Establishment of the experimental procedures employed in the rare earth element determination of geological samples by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis is discussed in the present work. The procedures involve preparation and calibration of the isotope tracers isotope dilution, dissolution in a teflon pressure vessel, chemical separation and isotope analysis using a fully automated Micromass VG ISOTOPES model 354 thermal ionization mass spectrometer. For the initial chemical separation of total rare earths the cationic resin was employed and HC1 and HNO 3 acids as eluents. In the second step rare earths elements were separated into individual (La, Ce and Nd) and subgroups (Sm-Eu-Gd, Yb-Er-Dy) fractions using the same cationic resin and α-HIBA as eluent. Nine elements La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er and Yb are determined by this method in the ''United States Geological Survey'' (USGS) standard samples GSP-1, AGV-1 and G-2, with an overall precision of +- 1 to 2% and an accuracy of 5%. The concentration of rare earth element determined in the standard sample PCC-1 showed that the total analytical blanks are in submicrogram levels. The concentration of rare earth elements in the same USGS standard samples were also determined by Instrumental neutron activation analysis, neutron activation analysis with chemical separation before irradiation and inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy. The chemical procedures employed for these methods are the same as that used for mass spectrometric isotope dilution. Based on the results obtained, each method was evaluated pointing out their merits and defects. The study clearly showed that the chemical procedure employed for all these techniques was satisfactory. (author) [pt

  8. A top-down bottom-up modeling approach to climate change policy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuladhar, Sugandha D.; Yuan, Mei; Bernstein, Paul; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes macroeconomic impacts of U.S. climate change policies for three different emissions pathways using a top-down bottom-up integrated model. The integrated model couples a technology-rich, bottom-up model of the U.S. electricity sector with a fully dynamic, forward-looking general equilibrium model of the U.S. economy. Our model provides a unique and consistent modeling framework for climate change analysis. Because of the model's detail and flexibility, we use it to examine additional scenarios to analyze many of the major uncertainties surrounding the implementation and impact of climate change policies - the role of command-and-control measures, loss in flexibility mechanisms such as banking, limits on low-emitting technology, and availability of offsets. The results consistently demonstrate that those policies that combine market-oriented abatement incentives with full flexibility are the most cost-effective. (author)

  9. Manufacturing at Nanoscale: Top-Down, Bottom-up and System Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiang; Sun Cheng; Fang, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    The current nano-technology revolution is facing several major challenges: to manufacture nanodevices below 20 nm, to fabricate three-dimensional complex nano-structures, and to heterogeneously integrate multiple functionalities. To tackle these grand challenges, the Center for Scalable and Integrated NAno-Manufacturing (SINAM), a NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center, set its goal to establish a new manufacturing paradigm that integrates an array of new nano-manufacturing technologies, including the plasmonic imaging lithography and ultramolding imprint lithography aiming toward critical resolution of 1-10 nm and the hybrid top-down and bottom-up technologies to achieve massively parallel integration of heterogeneous nanoscale components into higher-order structures and devices. Furthermore, SINAM will develop system engineering strategies to scale-up the nano-manufacturing technologies. SINAMs integrated research and education platform will shed light to a broad range of potential applications in computing, telecommunication, photonics, biotechnology, health care, and national security

  10. Mesoporous ZSM-5 Zeolites in Acid Catalysis: Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pit Losch

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A top-down desilication of Al-rich ZSM-5 zeolites and a bottom-up mesopores creating method were evaluated in this study. Three liquid–solid and one gas–solid heterogeneously-catalysed reactions were chosen to establish relationships between zeolites textural properties and their catalytic behavior in acid-catalysed model reactions that are influenced by shape selectivity: Diels-Alder cyclization between isoprene and methylacrylate, Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO reaction, chlorination of iodobenzene with trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, and Friedel-Crafts acylation of anisole by carboxylic acids with differing sizes. It is found amongst others that no optimal mesoporosity for all the different reactions can be easily obtained, but depending on the chosen application, a specific treatment has to be set to achieve high activity/selectivity and stability.

  11. The Ideological Divide Concerning Climate Change Opinion: Integrating Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eJacquet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The United States wields disproportionate global influence in terms of carbon dioxide emissions and international climate policy. This renders it an especially important context in which to examine the interplay among social, psychological, and political factors in shaping attitudes and behaviors about climate change. In this article, we review the emerging literature addressing the liberal-conservative divide in the U.S. with respect to thought, communication, and action concerning climate change. Because of its theoretical and practical significance, we focus on the motivational basis for skepticism and inaction on the part of some, including top-down institutional forces, such as corporate strategy, and bottom-up psychological factors, such as ego, group, and system justification. Although more research is needed to elucidate fully the social, cognitive, and motivational bases of environmental attitudes and behavior, a great deal has been learned in just a few years by focusing on specific ideological factors in addition to general psychological principles.

  12. Top-down versus bottom-up processing of influence diagrams in probabilistic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, R.D.; Burns, T.J.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work by Phillips and Selby has shown that influence diagram methodology can be a useful analytical tool in reactor safety studies. In some instances an influence diagram can be used as a graphical representation of probabilistic dependence within a system or event sequence. Under these circumstances, Bayesian statistics is employed to transform the relationships depicted in the influence diagram into the correct expression for a desired marginal probability (e.g. the top node). Top-down and bottom-up algorithms have emerged as the dominant methods for quantifying influence diagrams. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a potential error in employing the bottom-up algorithm when dealing with interdependencies

  13. Spallation Neutron Source Availability Top-Down Apportionment Using Characteristic Factors and Expert Opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Schryver, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Apportionment is the assignment of top-level requirements to lower tier elements of the overall facility. A method for apportioning overall facility availability requirements among systems and subsystems is presented. Characteristics that influence equipment reliability and maintainability are discussed. Experts, using engineering judgment, scored each characteristic for each system whose availability design goal is to be established. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method is used to produce a set of weighted rankings for each characteristic for each alternative system. A mathematical model is derived which incorporates these weighting factors. The method imposes higher availability requirements on those systems in which an incremental increase in availability is easier to achieve, and lower availability requirements where greater availability is more difficult and costly. An example is given of applying this top-down apportionment methodology to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility

  14. Unsupervised Tattoo Segmentation Combining Bottom-Up and Top-Down Cues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Josef D [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Tattoo segmentation is challenging due to the complexity and large variance in tattoo structures. We have developed a segmentation algorithm for nding tattoos in an image. Our basic idea is split-merge: split each tattoo image into clusters through a bottom-up process, learn to merge the clusters containing skin and then distinguish tattoo from the other skin via top-down prior in the image itself. Tattoo segmentation with unknown number of clusters is transferred to a gure-ground segmentation. We have applied our segmentation algorithm on a tattoo dataset and the results have shown that our tattoo segmentation system is e cient and suitable for further tattoo classi cation and retrieval purpose.

  15. Selective Area Sublimation: A Simple Top-down Route for GaN-Based Nanowire Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damilano, B; Vézian, S; Brault, J; Alloing, B; Massies, J

    2016-03-09

    Post-growth in situ partial SiNx masking of GaN-based epitaxial layers grown in a molecular beam epitaxy reactor is used to get GaN selective area sublimation (SAS) by high temperature annealing. Using this top-down approach, nanowires (NWs) with nanometer scale diameter are obtained from GaN and InxGa1-xN/GaN quantum well epitaxial structures. After GaN regrowth on InxGa1-xN/GaN NWs resulting from SAS, InxGa1-xN quantum disks (QDisks) with nanometer sizes in the three dimensions are formed. Low temperature microphotoluminescence experiments demonstrate QDisk multilines photon emission around 3 eV with individual line widths of 1-2 meV.

  16. Supervisor localization a top-down approach to distributed control of discrete-event systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a systematic top-down approach to distributed control synthesis of discrete-event systems (DES). The approach is called supervisor localization; its essence is the allocation of external supervisory control action to individual component agents as their internal control strategies. The procedure is: first synthesize a monolithic supervisor, to achieve globally optimal and nonblocking controlled behavior, then decompose the monolithic supervisor into local controllers, one for each agent. The collective behavior of the resulting local controllers is identical to that achieved by the monolithic supervisor. The basic localization theory is first presented in the Ramadge–Wonham language-based supervisory control framework, then demonstrated with distributed control examples of multi-robot formations, manufacturing systems, and distributed algorithms. An architectural approach is adopted to apply localization to large-scale DES; this yields a heterarchical localization procedure, which is...

  17. Top-down versus bottom-up processing of influence diagrams in probabilistic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, R.D.; Burns, T.J.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Recent work by Phillips et al., and Selby et al., has shown that influence diagram methodology can be a useful analytical tool in reactor safety studies. An influence diagram is a graphical representation of probabilistic dependence within a system or event sequence. Bayesian statistics are employed to transform the relationships depicted in the influence diagram into the correct expression for a desired marginal probability (e.g. the top event). As with fault trees, top-down and bottom-up algorithms have emerged as the dominant methods for quantifying influence diagrams. Purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a potential error in employing the bottom-up algorithm when dealing with interdependencies. In addition, the computing efficiency of both methods is discussed

  18. Manipulation of strain state in silicon nanoribbons by top-down approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Miao; Xue, Zhongying; Sun, Gaodi; Guo, Qinglei; Chen, Da; Di, Zengfeng, E-mail: zfdi@mail.sim.ac.cn; Wang, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang, Gaoshan; Mei, Yongfeng [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-04-27

    Tensile strain is often utilized to enhance the electron mobility and luminescent characteristics of semiconductors. A top-down approach in conjunction with roll-up technology is adopted to produce high tensile strain in Si nanoribbons by patterning and releasing of the bridge-like structures. The tensile strain can be altered between uniaxial state and biaxial state by adjusting the dimensions of the patterns and can be varied controllably up to 3.2% and 0.9% for the uniaxial- and biaxial-strained Si nanoribbons, respectively. Three-dimensional finite element analysis is performed to investigate the mechanism of strain generation during patterning and releasing of the structure. Since the process mainly depends on the geometrical factors, the technique can be readily extended to other types of mechanical, electrical, and optical membranes.

  19. Top-down approach from satellite to terrestrial rover application for environmental monitoring of landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, C; Mei, A; Zampetti, E; Bassani, C; Paciucci, L; Manetti, P

    2017-04-15

    This paper describes a methodology to perform chemical analyses in landfill areas by integrating multisource geomatic data. We used a top-down approach to identify Environmental Point of Interest (EPI) based on very high-resolution satellite data (Pleiades and WorldView 2) and on in situ thermal and photogrammetric surveys. Change detection techniques and geostatistical analysis supported the chemical survey, undertaken using an accumulation chamber and an RIIA, an unmanned ground vehicle developed by CNR IIA, equipped with a multiparameter sensor platform for environmental monitoring. Such an approach improves site characterization, identifying the key environmental points of interest where it is necessary to perform detailed chemical analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Implementing collaborative improvement - top-down, bottom-up or both?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus; Boer, Harry; Caniato, Federico

    2007-01-01

    , the study identifies three different implementation approaches. The bottom-up learning-by-doing approach starts at a practical level, with simple improvement activities, and aims at gradually developing a wide range of CoI knowledge, skills and initiatives. The top-down directive approach starts...... with aligning the partners' CoI objectives and an assessment of their collaboration and CoI maturity in order to provide a common platform before actually starting improvement activities. The laissez-faire approach builds on shared goals/vision, meetings on equal terms and joint work, in a non-directive and non......-facilitated way, though. The article demonstrates how and why the different approaches have different effects on the development of collaborative improvement....

  1. A top-down approach to crystal engineering of a racemic Δ2-isoxazoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Giuseppe M; Rescifina, Antonio; Chiacchio, Ugo; Bacchi, Alessia; Punzo, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    The crystal structure of racemic dimethyl (4RS,5RS)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-4,5-dihydroisoxazole-4,5-dicarboxylate, C13H12N2O7, has been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. By analysing the degree of growth of the morphologically important crystal faces, a ranking of the most relevant non-covalent interactions determining the crystal structure can be inferred. The morphological information is considered with an approach opposite to the conventional one: instead of searching inside the structure for the potential key interactions and using them to calculate the crystal habit, the observed crystal morphology is used to define the preferential lines of growth of the crystal, and then this information is interpreted by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Comparison with the X-ray structure confirms the validity of the strategy, thus suggesting this top-down approach to be a useful tool for crystal engineering.

  2. A top-down approach for the prediction of hardness and toughness of hierarchical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Paggi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Many natural and man-made materials exhibit structure over more than one length scale. In this paper, we deal with hierarchical grained composite materials that have recently been designed to achieve superior hardness and toughness as compared to their traditional counterparts. Their nested structure, where meso-grains are recursively composed of smaller and smaller micro-grains at the different scales with a fractal-like topology, is herein studied from a hierarchical perspective. Considering a top-down approach, i.e. from the largest to the smallest scale, we propose a recursive micromechanical model coupled with a generalized fractal mixture rule for the prediction of hardness and toughness of a grained material with n hierarchical levels. A relationship between hardness and toughness is also derived and the analytical predictions are compared with experimental data.

  3. Spatial inter-comparison of Top-down emission inventories in European urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetti, Marco; Thunis, Philippe; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Clappier, Alain; Couvidat, Florian; Guevara, Marc; Kuenen, Jeroen; López-Aparicio, Susana

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an inter-comparison of the main Top-down emission inventories currently used for air quality modelling studies at the European level. The comparison is developed for eleven European cities and compares the distribution of emissions of NOx, SO2, VOC and PPM2.5 from the road transport, residential combustion and industry sectors. The analysis shows that substantial differences in terms of total emissions, sectorial emission shares and spatial distribution exist between the datasets. The possible reasons in terms of downscaling approaches and choice of spatial proxies are analysed and recommendations are provided for each inventory in order to work towards the harmonisation of spatial downscaling and proxy calibration, in particular for policy purposes. The proposed methodology may be useful for the development of consistent and harmonised European-wide inventories with the aim of reducing the uncertainties in air quality modelling activities.

  4. Bottom-up and Top-down Input Augment the Variability of Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Kreiman, Gabriel; Born, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurons in the cerebral cortex respond inconsistently to a repeated sensory stimulus, yet they underlie our stable sensory experiences. Although the nature of this variability is unknown, its ubiquity has encouraged the general view that each cell produces random spike patterns that noisily represent its response rate. In contrast, here we show that reversibly inactivating distant sources of either bottom-up or top-down input to cortical visual areas in the alert primate reduces both the spike train irregularity and the trial-to-trial variability of single neurons. A simple model in which a fraction of the pre-synaptic input is silenced can reproduce this reduction in variability, provided that there exist temporal correlations primarily within, but not between, excitatory and inhibitory input pools. A large component of the variability of cortical neurons may therefore arise from synchronous input produced by signals arriving from multiple sources. PMID:27427459

  5. A top-down systems biology view of microbiome-mammalian metabolic interactions in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, François-Pierre J; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Wang, Yulan; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Yap, Ivan K S; Tang, Huiru; Zirah, Séverine; Murphy, Gerard M; Cloarec, Olivier; Lindon, John C; Sprenger, Norbert; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil; van Bladeren, Peter; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2007-01-01

    Symbiotic gut microorganisms (microbiome) interact closely with the mammalian host's metabolism and are important determinants of human health. Here, we decipher the complex metabolic effects of microbial manipulation, by comparing germfree mice colonized by a human baby flora (HBF) or a normal flora to conventional mice. We perform parallel microbiological profiling, metabolic profiling by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance of liver, plasma, urine and ileal flushes, and targeted profiling of bile acids by ultra performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and short-chain fatty acids in cecum by GC-FID. Top-down multivariate analysis of metabolic profiles reveals a significant association of specific metabotypes with the resident microbiome. We derive a transgenomic graph model showing that HBF flora has a remarkably simple microbiome/metabolome correlation network, impacting directly on the host's ability to metabolize lipids: HBF mice present higher ileal concentrations of tauro-conjugated bile acids, reduced plasma levels of lipoproteins but higher hepatic triglyceride content associated with depletion of glutathione. These data indicate that the microbiome modulates absorption, storage and the energy harvest from the diet at the systems level. PMID:17515922

  6. Pioneering In Situ Recrystallization during Bead Milling: A Top-down Approach to Prepare Zeolite A Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Chokkalingam; Yamaguchi, Yudai; Liu, Zhendong; Ibe, Sayoko; Elangovan, Shanmugam P; Ishii, Toshihiro; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Akira; Okubo, Tatsuya; Wakihara, Toru

    2016-07-05

    Top-down approach has been viewed as an efficient and straightforward method to prepare nanosized zeolites. Yet, the mechanical breaking of zeolite causes amorphization, which usually requires a post-milling recrystallization to obtain fully crystalline nanoparticles. Herein we present a facile methodology to prepare zeolite nanocrystals, where milling and recrystallization can be performed in situ. A milling apparatus specially designed to work under conditions of high alkalinity and temperature enables the in situ recrystallization during milling. Taking zeolite A as an example, we demonstrate its size reduction from ~3 μm to 66 nm in 30 min, which is quite faster than previous methods reported. Three functions, viz., miniaturization, amorphization and recrystallization were found to take effect concurrently during this one-pot process. The dynamic balance between these three functions was achieved by adjusting the milling period and temperature, which lead to the tuning of zeolite A particle size. Particle size and crystallinity of the zeolite A nanocrystals were confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and water adsorption-desorption. This work presents a pioneering advancement in this field of nanosized zeolites, and will facilitate the mass production as well as boost the wide applications of nanosized zeolites.

  7. An integrated top-down and bottom-up proteomic approach to characterize the antigen-binding fragment of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Lennard; Wu, Si; Vanduijn, Martijn; Tolić, Nikolai; Stingl, Christoph; Zhao, Rui; Luider, Theo; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-05-01

    We have previously shown that different individuals exposed to the same antigen produce antibodies with identical mutations in their complementarity determining regions (CDR), suggesting that CDR tryptic peptides can serve as biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. Complete Fabs derived from disease specific antibodies have even higher potential; they could potentially be used for disease treatment and are required to identify the antigens toward which the antibodies are directed. However, complete Fab sequence characterization via LC-MS analysis of tryptic peptides (i.e. bottom-up) has proven to be impractical for mixtures of antibodies. To tackle this challenge, we have developed an integrated bottom-up and top-down MS approach, employing 2D chromatography coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS), and applied this approach for full characterization of the variable parts of two pharmaceutical monoclonal antibodies with sensitivity comparable to the bottom-up standard. These efforts represent an essential step toward the identification of disease specific antibodies in patient samples with potentially significant clinical impact. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Top-Down-Assisted Bottom-Up Method for Homologous Protein Sequencing: Hemoglobin from 33 Bird Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Laskay, Ünige A.; Vilcins, Inger-Marie E.; Barbour, Alan G.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2015-11-01

    Ticks are vectors for disease transmission because they are indiscriminant in their feeding on multiple vertebrate hosts, transmitting pathogens between their hosts. Identifying the hosts on which ticks have fed is important for disease prevention and intervention. We have previously shown that hemoglobin (Hb) remnants from a host on which a tick fed can be used to reveal the host's identity. For the present research, blood was collected from 33 bird species that are common in the U.S. as hosts for ticks but that have unknown Hb sequences. A top-down-assisted bottom-up mass spectrometry approach with a customized searching database, based on variability in known bird hemoglobin sequences, has been devised to facilitate fast and complete sequencing of hemoglobin from birds with unknown sequences. These hemoglobin sequences will be added to a hemoglobin database and used for tick host identification. The general approach has the potential to sequence any set of homologous proteins completely in a rapid manner.

  9. Analgesia induced by self-initiated electrotactile sensation is mediated by top-down modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke; Tang, Zhengyu; Wang, Huiquan; Guo, Yifei; Peng, Weiwei; Hu, Li

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that sensory perception can be attenuated when sensory stimuli are controlled by self-initiated actions. This phenomenon is explained by the consistency between forward models of anticipated action effects and actual sensory feedback. Specifically, the brain state related to the binding between motor processing and sensory perception would have inhibitory function by gating sensory information via top-down control. Since the brain state could casually influence the perception of subsequent stimuli of different sensory modalities, we hypothesize that pain evoked by nociceptive stimuli following the self-initiated tactile stimulation would be attenuated as compared to that following externally determined tactile stimulation. Here, we compared psychophysical and neurophysiological responses to identical nociceptive-specific laser stimuli in two different conditions: self-initiated tactile sensation condition (STS) and nonself-initiated tactile sensation condition (N-STS). We observed that pain intensity and unpleasantness, as well as laser-evoked brain responses, were significantly reduced in the STS condition compared to the N-STS condition. In addition, magnitudes of alpha and beta oscillations prior to laser onset were significantly larger in the STS condition than in the N-STS condition. These results confirmed that pain perception and pain-related brain responses were attenuated when the tactile stimulation was initiated by subjects' voluntary actions, and exploited neural oscillations reflecting the binding between motor processing and sensory feedback. Thus, our study elaborated the understanding of underlying neural mechanisms related to top-down modulations of the analgesic effect induced by self-initiated tactile sensation, which provided theoretical basis to improve the analgesic effect in various clinical applications. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  10. The changing Chinese SEA indicator guidelines: Top-down or bottom-up?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Jingjing; Christensen, Per; Kørnøv, Lone

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, China has introduced a set of indicators to guide the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) practice. The most recent indicator system proposed in 2009 is based on sector-specific guidelines and it found its justification in past negative experiences with more general guidelines (from 2003), which were mostly inspired by, or copied from, international experiences. Based on interviews with practitioners, researchers and administrators, we map and analyse the change in the national guidelines. This analysis is based on a description of the indicators that makes it possible to discern different aggregation levels of indicators and then trace the changes occurring under two sets of guidelines. The analysis also reveals the reasons and rationales behind the changes found in the guidelines. This analysis is inspired by implementation theory and a description of some of the more general trends in the development of SEA and other environmental policies in a recent Chinese context. Beside a more top-down, intentional approach specifying indicators for different sectors based on Chinese experiences from the preceding years, another significant change, following the new guidelines, is a more bottom-up approach which gives more discretion to practitioners. This entails a call for practitioners to make decisions on indicators, which involves an interpretation of the ones present in sector guidance. Highlights: • Focusing on the new Chinese national SEA guidelines proposed in 2009 • Mapping and analysing the most recent change in the indicator system • Revealing the reasons and rationales behind the changes found in the new guidelines • A top-down intention specifying indicators for different sectors • A bottom-up effect in giving discretion and interpretation of using indicators

  11. Diversity has stronger top-down than bottom-up effects on decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Diane S; Cardinale, Bradley J; Downing, Amy L; Duffy, J Emmett; Jouseau, Claire; Sankaran, Mahesh; Wright, Justin P

    2009-04-01

    The flow of energy and nutrients between trophic levels is affected by both the trophic structure of food webs and the diversity of species within trophic levels. However, the combined effects of trophic structure and diversity on trophic transfer remain largely unknown. Here we ask whether changes in consumer diversity have the same effect as changes in resource diversity on rates of resource consumption. We address this question by focusing on consumer-resource dynamics for the ecologically important process of decomposition. This study compares the top-down effect of consumer (detritivore) diversity on the consumption of dead organic matter (decomposition) with the bottom-up effect of resource (detrital) diversity, based on a compilation of 90 observations reported in 28 studies. We did not detect effects of either detrital or consumer diversity on measures of detrital standing stock, and effects on consumer standing stock were equivocal. However, our meta-analysis indicates that reductions in detritivore diversity result in significant reductions in the rate of decomposition. Detrital diversity has both positive and negative effects on decomposition, with no overall trend. This difference between top-down and bottom-up effects of diversity is robust to different effect size metrics and could not be explained by differences in experimental systems or designs between detritivore and detrital manipulations. Our finding that resource diversity has no net effect on consumption in "brown" (detritus-consumer) food webs contrasts with previous findings from "green" (plant-herbivore) food webs and suggests that effects of plant diversity on consumption may fundamentally change after plant death.

  12. Top down modulation of attention to food cues via working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Suzanne; Rutters, Femke; Thomas, Jason M; Naish, Katherine; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2012-08-01

    Attentional biases towards food cues may be linked to the development of obesity. The present study investigated the mechanisms underlying attentional biases to food cues by assessing the role of top down influences, such as working memory (WM). We assessed whether attention in normal-weight, sated participants was drawn to food items specifically when that food item was held in WM. Twenty-three participants (15 f/8 m, age 23.4±5 year, BMI 23.5±4 kg/m(2)) took part in a laboratory based study assessing reaction times to food and non-food stimuli. Participants were presented with an initial cue stimulus to either hold in WM or to merely attend to, and then searched for the target (a circle) in a two-item display. On valid trials the target was flanked by a picture matching the cue, on neutral trials the display did not contain a picture matching the cue, and on invalid trials the distractor (a square) was flanked by a picture matching the cue. Cues were food, cars or stationery items. We observed that, relative to the effects with non-food stimuli, food items in WM strongly affected attention when the memorised cue re-appeared in the search display. In particular there was an enhanced response on valid trials, when the re-appearance of the memorised cue coincided with the search target. There were no effects of cue category on attentional guidance when the cues were merely attended to but not held in WM. These data point towards food having a strong effect on top-down guidance of search from working memory, and suggest a mechanism whereby individuals who are preoccupied with thoughts of food, for example obese individuals, show facilitated detection of food cues in the environment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Top-down approach in protein RDC data analysis: de novo estimation of the alignment tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kang; Tjandra, Nico

    2007-01-01

    In solution NMR spectroscopy the residual dipolar coupling (RDC) is invaluable in improving both the precision and accuracy of NMR structures during their structural refinement. The RDC also provides a potential to determine protein structure de novo. These procedures are only effective when an accurate estimate of the alignment tensor has already been made. Here we present a top-down approach, starting from the secondary structure elements and finishing at the residue level, for RDC data analysis in order to obtain a better estimate of the alignment tensor. Using only the RDCs from N-H bonds of residues in α-helices and CA-CO bonds in β-strands, we are able to determine the offset and the approximate amplitude of the RDC modulation-curve for each secondary structure element, which are subsequently used as targets for global minimization. The alignment order parameters and the orientation of the major principal axis of individual helix or strand, with respect to the alignment frame, can be determined in each of the eight quadrants of a sphere. The following minimization against RDC of all residues within the helix or strand segment can be carried out with fixed alignment order parameters to improve the accuracy of the orientation. For a helical protein Bax, the three components A xx , A yy and A zz , of the alignment order can be determined with this method in average to within 2.3% deviation from the values calculated with the available atomic coordinates. Similarly for β-sheet protein Ubiquitin they agree in average to within 8.5%. The larger discrepancy in β-strand parameters comes from both the diversity of the β-sheet structure and the lower precision of CA-CO RDCs. This top-down approach is a robust method for alignment tensor estimation and also holds a promise for providing a protein topological fold using limited sets of RDCs

  14. Hemispheric lateralization in top-down attention during spatial relation processing: a Granger causal model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falasca, N W; D'Ascenzo, S; Di Domenico, A; Onofrj, M; Tommasi, L; Laeng, B; Franciotti, R

    2015-04-01

    Magnetoencephalography was recorded during a matching-to-sample plus cueing paradigm, in which participants judged the occurrence of changes in either categorical (CAT) or coordinate (COO) spatial relations. Previously, parietal and frontal lobes were identified as key areas in processing spatial relations and it was shown that each hemisphere was differently involved and modulated by the scope of the attention window (e.g. a large and small cue). In this study, Granger analysis highlighted the patterns of causality among involved brain areas--the direction of information transfer ran from the frontal to the visual cortex in the right hemisphere, whereas it ran in the opposite direction in the left side. Thus, the right frontal area seems to exert top-down influence, supporting the idea that, in this task, top-down signals are selectively related to the right side. Additionally, for CAT change preceded by a small cue, the right frontal gyrus was not involved in the information transfer, indicating a selective specialization of the left hemisphere for this condition. The present findings strengthen the conclusion of the presence of a remarkable hemispheric specialization for spatial relation processing and illustrate the complex interactions between the lateralized parts of the neural network. Moreover, they illustrate how focusing attention over large or small regions of the visual field engages these lateralized networks differently, particularly in the frontal regions of each hemisphere, consistent with the theory that spatial relation judgements require a fronto-parietal network in the left hemisphere for categorical relations and on the right hemisphere for coordinate spatial processing. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae extracellular matrix: a top-down solid-state NMR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Fong, Jiunn C N; Yildiz, Fitnat; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are communities of bacterial cells surrounded by a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae, the human pathogen responsible for cholera, contributes to its environmental survival and infectivity. Important genetic and molecular requirements have been identified for V. cholerae biofilm formation, yet a compositional accounting of these parts in the intact biofilm or extracellular matrix has not been described. As insoluble and non-crystalline assemblies, determinations of biofilm composition pose a challenge to conventional biochemical and biophysical analyses. The V. cholerae extracellular matrix composition is particularly complex with several proteins, complex polysaccharides, and other biomolecules having been identified as matrix parts. We developed a new top-down solid-state NMR approach to spectroscopically assign and quantify the carbon pools of the intact V. cholerae extracellular matrix using ¹³C CPMAS and ¹³C{(¹⁵N}, ¹⁵N{³¹P}, and ¹³C{³¹P}REDOR. General sugar, lipid, and amino acid pools were first profiled and then further annotated and quantified as specific carbon types, including carbonyls, amides, glycyl carbons, and anomerics. In addition, ¹⁵N profiling revealed a large amine pool relative to amide contributions, reflecting the prevalence of molecular modifications with free amine groups. Our top-down approach could be implemented immediately to examine the extracellular matrix from mutant strains that might alter polysaccharide production or lipid release beyond the cell surface; or to monitor changes that may accompany environmental variations and stressors such as altered nutrient composition, oxidative stress or antibiotics. More generally, our analysis has demonstrated that solid-state NMR is a valuable tool to characterize complex biofilm systems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The changing Chinese SEA indicator guidelines: Top-down or bottom-up?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jingjing, E-mail: Jingjing@plan.aau.dk; Christensen, Per; Kørnøv, Lone

    2014-01-15

    In the last decades, China has introduced a set of indicators to guide the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) practice. The most recent indicator system proposed in 2009 is based on sector-specific guidelines and it found its justification in past negative experiences with more general guidelines (from 2003), which were mostly inspired by, or copied from, international experiences. Based on interviews with practitioners, researchers and administrators, we map and analyse the change in the national guidelines. This analysis is based on a description of the indicators that makes it possible to discern different aggregation levels of indicators and then trace the changes occurring under two sets of guidelines. The analysis also reveals the reasons and rationales behind the changes found in the guidelines. This analysis is inspired by implementation theory and a description of some of the more general trends in the development of SEA and other environmental policies in a recent Chinese context. Beside a more top-down, intentional approach specifying indicators for different sectors based on Chinese experiences from the preceding years, another significant change, following the new guidelines, is a more bottom-up approach which gives more discretion to practitioners. This entails a call for practitioners to make decisions on indicators, which involves an interpretation of the ones present in sector guidance. Highlights: • Focusing on the new Chinese national SEA guidelines proposed in 2009 • Mapping and analysing the most recent change in the indicator system • Revealing the reasons and rationales behind the changes found in the new guidelines • A top-down intention specifying indicators for different sectors • A bottom-up effect in giving discretion and interpretation of using indicators.

  17. INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF A THERMOSPRAY-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHIC/MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR SELECTED N-METHYL CARBAMATES, N-METHYL CARBAMOYLOXIMES, AND SUBSTITUTED UREA PESTICIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A thermospray-liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric (TS-LC/MS) method was evaluated in an interlaboratory study for determining 3 N-methyl carbamates (bendiocarb, carbaryl, and carbofuran), 3-N-methyl carbamoyloximes (aldicarb, methomyl, and oxamyl), 2 substituted urea pestic...

  18. Alkylation of human serum albumin by sulfur mustard in vitro and in vivo : Mass spectrometric analysis of a cysteine adduct as a sensitive biomarker of exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    1999-01-01

    To develop a mass spectrometric assay for the detection of sulfur mustard adducts with human serum albumin, the following steps were performed: quantitation of the binding of the agent to the protein by using [14C] sulfur mustard and analysis of acidic and tryptic digests of albumin from blood after

  19. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib in mouse plasma using salting-out liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparidans, Rolf W; van Hoppe, Stephanie; Rood, Johannes J M; Schinkel, Alfred H; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assay for afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of the ErbB (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog) tyrosine kinase family, was developed and validated. Plasma samples were pre-treated using salting-out

  20. Electronic states and nature of bonding in the molecule YC by all electron ab initio multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations and mass spectrometric equilibrium experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Pelino, Mario; Gingerich, Karl A.

    1992-01-01

    , and they hardly contribute to the bonding. The chemical bond in the YC molecule is polar with charge transfer from Y to C giving rise to a dipole moment of 3.90 D at 3.9 a.u. in the 4PI ground state. Mass spectrometric equilibrium investigations in the temperature range 2365-2792 K have resulted...

  1. A novel mass spectrometric strategy "BEMAP" reveals Extensive O-linked protein glycosylation in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Krogh, Thøger Jensen

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of sugars to proteins via side-chain oxygen atoms (O-linked glycosylation) is seen in all three domains of life. However, a lack of widely-applicable analytical tools has restricted the study of this process, particularly in bacteria. In E. coli, only four O-linked glycoproteins have...... previously been characterized. Here we present a glycoproteomics technique, termed BEMAP, which is based on the beta-elimination of O-linked glycans followed by Michael-addition of a phosphonic acid derivative, and subsequent titanium dioxide enrichment. This strategy allows site-specific mass......-spectrometric identification of proteins with O-linked glycan modifications in a complex biological sample. Using BEMAP we identified cell surface-associated and membrane vesicle glycoproteins from Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and non-pathogenic E. coli K-12. We identified 618 glycosylated Serine and Threonine residues...

  2. Multi-element determination in environmental samples by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis using thermal ionization. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilpert, K.; Waidmann, E.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical procedure for the multi-element analysis of the elements Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Cd, Ba, Tl, and Pb in pine needles by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis using thermal ionization has been reported in Part I of this paper. This procedure is now transferred to the non-vegetable material 'Oyster Tissue' (Standard Reference Material 1566, National Bureau of Standards, USA). By a modification of the analytical procedure, it was possible to determine Cr in this material in addition to the aforementioned elements. No concentrations are certified for the elements Ga, Ba and Tl analyzed in this work. The concentrations of the remaining elements obtained by the multi-element analysis agree well with those certified. (orig.)

  3. Development of a mass spectrometrical isotope dilution analysis for determination of trace iodine levels and its application for food samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindlmeier, W.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometrical isotope dilution procedure for the determination of trace amounts of iodine in various materials was developed using 129 I as indicator isotope, based on the determination of the 129 I/ 127 I isotope relationship. Negative thermionization was used as ionization method. The analysis procedure, which worked with a standard deviation of between 0,1 and 10% (depending on material tested), was used to determine the iodine level of table salt - both iodized and normal salt (3-6 ppm and less than 0,006 ppm respectively), and food samples with an organic matrix. For comparison the iodine levels were also measured with an iodine-selective electrode. Special preparation and separation procedures were done to suit the sample material. A comparison of the levels of iodine concentration in various powdered milks which were measured by international collaborators using varying methods shows the superior reproducibility of the MS-IDA. (RB) [de

  4. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  5. Mass spectrometric detection of proteins in non-aqueous media : the case of prion proteins in biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douma, M.D.; Kerr, G.M.; Brown, R.S.; Keller, B.O.; Oleschuk, R.D. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2008-08-15

    This paper presented a filtration method for detecting protein traces in non-aqueous media. The extraction technique used a mixture of acetonitrile, non-ionic detergent and water along with filter disks with embedded C{sub 8}-modified silica particles to capture the proteins from non-aqueous samples. The extraction process was then followed by an elution of the protein from the filter disk and direct mass spectrometric detection and tryptic digestion with peptide mapping and MS/MS fragmentation of protein-specific peptides. The method was used to detect prion proteins in spiked biodiesel samples. A tryptic peptide with the sequence YGQGSPGGNR was used for unambiguous identification. Results of the study showed that the method is suitable for the large-scale testing of protein impurities in tallow-based biodiesel production processes. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Prey vulnerability limits top-down control and alters reciprocal feedbacks in a subsidized model food web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William I Atlas

    Full Text Available Resource subsidies increase the productivity of recipient food webs and can affect ecosystem dynamics. Subsidies of prey often support elevated predator biomass which may intensify top-down control and reduce the flow of reciprocal subsidies into adjacent ecosystems. However, top-down control in subsidized food webs may be limited if primary consumers posses morphological or behavioral traits that limit vulnerability to predation. In forested streams, terrestrial prey support high predator biomass creating the potential for strong top-down control, however armored primary consumers often dominate the invertebrate assemblage. Using empirically based simulation models, we tested the response of stream food webs to variations in subsidy magnitude, prey vulnerability, and the presence of two top predators. While terrestrial prey inputs increased predator biomass (+12%, the presence of armored primary consumers inhibited top-down control, and diverted most aquatic energy (∼75% into the riparian forest through aquatic insect emergence. Food webs without armored invertebrates experienced strong trophic cascades, resulting in higher algal (∼50% and detrital (∼1600% biomass, and reduced insect emergence (-90%. These results suggest prey vulnerability can mediate food web responses to subsidies, and that top-down control can be arrested even when predator-invulnerable consumers are uncommon (20% regardless of the level of subsidy.

  7. Effects of pollutants on bottom-up and top-down processes in insect-plant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Casey D.; Trumble, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Bottom-up (host plant quality) and top-down (natural enemies) forces both influence the fitness and population dynamics of herbivores. However, the impact of pollutants acting on these forces has not been examined, which prompted us to review the literature to test hypotheses regarding this area of research. A comprehensive literature search found 126 references which examined fitness components and population dynamics of 203 insect herbivores. One hundred and fifty-three of the 203 herbivores (75.4%) had fitness impacted due to bottom-up factors in polluted environments. In contrast, only 20 of the 203 (9.9%) had fitness significantly impacted due to top-down factors in polluted environments. The paucity of results for top-down factors impacting fitness does not necessarily mean that top-down factors are less important, but rather that fewer studies include natural enemies. We provide a synthesis of available data by pollution type and herbivore guild, and suggest future research to address this issue. - Pollutants can affect insect herbivores through bottom-up and, possibly, top-down processes

  8. Detection, characterization and quantification of salicylic acid conjugates in plant extracts by ESI tandem mass spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Victoria; Vicent, Cristian; Cerezo, Miguel; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte; Dean, John; Flors, Victor

    2012-04-01

    An approach for the detection and characterization of SA derivatives in plant samples is presented based on liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometric techniques. Precursor ion scan methods using an ESI triple quadrupole spectrometer for samples from plants challenged with the virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 allowed us to detect two potential SA derivatives. The criterion used to consider a potential SA derivative is based on the detection of analytes in the precursor ion scan chromatogram upon selecting m/z 137 and m/z 93 that correspond to the salicylate and its main product ion, respectively. Product ion spectra of the newly-detected analytes as well as accurate m/z determinations using an ESI Q-time-of-flight instrument were registered as means of characterization and strongly suggest that glucosylated forms of SA at the carboxylic and at the phenol functional groups are present in plant samples. The specific synthesis and subsequent chromatography of salicylic glucosyl ester (SGE) and glucosyl salicylate (SAG) standards confirmed the chemical identity of both peaks that were obtained applying different tandem mass spectrometric techniques and accurate m/z determinations. A multiple reaction monitoring method has been developed and applied to plant samples. The advantages of this LC-ESI-MS/MS methods with respect to the traditional analysis of glucosyl conjugates are also discussed. Preliminary results revealed that SA and the glucosyl conjugates are accumulated in Arabidopsis thaliana in a time dependent manner, accordingly to the up-regulation of SA-dependent defenses following P. syringae infection. This technique applied to plant hormones or fragment ions may be useful to obtain chemical family members of plant metabolites and help identify their contribution in the signaling of plant defenses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  10. The Comparative Effect of Top-down Processing and Bottom-up Processing through TBLT on Extrovert and Introvert EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezhman Nourzad Haradasht

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This research seeks to examine the effect of two models of reading comprehension, namely top-down and bottom-up processing, on the reading comprehension of extrovert and introvert EFL learners’ reading comprehension. To do this, 120 learners out of a total number of 170 intermediate learners being educated at Iran Mehr English Language School were selected all taking a PET (Preliminary English Test first for homogenization prior to the study. They also answered the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI which in turn categorized them into two subgroups within each reading models consisting of introverts and extroverts. All in all, there were four subgroups: 30 introverts and 30 extroverts undergoing the top-down processing treatment, and 30 introverts and 30 extroverts experiencing the bottom-up processing treatment. The aforementioned PET was administered as the post test of the study after each group was exposed to the treatment for 18 sessions in six weeks. After the instructions finished, the mean scores of all four groups on this post test were computed and a two-way ANOVA was run to test all the four hypotheses raise in this study. the results showed that while learners generally benefitted more from the bottom-up processing setting compared  to the top-down processing one, the extrovert group was better off receiving top-down instruction. Furthermore, introverts outperformed extroverts in bottom-up group; yet between the two personalities subgroups in the top-down setting no difference was seen. A predictable pattern of benefitting from teaching procedures could not be drawn for introverts as in both top-down and bottom-up settings, they benefitted more than extroverts.

  11. Architecture of top down, parallel pattern recognition system TOPS and its application to the MR head images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunoshita, Jun-ichi; Akamatsu, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Shinji.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes about the system architecture of a new image recognition system TOPS (top-down parallel pattern recognition system), and its application to the automatic extraction of brain organs (cerebrum, cerebellum, brain stem) from 3D-MRI images. Main concepts of TOPS are as follows: (1) TOPS is the top-down type recognition system, which allows parallel models in each level of hierarchy structure. (2) TOPS allows parallel image processing algorithms for one purpose (for example, for extraction of one special organ). This results in multiple candidates for one purpose, and judgment to get unique solution for it will be made at upper level of hierarchy structure. (author)

  12. Integrating the bottom-up and top-down approach to energy economy modelling. The case of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents results from an integration project covering Danish models based on bottom-up and top-down approaches to energy]economy modelling. The purpose of the project was to identify theoretical and methodological problems for integrating existing models for Denmark and to implement...... an integration of the models. The integration was established through a number of links between energy bottom-up modules and a macroeconomic model. In this integrated model it is possible to analyse both top-down instruments, such as taxes along with bottom-up instruments, such as regulation of technology...

  13. Covariance specification and estimation to improve top-down Green House Gas emission estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Prasad, K.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) operates the North-East Corridor (NEC) project and the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) in order to develop measurement methods to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions as well as their uncertainties in urban domains using a top down inversion method. Top down inversion updates prior knowledge using observations in a Bayesian way. One primary consideration in a Bayesian inversion framework is the covariance structure of (1) the emission prior residuals and (2) the observation residuals (i.e. the difference between observations and model predicted observations). These covariance matrices are respectively referred to as the prior covariance matrix and the model-data mismatch covariance matrix. It is known that the choice of these covariances can have large effect on estimates. The main objective of this work is to determine the impact of different covariance models on inversion estimates and their associated uncertainties in urban domains. We use a pseudo-data Bayesian inversion framework using footprints (i.e. sensitivities of tower measurements of GHGs to surface emissions) and emission priors (based on Hestia project to quantify fossil-fuel emissions) to estimate posterior emissions using different covariance schemes. The posterior emission estimates and uncertainties are compared to the hypothetical truth. We find that, if we correctly specify spatial variability and spatio-temporal variability in prior and model-data mismatch covariances respectively, then we can compute more accurate posterior estimates. We discuss few covariance models to introduce space-time interacting mismatches along with estimation of the involved parameters. We then compare several candidate prior spatial covariance models from the Matern covariance class and estimate their parameters with specified mismatches. We find that best-fitted prior covariances are not always best in recovering the truth. To achieve

  14. Top-down workforce demand extrapolation based on an EC energy road-map scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, F.; Von Estorff, U.

    2014-01-01

    The EHRO-N team of JRC-IET provides the EC with essential data related to supply and demand for nuclear experts based on bottom-up information from the nuclear industry. The current paper deals with an alternative approach to derive figures for the demand side information of the nuclear workforce. Complementary to the bottom-up approach, a top-down modelling approach extrapolation of an EC Energy road-map nuclear energy demand scenario is followed here in addition to the survey information. In this top-down modelling approach, the number of nuclear power plants that are in operation and under construction is derived as a function of time from 2010 up to 2050 assuming that the current reactor park will be replaced by generic third generation reactors of 1400 MWe or 1000 MWe. Depending on the size of new build reactors, the analysis shows the number of new reactors required to fulfil the demand for nuclear energy. Based on workforce models for operation and construction of nuclear power plants, the model allows an extrapolation of these respective work-forces. Using the nuclear skills pyramid, the total workforce employed at a plant is broken down in a nuclear (experts), nuclearized, and nuclear aware workforce. With retirement profiles for nuclear power plants derived from the bottom-up EHRO-N survey, the replacement of the current workforce is taken into account. The peak of the new workforce (partly replacing the retiring workforce and additionally keeping up with the growing total workforce demand) for nuclear experts and nuclearized employees is to be expected at the end of the considered period (2050). However, the peak workforce for nuclear aware employees is to be expected around 2020. When comparing to historical data for the nuclear capacity being installed at the same time in Europe, it is clear that the expected future capacity to be installed at the same time in Europe is significantly lower (factor of 2) than in the early 1980's. However, it should

  15. Top-down Estimates of Isoprene Emissions in Australia Inferred from OMI Satellite Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, J.; Fisher, J. A.; Surl, L.; Palmer, P. I.

    2017-12-01

    Australia is a global hotspot for biogenic isoprene emission factors predicted by process-based models such as the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN). It is also prone to increasingly frequent temperature extremes that can drive episodically high emissions. Estimates of biogenic isoprene emissions from Australia are poorly constrained, with the frequently used MEGAN model overestimating emissions by a factor of 4-6 in some areas. Evaluating MEGAN and other models in Australia is difficult due to sparse measurements of emissions and their ensuing chemical products. In this talk, we will describe efforts to better quantify Australian isoprene emissions using top-down estimates based on formaldehyde (HCHO) observations from the OMI satellite instrument, combined with modelled isoprene to HCHO yields obtained from the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. The OMI-based estimates are evaluated using in situ observations from field campaigns conducted in southeast Australia. We also investigate the impact on the inferred emission of horizontal resolution used for the yield calculations, particularly in regions on the boundary between low- and high-NOx chemistry. The prevalence of fire smoke plumes roughly halves the available satellite dataset over Australia for much of the year; however, seasonal averages remain robust. Preliminary results show that the top-down isoprene emissions are lower than MEGAN estimates by up to 90% in summer. The overestimates are greatest along the eastern coast, including areas surrounding Australia's major population centres in Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane. The coarse horizontal resolution of the model significantly affects the emissions estimates, as many biogenic emitting regions lie along narrow coastal stretches. Our results confirm previous findings that the MEGAN biogenic emission model is poorly calibrated for the Australian environment and suggests that chemical transport models driven by MEGAN are likely

  16. Terverticillate penicillia studied by direct electrospray mass spectrometric profiling of crude extracts II. Database and identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedsgaard, Jørn

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectral database was built using standard instrument software from 678 electrospray mass spectra (mass profiles) from crude fungal extracts of terverticillate taxa within the genus Penicillium. The match factors calculated from searching all the mass profiles stored in the database were...

  17. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    -specific thermometer; these experiments also provide a reference frame for reporting mass spectrometric data. Differential H-exchange rates of the two molecular sites in propane could be a new tool to constrain thermal history of sub-surface propane. Our experimental and mass spectrometric approaches should be generalizable to other hydrocarbon compounds.

  18. The Early Anthropogenic Hypothesis: Top-Down and Bottom-up Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddiman, W. F.

    2014-12-01

    Two complementary lines of evidence support the early anthropogenic hypothesis. Top-down evidence comes from comparing Holocene greenhouse-gas trends with those during equivalent intervals of previous interglaciations. The increases in CO2 and CH4 during the late Holocene are anomalous compared to the decreasing trends in a stacked average of previous interglaciations, thereby supporting an anthropogenic origin. During interglacial stage 19, the closest Holocene insolation analog, CO2 fell to 245 ppm by the time equivalent to the present, in contrast to the observed pre-industrial rise to 280-285 ppm. The 245-ppm level measured in stage 19 falls at the top of the natural range predicted by the original anthropogenic hypothesis of Ruddiman (2003). Bottom-up evidence comes from a growing list of archeological and other compilations showing major early anthropogenic transformations of Earth's surface. Key examples include: efforts by Dorian Fuller and colleagues mapping the spread of irrigated rice agriculture across southern Asia and its effects on CH4 emissions prior to the industrial era; an additional effort by Fuller showing the spread of methane-emitting domesticated livestock across Asia and Africa (coincident with the spread of fertile crescent livestock across Europe); historical compilations by Jed Kaplan and colleagues documenting very high early per-capita forest clearance in Europe, thus underpinning simulations of extensive pre-industrial clearance and large CO2 emissions; and wide-ranging studies by Erle Ellis and colleagues of early anthropogenic land transformations in China and elsewhere.

  19. Metabolic Network Discovery by Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches and Paths for Reconciliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çakır, Tunahan, E-mail: tcakir@gyte.edu.tr [Computational Systems Biology Group, Department of Bioengineering, Gebze Technical University (formerly known as Gebze Institute of Technology), Gebze (Turkey); Khatibipour, Mohammad Jafar [Computational Systems Biology Group, Department of Bioengineering, Gebze Technical University (formerly known as Gebze Institute of Technology), Gebze (Turkey); Department of Chemical Engineering, Gebze Technical University (formerly known as Gebze Institute of Technology), Gebze (Turkey)

    2014-12-03

    The primary focus in the network-centric analysis of cellular metabolism by systems biology approaches is to identify the active metabolic network for the condition of interest. Two major approaches are available for the discovery of the condition-specific metabolic networks. One approach starts from genome-scale metabolic networks, which cover all possible reactions known to occur in the related organism in a condition-independent manner, and applies methods such as the optimization-based Flux-Balance Analysis to elucidate the active network. The other approach starts from the condition-specific metabolome data, and processes the data with statistical or optimization-based methods to extract information content of the data such that the active network is inferred. These approaches, termed bottom-up and top-down, respectively, are currently employed independently. However, considering that both approaches have the same goal, they can both benefit from each other paving the way for the novel integrative analysis methods of metabolome data- and flux-analysis approaches in the post-genomic era. This study reviews the strengths of constraint-based analysis and network inference methods reported in the metabolic systems biology field; then elaborates on the potential paths to reconcile the two approaches to shed better light on how the metabolism functions.

  20. Critical appraisal of the top-down approach for vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelhalim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR has been linked to recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs, renal scarring, hypertension, renal insufficiency and end-stage kidney disease. Different imaging strategies have been proposed to approach children presenting with UTI to sort out patients with significant VUR while minimizing patient morbidity, radiation exposure and financial burden. None of these imaging strategies is universally accepted. The “top-down approach” (TDA aims at restricting the number of voiding cystourethrograms (VCUGs and its associated morbidity while identifying patients with clinically-significant reflux. In this approach, children presenting with febrile UTIs are acutely investigated with dimercapto-succinic acid (DMSA renal scans to identify patients with renal parenchymal inflammation. Those with evidence of renal affection are offered VCUG and late DMSA scan to identify VUR and permanent renal scarring, respectively. Although TDA could identify clinically-significant VUR with high sensitivity, it is not without limitations. The approach segregates patients based on the presence of DMSA cortical lesions omitting the morbidity and the economic burden of UTI. Additionally, some of DMSA lesions are attributed to congenital dysplasia and unrelated to UTI. Ionizing radiation exposure, financial costs, limited availability of DMSA scans in the acute setting, variability in interpreting the results and low yield of actionable findings on DMSA scans are some other limitations. In this review, we tried to address the drawbacks of the TDA and reinforce the value of patient-centered approach for VUR.

  1. Modeling the Effects of Perceptual Load: Saliency, Competitive Interactions, and Top-Down Biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neokleous, Kleanthis; Shimi, Andria; Avraamides, Marios N

    2016-01-01

    A computational model of visual selective attention has been implemented to account for experimental findings on the Perceptual Load Theory (PLT) of attention. The model was designed based on existing neurophysiological findings on attentional processes with the objective to offer an explicit and biologically plausible formulation of PLT. Simulation results verified that the proposed model is capable of capturing the basic pattern of results that support the PLT as well as findings that are considered contradictory to the theory. Importantly, the model is able to reproduce the behavioral results from a dilution experiment, providing thus a way to reconcile PLT with the competing Dilution account. Overall, the model presents a novel account for explaining PLT effects on the basis of the low-level competitive interactions among neurons that represent visual input and the top-down signals that modulate neural activity. The implications of the model concerning the debate on the locus of selective attention as well as the origins of distractor interference in visual displays of varying load are discussed.

  2. Modeling the effects of perceptual load: saliency, competitive interactions, and top-down biases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleanthis eNeokleous

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model of visual selective attention has been implemented to account for experimental findings on the Perceptual Load Theory (PLT of attention. The model was designed based on existing neurophysiological findings on attentional processes with the objective to offer an explicit and biologically plausible formulation of PLT. Simulation results verified that the proposed model is capable of capturing the basic pattern of results that support the Perceptual Load Theory as well as findings that are considered contradictory to the theory. Importantly, the model is able to reproduce the behavioral results from a dilution experiment, providing thus a way to reconcile PLT with the competing Dilution account. Overall, the model presents a novel account for explaining PLT effects on the basis of the low-level competitive interactions among neurons that represent visual input and the top-down signals that modulate neural activity. The implications of the model concerning the debate on the locus of selective attention as well as the origins of distractor interference in visual displays of varying load are discussed.

  3. Top-down population regulation of a top predator: lions in the Ngorongoro Crater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissui, Bernard M; Packer, Craig

    2004-09-07

    Efforts to determine whether bottom-up or top-down processes regulate populations have been hampered by difficulties in accurately estimating the population's carrying capacity and in directly measuring food intake rate, the impacts of interspecific competition and exposure to natural enemies. We report on 40 years of data on the lion population in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania, which showed strong evidence of density-dependent regulation at 100-120 individuals but has remained below 60 individuals for the past decade despite consistently high prey abundance. The lions enjoy a higher per capita food-intake rate and higher cub recruitment at low population density, and interspecific competition has not increased in recent years. These animals have suffered from a number of severe disease outbreaks over the past 40 years, but, whereas the population recovered exponentially from a severe epizootic in 1963, three outbreaks between 1994 and 2001 have occurred in such rapid succession that the population has been unable to return to the carrying capacity. The Crater population may have become unusually vulnerable to infectious disease in recent years owing to its close proximity to a growing human population and a history of close inbreeding. The Crater lions may therefore provide important insights into the future of many endangered populations.

  4. Pupil dilation reveals top-down attentional load during spatial monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Matteo; Bonato, Mario; Zorzi, Marco

    2015-12-01

    It has long been known that the diameter of human pupil enlarges with increasing effort during the execution of a task. This has been observed not only for purely mechanical effort but also for mental effort, as for example the computation of arithmetic problems with different levels of difficulty. Here we show that pupil dilation reflects changes in visuospatial awareness induced by attentional load during multi-tasking. In the single-task condition, participants had to report the position of lateralized, briefly presented, masked visual targets ("right", "left", or "both" sides). In the multitasking conditions, participants also performed additional tasks, either visual or auditory, to increase the attentional load. Sensory stimulation was kept constant across all conditions to rule out the influence of low-level factors. Results show that event-related pupil dilation strikingly increased with task demands, mirroring a concurrent decrease in visuospatial awareness. Importantly, pupil dilation significantly differed between two dual-task conditions that required to process the same number of stimuli but yielded differed levels of accuracy (difficulty). In contrast, pupil dilation did not differ between two conditions which were equally challenging but differed both in the modality of the dual task (auditory vs. visual) and in the number of stimuli to be attended. We conclude that pupil dilation genuinely reflects the top-down allocation of supramodal attentional resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A top-down manner-based DCNN architecture for semantic image segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Qiao

    Full Text Available Given their powerful feature representation for recognition, deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs have been driving rapid advances in high-level computer vision tasks. However, their performance in semantic image segmentation is still not satisfactory. Based on the analysis of visual mechanism, we conclude that DCNNs in a bottom-up manner are not enough, because semantic image segmentation task requires not only recognition but also visual attention capability. In the study, superpixels containing visual attention information are introduced in a top-down manner, and an extensible architecture is proposed to improve the segmentation results of current DCNN-based methods. We employ the current state-of-the-art fully convolutional network (FCN and FCN with conditional random field (DeepLab-CRF as baselines to validate our architecture. Experimental results of the PASCAL VOC segmentation task qualitatively show that coarse edges and error segmentation results are well improved. We also quantitatively obtain about 2%-3% intersection over union (IOU accuracy improvement on the PASCAL VOC 2011 and 2012 test sets.

  6. Laboratory Formation of Fullerenes from PAHs: Top-down Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castellanos, Pablo; Paardekooper, Daniel M.; Linnartz, Harold; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Interstellar molecules are thought to build up in the shielded environment of molecular clouds or in the envelope of evolved stars. This follows many sequential reaction steps of atoms and simple molecules in the gas phase and/or on (icy) grain surfaces. However, these chemical routes are highly inefficient for larger species in the tenuous environment of space as many steps are involved and, indeed, models fail to explain the observed high abundances. This is definitely the case for the C60 fullerene, recently identified as one of the most complex molecules in the interstellar medium. Observations have shown that, in some photodissociation regions, its abundance increases close to strong UV-sources. In this Letter we report laboratory findings in which C60 formation can be explained by characterizing the photochemical evolution of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sequential H losses lead to fully dehydrogenated PAHs and subsequent losses of C2 units convert graphene into cages. Our results present for the first time experimental evidence that PAHs in excess of 60 C-atoms efficiently photo-isomerize to buckminsterfullerene, C60. These laboratory studies also attest to the importance of top-down synthesis routes for chemical complexity in space.

  7. Node Query Preservation for Deterministic Linear Top-Down Tree Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Miyahara

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the decidability of node query preservation problems for XML document transformations. We assume a transformation given by a deterministic linear top-down data tree transducer (abbreviated as DLT^V and an n-ary query based on runs of a tree automaton. We say that a DLT^V Tr strongly preserves a query Q if there is a query Q' such that for every document t, the answer set of Q' for Tr(t is equal to the answer set of Q for t. Also we say that Tr weakly preserves Q if there is a query Q' such that for every t_d in the range of Tr, the answer set of Q' for t_d is equal to the union of the answer set of Q for t such that t_d = Tr(t. We show that the weak preservation problem is coNP-complete and the strong preservation problem is in 2-EXPTIME.

  8. LABORATORY FORMATION OF FULLERENES FROM PAHS: TOP-DOWN INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen, Junfeng; Castellanos, Pablo; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Paardekooper, Daniel M.; Linnartz, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar molecules are thought to build up in the shielded environment of molecular clouds or in the envelope of evolved stars. This follows many sequential reaction steps of atoms and simple molecules in the gas phase and/or on (icy) grain surfaces. However, these chemical routes are highly inefficient for larger species in the tenuous environment of space as many steps are involved and, indeed, models fail to explain the observed high abundances. This is definitely the case for the C 60 fullerene, recently identified as one of the most complex molecules in the interstellar medium. Observations have shown that, in some photodissociation regions, its abundance increases close to strong UV-sources. In this Letter we report laboratory findings in which C 60 formation can be explained by characterizing the photochemical evolution of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sequential H losses lead to fully dehydrogenated PAHs and subsequent losses of C 2 units convert graphene into cages. Our results present for the first time experimental evidence that PAHs in excess of 60 C-atoms efficiently photo-isomerize to buckminsterfullerene, C 60 . These laboratory studies also attest to the importance of top-down synthesis routes for chemical complexity in space

  9. Musical experience shapes top-down auditory mechanisms: evidence from masking and auditory attention performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Ashley, Richard

    2010-03-01

    A growing body of research suggests that cognitive functions, such as attention and memory, drive perception by tuning sensory mechanisms to relevant acoustic features. Long-term musical experience also modulates lower-level auditory function, although the mechanisms by which this occurs remain uncertain. In order to tease apart the mechanisms that drive perceptual enhancements in musicians, we posed the question: do well-developed cognitive abilities fine-tune auditory perception in a top-down fashion? We administered a standardized battery of perceptual and cognitive tests to adult musicians and non-musicians, including tasks either more or less susceptible to cognitive control (e.g., backward versus simultaneous masking) and more or less dependent on auditory or visual processing (e.g., auditory versus visual attention). Outcomes indicate lower perceptual thresholds in musicians specifically for auditory tasks that relate with cognitive abilities, such as backward masking and auditory attention. These enhancements were observed in the absence of group differences for the simultaneous masking and visual attention tasks. Our results suggest that long-term musical practice strengthens cognitive functions and that these functions benefit auditory skills. Musical training bolsters higher-level mechanisms that, when impaired, relate to language and literacy deficits. Thus, musical training may serve to lessen the impact of these deficits by strengthening the corticofugal system for hearing. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Accumulation of evidence during sequential decision making: the importance of top-down factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Floris P; Jensen, Ole; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2010-01-13

    In the last decade, great progress has been made in characterizing the accumulation of neural information during simple unitary perceptual decisions. However, much less is known about how sequentially presented evidence is integrated over time for successful decision making. The aim of this study was to study the mechanisms of sequential decision making in humans. In a magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we presented healthy volunteers with sequences of centrally presented arrows. Sequence length varied between one and five arrows, and the accumulated directions of the arrows informed the subject about which hand to use for a button press at the end of the sequence (e.g., LRLRR should result in a right-hand press). Mathematical modeling suggested that nonlinear accumulation was the rational strategy for performing this task in the presence of no or little noise, whereas quasilinear accumulation was optimal in the presence of substantial noise. MEG recordings showed a correlate of evidence integration over parietal and central cortex that was inversely related to the amount of accumulated evidence (i.e., when more evidence was accumulated, neural activity for new stimuli was attenuated). This modulation of activity likely reflects a top-down influence on sensory processing, effectively constraining the influence of sensory information on the decision variable over time. The results indicate that, when making decisions on the basis of sequential information, the human nervous system integrates evidence in a nonlinear manner, using the amount of previously accumulated information to constrain the accumulation of additional evidence.

  11. The Temporal Pole Top-Down Modulates the Ventral Visual Stream During Social Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrs, Corinna; Zaki, Jamil; Schlochtermeier, Lorna H; Jacobs, Arthur M; Kuchinke, Lars; Koelsch, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The temporal pole (TP) has been associated with diverse functions of social cognition and emotion processing. Although the underlying mechanism remains elusive, one possibility is that TP acts as domain-general hub integrating socioemotional information. To test this, 26 participants were presented with 60 empathy-evoking film clips during fMRI scanning. The film clips were preceded by a linguistic sad or neutral context and half of the clips were accompanied by sad music. In line with its hypothesized role, TP was involved in the processing of sad context and furthermore tracked participants' empathic concern. To examine the neuromodulatory impact of TP, we applied nonlinear dynamic causal modeling to a multisensory integration network from previous work consisting of superior temporal gyrus (STG), fusiform gyrus (FG), and amygdala, which was extended by an additional node in the TP. Bayesian model comparison revealed a gating of STG and TP on fusiform-amygdalar coupling and an increase of TP to FG connectivity during the integration of contextual information. Moreover, these backward projections were strengthened by emotional music. The findings indicate that during social cognition, TP integrates information from different modalities and top-down modulates lower-level perceptual areas in the ventral visual stream as a function of integration demands. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Top-down versus bottom-up processing of influence diagrams in probabilistic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, R.D.; Burns, T.J.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work by Phillips et al and Selby et al has shown that influence diagram methodology can be a useful analytical tool in reactor safety studies. In some instances, an influence diagram can be used as a graphical representation of probabilistic dependence within a system or event sequence. Under these circumstances, Bayesian statistics is employed to transform the relationships depicted in the influence diagram into the correct expression for a desired marginal probability (e.g., the top node). In the references cited above, the authors demonstrated the usefulness of influence diagrams for assessing the reliability of operator performance during pressurized thermal shock transients. In addition, the use of influence diagrams identified the critical variables that had the greatest impact on operator reliability for a particular scenario (e.g., control room design, procedures, etc.). Top-down and bottom-up algorithms have emerged as the dominant methods for quantifying influence diagrams. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a potential error in employing the bottom-up algorithm when dealing with interdependencies

  13. Critical appraisal of the top-down approach for vesicoureteral reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhalim, Ahmed; Khoury, Antoine E

    2017-06-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) has been linked to recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), renal scarring, hypertension, renal insufficiency and end-stage kidney disease. Different imaging strategies have been proposed to approach children presenting with UTI to sort out patients with significant VUR while minimizing patient morbidity, radiation exposure and financial burden. None of these imaging strategies is universally accepted. The"top-down approach" (TDA) aims at restricting the number of voiding cystourethrograms (VCUGs) and its associated morbidity while identifying patients with clinically-significant reflux. In this approach, children presenting with febrile UTIs are acutely investigated with dimercapto-succinic acid (DMSA) renal scans to identify patients with renal parenchymal inflammation. Those with evidence of renal affection are offered VCUG and late DMSA scan to identify VUR and permanent renal scarring, respectively. Although TDA could identify clinically-significant VUR with high sensitivity, it is not without limitations. The approach segregates patients based on the presence of DMSA cortical lesions omitting the morbidity and the economic burden of UTI. Additionally, some of DMSA lesions are attributed to congenital dysplasia and unrelated to UTI. Ionizing radiation exposure, financial costs, limited availability of DMSA scans in the acute setting, variability in interpreting the results and low yield of actionable findings on DMSA scans are some other limitations. In this review, we tried to address the drawbacks of the TDA and reinforce the value of patient-centered approach for VUR.

  14. A combined bottom-up/top-down approach to prepare a sterile injectable nanosuspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xi; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xia; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Xing; Wang, Yanjiao

    2014-09-10

    To prepare a uniform nanosuspension of strongly hydrophobic riboflavin laurate (RFL) allowing sterile filtration, physical modification (bottom-up) was combined with high-pressure homogenization (top-down) method. Unlike other bottom-up approaches, physical modification with surfactants (TPGS and PL-100) by lyophilization controlled crystallization and compensated for the poor wettability of RFL. On one hand, crystal growth and aggregation during freezing was restricted by a stabilizer-layer adsorbed on the drug surface by hydrophobic interaction. On the other hand, subsequent crystallization of drug in the sublimation process was limited to the interstitial spaces between solvent crystals. After lyophilization, modified drug with a smaller particle size and better wettability was obtained. When adding surfactant solution, water molecules passed between the hydrophilic groups of surface active molecules and activated the polymer chains allowing them to stretch into water. The coarse suspension was crushed into a nanosuspension (MP=162 nm) by high-pressure homogenization. For long term stability, lyophilization was applied again to solidify the nanosuspension (sorbitol as cryoprotectant). A slight crystal growth to about 600 nm was obtained to allow slow release for a sustained effect after muscular administration. Moreover, no paw-licking responses and very slight muscular inflammation demonstrated the excellent biocompatibility of this long-acting RFL injection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spongy Gels by a Top-Down Approach from Polymer Fibrous Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohua; Duan, Gaigai; Kuhn, Ute; Mörl, Michaela; Altstädt, Volker; Yarin, Alexander L; Greiner, Andreas

    2017-03-13

    Ultralight cellular sponges offer a unique set of properties. We show here that solvent uptake by these sponges results in new gel-like materials, which we term spongy gels. The appearance of the spongy gels is very similar to classic organogels. Usually, organogels are formed by a bottom-up process. In contrast, the spongy gels are formed by a top-down approach that offers numerous advantages for the design of their properties, reproducibility, and stability. The sponges themselves represent the scaffold of a gel that could be filled with a solvent, and thereby form a mechanically stable gel-like material. The spongy gels are independent of a time-consuming or otherwise demanding in situ scaffold formation. As solvent evaporation from gels is a concern for various applications, we also studied solvent evaporation of wetting and non-wetting liquids dispersed in the sponge. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Dynamic formulation of a top-down and bottom-up merging energy policy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, Christoph W.; Haldi, P.-A.; Sarlos, G.Gerard

    2003-01-01

    The impact of energy policy measures is not restricted to the energy system and should therefore be analysed within an economy-wide framework, while keeping the essential details of the energy sector. The aim of this paper is to present new developments in the field of the consistent evaluation of indicators for the sustainability assessment of energy policy measures. Starting from the static concept of Boehringer (Energy Econ. 20 (1998) 233), this paper shows how the complementarity format can be used in computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelling for a dynamic formulation of bottom-up and top-down approach merging models. While a hybrid approach increases the credibility of CGE models in energy policy analysis by replacing the energy sector generic functional forms with a bottom-up activity analysis based on specific technologies, the endogenous formulation of investment decisions makes an explicit description of evolving specific capital stocks and technology mixes possible. Both features are essential when assessing effects of policy measures that may be affected by structural change--which is typically the case in the long-term assessment of energy policy measures

  17. Painful faces-induced attentional blink modulated by top-down and bottom-up mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun eZheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain-related stimuli can capture attention in an automatic (bottom-up or intentional (top-down fashion. Previous studies have examined attentional capture by pain-related information using spatial attention paradigms that involve mainly a bottom-up mechanism. In the current study, we investigated the pain information–induced attentional blink (AB using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP task, and compared the effects of task-irrelevant and task-relevant pain distractors. Relationships between accuracy of target identification and individual traits (i.e., empathy and catastrophizing thinking about pain were also examined. The results demonstrated that task-relevant painful faces had a significant pain information–induced AB effect, whereas task-irrelevant faces a near-significant trend of this effect, supporting the notion that pain-related stimuli can influence the temporal dynamics of attention. Furthermore, we found a significant negative correlation between response accuracy and pain catastrophizing score in task-relevant trials. These findings suggest that active scanning of environmental information related to pain produces greater deficits in cognition than does unintentional attention toward pain, which may represent the different ways in which healthy individuals and patients with chronic pain process pain-relevant information. These results may provide insight into the understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in patients with chronic pain.

  18. Metabolic Network Discovery by Top-Down and Bottom-Up Approaches and Paths for Reconciliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çakır, Tunahan; Khatibipour, Mohammad Jafar

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus in the network-centric analysis of cellular metabolism by systems biology approaches is to identify the active metabolic network for the condition of interest. Two major approaches are available for the discovery of the condition-specific metabolic networks. One approach starts from genome-scale metabolic networks, which cover all possible reactions known to occur in the related organism in a condition-independent manner, and applies methods such as the optimization-based Flux-Balance Analysis to elucidate the active network. The other approach starts from the condition-specific metabolome data, and processes the data with statistical or optimization-based methods to extract information content of the data such that the active network is inferred. These approaches, termed bottom-up and top-down, respectively, are currently employed independently. However, considering that both approaches have the same goal, they can both benefit from each other paving the way for the novel integrative analysis methods of metabolome data- and flux-analysis approaches in the post-genomic era. This study reviews the strengths of constraint-based analysis and network inference methods reported in the metabolic systems biology field; then elaborates on the potential paths to reconcile the two approaches to shed better light on how the metabolism functions.

  19. Top-down Estimates of Biomass Burning Emissions of Black Carbon in the Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Li, Q.; Randerson, J. T.; CHEN, D.; Zhang, L.; Liou, K.

    2012-12-01

    We apply a Bayesian linear inversion to derive top-down estimates of biomass burning emissions of black carbon (BC) in the western United States (WUS) for May-November 2006 by inverting surface BC concentrations from the IMPROVE network using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Model simulations are conducted at both 2°×2.5° (globally) and 0.5°×0.667° (nested over North America) horizontal resolutions. We first improve the spatial distributions and seasonal and interannual variations of the BC emissions from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFEDv2) using MODIS 8-day active fire counts from 2005-2007. The GFEDv2 emissions in N. America are adjusted for three zones: boreal N. America, temperate N. America, and Mexico plus Central America. The resulting emissions are then used as a priori for the inversion. The a posteriori emissions are 2-5 times higher than the a priori in California and the Rockies. Model surface BC concentrations using the a posteriori estimate provide better agreement with IMPROVE observations (~50% increase in the Taylor skill score), including improved ability to capture the observed variability especially during June-September. However, model surface BC concentrations are still biased low by ~30%. Comparisons with the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) are included.

  20. A Multifaceted Mass Spectrometric Method to Probe Feeding Related Neuropeptide Changes in Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhuo; DeLaney, Kellen; Hui, Limei; Wang, Junhua; Sturm, Robert M.; Li, Lingjun

    2018-05-01

    Food intake is regulated by various neuromodulators, including numerous neuropeptides. However, it remains elusive at the molecular and cellular level as to how these important chemicals regulate internal processes and which regions of the neuronal organs are responsible for regulating the behavior. Here we report a comparative neuropeptidomic analysis of the brain and pericardial organ (PO) in response to feeding in two well-studied crustacean physiology model organisms, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, using mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. A multifaceted MS-based approach has been developed to obtain complementary information on the expression changes of a large array of neuropeptides in the brain and PO. The method employs stable isotope labeling of brain and PO extracts for relative MS quantitation, capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS for fractionation and high-specificity analysis, and mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) for in-situ molecular mapping of peptides. A number of neuropeptides, including RFamides, B-type allatostatins (AST-B), RYamides, and orcokinins exhibit significant changes in abundance after feeding in this investigation. Peptides from the AST-B family found in PO tissue were shown to have both altered expression and localization changes after feeding, indicating that they may be a class of vital neuropeptide regulators involved in feeding behavior. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. A Multifaceted Mass Spectrometric Method to Probe Feeding Related Neuropeptide Changes in Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhuo; DeLaney, Kellen; Hui, Limei; Wang, Junhua; Sturm, Robert M.; Li, Lingjun

    2018-02-01

    Food intake is regulated by various neuromodulators, including numerous neuropeptides. However, it remains elusive at the molecular and cellular level as to how these important chemicals regulate internal processes and which regions of the neuronal organs are responsible for regulating the behavior. Here we report a comparative neuropeptidomic analysis of the brain and pericardial organ (PO) in response to feeding in two well-studied crustacean physiology model organisms, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, using mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. A multifaceted MS-based approach has been developed to obtain complementary information on the expression changes of a large array of neuropeptides in the brain and PO. The method employs stable isotope labeling of brain and PO extracts for relative MS quantitation, capillary electrophoresis (CE)-MS for fractionation and high-specificity analysis, and mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) for in-situ molecular mapping of peptides. A number of neuropeptides, including RFamides, B-type allatostatins (AST-B), RYamides, and orcokinins exhibit significant changes in abundance after feeding in this investigation. Peptides from the AST-B family found in PO tissue were shown to have both altered expression and localization changes after feeding, indicating that they may be a class of vital neuropeptide regulators involved in feeding behavior. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Mono-, di- and trimethylated homologues of isoprenoid tetraether lipid cores in archaea and environmental samples: mass spectrometric identification and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappy, Chris; Barillà, Daniela; Chong, James; Hodgson, Dominic; Morgan, Hugh; Suleman, Muhammad; Tan, Christine; Yao, Peng; Keely, Brendan

    2015-12-01

    Higher homologues of widely reported C(86) isoprenoid diglycerol tetraether lipid cores, containing 0-6 cyclopentyl rings, have been identified in (hyper)thermophilic archaea, representing up to 21% of total tetraether lipids in the cells. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirms that the additional carbon atoms in the C(87-88) homologues are located in the etherified chains. Structures identified include dialkyl and monoalkyl ('H-shaped') tetraethers containing C(40-42) or C(81-82) hydrocarbons, respectively, many representing novel compounds. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of hydrocarbons released from the lipid cores by ether cleavage suggests that the C(40) chains are biphytanes and the C(41) chains 13-methylbiphytanes. Multiple isomers, having different chain combinations, were recognised among the dialkyl lipids. Methylated tetraethers are produced by Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in varying proportions depending on growth conditions, suggesting that methylation may be an adaptive mechanism to regulate cellular function. The detection of methylated lipids in Pyrobaculum sp. AQ1.S2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius represents the first reported occurrences in Crenarchaeota. Soils and aquatic sediments from geographically distinct mesotemperate environments that were screened for homologues contained monomethylated tetraethers, with di- and trimethylated structures being detected occasionally. The structural diversity and range of occurrences of the C(87-89) tetraethers highlight their potential as complementary biomarkers for archaea in natural environments. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Mass spectrometrical study of rare gas compositions and neutron capture effects in Yamato-74191 (L 3) Chondrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoka, N.; Nagao, K.

    1980-01-01

    The unequilibrated hypersthene chondrite Yamato-74191 was studied mass spectrometrically for rare gases released at various temperatures. Cosmogenic gases dominate in He and Ne. The meteorite contains large amounts of trapped Ar, Kr and Xe, and radiogenic 40 Ar and 129 Xe. Cosmic-ray irradiation and K-Ar ages were determined. In addition to spallogenic components of Kr and Xe, isotopic excesses of 8 sup(O)Kr, 82 Kr, 128 Xe and 126 Xe relative to AVCC-Kr and -Xe were found. The ratio of 80 Kr-excess to 82 Kr-excess is 2.66 after correction for spallogenic Kr. A correlation between 128 Xe/ 132 Xe and 129 Xe/ 132 Xe was found. The 129 Xe/ 132 Xe ratio for trapped Xe in Yamato-74191 was determined as 1.12 +- 0.29 with the correlation plot. The excesses found in Yamato-74191 are best explained by epithermal neutron capture on Br and I, and by the 127 I(n,2nβ) 126 Xe reaction. Using neutron-produced 80 Kr, the neutron slowing-down density was estimated to be 0.14 +- 0.03 cm -3 sec -1 . A minimum mass and a preatmospheric radius was estimated to be 470 kg and 32 cm, respectively. (orig.)

  4. A GENERALIZED NON-LINEAR METHOD FOR DISTORTION CORRECTION AND TOP-DOWN VIEW CONVERSION OF FISH EYE IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Singh Bawa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS have been developed to automate and modify vehicles for safety and better driving experience. Among all computer vision modules in ADAS, 360-degree surround view generation of immediate surroundings of the vehicle is very important, due to application in on-road traffic assistance, parking assistance etc. This paper presents a novel algorithm for fast and computationally efficient transformation of input fisheye images into required top down view. This paper also presents a generalized framework for generating top down view of images captured by cameras with fish-eye lenses mounted on vehicles, irrespective of pitch or tilt angle. The proposed approach comprises of two major steps, viz. correcting the fish-eye lens images to rectilinear images, and generating top-view perspective of the corrected images. The images captured by the fish-eye lens possess barrel distortion, for which a nonlinear and non-iterative method is used. Thereafter, homography is used to obtain top-down view of corrected images. This paper also targets to develop surroundings of the vehicle for wider distortion less field of view and camera perspective independent top down view, with minimum computation cost which is essential due to limited computation power on vehicles.

  5. Predators with multiple ontogenetic niche shifts have limited potential for population growth and top-down control of their prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, A.; Huss, M.; Gårdmark, A.; Casini, M.; Vitale, F.; Hjelm, J.; Persson, L.; de Roos, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic collapses of top predators have revealed trophic cascades and community structuring by top-down control. When populations fail to recover after a collapse, this may indicate alternative stable states in the system. Overfishing has caused several of the most compelling cases of these

  6. The Interaction of Top-Down and Bottom-Up Statistics in the Resolution of Syntactic Category Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates how people resolve syntactic category ambiguities when comprehending sentences. It is proposed that people combine: (a) context-dependent syntactic expectations (top-down statistical information) and (b) context-independent lexical-category frequencies of words (bottom-up statistical information) in order to resolve…

  7. Top-down models in biology: explanation and control of complex living systems above the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Levin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    It is widely assumed in developmental biology and bioengineering that optimal understanding and control of complex living systems follows from models of molecular events. The success of reductionism has overshadowed attempts at top-down models and control policies in biological systems. However, other fields, including physics, engineering and neuroscience, have successfully used the explanations and models at higher levels of organization, including least-action principles in physics and control-theoretic models in computational neuroscience. Exploiting the dynamic regulation of pattern formation in embryogenesis and regeneration requires new approaches to understand how cells cooperate towards large-scale anatomical goal states. Here, we argue that top-down models of pattern homeostasis serve as proof of principle for extending the current paradigm beyond emergence and molecule-level rules. We define top-down control in a biological context, discuss the examples of how cognitive neuroscience and physics exploit these strategies, and illustrate areas in which they may offer significant advantages as complements to the mainstream paradigm. By targeting system controls at multiple levels of organization and demystifying goal-directed (cybernetic) processes, top-down strategies represent a roadmap for using the deep insights of other fields for transformative advances in regenerative medicine and systems bioengineering. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Dynamic ErbB4 Activity in Hippocampal-Prefrontal Synchrony and Top-Down Attention in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhibing; Robinson, Heath L; Yin, Dong-Min; Liu, Yu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Hongsheng; Lin, Thiri W; Xing, Guanglin; Gan, Lin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2018-04-18

    Top-down attention is crucial for meaningful behaviors and impaired in various mental disorders. However, its underpinning regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the hippocampal-prefrontal synchrony associates with levels of top-down attention. Both attention and synchrony are reduced in mutant mice of ErbB4, a receptor of neuregulin-1. We used chemical genetic and optogenetic approaches to inactivate ErbB4 kinase and ErbB4+ interneurons, respectively, both of which reduce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activity. Such inhibitions in the hippocampus impair both hippocampal-prefrontal synchrony and top-down attention, whereas those in the prefrontal cortex alter attention, but not synchrony. These observations identify a role of ErbB4-dependent GABA activity in the hippocampus in synchronizing the hippocampal-prefrontal pathway and demonstrate that acute, dynamic ErbB4 signaling is required to command top-down attention. Because both neuregulin-1 and ErbB4 are susceptibility genes of schizophrenia and major depression, our study contributes to a better understanding of these disorders. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Non-Visual Working Memory Load on Top-Down Modulation of Visual Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissman, Jesse; Gazzaley, Adam; D'Esposito, Mark

    2009-01-01

    While a core function of the working memory (WM) system is the active maintenance of behaviorally relevant sensory representations, it is also critical that distracting stimuli are appropriately ignored. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the role of domain-general WM resources in the top-down attentional modulation of…

  10. Attention, working memory, and phenomenal experience of WM content: memory levels determined by different types of top-down modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jane; Jacobs, Christianne; Silvanto, Juha

    2015-01-01

    What is the role of top-down attentional modulation in consciously accessing working memory (WM) content? In influential WM models, information can exist in different states, determined by allocation of attention; placing the original memory representation in the center of focused attention gives rise to conscious access. Here we discuss various lines of evidence indicating that such attentional modulation is not sufficient for memory content to be phenomenally experienced. We propose that, in addition to attentional modulation of the memory representation, another type of top-down modulation is required: suppression of all incoming visual information, via inhibition of early visual cortex. In this view, there are three distinct memory levels, as a function of the top-down control associated with them: (1) Nonattended, nonconscious associated with no attentional modulation; (2) attended, phenomenally nonconscious memory, associated with attentional enhancement of the actual memory trace; (3) attended, phenomenally conscious memory content, associated with enhancement of the memory trace and top-down suppression of all incoming visual input.

  11. The landscape of fear: The missing link to understand top-down and bottom-up controls of prey abundance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifying factors that may be responsible for affecting and possibly regulating the size of animal populations is a cornerstone in understanding population ecology. The main factors that are thought to influence population size are either resources (bottom-up), predation, (top-down), or interspec...

  12. Post-socialist agricultural cooperatives in Russia : A case study of top-down cooperatives in the Belgorod region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kurakin (Alexander); O. Visser (Oane)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThrough a study of agricultural service cooperatives in Russia’s Belgorod region, this article addresses two gaps in the literature: _first_, the dearth of empirical studies on cooperatives in post-socialist Russia; _second_, the lack of attention to top-down cooperatives in

  13. Sodium-cutting: a new top-down approach to cut open nanostructures on nonplanar surfaces on a large scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Deng, Da

    2014-11-11

    We report a new, low-cost and simple top-down approach, "sodium-cutting", to cut and open nanostructures deposited on a nonplanar surface on a large scale. The feasibility of sodium-cutting was demonstrated with the successfully cutting open of ∼100% carbon nanospheres into nanobowls on a large scale from Sn@C nanospheres for the first time.

  14. Abrupt onsets capture attention independent of top-down control settings 11: Additivity is no evidence for filtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreij, D.; Theeuwes, J.; Olivers, C.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    Is attentional capture contingent on top-down control settings or involuntarily driven by salient stimuli? Supporting the stimulus-driven attentional capture view, Schreij, Owens, and Theeuwes (2008) found that an onset distractor caused a response delay, in spite of participants' having adopted an

  15. A High Throughput Ambient Mass Spectrometric Approach to Species Identification and Classification from Chemical Fingerprint Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Musah, Rabi A.; Espinoza, Edgard O.; Cody, Robert B.; Lesiak, Ashton D.; Christensen, Earl D.; Moore, Hannah E.; Maleknia, Simin; Drijfhout, Falko P.

    2015-01-01

    A high throughput method for species identification and classification through chemometric processing of direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectrometry-derived fingerprint signatures has been developed. The method entails introduction of samples to the open air space between the DART ion source and the mass spectrometer inlet, with the entire observed mass spectral fingerprint subjected to unsupervised hierarchical clustering processing. A range of both polar and non-polar chemotypes a...

  16. Top-down modulation of visual processing and knowledge after 250 ms supports object constancy of category decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendan, Haline E; Ganis, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    People categorize objects more slowly when visual input is highly impoverished instead of optimal. While bottom-up models may explain a decision with optimal input, perceptual hypothesis testing (PHT) theories implicate top-down processes with impoverished input. Brain mechanisms and the time course of PHT are largely unknown. This event-related potential study used a neuroimaging paradigm that implicated prefrontal cortex in top-down modulation of occipitotemporal cortex. Subjects categorized more impoverished and less impoverished real and pseudo objects. PHT theories predict larger impoverishment effects for real than pseudo objects because top-down processes modulate knowledge only for real objects, but different PHT variants predict different timing. Consistent with parietal-prefrontal PHT variants, around 250 ms, the earliest impoverished real object interaction started on an N3 complex, which reflects interactive cortical activity for object cognition. N3 impoverishment effects localized to both prefrontal and occipitotemporal cortex for real objects only. The N3 also showed knowledge effects by 230 ms that localized to occipitotemporal cortex. Later effects reflected (a) word meaning in temporal cortex during the N400, (b) internal evaluation of prior decision and memory processes and secondary higher-order memory involving anterotemporal parts of a default mode network during posterior positivity (P600), and (c) response related activity in posterior cingulate during an anterior slow wave (SW) after 700 ms. Finally, response activity in supplementary motor area during a posterior SW after 900 ms showed impoverishment effects that correlated with RTs. Convergent evidence from studies of vision, memory, and mental imagery which reflects purely top-down inputs, indicates that the N3 reflects the critical top-down processes of PHT. A hybrid multiple-state interactive, PHT and decision theory best explains the visual constancy of object cognition.

  17. Top-down modulation of visual processing and knowledge after 250 ms supports object constancy of category decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haline E. Schendan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available People categorize objects slowly when visual input is highly impoverished instead of optimal. While bottom-up models may explain a decision with optimal input, perceptual hypothesis testing (PHT theories implicate top-down processes with impoverished input. Brain mechanisms and the time course of PHT are largely unknown. This event-related potential study used a neuroimaging paradigm that implicated prefrontal cortex in top-down modulation of occipitotemporal cortex. Subjects categorized more impoverished and less impoverished real and pseudo objects. PHT theories predict larger impoverishment effects for real than pseudo objects because top-down processes modulate knowledge only for real objects, but different PHT variants predict different timing. Consistent with parietal-prefrontal PHT variants, around 250 ms, the earliest impoverished real object interaction started on an N3 complex, which reflects interactive cortical activity for object cognition. N3 impoverishment effects localized to both prefrontal and occipitotemporal cortex for real objects only. The N3 also showed knowledge effects by 230 ms that localized to occipitotemporal cortex. Later effects reflected (a word meaning in temporal cortex during the N400, (b internal evaluation of prior decision and memory processes and secondary higher-order memory involving anterotemporal parts of a default mode network during posterior positivity (P600, and (c response related activity in posterior cingulate during an anterior slow wave (SW after 700 ms. Finally, response activity in supplementary motor area during a posterior SW after 900 ms showed impoverishment effects that correlated with RTs. Convergent evidence from studies of vision, memory, and mental imagery which reflects purely top-down inputs, indicates that the N3 reflects the critical top-down processes of PHT. A hybrid multiple-state interactive, PHT and decision theory best explains the visual constancy of object cognition.

  18. A neural mechanism of dynamic gating of task-relevant information by top-down influence in primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Akikazu; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Kashimori, Yoshiki

    2016-12-01

    Visual recognition involves bidirectional information flow, which consists of bottom-up information coding from retina and top-down information coding from higher visual areas. Recent studies have demonstrated the involvement of early visual areas such as primary visual area (V1) in recognition and memory formation. V1 neurons are not passive transformers of sensory inputs but work as adaptive processor, changing their function according to behavioral context. Top-down signals affect tuning property of V1 neurons and contribute to the gating of sensory information relevant to behavior. However, little is known about the neuronal mechanism underlying the gating of task-relevant information in V1. To address this issue, we focus on task-dependent tuning modulations of V1 neurons in two tasks of perceptual learning. We develop a model of the V1, which receives feedforward input from lateral geniculate nucleus and top-down input from a higher visual area. We show here that the change in a balance between excitation and inhibition in V1 connectivity is necessary for gating task-relevant information in V1. The balance change well accounts for the modulations of tuning characteristic and temporal properties of V1 neuronal responses. We also show that the balance change of V1 connectivity is shaped by top-down signals with temporal correlations reflecting the perceptual strategies of the two tasks. We propose a learning mechanism by which synaptic balance is modulated. To conclude, top-down signal changes the synaptic balance between excitation and inhibition in V1 connectivity, enabling early visual area such as V1 to gate context-dependent information under multiple task performances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dansyl-peptides matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric (MALDI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) features improve the liquid chromatography/MALDI-MS/MS analysis of the proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetta, Giovanni; Ndiaye, Sega; Demey, Emmanuelle; Haddad, Iman; Marino, Gennaro; Amoresano, Angela; Vinh, Joëlle

    2010-10-30

    Peptide tagging is a useful tool to improve matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometric (MALDI-MS/MS) analysis. We present a new application of the use of the dansyl chloride (DNS-Cl). DNS-Cl is a specific primary amine reagent widely used in protein biochemistry. It adds a fluorescent dimethylaminonaphthalene moiety to the molecule. The evaluation of MALDI-MS and MS/MS analyses of dansylated peptides shows that dansylation raises the ionization efficiency of the most hydrophilic species compared with the most hydrophobic ones. Consequently, higher Mascot scores and protein sequence coverage are obtained by combining MS and MS/MS data of native and tagged samples. The N-terminal DNS-Cl sulfonation improves the peptide fragmentation and promotes the generation of b-fragments allowing better peptide sequencing. In addition, we set up a labeling protocol based on the microwave chemistry. Peptide dansylation proved to be a rapid and cheap method to improve the performance of liquid chromatography (LC)/MALDI-MS/MS analysis at the proteomic scale in terms of peptide detection and sequence coverage. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Mass spectrometric studies of stable isotope-labelled carboxylic acid derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.Aa.; Dinger, F.; Dinh-Nguyen, N.

    1975-01-01

    Low resolution mass spectra of deuterium and carbon-13 labelled fatty acid pyrrolidides are discussed. The simple fragmentation pattern of pyrrolidides makes them superior to other derivatives, regarding location of isotopes. Deuteriation of ethylenic fatty acid pyrrolidides therefore seems to be an improved method to locate carbon-carbon double bonds by mass spectrometry. (author)

  1. Mass spectrometric identification of molecular species of phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidycholine extracted from shark liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, S.; Li, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    The profile and structural characterization of molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC) from shark liver using liquid chromatographic/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are described for the first time

  2. Top-down or bottom-up: Contrasting perspectives on psychiatric diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem MA Verhoeven

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Willem MA Verhoeven1,2, Siegfried Tuinier1, Ineke van der Burgt31Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Venray, The Netherlands; 2Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: Clinical psychiatry is confronted with the expanding knowledge of medical genetics. Most of the research into the genetic underpinnings of major mental disorders as described in the categorical taxonomies, however, did reveal linkage with a variety of chromosomes. This heterogeneity of results is most probably due to the assumption that the nosological categories as used in these studies are disease entities with clear boundaries. If the reverse way of looking, the so-called bottom-up approach, is applied, it becomes clear that genetic abnormalities are in most cases not associated with a single psychiatric disorder but with a certain probability to develop a variety of aspecific psychiatric symptoms. The adequacy of the categorical taxonomy, the so-called top-down approach, seems to be inversely related to the amount of empirical etiological data. This is illustrated by four rather prevalent genetic syndromes, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome, and Noonan syndrome, as well as by some cases with rare chromosomal abnormalities. From these examples, it becomes clear that psychotic symptoms as well as mood, anxiety, and autistic features can be found in a great variety of different genetic syndromes. A psychiatric phenotype exists, but comprises, apart from the chance to present several psychiatric symptoms, all elements from developmental, neurocognitive, and physical characteristics.Keywords: genetic disorders, psychiatric symptoms, phenotype, mental disorders

  3. Rehabilitation of gait after stroke: a review towards a top-down approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This document provides a review of the techniques and therapies used in gait rehabilitation after stroke. It also examines the possible benefits of including assistive robotic devices and brain-computer interfaces in this field, according to a top-down approach, in which rehabilitation is driven by neural plasticity. The methods reviewed comprise classical gait rehabilitation techniques (neurophysiological and motor learning approaches), functional electrical stimulation (FES), robotic devices, and brain-computer interfaces (BCI). From the analysis of these approaches, we can draw the following conclusions. Regarding classical rehabilitation techniques, there is insufficient evidence to state that a particular approach is more effective in promoting gait recovery than other. Combination of different rehabilitation strategies seems to be more effective than over-ground gait training alone. Robotic devices need further research to show their suitability for walking training and their effects on over-ground gait. The use of FES combined with different walking retraining strategies has shown to result in improvements in hemiplegic gait. Reports on non-invasive BCIs for stroke recovery are limited to the rehabilitation of upper limbs; however, some works suggest that there might be a common mechanism which influences upper and lower limb recovery simultaneously, independently of the limb chosen for the rehabilitation therapy. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) enables researchers to detect signals from specific regions of the cortex during performance of motor activities for the development of future BCIs. Future research would make possible to analyze the impact of rehabilitation on brain plasticity, in order to adapt treatment resources to meet the needs of each patient and to optimize the recovery process. PMID:22165907

  4. Changing physician perspectives on complementary and alternative medicine: the need for a top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKinnon TS

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thomas S MacKinnon,1 Norbert F Banhidy,1 Daniel R Tuite21School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, 2Faculty of Medicine, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Brighton, UKWe read with great interest the article by Patel et al1 discussing the changing perspectives towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, and an impetus for additional physician knowledge of the strengths and drawbacks of CAM. These findings are indeed relevant in the UK, with an estimated 41.1% one-year prevalence of CAM use, responsible for an annual out-of-pocket expenditure of £1.6 billion.2 We agree that improved training and education in medical school and residencies – which can be thought of as a “bottom-up” approach – are fundamental in preparing the health care system for improved integration of CAM. However, we also suggest that “top-down” changes are required to optimize patient care.Authors' reply Sejal J Patel,1 Kathi J Kemper,2 Joseph P Kitzmiller31College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 2Center for Integrative Health and Wellness, The Ohio State Wexner University Medical Center, 3Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAWe agree the letter is worthy of publication but have a little to add: a top-down approach (as suggested and described by the authors of the letter certainly complements the bottom-up approach (described in our article.1View the original paper by Patel et al.

  5. Top-down and bottom-up approaches for cost estimating new reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbey, P.; Gautier, G.M.; Duflo, D.; Rouyer, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    For several years, Generation-4 designs will be 'pre-conceptual' for the less mature concepts and 'preliminary' for the more mature concepts. In this situation, appropriate data for some of the plant systems may be lacking to develop a bottom-up cost estimate. Therefore, a more global approach, the Top-Down Approach (TDA), is needed to help the designers and decision makers in comparing design options. It utilizes more or less simple models for cost estimating the different parts of a design. TDA cost estimating effort applies to a whole functional element whose cost is approached by similar estimations coming from existing data, ratios and models, for a given range of variation of parameters. Modeling is used when direct analogy is not possible. There are two types of models, global and specific ones. Global models are applied to cost modules related to Code Of Account. Exponential formulae such as Ci = Ai + (Bi x Pi n ) are used when there are cost data for comparable modules in nuclear or other industries. Specific cost models are developed for major specific components of the plant: - process equipment such as reactor vessel, steam generators or large heat exchangers. - buildings, with formulae estimating the construction cost from base cost of m3 of building volume. - systems, when unit costs, cost ratios and models are used, depending on the level of detail of the design. Bottom Up Approach (BUA), which is based on unit prices coming from similar equipment or from manufacturer consulting, is very valuable and gives better cost estimations than TDA when it can be applied, that is at a rather late stage of the design. Both approaches are complementary when some parts of the design are detailed enough to be estimated by BUA, and when BUA results are used to check TDA results and to improve TDA models. This methodology is applied to the HTR (High Temperature Reactor) concept and to an advanced PWR design

  6. Temperature effects on seaweed-sustaining top-down control vary with season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Franziska J; Graiff, Angelika; Matthiessen, Birte

    2016-03-01

    Rising seawater temperature and CO2 concentrations (ocean acidification) represent two of the most influential factors impacting marine ecosystems in the face of global climate change. In ecological climate change research, full-factorial experiments performed across seasons in multispecies, cross-trophic-level settings are essential as they permit a more realistic estimation of direct and indirect effects as well as the relative importance of the effects of both major environmental stressors on ecosystems. In benthic mesocosm experiments, we tested the responses of coastal Baltic Sea Fucus vesiculosus communities to elevated seawater temperature and CO2 concentrations across four seasons of one year. While increasing [CO2] levels had only minor effects, warming had strong and persistent effects on grazers, and the resulting effects on the Fucus community were found to be season dependent. In late summer, a temperature-driven collapse of grazers caused a cascading effect from the consumers to the foundation species, resulting in overgrowth of Fucus thalli by epiphytes. In fall/winter (outside the growing season of epiphytes), intensified grazing under warming resulted in a significant reduction in Fucus biomass. Thus, we were able to confirm the prediction that future increases in water temperatures will influence marine food-web processes by altering top-down control, but we were also able to show that specific consequences for food-web structure depend on the season. Since F. vesiculosus is the dominant habitat-forming brown algal system in the Baltic Sea, its potential decline under global warming implies a loss of key functions and services such as provision of nutrient storage, substrate, food, shelter, and nursery grounds for a diverse community of marine invertebrates and fish in Baltic Sea coastal waters.

  7. Training set optimization and classifier performance in a top-down diabetic retinopathy screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigdahl, J.; Agurto, C.; Murray, V.; Barriga, S.; Soliz, P.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) affects more than 4.4 million Americans age 40 and over. Automatic screening for DR has shown to be an efficient and cost-effective way to lower the burden on the healthcare system, by triaging diabetic patients and ensuring timely care for those presenting with DR. Several supervised algorithms have been developed to detect pathologies related to DR, but little work has been done in determining the size of the training set that optimizes an algorithm's performance. In this paper we analyze the effect of the training sample size on the performance of a top-down DR screening algorithm for different types of statistical classifiers. Results are based on partial least squares (PLS), support vector machines (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (kNN), and Naïve Bayes classifiers. Our dataset consisted of digital retinal images collected from a total of 745 cases (595 controls, 150 with DR). We varied the number of normal controls in the training set, while keeping the number of DR samples constant, and repeated the procedure 10 times using randomized training sets to avoid bias. Results show increasing performance in terms of area under the ROC curve (AUC) when the number of DR subjects in the training set increased, with similar trends for each of the classifiers. Of these, PLS and k-NN had the highest average AUC. Lower standard deviation and a flattening of the AUC curve gives evidence that there is a limit to the learning ability of the classifiers and an optimal number of cases to train on.

  8. Pharmacy-based statewide naloxone distribution: A novel "top-down, bottom-up" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kate J; Harrand, Brianna; Floyd, Carly Cloud; Schaefer, Craig; Acosta, Julie; Logan, Bridget Claire; Clark, Karen

    To highlight New Mexico's multifaceted approach to widespread pharmacy naloxone distribution and to share the interventions as a tool for improving pharmacy-based naloxone practices in other states. New Mexico had the second highest drug overdose death rate in 2014 of which 53% were related to prescription opioids. Opioid overdose death is preventable through the use of naloxone, a safe and effective medication that reverses the effects of prescription opioids and heroin. Pharmacists can play an important role in providing naloxone to individuals who use prescription opioids. Not applicable. Not applicable. A multifaceted approach was utilized in New Mexico from the top down with legislative passage of provisions for a statewide standing order and New Mexico Department of Health support for pharmacy-based naloxone delivery. A bottom up approach was also initiated with the development and implementation of a training program for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians. Naloxone Medicaid claims were used to illustrate statewide distribution and utilization of the pharmacist statewide standing order for naloxone. Percent of pharmacies dispensing naloxone in each county were calculated. Trained pharmacy staff completed a program evaluation form. Questions about quality of instruction and ability of trainer to meet stated objectives were rated on a Likert scale. There were 808 naloxone Medicaid claims from 100 outpatient pharmacies during the first half of 2016, a 9-fold increase over 2014. The "A Dose of R x eality" training program evaluation indicated that participants felt the training was free from bias and met all stated objectives (4 out of 4 on Likert scale). A multi-pronged approach coupling state and community collaboration was successful in overcoming barriers and challenges associated with pharmacy naloxone distribution and ensured its success as an effective avenue for naloxone acquisition in urban and rural communities. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists

  9. Rehabilitation of gait after stroke: a review towards a top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belda-Lois Juan-Manuel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This document provides a review of the techniques and therapies used in gait rehabilitation after stroke. It also examines the possible benefits of including assistive robotic devices and brain-computer interfaces in this field, according to a top-down approach, in which rehabilitation is driven by neural plasticity. The methods reviewed comprise classical gait rehabilitation techniques (neurophysiological and motor learning approaches, functional electrical stimulation (FES, robotic devices, and brain-computer interfaces (BCI. From the analysis of these approaches, we can draw the following conclusions. Regarding classical rehabilitation techniques, there is insufficient evidence to state that a particular approach is more effective in promoting gait recovery than other. Combination of different rehabilitation strategies seems to be more effective than over-ground gait training alone. Robotic devices need further research to show their suitability for walking training and their effects on over-ground gait. The use of FES combined with different walking retraining strategies has shown to result in improvements in hemiplegic gait. Reports on non-invasive BCIs for stroke recovery are limited to the rehabilitation of upper limbs; however, some works suggest that there might be a common mechanism which influences upper and lower limb recovery simultaneously, independently of the limb chosen for the rehabilitation therapy. Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS enables researchers to detect signals from specific regions of the cortex during performance of motor activities for the development of future BCIs. Future research would make possible to analyze the impact of rehabilitation on brain plasticity, in order to adapt treatment resources to meet the needs of each patient and to optimize the recovery process.

  10. Functional size of human visual area V1: a neural correlate of top-down attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Ashika; Kolbe, Scott C; Anderson, Andrew J; Egan, Gary F; Vidyasagar, Trichur R

    2014-06-01

    Heavy demands are placed on the brain's attentional capacity when selecting a target item in a cluttered visual scene, or when reading. It is widely accepted that such attentional selection is mediated by top-down signals from higher cortical areas to early visual areas such as the primary visual cortex (V1). Further, it has also been reported that there is considerable variation in the surface area of V1. This variation may impact on either the number or specificity of attentional feedback signals and, thereby, the efficiency of attentional mechanisms. In this study, we investigated whether individual differences between humans performing attention-demanding tasks can be related to the functional area of V1. We found that those with a larger representation in V1 of the central 12° of the visual field as measured using BOLD signals from fMRI were able to perform a serial search task at a faster rate. In line with recent suggestions of the vital role of visuo-spatial attention in reading, the speed of reading showed a strong positive correlation with the speed of visual search, although it showed little correlation with the size of V1. The results support the idea that the functional size of the primary visual cortex is an important determinant of the efficiency of selective spatial attention for simple tasks, and that the attentional processing required for complex tasks like reading are to a large extent determined by other brain areas and inter-areal connections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of radioimmunoassay and gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay for d-amphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, K.H.; Ebert, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    Quantification of low levels of psychotropic drugs (10 -7 to 10 -9 g ml -1 ) in small volumes of plasma requires sensitive and accurate methods. Validation of these methods is best achieved by comparing results obtained using several techniques. In this study, amphetamine levels in plasma were measured using gas chromatography mass spectrometry and radioimmunoassay. Correlation of the results obtained by the two methods was found to be positive and high (R = 0.9822). The average coefficient of variation between assays for gas chromatography mass spectrometry was 5.8% and for radioimmunoassay was 12.3%, while the average coefficient of variation within assays for gas chromatography mass spectrometry was 4.9% and for radioimmunoassay 6.9%. Although gas chromatography mass spectrometry was 1.9 times more sensitive than radioimmunoassay, for most purposes, the convenience of the radioimmunoassay method outweighs the technical superiority of gas chromatography mass spectrometry. (author)

  12. In situ probing of cholesterol in astrocytes at the single-cell level using laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric imaging with colloidal silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdian, D C; Cha, Sangwon; Oh, Jisun; Sakaguchi, Donald S; Yeung, Edward S; Lee, Young Jin

    2010-04-30

    Mass spectrometric imaging has been utilized to localize individual astrocytes and to obtain cholesterol populations at the single-cell level in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with colloidal silver. The silver ion adduct of membrane-bound cholesterol was monitored to detect individual cells. Good correlation between mass spectrometric and optical images at different cell densities indicates the ability to perform single-cell studies of cholesterol abundance. The feasibility of quantification is confirmed by the agreement between the LDI-MS ion signals and the results from a traditional enzymatic fluorometric assay. We propose that this approach could be an effective tool to study chemical populations at the cellular level. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mass spectrometric measurement of urinary kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio in children with and without urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Melanie L; Briden, Kelleigh E; Mitsios, John V; Weindel, Annette L; Terrill, Cindy M; Hunstad, David A; Dietzen, Dennis J

    2018-04-19

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the first step of tryptophan (Trp) catabolism, yielding kynurenine (Kyn) metabolites. The kynurenine-to-tryptophan (K/T) ratio is used as a surrogate for biological IDO enzyme activity. IDO expression is increased during Escherichia coli urinary tract infection (UTI). Thus, our objective was to develop a method for measurement of Kyn/Trp ratio in human blood and urine and evaluate its use as a biomarker of UTI. A mass spectrometric method was developed to measure Trp and Kyn in serum and urine specimens. The method was applied to clinical urine specimens from symptomatic pediatric patients with laboratory-confirmed UTI or other acute conditions and from healthy controls. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was linear to 500 μmol/L for both Trp and Kyn. Imprecision ranged from 5 to 15% for Trp and 6-20% for Kyn. Analytical recoveries of Trp and Kyn ranged from 96 to 119% in serum and 90-97% in urine. No correlation was found between the K/T ratio and circulating IDO mass (r = 0.110) in serum. Urinary Kyn and Trp in the pediatric test cohort demonstrated elevations in the K/T ratio in symptomatic patients with UTI (median 13.08) and without UTI (median 14.38) compared to healthy controls (median 4.93; p < 0.001 for both comparisons). No significant difference in K/T ratio was noted between symptomatic patients with and without UTI (p = 0.84). Measurement of Trp and Kyn by LC-MS/MS is accurate and precise in serum and urine specimens. While urinary K/T ratio is not a specific biomarker for UTI, it may represent a general indicator of a systemic inflammatory process. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mass Spectrometric Analyses Reveal a Central Role for Ubiquitylation in Remodeling the Arabidopsis Proteome during Photomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Kim, Do-Young; Stankey, Robert J; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd M; Vierstra, Richard D

    2017-06-05

    The switch from skotomorphogenesis to photomorphogenesis is a key developmental transition in the life of seed plants. While much of the underpinning proteome remodeling is driven by light-induced changes in gene expression, the proteolytic removal of specific proteins by the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system is also likely paramount. Through mass spectrometric analysis of ubiquitylated proteins affinity-purified from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings before and after red-light irradiation, we identified a number of influential proteins whose ubiquitylation status is modified during this switch. We observed a substantial enrichment for proteins involved in auxin, abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroid signaling, peroxisome function, disease resistance, protein phosphorylation and light perception, including the phytochrome (Phy) A and phototropin photoreceptors. Soon after red-light treatment, PhyA becomes the dominant ubiquitylated species, with ubiquitin attachment sites mapped to six lysines. A PhyA mutant protected from ubiquitin addition at these sites is substantially more stable in planta upon photoconversion to Pfr and is hyperactive in driving photomorphogenesis. However, light still stimulates ubiquitylation and degradation of this mutant, implying that other attachment sites and/or proteolytic pathways exist. Collectively, we expand the catalog of ubiquitylation targets in Arabidopsis and show that this post-translational modification is central to the rewiring of plants for photoautotrophic growth. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mass spectrometric characterization of circulating and functional antigens derived from piperacillin in patients with cystic fibrosis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Paul; Meng, Xiaoli; Lavergne, Sidonie N.; El-Ghaiesh, Sabah; Monshi, Manal; Earnshaw, Caroline; Peckham, Daniel; Gooi, Jimmy; Conway, Steve; Pirmohamed, Munir; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Naisbitt, Dean J.; Park, B. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the relationship between the chemistry of drug antigen formation and immune function is lacking. Thus, mass spectrometric methods were employed to detect and fully characterize circulating antigens derived from piperacillin in patients undergoing therapy and the nature of the drug derived-epitopes on protein which can function as an antigen to stimulate T-cells. Albumin modification with piperacillin in vitro resulted in the formation of two distinct haptens, one formed directly from piperacillin and a second in which the dioxopiperazine ring had undergone hydrolysis. Modification was time- and concentration-dependent, with selective modification of Lys541 observed at low concentrations, whereas at higher concentrations up to 13/59 lysine residues were modified, four of which (Lys190, 195, 432 and 541) were detected in patients’ plasma. Piperacillin-specific T-lymphocyte responses (proliferation, cytokines and granzyme-B release) were detected ex vivo with cells from hypersensitive patients, and analysis of incubation medium showed that modification of the same lysine residues in albumin occurred in situ. The antigenicity of piperacillin-modified albumin was confirmed by stimulation of T-cells with characterized synthetic conjugates. Analysis of minimally-modified T-cell stimulatory albumin conjugates revealed peptide sequences incorporating Lys190, 432 and 541 as principal functional epitopes for T-cells. This study has characterized the multiple haptenic structures on albumin in patients, and showed that they constitute functional antigenic determinants for T-cells. PMID:21606251

  16. Vaporization study on vanadium monoxide and two-phase mixture of vanadium and vanadium monoxide by mass-spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banchorndhevakul, W.; Matsui, Tsuneo; Naito, Keiji

    1986-01-01

    The vapor pressures over single phase vanadium monoxide VO 1.022 (s) and the two-phase mixture of vanadium metal (β phase) and vanadium monoxide were measured by mass-spectrometric method in the temperature range of 1,803 ∼ 1,990 and 1,703 ∼ 1,884 K, respectively. The main gas species over both systems were found to be VO(g) and V(g). The vapor pressure of VO(g) over the two-phase mixture of V(s) and VO(s) was a little lower than that over single phase VO(s). The vapor pressure of V(g) over the two-phase mixture was nearly equal to that over single phase. From the vapor pressure data, the enthalpies of vaporization, the enthalpies of formation for VO(g) and V(g) and the dissociation energy of VO(g) were determined. The oxygen partial pressure was calculated as a function of temperature from the vapor pressures of VO(g) and V(g), from which the partial molar enthalpies and entropies of oxygen in both systems were obtained. (author)

  17. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 μg/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 μg. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 μg. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  18. Determination of itopride in human plasma by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometric detection: application to a bioequivalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon-Woo; Seo, Ji-Hyung; Choi, Seung-Ki; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2007-01-30

    A simple method using a one-step liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with butyl acetate followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with positive ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (ESI-MS/MS) detection was developed for the determination of itopride in human plasma, using sulpiride as an internal standard (IS). Acquisition was performed in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, by monitoring the transitions: m/z 359.5>166.1 for itopride and m/z 342.3>111.6 for IS, respectively. Analytes were chromatographed on an YMC C18 reverse-phase chromatographic column by isocratic elution with 1 mM ammonium acetate buffer-methanol (20: 80, v/v; pH 4.0 adjusted with acetic acid). Results were linear (r2=0.9999) over the studied range (0.5-1000 ng mL(-1)) with a total analysis time per run of 2 min for LC-MS/MS. The developed method was validated and successfully applied to bioequivalence studies of itopride hydrochloride in healthy male volunteers.

  19. The IDA-80 measurement evaluation programme on mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis of uranium and plutonium. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyrich, W.; Golly, W.; Spannagel, G.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.; Bievre, P. de; Wolters, W.

    1984-12-01

    The main objective was the acquisition of basic data on the uncertainties involved in the mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis as applied to the determination of uranium and plutonium in active feed solutions of reprocessing plants. The element concentrations and isotopic compositions of all test materials used were determined by CBNM and NBS with high accuracy. The more than 60000 analytical data reported by the participating laboratories were evaluated by statistical methods applied mainly to the calculation of estimates of the variances for the different uncertainty components contributing to the total uncertainty of this analytical technique. Attention was given to such topics as sample ageing, influence of fission products, spike calibration, ion fractionation, Pu-241 decay correction, minor isotope measurement and errors in data transfer. Furthermore, the performance of the 'dried sample' technique and the 'in-situ' spiking method of undiluted samples of reprocessing fuel solution with U-235/Pu-242 metal alloy spikes, were tested successfully. Considerable improvement of isotope dilution analysis in this safeguards relevant application during the last decade is shown as compared to the results obtained in the IDA-72 interlaboratory experiment, organized by KfK in 1972 on the same subject. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of traces of ether-type icing inhibitors in free-floating fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, H.S. [Dept. of Environmental Education, Kongju National Univ., Kongju (Korea); Abuse Drug Research Center, Kongju National Univ., Kongju (Korea); Ahn, H.S. [Dept. of Environmental Science, Kongju National Univ., Kongju (Korea)

    2004-08-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) assay method has been developed for simultaneous determination of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and diethylene glycol monomethly ether (DEGME) in spilled aviation fuels. Ethylene glycol monobutyl ether (EGBE) and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGEE) were used as internal standard and surrogate, respectively. Sample preparation consisted of back-extraction with 7 mL dichloromethane after extraction of 50 mL of fuel with 2 mL of water. The extract was concentrated to dryness, dissolved in 100 {mu}L methanol, and analyzed by GC-MS with selected-ion monitoring (SIM). The peaks had good chromatographic properties on a semi-polar column. EGME and DEGME were extracted from fuel with high recovery of 75 and 85%, with small variations, respectively. Method detection limits were 1.3 and 1.0 ng mL{sup -1} for EGME and DEGME, respectively, in spilled fuel. DEGME was detected at concentrations of 22.6 and 19.7 ng mL{sup -1} in two samples from among five free-floating samples collected in a tunnel of a subway station located in the vicinity of an army base in Korea. The method might be useful for differentiation between the fuel-types kerosene and JP-8, which might originate from a storage tank. (orig.)

  1. Mass spectrometric analysis of stable carbon isotopes in abiogenic and biogenic natural compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, M.I.; Ahmed, M.; Tasneem, M.A.; Khan, I.A.; Latif, Z.

    1989-07-01

    This report describes the general methodology of sup/13/ carbon analysis on mass spectrometer and various preparation systems developed for conversion of samples into isotopically non-fractionated and purified carbon dioxide. Laboratory standards required for sup/13/ C analysis have been calibrated against international standards. The reproducibility/accuracy of sample preparation and analysis on mass spectrometer for sup/13/ C or sup/12/ C measurement is well within the internationally acceptable limits. (author)

  2. Mass-spectrometric analysis of trace oxygen in carbon dioxide; Analyse de traces d'oxygene dans le gaz carbonique par spectrometrie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nief, G; Severin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The mass spectrum of pure CO{sub 2} contains a peak of weight 32 whose relationship to peak at 44 varies greatly depending on the previous history of the source of ions and even during the course of an analysis. The fact that this peak is more or less proportional to the pressure and that its appearance potential is the same as that of oxygen leads us to suppose that it is produced from oxygen formed by dissociation of the carbon dioxide on the tungsten filament. A prior treatment of the ion source with acetylene reduces the ratio 32/44 to a value of about 15.10{sup -5}. This same treatment also stabilises the spectrometer's sensitivity to oxygen. Two lines of introduction enable pure carbon dioxide, the specimen to be estimated and a reference mixture of known oxygen content to be sent into the mass spectrometer in quick succession. Oxygen in the carbon dioxide in amounts ranging between 0 and 500 p.p.m. can thus be determined to an accuracy of {+-} 5 p.p.m., the analysis taking 30 minutes. (author) [French] Le spectre de masse de CO{sub 2} pur contient un pic de masse 32 dont le rapport au pic 44 varie enormement suivant l'histoire anterieure de la source d'ions et meme au cours d'une analyse. Le fait que ce pic soit grossierement proportionnel a la pression et que son potentiel d'apparition soit le meme que celui de l'oxygene permet de supposer qu'il est engendre a partir de l'oxygene produit par dissociation du gaz carbonique sur le filament de tungstene. Un conditionnement prealable de la source d'ions avec de l'acetylene reduit le rapport 32/44 a une valeur d'environ 15.10{sup -5}. Ce meme traitement stabilise egalement la sensibilite du spectrometre vis-a-vis de l'oxygene. Une double ligne d'introduction de gaz permet d'envoyer en successions rapides dans le spectrometre de masse le gaz carbonique pur, l'echantillon a doser et un melange de reference de teneur en oxygene connue. On arrive ainsi a doser l'oxygene dans le gaz carbonique dans la gamme de 0 a

  3. Direct mass spectrometric screening of antibiotics from bacterial surfaces using liquid extraction surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Marco; González, Ignacio; Genilloud, Olga; Singh, Sheo B; Svatoš, Aleš

    2012-10-30

    There is a need to find new antibiotic agents to fight resistant pathogenic bacteria. To search successfully for novel antibiotics from bacteria cultivated under diverse conditions, we need a fast and cost-effective screening method. A combination of Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis (LESA), automated chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization, and high-resolution mass or tandem mass spectrometry using an Orbitrap XL was tested as the screening platform. Actinobacteria, known to produce well-recognized thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, were cultivated on a plate of solid medium and the antibiotics were extracted by organic solvent mixtures from the surface of colonies grown on the plate and analyzed using mass spectrometry (MS). LESA combined with high-resolution MS is a powerful tool with which to extract and detect thiazolyl peptide antibiotics from different Actinobacteria. Known antibiotics were correctly detected with high mass accuracy (antibiotics in particular and natural products in general. The method described in this paper is suitable for (1) screening the natural products produced by bacterial colonies on cultivation plates within the first 2 min following extraction and (2) detecting antibiotics at high mass accuracy; the cost is around 2 Euro per sample. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Mass spectrometric probes of metal cluster distributions and metastable ion decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, E.K.; Liu, K.; Cole, S.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The study of metal clusters has provided both an opportunity and a challenge to the application of mass spectrometry. These days the most often-used technique for cluster generation - laser vaporization - leads to extensive distributions of cluster sizes, from one to perhaps thousands of atoms, and most studies reported to date use excimer laser ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry for cluster detection. Our apparatus is a simple one-stage TOF design employing Wiley-McLauren spatial focusing and a one-meter drift tube. In a second apparatus employing a pulsed valve in the cluster source, we see asymmetric broadening of niobium cluster mass peaks under multiphoton ionization conditions, indicating metastable decay of parent cluster ions. Other studies of niobium clusters have shown no such asymmetric peaks. 2 figs

  5. Vacuum-Ultraviolet Photoionization and Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Lignin Monomers Coniferyl and Sinapyl Alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Golan, Amir; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-02-09

    The fragmentation mechanisms of monolignols under various energetic processes are studied with jet-cooled thermal desorption molecular beam (TDMB) mass spectrometry (MS), 25 keV Bi3+ secondary ion MS (SIMS), synchrotron vacuum-ultraviolet secondary neutral MS (VUV-SNMS) and theoretical methods. Experimental and calculated appearance energies of fragments observed in TDMB MS indicate that the coniferyl alcohol photoionization mass spectra contain the molecular parent and several dissociative photoionization products. Similar results obtained for sinapyl alcohol are also discussed briefly. Ionization energies of 7.60 eV ? 0.05 eV for coniferyl alcohol and<7.4 eV for both sinapyl and dihydrosinapyl alcohols are determined. The positive ion SIMS spectrum of coniferyl alcohol shares few characteristic peaks (m/z = 137 and 151) with the TDMB mass spectra, shows extensive fragmentation, and does not exhibit clear molecular parent signals. VUV-SNMS spectra, on the other hand, are dominated by the parent ion and main fragments also present in the TDMB spectra. Molecular fragmentation in VUV-SNMS spectra can be reduced by increasing the extraction delay time. Some features resembling the SIMS spectra are also observed in the desorbed neutral products. The monolignol VUV-SNMS peaks shared with the TDMB mass spectra suggest that dissociative photoionization of ion-sputtered neutral molecules predominate in the VUV-SNMS mass spectra, despite the extra internal energy imparted in the initial ion impact. The potential applications of these results to imaging mass spectrometry of bio-molecules are discussed.

  6. Mass-spectrometric study of volatile uranyl β-diketonates and their adducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, V.M.; Belyaev, B.N.; Berezinskij, S.O.; Sidorenko, G.V.; Suglobov, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    The mass spectra of a number of uranyl β-diketonates containing methyl, trifluoromethyl and tert-butyl substituents in β-diketonate anion, and their adducts are measured. The form of the unsolvated β-diketonates and their adducts in gas phase is studied. The ways of fragmentation of uranyl β-diketonates and their adducts are investigated. The data concerning the thermal and chemical side reactions proceeding with uranyl β-diketonates and their addicts in an ion source are obtained. The mass spectra of the samples of neptunyl and plutonyl β-diketonate adducts synthesized for the first time are measured

  7. Top-down holographic G-structure glueball spectroscopy at (N)LO in N and finite coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sil, Karunava; Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India)

    2017-06-15

    The top-down type IIB holographic dual of large-N thermal QCD as constructed in Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187, 2010) involving a fluxed resolved warped deformed conifold, its delocalized type IIA Strominger-Yau-Zaslow-mirror (SYZ-mirror) as well as its M-theory uplift constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) - both in the finite coupling g{sub s} masses of the 0{sup ++}, 0{sup -+}, 0{sup --}, 1{sup ++}, 2{sup ++} ('glueball') states (which correspond to fluctuations in the dilaton or complexified two-forms or appropriate metric components) in the aforementioned backgrounds of G-structure in the 'MQGP' limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013). We use WKB quantization conditions on one hand and impose Neumann/Dirichlet boundary conditions at an IR cut-off ('r{sub 0}')/horizon radius ('r{sub h}') on the solutions to the equations of motion on the other hand. We find that the former technique produces results closer to the lattice results. We also discuss the r{sub h} = 0 limits of all calculations. In this context we also calculate the 0{sup ++}, 0{sup --}, 1{sup ++}, 2{sup ++} glueball masses up to Next to Leading Order (NLO) in N and find a (g{sub s}M{sup 2})/(N)(g{sub s}N{sub f})-suppression similar to and further validating semi-universality of NLO corrections to transport coefficients, observed in Sil and Misra (Eur Phys J C 76(11):618, 2016). (orig.)

  8. Top-down holographic G-structure glueball spectroscopy at (N)LO in N and finite coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil, Karunava; Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok

    2017-01-01

    The top-down type IIB holographic dual of large-N thermal QCD as constructed in Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187, 2010) involving a fluxed resolved warped deformed conifold, its delocalized type IIA Strominger-Yau-Zaslow-mirror (SYZ-mirror) as well as its M-theory uplift constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) - both in the finite coupling g s masses of the 0 ++ , 0 -+ , 0 -- , 1 ++ , 2 ++ ('glueball') states (which correspond to fluctuations in the dilaton or complexified two-forms or appropriate metric components) in the aforementioned backgrounds of G-structure in the 'MQGP' limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013). We use WKB quantization conditions on one hand and impose Neumann/Dirichlet boundary conditions at an IR cut-off ('r 0 ')/horizon radius ('r h ') on the solutions to the equations of motion on the other hand. We find that the former technique produces results closer to the lattice results. We also discuss the r h = 0 limits of all calculations. In this context we also calculate the 0 ++ , 0 -- , 1 ++ , 2 ++ glueball masses up to Next to Leading Order (NLO) in N and find a (g s M 2 )/(N)(g s N f )-suppression similar to and further validating semi-universality of NLO corrections to transport coefficients, observed in Sil and Misra (Eur Phys J C 76(11):618, 2016). (orig.)

  9. Top-down holographic G-structure glueball spectroscopy at (N)LO in N and finite coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Karunava; Yadav, Vikas; Misra, Aalok

    2017-06-01

    The top-down type IIB holographic dual of large- N thermal QCD as constructed in Mia et al. (Nucl Phys B 839:187, 2010) involving a fluxed resolved warped deformed conifold, its delocalized type IIA Strominger-Yau-Zaslow-mirror (SYZ-mirror) as well as its M-theory uplift constructed in Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) - both in the finite coupling (g_s ˜ \\limits ^{Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013) - were shown explicitly to possess a local SU(3)/G_2-structure in Sil and Misra (Nucl Phys B 910:754, 2016). Glueballs spectra in the finite-gauge-coupling limit (and not just large 't Hooft coupling limit) - a limit expected to be directly relevant to strongly coupled systems at finite temperature such as QGP (Natsuume in String theory and quark-gluon plasma, 2007) - has thus far been missing in the literature. In this paper, we fill this gap by calculating the masses of the 0^{++}, 0^{-+},0^{{-}{-}}, 1^{++}, 2^{++} (`glueball') states (which correspond to fluctuations in the dilaton or complexified two-forms or appropriate metric components) in the aforementioned backgrounds of G-structure in the `MQGP' limit of Dhuria and Misra (JHEP 1311:001, 2013). We use WKB quantization conditions on one hand and impose Neumann/Dirichlet boundary conditions at an IR cut-off (`r_0')/horizon radius (`r_h') on the solutions to the equations of motion on the other hand. We find that the former technique produces results closer to the lattice results. We also discuss the r_h=0 limits of all calculations. In this context we also calculate the 0^{++}, 0^{{-}{-}},1^{++}, 2^{++} glueball masses up to Next to Leading Order (NLO) in N and find a g_sM^2/N(g_sN_f)-suppression similar to and further validating semi-universality of NLO corrections to transport coefficients, observed in Sil and Misra (Eur Phys J C 76(11):618, 2016).

  10. Photoionization mass spectrometric studies of selected compounds in a molecular beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, W.M.

    1979-03-01

    Photoionization efficiency curves have been measured at moderate to high resolution for several species produced in supersonic molecular beams of acetone, acetone-d/sub 6/ and CS/sub 2/. The molecular beam photoionization mass spectrometer which has been assembled for this work is described. The performance of this instrument has been characterized by a number of experiments and calculations.

  11. Nanodisc-based Co-immunoprecipitation for Mass Spectrometric Identification of Membrane-interacting Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Roepstorff, Peter; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    enterotoxigenic Escherischia coli, GM1-nanodiscs were employed for co-immunoprecipitation. The B subunit of heat labile enterotoxin was identified as a specific interaction partner by mass spectrometry, thus demonstrating that nanodisc technology is useful for highly specific detection and identification...

  12. Multiplex Mass Spectrometric Imaging with Polarity Switching for Concurrent Acquisition of Positive and Negative Ion Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Andrew R.; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-06-01

    We have recently developed a multiplex mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) method which incorporates high mass resolution imaging and MS/MS and MS3 imaging of several compounds in a single data acquisition utilizing a hybrid linear ion trap-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Perdian and Lee, Anal. Chem. 82, 9393-9400, 2010). Here we extend this capability to obtain positive and negative ion MS and MS/MS spectra in a single MS imaging experiment through polarity switching within spiral steps of each raster step. This methodology was demonstrated for the analysis of various lipid class compounds in a section of mouse brain. This allows for simultaneous imaging of compounds that are readily ionized in positive mode (e.g., phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins) and those that are readily ionized in negative mode (e.g., sulfatides, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylserines). MS/MS imaging was also performed for a few compounds in both positive and negative ion mode within the same experimental set-up. Insufficient stabilization time for the Orbitrap high voltage leads to slight deviations in observed masses, but these deviations are systematic and were easily corrected with a two-point calibration to background ions.

  13. Mass Spectrometric Method for Analyzing Metabolites in Yeast with Single Cell Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amantonico, Andrea; Oh, Joo Yeon; Sobek, Jens; Heinemann, Matthias; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-01-01

    Getting a look-in: An optimized MALDI-MS procedure has been developed to detect endogenous primary metabolites directly in the cell extract. A detection limit corresponding to metabolites from less than a single cell has been attained, opening the door to single-cell metabolomics by mass

  14. Determination of nuclear fuel burn-up using mass spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, B.; Bagyalakshmi, R.; Periaswami, G.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Chitambar, S.A.; Jain, H.C.; Mathews, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    Determination of burn-up using a stable fission product monitor such as 148 Nd and heavy elements, determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry gives the most accurate data. This report describes the work carried out to standardise the conditions for burn-up determination. Some typical results are given. (author)

  15. High-precision mass spectrometric analysis using stable isotopes in studies of children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schierbeek, Henk; van den Akker, Chris H. P.; Fay, Laurent B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2012-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes combined with mass spectrometry (MS) provides insight into metabolic processes within the body. Herein, an overview on the relevance of stable isotope methodology in pediatric research is presented. Applications for the use of stable isotopes with MS cover carbohydrate,

  16. [Mass spectrometric and quantum chemical study of dimeric associates of nucleosides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodub, L F; Aksenov, S A; Boldeskul, A I

    1995-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleosides H-bonded pairs were investigated using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and MNDO/H quantum chemistry method. It was shown that "rare" (enol or imin) forms of the nitrogen bases could form pairs with energy comparable with "canonical" base pair energy. It was shown that pair stability rows, which are measured using different experimental techniques, were in conformity each with other.

  17. Application of mass spectrometric techniques to delineate the modes-of-action of anticancer metallodrugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartinger, Christian G.; Groessl, Michael; Meier, Samuel M.; Casini, Angela; Dyson, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as an important tool for studying anticancer metallodrugs in complex biological samples and for characterising their interactions with biomolecules and potential targets on a molecular level. The exact modes-of-action of these coordination compounds and especially

  18. Photoionization mass spectrometric studies of selected compounds in a molecular beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, W.M.

    1979-03-01

    Photoionization efficiency curves have been measured at moderate to high resolution for several species produced in supersonic molecular beams of acetone, acetone-d 6 and CS 2 . The molecular beam photoionization mass spectrometer which has been assembled for this work is described. The performance of this instrument has been characterized by a number of experiments and calculations

  19. Liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric determination of selected sulphonamides in milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhijn, van J.A.; Lasaroms, J.J.P.; Berendsen, B.J.A.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2002-01-01

    Liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry is used for the quantitative analysis of selected sulphonamides in milk. Ultrafiltration is the only sample pre-treatment technique which is required. Consequently, sample throughput is much higher than with conventional procedures, and analyte

  20. NEMO. Netherlands Energy demand MOdel. A top-down model based on bottom-up information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koopmans, C.C.; Te Velde, D.W.; Groot, W.; Hendriks, J.H.A.

    1999-06-01

    The title model links energy use to other production factors, (physical) production, energy prices, technological trends and government policies. It uses a 'putty-semiputty' vintage production structure, in which new investments, adaptations to existing capital goods (retrofit) and 'good-housekeeping' are discerned. Price elasticities are relatively large in the long term and small in the short term. Most predictions of energy use are based on either econometric models or on 'bottom-up information', i.e. disaggregated lists of technical possibilities for and costs of saving energy. Typically, one predicts more energy-efficiency improvements using bottom-up information than using econometric ('top-down') models. We bridged this so-called 'energy-efficiency gap' by designing our macro/meso model NEMO in such a way that we can use bottom-up (micro) information to estimate most model parameters. In our view, reflected in NEMO, the energy-efficiency gap arises for two reasons. The first is that firms and households use a fairly high discount rate of 15% when evaluating the profitability of energy-efficiency improvements. The second is that our bottom-up information ('ICARUS') for most economic sectors does not (as NEMO does) take account of the fact that implementation of new, energy-efficient technology in capital stock takes place only gradually. Parameter estimates for 19 sectors point at a long-term technological energy efficiency improvement trend in Netherlands final energy use of 0.8% per year. The long-term price elasticity is estimated to be 0.29. These values are comparable to other studies based on time series data. Simulations of the effects of the oil price shocks in the seventies and the subsequent fall of oil prices show that the NEMO's price elasticities are consistent with historical data. However, the present pace at which new technologies become available (reflected in NEMO) appears to be lower than in the seventies and eighties. This suggests that it