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Sample records for tooth wear indices

  1. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  2. Tooth wear

    OpenAIRE

    Tušek Ivan; Tušek Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction), which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to toot...

  3. Tooth wear and wear investigations in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A; He, L H; Lyons, K; Swain, M V

    2012-03-01

    Tooth wear has been recognised as a major problem in dentistry. Epidemiological studies have reported an increasing prevalence of tooth wear and general dental practitioners see a greater number of patients seeking treatment with worn dentition. Although the dental literature contains numerous publications related to management and rehabilitation of tooth wear of varying aetiologies, our understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of tooth wear is still limited. The wear behaviour of dental biomaterials has also been extensively researched to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for the development of restorative materials with good wear resistance. The complex nature of tooth wear indicates challenges for conducting in vitro and in vivo wear investigations and a clear correlation between in vitro and in vivo data has not been established. The objective was to critically review the peer reviewed English-language literature pertaining to prevalence and aetiology of tooth wear and wear investigations in dentistry identified through a Medline search engine combined with hand-searching of the relevant literature, covering the period between 1960 and 2011. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Gear Tooth Wear Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Irebert R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-based condition indicators continue to be developed for Health Usage Monitoring of rotorcraft gearboxes. Testing performed at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown correlations between specific condition indicators and specific types of gear wear. To speed up the detection and analysis of gear teeth, an image detection program based on the Viola-Jones algorithm was trained to automatically detect spiral bevel gear wear pitting. The detector was tested using a training set of gear wear pictures and a blind set of gear wear pictures. The detector accuracy for the training set was 75 percent while the accuracy for the blind set was 15 percent. Further improvements on the accuracy of the detector are required but preliminary results have shown its ability to automatically detect gear tooth wear. The trained detector would be used to quickly evaluate a set of gear or pinion pictures for pits, spalls, or abrasive wear. The results could then be used to correlate with vibration or oil debris data. In general, the program could be retrained to detect features of interest from pictures of a component taken over a period of time.

  5. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  6. Tooth Wear Inclination in Great Ape Molars.

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    Knight-Sadler, Jordan; Fiorenza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Primate dietary diversity is reflected in their dental morphology, with differences in size and shape of teeth. In particular, the tooth wear angle can provide insight into a species' ability to break down certain foods. To examine dietary and masticatory information, digitized polygon models of dental casts provide a basis for quantitative analysis of wear associated with tooth attrition. In this study, we analyze and compare the wear patterns of Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorillagorilla and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii lower molars, focusing on the degree of inclination of specific wear facets. The variation in wear angles appears to be indicative of jaw movements and the specific stresses imposed on food during mastication, reflecting thus the ecology of these species. Orangutans exhibit flatter wear angles, more typical of a diet consisting of hard and brittle foods, while gorillas show a wear pattern with a high degree of inclination, reflecting thus their more leafy diet. Chimpanzees, on the other hand, show intermediate inclinations, a pattern that could be related to their highly variable diet. This method is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for better understanding the relationship between food, mastication and tooth wear processes in living primates, and can be potentially used to reconstruct the diet of fossil species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  8. Biologically Based Restorative Management of Tooth Wear

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    Martin G. D. Kelleher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and severity of tooth wear is increasing in industrialised nations. Yet, there is no high-level evidence to support or refute any therapeutic intervention. In the absence of such evidence, many currently prevailing management strategies for tooth wear may be failing in their duty of care to first and foremost improve the oral health of patients with this disease. This paper promotes biologically sound approaches to the management of tooth wear on the basis of current best evidence of the aetiology and clinical features of this disease. The relative risks and benefits of the varying approaches to managing tooth wear are discussed with reference to long-term follow-up studies. Using reference to ethical standards such as “The Daughter Test”, this paper presents case reports of patients with moderate-to-severe levels of tooth wear managed in line with these biologically sound principles.

  9. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harding, M A

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five.

  10. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

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    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Anthropology, tooth wear, and occlusion ab origine.

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    Young, W G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this essay is to emphasize that anthropology, the study of man in his environments, is a potent tool for scientific discovery and inspiration in dental science. It attempts to capture flashes of creative anthropological insight which have illuminated studies of tooth wear and occlusion in the past. While it documents contributions, understandings, and misunderstandings from Australian and New Zealand dentists, it is not a hagiography. The real saint of this essay is the Australian aborigine. For when men and women are understood in their environments, much is learned from them which challenges preconceptions of our dental science culture. The essay concludes that new, contemporary Australian culture needs to be studied by anthropological approaches if we are to understand how dental erosion is exacerbating tooth wear and damaging the occlusions of contemporary Australians. Much remains to be discovered about contemporary lifestyles, habits, and diets that lead to dental erosion, the principal cause of contemporary tooth wear in this part of the world.

  12. Assessment of the progression of tooth wear on dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoorn-Vis, G.M.G.J.; Wetselaar, P.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Evälahti, M.; Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods are available for the grading of tooth wear, but their ability to assess the progression of wear over time has not been studied frequently. The aim was to assess whether the occlusal/incisal grading scale of the Tooth Wear Evaluation System (TWES) was sensitive enough for the detection

  13. Association between Severity of Tooth Wear and Dentinal Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Ayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Tooth wear (attrition, abrasion, erosion, and abfraction is perceived globally as ever increasing problem. Several outcome of the tooth wear are hypersensitivity, esthetic problems, functional impairment, annoyance to the patient, and fracture of the tooth. Among these, the measurable and more commonly reported outcome is hypersensitivity to stimuli. Although dentin hypersensitivity is a common clinical condition and is generally reported by the patient after experiencing a sharp, short pain caused by one of the several different external stimuli, it is often inadequately understood. None of the scientific literature available till date attempted to establish the relationship between tooth wear and dentin hypersensitivity which could be a key factor in monitoring those patients.  The aim of the study was to estimate the association between severity of teeth wear and sensitivity in the patients with reported dentinal hypersensitivity.Materials & Methods: Fifty patients with dentin hypersensitivity were investigated for tooth wear. Tooth wear measured using exact tooth wear index and level of sensitivity to stimuli was recorded using a numerical rating scale. Results: Enamel wear at cervical region of teeth showed a positive correlation (p=.010, similarly, dentin wear at cervical region of teeth showed positive correlation and significant association (p<.001 with dentinal hypersensitivity.Conclusion: The observation supports a significant association between severities of tooth surface wear and dentinal hypersensitivity.

  14. Erosive and Mechanical Tooth Wear in Viking Age Icelanders.

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    Richter, Svend; Eliasson, Sigfus Thor

    2017-08-29

    (1) Background: The importance of the Icelandic Sagas as a source of information about diet habits in medieval Iceland, and possibly other Nordic countries, is obvious. Extensive tooth wear in archaeological material worldwide has revealed that the main cause of this wear is believed to have been a coarse diet. Near the volcano Hekla, 66 skeletons dated from before 1104 were excavated, and 49 skulls could be evaluated for tooth wear. The purpose of this study was to determine the main causes of tooth wear in light of diet and beverage consumption described in the Sagas; (2) Materials and methods: Two methods were used to evaluate tooth wear and seven for age estimation; (3) Results: Extensive tooth wear was seen in all of the groups, increasing with age. The first molars had the highest score, with no difference between sexes. These had all the similarities seen in wear from a coarse diet, but also presented with characteristics that are seen in erosion in modern Icelanders, through consuming excessive amounts of soft drinks. According to the Sagas, acidic whey was a daily drink and was used for the preservation of food in Iceland, until fairly recently; (4) Conclusions: It is postulated that the consumption of acidic drinks and food, in addition to a coarse and rough diet, played a significant role in the dental wear seen in ancient Icelanders.

  15. Incisal tooth wear and self-reported TMD pain in children and adolescents.

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    Hirsch, Christian; John, Mike T; Lobbezoo, Frank; Setz, Juergen M; Schaller, Hans-Guenter

    2004-01-01

    Incisal tooth wear may be a sign of long-term bruxing behavior. Bruxism is purported to be a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this population-based cross-sectional study was to determine if anterior tooth wear is associated with the self-report of TMD pain in children and adolescents. In a population sample of 1,011 children and adolescents (mean age 13.1 years, range 10 to 18 years; female 52%; response rate 85%), TMD cases were defined as subjects reporting pain in the face, jaw muscles, and temporomandibular joint during the last month according to RDC/TMD. All other subjects were considered controls. Incisal tooth wear was assessed in the clinical examination using a 0 to 2 scale (no wear, enamel wear, dentin wear) for every anterior permanent tooth. The mean wear score for the individuals was categorized into 0, 0.01 to 0.20, 0.21 to 0.40, and 0.41+. A multiple logistic regression analysis, controlling for the effects of age and gender, analyzed the association between the categorized summary wear score and TMD. Specifically, the hypothesis of a trend between higher tooth wear scores and higher risk of TMD was tested. An odds ratio of 1.1 indicated, after adjusting for gender and age, no statistically significantly higher risk of TMD pain with higher tooth wear scores. Incisal tooth wear was not associated with self-reported TMD pain in 10- to 18-year-old subjects.

  16. Control of erosive tooth wear: possibilities and rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Campos Serra

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a type of wear caused by non bacterial acids or chelation. There is evidence of a significant increase in the prevalence of dental wear in the deciduous and permanent teeth as a consequence of the frequent intake of acidic foods and drinks, or due to gastric acid which may reach the oral cavity following reflux or vomiting episodes. The presence of acids is a prerequisite for dental erosion, but the erosive wear is complex and depends on the interaction of biological, chemical and behavioral factors. Even though erosion may be defined or described as an isolated process, in clinical situations other wear phenomena are expected to occur concomitantly, such as abrasive wear (which occurs, e.g, due to tooth brushing or mastication. In order to control dental loss due to erosive wear it is crucial to take into account its multifactorial nature, which predisposes some individuals to the condition.

  17. Severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome. A case–control study

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    Saeves Ronnaug

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a rare complex multsystemic genetic disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia and obesity, mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, facial dysmorphology and oral abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to explore the prevalence of tooth wear and possible risk factors in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome. Methods Forty-nine individuals (6-40 years with PWS and an age- and sex-matched control group were included. Tooth wear was evaluated from dental casts and intraoral photographs and rated by four examiners using the Visual Erosion Dental Examination (VEDE scoring system and the individual tooth wear index IA. In accordance with the VEDE scoring system, tooth wear was also evaluated clinically. Whole saliva was collected. Results Mean VEDE score was 1.70 ± 1.44 in the PWS group and 0.46 ± 0.36 in the control group (p A was 7.50 (2.60-30.70 in the PWS group and 2.60 (0.90-4.70 among controls (p A; r = 0.82, p A; r = 0.43, p = 0.002. Tooth grinding was also associated with tooth wear in the PWS group, as indicated by the mean VEDE 2.67 ± 1.62 in grinders and 1.14 ± 0.97 in non-grinders (p = 0.001 and median IA values 25.70 (5.48-68.55 in grinders and 5.70 (1.60-9.10 in non-grinders (p = 0.003. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed with tooth wear as the dependent variable and PWS (yes/no, age, tooth grinding and saliva secretion as independent variables. PWS (yes/no, age and tooth grinding retained a significant association with tooth wear, VEDE (p A (p  Conclusions Our study provides evidence that tooth wear, in terms of both erosion and attrition, is a severe problem in Prader-Willi syndrome. There is therefore considerable need for prosthodontic rehabilitation in young adults with PWS.

  18. Tooth wear : a systematic review of treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muts, Erik-Jan; van Pelt, Hans; Edelhoff, Daniel; Krejci, Ivo; Cune, Marco

    2014-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Treatment of tooth wear is increasing. Because no evidence-based guidelines are available, the clinician may have difficulties deciding which treatment option to choose to resolve complex situations. PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review was to identify similarities

  19. Assessment of the amount of tooth wear on dental casts and intra-oral photographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Wetselaar-Glas, M.J.M.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial condition, leading to the loss of dental hard tissues. Many grading scales are available to assess the amount of tooth wear, one of which is the tooth wear evaluation system (TWES). A grading scale can be used chairside, on casts and on photographs. The aim was to test

  20. Tooth wear in three ethnic groups in Sabah (northern Borneo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, A; Lo, M S

    1996-12-01

    The prevalence and associated aetiologies of tooth wear were investigated in three ethnic groups in Sabah (Northern Borneo) using the Tooth Wear Index (TWI). The number of surfaces with enamel wear only, dentine exposed for less than a third or dentine exposed for more than a third were categorised into the TW minimal, moderate or severe respectively. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit medical/dental history, oral hygiene practices, satisfaction with body image, diet and other personal habits/details. The sample comprised of a self selected sample of 148 dental hospital attenders; 47 (32 per cent) each of ethnic Chinese and Malay and 54 (36 per cent) of ethnic Kadazan, matched for age and with a similar number of scoreable teeth per subject. Dentine exposure within the total sample was a common finding (95 per cent TW with moderate, 41 per cent TW severe). The Kadazan group had significantly (P Chinese or Malay. Tobacco chewing was positively associated (rho = +0.4, P Chinese subjects. The aetiological factors associated with this tooth wear are different to those encountered in Western cultures.

  1. Tooth wear and erosion: methodological issues in epidemiological and public health research and the future research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganss, C; Young, A; Lussi, A

    2011-09-01

    This paper addresses methodological issues in the field of tooth wear and erosion research including the epidemiological indices, and identifies future work that is needed to improve knowledge about tooth wear and erosion. The paper is result of the work done at the meetings of the Special Interest Group "Tooth Surface Loss and Erosion" at the 2008, 2009 and 2010 conferences of the European Association for Dental Public Health, and the Workshop "Current Erosion indices- flawed or valid" which took place in Basel in 2007. Although there is consensus about the definition and the diagnostic criteria of various forms of tooth wear, gaps in research strategies have been identified. A basic problem is that fundamental concepts of wear and erosion as an oral health problem, have not yet been sufficiently defined. To a certain extent, tooth wear is a physiological condition, and there is no consensus as to whether it can be regarded as a disease. Furthermore, the multitude of indices and flaws in existing indices, make published data difficult to interpret. Topics for the research agenda are: the initiation of a consensus process towards an internationally accepted index, and the initiation of data collection on the prevalence of various forms of wear on a population-based level. There should be an emphasis on promoting communication between basic and clinical sciences, and the area of Public Health Dentistry. Furthermore, the question of whether tooth wear is a public health problem remains open for debate.

  2. Effect of tooth profile modification on wear in internal gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunalioglu, M. S.; Tuc, B.

    2018-05-01

    Internal gears are often used in the automotive industry when two gears are required to rotate in the same direction. Tooth shapes, slippage speeds at the beginning and end of meshing are different according to the external gears. Manufacturing of internal gears is more difficult than external gears. Thus, it is necessary to determine the working conditions and wear behavior of internal gears carefully. The profile modification method in terms of strength and surface tension of the gear mechanism are performed in order to increase the load-carrying capability. In this study, profile modification method was performed in the internal gears to reduce the wear on the teeth. For this purpose, the wear of the internal gears was theoretically investigated by adapting the Archard wear equation to the internal gears. Closed circuit power circulation system was designed and manufactured to experimentally investigate the wear in internal gears. With this system, wear tests of gears made of St 50 material without profile modification and different profile modifications were made and the results were compared. Experimental study was performed in the same loading and cycle time conditions to validate the theoretical results and it was seen that the results are compatible. According to the experimental results, it is seen that in the internal gears, when profile modification done the wear is decreased in the teeth tip region.

  3. The correction of occlusal vertical dimension on tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostiny Rostiny

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss of occlusal vertical dimension which is caused by tooth wear is necessarily treated to regain vertical dimension. Correctional therapy should be done as early possible. In this case, simple and relatively low cost therapy was performed. In unserve loss of occlusal vertical dimension, partial removable denture could be used and the improvement of lengthening anterior teeth using composite resin to improve to regain vertical dimensional occlusion.

  4. Influence of Intrinsic Factors on Erosive Tooth Wear in a Large-Scale Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraudanjoki, Viivi; Laitala, Marja-Liisa; Tjäderhane, Leo; Pesonen, Paula; Lussi, Adrian; Ronkainen, Jukka; Anttonen, Vuokko

    2016-01-01

    To assess the influence of self-reported intrinsic factors [gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), long-term alcoholism, long-term heavy use of alcohol and multiple pregnancies] on erosive tooth wear in a middle-aged cohort sample. Of the total Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC 1966), a convenience sample (n = 3,181) was invited for an oral health examination in 2012-2013, of which 1,962 participated, comprising the final study group. Erosive tooth wear was assessed by sextants using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination Index (BEWE, 0-18). Clinical data were supplemented by questionnaires conducted in 1997/1998 and 2012/2013. The participants were divided into severe (BEWE sum ≥9) and no-to-moderate (BEWE sum 0-8) erosive wear groups, and the logistic regression model was applied. Selected intrinsic factors were quite rare in this cohort sample and explained only 5.9% of the difference in the prevalence and severity of erosive wear. Daily symptoms of GERD [odds ratio (OR) 3.8, confidence interval (CI) 1.2-12.0] and hyposalivation (OR 3.8, CI 1.2-11.8) were the strongest risk indicators for severe erosive wear. Additionally, variables associated with an elevated risk for severe erosive wear were diagnosed alcoholism at any point (OR 2.5, CI 0.7-9.7) and self-reported heavy use of alcohol in both questionnaires (OR 2.0, CI 0.6-6.2). Even low-dose long-term consumption of alcohol was associated with erosive wear. In this cohort sample, intrinsic factors such as GERD or alcoholism alone are relatively uncommon causes of erosive tooth wear. The role of long-term use of alcohol in the erosion process may be bigger than presumed. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Tooth wear and feeding ecology in mountain gorillas from Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.

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    Galbany, Jordi; Imanizabayo, Olive; Romero, Alejandro; Vecellio, Veronica; Glowacka, Halszka; Cranfield, Michael R; Bromage, Timothy G; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Stoinski, Tara S; McFarlin, Shannon C

    2016-03-01

    Ecological factors have a dramatic effect on tooth wear in primates, although it remains unclear how individual age contributes to functional crown morphology. The aim of this study is to determine how age and individual diet are related to tooth wear in wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) from Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. We calculated the percent of dentine exposure (PDE) for all permanent molars (M1-M3) of known-age mountain gorillas (N = 23), to test whether PDE varied with age using regression analysis. For each molar position, we also performed stepwise multiple linear regression to test the effects of age and percentage of time spent feeding on different food categories on PDE, for individuals subject to long-term observational studies by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International's Karisoke Research Center. PDE increased significantly with age for both sexes in all molars. Moreover, a significant effect of gritty plant root consumption on PDE was found among individuals. Our results support prior reports indicating reduced tooth wear in mountain gorillas compared to western gorillas, and compared to other known-aged samples of primate taxa from forest and savanna habitats. Our findings corroborate that mountain gorillas present very low molar wear, and support the hypothesis that age and the consumption of particular food types, namely roots, are significant determinants of tooth wear variation in mountain gorillas. Future research should characterize the mineral composition of the soil in the Virunga habitat, to test the hypothesis that the physical and abrasive properties of gritty foods such as roots influence intra- and interspecific patterns of tooth wear. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Comparative analyses of tooth wear in free-ranging and captive wild equids.

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    Taylor, L A; Müller, D W H; Schwitzer, C; Kaiser, T M; Castell, J C; Clauss, M; Schulz-Kornas, E

    2016-03-01

    Captive breeding has played a crucial role in the conservation of threatened equid species. Grazing ruminants and rhinoceros in captivity have less abrasion-dominated tooth wear than their free-ranging conspecifics, with potential negative consequences for their health. However, a similar study on wild equids in captivity is missing. The aim was to establish if different tooth wear patterns are exhibited by free-ranging and captive equids. Cross-sectional study of museum specimens comparing free-ranging and captive equids. Dental casts of maxillary cheek teeth of 228 museum specimens (122 from free-ranging and 106 from captive individuals) of 7 wild equid species were analysed using the extended mesowear method. Although teeth showing specific abnormalities were not scored, the presence of focal overgrowths (hooks) of the rostral premolars (106, 206) was recorded. Captive Equus ferus przewalskii, E. grevyi, E. hemionus, E. quagga boehmi and E. zebra hartmannae have less abrasion-dominated tooth wear on their premolars than their free-ranging conspecifics (P<0.001). Fewer differences were exhibited between populations in the molars. No differences were exhibited in the distal cusp of the molars (110, 210) between populations, except in a small sample of E. kiang. Captive equids exhibited more homogeneous wear along the tooth row whereas free-ranging equids exhibited a tooth wear gradient, with more abrasion on premolars than molars. There were more rostral hooks on the premolars (106, 206) in the captive than the free-ranging population (P = 0.02). Captive equids did experience less abrasion-dominated tooth wear than their free-ranging conspecifics, but the differences in tooth wear were less pronounced than those between captive and free-ranging wild ruminant and rhinoceros species. This indicates that feeding regimes for captive equids deviate less from natural diets than those for captive ruminants and rhinoceros but that factors leading to hook

  7. [Tooth wear in Hindu betel nut chewers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerreth, Karolina

    2006-01-01

    Literature data describe the impact of certain factors on oral health. Very well known is habitual chewing of different plant products, including tobacco, which depending on the geographical area and the substances used, have various names. It has been estimated that approximately 200 million residents of the West Pacific Rim and South-East Asia indulge in betel chewing. Betel is composed of a leaf of the betel pepper, lime, tobacco and the nut of the areca palm. This study aimed to assess the degree of abrasive changes in residents of the Korunalaya Leprosy Care Center. The examinations were carried out on 85 patients (45 females and 40 males), aged 35-95 years, at the local dental surgery. Patients had their teeth assessed and they were further interviewed as to the duration of their habit with regard to their sex and age (35-44; 45-64 and > or = 65 years). The abrasive changes were evaluated using Gerasimov's 7-degree scale. Interview data indicate that 71.76% of the patients were habitual betel chewers. Among female patients, third-degree abrasion was the most frequent change while among males--fifth degree (53.3% and 45.0%, respectively). The abrasive changes, increasing with age, can be attributed to the duration of betel chewing. It is worth noticing that a vegetarian diet can be a contributing factor to abrasion as most of the food consumed by Hindus are plants.

  8. Unravelling the Functional Biomechanics of Dental Features and Tooth Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Kullmer, Ottmar; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Most of the morphological features recognized in hominin teeth, particularly the topography of the occlusal surface, are generally interpreted as an evolutionary functional adaptation for mechanical food processing. In this respect, we can also expect that the general architecture of a tooth reflects a response to withstand the high stresses produced during masticatory loadings. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA), with an advanced loading concept derived from individual occlusal wear information to evaluate whether some dental traits usually found in hominin and extant great ape molars, such as the trigonid crest, the entoconid-hypoconulid crest and the protostylid have important biomechanical implications. For this purpose, FEA was applied to 3D digital models of three Gorilla gorilla lower second molars (M2) differing in wear stages. Our results show that in unworn and slightly worn M2s tensile stresses concentrate in the grooves of the occlusal surface. In such condition, the trigonid and the entoconid-hypoconulid crests act to reinforce the crown locally against stresses produced along the mesiodistal groove. Similarly, the protostylid is shaped like a buttress to suffer the high tensile stresses concentrated in the deep buccal groove. These dental traits are less functional in the worn M2, because tensile stresses decrease physiologically in the crown with progressing wear due to the enlargement of antagonistic contact areas and changes in loading direction from oblique to nearly parallel direction to the dental axis. This suggests that the wear process might have a crucial influence in the evolution and structural adaptation of molars enabling to endure bite stresses and reduce tooth failure throughout the lifetime of an individual. PMID:23894570

  9. Management of Tooth Wear: A Holistic, Dental, Medical, and Mental Healthcare Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khaled E

    2016-08-01

    Tooth wear is a condition that affects a substantial cohort of dental patients. It has a measurable impact on patients' satisfaction, and overall quality of life. Recently, with growing evidence, our understanding of the aetiology, progression, and management of tooth wear has evolved. The paper argues that pathological tooth wear should not be solely considered as a dental condition, but rather a dental manifestation of other mental and medical disorders. As such, successful management of tooth wear, and its underlying aetiology, requires a holistic, multidisciplinary management approach, involving dental, medical, and mental healthcare providers.

  10. The prevalence of deciduous tooth wear in six-year-old children and its relationship with potential explanatory factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Daniela; Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Machado, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and aetiological factors involved with wear of deciduous teeth. A convenience sample of 356 children (aged 6 years old) was selected at Bauru, SP (Brazil). Clinical examinations were carried out by 1 examiner (Kappa = 0.87), using the Tooth Wear Index (G0-G4). A questionnaire addressing the aetiological factors of tooth wear was applied to parents. Wear on the incisors was diagnosed in 34.8% of children (91.1% G1 and 6.4% G2); 78.1% presented wear in canines (64.7% G1 and 33.1% G2); and 40.7% in molars (89.6% G1 and 9.0% G2). No significant correlation was observed between gastro-oesophageal reflux, toothbrushing habits, or consumption of citrus fruits/soft drinks and the presence of tooth wear for all groups of teeth. The wear showed correlation with the presence of bruxism for canines and with the habit of holding drinks in the mouth before swallowing for incisors (Chi-square test, p < 0.05). The findings indicate that the wear of incisors could be considered physiological for this age. Further longitudinal studies should be conducted in order to measure the wear in canines and molars in the period close to their replacement by permanent teeth.

  11. Tooth Wear Is Frequent in Adult Patients with Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Amato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Celiac disease (CD patients can be affected by mouth and tooth disorders, which are influenced by their gluten-free diet. The aim of our research was to evaluate the pathological conditions of the stomatognathic system observed in celiac patients on a gluten-free diet. (2 Methods: we consecutively recruited celiac patients on a gluten-free diet at our celiac center, as well as healthy volunteers. Two dentists examined all patients/controls and checked them for any mouth disorder. (3 Results: Forty-nine patients affected by celiac disease (age at test 31.8 ± 11.58, time on GFD 8.73 ± 7.7 and 51 healthy volunteers (age at test 30.5 ± 8.7 were included. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis was reported in 26 patients (53.0% and in 13 (25.5% controls (p = 0.005. Dental enamel disorders were reported in 7 patients (14.3% and in 0 controls (p = 0.002, with none having geographic tongue. We found non-specific tooth wear, characterized by loss of the mineralized tissue of the teeth, in 9 patients (18.3% and in 3 (5.9% controls (p = 0.05. (4 Conclusion: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and enamel hypoplasia are “risk indicators” that may suggest that an individual has CD. We detected a high prevalence of non-specific tooth wear that can be caused by several factors such as malocclusion, sleep bruxism, parafunctional activity, and age.

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practice of tooth wear among adults in Bertam, Penang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nurfarhana Farah; Roslan, Husniyati; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2016-12-01

    Tooth wear is an oral lesion with multifactorial causes. The prevalence is increasing with an increasing age. Knowledge of tooth wear is part of oral health and essential requirements are needed to modify health related behaviors. This study was aimed to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of tooth wear and to compare with the socio-demographic factors. A cross-sectional study using a modified version of self-administered questionnaire was distributed among 390 adults (aged more than 18 years old) from three government institutions in Bertam, Penang. A total of 349 (89.5%) subjects had participated in this study with 55.3% were males and majority of the subjects were Malays. About 58.2% had low level of knowledge with mean score at 20.8. Meanwhile, 93.4% subjects had a positive attitude and 84.2% had poor level of practice on oral hygiene. The low mean score of knowledge among subjects was not necessary an indicator that attitude and practice were affected. However, identification of etiological factors emphasizes on educational approaches, and empowerment of patients and community towards awareness are the most important factors for preventive strategies.

  13. Nutritional status, tooth wear and quality of life in Brazilian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Francisco Juliherme Pires de; Sales-Peres, André de Carvalho; Moura-Grec, Patricia Garcia de; Mapengo, Marta Artemisa Abel; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the correlation among nutritional status, tooth wear and quality of life in Brazilian schoolchildren. The study followed a cross-sectional design. Nutritional status was measured via anthropometry using BMI and tooth wear was measured using the Dental Wear Index; both these assessments were carried out by a trained recorder according to standard criteria. A modified version of the Child Oral Impacts on Daily Performances was used to assess quality of life. City of Bauru, in Brazil. A cluster sample of 396 schoolchildren (194 boys and 202 girls) aged 7-10 years. The anthropometric assessment showed similar situations for both sexes regarding underweight (31·40 % in boys and 30·20 % in girls) and overweight/obesity (33·96 % in boys and 33·17 % in girls). The underweight children showed a greater severity of tooth wear in the primary teeth (OR=0·72; CI 0·36, 1·42), although in the permanent dentition the obese children had a greater severity of tooth wear (OR=1·42; 95 % CI 0·31, 6·55). The tooth wear was correlated with age for both dentitions. Tooth wear in the primary and permanent dentition may be related to nutritional status. Tooth wear and obesity did not have a significant impact on the schoolchildren's perception of quality of life.

  14. Accuracy and precision of estimating age of gray wolves by tooth wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.; Nowak, R.M.; Mech, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy and precision of tooth wear for aging gray wolves (Canis lupus) from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario based on 47 known-age or known-minimum-age skulls. Estimates of age using tooth wear and a commercial cementum annuli-aging service were useful for wolves up to 14 years old. The precision of estimates from cementum annuli was greater than estimates from tooth wear, but tooth wear estimates are more applicable in the field. We tended to overestimate age by 1-2 years and occasionally by 3 or 4 years. The commercial service aged young wolves with cementum annuli to within ?? 1 year of actual age, but under estimated ages of wolves ???9 years old by 1-3 years. No differences were detected in tooth wear patterns for wild wolves from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario, nor between captive and wild wolves. Tooth wear was not appropriate for aging wolves with an underbite that prevented normal wear or severely broken and missing teeth.

  15. Development of Plastic Gear for Power Transmission : Abnormal Wear on the Tooth Root and Tooth Fracture near Pitch Point

    OpenAIRE

    Terashima, Kenichi; Tsukamoto, Naohisa; Nishida, Noriteru; Shi, Jiasun

    1986-01-01

    Plastic gears have many excellent characteristics which are locking in metallic gears, such as corrosion resistance, self-lubrication, quiet running, and so forth. The meshing behavior of plastic gears is very different from that of metallic gears. Therefore, the life estimation is very difficult for plastic gears. In this paper, generating and growing mechanisms of abnormal wear which appears fatally near the root of plastic tooth are analyzed, and then it is clarified that tooth fractures w...

  16. Tooth wear risk assessment and care-planning in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, S; Khan, M; Patel, A; Patel, N J; Shah, N; Bartlett, D; Movahedi, S

    2018-03-09

    Objective To assess charting, risk assessment and treatment-planning of tooth wear between recently qualified and experienced dentists in general dental practice.Design Service evaluation.Setting Multi-setting evaluation of three mixed NHS/Private general dental practices in North-East London.Methods The clinical notes of new patient examinations on dentate adults presenting from the 1 October 2016 to 31 December 2016 were audited collecting data on tooth wear charting, risk assessment and treatment planning. Data were analysed using descriptives, chi square and logistic regressions in SPSS. Significance was inferred at p charted for 48% of those attending foundation dentists and 5% of those attending experienced dentists. Diet was assessed in 50.6% of patients examined by foundation dentists and 1.0% of patients examined by experienced dentists. Foundation dentists were more likely to chart tooth wear, risk assess and preventively manage tooth wear compared to experienced dentists (p <0.001).Conclusion This service evaluation highlights that improvements are required in recording, risk assessing and preventive treatment planning of erosive tooth wear. Experienced dentists were less likely to risk assess tooth wear and less likely to provide preventive treatment. Experienced GDPs may benefit from re-training in this area.

  17. Minimum intervention dentistry and the management of tooth wear in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, I A

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of tooth wear, or non-carious tooth surface loss (NCTSL), is increasing and oral rehabilitation of patients with non-carious tooth loss requires strategies that address all the factors relevant to the aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition. The multifactorial nature of tooth wear and the variability in its clinical presentation provides treatment challenges for the clinician and successful management must be more than just restoration. Management must include an appropriate mix of preventive and restorative strategies and an understanding that long-term restorative success is affected by the patient's oral environment, and how diet, lifestyle and medical status can modify this environment. Ultimately, the success of any restorative intervention is very dependent on the stability of the oral environment and the condition of the remaining tooth structure. Minimum intervention dentistry (MID) philosophies are ideally suited to tooth wear cases and an overall MID strategy involving diagnosis, recognition and control of predisposing factors, stabilization of the oral environment, remineralization and restoration of the tooth structure, and ongoing maintenance can be implemented. When restorative treatment is required, contemporary materials and techniques are available that can provide cost-effective and conservative restorative alternatives for patients unable to undergo the complex indirect restorative techniques that are both costly and time consuming to implement. These minimally invasive approaches are not only an economically viable solution, but can provide aesthetic and functional rehabilitation and maintain tooth structure as a precursor to more complex restorative options when required. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeves, Ronnaug; Espelid, Ivar; Storhaug, Kari; Sandvik, Leiv; Nordgarden, Hilde

    2012-05-28

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex multsystemic genetic disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia and obesity, mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, facial dysmorphology and oral abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to explore the prevalence of tooth wear and possible risk factors in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome. Forty-nine individuals (6-40 years) with PWS and an age- and sex-matched control group were included. Tooth wear was evaluated from dental casts and intraoral photographs and rated by four examiners using the Visual Erosion Dental Examination (VEDE) scoring system and the individual tooth wear index IA. In accordance with the VEDE scoring system, tooth wear was also evaluated clinically. Whole saliva was collected. Mean VEDE score was 1.70 ± 1.44 in the PWS group and 0.46 ± 0.36 in the control group (p Prader-Willi syndrome. There is therefore considerable need for prosthodontic rehabilitation in young adults with PWS.

  19. Effect of dental wear, stabilization appliance and anterior tooth reconstruction on mandibular movements during speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Priscila de Oliveira; Faot, Fernanda; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2008-01-01

    This study described changes in mandibular movements during pronunciation of /m/ and /s/ sounds in Portuguese, in patients presenting dental wear before and after appliance insertion and tooth reconstruction. Subjects were divided into a control group of dentate patients and an experimental group of patients with incisal tooth wear due to bruxism. A magnetic jaw tracking device measured the jaw opening, and translations to left and right sides of the mandible during pronunciation of phonemes. Evaluations were carried out 1 week and immediately before appliance insertion; 24 h, 7, 30 and 60 days after appliance insertion; and 1 week and 1 month after tooth reconstruction. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney and Friedman tests (pspeech of /m/ and /s/ sounds were not changed after appliance insertion and reconstruction of teeth.

  20. Early detection of tooth wear by en-face optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Negrutiu, Meda; Sinescu, Cosmin; Demjan, Eniko; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-02-01

    Excessive dental wear (pathological attrition and/or abfractions) is a frequent complication in bruxing patients. The parafunction causes heavy occlusal loads. The aim of this study is the early detection and monitoring of occlusal overload in bruxing patients. En-face optical coherence tomography was used for investigating and imaging of several extracted tooth, with a normal morphology, derived from patients with active bruxism and from subjects without parafunction. We found a characteristic pattern of enamel cracks in patients with first degree bruxism and with a normal tooth morphology. We conclude that the en-face optical coherence tomography is a promising non-invasive alternative technique for the early detection of occlusal overload, before it becomes clinically evident as tooth wear.

  1. Unravelling the Functional Biomechanics of Dental Features and Tooth Wear

    OpenAIRE

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Kullmer, Ottmar; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Most of the morphological features recognized in hominin teeth, particularly the topography of the occlusal surface, are generally interpreted as an evolutionary functional adaptation for mechanical food processing. In this respect, we can also expect that the general architecture of a tooth reflects a response to withstand the high stresses produced during masticatory loadings. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA), with an advanced loading concept derived from i...

  2. Age determination in roe deer - a new approach to tooth wear evaluated on known age individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Toke Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A novel, simple, and objective method is presented for ageing roe deer Capreolus capreolus (Linnaeus, 1758) evaluated on 471 lower jaws from roe deer of known age (351 with permanent premolars). It is based on tooth eruption patterns and presence/absence of wear characters in jaws from roe deer...... integrated in a scoring system. Permanent cheek teeth emerge in May-July in the year after birth, which enables precise age determination of individuals with deciduous premolars. For individuals with permanent cheek teeth, the method provides the correct age for all individuals younger than 13 months...... originate from two separated Danish roe deer populations exposed to contrasting habitats, but no difference in wear rate is found between populations. Thus, previous concern about the validity of age determination methods based on tooth wear may have been overstated. The findings demonstrate that objective...

  3. Age-related tooth wear differs between forest and savanna primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Galbany

    Full Text Available Tooth wear in primates is caused by aging and ecological factors. However, comparative data that would allow us to delineate the contribution of each of these factors are lacking. Here, we contrast age-dependent molar tooth wear by scoring percent of dentine exposure (PDE in two wild African primate populations from Gabonese forest and Kenyan savanna habitats. We found that forest-dwelling mandrills exhibited significantly higher PDE with age than savanna yellow baboons. Mandrills mainly feed on large tough food items, such as hard-shell fruits, and inhabit an ecosystem with a high presence of mineral quartz. By contrast, baboons consume large amounts of exogenous grit that adheres to underground storage organs but the proportion of quartz in the soils where baboons live is low. Our results support the hypothesis that not only age but also physical food properties and soil composition, particularly quartz richness, are factors that significantly impact tooth wear. We further propose that the accelerated dental wear in mandrills resulting in flatter molars with old age may represent an adaptation to process hard food items present in their environment.

  4. Assessment of Tooth Wear Among Glass Factory Workers: WHO 2013 Oral Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Bhat, Nagesh; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Bapat, Salil; Gupta, Vivek Vardhan

    2015-08-01

    Glass factory workers are often exposed to the hazardous environment that leads to deleterious oral health and subsequently, general health. We planned to determine the effects of the particulates present in the milieu on the tooth wear among workers. To assess tooth wear among glass factory workers in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 936 glass workers in Jaipur, Rajasthan, India from January-June 2014. A survey proforma was designed for tooth wear evaluation with the help of WHO Oral Health Assessment form 2013 (for adults). Information regarding oral health practices, adverse habits and dietary habits, demographic details was gathered and clinical parameters were recorded. The Chi-square test, t-test, One-way Analysis of Variance and a Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. The most prevalent form of erosion was enamel erosion (589, 62.93%) with few subjects of deeper dentinal erosion and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Dental erosion was found to be higher among males compared to females. Years of experience and educational status were identified as best predictors for dental erosion. It was concluded that there was considerable evidence of dental erosion found among the factory workers. Due to ignorance on social, cultural and health aspects, professional approach with regular dental care services for detection of early symptoms and planning of preventive strategies is warranted.

  5. Methods for quantitative measurement of tooth wear using the area and volume of virtual model cusps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Park, Young-Seok; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Sulhee; Lee, Seung-Pyo

    2018-04-01

    Clinicians must examine tooth wear to make a proper diagnosis. However, qualitative methods of measuring tooth wear have many disadvantages. Therefore, this study aimed to develop and evaluate quantitative parameters using the cusp area and volume of virtual dental models. The subjects of this study were the same virtual models that were used in our former study. The same age group classification and new tooth wear index (NTWI) scoring system were also reused. A virtual occlusal plane was generated with the highest cusp points and lowered vertically from 0.2 to 0.8 mm to create offset planes. The area and volume of each cusp was then measured and added together. In addition to the former analysis, the differential features of each cusp were analyzed. The scores of the new parameters differentiated the age and NTWI groups better than those analyzed in the former study. The Spearman ρ coefficients between the total area and the area of each cusp also showed higher scores at the levels of 0.6 mm (0.6A) and 0.8A. The mesiolingual cusp (MLC) showed a statistically significant difference ( P <0.01) from the other cusps in the paired t -test. Additionally, the MLC exhibited the highest percentage of change at 0.6A in some age and NTWI groups. Regarding the age groups, the MLC showed the highest score in groups 1 and 2. For the NTWI groups, the MLC was not significantly different in groups 3 and 4. These results support the proposal that the lingual cusp exhibits rapid wear because it serves as a functional cusp. Although this study has limitations due to its cross-sectional nature, it suggests better quantitative parameters and analytical tools for the characteristics of cusp wear.

  6. Dental caries, tooth wear and diet in an adult medieval (12th-14th century) population from mediterranean France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esclassan, R; Grimoud, A M; Ruas, M P; Donat, R; Sevin, A; Astie, F; Lucas, S; Crubezy, E

    2009-03-01

    The aims of the present work were to determine the frequency and distribution of caries and tooth wear on paired maxillae of a mediaeval sample from southwest France in which the sex of the remains had been established, and to make a relation with the diet of this population. The sample analysed consisted of the dental remains of 58 adult individuals (29 men and 29 women) excavated from the mediaeval cemetery of the archaeological site of Vilarnau d'Amont (southwest France). A total of 1395 teeth were examined. The frequency of ante-mortem tooth loss for the sample was 8.7% and the frequency of caries was 17.5%. The frequencies of carious lesions in adult men and women's dentition were 21.9% and 14.0%. The most frequent were occlusal (49.7% and 34.3%) and approximal caries (26.5% and 37.4%). Concerning tooth wear, all 58 individuals were affected by attrition (100%) and more than 90% of the teeth were concerned. Most of them showed the presence of dentin clusters. There was no significant difference between men and women for caries and tooth wear. These findings are similar to those of other studies on European populations of the same socio-economic status and confirm the predominance of tooth wear over carious lesions during this period. Both caries and tooth wear may be related to the regional diet of this rural population.

  7. A Proposed Methodology to Assess the Accuracy of 3D Scanners and Casts and Monitor Tooth Wear Progression in Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khaled E; Whitters, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Pierce, S Gareth; MacLeod, Charles N; Murray, Colin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detail and assess the capability of a novel methodology to 3D-quantify tooth wear progression in a patient over a period of 12 months. A calibrated stainless steel model was used to identify the accuracy of the scanning system by assessing the accuracy and precision of the contact scanner and the dimensional accuracy and stability of casts fabricated from three different types of impression materials. Thereafter, the overall accuracy of the 3D scanning system (scanner and casts) was ascertained. Clinically, polyether impressions were made of the patient's dentition at the initial examination and at the 12-month review, then poured in type IV dental stone to assess the tooth wear. The anterior teeth on the resultant casts were scanned, and images were analyzed using 3D matching software to detect dimensional variations between the patient's impressions. The accuracy of the 3D scanning system was established to be 33 μm. 3D clinical analysis demonstrated localized wear on the incisal and palatal surfaces of the patient's maxillary central incisors. The identified wear extended to a depth of 500 μm with a distribution of 4% to 7% of affected tooth surfaces. The newly developed 3D scanning methodology was found to be capable of assessing and accounting for the various factors affecting tooth wear scanning. Initial clinical evaluation of the methodology demonstrates successful monitoring of tooth wear progression. However, further clinical assessment is needed.

  8. Use of dentifrices to prevent erosive tooth wear: harmful or helpful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the loss of dental hard tissues caused by non-bacterial acids. Due to acid contact, the tooth surface becomes softened and more prone to abrasion from toothbrushing. Dentifrices containing different active agents may be helpful in allowing rehardening or in increasing surface resistance to further acidic or mechanical impacts. However, dentifrices are applied together with brushing and, depending on how and when toothbrushing is performed, as well as the type of dentifrice and toothbrush used, may increase wear. This review focuses on the potential harmful and helpful effects associated with the use of dentifrices with regard to erosive wear. While active ingredients like fluorides or agents with special anti-erosive properties were shown to offer some degree of protection against erosion and combined erosion/abrasion, the abrasive effects of dentifrices may increase the surface loss of eroded teeth. However, most evidence to date comes from in vitro and in situ studies, so clinical trials are necessary for a better understanding of the complex interaction of active ingredients and abrasives and their effects on erosive tooth wear.

  9. Restorative Management of Severe Localized Tooth Wear Using a Supraoccluding Appliance: A 5-Year Follow-Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Wong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report illustrates a novel conservative restorative management of a patient with bulimia nervosa who presented with severe localized upper palatal tooth wear and an anterior reverse overjet. This was achieved by using a localized bite raising or supraoccluding appliance, cemented on the lingual side of the lower anterior teeth to create interocclusal space, obviating the need for tooth reduction of the eroded upper palatal and incisal tooth surfaces. Surgical crown lengthening was performed to create a better aesthetic gingival architecture. All-ceramic restorations were provided on the upper anterior teeth to restore the tooth surface loss and provide a positive overbite and overjet. There was no complication or other observable biological change detected at the 5-year follow-up. The use of an appliance applying the supraoccluding technique, or Dahl concept, is a safe, conservative, and useful treatment option in the management of localized tooth wear.

  10. Clinical monitoring of tooth wear progression in patients over a period of one year using CAD/CAM

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Khaled E.; Whitters, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Pierce, S. Gareth; MacLeod, Charles N.; Murray, Colin A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clinically monitor the progression of tooth wear over a period of 1 year in a cohort of referred tooth wear patients through the use of a computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) scanner and a standardized scanning/assessment methodology. Materials and Methods: Polyether impressions were made of 11 participants (130 teeth) at baseline and at 1 year. Impressions were poured in type IV dental stone and the anterior teeth were 3D scanne...

  11. Forensic Age Estimation of Chinese Malaysian Adults by Evaluating Occlusal Tooth Wear Using Modified Kim’s Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Kit Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Evaluation of dental attrition is an easy and relatively accurate approach to estimating the age of an adult either ante- or postmortem for some specific population. Dental attrition represents a progressive physiological age change that can be measured using variety of indices to aid as an adjunct in forensic age estimation. Some of the previously proposed indices have their own practical limitations. This paper focuses on using modified Kim’s criteria to score dental attrition to estimate the age of Chinese Malaysian adults and validate it. Methodology. Tooth wear was evaluated on 190 dental models of Chinese Malaysian adults (age range: 20–60 years using modified Kim’s index to custom-derive a population specific linear equation. The same equation was validated further on new 60 dental casts. Results and Conclusion. Regression analysis revealed good correlation between age and teeth wear and lower standard error of estimate. Test of regression on a test sample (n=30 pairs, age range: 20–60 years showed insignificant difference between predicted versus the actual age with statistically acceptable mean absolute difference. These data suggest that modified Kim’s index can be used effectively in forensic age estimation.

  12. The functional and palaeoecological implications of tooth morphology and wear for the megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian of Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan C Mallon

    Full Text Available Megaherbivorous dinosaurs were exceptionally diverse on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia, and a growing body of evidence suggests that this diversity was facilitated by dietary niche partitioning. We test this hypothesis using the fossil megaherbivore assemblage from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian of Alberta as a model. Comparative tooth morphology and wear, including the first use of quantitative dental microwear analysis in the context of Cretaceous palaeosynecology, are used to infer the mechanical properties of the foods these dinosaurs consumed. The phylliform teeth of ankylosaurs were poorly adapted for habitually processing high-fibre plant matter. Nevertheless, ankylosaur diets were likely more varied than traditionally assumed: the relatively large, bladed teeth of nodosaurids would have been better adapted to processing a tougher, more fibrous diet than the smaller, cusp-like teeth of ankylosaurids. Ankylosaur microwear is characterized by a preponderance of pits and scratches, akin to modern mixed feeders, but offers no support for interspecific dietary differences. The shearing tooth batteries of ceratopsids are much better adapted to high-fibre herbivory, attested by their scratch-dominated microwear signature. There is tentative microwear evidence to suggest differences in the feeding habits of centrosaurines and chasmosaurines, but statistical support is not significant. The tooth batteries of hadrosaurids were capable of both shearing and crushing functions, suggestive of a broad dietary range. Their microwear signal overlaps broadly with that of ankylosaurs, and suggests possible dietary differences between hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines. Tooth wear evidence further indicates that all forms considered here exhibited some degree of masticatory propaliny. Our findings reveal that tooth morphology and wear exhibit different, but complimentary, dietary signals that combine to support the hypothesis

  13. The functional and palaeoecological implications of tooth morphology and wear for the megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Jordan C; Anderson, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaurs were exceptionally diverse on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia, and a growing body of evidence suggests that this diversity was facilitated by dietary niche partitioning. We test this hypothesis using the fossil megaherbivore assemblage from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta as a model. Comparative tooth morphology and wear, including the first use of quantitative dental microwear analysis in the context of Cretaceous palaeosynecology, are used to infer the mechanical properties of the foods these dinosaurs consumed. The phylliform teeth of ankylosaurs were poorly adapted for habitually processing high-fibre plant matter. Nevertheless, ankylosaur diets were likely more varied than traditionally assumed: the relatively large, bladed teeth of nodosaurids would have been better adapted to processing a tougher, more fibrous diet than the smaller, cusp-like teeth of ankylosaurids. Ankylosaur microwear is characterized by a preponderance of pits and scratches, akin to modern mixed feeders, but offers no support for interspecific dietary differences. The shearing tooth batteries of ceratopsids are much better adapted to high-fibre herbivory, attested by their scratch-dominated microwear signature. There is tentative microwear evidence to suggest differences in the feeding habits of centrosaurines and chasmosaurines, but statistical support is not significant. The tooth batteries of hadrosaurids were capable of both shearing and crushing functions, suggestive of a broad dietary range. Their microwear signal overlaps broadly with that of ankylosaurs, and suggests possible dietary differences between hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines. Tooth wear evidence further indicates that all forms considered here exhibited some degree of masticatory propaliny. Our findings reveal that tooth morphology and wear exhibit different, but complimentary, dietary signals that combine to support the hypothesis of dietary niche

  14. Gastro-oesophageal reflux - an important causative factor of severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeves, Ronnaug; Strøm, Finn; Sandvik, Leiv; Nordgarden, Hilde

    2018-04-23

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is the most common genetic human obesity syndrome and is characterized by hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia, obesity and mild mental retardation. Oral abnormalities, such as decreased salivary flow rates and extreme tooth wear, have also been described. Studies have shown a significant increase in reflux symptoms in individuals with obstuctive sleep apnoea syndrome and increased BMI, both of which are typical findings in PWS. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) has been identified in some individuals with PWS and is a significant intrinsic factor in dental tooth wear. The aim of this study was therefore to estimate the prevalence of GORD in adults and children and to evaluate a possible correlation between GORD and tooth wear in adults with PWS. They were all registered at the TAKO-centre. Twenty-nine individuals, 17 adults with a mean age of 32.6 years (range 18-48) and 12 children with a mean age of 8.8 years (range 3-17), agreed to undergo 24-hour oesophageal pH monitoring, and 90% of those enrolled managed to complete the examination. Four children and eleven adults were diagnosed with pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux, which is defined as acid exposure (pH less than 4) more than 3.6 or 4.3 percent of the time, respectively. Manometry performed in the adult group showed a pathologically high lower oesophageal sphincter pressure in four of the five individuals who had normal oesophageal pH values (pH under 4 less than 4.3% of the time). The two groups (reflux and non-reflux) were well balanced according to BMI, genotype, tooth grinding and hyposalivation. However, twice as many individuals in the reflux group as in the non-reflux group reported high consumption of acidic foods and drinks. Increased tooth wear was significantly correlated with GORD in the two groups (reflux n=6 and non-reflux n=6). The prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux is high in individuals with PWS. Tooth wear was strongly associated with

  15. Radioactive tracer system to indicate drill bit wear or failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, B.A.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive tracer system for indicating drill bit wear or failure utilizing radioactive krypton 85 in clathrate form, in the form of water-soluble kryptonates, or dissolved grease, is described. Preferably the radioactive krypton is placed so that when drill bit wear or failure occurs, the radioactive krypton 85 is relased and effectively becomes diffused in the circulating drilling fluid. At the surface, the radioactive krypton 85 gas is separated from the circulating drilling fluid by gas-mud separating means and is transported as a gas to a counting chamber where an accurate radioactivity count of beta rays released from the krypton is obtained. (Patent Office Record)

  16. Quantification of incisal tooth wear in upper anterior teeth: conventional vs new method using toolmakers microscope and a three-dimensional measuring technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Sghaireen, Mohd G; Alzarea, Bader K; Lynch, Edward

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to quantify tooth wear in upper anterior teeth using a new CAD-CAM Laser scanning machine, tool maker microscope and conventional tooth wear index. Fifty participants (25 males and 25 females, mean age = 25 ± 4 years) were assessed for incisal tooth wear of upper anterior teeth using Smith and Knight clinical tooth wear index (TWI) on two occasions, the study baseline and 1 year later. Stone dies for each tooth were prepared and scanned using the CAD-CAM Laser Cercon System. Scanned images were printed and examined under a toolmaker microscope to quantify tooth wear and then the dies were directly assessed under the microscope to measure tooth wear. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used to analyze the data. TWI scores for incisal edges were 0-3 and were similar at both occasions. Score 4 was not detected. Wear values measured by directly assessing the dies under the toolmaker microscope (range = 113 - 150 μm, mean = 130 ± 20 μm) were significantly more than those measured from Cercon Digital Machine images (range=52-80 μm, mean = 68 ± 23 μm) and both showed significant differences between the two occasions. Wear progression in upper anterior teeth was effectively detected by directly measuring the dies or the images of dies under toolmaker microscope. Measuring the dies of worn dentition directly under tool maker microscope enabled detection of wear progression more accurately than measuring die images obtained with Cercon Digital Machine. Conventional method was the least sensitive for tooth wear quantification and was unable to identify wear progression in most cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The evolutionary paradox of tooth wear: simply destruction or inevitable adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Benazzi

    Full Text Available Over the last century, humans from industrialized societies have witnessed a radical increase in some dental diseases. A severe problem concerns the loss of dental materials (enamel and dentine at the buccal cervical region of the tooth. This "modern-day" pathology, called non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs, is ubiquitous and worldwide spread, but is very sporadic in modern humans from pre-industrialized societies. Scholars believe that several factors are involved, but the real dynamics behind this pathology are far from being understood. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA, to suggest that the lack of dental wear, characteristic of industrialized societies, might be a major factor leading to NCCLs. Occlusal loads were applied to high resolution finite element models of lower second premolars (P2 to demonstrate that slightly worn P2s envisage high tensile stresses in the buccal cervical region, but when worn down artificially in the laboratory the pattern of stress distribution changes and the tensile stresses decrease, matching the results obtained in naturally worn P2s. In the modern industrialized world, individuals at advanced ages show very moderate dental wear when compared to past societies, and teeth are exposed to high tensile stresses at the buccal cervical region for decades longer. This is the most likely mechanism explaining enamel loss in the cervical region, and may favor the activity of other disruptive processes such as biocorrosion. Because of the lack of dental abrasion, our masticatory apparatus faces new challenges that can only be understood in an evolutionary perspective.

  18. The Evolutionary Paradox of Tooth Wear: Simply Destruction or Inevitable Adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Schulz, Dieter; Grosse, Ian R.; Gruppioni, Giorgio; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Kullmer, Ottmar

    2013-01-01

    Over the last century, humans from industrialized societies have witnessed a radical increase in some dental diseases. A severe problem concerns the loss of dental materials (enamel and dentine) at the buccal cervical region of the tooth. This “modern-day” pathology, called non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs), is ubiquitous and worldwide spread, but is very sporadic in modern humans from pre-industrialized societies. Scholars believe that several factors are involved, but the real dynamics behind this pathology are far from being understood. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA), to suggest that the lack of dental wear, characteristic of industrialized societies, might be a major factor leading to NCCLs. Occlusal loads were applied to high resolution finite element models of lower second premolars (P2) to demonstrate that slightly worn P2s envisage high tensile stresses in the buccal cervical region, but when worn down artificially in the laboratory the pattern of stress distribution changes and the tensile stresses decrease, matching the results obtained in naturally worn P2s. In the modern industrialized world, individuals at advanced ages show very moderate dental wear when compared to past societies, and teeth are exposed to high tensile stresses at the buccal cervical region for decades longer. This is the most likely mechanism explaining enamel loss in the cervical region, and may favor the activity of other disruptive processes such as biocorrosion. Because of the lack of dental abrasion, our masticatory apparatus faces new challenges that can only be understood in an evolutionary perspective. PMID:23638020

  19. Human diet in the early medieval period: Tooth wear, mastication, enamel thickness and its relationship to social stratification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ibrová, A.; Dupej, J.; Stránská, Petra; Velemínský, P.; Poláček, Lumír; Velemínská, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 162, S64 (2017), s. 226 ISSN 0002-9483. [Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists /86./. 19.04.2017-22.04.2017, New Orleans] Institutional support: RVO:67985912 ; RVO:68081758 Keywords : Early Middle Ages * human diet * anthropology * tooth wear * Central Europe Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology; AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology (ARUB-Q) OBOR OECD: Archaeology; Archaeology (ARUB-Q) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajpa.23210/pdf

  20. Association between traditional oral hygiene methods with tooth wear, gingival bleeding, and recession: A descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Naseem; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Jain, Veena; Logani, Ajay

    2018-01-01

    Oral hygiene maintenance is crucial for prevention of various oral diseases. Oral hygiene practices across the country vary largely and people in peri-urban and rural areas use traditional methods of oral hygiene like powders, bark, oil and salt etc. Their effect on oral soft and hard tissues need to be studied to understand their beneficial and/ or harmful effects on maintenance of oral hygiene and prevention or causation of oral diseases. This study aimed to assess the plaque-cleaning efficacy, gingival bleeding, recession and tooth wear with different traditional oral hygiene methods as compared to use of toothpaste-toothbrush, the most accepted method of oral hygiene practice. Hospital based cross sectional analytical study. Results: Total 1062 traditional oral hygiene method users were compared with same number of toothpaste-brush users. The maximum number in the former group used tooth powder (76%) as compared to other indigenous methods, such as use of bark of trees etc and out of tooth powder users; almost 75% reported using red toothpowder. The plaque scores and gingival bleeding & recession were found to be more in traditional oral hygiene method users. The toothwear was also more severe among the toothpowder users. Traditional methods were found to be inferior in plaque control as was documented by increased bleeding and gingival recession. Its effect on hard tissues of teeth was very damaging with higher tooth wear scores on all surfaces.

  1. The inter-relationship between dietary and environmental properties and tooth wear: comparisons of mesowear, molar wear rate, and hypsodonty index of extant Sika deer populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugino Ozaki Kubo

    Full Text Available In reference to the evolutionary trend of increasing cheek tooth height in herbivorous ungulates, the causes of dental abrasion have long been debated. Interspecific comparisons of extant ungulates have revealed that both phytoliths in grass and external abrasive matter may play important roles. Using analysis of extant sika deer living in various environments and showing continuous latitudinal variation in food habits from northern grazing to southern browsing, we quantitatively evaluated the influence of dietary and environmental properties on three dental variables: mesowear score (MS, molar wear rate, and M3 hypsodonty index. We used 547 skulls and 740 mandibles from 16 populations of sika deer to obtain the dental measurements. We found that only graminoid proportion in diet correlated with MS and the molar wear rate, implying that phytoliths in grass abrade dental tissues. In contrast, annual precipitation in habitat was not correlated with any of the dental variables. We also found a significant correlation between the molar wear rate (selective pressure for high-crowned molars and the M3 hypsodonty index of extant sika deer, implying an evolutionary increment in molar height corresponding to the molar wear rate. Our intraspecific comparative analyses provide further support for use of mesowear analysis as a paleodiet estimation method; it not only reveals staple food types (graminoids or dicots but also implies regional or seasonal variation in the diet of the species.

  2. Rates of anterior tooth wear in Middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Martinón-Torres, M; Sarmiento, S; Lozano, M; Arsuaga, J L; Carbonell, E

    2003-10-14

    This study presents quantitative data on the rates of anterior tooth wear in a Pleistocene human population. The data were obtained for the hominin sample of the Sima de los Huesos site in Atapuerca, Spain. The fossil record belongs to a minimum of 28 individuals of the same biological population, assigned to the species Homo heidelbergensis. We have estimated the original and the preserved crown height of the mandibular incisors (I1 and I2) of 11 individuals, whose age at death can be ascertained from the mineralization stage and tooth eruption. Results provide a range of 0.276-0.348 and 0.288-0.360 mm per year for the mean wear rate of the mandibular I1 and I2, respectively, in individuals approximately 16-18 years old. These data suggest that incisors' crowns would be totally worn out toward the fifth decade of life. Thus, we expect the life expectancy of this population to be seriously limited. These data, which could be contrasted with results obtained on hominins at other sites, could be of interest for estimating the death age of adult individuals.

  3. Comparison of Three types of Tooth Brushes on Plaque and Gingival Indices: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeintaghavi, Amir; Sargolzaie, Naser; Rostampour, Mehrnoosh; Sarvari, Sara; Kargozar, Sanaz; Gharaei, Shideh

    2017-01-01

    To compare clinical results of three types of manual tooth brushes on plaque removal efficacy and gingivitis. This study is a single blind randomized trial with crossover design which involved 30 periodontaly healthy individuals. Professional plaque removal and oral hygiene instruction were performed for all the participants in the first step of our study followed by asking them to avoid brushing for 2 days. Thereafter plaque and gingivitis scores were measured using plaque and gingival indices (PI and GI). Then subjects were instructed to use Pulsar tooth brush for a two-week period and then, GI and PI indices were assessed again. After passing one-week period for wash out, subjects didn't brush for 2 days and indices were recorded again. The same procedure was done for CrossAction, and Butler 411 tooth brushes respectively and at the end of the study these variables were analyzed using SPSS software ver.16. Repeated measurement ANOVA test was used to compare the scores between different brushes. Finding of this study reveals that using all three types of tooth brushes resulted in significant plaque and gingivitis reduction compared to baseline levels. Pulsar tooth brush was significantly more effective in diminishing PI and GI than Butler tooth brush (p=0.044 and 0.031 respectively). According to our findings all 3 types of tooth brushes are effective in reduction of plaque and gingivitis and this reduction is significantly greater for Pulsar tooth brush compared to Butler and CrossAction tooth brushes.

  4. Three-dimensional in vitro measurements of tooth wear using fluoridated dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashhadani, A; Plygkos, I; Bozec, L; Rodriguez, J M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in wear of human enamel and dentine in vitro using a 3D measurement method comparing silica versus non-silica containing fluoridated dentifrices (Colgate Total(™) [CT] or Fluor Protector Gel(™) [FPG]). Mounted native enamel (n = 36) and polished dentine (n = 36) samples were subjected to 10 wear cycles. Each cycle consisted of: (1) 1 hour remineralization in artificial saliva (AS); (2) 10 minute erosion (0.3% citric acid; pH = 2.8); (3) 2 minute toothbrush abrasion in AS (G1, control) or a slurry of 3:1 by weight of AS:dentifrice (G2 = CT; G3 = FPG) under a load of 2 N. Each group contained 12 enamel and 12 dentine samples. Paired pre- and post-wear scans made with a contacting scanner were digitally superimposed using ball bearings as datum. Mean and (SD) enamel wear was G1 = 21.9 μm (6.4); G2 = 15.2 μm (2.8); G3 = 16.9 μm (3.2). Enamel wear was not different between dentifrices (p = 0.99). Both dentifrices resulted in less enamel wear compared to the control (p Dental Association.

  5. Risk factors for tooth wear lesions among patients attending the dental clinic of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital, Benin City: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeigbemen A Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with tooth wear lesions in patients attending a dental clinic. Context: Tooth wear lesions entail the loss of dental hard tissues in the absence of caries or trauma. They include abrasion, attrition, and erosion. The etiology is often related to habits leading to insidious symptoms with similar presentations in both community and hospital patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved patients attending the outpatient dental clinic of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital over a 3-month period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to elicit information from the respondents. Results: A total of 152 respondents aged 17–80 years and above, comprising 86 males (56.6%, and 66 females (43.3% constituted the study population. The Binis were the most represented 34.2%, followed by the Esans 21.1%, while the least represented were the Yorubas (6.6%. The occupations represented in this study include civil servants (30.3%, unskilled workers (23.7%, and non-medical professionals (7.9%. Tooth wear lesions were present in 55.3% of the respondents. Attrition accounted for 29.6%, Abrasion (11.8%, combination of attrition and abrasion (4.6%, and abfraction (2.0%. There was a statistically significant association between tooth wear lesions and age, occupation, sensitivity or pain, tooth cleaning aids, toothbrush texture brushing technique, intake of carbonated beverages, and method of intake. Conclusion: Tooth wear lesions such as attrition and abrasion were prevalent among the respondents in this hospital setting and, therefore, represent an important group of dental problems among this population. It is, therefore, important to direct the appropriate oral health awareness program for the prevention, early detection, and management of these conditions.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy of dentition: methodology and ultrastructural morphology of tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurkin, G V; Almquist, A J; Pfeihofer, A A; Stoddard, E L

    1975-01-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were taken of sets of human molars-those of paleo-Indians used in mastication of, ostensibly, a highly abrasive diet, and those of contemporary Americans. Different ultrastructural patterns of enamel wear were observed between the groups.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES-NL) in dental patients with and without self-reported tooth wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Larsson, P.; John, M.T.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Orofacial Esthetic Scale (OES) in dental patients with and without self-reported tooth wear. The English version of the OES was translated into Dutch, following established guidelines for cross-cultural

  8. Soft drink, software and softening of teeth: a case report of tooth wear in the mixed dentition due to a combination of dental erosion and attrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a 9-year-old boy with severe tooth wear as a result of drinking a single glass of soft drink per day. This soft drink was consumed over a period of one to two hours, while he was gaming intensively on his computer. As a result, a deep bite, enamel cupping, sensitivity of

  9. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times.  Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite. Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5 for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45% for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control. Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms-1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05.Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001. However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05. Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites.

  10. Innovative measuring system for wear-out indication of high power IGBT modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Ørndrup; Due, Jens; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    Power converter failures are a major issue in modern Wind turbines. One of the key elements of power converters for high power application is the IGBT modules. A test bench capable of performing an accelerated wear-out test through power cycling of IGBT modules has been made. In the test bench...... it is possible to stress the IGBT module in a real life working point, controlling the voltage, current and phase of the device under test. An analysis of failure mechanisms has been carried out, indicating that VCE can be used as an sign of wear out of the IGBT module. Therefore an innovative measuring system...... for VCE monitoring with an accuracy as low as a few mV has been implemented. The measurements on the IGBT in the test bench show that it is possible to monitor VCE and use this as an indicator of wear-out....

  11. Predatory behaviour of carnivorous dinosaurs: Ecological interpretations based on tooth marked dinosaur bones and wear patterns of theropod teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    Predation marks on bones are a source on information on the feeding behaviour of the carnivores involved. Although predator damaged bone is common in the fossil record, published reports of such marks on dinosaur bones are rare. Patterns of bone modification by mammalian carnivores overlap patterns...... left by theropod dinosaurs.Differences in tooth morphology can also be correlated with characteristics of the marks left by the teeth. In a study of tooth marks on dinosaur bones from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada, it was possible to identify the feeding theropods to family, generic...... different taxa and different skeletal elements produced some interesting results. The frequency of tooth marked dinosaur bones is higher than expected. Up to 14 % of the observed hadrosaur bones were predator damaged. The lower incidence of damage in ceratopsian bones can be explained by the fact...

  12. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Gasga, José; Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois; Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E.; García-García, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI) XRD index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI) FTIR index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI) XRD value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI) FTIR indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI) XRD than with (CI) FTIR . • Regardless of the temperature, (CI) XRD and (CI) FTIR showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement

  13. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L., E-mail: esmemapi@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois, E-mail: galoisborre@yahoo.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@yahoo.com.mx [Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); García-García, Ramiro, E-mail: ramiro@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI){sub XRD} index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI){sub FTIR} index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI){sub XRD} value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI){sub FTIR} indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI){sub XRD} than with (CI){sub FTIR}. • Regardless of the temperature, (CI){sub XRD} and (CI){sub FTIR} showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement.

  14. Frequency and risk indicators of tooth decay among pregnant women in France: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Kaminski, Monique; Lelong, Nathalie; Musset, Anne-Marie; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women's medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d. = 2.8). Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR = 1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45]), lower educational level (aOR = 1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23]) and dental plaque (aOR = 1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]). The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations.

  15. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gasga, José; Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois; Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E; García-García, Ramiro; Brès, Etienne F

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI)XRD index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI)FTIR index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI)XRD value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI)FTIR indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. © 2013.

  16. Estimating ages of white-tailed deer: Age and sex patterns of error using tooth wear-and-replacement and consistency of cementum annuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael D.; Storm, Daniel J.; Rolley, Robert E.; Beissel, Thomas; Richards, Bryan J.; Van Deelen, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The age structure of harvested animals provides the basis for many demographic analyses. Ages of harvested white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and other ungulates often are estimated by evaluating replacement and wear patterns of teeth, which is subjective and error-prone. Few previous studies however, examined age- and sex-specific error rates. Counting cementum annuli of incisors is an alternative, more accurate method of estimating age, but factors that influence consistency of cementum annuli counts are poorly known. We estimated age of 1,261 adult (≥1.5 yr old) white-tailed deer harvested in Wisconsin and Illinois (USA; 2005–2008) using both wear-and-replacement and cementum annuli. We compared cementum annuli with wear-and-replacement estimates to assess misclassification rates by sex and age. Wear-and-replacement for estimating ages of white-tailed deer resulted in substantial misclassification compared with cementum annuli. Age classes of females were consistently underestimated, while those of males were underestimated for younger age classes but overestimated for older age classes. Misclassification resulted in an impression of a younger age-structure than actually was the case. Additionally, we obtained paired age-estimates from cementum annuli for 295 deer. Consistency of paired cementum annuli age-estimates decreased with age, was lower in females than males, and decreased as age estimates became less certain. Our results indicated that errors in the wear-and-replacement techniques are substantial and could impact demographic analyses that use age-structure information. 

  17. An in vitro investigation of human enamel wear by restorative dental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, L.K.; Saiki, M.; De Campos, T.N.

    2001-01-01

    A radiometric method was applied to asses enamel wear by another enamel and by restorative materials. The radioactive enamel was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with the radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring the beta-activity of 32 P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another natural enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another natural enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. (author)

  18. Frequency and risk indicators of tooth decay among pregnant women in France: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Noel Vergnes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. METHODS: A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women's medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. RESULTS: 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d. = 2.8. Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR = 1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45], lower educational level (aOR = 1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23] and dental plaque (aOR = 1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]. The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. DISCUSSION: The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations.

  19. Smoking and drinking as risk indicators for tooth loss in middle-aged Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morse, Douglas E; Avlund, Kirsten; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2014-01-01

    , drinking, and various covariates was obtained using self-administered, structured questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression (dependent variable: 6+ vs. ...: Our findings suggest that smoking is positively associated, while alcoholic beverage consumption is inversely related to tooth loss in middle-aged Danes....

  20. Reduced wear of enamel with novel fine and nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, Antonios; Chen, Xiaohui; Hill, Robert; Cattell, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Leucite glass-ceramics used to produce all-ceramic restorations can suffer from brittle fracture and wear the opposing teeth. High strength and fine crystal sized leucite glass-ceramics have recently been reported. The objective of this study is to investigate whether fine and nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics with minimal matrix microcracking are associated with a reduction in in vitro tooth wear. Human molar cusps (n=12) were wear tested using a Bionix-858 testing machine (300,000 simulated masticatory cycles) against experimental fine crystal sized (FS), nano-scale crystal sized (NS) leucite glass-ceramics and a commercial leucite glass-ceramic (Ceramco-3, Dentsply, USA). Wear was imaged using Secondary Electron Imaging (SEI) and quantified using white-light profilometry. Both experimental groups were found to produce significantly (pceramic) loss than the FS group. Increased waviness and damage was observed on the wear surfaces of the Ceramco-3 glass-ceramic disc/tooth group in comparison to the experimental groups. This was also indicated by higher surface roughness values for the Ceramco-3 glass-ceramic disc/tooth group. Fine and nano-sized leucite glass-ceramics produced a reduction in in vitro tooth wear. The high strength low wear materials of this study may help address the many problems associated with tooth enamel wear and restoration failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tooth damage in captive orcas (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John; Visser, Ingrid N; Ventre, Jeffrey; Waltz, Jordan; Loch, Carolina

    2017-12-01

    Tooth damage as a result of oral stereotypies is evident in captive orca, yet little research on the topic exists. This study examines the associations between dental pathology, sex, facility, duration of captivity and other factors in captive orca. We evaluated mandibular and maxillary teeth from dental images of 29 captive orca owned by a US-based theme park. Each tooth was scored for coronal wear, wear at or below gum line and bore holes. Fractured and missing teeth were also noted. Summary statistics described the distribution and severity of pathologies; inferential statistics examined how pathologies differed between sexes, between wild-captured and captive-born orcas and between captive orca at four facilities. We also evaluated how dental pathology and duration of captivity were related. Approximately 24% of whales exhibited "major" to "extreme" mandibular coronal tooth wear, with coronal wear and wear at or below gum line highly correlated. More than 60% of mandibular teeth 2 and 3 exhibited fractures. Bore holes were observed primarily among anterior mandibular teeth, with more than 61% of teeth 2 and 3 bearing evidence of having been drilled. Four of five orca with the highest age-adjusted tooth pathology indices were captive-born. Various dental pathologies were observed across all whales, with pathologies beginning at a young age. Oral stereotypies exhibited by captive orca contributed to the observed dental damage. By making dental and health records of captive whales publicly available, the theme park industry is uniquely positioned to provide further insight into dental pathology and resultant health consequences in captive orca. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Wear of human enamel: a quantitative in vitro assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidonis, J A; Richards, L C; Townsend, G C; Tansley, G D

    1998-12-01

    Many factors influence the extent and rate at which enamel wears. Clinical studies in humans are limited by difficulties in the accurate quantification of intra-oral wear and by a lack of control over the oral environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the wear characteristics of human dental enamel under controlled experimental conditions. An electro-mechanical tooth wear machine, in which opposing enamel surfaces of sectioned, extracted teeth were worn under various conditions, was used to simulate tooth grinding or bruxism. Enamel surface wear was quantified by weight to an accuracy of 0.1 mg, with water uptake and loss controlled. The variables considered included the structure and hardness of enamel, facet area, duration of tooth contact, relative speed of opposing surfaces, temperature, load, pH, and the nature of the lubricant. Enamel wear under non-lubricated conditions increased with increasing load over the range of 1.7 to 16.2 kg. The addition of a liquid lubricant (pH = 7) reduced enamel wear up to 6.7 kg, but when the load increased above this threshold, the rate of wear increased dramatically. With the viscosity of the lubricant constant and pH = 3, the rate of wear was further reduced to less than 10% of the non-lubricated rate at 9.95 kg, after which the rate again increased substantially. Under more extreme conditions (pH = 1.2, simulating gastric acids), the wear was excessive under all experimental loads. When saliva was used as a lubricant, the amount of wear was relatively low at 9.95 kg, but rapid wear occurred at 14.2 kg and above. These results indicate that under non-lubricated conditions, enamel wear remains low at high loads due to the dry-lubricating capabilities of fine enamel powder. Under lubricated conditions, low loads with an acidic lubricant lead to little enamel wear, whereas very low pH results in a high rate of wear under all loads.

  3. Factors associated with tooth loss and prosthodontic status among Sudanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Nadia; Allen, Patrick F; Abu-bakr, Neamat H; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the degree of tooth loss, factors influencing tooth loss, and the extent of prosthodontic rehabilitation in Sudanese adults (≥ 16 years old) attending outpatient clinics in Khartoum State. Pearson and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between tooth loss and specific characteristics determined through interviews and clinical examinations. The mean number of missing teeth was 3.6 (SD, 4.9) and the prevalence of edentulism was 0.1%. The prevalence of tooth loss (missing at least one tooth) was 78%; 66.9% of tooth loss was due to caries, and 11.2% was attributable to other reasons. Prosthetic replacement of missing teeth was evident in 3%, whereas a need for prosthetic replacement was evident in 57%. Having teeth was associated with age, gender, and socioeconomic status; tooth loss due to caries was associated with age, tribe, frequency of tooth-brushing, and a low rate of dental consultation. Tooth loss due to other reasons was associated with age, tribe, education, periodontal pocketing, tobacco use, tooth wear, and prosthetic status. The results of the present study indicated that the major cause of tooth loss was dental caries, thus emphasizing the importance of a public prevention-based healthcare program. Replacement of missing teeth was uncommon in the study subjects, which may reflect lack of access to this type of oral healthcare.

  4. Tissue concentrations of four Taiwanese toothed cetaceans indicating the silver and cadmium pollution in the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Hsien; Zhuang, Ming-Feng; Chou, Lien-Siang; Liu, Jean-Yi; Shih, Chieh-Chih; Chen, Chiee-Young

    2017-11-30

    Muscle, lung, kidney and liver tissues of 45 bycatch and stranded cetaceans, including 14 Grampus griseus (Gg), 7 Kogia simus (Ks), 10 Lagenodelphis hosei (Lh), and 14 Stenella attenuata (Sa), were collected in the waters off Taiwan from 1994 to 1995, and from 2001 to 2012. Baseline concentrations (in μgg -1 dry weight) of the cetaceans were lung (<0.05)=muscle (<0.05)toothed cetaceans are suggested. Marked high concentrations of Ag and Cd found in Gg and Lh are highly related to their squid-eating and deep diving habits. The highest ever recorded concentrations of liver-Ag and kidney-Cd were found in two Lh. These Taiwanese cetaceans indicate marked Ag and Cd pollution in the recent two decades in the western Pacific Ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Canine tooth size and fitness in male mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Steven R; Setchell, Joanna M; Charpentier, Marie; Knapp, Leslie A; Wickings, E Jean

    2008-07-01

    Sexual selection theory explains the evolution of exaggerated male morphologies and weaponry, but the fitness consequences of developmental and age-related changes in these features remain poorly understood. This long-term study of mandrill monkeys (Mandrillus sphinx) demonstrates how age-related changes in canine tooth weaponry and adult canine size correlate closely with male lifetime reproductive success. Combining long-term demographic and morphometric data reveals that male fitness covaries simply and directly with canine ontogeny, adult maximum size, and wear. However, fitness is largely independent of other somatometrics. Male mandrills sire offspring almost exclusively when their canines exceed approximately 30 mm, or two-thirds of average adult value (45 mm). Moreover, sires have larger canines than nonsires. The tooth diminishes through wear as animals age, corresponding with, and perhaps influencing, reproductive senescence. These factors combine to constrain male reproductive opportunities to a brief timespan, defined by the period of maximum canine length. Sexually-selected weaponry, especially when it is nonrenewable like the primate canine tooth, is intimately tied to the male life course. Our analyses of this extremely dimorphic species indicate that sexual selection is closely intertwined with growth, development, and aging, pointing to new directions for sexual selection theory. Moreover, the primate canine tooth has potential as a simple mammalian system for testing genetically-based models of aging. Finally, the tooth may record details of life histories in fossil primates, especially when sexual selection has played a role in the evolution of dimorphism.

  6. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whole tooth. This area is known as the "pulp" of the tooth. The jawbone is attached to ... JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  7. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An analysis of the physiologic parameters of intraoral wear: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Cakir, Deniz; Burgess, John O; Janyavula, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the conditions of in vivo mastication and describes a novel method of measuring in vitro wear. Methods: parameters of intraoral wear are reviewed in this analysis, including chewing force, tooth sliding distance, food abrasivity, saliva lubrication, and antagonist properties. Results: clinical measurement of mastication forces indicates a range of normal forces between 20 and 140 N for a single molar. During the sliding phase of mastication, horizontal movement has been measured between 0.9 and 2.86 mm. In vivo wear occurs by three-body abrasion when food particles are interposed between teeth and by two-body abrasion after food clearance. Analysis of food particles used in wear testing reveals that food particles are softer than enamel and large enough to separate enamel and restoration surfaces and act as a solid lubricant. In two-body wear, saliva acts as a boundary lubricant with a viscosity of 3 cP. Enamel is the most relevant antagonist material for wear testing. The shape of a palatal cusp has been estimated as a 0.6 mm diameter ball and the hardest region of a tooth is its enamel surface. pH values and temperatures have been shown to range between 2–7 and 5–55 °C in intraoral fluids, respectively. These intraoral parameters have been used to modify the Alabama wear testing method. (paper)

  9. Gear wear monitoring by modulation signal bispectrum based on motor current signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiliang; Gu, Fengshou; Mansaf, Haram; Wang, Tie; Ball, Andrew D.

    2017-09-01

    Gears are important mechanical components for power transmissions. Tooth wear is one of the most common failure modes, which can present throughout a gear's lifetime. It is significant to accurately monitor gear wear progression in order to take timely predictive maintenances. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is an effective and non-intrusive approach which is able to monitor faults from both electrical and mechanical systems. However, little research has been reported in monitoring the gear wear and estimating its severity based on MCSA. This paper presents a novel gear wear monitoring method through a modulation signal bispectrum based motor current signal analysis (MSB-MCSA). For a steady gear transmission, it is inevitable to exist load and speed oscillations due to various errors including wears. These oscillations can induce small modulations in the current signals of the driving motor. MSB is particularly effective in characterising such small modulation signals. Based on these understandings, the monitoring process was implemented based on the current signals from a run-to-failure test of an industrial two stages helical gearbox under a moderate accelerated fatigue process. At the initial operation of the test, MSB analysis results showed that the peak values at the bifrequencies of gear rotations and the power supply can be effective monitoring features for identifying faulty gears and wear severity as they exhibit agreeable changes with gear loads. A monotonically increasing trend established by these features allows a clear indication of the gear wear progression. The dismantle inspection at 477 h of operation, made when one of the monitored features is about 123% higher than its baseline, has found that there are severe scuffing wear marks on a number of tooth surfaces on the driving gear, showing that the gear endures a gradual wear process during its long test operation. Therefore, it is affirmed that the MSB-MSCA approach proposed is reliable

  10. Abrasive Wear of Four Direct Restorative Materials by Standard and Whitening Dentifrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Weader, E., Liscombe, C., & Holt, J.S. (2005). The measurement of enamel and dentine abrasion by tooth - whitening products using an in situ model...ABRASION OF TOOTH STRUCTURE Hard tissue abrasion is a familiar consequence of toothbrushing. Enamel , dentin, and cementum differ in their...LESIONS Cervical enamel wear is common; however, relatively few epidemiologic studies have distinguished between cervical enamel wear and tooth wear in

  11. Changes in food processing and occlusal dental wear during the early agricultural period in northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James T

    2008-01-01

    Crown dimensions and occlusal surface wear rate and wear plane were evaluated using paired first and second mandibular molars from a sample of 84 Early Agricultural period (1600 B.C.-A.D. 200) skeletons from northwest Mexico. Although this period represents a major shift in subsistence strategies in the Sonoran Desert, from food-foraging to agriculture, archaeological and dental pathology studies have identified this period as one of relative dietary stability. It was therefore predicted that very little variation in occlusal wear would have occurred between the early phase (San Pedro: 1600-800 B.C.) and late phase (Cienega: 800 B.C.-A.D. 200). Comparison of crown diameters identified some phenotypic differences between sexes but not between archaeological phases. Molar occlusal surfaces were then divided into four quadrants, and wear scores recorded for each quadrant. Principle axis analysis was performed between total wear scores of paired, adjacent first and second mandibular molars to assess rate and occlusal wear plane over time. The analysis demonstrated that both wear rate and wear plane increased from the early to the late phase of the Early Agricultural period. These results indicate that although diet may have indeed remained stable during this period in the Sonoran Desert increases in the rate of wear and wear plane may reflect changes in food-processing techniques. It is suggested that more intensive processing of agricultural products during the Cienega phase simultaneously softened the diet to create more tooth-contact wear and introduced more grit to cause faster and more angled wear on the molar occlusal surfaces. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. An in vitro study of dental enamel wear by restorative materials using radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa

    2000-01-01

    There is an increasing demand and interest to study the dental materials wear as well as about the abrasion effect on antagonistic teeth. Due to the fact that the existent restorative materials have no specifications about their abrasiveness, it is necessary the establishment of degrees of comparison among them to support clinical application. In this work, the radiometric method was applied to study the enamel wear caused by another enamel and by restorative materials (Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse porcelains, Artglass and Targis). The dental enamel made radioactive by irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with this radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of 32 P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. This study allowed to conclude that the radiometric method proposed can be used satisfactorily in the evaluation of enamel wear by restorative materials. This method presents advantages due to quick responses and ease of analyses There is (author)

  13. Tooth polishing: The current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Alankar Sawai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients′ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same.

  14. Tooth Enamel δ13C and δ18O Variations in Modern and Archaeological Horses From Northern Kazakhstan as Indicators of Regional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M. T.; Rosenmeier, M. F.; Stacy, E. M.; Olsen, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the oxygen and carbon isotope values of tooth enamel were measured in forty-one modern and twenty-three Copper Age (3600 - 3100 B.C.) horse specimens from the grassland steppe region of northern Kazakhstan. Modern tooth enamel δ13C and δ18O values were compared with the carbon isotopic compositions of local vegetation and the δ18O values of meteoric waters. Tooth enamel isotope values within the Copper Age specimens (attributed to the so-called Botai culture) were, in turn, compared with modern samples. Average carbon isotopic values within modern bulk tooth enamel samples ranged between -13.7 and -12.0‰ (VPDB). This suggests that the diet of modern northern Kazakhstani horses is comprised almost entirely of C3 plants (considering enamel-diet fractionation factors) consistent with documented grassland compositions within the region. The observed amplitude of δ13C variations within individual teeth (typically less than ~2‰) suggests only minimal seasonal variation in the δ13C of grasses attributed to heat and water stress. Alternatively, the minimal seasonal changes observed within intra-tooth δ13C values may be the direct result of fodder provisioning. Ingested water δ18O values derived from oxygen isotope ratios within bulk tooth enamel samples appear statistically indistinguishable from estimates of regional precipitation, suggesting that Kazakhstani horse tooth enamel δ18O measurements may be used as a direct estimate of the oxygen isotopic composition of meteoric waters. Intra-tooth oxygen isotopic variations therefore reflect the pronounced seasonal variability in precipitation δ18O values tied to temperature changes and amount effects observed annually within Kazakhstan. However, these intra-tooth isotopic variations exhibit slightly reduced amplitudes relative to meteoric water values, suggesting that horses likely consume water from buffered sources such as lakes and wells. Average bulk tooth enamel δ13C values within

  15. A solution to the worn tooth conundrum in primate functional anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Peter S; M'Kirera, Francis

    2003-04-01

    Worn teeth are a bane to paleobiologists interested in the diets of human ancestors and other fossil primates. Although worn teeth dominate fossil assemblages, their shapes are usually not used to reconstruct the diets of extinct species. The problem is that traditional studies of primate dental functional anatomy have focused on unworn morphology. This has limited most functional analyses to only a few well-represented fossil species. This paper introduces a method to characterize and compare worn occlusal morphology in primates using laser scanning and geographic information systems technologies. A study of variably worn chimpanzee and gorilla molars indicates that differences between these species in tooth shape remain consistent at given stages of wear. Although cusp slope decreases with wear in both taxa, angularity values remain unchanged. These results indicate that African ape teeth wear in a manner that keeps them mechanically efficient for fracturing specific foods. Studies of changes in tooth shape with wear add a new dimension to dental functional anatomy, and offer a more complete picture of dental-dietary adaptations. Also, given how rare unworn teeth are in the fossil record, the ability to include worn specimens in analyses opens the door to reconstructing the diets of many more extinct primate groups, allowing us to better understand the adaptive radiation of our order.

  16. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  17. Wear Fast, Die Young: More Worn Teeth and Shorter Lives in Iberian Compared to Scottish Red Deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Barbería, F J; Carranza, J; Sánchez-Prieto, C

    2015-01-01

    Teeth in Cervidae are permanent structures that are not replaceable or repairable; consequently their rate of wear, due to the grinding effect of food and dental attrition, affects their duration and can determine an animal's lifespan. Tooth wear is also a useful indicator of accumulative life energy investment in intake and mastication and their interactions with diet. Little is known regarding how natural and sexual selection operate on dental structures within a species in contrasting environments and how these relate to life history traits to explain differences in population rates of tooth wear and longevity. We hypothesised that populations under harsh environmental conditions should be selected for more hypsodont teeth while sexual selection may maintain similar sex differences within different populations. We investigated the patterns of tooth wear in males and females of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) in Southern Spain and Scottish red deer (C. e. scoticus) across Scotland, that occur in very different environments, using 10343 samples from legal hunting activities. We found higher rates of both incisor and molar wear in the Spanish compared to Scottish populations. However, Scottish red deer had larger incisors at emergence than Iberian red deer, whilst molars emerged at a similar size in both populations and sexes. Iberian and Scottish males had earlier tooth depletion than females, in support of a similar sexual selection process in both populations. However, whilst average lifespan for Iberian males was 4 years shorter than that for Iberian females and Scottish males, Scottish males only showed a reduction of 1 year in average lifespan with respect to Scottish females. More worn molars were associated with larger mandibles in both populations, suggesting that higher intake and/or greater investment in food comminution may have favoured increased body growth, before later loss of tooth efficiency due to severe wear. These results

  18. An in vitro study of dental enamel wear by restorative materials using radiometric method; Estudo in vitro do desgaste do esmalte dental pelos materiais restauradores utilizando metodo radiometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa

    2000-07-01

    There is an increasing demand and interest to study the dental materials wear as well as about the abrasion effect on antagonistic teeth. Due to the fact that the existent restorative materials have no specifications about their abrasiveness, it is necessary the establishment of degrees of comparison among them to support clinical application. In this work, the radiometric method was applied to study the enamel wear caused by another enamel and by restorative materials (Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse porcelains, Artglass and Targis). The dental enamel made radioactive by irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with this radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of {sup 32}P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. This study allowed to conclude that the radiometric method proposed can be used satisfactorily in the evaluation of enamel wear by restorative materials. This method presents advantages due to quick responses and ease of analyses There is (author)

  19. Investigation on wear characteristic of biopolymer gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Wafiuddin Bin Md; Daing Idris, Daing Mohamad Nafiz Bin; Sofian, Azizul Helmi Bin; Basrawi, Mohamad Firdaus bin; Khalil Ibrahim, Thamir

    2017-10-01

    Polymer is widely used in many mechanical components such as gear. With the world going to a more green and sustainable environment, polymers which are bio based are being recognized as a replacement for conventional polymers based on fossil fuel. The use of biopolymer in mechanical components especially gear have not been fully explored yet. This research focuses on biopolymer for spur gear and whether the conventional method to investigate wear characteristic is applicable. The spur gears are produced by injection moulding and tested on several speeds using a custom test equipment. The wear formation such as tooth fracture, tooth deformation, debris and weight loss was observed on the biopolymer spur gear. It was noted that the biopolymer gear wear mechanism was similar with other type of polymer spur gears. It also undergoes stages of wear which are; running in, linear and rapid. It can be said that the wear mechanism of biopolymer spur gear is comparable to fossil fuel based polymer spur gear, thus it can be considered to replace polymer gears in suitable applications.

  20. Tooth cusp sharpness as a dietary correlate in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaume, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian molars have undergone heavy scrutiny to determine correlates between morphology and diet. Here, the relationship between one aspect of occlusal morphology, tooth cusp radius of curvature (RoC), and two broad dietary categories, folivory and frugivory, is analyzed in apes. The author hypothesizes that there is a relationship between tooth cusp RoC and diet, and that folivores have sharper teeth than frugivores, and further test the correlation between tooth cusp RoC and tooth cusp size. Eight measures of tooth cusp RoC (two RoCs per cusp) were taken from 53 M(2) s from four species and subspecies of frugivorous apes (Pongo pygmaeus, Pan troglodytes troglodytes, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, and Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and two subspecies of folivorous apes (Gorilla beringei beringei, and Gorilla beringei graueri). Phylogenetically corrected ANOVAs were run on the full dataset and several subsets of the full dataset, revealing that, when buccolingual RoCs are taken into account, tooth cusp RoCs can successfully differentiate folivores and frugivores. PCAs revealed that folivores consistently had duller teeth than frugivores. In addition, a weak, statistically significant positive correlation exists between tooth cusp size and tooth cusp RoC. The author hypothesizes differences in tooth cusp RoC are correlated with wear rates, where, per vertical unit of wear, duller cusps will have a longer length of exposed enamel ridge than sharper cusps. More data need to be gathered to determine if the correlation between tooth cusp RoC and tooth cusp size holds true when small primates are considered. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  2. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  3. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... teeth using a thin resin cement. Bleaching, or tooth whitening, is a process used by dentists to lighten ... following? Damage to only the hard outer surface (enamel) of the tooth An incomplete fracture of a ...

  4. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Share Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  5. Unique method of tooth replacement in durophagous placodont marine reptiles, with new data on the dentition of Chinese taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, James M; Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Muscio, Giuseppe; Scheyer, Torsten M

    2014-05-01

    The placodonts of the Triassic period (~252-201 mya) represent one of the earliest and most extreme specialisations to a durophagous diet of any known reptile group. Exceptionally enlarged crushing tooth plates on the maxilla, dentary and palatine cooperated to form functional crushing areas in the buccal cavity. However, the extreme size of these teeth, combined with the unusual way they occluded, constrained how replacement occurred. Using an extensive micro-computed tomographic dataset of 11 specimens that span all geographic regions and placodont morphotypes, tooth replacement patterns were investigated. In addition, the previously undescribed dental morphologies and formulae of Chinese taxa are described for the first time and incorporated into the analysis. Placodonts have a unique tooth replacement pattern and results follow a phylogenetic trend. The plesiomorphic Placodus species show many replacement teeth at various stages of growth, with little or no discernible pattern. On the other hand, the more derived cyamodontoids tend to have fewer replacement teeth growing at any one time, replacing teeth unilaterally and/or in functional units, thus maintaining at least one functional crushing area at all times. The highly derived placochelyids have fewer teeth and, as a result, only have one or two replacement teeth in the upper jaw. This supports previous suggestions that these taxa had an alternative diet to other placodonts. Importantly, all specimens show at least one replacement tooth growing at the most posterior palatine tooth plates, indicating increased wear at this point and thus the most efficient functional crushing area. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  6. Wear of rolling element bearings in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Rolling element bearings and related mechanisms are attractive for service in liquid sodium but it is not clear what minimum wear rate can be anticipated. For axially loaded angular contact bearings rotation is incompatible with pure rolling on both races and wear arises from the resulting ball spin. The initial pressure distributions and sizes of the contact ellipses can be calculated but will change with bearing wear. However, the most effective distribution for producing wear would be for the full loads to be borne on the tips of the contact areas, whose maximum length is given by examination of the race wear tracks. A calculation on such a basis should set a lower limit for the wear coefficient. Both the torque and instantaneous wear rate of a bearing will be similar functions of the integral over the contact areas of the product of contact pressure and radius from the ball spin axis. A better estimate of wear coefficient should be obtained by relating the average torque, the average wear, the initial torque and the initial wear where the conditions are known. Analysis of tests in sodium at 400 0 C of high speed steel and Stellite bearings by these methods indicates specific wear rates of the order of 10 -15 m 3 /N-m, not unduly out of line with the range of values found in conventional sliding tests

  7. Millisecond bearing wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatchley, C.; Sioshansi, P.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclides have been widely used for many purposes in medicine, metals, transportation, manufacturing and research. Approximately 200 artificially produced nuclides are commercially available from reactors or accelerator sources. Another 400 or so have properties which may make them useful if satisfactory methods of production can be developed. One of the most economically important industrial applications of radionuclides has been in wear measurement and condition monitoring in reciprocating engines. The general techniques developed for this purpose have also been applied in a number of other areas besides engine or lubrication studies. The wear of floor wax applied to linoleum, for example, has been measured by mixing shortlived radionuclides in the wax. In those applications where the material is tagged and then followed, the radionuclides are termed ''tracers,'' similar to the medical tracer materials used to measure uptake or metabolism of biologically active chemicals in the body. The alternate function for the radionuclides is to act as ''markers'' which indicate the amount of material which is remaining at the location of the original activation. Both approaches require that the debris removed from the surface must be carried away from the original site. The first application of radioactive tracers as a diagnostic tool in engines was in 1949. In this technique, an entire wearing part such as a piston ring or gear was first exposed to neutrons in a nuclear reactor. This caused the entire volume of the part to become radioactive. The part was next installed and exposed to wear in the operating engine. Detectors placed near the oil line, an oil filter or a sediment trap then determined the amount of debris from the part by counting the gamma rays escaping from the debris

  8. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailavanya Nuvvula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. Objective: to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A questionnaire containing 10 items was distributed to the dental practitioners, which included age, gender, no of teeth indicated for extraction, the reason for extraction, and the periodontal parameters that are involved with the extracted tooth and were requested to complete the form on every extraction they were to undertake. the study form was collected at the end of the study period and data was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: A total of 502 patients were enrolled during the study period, and a total of 1055 teeth were extracted for several reasons. we found that 51.14%extractions are due to dental caries in case of 20-30years age groups, which is more when compared to tooth loss due to periodontal diseases in this age group. whereas in case of >40years of age group periodontal diseases account for 54.11%, and dental caries accounts for only 29.11%. Showing more teeth were lost due to periodontal disease. Conclusion: therefore we concluded that, caries is the dominant reason for extraction in patients with 20–30 years of age while periodontal disease accounts for the majority of tooth extraction in patients older than 40 years.

  9. A new in situ model to study erosive enamel wear, a clinical pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, J.L.; Truin, G.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an in situ model for erosive wear research which allows for more clinically relevant exposure parameters than other in situ models and to show tooth site-specific erosive wear effect of an acid challenge of orange juice on enamel. METHODS: This pilot study included 6

  10. Uneven distribution of enamel in the tooth crown of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela E. Winkler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Unworn teeth of herbivorous mammals are not immediately functional. They have to be partially worn to expose enamel ridges which can then act as shear-cutting blades to break the food down. We use the Plains Zebra (Equus quagga as a hypsodont, herbivorous model organism to investigate how initial wear of the tooth crown is controlled by underlying structures. We find that the enamel proportion is smaller at the apical half of the tooth crown in all upper tooth positions and suggest that lower enamel content here could promote early wear. Besides this uneven enamel distribution, we note that the third molar has a higher overall enamel content than any other tooth position. The M3 is thus likely to have a slightly different functional trait in mastication, resisting highest bite forces along the tooth row and maintaining functionality when anterior teeth are already worn down.

  11. Uneven distribution of enamel in the tooth crown of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Unworn teeth of herbivorous mammals are not immediately functional. They have to be partially worn to expose enamel ridges which can then act as shear-cutting blades to break the food down. We use the Plains Zebra (Equus quagga) as a hypsodont, herbivorous model organism to investigate how initial wear of the tooth crown is controlled by underlying structures. We find that the enamel proportion is smaller at the apical half of the tooth crown in all upper tooth positions and suggest that lower enamel content here could promote early wear. Besides this uneven enamel distribution, we note that the third molar has a higher overall enamel content than any other tooth position. The M3 is thus likely to have a slightly different functional trait in mastication, resisting highest bite forces along the tooth row and maintaining functionality when anterior teeth are already worn down.

  12. Power Consumption Optimization in Tooth Gears Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatnikov, N.; Harlamov, G.; Kanatnikova, P.; Pashmentova, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper reviews the issue of optimization of technological process of tooth gears production of the power consumption criteria. The authors dwell on the indices used for cutting process estimation by the consumed energy criteria and their applicability in the analysis of the toothed wheel production process. The inventors proposed a method for optimization of power consumptions based on the spatial modeling of cutting pattern. The article is aimed at solving the problem of effective source management in order to achieve economical and ecological effect during the mechanical processing of toothed gears. The research was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project No. 17-79-10316).

  13. Abrasive wear of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.; Wilson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the wear behavior of a variety of advanced materials. Among the many materials under evaluation are intermetallic alloys based on the compounds: Fe 3 Al, Ti 3 Al, TiAl, Al 3 Ti, NiAl and MoSi 2 . The high hardness, high modulus, low density, and superior environmental stability of these compounds make them attractive for wear materials. This paper reports on the abrasive wear of alloys and composites based on the above compounds. The abrasive wear behavior of these alloys and composites are compared to other engineering materials used in wear applications

  14. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ..... reflux in children with cerebral palsy and its relationship to erosion of ... phate (ACP) on root surface hypersensitivity. Operative ... Lussi A. Dental erosion clinical diagnosis and case.

  15. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  16. Dental wear, wear rate, and dental disease in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, Alison A

    2010-06-01

    The African apes possess thinner enamel than do other hominoids, and a certain amount of dentin exposure may be advantageous in the processing of tough diets eaten by Gorilla. Dental wear (attrition plus abrasion) that erodes the enamel exposes the underlying dentin and creates additional cutting edges at the dentin-enamel junction. Hypothetically, efficiency of food processing increases with junction formation until an optimal amount is reached, but excessive wear hinders efficient food processing and may lead to sickness, reduced fecundity, and death. Occlusal surfaces of molars and incisors in three populations each of Gorilla and Pan were videotaped and digitized. The quantity of incisal and molar occlusal dental wear and the lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were measured in 220 adult and 31 juvenile gorilla and chimpanzee skulls. Rates of dental wear were calculated in juveniles by scoring the degree of wear between adjacent molars M1 and M2. Differences were compared by principal (major) axis analysis. ANOVAs compared means of wear amounts. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the relationship between molar wear and incidence of dental disease. Results indicate that quantities of wear are significantly greater in permanent incisors and molars and juvenile molars of gorillas compared to chimpanzees. The lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were predominantly suboptimal. Western lowland gorillas have the highest quantities of wear and the most molars with suboptimal wear. The highest rates of wear are seen in Pan paniscus and Pan t. troglodytes, and the lowest rates are found in P.t. schweinfurthii and G. g. graueri. Among gorillas, G. b. beringei have the highest rates but low amounts of wear. Coefficients between wear and dental disease were low, but significant when all teeth were combined. Gorilla teeth are durable, and wear does not lead to mechanical senescence in this sample.

  17. Determining the direction of tooth grinding: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Berge, F; te Poel, J; Ranjitkar, S; Kaidonis, J A; Lobbezoo, F; Hughes, T E; Townsend, G C

    2012-08-01

    The analysis of microwear patterns, including scratch types and widths, has enabled reconstruction of the dietary habits and lifestyles of prehistoric and modern humans. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine whether an assessment of microwear features of experimental scratches placed on enamel, perpendicularly to the direction of grinding, could predict the grinding direction. Experimental scratches were placed using a scalpel blade on standardised wear facets that had been prepared by wearing opposing enamel surfaces in an electromechanical tooth wear machine. These control 'baseline' facets (with unworn experimental scratches) were subjected to 50 wear cycles, so that differential microwear could be observed on the leading and trailing edges of the 'final' facets. In Group 1 (n=28), the 'footprint' microwear patterns corresponding to the known grinding direction of specimens in the tooth wear machine were identified. Then, they were used to predict the direction of tooth grinding blindly in the same sample after a 2-week intermission period. To avoid overfitting the predictive model, its sensitivity was also cross-validated in a new sample (Group 2, n=14). A crescent-shaped characteristic observed in most experimental scratches matched the grinding direction on all occasions. The best predictor of the direction of grinding was a combined assessment of the leading edge microwear pattern and the crescent characteristic (82.1% in Group 1 and 92.9% in Group 2). In conclusion, a simple scratch test can determine the direction of tooth grinding with high reliability, although further improvement in sensitivity is desirable. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Tool Wear Analysis due to Machining In Super Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polishetty Ashwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents tool wear study when a machinability test was applied using milling on Super Austenitic Stainless Steel AL6XN alloy. Eight milling trials were performed under two cutting speeds, 100 m/min and 150 m/min, combined with two feed rates at 0.1mm/tooth and 0.15 mm/tooth and two depth of cuts at 2 mm and 3 mm. An Alicona 3D optical surface profilometer was used to scan cutting inserts flank and rake face areas for wear. Readings such as maximum and minimum deviations were extracted and used to analyse the outcomes. Results showed various types of wear were generated on the tool rake and flank faces. The common formed wear was the crater wear. The formation of the build-up edge was observed on the rake face of the cutting tool.

  19. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  20. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lateral incisor. This may be accomplished by adding plastic or porcelain filling material or a porcelain crown ... This type of bridge requires much less tooth reduction of adjacent teeth, and there is no danger ...

  1. To Tell the Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Activity Sheets 2018 Brushing Calendar Sports Safety National Nutrition Month Choose Water for a Sparkling Smile Holiday Workshop Thanksgiving Back to School Fourth of July Fun Tooth Fairy Sugar Wars Valentine's Day Halloween Defeat Monster Mouth! Color and ...

  2. Polymer wear evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerbon, Mikkel; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wear plays an increasing role in manufacturing of machine parts for e.g. medical devices. Some of these have an expected lifetime of five to eight years during which very little wear of the components is acceptable. Too much wear compromises the dosage accuracy of the device and thereby...... the safety of the patients. Prediction of the wear of polymers is complicated by the low thermal conductivity of this kind of material. It implies that any acceleration of testing conditions by increased contact pressure and/or sliding velocity will make the polymer fail due to exaggerated heat buildup....... This is not the kind of wear observed in medical devices. In the present work a method was developed capable of evaluating the wear progression in polymer-polymer contacts. The configuration of the setup is injection moulded specimens consisting of an upper part having a toroid shape and a lower flat part. The sliding...

  3. Modeling wear of cast Ti alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S; Koike, Marie; Okabe, Toru

    2007-05-01

    The wear behavior of Ti-based alloys was analyzed by considering the elastic-plastic fracture of individual alloys in response to the relevant contact stress field. Using the contact stresses as the process driving force, wear was computed as the wear rate or volume loss as a function of hardness and tensile ductility for Ti-based cast alloys containing an alpha, alpha+beta or beta microstructure with or without the intermetallic precipitates. Model predictions indicated that wear of Ti alloys increases with increasing hardness but with decreasing fracture toughness or tensile ductility. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data to elucidate the roles of microstructure in wear and contrasted against those in grindability.

  4. Tooth eruption and browridge formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M D

    1982-05-01

    One of the most reasonable hypotheses regarding the functional significance of the browridge is that the supraorbital torus forms in response to masticatory stress during development. Oyen, Walker, and Rice (1979) have recently proposed a model that tests this hypothesis: if browridges are functionally related to masticatory stresses on the cranial vault, then changes in the biomechanics of the masticatory system ought to be reflected by changes in the browridge. To test their model they attempted to relate biomechanical discontinuities resulting from tooth eruption to episodes of bone deposition on the supraorbital tori of a developmental series of dry Papio crania. This paper reports on a parallel test of the model on a cross-sectional sample of Australian Aboriginal juvenile crania. This sample showed no relation between tooth eruption and the supraorbital surface morphology thought to be indicative of active bone deposition. It is also demonstrated that no significant relationship between tooth eruption and episodes of bone deposition is shown by the Papio sample. It is concluded that the use of small cross-sectional samples of dry crania does not provide a valid test of the model.

  5. Comparative Investigation on Tool Wear during End Milling of AISI H13 Steel with Different Tool Path Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesta, Erry Yulian T.; Riza, Muhammad; Avicena

    2018-03-01

    Tool wear prediction plays a significant role in machining industry for proper planning and control machining parameters and optimization of cutting conditions. This paper aims to investigate the effect of tool path strategies that are contour-in and zigzag tool path strategies applied on tool wear during pocket milling process. The experiments were carried out on CNC vertical machining centre by involving PVD coated carbide inserts. Cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were set to vary. In an experiment with three factors at three levels, Response Surface Method (RSM) design of experiment with a standard called Central Composite Design (CCD) was employed. Results obtained indicate that tool wear increases significantly at higher range of feed per tooth compared to cutting speed and depth of cut. This result of this experimental work is then proven statistically by developing empirical model. The prediction model for the response variable of tool wear for contour-in strategy developed in this research shows a good agreement with experimental work.

  6. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... milk, ice cream, honey, sugar, soda, dried fruit, cake, cookies, hard candy and mints, dry cereal, and ... teeth can wear down and gums may recede, making teeth more vulnerable to root decay. Older adults ...

  7. Relationship between food habits and tooth erosion occurrence in Malaysian University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Lee, Mei Tee; Ali, Nor Hazirah Muhammad; Samynathan, Selvamary; Jie, Ying Phor; Ismail, Noor Hasnani; Bibiana Hui Ying, Yong; Wei Seng, Yeo; Yahya, Nurul Asyikin

    2012-04-01

    Tooth erosion is a growing dental problem; however, the role of diet in the aetiology of tooth erosion is unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the association between tooth erosion occurrence and the consumption of acidic foods and drinks among undergraduate university students. A total of 150 undergraduate students (33 males and 117 females) aged 19 to 24 years at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia participated in this study. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination was used to assess the occurrence of tooth erosion. Information regarding dental hygiene practices, usual dietary habits, and consumption of acidic foods and drinks was obtained through a structured questionnaire. In all, 68% of subjects had tooth erosion. Subjects who reported having received information about healthy eating were less likely to have tooth erosion (χ(2) [1, N = 150] = 7.328, P = 0.007). The frequencies of milk (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.13-0.67) and tea/coffee (adjusted OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.19-0.95) consumption were negatively associated with tooth erosion. Dental hygiene practice, the frequency and amount of acidic food and drink intake, and body mass index classification were not significantly associated with the risk of tooth erosion (P > 0.05). A high prevalence of tooth erosion was observed among this group of students. Preventive measures, such as dietary advice and increased consumption of milk at a younger age, may reduce the occurrence of tooth erosion among this age group.

  8. Abutment tooth loss in patients with overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Qian, Fang

    2004-06-01

    Since the 1960s, the use of natural teeth as overdenture abutments has become part of accepted clinical practice. Several longitudinal studies have been conducted, but tooth loss has not been reported to be a significant problem. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of tooth loss in a prospective cohort study of subjects wearing overdentures. The study, conducted between 1973 and 1994, evaluated 273 subjects (62.3 percent male) with a mean age of 59.6 years. Of the 273 subjects with 666 abutments, 74 lost 133 abutments. The most common cause of tooth loss was periodontal disease (29.3 percent) followed by periapical lesions (18.8 percent) and caries (16.5 percent). Through logistic regression, the authors found that subjects who lost teeth were more likely to have medical problems that could cause soft-tissue lesions of the oral mucosa, were less likely to use fluoride daily and were less likely to return for yearly recall visits. The authors found 22 vertical fractures in 17 subjects. Chi2 analysis revealed that overdenture teeth in the maxillary arch that were opposed by natural teeth were more likely to experience vertical fractures. In a study that followed up some patients for as long as 22 years, the rate of tooth loss was 20.0 percent. Many of these failures could have been prevented if patients had practiced better oral hygiene. The findings suggest that if a dentist recommends overdenture therapy, the patient needs to be examined regularly to reduce the risk of experiencing caries and periodontal disease. Also, if the abutments are in the maxilla and are opposed by natural teeth, the dentist should consider using thimble crowns to reduce the risk of vertical fractures.

  9. GABA and glutamate levels in occlusal splint-wearing males with possible bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; Romito, Laura M; Dzemidzic, Mario; Dydak, Ulrike; Xu, Jun; Bodkin, Cynthia L; Manchanda, Shalini; Byrd, Kenneth E

    2015-07-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of anxiety behavioural disorders such as panic disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder and is also implicated in the manifestation of tooth-grinding and clenching behaviours generally known as bruxism. In order to test whether the stress-related behaviours of tooth-grinding and clenching share similar underlying mechanisms involving GABA and other metabolites as do anxiety-related behavioural disorders, we performed a Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) study for accurate, in vivo metabolite quantification in anxiety-related brain regions. MRS was performed in the right hippocampus and right thalamus involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis system, together with a motor planning region (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/pre-supplementary motor area) and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Eight occlusal splint-wearing men (OCS) with possible tooth-grinding and clenching behaviours and nine male controls (CON) with no such behaviour were studied. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed significant Group×Region interaction for GABA+ (p = 0.001) and glutamate (Glu) (p = 0.031). Between-group post hoc ANOVA showed significantly lower levels of GABA+ (p = 0.003) and higher levels of Glu (p = 0.002) in DLPFC of OCS subjects. These GABA+ and Glu group differences remained significant (GABA+, p = 0.049; Glu, p = 0.039) after the inclusion of anxiety as a covariate. Additionally, GABA and Glu levels in the DLPFC of all subjects were negatively related (Pearson's r = -0.75, p = 0.003). These findings indicate that the oral behaviours of tooth-grinding and clenching, generally known as bruxism, may be associated with disturbances in brain GABAergic and glutamatergic systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Wear of resin composites: Current insights into underlying mechanisms, evaluation methods and influential factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimasa Tsujimoto

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The application of resin composites in dentistry has become increasingly widespread due to the increased aesthetic demands of patients, improvements in the formulation of resin composites, and the ability of these materials to bond to tooth structures, together with concerns about dental amalgam fillings. As resistance to wear is an important factor in determining the clinical success of resin composite restoratives, this review article defines what constitutes wear and describes the major underlying phenomena involved in this process. Insights are further included on both in vivo and in vitro tests used to determine the wear resistance of resin composite and the relationships between these tests. The discussion focuses on factors that contribute to the wear of resin composite. Finally, future perspectives are included on both clinical and laboratory tests and on the development of resin composite restorations. Keywords: Resin composites, Wear resistance, Wear testing

  11. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is for ...

  12. Abrasive wear of ceramic wear protection at ambient and high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, M.; Adam, K.; Tumma, M.; Alessio, K. O.

    2017-05-01

    Ceramic wear protection is often applied in abrasive conditions due to their excellent wear resistance. This is especially necessary in heavy industries conveying large amounts of raw materials, e.g. in steel industry. Some plants also require material transport at high temperatures and velocities, making the need of temperature stable and abrasion resistant wear protection necessary. Various types and wear behaviour of ceramic protection are known. Hence, the goal of this study is to identify the best suitable ceramic materials for abrasive conditions in harsh environments at temperatures up to 950°C and severe thermal gradients. Chamottes, known for their excellent thermal shock resistance are compared to high abrasion resistant ceramic wear tiles and a cost efficient cement-bounded hard compound. Testing was done under high-stress three-body abrasion regime with a modified ASTM G65 apparatus enabling for investigations up to ~950°C. Thereto heated abrasive is introduced into the wear track and also preheated ceramic samples were used and compared to ambient temperature experiments. Results indicate a significant temperature influence on chamottes and the hard compound. While the chamottes benefit from temperature increase, the cement-bounded hard compound showed its limitation at abrasive temperatures of 950°C. The high abrasion resistant wear tiles represented the materials with the best wear resistance and less temperature influence in the investigated range.

  13. Rubber glove wearing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Takada, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    Rubber groves are attached each to an upper end of a glove putting vessel having an air-sucking hole on the bottom by enlarging an opening end of the rubber glove and turning back the inside to the outside. When the sucking device is operated, air in the glove putting device is sucked and the rubber glove is expanded by an atmospheric pressure. After expansion of the rubber glove to some extent, the sucking device is stopped, and presence or absence of failures of the rubber glove is confirmed by shrinkage of the rubber glove and by an indication value of a pressure gauge for detecting the pressure change in the vessel. Then, a hand is inserted to the expanded rubber glove, and a detaching switch in the vessel is pushed by a finger tip. A detaching piece at the upper end of the vessel is protruded outwardly to enlarge the turned-back portion of the rubber glove to easily release the rubber glove from the putting vessel, and the rubber glove is put on. This enables to wear the rubber glove and conduct failure test simultaneously. Further, a user can put on the rubber glove without touching the outside of the rubber glove. (I.N.)

  14. Elderly complete denture wearers: a social approach to tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Eftychia; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    To correlate emotional reactions to tooth loss with denture satisfaction attributes in elderly complete denture wearers. Total tooth loss is a serious life event, and poor oral health has an impact on daily life. Edentulism treated by rehabilitation with dentures can have a positive effect on patients' self-image and social behaviour. A group of 80 edentulous subjects undergoing routine prosthetic care in a Greek Department of Prosthetic Dentistry were interviewed using two structured questionnaires. The first questionnaire explored reactions to tooth loss, whereas the second measured their subjective experience of complete dentures. The responses to both questionnaires were compared using the statistical package SPSS v.17. The results showed significant correlation between aspects of tooth loss experience and complete denture satisfaction. Despite the fact that a substantial proportion of patients were satisfied with their complete dentures, some patients experienced increased social and psychological problems related to their edentulousness and the wearing of complete dentures. The aesthetic and functional aspects of complete dentures affected both patients' social behaviour and self-confidence. Total tooth loss was not only reflected in patient's social behaviour and self-image, but it had a complex and multifaceted impact on satisfaction from complete dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Rapid Analyses of Polyetheretherketone Wear Characteristics by Accelerated Wear Testing with Microfabricated Surfaces for Artificial Joint Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ying; Kuo, Chien-Wei; Fang, Hsu-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Wear particle-induced biological responses are the major factors resulting in the loosening and then failure of total joint arthroplasties. It is feasible to improve the lubrication and reduce the wear of artificial joint system. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is considered as a potential bearing material due to its mechanical characteristics of resistance to fatigue strain. The PEEK wear particles have been indicated to be involved in biological responses in vitro, and further studies regarding the wear phenomena and wear particle generation are needed. In this study, we have established an accelerated wear testing system with microfabricated surfaces. Various contact pressures and lubricants have been utilized in the accelerated wear tests. Our results showed that increasing contact pressure resulted in an increase of wear particle sizes and wear rate, and the size of PEEK wear particles can be controlled by the feature size of microfabricated surfaces. These results provided the information rapidly about factors that affect the morphology and amount of PEEK wear particles and can be applied in the future for application of PEEK on the biological articulation system.

  16. Nitrogen implantation of steels: A treatment which can initiate sustained oxidative wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, E.B.; Reinbold, R.; Missouri Univ., Rolla; Kohser, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Falex wear tests on mild (SAE 3135) steel samples treated by either nitrogen implantation (2.5x10 17 N 2 + cm -2 at 180 keV) or low temperature (about 315 0 C) oxidation are reported. The results show that both treatments lead to about an order-of-magnitude reduction in the long-term wear rate of the steel. In addition to the wear rate measurements, the wear member asymmetry behavior, scanning electron microscopy studies, Auger spectra and sputter profiles all indicate that the wear modes induced by both treatments are the same and are oxidative wear. These results confirm the previously proposed initiator-sustainer wear model in which implanted nitrogen simply acts as an initiator of favorable oxidative wear but is not directly involved in maintaining the sustained wear resistance. Possible mechanisms for both the initiation process and the sustained wear process are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  17. Grain size dependence of wear in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.; Rice, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Platt, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Pin-On-Disk (POD), microwear tests of Al 2 O 3 , MgO, MgAl 2 O 4 , and ZrO 2 , most being dense and essentially single phase, showed the reciprocal of wear following a hall-petch type relationship. However, extrapolation to infinite grain size always gave a lower intercept than most or all single-crystal values; in particular, Al 2 O 3 data projects to a negative intercept. Initial macro wear tests of some of the same Al 2 O 3 materials also indicate a hall-petch type grain-size dependence, but with a greatly reduced grain-size dependence, giving a positive hall-petch intercept. Further, the macrowear grain-size dependence appears to decrease with increased wear. It is argued that thermal expansion anisotropy (of Al 2 O 3 ) significantly affects the grain size dependence of POD wear, in particular, giving a negative intercept, while elastic anisotropy is suggested as a factor in the grain-size dependence of the cubic (MgO, MgAl 2 O 4 , and ZrO 2 ) materials. The reduced grain-size dependence in the macrowear tests is attributed to overlapping wear tracks reducing the effects of enhanced wear damage, e.g., from elastic and thermal expansion anisotropies

  18. Optical wear monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  19. Innovative Design and Performance Evaluation of Bionic Imprinting Toothed Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Wang, Xiaoyang; Tong, Jin; Stephen, Carr

    2018-01-01

    A highly efficient soil-burrowing dung beetle possesses an intricate outer contour curve on its foreleg end-tooth. This study was carried out based on evidence that this special outer contour curve has the potential of reducing soil penetration resistance and could enhance soil-burrowing efficiency. A toothed wheel is a typical agricultural implement for soil imprinting, to increase its working efficiency; the approach of the bionic geometrical structure was utilized to optimize the innovative shape of imprinting toothed wheel. Characteristics in the dung beetle's foreleg end-tooth were extracted and studied by the edge detection technique. Then, this special outer contour curve was modeled by a nine-order polynomial function and used for the innovative design of imprinting the tooth's cutting edge. Both the conventional and bionic teeth were manufactured, and traction tests in a soil bin were conducted. Taking required draft force and volume of imprinted microbasin as the evaluating indexes, operating efficiency and quality of different toothed wheels were compared and investigated. Results indicate that compared with the conventional toothed wheel, a bionic toothed wheel possesses a better forward resistance reduction property against soil and, meanwhile, can enhance the quality of soil imprinting by increasing the volume of the created micro-basin.

  20. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    OpenAIRE

    Nuvvula, Sailavanya; Chava, Vijay Kumar; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. Objective: to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A quest...

  1. In Vitro Investigation of Wear of CAD/CAM Polymeric Materials Against Primary Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Won Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of polymeric computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing CAD/CAM materials on antagonistic primary tooth wear. Five CAD/CAM polymeric materials were examined: Vipi Block Monocolor (VBM, Yamahachi polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA (YAP, Mazic Duro (MZD, Vita Enamic (ENA, and Pekkton (PEK. All of the specimens were tested in a thermomechanical loading machine with the primary canine as the antagonist (50 N, 1.2 × 105 cycles, 1.7 Hz, 5/55 °C. The wear losses of the antagonist tooth and the restorative materials were calculated using reverse modelling software and an electronic scale. VBM and ENA showed significantly higher antagonist tooth wear than PEK (p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference observed among VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05. PEK showed the largest value in both material volumetric and weight losses. In terms of material volumetric losses, there was no significant difference between all of the groups (p > 0.05. In terms of material weight losses, PEK was significantly larger than ENA (p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference between VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05. Volumetric and weight losses of materials showed similar wear behaviour. However, the wear patterns of antagonists and materials were different, especially in PEK.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict

  3. La huella de contacto entre flancos como indicador de la precisión de la transmisión por engranaje de tornillo sinfín. // The tooth contact pattern as indicator of the cylindrical wormgearing precision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rivero Llerena

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación es la creación de un procedimiento que permita evaluar el grado de precisión de latransmisión por tornillo sinfín, teniendo en cuenta los errores de fabricación y montaje propios de cada tecnología deelaboración. Se utilizó un método teórico, que combinado con las mediciones físicas de la huella de contacto, dieron lugar aun procedimiento que se fundamenta en el empleo de nomogramas que contienen los parámetros del contacto entre flancos.Se aprecia que el procesamiento de las imágenes digitales de la huella, permite establecer determinadas características decalidad del par engranado.Palabras claves: Engranaje de tornillo sinfín, grado de precisión, huella de contacto, montaje._________________________________________________________________________________Abstract:The objective of this investigation is the establishment of a procedure to evaluate the degree of accuracy of the wormgear transmission, taking into account the manufacturing errors and assembly. A theoretical method was used andcombined with the physical measurement of tooth contact pattern, giving as result a procedure focused on the use ofnomograms related to contact parameters between faces. It can be appreciated that digital image processing of toothcontact pattern give the possibility of state gear quality featuresKey words: Worm gear, accuracy, tooth contact patter.

  4. Geotribology - Friction, wear, and lubrication of faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Yuval; Reches, Ze'ev

    2018-05-01

    We introduce here the concept of Geotribology as an approach to study friction, wear, and lubrication of geological systems. Methods of geotribology are applied here to characterize the friction and wear associated with slip along experimental faults composed of brittle rocks. The wear in these faults is dominated by brittle fracturing, plucking, scratching and fragmentation at asperities of all scales, including 'effective asperities' that develop and evolve during the slip. We derived a theoretical model for the rate of wear based on the observation that the dynamic strength of brittle materials is proportional to the product of load stress and loading period. In a slipping fault, the loading period of an asperity is inversely proportional to the slip velocity, and our derivations indicate that the wear-rate is proportional to the ratio of [shear-stress/slip-velocity]. By incorporating the rock hardness data into the model, we demonstrate that a single, universal function fits wear data of hundreds of experiments with granitic, carbonate and sandstone faults. In the next step, we demonstrate that the dynamic frictional strength of experimental faults is well explained in terms of the tribological parameter PV factor (= normal-stress · slip-velocity). This factor successfully delineates weakening and strengthening regimes of carbonate and granitic faults. Finally, our analysis revealed a puzzling observation that wear-rate and frictional strength have strikingly different dependencies on the loading conditions of normal-stress and slip-velocity; we discuss sources for this difference. We found that utilization of tribological tools in fault slip analyses leads to effective and insightful results.

  5. Teachers' Perceptions of Adolescent Girls Who Wear Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Linda R.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Females, aged 10-14, were photographed wearing a body aid, a postauricular aid, or no hearing aid. Ratings by 60 college education majors indicated that subjects pictured wearing a hearing aid were rated lower on achievement but higher on factors of appearance, personality, and assertiveness than subjects without the aid. (Author/JDD)

  6. Beeswax as dental filling on a neolithic human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Coppa, Alfredo; Mancini, Lucia; Dreossi, Diego; Eichert, Diane; Turco, Gianluca; Biasotto, Matteo; Terrasi, Filippo; De Cesare, Nicola; Hua, Quan; Levchenko, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual's death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling.

  7. Beeswax as dental filling on a neolithic human tooth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bernardini

    Full Text Available Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual's death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling.

  8. Collar of Lady's Wear in Qing Dynasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-jun

    2007-01-01

    The research is started with a query that whether the width of collar in Qing Dynasty Is too small. The paper bases on the statistics which come from the collection of the Costume Museum of Donghua University. compares the results with the natlonal standard specification, then analyzes the structure and shape of collars in Qing Dynasty, and tells the relationship between collar and the garment. Furthermore, the paper discusses the function of lady's collar in Qing Dynasty and gives a suggestion that collar being an Indicator to distinguish women's wear from children's wear.

  9. Occlusal relief changes with molar wear in Pan troglodytes troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'kirera, Francis; Ungar, Peter S

    2003-06-01

    Most research on primate tooth form-function relationships has focused on unworn teeth. This study presents a morphological comparison of variably worn lower second molars (M(2)s) of lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla; n=47) and common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes; n=54) using dental topographic analysis. High-resolution replicas of occlusal surfaces were prepared and scanned in 3D by laser scanning. The resulting elevation data were used to create a geographic information system (GIS) for each tooth. Occlusal relief, defined as the ratio of 3D surface area to 2D planometric area of the occlusal table, was calculated and compared between wear stages, taxa, and sexes. The results failed to show a difference in occlusal relief between males and females of a given taxon, but did evince differences between wear stages and between taxa. A lack of significant interaction between wear stage and taxon factors suggests that differences in occlusal relief between chimpanzees and gorillas are maintained throughout the wear sequence. These results add to a growing body of information on how molar teeth change with wear, and how differences between primate species are maintained at comparable points throughout the wear sequence. Such studies provide new insights into form-function relationships, which will allow us to infer certain aspects of diet in fossils with worn teeth.

  10. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  11. Osteopatologias e alterações dentárias em Otaria byronia (Pinnipedia, Otariidae da costa do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Osteopathologies and tooth alterations in Otaria byronia (Pinnipedia, Otariidae from Rio Grande do Sul coast, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Rodrigues Braunn

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone diseases and tooth alterations in 47 specimens of Otaria byronia (Blainville, 1820, from southern Brazilian coast, were analized. Tooth wear and the associated bone pathologies were determined, as well as their percentuals. The main infection was osteomyelitis associated with tooth alterations, such as fractures and attrition, both of them exposing the pulp chamber. Tooth attrition increases with age, favoring fractures and their complications, including osteomyelitis, causing a high frequency of them in specimens presenting more pronounced tooth wear. In one specimen tuberculosis was found in the maxilla, perhaps primarily pulmonary. The high frequency of enamel hypoplasia might reflect cyclic food deficit. Infections and tooth fractures might be related to behaviour, such as fishermen interaction, territorial fighting, and accidents during food capture.

  12. Three-dimensional anatomy of equine incisors: tooth length, enamel cover and age related changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Equine incisors are subjected to continuous occlusal wear causing multiple, age related changes of the extragingival crown. It is assumed that the occlusal wear is compensated by continued tooth elongation at the apical ends of the teeth. In this study, μCT-datasets offered the opportunity to analyze the three-dimensional appearance of the extra- and intraalveolar parts of the enamel containing dental crown as well as of the enamel-free dental root. Multiple morphometric measurements elucidated age related, morphological changes within the intraalveolar part of the incisors. Results Equine incisors possess a unique enamel cover displaying large indentations on the mesial and distal sides. After eruption tooth elongation at the apical end outbalances occlusal wear for two to four years resulting in increasing incisor length in this period of time. Remarkably, this maximum length is maintained for about ten years, up to a tooth age of 13 to 15 years post eruption. Variances in the total length of individual teeth are related to different Triadan positions (central-, middle- and corner incisors) as well as to the upper and lower arcades. Conclusion Equine incisors are able to fully compensate occlusal wear for a limited period of time. However, after this ability ceases, it is expected that a diminished intraalveolar tooth length will cause massive changes in periodontal biomechanics. The time point of these morphodynamic and biomechanical changes (13 to 15 years post eruption) occurs in coincidence with the onset of a recently described destructive disease of equine incisor (equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis) in aged horses. However, further biomechanical, cell biological and microbiological investigations are needed to elucidate a correlation between age related changes of incisor morphology and this disease. PMID:24321365

  13. [Wear intensity and surface roughness of microhybrid composite and ceramic occlusal veneers on premolars after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Y; Jiang, T; Cheng, M X; Zhang, Y W

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the wear intensity and surface roughness of occlusal veneers on premolars made of microhybrid composite resin or two kinds of ceramics in vitro after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests. In the study,24 fresh extracted human premolars without root canal treatment were prepared (cusps reduction of 1.5 mm in thickness to simulate middle to severe tooth wear, the inclinations of cusps were 20°). The prepared teeth were restored with occlusal veneers made of three different materials: microhybrid composite, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate ceramic in the thickness of 1.5 mm. The occlusal veneers were cemented with resin cement. The specimens were fatigued using the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests after being stored in water for 72 h. The wear of specimens was measured using gypsum replicas and 3D laser scanner before and after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests and the mean lost distance (mm) was used to indicate the level of wear. The surfaces of occlusal contact area were observed and the surface roughness was recorded using 3D laser scanning confocal microscope before and after the fatigue test. Differences between the groups were compared using ONE-way ANOVA(Pcomposite group, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic group, and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic group was (-0.13±0.03) mm, (-0.05±0.01) mm and (-0.05±0.01) mm, the wear of microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two ceramic groups(Pcomposite was significantly higher than the two ceramic groups(Pcomposite(P=0.005) and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic (P=0.010). From the view of wear speed, microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two kinds of ceramics, but it was similar to enamel when the opposing tooth was natural. The surface roughness before the themocycling and cyclic mechanical loading test of microhybrid

  14. Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smits Peter D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The range of potential morphologies resulting from evolution is limited by complex interacting processes, ranging from development to function. Quantifying these interactions is important for understanding adaptation and convergent evolution. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of carnivoran and dasyuromorph tooth rows, we compared statistical models of the relationship between tooth row shape and the opposing tooth row, a static feature, as well as measures of mandibular motion during chewing (occlusion, which are kinetic features. This is a new approach to quantifying functional integration because we use measures of movement and displacement, such as the amount the mandible translates laterally during occlusion, as opposed to conventional morphological measures, such as mandible length and geometric landmarks. By sampling two distantly related groups of ecologically similar mammals, we study carnivorous mammals in general rather than a specific group of mammals. Results Statistical model comparisons demonstrate that the best performing models always include some measure of mandibular motion, indicating that functional and statistical models of tooth shape as purely a function of the opposing tooth row are too simple and that increased model complexity provides a better understanding of tooth form. The predictors of the best performing models always included the opposing tooth row shape and a relative linear measure of mandibular motion. Conclusions Our results provide quantitative support of long-standing hypotheses of tooth row shape as being influenced by mandibular motion in addition to the opposing tooth row. Additionally, this study illustrates the utility and necessity of including kinetic features in analyses of morphological integration.

  15. MOCEAN SURF WEAR -MALLISTO

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtovaara, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Surffi on urheilulaji, jossa kuljetaan aallon päällä surffilaudalla. Surffaus on lähtöisin Polynesiasta, mutta nykypäivänä surffausta harrastetaan ympäri maailmaa. Opinnäytetyö käsittelee surf wear -malliston suunnittelua ja toteuttamista omalle toi-minimelle Mocean. Työn tavoitteena oli suunnitella toimiva, mutta myös trendikäs mallisto naissurffareille. Mallisto sisältää bikineitä, surffipaitoja legginsejä ja shortseja. Mallisto on suunniteltu naissurffareille, jotka surffaavat lämpimis...

  16. Wear Particle Atlas. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-28

    Superintendent NOTICE Reproduction of this document in any form by other than naval activities is/Jotbvlhorized except isys^iedcil approval of the SecretarWof...constant. •.■, -1 "if -w \\ SÄNPLlWi V» IVf Figure 3.1.1.1 Simplified Oil Path Ref 21 Scott. D, McCullagh. PJ and Campbell GW Condition Monitoring...Wear Particles in Human Synovial Fluid Arthritis and Rheumatism, 24 (1981) 912-918 30 Evans. C H .andTew W P isolationof Biological Materials

  17. Adhesive, abrasive and oxidative wear in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is increasingly being used to provide wear resistance in metals and cemented tungsten carbides. Field trials and laboratory tests indicate that the best performance is achieved in mild abrasive wear. This can be understood in terms of the classification of wear modes (adhesive, abrasive, oxidative etc.) introduced by Burwell. Surface hardening and work hardenability are the major properties to be enhanced by ion implantation. The implantation of nitrogen or dual implants of metallic and interstitial species are effective. Recently developed techniques of ion-beam-enhanced deposition of coatings can further improve wear resistance by lessening adhesion and oxidation. In order to support such hard coatings, ion implantation of nitrogen can be used as a preliminary treatment. There is thus emerging a versatile group of related hard vacuum treatments involving intense beams of nitrogen ions for the purpose of tailoring metal surfaces to resist wear. (Auth.)

  18. A comparison between indirect and objective wear-time assessment of removable orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Timm C; Meyer-Gutknecht, Hannes; Mayer, Nicolai; Weber, Joachim; Weimer, Katja

    2017-04-01

    Patients do not always adhere to the wear times prescribed for removable orthodontic appliances. We evaluated the validity and usability of indirect wear-time assessment methods by comparing wear-time estimates with microelectronically measured wear times in patients with removable orthodontic appliances. Wear times of 33 expansion plates, 34 functional appliances, and 42 retention plates of patients aged 6-20 years (12.3±2.9 years, 50.5% female) were indirectly determined by practitioners using a questionnaire assessing five parameters on a 5-point Likert scale: appliance handling, appliance appearance, bite shift, tooth movement, and appliance fit. The perceived difficulty in assessing each parameter was rated. Actual wear times were evaluated with microelectronic sensors in the appliances. Regression analyses revealed that practitioners' decisions about wear times varied depending on the type of appliance and criteria used, with only one standard criterion best predicting estimated wear time for each appliance. Different standard criteria were better predictors of measured wear time: 22.3% of wear-time variability was explained by expansion plate appearance, 31.2% by functional appliance handling, and 18.8% by retainer fitting. However, practitioners rated the difficulty of assessment in most cases as 'easy'. The study was not double blinded for technical reasons, and practitioners may have considered the evaluation criteria more carefully than in normal daily practice. Practitioners' decisions about wear times based on standard criteria strongly vary depending on the type of appliance and criteria used. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. 'Your whole life is lived through your teeth': biographical disruption and experiences of tooth loss and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy; May, Carl; Exley, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    The experience and meaning of tooth loss and replacement has varied historically and culturally but has received relatively little attention from social scientists. Our study set out to understand these experiences in the context of the arrival of newer, dental implant treatments. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with 39 men and women who had experienced tooth loss and replacement. A thematic analysis was sensitised by previous sociological work on chronic illness, particularly Bury's notion of biographical disruption. We found that while for some individuals the loss of a tooth was relatively insignificant, for others it was devastating and disruptive. In seeking to understand this difference, the concept of biographical disruption was a helpful analytical tool. Our analysis identified two forms of disruption. The first related to the meanings of tooth loss (the neglected mouth) and denture wearing (a marker of old age). The second, embodied, disruption concerned the relationship between the self and mouth in those wearing dentures (the invaded, unreliable mouth) and could occur even where tooth loss and denture wearing had been biographically anticipated. © 2013 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Wear of polymers and composites

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelbary, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    In the field of tribology, the wear behaviour of polymers and composite materials is considered a highly non-linear phenomenon. Wear of Polymers and Composites introduces fundamentals of polymers and composites tribology. The book suggests a new approach to explore the effect of applied load and surface defects on the fatigue wear behaviour of polymers, using a new tribometer and thorough experiments. It discusses effects of surface cracks, under different static and cyclic loading parameters on wear, and presents an intelligent algorithm, in the form of a neural network, to map the relations

  1. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  2. Wear mechanisms of toughened zirconias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, P.C.; Libsch, T.A.; Rhee, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    The dry friction and wear behavior of toughened zirconias against hardened steel was studied using the falex ring and block technique. Three experimental ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 ceramics and two commerical ZrO 2 -MgO ceramics were investigated. Each ceramic was tested at 500 and 2000 rpm at normal loads in the range 2.3 to 40.8 kg. Significant trends in the friction and wear data were found correlating composition, test speeds, and loads. Microstructural examination of the ring, ceramic block, and wear debris has shown that the wear process is very complex and incorporates a number of mechanisms

  3. Influence of heat treatment on the wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Hanxiang; Qin, Jie; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shihong [China University of Petroleum, Qingdao (China)

    2017-02-15

    Wear phenomenon has caused severe damage or failure of fracturing tools in oil and gas industry. In this paper, influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties and wear resistance of fracturing tool made of lamellar graphite grey cast iron were investigated. The surface composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic microscope. Sliding wear tests were performed to study the tribological behavior. Tests results showed that wear rates of treated specimens decreased by 33 %. Besides, worn morphology and wear debris were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive Xray spectra (EDS). Wear failure mechanisms of specimens were identified. Furthermore, on-site experiment results indicated that wear loss of treated samples decreased by 37.5 %. The wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools can be improved obviously by the heat treatment.

  4. Influence of heat treatment on the wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Hanxiang; Qin, Jie; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shihong

    2017-01-01

    Wear phenomenon has caused severe damage or failure of fracturing tools in oil and gas industry. In this paper, influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties and wear resistance of fracturing tool made of lamellar graphite grey cast iron were investigated. The surface composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic microscope. Sliding wear tests were performed to study the tribological behavior. Tests results showed that wear rates of treated specimens decreased by 33 %. Besides, worn morphology and wear debris were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive Xray spectra (EDS). Wear failure mechanisms of specimens were identified. Furthermore, on-site experiment results indicated that wear loss of treated samples decreased by 37.5 %. The wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools can be improved obviously by the heat treatment

  5. AN EARLY JURASSIC SAUROPOD TOOTH FROM PATAGONIA (CAÑADÓN ASFALTO FORMATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR SAUROPOD DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carballido, José L

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Eusauropods were a group of herbivorous dinosaurs that evolved during the Early Jurassic and dominated the terrestrial ecosystems throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous. A peak of diversity is represented by the Late Jurassic, when most of the lineages of the derived clade, Neosauropoda, are represented. Different lineages of eusauropods differ in several morphological aspects, including a great diversity in gathering strategies, inferred by their dentition morphology and wear facets. Here we describe a new tooth morphotype that can be well differentiated from any other tooth recovered from the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Lower Jurassic-Middle-Jurassic. Therefore this new tooth morphology increase the evidence of a high diversity of sauropods during that time as well as providing evidence of advanced characters in the dentition of some Early Jurassic sauropods (e.g., subcylindrical and narrow crowns with single apical wear facet.

  6. Assessment of wear facets produced by the ACTA wear machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana R; Larsen, Liselotte; Dowling, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    . The mean wear depth was measured using the traditionally employed 2D and compared with the 3D profilometric (digital) techniques. Data were submitted to analyses of variance, Tukey's post hoc tests and Independent Samples Student's t-tests (where appropriate) at p...OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of a three-dimensional (3D) digital scanning method in determining the accuracy of the wear performance parameters of resin-based composites (RBCs) determined using a two-dimensional (2D) analogue methodology following in-vitro testing in an Academisch Centrum...... for Tandheelkunde Amsterdam (ACTA) wear machine. METHODS: Specimens compatible with the compartments of the ACTA wear machine specimen wheel (n=10) were prepared from one commercial and four experimental RBCs. The RBC specimens were rotated against an antagonist wheel in a food-like slurry for 220,000 wear cycles...

  7. Role of multiple cusps in tooth fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barani, Amir; Bush, Mark B; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-07-01

    The role of multiple cusps in the biomechanics of human molar tooth fracture is analysed. A model with four cusps at the bite surface replaces the single dome structure used in previous simulations. Extended finite element modelling, with provision to embed longitudinal cracks into the enamel walls, enables full analysis of crack propagation from initial extension to final failure. The cracks propagate longitudinally around the enamel side walls from starter cracks placed either at the top surface (radial cracks) or from the tooth base (margin cracks). A feature of the crack evolution is its stability, meaning that extension occurs steadily with increasing applied force. Predictions from the model are validated by comparison with experimental data from earlier publications, in which crack development was followed in situ during occlusal loading of extracted human molars. The results show substantial increase in critical forces to produce longitudinal fractures with number of cuspal contacts, indicating a capacity for an individual tooth to spread the load during mastication. It is argued that explicit critical force equations derived in previous studies remain valid, at the least as a means for comparing the capacity for teeth of different dimensions to sustain high bite forces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Advancements in all-ceramics for dental restorations and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Misbahuddin, Syed; Kazmi, Murtaza Raza; Qureshi, Sameer; Uddin, Muhammad Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a process that is usually a result of tooth to tooth and/or tooth and restoration contact. The process of wear essentially becomes accelerated by the introduction of restorations inside the oral cavity, especially in case of opposing ceramic restorations. The newest materials have vastly contributed toward the interest in esthetic dental restorations and have been extensively studied in laboratories. However, despite the recent technological advancements, there has not been a valid in vivo method of evaluation involving clinical wear caused due to ceramics upon restored teeth and natural dentition. The aim of this paper is to review the latest advancements in all-ceramic materials, and their effect on the wear of opposing dentition. The descriptive review has been written after a thorough MEDLINE/PubMed search by the authors. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of recent advancements and that they should always consider the type of ceramic restorative materials used to maintain a stable occlusal relation. The ceramic restorations should be adequately finished and polished after the chair-side adjustment process of occlusal surfaces. PMID:28042280

  10. Variables affecting orthodontic tooth movement with clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, Justin R; McGorray, Susan P; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we examined the impacts of age, sex, root length, bone levels, and bone quality on orthodontic tooth movement. Clear aligners were programmed to move 1 central incisor 1 mm over the course of 8 weeks. Thirty subjects, ages 19 to 64, were enrolled, and measurements were made on digital models (percentage of tooth movement goal achieved). Morphometric features and bone quality were assessed with cone-beam computed tomography. Data from this study were combined with data from 2 similar studies to increase the power for some analyses. The mean percentage of tooth movement goal achieved was 57% overall. Linear regression modeling indicated a cubic relationship between age and tooth movement, with a decreasing rate of movement from ages 18 to 35 years, a slightly increasing rate from ages 35 to 50, and a decreasing rate from ages 50 to 70. The final decreasing trend was not apparent for women. As would be expected, the correlation was significant between the percentage of the goal achieved and the cone-beam computed tomography superimposed linear measures of tooth movement. A significant negative correlation was found between tooth movement and the measurement apex to the center of rotation, but bone quality, as measured by fractal dimension, was not correlated with movement. The relationship between age and tooth movement is complex and might differ for male and female patients. Limited correlations with cone-beam computed tomography morphology and rate of tooth movement were detected. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microtomography evaluation of dental tissue wear surface induced by in vitro simulated chewing cycles on human and composite teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bedini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a 3D microtomography display of tooth surfaces after in vitro dental wear tests has been obtained. Natural teeth have been compared with prosthetic teeth, manufactured by three different polyceramic composite materials. The prosthetic dental element samples, similar to molars, have been placed in opposition to human teeth extracted by paradontology diseases. After microtomography analysis, samples have been subjected to in vitro fatigue test cycles by servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. After the fatigue test, each sample has been subjected again to microtomography analysis to obtain volumetric value changes and dental wear surface images. Wear surface images were obtained by 3D reconstruction software and volumetric value changes were measured by CT analyser software. The aim of this work has been to show the potential of microtomography technique to display very clear and reliable wear surface images. Microtomography analysis methods to evaluate volumetric value changes have been used to quantify dental tissue and composite material wear.

  12. Tyre and road wear prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Both tyre wear and road polishing are complex phenomenon, which are obviously strongly related; the energy that polishes the road is the energy that wears the tyre. The both depend non-linearly on numerous parameters, like materials used, vehicle and road usage, environmental conditions (i.e.

  13. Factors affecting dental biofilm in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li; Chieng, Joyce; Wong, Connie; Benic, Gareth; Farella, Mauro

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the amount and the distribution of biofilm in patients wearing fixed appliances and its relation with age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing, and patient motivation. The sample comprised 52 patients (15.5 ± 3.6 years old, 30 females and 22 males) wearing fixed orthodontic appliances. Dental biofilm was assessed using a modified plaque index (PI). A questionnaire was used to collect patient's information, including gender, age, treatment motivation, and frequency of tooth brushing. Gingival (PI score = 0.9 ± 0.7), mesial (0.8 ± 0.6), and distal (0.8 ± 0.5) areas accumulated more biofilm than occlusal areas (0.3 ± 0.3) (P appliances have the highest biofilm accumulation on the maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary canines, particularly in the gingival area and areas behind arch wires. Less biofilm was observed in female and adult patients and in those who were self-motivated and brushed their teeth more often.

  14. Evaluation of dry sliding wear behavior of silicon particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Li Guobin

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports a study on the wear property of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites 9Si/Al-Cu-Mg. A on rock wear-testing machine is used to evaluate the wear property of the composites, in which a GCrl5 steel ring is used as the counter face material. The wear behavior of the composites under different conditions is studied. The optical microscope and scanning electron microscope are used to analyze the worn surfaces and the subsurface of the composites in order to research the wear mechanism of the composites. Results indicate that the weight loss of the composite were lower than that of the matrix alloy

  15. Wear-Induced Changes in FSW Tool Pin Profile: Effect of Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlot, Pankaj; Jha, Kaushal; Dey, G. K.; Arora, Amit

    2018-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of high melting point metallic (HMPM) materials has limited application due to tool wear and relatively short tool life. Tool wear changes the profile of the tool pin and adversely affects weld properties. A quantitative understanding of tool wear and tool pin profile is crucial to develop the process for joining of HMPM materials. Here we present a quantitative wear study of H13 steel tool pin profile for FSW of CuCrZr alloy. The tool pin profile is analyzed at multiple traverse distances for welding with various tool rotational and traverse speeds. The results indicate that measured wear depth is small near the pin root and significantly increases towards the tip. Near the pin tip, wear depth increases with increase in tool rotational speed. However, change in wear depth near the pin root is minimal. Wear depth also increases with decrease in tool traverse speeds. Tool pin wear from the bottom results in pin length reduction, which is greater for higher tool rotational speeds, and longer traverse distances. The pin profile changes due to wear and result in root defect for long traverse distance. This quantitative understanding of tool wear would be helpful to estimate tool wear, optimize process parameters, and tool pin shape during FSW of HMPM materials.

  16. [Esthetic analysis on immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-wei; Wang, Guo-shi; Sha, Yan-zhi

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the esthetic outcomes of immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla with the pink esthetic score (PES). Nine patients were treated with 9 Straumann implants by immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla. Assessment of PES after crown placement at 1 week (baseline) and 6 months after implantation was conducted. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0 software package. Nine implants achieved a retention rate of 100%. PES for single-tooth implant was 10.33 ± 1.50 at 1 week and 11.44 ± 0.88 at 6 months after crown placement. The difference was significant(P=0.021). This study indicates that immediate single-tooth implant restoration in anterior maxilla is predictable. Immediate single-tooth implantation can result in good clinical esthetic results in most patients with single-tooth missing in anterior maxilla.

  17. On the Determination of the Gear Teeth Wear Using an Inductive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Atamanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem to measure the teeth wear of rotating gear wheels and a possibility to create simple, reliable and inexpensive mobile systems of diagnostics allowing to record the wear in the course of use are presently relevant. The paper presents implemented technical solutions as a result of work. The aim of the work was to prove experimentally that it is possible to measure the teeth wear of a gear wheel using a passive inductive sensor and a positioning disk. The technique to determine the wear uses a phase-chronometric method developed at BMSTU.To reach the objective, an experimental installation was designed and made. Works are performed, and experimental results of used stationary inductive sensors of passive type to measure the ferromagnetic gear wheels wear of reducers in use are received. The technique for defining the points at the output signal of the inductive sensor, which correspond to the specified points of the tooth profile and, in particular, to the profile points on a pitch circle of the tooth of gear wheel has been developed. Experiments allowed us to define the main dependences of signal parameters on the sizes and arrangement of the sensor magnet with respect to the passing tooth in the course of rotation, as well as on the number of the sensor coil turns, speed of gear wheel rotation, and on the gap size between the end face of the sensor and the top of a tooth.The technique for positioning the sensor with respect to tooth has been deve loped. In particular, it allows us to position a sensor at any point of the involute, including also a point of the profile on a pitch circle. This is necessary to adjust the sensor. The conducted researches allowed us to develop a technique for exact measuring system adjustment to a hitch circle of the gear wheel and to develop for this purpose a system of diagnostics and measurement of teeth wear with the wheel being rotated. The results of work performed at the JSC ELARA in Cheboksary city

  18. DENTAL WEAR CAUSED BY ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BRUXISM AND GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE: A REHABILITATION REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Branco, Carolina Assaf; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra; Fernandes, Alfredo J?lio; Soares, Carlos Jos?

    2007-01-01

    Bruxism is a pathological activity of the stomatognathic system that involves tooth grinding and clenching during parafunctional jaw movements. Clinical signs of bruxism are mostly related to dental wear and muscular and joint discomforts, but a large number of etiological factors can be listed, as local, systemic, psychological and hereditary factors. The association between bruxism, feeding and smoking habits and digestive disorders may lead to serious consequences to dental and related str...

  19. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp: proteomics of human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The unique pulp-dentin complex demonstrates strong regenerative potential, which enables it to respond to disease and traumatic injury. Identifying the proteins of the pulp-dentin complex is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of regeneration, tissue calcification, defense processes, and the reparation of dentin by dental pulp. The lack of knowledge of these proteins limits the development of more efficient therapies. The proteomic profile of human tooth pulp was investigated and compared with the proteome of human dentin and blood. The samples of tooth pulp were obtained from 5 sound permanent human third molars of 5 adults (n = 5). The extracted proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and identified by correlating mass spectra to the proteomic databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 2 proteins were detected for the first time in an actual human sample. The identified tooth pulp proteins have a variety of functions: structural, catalytic, transporter, protease activity, immune response, and many others. In a comparison with dentin and blood plasma, 140 (pulp/dentin) shared proteins were identified, 37 of which were not observed in plasma. It can be suggested that they might participate in the unique pulp-dentin complex. This proteomic investigation of human tooth pulp, together with the previously published study of human dentin, is one of the most comprehensive proteome lists of human teeth to date. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Buchtova, Marcela; Dosedelova, Hana; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid, and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus, and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development. PMID:24611053

  1. Effect of Orthodontic Tooth Movement on Salivary Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiven Adhitya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Aspartate aminotransferase is one of biological indicator in gingival crevicular fluid (CGF. Force orthodontic application could increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in CGF. However, the increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in saliva due to orthodontic force and its correlation between aspartate aminotransferase activity and tooth movement remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate application orthodontic force on the aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva based on the duration of force and finding correlation between tooth movement and aspartate aminotransferase activity. Methods: Twenty saliva samples collected before extraction of first premolar, at the time of force application for canine retraction and after force application. The canines retraction used 100 grams of interrupted force (module chain for thirty days. The collection of saliva and the measurement of tooth movement were carried out 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days after force application. The measurement of aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva was done using spectrophotometer. Results: Application of orthodontic force influences the salivary aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=25.290, p=0.000. Furthermore, tooth movement correlated with aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=0.429, p=0.000. Conclusion: Aspartate aminotransferase activity could be used as tooth movement indicator that related to the duration of force application.DOI : 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.128

  2. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldrich eZahradnicek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development.

  3. Extended wearing trial of Trifield lens device for 'tunnel vision'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Russell L; Giorgi, Robert G; Berson, Eliot L; Peli, Eli

    2010-05-01

    Severe visual field constriction (tunnel vision) impairs the ability to navigate and walk safely. We evaluated Trifield glasses as a mobility rehabilitation device for tunnel vision in an extended wearing trial. Twelve patients with tunnel vision (5-22 degrees wide) due to retinitis pigmentosa or choroideremia participated in the 5-visit wearing trial. To expand the horizontal visual field, one spectacle lens was fitted with two apex-to-apex prisms that vertically bisected the pupil on primary gaze. This provides visual field expansion at the expense of visual confusion (two objects with the same visual direction). Patients were asked to wear these spectacles as much as possible for the duration of the wearing trial (median 8, range 6-60 weeks). Clinical success (continued wear, indicating perceived overall benefit), visual field expansion, perceived direction and perceived visual ability were measured. Of 12 patients, nine chose to continue wearing the Trifield glasses at the end of the wearing trial. Of those nine patients, at long-term follow-up (35-78 weeks), three reported still wearing the Trifield glasses. Visual field expansion (median 18, range 9-38 degrees) was demonstrated for all patients. No patient demonstrated adaptation to the change in visual direction produced by the Trifield glasses (prisms). For reported difficulty with obstacles, some differences between successful and non-successful wearers were found. Trifield glasses provided reported benefits in obstacle avoidance to 7 of the 12 patients completing the wearing trial. Crowded environments were particularly difficult for most wearers. Possible reasons for long-term discontinuation and lack of adaptation to perceived direction are discussed.

  4. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Child First See a Dentist? The History of Dental Advances Why is Oral Health Important for Men? What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | ...

  5. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and oral health information you need from ... Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | ...

  6. Wear behaviour of Armco iron after irradiation with neutrons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szatzschneider, K.

    1977-04-01

    The effects of neutron and alpha particle irradiation on the wear behaviour of Armco iron were studied. For the investigation, a pin-desk test facility was designed and built. From the experiments an influence upon wear of the type of irradiation, and the radiation dose was determined, which, however, cannot be explained - on the basis of existing wear theories - by the change in the macroscopic-mechanical properties of the material. It has again been shown that an indication of the hardness is not sufficient to describe wear. The influence of the history of the material (irradiation, annealing, deformation) is very strong and connot be predicted because of the multiplicity of interdependences. Wear in the low wear area was identified as being due to oxidation, in the high wear area as metallic. (orig./GSC) [de

  7. Dry sliding wear behaviour of organo-modified montmorillonite filled epoxy nanocomposites using Taguchi's techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashmi; Renukappa, N.M.; Suresha, B.; Devarajaiah, R.M.; Shivakumar, K.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful fabrication of OMMT filled epoxy nanocomposites by high-shear mixing mehod. → Systematic tribological behaviour of the nanocomposites was made using Taguchi method. → Worn surface morphologies of the samples were discussed for different wear mechanisms. → Generation of wear data for sliding/bearing parts for different industries. -- Abstract: The aim of the research article is to study the dry sliding wear behaviour of epoxy with different wt.% of organo-modified montmorillonite (OMMT) filled nanocomposites. An orthogonal array (L 9 ) was used to investigate the influence of tribological parameters. The results indicate that the sliding distance emerges as the most significant factor affecting wear rate of epoxy nanocomposites. Experimental results showed that the inclusion of 5 wt.% OMMT nanofiller increased the wear resistance of the epoxy nanocomposite significantly. Furthermore, the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the wear mechanisms and to correlate them with the wear test results.

  8. Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; S?ndor, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation. Methods: A piezosurgical handpiece and its ...

  9. Stem cells for tooth engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bluteau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

  10. AUTOGENOUS TOOTH TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    ABSTRACT. A case of autotransplantation of a tooth in a 26 year old female African cleft palate patient is reported. This case report emphasizes the possibility and success of autotransplantation in our centre, it also emphasizes that transplantation is only technique sensitive but less equipment sensitive. It further stresses.

  11. Wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper several aspects of the wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals, ceramics and super-hard materials (CBN) in machining cast iron are discussed, with particular attention being given to high-speed machining of different cast iron grades. The influence of machining parameters, microstructure, composition and mechanical and chemical properties of the cutting tool and the work-piece material on wear are considered. (author)

  12. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yu Pan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration.

  13. Critical component wear in heavy duty engines

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, P A

    2011-01-01

    The critical parts of a heavy duty engine are theoretically designed for infinite life without mechanical fatigue failure. Yet the life of an engine is in reality determined by wear of the critical parts. Even if an engine is designed and built to have normal wear life, abnormal wear takes place either due to special working conditions or increased loading.  Understanding abnormal and normal wear enables the engineer to control the external conditions leading to premature wear, or to design the critical parts that have longer wear life and hence lower costs. The literature on wear phenomenon r

  14. A probability distribution model of tooth pits for evaluating time-varying mesh stiffness of pitting gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yaguo; Liu, Zongyao; Wang, Delong; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Huan; Lin, Jing

    2018-06-01

    Tooth damage often causes a reduction in gear mesh stiffness. Thus time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) can be treated as an indication of gear health conditions. This study is devoted to investigating the mesh stiffness variations of a pair of external spur gears with tooth pitting, and proposes a new model for describing tooth pitting based on probability distribution. In the model, considering the appearance and development process of tooth pitting, we model the pitting on the surface of spur gear teeth as a series of pits with a uniform distribution in the direction of tooth width and a normal distribution in the direction of tooth height, respectively. In addition, four pitting degrees, from no pitting to severe pitting, are modeled. Finally, influences of tooth pitting on TVMS are analyzed in details and the proposed model is validated by comparing with a finite element model. The comparison results show that the proposed model is effective for the TVMS evaluations of pitting gears.

  15. In vitro wear of four ceramic materials and human enamel on enamel antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Jun; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the wear of four different ceramics and human enamel. The ceramics used were lithium disilicate glass (e.max Press), leucite-reinforced glass (GN-Ceram), yttria-stabilized zirconia (Aadva Zr), and feldspathic porcelain (Porcelain AAA). Hemispherical styli were fabricated with these ceramics and with tooth enamel. Flattened enamel was used for antagonistic specimens. After 100,000 wear cycles of a two-body wear test, the height and volume losses of the styli and enamel antagonists were determined. The mean and standard deviation for eight specimens were calculated and statistically analyzed using a non-parametric (Steel-Dwass) test (α = 0.05). GN-Ceram exhibited greater stylus height and volume losses than did Porcelain AAA. E.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli showed no significant differences, and Aadva Zr exhibited the smallest stylus height and volume losses. The wear of the enamel antagonist was not significantly different among GN-Ceram, e.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. Aadva Zr resulted in significantly lower wear values of the enamel antagonist than did GN-Ceram, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. In conclusion, leucite-reinforced glass, lithium disilicate glass, and feldspathic porcelain showed wear values closer to those for human enamel than did yttria-stabilized zirconia. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  16. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thamizhmanii, S; Mohideen, R; Zaidi, A M A; Hasan, S

    2015-01-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips. (paper)

  17. Biogeneric tooth: a new mathematical representation for tooth morphology in lower first molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Albert; Blanz, Volker; Hickel, Reinhard

    2005-08-01

    A mathematical representation of tooth morphology may help to improve and automate restorative computer-aided design processes, virtual dental education, and parametric morphology. However, to date, no quantitative formulation has been identified for the description of dental features. The aim of this study was to establish and to validate a mathematical process for describing the morphology of first lower molars. Stone replicas of 170 caries-free first lower molars from young patients were measured three-dimensionally with a resolution of about 100,000 points. First, the average tooth was computed, which captures the common features of the molar's surface quantitatively. For this, the crucial step was to establish a dense point-to-point correspondence between all teeth. The algorithm did not involve any prior knowledge about teeth. In a second step, principal component analysis was carried out. Repeated for 3 different reference teeth, the procedure yielded average teeth that were nearly independent of the reference (less than +/- 40 microm). Additionally, the results indicate that only a few principal components determine a high percentage of the three-dimensional shape variability of first lower molars (e.g. the first five principal components describe 52% of the total variance, the first 10 principal components 72% and the first 20 principal components 83%). With the novel approach presented in this paper, surfaces of teeth can be described efficiently in terms of only a few parameters. This mathematical representation is called the 'biogeneric tooth'.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Human Tooth Pulp: Proteomics of Human Tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2014), s. 1961-1966 ISSN 0099-2399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA MZd(CZ) NT14324 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dentin * human pulp * tandem mass spectrometry * tooth proteome * 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.375, year: 2014

  19. Tooth development in Ambystoma mexicanum: phosphatase activities, calcium accumulation and cell proliferation in the tooth-forming tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wistuba, Joachim; Ehmcke, Jens; Clemen, Günter

    2003-06-01

    Prerequisites of tooth formation, cell proliferation in the tooth-forming tissues, calcium accumulation and the enzymatic activities of alkaline (ALP) and acid phosphatases (ACP) were investigated by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods in various developmental stages of the Mexican Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum. During the growth of replacement teeth, the tooth-forming tissues continually recruit cells from the surrounding regions. The basal layer of the oral epithelium, the dental lamina and sometimes even the outer enamel epithelium provide cells for the differentiated inner enamel epithelium, in which the active ameloblasts are localized. The differentiating odontoblasts are derived from proliferating cells situated basally to the replacement teeth in the mesenchymal tissue. When differentiation has started and the cells have become functional, proliferative activity can no longer be observed. Calcium is accumulated close to the site of mineralization in the inner enamel epithelium and in the odontoblasts as it is in mammals, elasmobranchii and teleostei. The activities of ACP and ALP related to the mineralization of the replacement teeth are separated spatially and not sequentially as they are in mammals. However, the results indicate a similar function of these enzymatic components in relation to tooth formation and maturation of mineral deposition. Most of the substantial processes related to tooth formation reported from other vertebrates occur in a manner similar to that in Ambystoma mexicanum, but there also seem to be basic mechanisms present that are realised in a unique way in this urodele.

  20. Occlusal splints for treating sleep bruxism (tooth grinding).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, C R; Silva, A B; Machado, M A; Saconato, H; Prado, G F

    2007-10-17

    effective for treating sleep bruxism. Indication of its use is questionable with regard to sleep outcomes, but it may be that there is some benefit with regard to tooth wear. This systematic review suggests the need for further investigation in more controlled RCTs that pay attention to method of allocation, outcome assessment, large sample size, and sufficient duration of follow up. The study design must be parallel, in order to eliminate the bias provided by studies of cross-over type. A standardisation of the outcomes of the treatment of sleep bruxism should be established in the RCTs.

  1. Fault Wear by Damage Evolution During Steady-State Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Sagy, Amir; Boneh, Yuval; Reches, Ze'ev

    2014-11-01

    Slip along faults generates wear products such as gouge layers and cataclasite zones that range in thickness from sub-millimeter to tens of meters. The properties of these zones apparently control fault strength and slip stability. Here we present a new model of wear in a three-body configuration that utilizes the damage rheology approach and considers the process as a microfracturing or damage front propagating from the gouge zone into the solid rock. The derivations for steady-state conditions lead to a scaling relation for the damage front velocity considered as the wear-rate. The model predicts that the wear-rate is a function of the shear-stress and may vanish when the shear-stress drops below the microfracturing strength of the fault host rock. The simulated results successfully fit the measured friction and wear during shear experiments along faults made of carbonate and tonalite. The model is also valid for relatively large confining pressures, small damage-induced change of the bulk modulus and significant degradation of the shear modulus, which are assumed for seismogenic zones of earthquake faults. The presented formulation indicates that wear dynamics in brittle materials in general and in natural faults in particular can be understood by the concept of a "propagating damage front" and the evolution of a third-body layer.

  2. Adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz; Taktak, Suekrue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, the wear and adhesion properties of BDI were investigated. → Boro-tempering process under several heat treatment conditions was examined. → Optical microscope, SEM and XRD analysis were carried out to investigate the microstructure. → It was observed that boro-tempering process improves micro-hardness and wear properties of ductile irons. -- Abstract: In this study, adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron (BDI) were investigated. Boro-tempering was carried out on two stage processes i.e. boronizing and tempering. At the first stage, ductile iron samples were boronized by using pack process at 900 o C for 1, 3, and 5 h and then, secondly tempered at 250, 300, 350, and 400 o C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of boro-tempered samples showed that FeB and Fe 2 B phases were found on the surface of the samples. The Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test was used to assess the adhesion of boride layer. Test result showed that adhesion decreased with increasing boriding time and increased with increasing tempering temperature. Dry sliding wear tests of these samples were performed against Al 2 O 3 ball at a constant sliding speed and loads of 5 and 10 N. Wear tests indicated that boro-tempering heat treatment increased wear resistance of ductile iron. In addition, it was found that while wear rate of boro-tempered samples decreased with increasing boriding time, there is no significant affect of tempering temperature on wear rate.

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  4. Canadian Eskimo permanent tooth emergence timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhall, J T; Belier, P L; Mayhall, M F

    1978-08-01

    To identify the times of emergence of the permanent teeth of Canadian Eskimos (Inuit), 368 children and adolescents were examined. The presence or absence of all permanent teeth except the third molars was recorded and these data subjected to probit analysis. Female emergence times were advanced over males. Generally, the Inuit of both sexes showed statistically significant earlier emergence times than Montreal children, except for the incisors. The present results do not support hypotheses indicating that premature extraction of the deciduous teeth advances the emergence of their succedaneous counterparts. There is some indication the controls of deciduous tooth emergence continue to play some part in emergence of the permanent dentition, especially the first permanent teeth that emerge.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-01-07

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2014-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  9. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2016-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  10. [Assessment of tooth bleaching efficacy with spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhao; Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the changes in CIE L*, a*, and b* at cervical, body, and incisal sites after tooth bleaching by using a spectrophotometer. Sixty-seven intact and healthy maxillary central incisors were in-vestigated. These incisors were darker than A3 according to the Vita Classical shade guide. The CIE tooth shade parameters L*, a*, and b* were simultaneously recorded at three tooth areas (cervical, body, and incisal) with a spectrophotometer before and after tooth bleaching (35%H2O2 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating). The shade dif-ferential (DeltaE) was calculated. ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson correlation analysis were used for data analysis. The efficacy rates of tooth bleaching were satisfactory, with 86.6%, 86.6%, and 85.1% in the cervical, body, and incisal sites, respectively. The average values of DeltaE were 5.09, 4.44, and 4.40 in the cervical, body, and incisal sites. Tooth bleaching significantly increased L* and significantly decreased a* and b* in all tooth areas (P spectrophotometer could objectively evaluate the whitening effect of tooth bleaching at the different tooth sites. The tooth bleaching system (35%H202 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating) exerts powerful bleaching actions in most of the tooth areas investigated. The order of tooth bleaching effectiveness is cervicalbody>incisal. Yellow coloration is decreased mainly at the cervical site, and brightness was increased mostly at theincisal site. The effectiveness of tooth bleaching increases as the baseline b* value increases.

  11. Wear of micro end mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the important issue of wear on micro end mills considering relevant metrological tools for its characterization and quantification. Investigation of wear on micro end mills is particularly difficult and no data are available in the literature. Small worn volumes cause large...... part. For this investigation 200 microns end mills are considered. Visual inspection of the micro tools requires high magnification and depth of focus. 3D reconstruction based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and stereo-pair technique is foreseen as a possible method for quantification...

  12. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A; Cecchini, Giancarlo M; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  13. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eLiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids versus snakes: (i the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element. The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as

  14. Calculation of wear (f.i. wear modulus) in the plastic cup of a hip joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The wear equation is applied to the wear process in a hip joint prosthesis and a wear modulus is defined. The sliding distance, wear modulus, wear volume, wear area, contact angle and the maximum normal stress were calculated and the theoretical calculations applied to test results. During the wear

  15. Dental wear caused by association between bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a rehabilitation report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Aparecida de Godoi Machado

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Bruxism is a pathological activity of the stomatognathic system that involves tooth grinding and clenching during parafunctional jaw movements. Clinical signs of bruxism are mostly related to dental wear and muscular and joint discomforts, but a large number of etiological factors can be listed, as local, systemic, psychological and hereditary factors. The association between bruxism, feeding and smoking habits and digestive disorders may lead to serious consequences to dental and related structures, involving dental alterations (wear, fractures and cracks, periodontal signs (gingival recession and tooth mobility and muscle-joint sensivity, demanding a multidisciplinary treatment plan. This paper presents a case report in which bruxism associated with acid feeding, smoking habit and episodes of gastric reflow caused severe tooth wear and great muscular discomfort with daily headache episodes. From the diagnosis, a multidisciplinary treatment plan was established. The initial treatment approach consisted of medical follow up with counseling on diet and smoking habits and management of the gastric disorders. This was followed by the installation of an interocclusal acrylic device in centric relation of occlusion (CRO for reestablishment of the occlusal stability, vertical dimension of occlusion, anterior guides and return to normal muscle activity (90-day use approximately. After remission of initial symptoms, oral rehabilitation was implemented in CRO by means of full resin composite restorations and new interocclusal device for protection of restorations. Satisfactory esthetics, improved function and occlusal stability were obtained after oral rehabilitation. The patient has attended annual follow-ups for the past 2 years. The multidisciplinary treatment seems to be the key for a successful rehabilitation of severe cases of dental wear involving the association of different health disorders.

  16. Dental wear caused by association between bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a rehabilitation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Branco, Carolina Assaf; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Soares, Carlos José

    2007-08-01

    Bruxism is a pathological activity of the stomatognathic system that involves tooth grinding and clenching during parafunctional jaw movements. Clinical signs of bruxism are mostly related to dental wear and muscular and joint discomforts, but a large number of etiological factors can be listed, as local, systemic, psychological and hereditary factors. The association between bruxism, feeding and smoking habits and digestive disorders may lead to serious consequences to dental and related structures, involving dental alterations (wear, fractures and cracks), periodontal signs (gingival recession and tooth mobility) and muscle-joint sensitivity, demanding a multidisciplinary treatment plan. This paper presents a case report in which bruxism associated with acid feeding, smoking habit and episodes of gastric reflow caused severe tooth wear and great muscular discomfort with daily headache episodes. From the diagnosis, a multidisciplinary treatment plan was established. The initial treatment approach consisted of medical follow up with counseling on diet and smoking habits and management of the gastric disorders. This was followed by the installation of an interocclusal acrylic device in centric relation of occlusion (CRO) for reestablishment of the occlusal stability, vertical dimension of occlusion, anterior guides and return to normal muscle activity (90-day use approximately). After remission of initial symptoms, oral rehabilitation was implemented in CRO by means of full resin composite restorations and new interocclusal device for protection of restorations. Satisfactory esthetics, improved function and occlusal stability were obtained after oral rehabilitation. The patient has attended annual follow-ups for the past 2 years. The multidisciplinary treatment seems to be the key for a successful rehabilitation of severe cases of dental wear involving the association of different health disorders.

  17. Visualization of Tooth for Non-Destructive Evaluation from CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hui; Chae, Ok Sam [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This paper reports an effort to develop 3D tooth visualization system from CT sequence images as a part of the non-destructive evaluation suitable for the simulation of endodontics, orthodontics and other dental treatments. We focus on the segmentation and visualization for the individual tooth. In dental CT images teeth are touching the adjacent teeth or surrounded by the alveolar bones with similar intensity. We propose an improved level set method with shape prior to separate a tooth from other teeth as well as the alveolar bones. Reconstructed 3D model of individual tooth based on the segmentation results indicates that our technique is a very conducive tool for tooth visualization, evaluation and diagnosis. Some comparative visualization results validate the non-destructive function of our method.

  18. Improved Prefrontal Activity and Chewing Performance as Function of Wearing Denture in Partially Edentulous Elderly Individuals: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kazunobu; Narita, Noriyuki; Iwaki, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of wearing a denture on prefrontal activity during chewing performance. We specifically examined that activity in 12 elderly edentulous subjects [63.1±6.1 years old (mean ± SD)] and 12 young healthy controls (22.1±2.3 years old) using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in order to evaluate the quality of prefrontal functionality during chewing performance under the conditions of wearing a denture and tooth loss, and then compared the findings with those of young healthy controls. fNIRS and electromyography were used simultaneously to detect prefrontal and masticatory muscle activities during chewing, while occlusal force and masticatory score were also examined by use of a food intake questionnaire. A significant increase in prefrontal activity was observed during chewing while wearing a denture, which was accompanied by increased masticatory muscle activity, occlusal force, and masticatory score, as compared with the tooth loss condition. Prefrontal activation during chewing while wearing a denture in the elderly subjects was not much different from that in the young controls. In contrast, tooth loss in the elderly group resulted in marked prefrontal deactivation, accompanied by decreased masticatory muscle activity, occlusal force, and masticatory score, as compared with the young controls. We concluded that intrinsic prefrontal activation during chewing with a denture may prevent prefrontal depression induced by tooth loss in elderly edentulous patients. PMID:27362255

  19. Abrasive wear of enamel by bioactive glass-based toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asad; Mneimne, Mohammed; Zou, Li Fong; Hill, Robert G; Gillam, David G

    2014-10-01

    To determine the abrasivity of a 45S5 bioactive glass based toothpaste on enamel as a function of the particle size and shape of the glass. 45S5 glass was synthesized ground and sieved to give various particle sized fractions toothpastes and their tooth brush abrasivity measured according to BS EN ISO11609 methodology. Enamel loss increased with increasing particle size. The percussion milled powder exhibited particles that had sharp edges and the pastes were significantly more abrasive than the pastes made with round ball milled powders. One interesting observation made during the present study was that there was preferential wear of the enamel at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), particularly with the coarse particle sized pastes.

  20. Utilization of radiometric method in evaluation of wear on human dental enamel in vitro by dental porcelain glazed and polished

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa; Campos, Tomie Nakakuki de; Adachi, Eduardo Makoto

    2005-01-01

    The dental porcelain is a material commonly used in prosthesis. Disadvantages of dental porcelain use include possibility to cause tooth or dental materials wear. Before its use in the mouth, surfaces are treated with polishing and/or glazing. This research used the radiometric method to verify the influence of these surface treatments on the porcelains of commercial brands: Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse. This method was originally developed for dentifrice abrasiveness evaluation. Five specimens of dental enamel and 10 specimens of each porcelain (5 glazed, 5 polished) were used. The dental enamel was flattened and irradiated with neutrons from the IEA-R1 (IPEN/CNEN) nuclear reactor. Then it was weared by each porcelain in sliding motion, with water. After 2,500 cycles for each porcelain specimen, the released enamel residue was measured. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of 32 P transferred to water from the irradiated tooth. Results varied from 2.57 to 5.81 μg of enamel /mm 2 weared surface. There was no statistical difference (α=0.05) between dental enamel wear caused by the same porcelains glazed or polished. The results suggest that adequate surface finishing depend on the type of dental porcelain. (author)

  1. Promoting positive health behaviours--'tooth worm' phenomenon and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X L; Hsu, C Y S; Xu, Y C; Loh, T; Koh, D; Hwarng, H B

    2012-03-01

    'Tooth worm' is a traditional belief about the pathogen of dental caries (tooth decay). Nevertheless, in our previous study, parental 'tooth worm' belief was linked to a reduced caries risk of their children. This study aimed to further characterize the impact of parental 'tooth worm' belief on their children's caries experience and its psychobehavioural mechanisms. analytic observational study. Thirteen randomly selected kindergartens in Singapore. 1,782 preschoolers aged 3-6 years. Each child received an oral examination and microbiological tests. Parents completed a self-administered questionnaire on their socio-demographic background, oral health knowledge/attitude and child's oral health habits. Multivariate analysis confirmed a reduced chance of 'high caries rate' (number of affected teeth > 2) among children whose parents held the 'tooth worm' belief (Odds Ratio = 0.41; 95% Confidence Interval = 0.19-0.89). With such perception among parents, children brushed their teeth more frequently (p = 0.042). Since no difference in oral hygiene was observed, the health benefit of the "tooth worm" perception may be acquired through the delivery of fluoride (an agent with proven anti-caries effect) during frequent toothbrushing episodes. This study revealed a 'tooth worm' phenomenon, indicating that parental 'tooth worm' belief is associated with early establishment of regular toothbrushing habit and reduction of dental caries in children. This phenomenon and its psychobehavioural mechanisms, enriching our understanding of oral health behaviours, have implications for effective health education.

  2. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth.

  3. Wear behavior of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plant operating condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-Sup; Hong, Jin-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Nam; Jang, Ki-Sang

    2003-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed on steam generator tubes materials at steam generator operating temperature. The material surfaces react with oxygen to form oxides. The oxide properties such as formation rate and mechanical properties are varied with the test temperature and alloy composition. So, it is important to investigate the wear properties of each steam generator tube materials in steam generator operating condition. The tests results indicated that the wear coefficient in work rate model of alloy 690 was faster than that of alloy 800. From the scanning electron microscopy observation, the wear scars were similar each other and worn surfaces were covered with oxide layers. It seemed that the oxide layers were formed by wear debris sintering or cold welding and these layer properties affected the wear rate of steam generator tube materials. (author)

  4. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  5. Wear resistance of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  6. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  7. Analysis of tooth tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, E.V.; Timchenko, P.E.; Kulabukhova, A.Yu.; Volova, L.T.; Rosenbaum, A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of healthy tooth tissue and tooth tissues during caries disease are presented. Features of Raman spectrum of tooth tissues during caries disease are obtained: the main changes are detected at wavenumbers 956 cm -1 .1069 cm -1 . corresponding to phosphates. and 1241 cm -1 . 1660 cm -1 . corresponding to collagen III and collagen I. respectively. Were introduced criteria allowing to detect caries and to identify weakening of tooth tissues. preceding the caries. The reliability of research results is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. (paper)

  8. Measurement of Wear in Radial Journal Bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.; Ligterink, D.J.; de Gee, A.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    this article, the measurement of wear in radial journal bearings is discussed, where a distinction is made between stationary and non-stationary contact conditions. Starting with Holm/Archard's wear law, equations are derived for the calculation of the specific wear rate k of the bearing material as

  9. Backside wear in modern total knee designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Prakash; Furman, Bridgette D; Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-02-01

    Although modularity affords various options to the orthopedic surgeon, these benefits come at a price. The unintended bearing surface between the back surface of the tibial insert and the metallic tray results in micromotion leading to polyethylene wear debris. The objective of this study was to examine the backside wear of tibial inserts from three modern total knee designs with very different locking mechanisms: Insall-Burstein II (IB II), Optetrak, and Advance. A random sample of 71 inserts were obtained from our institution's retrieval collection and examined to assess the extent of wear, depth of wear, and wear damage modes. Patient records were also obtained to determine patient age, body mass index, length of implantation, and reason for revision. Modes of wear damage (abrasion, burnishing, scratching, delamination, third body debris, surface deformation, and pitting) were then scored in each zone from 0 to 3 (0 = 0%, 1 = 0-10%, 2 = 10-50%, and 3 = >50%). The depth of wear was subjectively identified as removal of manufacturing identification markings stamped onto the inferior surface of the polyethylene. Both Advance and IB II polyethylene inserts showed significantly higher scores for backside wear than the Optetrak inserts. All IB II and Advance implants showed evidence of backside wear, whereas 17% (5 out of 30) of the retrieved Optetrak implants had no observable wear. There were no significant differences when comparing the depth of wear score between designs. The locking mechanism greatly affects the propensity for wear and should be considered when choosing a knee implant system.

  10. Assessment of wear dependence parameters in complex model of cutting tool wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antsev, A. V.; Pasko, N. I.; Antseva, N. V.

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses wear dependence of the generic efficient life period of cutting tools taken as an aggregate of the law of tool wear rate distribution and dependence of parameters of this law's on the cutting mode, factoring in the random factor as exemplified by the complex model of wear. The complex model of wear takes into account the variance of cutting properties within one batch of tools, variance in machinability within one batch of workpieces, and the stochastic nature of the wear process itself. A technique of assessment of wear dependence parameters in a complex model of cutting tool wear is provided. The technique is supported by a numerical example.

  11. Mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling limits tooth number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Elina; Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Balic, Anamaria; Jussila, Maria; Thesleff, Irma

    2018-02-21

    Tooth agenesis is one of the predominant developmental anomalies in humans, usually affecting the permanent dentition generated by sequential tooth formation and, in most cases, caused by mutations perturbing epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In addition, loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt feedback inhibitor AXIN2 lead to human tooth agenesis. We have investigated the functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during sequential formation of molar teeth using mouse models. Continuous initiation of new teeth, which is observed after genetic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the oral epithelium, was accompanied by enhanced expression of Wnt antagonists and a downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the dental mesenchyme. Genetic and pharmacological activation of mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling negatively regulated sequential tooth formation, an effect partly mediated by Bmp4. Runx2 , a gene whose loss-of-function mutations result in sequential formation of supernumerary teeth in the human cleidocranial dysplasia syndrome, suppressed the expression of Wnt inhibitors Axin2 and Drapc1 in dental mesenchyme. Our data indicate that increased mesenchymal Wnt signaling inhibits the sequential formation of teeth, and suggest that Axin2 / Runx2 antagonistic interactions modulate the level of mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling, underlying the contrasting dental phenotypes caused by human AXIN2 and RUNX2 mutations. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Experience of racism and tooth brushing among pregnant Aboriginal Australians: exploring psychosocial mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, J; Jamieson, L M; Priest, N; Parker, E J; Roberts-Thomson, K F; Lawrence, H P; Broughton, J; Paradies, Y

    2014-09-01

    Despite burgeoning evidence regarding the pathways by which experiences of racism influence health outcomes, little attention has been paid to the relationship between racism and oral health-related behaviours in particular. We hypothesised that self-reported racism was associated with tooth brushing, and that this association was mediated by perceived stress and sense of control and moderated by social support. Data from 365 pregnant Aboriginal Australian women were used to evaluate tooth brushing behaviour, sociodemographic factors, psychosocial factors, general health, risk behaviours and racism exposure. Bivariate associations were explored and hierarchical logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for tooth brushing. Perceived stress and sense of control were examined as mediators of the association between self-reported racism and tooth brushing using binary mediation with bootstrapping. High levels of self-reported racism persisted as a risk indicator for tooth brushing (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.27,0.98) after controlling for significant covariates. Perceived stress mediated the relationship between self-reported racism and tooth brushing: the direct effect of racism on tooth brushing was attenuated, and the indirect effect on tooth brushing was significant (beta coefficient -0.09; bias-corrected 95%CI -0.166,-0.028; 48.1% of effect mediated). Sense of control was insignificant as a mediator of the relationship between racism and tooth brushing. High levels of self-reported racism were associated with non-optimal tooth brushing behaviours, and perceived stress mediated this association among this sample of pregnant Aboriginal women.. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  13. FACTORS RELATED TO TOOTH LOSS AMONG INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN PHATHUM THANI, THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaaidee, Jeerateep; Chatrchaiwiwatana, Supaporn; Ratanasiri, Amornrat

    2017-01-01

    Tooth loss is an important oral health problem among Thai people. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of and factors associated with tooth loss among Thai industrial workers in order to apply preventive oral health programs to this population. The study consisted of 1,500 adults working in Nava Nakorn Industrial Estate, Pathum Thani Province, Thailand in 2014. Probability proportion to size cluster sampling was used and 16 clusters were included in the study. An oral health questionnaire was developed, evaluated for content validity by experts and then given to participants to fill out. The study population consisted of 621 males (41.4%) and 879 females (58.6%) aged between 19-25 years. The overall prevalence of tooth loss was 62.2% and the major reason for tooth loss was dental caries (60%). Results from multivariable logistic regression analysis show that factors associated with tooth loss were: having a history of scaling or tooth cleaning [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)= 2.47; 95% CI: 1.21-4.65], having dental caries with exposed pulp (AOR=4.12; 95% CI: 3.26-7.67), having tooth mobility due to periodontal disease (AOR=2.41; 95% CI: 2.71-5.22), having needed tooth restoration (AOR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.23-2.65), having a history of maxillofacial or a temporo-mandibular joint accident (AOR=2.13; 95% CI: 1.87- 3.23), wearing dentures (AOR=2.58; 95% CI: 2.17-6.72), using dental care services during the previous year (AOR=2.21; 95% CI: 1.26-4.57), eating snacks and candy daily (AOR=2.14; 95% CI: 1.82-2.92), having toothache (AOR=2.64; 95% CI: 1.43- 3.92), having dental caries (AOR=2.23; 95% CI: 1.62-3.27) and having a history of orthodontic treatment (AOR=3.61; 95% CI: 1.84-5.68). The Nagelkerke R squared for the model was 0.42. Our findings suggest several clinical, socio-economic and lifestyle factors are associated with tooth loss among these Thai industrial workers. An appropriate preventive oral health program targeting this high-risk group taking

  14. Interactions between dodecyl phosphates and hydroxyapatite or tooth enamel: relevance to inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Siân B; Barbour, Michele E; Shellis, R Peter; Rees, Gareth D

    2014-05-01

    Tooth surface modification is a potential method of preventing dental erosion, a form of excessive tooth wear facilitated by softening of tooth surfaces through the direct action of acids, mainly of dietary origin. We have previously shown that dodecyl phosphates (DPs) effectively inhibit dissolution of native surfaces of hydroxyapatite (the type mineral for dental enamel) and show good substantivity. However, adsorbed saliva also inhibits dissolution and DPs did not augment this effect, which suggests that DPs and saliva interact at the hydroxyapatite surface. In the present study the adsorption and desorption of potassium and sodium dodecyl phosphates or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to hydroxyapatite and human tooth enamel powder, both native and pre-treated with saliva, were studied by high performance liquid chromatography-mass Spectrometry. Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to analyse residual saliva and surfactant on the substrates. Both DPs showed a higher affinity than SDS for both hydroxyapatite and enamel, and little DP was desorbed by washing with water. SDS was readily desorbed from hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the phosphate head group is essential for strong binding to this substrate. However, SDS was not desorbed from enamel, so that this substrate has surface properties different from those of hydroxyapatite. The presence of a salivary coating had little or no effect on adsorption of the DPs, but treatment with DPs partly desorbed saliva; this could account for the failure of DPs to increase the dissolution inhibition due to adsorbed saliva. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of nitrogen ion implantation on wear studied by a new laboratory wear test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, E.; Paszti, F.; Vertessy, Z. (Central Research Inst. for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary))

    1991-05-01

    A new laboratory wear test is developed in which the wear trace is measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The advantage of the new test is that the wear rate is directly determinable. The new test setup has been used to study the effects of nitrogen implantation on the wear processes on 115CrV3 steel. The wear rate decreases by a factor of 2 at 4x10{sup 17} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2} implanted dose. (orig.).

  16. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Girot, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  17. Wear behavior of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal versus titanium and titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbara, Tsunemichi; Yajima, Yasutomo; Yoshinari, Masao

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) on the two-body wear behavior of titanium (Ti). Two-body wear tests were performed using TZP, two grades of cp-Ti or Ti alloy in distilled water, and the cross-sectional area of worn surfaces was measured to evaluate the wear behavior. In addition, the surface hardness and coefficient of friction were determined and an electron probe microanalysis performed to investigate the underlying mechanism of wear. The hardness of TZP was much greater than that of Ti. The coefficient of friction between Ti and Ti showed a higher value than the Ti/TZP combination. Ti was more susceptible to wear by both TZP and Ti than TZP, indicating that the mechanism of wear between TZP and Ti was abrasive wear, whereas that between Ti and Ti was adhesive wear. No remarkable difference in the amount of wear in Ti was observed between TZP and Ti as the opposite material, despite the hardness value of Ti being much smaller than that of TZP. (communication)

  18. Impact Fretting Wear Behavior of Alloy 690 Tubes in Dry and Deionized Water Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Bing Cai; Jin-Fang Peng; Hao Qian; Li-Chen Tang; Min-Hao Zhu

    2017-01-01

    The impact fretting wear has largely occurred at nuclear power device induced by the flow-induced vibration,and it will take potential hazards to the service of the equipment.However,the present study focuses on the tangential fretting wear of alloy 690 tubes.Research on impact fretting wear of alloy 690 tubes is limited and the related research is imminent.Therefore,impact fretting wear behavior of alloy 690 tubes against 304 stainless steels is investigated.Deionized water is used to simulate the flow environment of the equipment,and the dry environment is used for comparison.Varied analytical techniques are employed to characterize the wear and tribochemical behavior during impact fretting wear.Characterization results indicate that cracks occur at high impact load in both water and dry equipment;however,the water as a medium can significantly delay the cracking time.The crack propagation behavior shows a jagged shape in the water,but crack extended disorderly in dry equipment because the water changed the stress distribution and retarded the friction heat during the wear process.The SEM and XPS analysis shows that the main failure mechanisms of the tube under impact fretting are fatigue wear and friction oxidation.The effect of medium(water) on fretting wear is revealed,which plays a potential and promising role in the service of nuclear power device and other flow equipments.

  19. Dry sliding wear of Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Akbarzadeh Chiniforush

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of dry sliding wear are presented for ductile irons with composition Fe-3.56C-2.67Si-0.25Mo-0.5Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5 in wt.% with applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N for austempering temperatures of 270, 320, and 370 °C after austenitizing at 870 °C for 120 min. The mechanical property measurements show that the grades of the ASTM 897M: 1990 Standard can be satisfied for the selected austempering conditions. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Observations indicate that wear is due to subsurface fatigue with cracks nucleated at deformed graphite nodules.

  20. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  1. Investigation of EPR signals on tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlenko, A; Mironova-Ulmane, N; Polakov, M; Riekstina, D [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    2007-12-15

    Calcified tissues are involved in continues metabolic process in human organism exchanging a number of chemical elements with environment. The rate of biochemical reactions is tissue dependent and the slowest one at the tooth enamel, the most mineralized tissue of human organism. The long time stability and unique chemical composition make tooth enamel suitable for number of application. The assessment of individual radiation dose by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and evaluations of elemental composition by Instrumentation Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) are the well known procedures where properties of tooth enamel intensively used. The current work is focused on investigation of EPR signals and determination of chemical composition on several teeth samples having different origin. The EPR spectra and INAA element content of milk tooth, caries tooth, and paradantose tooth have been compared to each other. The results showed that the intensity of EPR signal is much higher for the caries tooth than the for paradantose tooth that is in agreement with depleted Ca content.

  2. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Friction and wear in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the design of a safe and reliable sodium-cooled reactor one of the more important problem areas is that of friction and wear of components immersed in liquid sodium or exposed to sodium vapor. Sodium coolant at elevated temperatures may severely affect most oxide-bearing surface layers which provide corrosion resistance and, to some extent, lubrication and surface hardness. Consequently, accelerated deterioration may be experienced on engaged-motion contact surfaces, which could result in unexpected reactor shutdown from component malfunction or failure due to galling and seizure. An overall view of the friction and wear phenomena encountered during oscillatory rubbing of surfaces in high-temperature, liquid-sodium environments is presented. Specific data generated at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) on this subject is also presented. (U.S.)

  4. Multidisciplinary treatment of tooth wear in a patient with Asperger’s Syndrome and dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Vermaire, J.H.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a patient who is referred by his home physician to a centre for special dental care because of the presence of severe oral pain with an existing dental phobia. The patient has Asperger's Syndrome. Besides his extreme fear for dental treatment and several deep carious

  5. Mathematical description of tooth flank surface of globoidal worm gear with straight axial tooth profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połowniak, Piotr; Sobolak, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    In this article, a mathematical description of tooth flank surface of the globoidal worm and worm wheel generated by the hourglass worm hob with straight tooth axial profile is presented. The kinematic system of globoidal worm gear is shown. The equation of globoid helix and tooth axial profile of worm is derived to determine worm tooth surface. Based on the equation of meshing the contact lines are obtained. The mathematical description of globoidal worm wheel tooth flank is performed on the basis of contact lines and generating the tooth side by the extreme cutting edge of worm hob. The presented mathematical model of tooth flank of TA worm and worm wheel can be used e.g. to analyse the contact pattern of the gear.

  6. Autogenous Transplantation for Replacing a Hopeless Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Khalilak, Zohreh; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation (ATT) is a simple and reasonable choice for replacing the missing teeth when a proper donor tooth is available. This report presents a case of successful ATT of a maxillary right third molar for replacement of mandibular right second molar with a concomitant endodontic-periodontal disease. The mandibular second molar was believed to be hopeless due to a severe damage to coronal tooth structure, inappropriate root canal treatment and apical radiolucency. After extraction of mandibular second molar and maxillary third molar (the donor), the tooth was re-implanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. Root canal therapy was then performed. After 3 years, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed satisfying results, with no signs and symptoms. The patient is asymptomatic and the transplanted tooth is still functional with no signs of marginal periodontal pathosis. Radiographies showed bone regeneration in the site of previous extensive periapical lesion, normal periodontal ligament with no signs of root resorption.

  7. Tooth whitening: what we now know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Current research about tooth whitening shows that it is safe and effective when manufacturer's protocol is followed, yet there are risks of which the profession and users should be aware. This update provides a summary of current research and assessment of the safety and efficacy of tooth whitening regimens. Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures by the public. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision. The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening. Current reports in the literature are reviewed that are related to the use of peroxide based whitening methods. These reports include in vitro studies for method optimization and mechanism as well as clinical studies on effects of various whitening regimens. When manufacturer's instructions are followed, hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide based tooth whitening is safe and effective. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with tooth whitening and instructed on identification of adverse occurrences so that they may seek professional help as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of reliability of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Nuno Marques; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Zheng, Cheng; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2016-08-01

    Information is lacking about the fatigue resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) tooth-colored implant custom abutment materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the reliability of different types of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments. Zirconia (Lava Plus), lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD), and resin-based composite (Lava Ultimate) abutments were fabricated using CAD-CAM technology and bonded to machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy inserts for conical connection implants (NobelReplace Conical Connection RP 4.3×10 mm; Nobel Biocare). Three groups (n=19) were assessed: group ZR, CAD-CAM zirconia/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; group RC, CAD-CAM resin-based composite/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; and group LD, CAD-CAM lithium disilicate/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments. Fifty-seven implant abutments were secured to implants and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin according to ISO standard 14801. Static failure load (n=5) and fatigue failure load (n=14) were tested. Weibull cumulative damage analysis was used to calculate step-stress reliability at 150-N and 200-N loads with 2-sided 90% confidence limits. Representative fractured specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to observe fracture patterns. Weibull plots revealed β values of 2.59 for group ZR, 0.30 for group RC, and 0.58 for group LD, indicating a wear-out or cumulative fatigue pattern for group ZR and load as the failure accelerating factor for groups RC and LD. Fractographic observation disclosed that failures initiated in the interproximal area where the lingual tensile stresses meet the compressive facial stresses for the early failure specimens. Plastic deformation of titanium inserts with fracture was observed for zirconia abutments in fatigue resistance testing. Significantly higher reliability was found in group ZR, and no significant differences in reliability were

  9. Morphometry, Microstructure, and Wear Pattern of Neornithischian Dinosaur Teeth From the Upper Cretaceous Iharkút Locality (Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virág, Attila; Ősi, Attila

    2017-08-01

    Teeth of iguanodontian ornithopods and ceratopsians could be remarkably similar, thus the referral of isolated dental material to particular neornithischian clades can be highly problematic. These groups are represented by the rhabdodontid Mochlodon vorosi and the basal coronosaurian Ajkaceratops kozmai in the Upper Cretaceous Csehbánya Formation at Iharkút (western Hungary). Whereas teeth of Mochlodon are common elements at the locality, no dental material belonging to Ajkaceratops was identified until now. Here we used mathematical statistical approaches, as well as tooth wear and dental microstructure analysis in order to decide whether the teeth previously referred to Mochlodon can be treated as a homogenous sample, or some remains belong rather to Ajkaceratops. According to our results, there was a striking morphological and structural convergence between the teeth of both taxa. However, the wear study revealed the existence of two different patterns within the sample. One is characterized by straight and parallel microstriations that suggest orthal movements during the jaw closure. This pattern was associated with Mochlodon. The other pattern appeared only on a few teeth, and it can be differentiated by its distinctive curved microstriations that indicate circumpalinal chewing. Because curved striations have never been described in ornithopods, but are found in several neoceratopsians, this pattern was associated here with Ajkaceratops. Here we present the first teeth that can provisionally be referred to the latter genus. We believe that the methodology discussed in this article will facilitate distinguishing ceratopsian and ornithopod teeth in other localities as well. Anat Rec, 300:1439-1463, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of autogenous tooth transplantation for replacement of the missing or unrestorable mandibular molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahiduj Jaman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the functional and occlusal stability of autogenous tooth transplantation. A total of 30 patients were included. Among them, 21 participants received transplanted first molar and the remaining 9 received transplanted second molar. In all the cases, donor tooth were third molar. In each participant, extraction of un-restorable first or second molar tooth was performed which was then replaced by atrumatic extracted third molar tooth. Each third molar tooth was placed in the recipient extracted socket, followed by the evaluation of the occlusion and then stabilized with arch bar and ligature wire. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed at 15 days, 3 and 12 months in respect to occlusal stability, tooth mobility and periodontal status. It was found that 23 transplanted tooth were successful and the remaining 7 tooth need long-term observation for the final outcome, which was statistically significant. It can be concluded that the autogenous tooth transplantation can replace missing tooth to ensure the preservation of function, aesthetic and to prevent bone resorption of the missing area of the jaw, which can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional outcome.

  11. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1 Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2 Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

  12. A new methodology for predictive tool wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Sik

    An empirical approach to tool wear, which requires a series of machining tests for each combination of insert and work material, has been a standard practice for industries since early part of the twentieth century. With many varieties of inserts and work materials available for machining, the empirical approach is too experiment-intensive that the demand for the development of a model-based approach is increasing. With a model-based approach, the developed wear equation can be extended without additional machining experiments. The main idea is that the temperatures on the primary wear areas are increasing such that the physical properties of the tool material degrade substantially and consequently tool wear increases. Dissolution and abrasion are identified to be the main mechanisms for tool wear. Flank wear is predominantly a phenomenon of abrasion as evident by the presence of a scoring mark on the flank surface. Based on this statement, it is reasonable to expect that the flank-wear rate would increase with the content of hard inclusions. However, experimental flank wear results did not necessary correspond to the content of cementite phase present in the steels. Hence, other phenomena are believed to significantly affect wear behavior under certain conditions. When the cutting temperature in the flank interface is subjected to high enough temperatures, pearlitic structure austenizes. During the formation of a new austenitic phase, the existing carbon is dissolved into the ferrite matrix, which will reduce the abrasive action. To verify the austenitic transformation, turning tests were conducted with plain carbon steels. The machined surface areas are imaged using X-ray diffraction the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). On the other hand, crater wear occurs as a result of dissolution wear and abrasive wear. To verify the wear mechanisms of crater wear, various coating inserts as well as uncoated inserts were

  13. Effect of CPP-ACP on the remineralization of acid-eroded human tooth enamel: nanomechanical properties and microtribological behaviour study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L; Zheng, J; Zhang, Y F; Qian, L M; Zhou, Z R

    2013-01-01

    Casein phosphopeptide-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) has been used to enhance tooth remineralization in the dental clinic. But the contribution of CPP-ACP to the remineralization of acid-eroded human tooth enamel is of widespread controversy. To confirm the application potential of CPP-ACP in the remineralization repair of tooth erosion caused by acid-attack, the effect of remineralization in vitro in 2% w/v CPP-ACP solution on the acid-eroded human tooth enamel was investigated in this study. The repair of surface morphology and the improvement of nanomechanical and microtribological properties were characterized with laser confocal scanning microscope, scanning electron microscope, nanoindentation tester and nanoscratch tester. Results showed that a layer of uneven mineral deposits, which were mainly amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in all probability, was observed on the acid-eroded enamel surface after remineralization. Compared with the acid-eroded enamel surface, the nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus of the remineralized enamel surface obviously increased. Both the friction coefficient and wear volume of the acid-eroded enamel surface decreased after remineralization. However, both the nanomechanical and the anti-wear properties of the remineralized enamel surface were still inferior to those of original enamel surface. In summary, tooth damage caused by acid erosion could be repaired by remineralization in CPP-ACP solution, but the repair effect, especially on the nanomechanical and anti-wear properties of the acid-eroded enamel, was limited. These results would contribute to a further exploration of the remineralization potential of CPP-ACP and a better understanding of the remineralization repair mechanism for acid-eroded human tooth enamel. (paper)

  14. Effect of CPP-ACP on the remineralization of acid-eroded human tooth enamel: nanomechanical properties and microtribological behaviour study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Y. F.; Qian, L. M.; Zhou, Z. R.

    2013-10-01

    Casein phosphopeptide-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) has been used to enhance tooth remineralization in the dental clinic. But the contribution of CPP-ACP to the remineralization of acid-eroded human tooth enamel is of widespread controversy. To confirm the application potential of CPP-ACP in the remineralization repair of tooth erosion caused by acid-attack, the effect of remineralization in vitro in 2% w/v CPP-ACP solution on the acid-eroded human tooth enamel was investigated in this study. The repair of surface morphology and the improvement of nanomechanical and microtribological properties were characterized with laser confocal scanning microscope, scanning electron microscope, nanoindentation tester and nanoscratch tester. Results showed that a layer of uneven mineral deposits, which were mainly amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) in all probability, was observed on the acid-eroded enamel surface after remineralization. Compared with the acid-eroded enamel surface, the nanoindentation hardness and Young's modulus of the remineralized enamel surface obviously increased. Both the friction coefficient and wear volume of the acid-eroded enamel surface decreased after remineralization. However, both the nanomechanical and the anti-wear properties of the remineralized enamel surface were still inferior to those of original enamel surface. In summary, tooth damage caused by acid erosion could be repaired by remineralization in CPP-ACP solution, but the repair effect, especially on the nanomechanical and anti-wear properties of the acid-eroded enamel, was limited. These results would contribute to a further exploration of the remineralization potential of CPP-ACP and a better understanding of the remineralization repair mechanism for acid-eroded human tooth enamel.

  15. Relationship and inter observer agreement of tooth and face forms in a Saudi subpopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Syed Rashid; Shiddi, Ibraheem Al; Al-Sufyani, Mohammed D; Althobaiti, Fahad A

    2015-04-01

    To determine the relationship of tooth form with the face form by different observers and further investigate the inter observer agreement on tooth forms, face forms, their relationship among male Saudis. A comparative cross-sectional study. Department of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA, from February till August 2013. Ninety four male participants aged 18 - 35 years were randomly recruited for the study. Full-face and anterior teeth (intraoral) digital photographs in the frontal plane were recorded. The outline tracings of the face and the tooth were obtained using Autocad (version 2010) software. The outline of the tooth was enlarged proportionately, without altering the length to width ratio to fit the face outline. The outlines were then evaluated visually by 6 prosthodontists and results were tabulated. The most common type of face form (49.65%) and tooth form (56.38%) was square tapering. Using the visual method, a good relationship (31.41%), moderate relationship (35.31%), weak relationship (19.68%) and no relationship (13.65%) between the tooth form and face form was found by the observers. Overall kappa for inter observer agreement on face form, tooth form and their relationship was 0.24, 0.17 and 0.26 respectively. The kappa values showed a fair agreement between the observers. The study results indicated that there was no highly defined relationship between the tooth form and face form in the studied Saudi subpopulation. A fair agreement was found between the observers for classifying the tooth forms, face froms and their relationship.

  16. On the mechanical properties of tooth enamel under spherical indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Herzl

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical properties of tooth enamel generally exhibit large variations, which reflect its structural and material complexity. Some key properties were evaluated under localized contact, simulating actual functioning conditions. Prominent cusps of extracted human molar teeth were polished down ~0.7 mm below the cusp tip and indented by tungsten carbide balls. The internal damage was assessed after unloading from longitudinal or transverse sections. The ultimate tensile stress (UTS) was determined using a novel bilayer specimen. The damage is characterized by penny-like radial cracks driven by hoop stresses and cylindrical cracks driven along protein-rich interrod materials by shear stresses. Shallow cone cracks typical of homogeneous materials which may cause rapid tooth wear under repeat contact are thus avoided. The mean stress vs. indentation strain curve is highly nonlinear, attributable to plastic shearing of protein between and within enamel rods. This curve is also affected by damage, especially radial cracks, the onset of which depends on ball radius. Several material properties were extracted from the tests, including shear strain at the onset of ring cracks γ(F) (=0.14), UTS (=119 MPa), toughness K(C) (=0.94 MPa m(1/2)), a crack propagation law and a constitutive response determined by trial and error with the aid of a finite-element analysis. These quantities, which are only slightly sensitive to anatomical location within the enamel region tested, facilitate a quantitative assessment of crown failure. Causes for variations in published UTS and K(C) values are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tooth fractures in canine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capik, I.; Ledecky, V.; Sevcik, A.

    2001-01-01

    Tooth fractures constitute a considerable fraction of all tooth diseases. Out of the 5,370 dogs treated during four years, 492 were presented with dental problems and 28.3 % of the latter were treated for tooth fractures. Canines were the most frequently affected teeth (38.8 %), followed by premolars (33.1 %), incisors (25.9 %), and molars (2.2 %), 55.4 % of the patients with canine and incisor fractures being large breed dogs. Fractures of premolars (mostly of 108, 208) were divided evenly irrespective of breed or body size. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment yielded good therapeutic results in most cases, but repeated treatment was necessary in some patients

  18. Wear mechanisms in ceramic hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, Matthew; Goswami, Tarun

    2004-01-01

    The wear in hip implants is one of the main causes for premature hip replacements. The wear affects the potential life of the prosthesis and subsequent removals of in vivo implants. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review various joints that show lower wear rates and consequently higher life. Ceramics are used in hip implants and have been found to produce lower wear rates. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ceramics compared to other implant materials. Different types of ceramics that are being used are reviewed in terms of the wear characteristics, debris released, and their size together with other biological factors. In general, the wear rates in ceramics were lower than that of metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene combinations.

  19. Radiation tagging measures wear at speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Jon.

    1994-01-01

    A new non-invasive technique for performing accelerated wear and corrosion analysis is particularly relevant to power transmission systems. Wear tests that would normally take days or weeks to complete can now be performed in hours. A tiny patch of the wearing component is made mildly radioactive and the drop in activity as material is worn away is monitored. Known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), the technology was originally developed and pioneered in-house by the Atomic Energy Authority. Since then, the dominant partner has been the automotive sector where TLA has been used extensively for engine wear and lubrication performance analysis. However, TLA could be used in any wear or corrosion environment. Applications include wear analysis of machine tool cutting surfaces, pump impellers and brake linings to the corrosion monitoring of process plant and pipelines. (author)

  20. Wear measurement of dental tissues and materials in clinical studies: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfman, C; Koenig, V; Mainjot, A K

    2018-06-01

    This study aims to systematically review the different methods used for wear measurement of dental tissues and materials in clinical studies, their relevance and reliability in terms of accuracy and precision, and the performance of the different steps of the workflow taken independently. An exhaustive search of clinical studies related to wear of dental tissues and materials reporting a quantitative measurement method was conducted. MedLine, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases were used. Prospective studies, pilot studies and case series (>10 patients), as long as they contained a description of wear measurement methodology. Only studies published after 1995 were considered. After duplicates' removal, 495 studies were identified, and 41 remained for quantitative analysis. Thirty-four described wear-measurement protocols, using digital profilometry and superimposition, whereas 7 used alternative protocols. A specific form was designed to analyze the risk of bias. The methods were described in terms of material analyzed; study design; device used for surface acquisition; matching software details and settings; type of analysis (vertical height-loss measurement vs volume loss measurement); type of area investigated (entire occlusal area or selective areas); and results. There is a need of standardization of clinical wear measurement. Current methods exhibit accuracy, which is not sufficient to monitor wear of restorative materials and tooth tissues. Their performance could be improved, notably limiting the use of replicas, using standardized calibration procedures and positive controls, optimizing the settings of scanners and matching softwares, and taking into account unusable data. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Durability analysis of gneiss using wear resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Ernandes Dias Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted in gneiss in Santo Antonio de Pádua, RJ, BR, including durability analysis of the rock using slake durability test. Rocks in the region of Pádua are mostly used for ornamental purposes. A lab equipment was developed to evaluate the influence of rotation in the test, allowing for the speed variation of 7 RPM to 238 RPM. This study could be implemented in a wide variety of rock materials, targeting them according to their lifetime in the project. With variation of the wear levels, increasing weight loss was observed until the inertia moment in which the sample holds to the machine wall. The results indicate an increase in linear mass loss. These procedures allow a more precise analysis of durability than can be applied in different different regions of the world.

  2. Assessment of performance parameters for EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Fattibene, P.; Shishkina, E.A.; Ivanov, D.V.; De Coste, V.; Guettler, A.; Onori, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of a comparison between three laboratories, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal-to-dose response curves were measured for sets of 30 tooth enamel samples and the variance of EPR measurements in dependence on absorbed dose was evaluated, in nine combinations of laboratory of sample preparation and EPR evaluation, respectively. As a test for benchmarking of EPR evaluation, the parameters 'critical dose' and 'limit of detection' were proposed as performance parameters following definitions from chemical-metrology, and a model function was suggested for analytical formulation of the dependence of the variance of EPR measurement on absorbed dose. First estimates of limits of detection by weighted and unweighted fitting resulted in the range 101-552 and 67-561 mGy, respectively, and were generally larger with weighted than with unweighted fitting. Indication was found for the influence of methodology of sample preparation and applied EPR measurement parameters on performance of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

  3. Sliding friction and wear behaviors of surface-coated natural serpentine mineral powders as lubricant additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baosen; Xu Yi; Gao Fei; Shi Peijing; Xu Binshi; Wu Yixiong

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the friction and wear properties of surface-coated natural serpentine powders (SP) suspended in diesel engine oil using an Optimal SRV oscillating friction and wear tester. The worn surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicated that the additives can improve the wear resistance and decrease friction coefficient of carbon steel friction couples. The 0.5 wt% content of serpentine powders is found most efficient in reducing friction and wear at the load of 50 N. The SEM and XPS analysis results demonstrate that a tribofilm forms on the worn surface, which is responsible for the decrease in friction and wear, mainly with iron oxides, silicon oxides, graphite and organic compounds.

  4. FEM-DEM coupling simulations of the tool wear characteristics in prestressed machining superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruitao Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complicated contact loading at the tool-chip interface, ceramic tool wear in prestressed machining superalloy is rare difficult to evaluate only by experimental approaches. This study aims to develop a methodology to predict the tool wear evolution by using combined FEM and DEM numerical simulations. Firstly, a finite element model for prestressed cutting is established, subsequently a discrete element model to describe the tool-chip behaviour is established based on the obtained boundary conditions by FEM simulations, finally, simulated results are experimentally validated. The predicted tool wear results show nice agreement with experiments, the simulation indicates that, within a certain range, higher cutting speed effectively results in slighter wear of Sialon ceramic tools, and deeper depth of cut leads to more serious tool wear.

  5. Recent advances in engineering of tooth and tooth structures using postnatal dental cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki J. Honda

    2010-02-01

    This review focuses on the performance of postnatal and adult dental cells that have been used for generating teeth. Their ability to contribute to tooth development was assessed in the omentum or in the tooth socket. Adult dental cells were limited in their potential owing to various parameters. From these results described, new approaches for regenerated teeth are proposed in this review. One strategy to replace teeth is tooth root engineering using tissue from postnatal teeth. Since the enamel organ epithelium disappears after tooth maturation, the epithelial rest cells of Malassez were evaluated to determine their capacity to generate enamel. From these results, it is suggested that erupted mature teeth have cell sources with the capacity to produce tooth root. The development of biological approaches for tooth root regeneration using postnatal dental cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field in the years to come.

  6. Determination of rail wear and short-time wear measurements of rails applying radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohmann, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    An energetic model has been developed for calculating rail wear. Short-time wear tests on rails after surface activation and following activity measurements showed a good agreement with the calculated values

  7. Friction & Wear Under Very High Electromagnetic Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowan, Richard S; Danyluk, Steven; Moon, Francis; Ford, J. C; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes initial progress toward advancing the fundamental understanding of the friction, wear and mechanics of interfaces subjected to extreme electromagnetic stress, high relative...

  8. Daily Water Requirements when Wearing Body Armor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montain, Scott

    2000-01-01

    .... This report presents the results of model simulations predicting the individual daily water requirements under a broad range of energy expenditures and weather conditions when wearing battle dress...

  9. Nitrogen implantation of type 303 stainless steel gears for improved wear and fatigue resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustas, F.M.; Misra, M.S.; Tack, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Fine-positioning mechanisms are responsible for accurate and reproducible control of aerospace system devices, i.e. filter grading wheels. Low wear and fatigue resistance of mechanism components, such as pinions and gears, can reduce system performance and reliability. Surface modification using ion implantation with nitrogen was used on type 303 stainless steel pinions and gears to increase tribological performance. Wear-life tests of untreated, nitrogen-implanted and nitrogen-implanted-and-annealed gears were performed in a fine-positioning mechanism under controlled environmental conditions. Wear and fatigue resistance were monitored at selected time intervals which were a percentage of the predicted failure life as determined by a numerical stress analysis. Surface analyses including scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy were performed to establish the wear and fatigue mechanisms and the nitrogen concentration-depth distributions respectively. Nitrogen implantation resulted in a significant improvement in both surface wear and fatigue spalling resistance over those of untreated gears. A 40% reduction in surface wear and a 44% reduction in dedendum spalling was observed. In contrast, the nitrogen-implanted-and-annealed gears showed a 46% increase in sliding wear area and an 11% increase in spall density compared with those of untreated gears, indicating that the post-implantation anneal was detrimental to wear and fatigue resistance. (orig.)

  10. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  11. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  12. Tooth resorption in cats: contribution of vitamin D and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth resorption in cats Tooth resorption affecting several teeth is a painful disease with a prevalence of up to 75% in household cats and is often accompanied by periodontitis. Tooth resorption is caused by an increased number and activity of tooth-resorbing odontoclasts, cells that share

  13. Autotransplantation donor tooth site harvesting using piezosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylikontiola, Leena P; Sándor, George K

    2016-01-01

    The harvesting of a tooth as a candidate for tooth autotransplantation requires that the delicate dental tissues around the tooth be minimally traumatized. This is especially so for the periradicular tissues of the tooth root and the follicular tissues surrounding the crown. The aim of this report is to describe the use of piezosurgery as an attempt at morbidity reduction in the harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation. A piezosurgical handpiece and its selection of tips were easily adapted to allow the harvesting and delivery of teeth for autotransplantation purposes. Twenty premolar teeth were harvested using a piezosurgical device. The harvested teeth were subsequently successfully autotransplanted. All twenty teeth healed in a satisfactory manner without excessive mobility or ankyloses. Piezosurgery avoids some of the traumatic aspects of harvesting teeth and removing bone which are associated with thermal damage from the use of conventional rotary instruments or saws. Piezosurgery can be adapted to facilitate the predictable harvesting of teeth for autotransplantation purposes.

  14. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)? How Do I Care for My Child's Baby Teeth? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  15. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  16. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-09-23

    same way. The wear rate from wear test 2a was approximately double the wear rate from wear test 2b for paddle pairs 4 and 5. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on paddle pairs 1, 2, 3 and 6 based on mass change, indicating that the un-wetted and fully wetted premix materials cause less wear than the partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles showed more deformation on the flat paddles than the helical paddles which was consistent with the wear rates. Aligning of the auger discharge flight with paddle pair 1 resulted in a lower wear rate paddle pair 1 rather than having them misaligned with the feed augers. During the paddle wear tests, polishing wear was observed on the inside barrel of the mixer. The polishing wear is evident on the upper housing clamshell and the lower housing clamshell primarily at paddle pairs 4 and 5, which is the transition region of the mixer. Wear on the mixer barrel increases the space between the paddles and the barrel, resulting in increased grout build up on the barrel. Since the mixer barrel cannot be reconfigured or replaced in the SPF, the method for mitigating wear on the barrel is to move the more viscous grout through the transition region as quickly as possible. In addition, the location of the liquid inlet does not allow for sufficient cleaning of the mixer since residual grout remains on paddle pairs 1 - 4. As the paddles continue to wear and the self-cleaning capability of the paddles is lost, the lack of sufficient flushing would aid in grout build up between the barrel and the paddles which could eventually lead to decreased throughput capacity of the dry feeds. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in no change to the rheological properties of the grout mixture. Both tests produced a grout that is within the processing range of the SPF. Based on the results of this testing, it is recommended for the currently installed SPF mixer that paddle

  17. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  18. Orthodontic Tooth Movement with Clear Aligners

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Carl T.; McGorray, Susan P.; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. ev...

  19. Stick-slip friction and wear of articular joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    Stick-slip friction was observed in articular cartilage under certain loading and sliding conditions and systematically studied. Using the Surface Forces Apparatus, we show that stick-slip friction can induce permanent morphological changes (a change in the roughness indicative of wear/damage) in cartilage surfaces, even under mild loading and sliding conditions. The different load and speed regimes can be represented by friction maps—separating regimes of smooth and stick-slip sliding; damage generally occurs within the stick-slip regimes. Prolonged exposure of cartilage surfaces to stick-slip sliding resulted in a significant increase of surface roughness, indicative of severe morphological changes of the cartilage superficial zone. To further investigate the factors that are conducive to stick-slip and wear, we selectively digested essential components of cartilage: type II collagen, hyaluronic acid (HA), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Compared with the normal cartilage, HA and GAG digestions modified the stick-slip behavior and increased surface roughness (wear) during sliding, whereas collagen digestion decreased the surface roughness. Importantly, friction forces increased up to 2, 10, and 5 times after HA, GAGs, and collagen digestion, respectively. Also, each digestion altered the friction map in different ways. Our results show that (i) wear is not directly related to the friction coefficient but (ii) more directly related to stick-slip sliding, even when present at small amplitudes, and that (iii) the different molecular components of joints work synergistically to prevent wear. Our results also suggest potential noninvasive diagnostic tools for sensing stick-slip in joints. PMID:23359687

  20. Can dead man tooth do tell tales? Tooth prints in forensic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Vineetha; Murthy, Sarvani; Ashwinirani, S R; Prasad, Kulkarni; Girish, Suragimath; Vinit, Shashikanth Patil

    2017-01-01

    We know that teeth trouble us a lot when we are alive, but they last longer for thousands of years even after we are dead. Teeth being the strongest and resistant structure are the most significant tool in forensic investigations. Patterns of enamel rod end on the tooth surface are known as tooth prints. This study is aimed to know whether these tooth prints can become a forensic tool in personal identification such as finger prints. A study has been targeted toward the same. In the present in-vivo study, acetate peel technique has been used to obtain the replica of enamel rod end patterns. Tooth prints of upper first premolars were recorded from 80 individuals after acid etching using cellulose acetate strips. Then, digital images of the tooth prints obtained at two different intervals were subjected to biometric conversion using Verifinger standard software development kit version 6.5 software followed by the use of Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) software for comparison of the tooth prints. Similarly, each individual's finger prints were also recorded and were subjected to the same software. Further, recordings of AFIS scores obtained from images were statistically analyzed using Cronbach's test. We observed that comparing two tooth prints taken from an individual at two intervals exhibited similarity in many cases, with wavy pattern tooth print being the predominant type. However, the same prints showed dissimilarity when compared with other individuals. We also found that most of the individuals with whorl pattern finger print showed wavy pattern tooth print and few loop type fingerprints showed linear pattern of tooth prints. Further more experiments on both tooth prints and finger prints are required in establishing an individual's identity.

  1. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Morphological study of tooth development in podoplanin-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyo Takara

    Full Text Available Podoplanin is a mucin-type highly O-glycosylated glycoprotein identified in several somatyic cells: podocytes, alveolar epithelial cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, lymph node stromal fibroblastic reticular cells, osteocytes, odontoblasts, mesothelial cells, glia cells, and others. It has been reported that podoplanin-RhoA interaction induces cytoskeleton relaxation and cell process stretching in fibroblastic cells and osteocytes, and that podoplanin plays a critical role in type I alveolar cell differentiation. It appears that podoplanin plays a number of different roles in contributing to cell functioning and growth by signaling. However, little is known about the functions of podoplanin in the somatic cells of the adult organism because an absence of podoplanin is lethal at birth by the respiratory failure. In this report, we investigated the tooth germ development in podoplanin-knockout mice, and the dentin formation in podoplanin-conditional knockout mice having neural crest-derived cells with deficiency in podoplanin by the Wnt1 promoter and enhancer-driven Cre recombinase: Wnt1-Cre;PdpnΔ/Δmice. In the Wnt1-Cre;PdpnΔ/Δmice, the tooth and alveolar bone showed no morphological abnormalities and grow normally, indicating that podoplanin is not critical in the development of the tooth and bone.

  3. Morphological study of tooth development in podoplanin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kenyo; Maruo, Naoki; Oka, Kyoko; Kaji, Chiaki; Hatakeyama, Yuji; Sawa, Naruhiko; Kato, Yukinari; Yamashita, Junro; Kojima, Hiroshi; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Podoplanin is a mucin-type highly O-glycosylated glycoprotein identified in several somatyic cells: podocytes, alveolar epithelial cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, lymph node stromal fibroblastic reticular cells, osteocytes, odontoblasts, mesothelial cells, glia cells, and others. It has been reported that podoplanin-RhoA interaction induces cytoskeleton relaxation and cell process stretching in fibroblastic cells and osteocytes, and that podoplanin plays a critical role in type I alveolar cell differentiation. It appears that podoplanin plays a number of different roles in contributing to cell functioning and growth by signaling. However, little is known about the functions of podoplanin in the somatic cells of the adult organism because an absence of podoplanin is lethal at birth by the respiratory failure. In this report, we investigated the tooth germ development in podoplanin-knockout mice, and the dentin formation in podoplanin-conditional knockout mice having neural crest-derived cells with deficiency in podoplanin by the Wnt1 promoter and enhancer-driven Cre recombinase: Wnt1-Cre;PdpnΔ/Δmice. In the Wnt1-Cre;PdpnΔ/Δmice, the tooth and alveolar bone showed no morphological abnormalities and grow normally, indicating that podoplanin is not critical in the development of the tooth and bone.

  4. Truck tyre wear assessment and prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Montanaro, F.; Donadio, D.; Gelosa, E.; Vis, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tyre wear is a complex phenomenon. It depends non-linearly on numerous parameters, like tyre compound and design, vehicle type and usage, road conditions and road surface characteristics, environmental conditions (e.g., temperature) and many others. Yet, tyre wear has many economic and ecological

  5. Prediction of wear rates in comminution equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lucas Roald Dörig; Fundal, Erling; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    -resistant high chromium white cast iron (21988/JN/HBW555XCr21), a heat-treated wear resistant steel (Hardox 400) and a plain carbon construction steel (S235). Quartz, which accounts for the largest wear loss in the cement industry, was chosen as abrasive. Other process parameters such as velocity (1–7 m...

  6. Straylight Measurements in Contact Lens Wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Engelbrecht, Leonore A.; van Vliet, Johannes M. J.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To quantify the effect of contact lens wear on straylight in rigid and soft contact lens wearers and (2) to relate findings to morphological changes and subjective complaints. Methods: Straylight was measured using the Oculus C-Quant during contact lens wear and after contact lens

  7. Numerical prediction of car tire wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Cheli, F.; Braghin, F.; Gelosa, E.; Keckman, A.

    2004-01-01

    Due to their many economic and ecological implications, the possibility to predict tire wear is of major importance to tire manufacturers, fleet owners and governments. Based on these observations, in 2000, a three-year project named TROWS (Tire and Road Wear and Slip assessment was started. One of

  8. Vibrational characteristics and wear of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmugar, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel rod wear, due to vibration, is a continuing concern in the design of liquid-cooled reactors. In my report, the methodology and models that are used to predict fuel rod vibrational response and vibratory wear, in a light water reactor environment, are discussed. This methodology is being followed at present in the design of Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel. Fuel rod vibrations are expressed as the normal bending modes, and sources of rod vibration are examined with special emphasis on flow-induced mechanisms in the stable flow region. In a typical Westinghouse PWR fuel assembly design, each fuel rod is supported at multiple locations along the rod axis by a square-shaped 'grid cell'. For a fuel rod /grid support system, the development of small oscillatory motions, due to fluid flow at the rod/grid interface, results in material wear. A theoretical wear mode is developed using the Archard Theory of Adhesive Wear as the basis. Without question certainty, fretting wear becomes a serious problem if it progresses to the stage where the fuel cladding is penetrated and fuel is exposed to the coolant. Westinghouse fuel is designed to minimize fretting wear by limiting the relative motion between the fuel rod and its supports. The wear producing motion between the fuel rod and its supports occurs when the vibration amplitude exceeds the slippage threshold amplitude

  9. CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Leonardis

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a common inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system. In our paper, different types of CMT are described with their typical clinical pictures, electrophysiological signs and molecular genetic studies. CMT is classified as demyelinative and axonal type and distal motor neuronopathy.Conclusions. CMT can be of autosomal dominant, recessive and X-linked inheritance. The most frequent form of CMT is the result of the dominantly inherited duplication of chromosome 17p11.2 and is marked as CMT1A. The same group involves also rare patients with point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in protein zero gene. CMT1C is linked to chromosome 16p13.1–12.3. Patients with point mutations in early growth response 2 gene (EGR2 are included in group CMT1D. The disease can be also inhereted X-linked (CMTX with the mutations in connexin-32 gene. In autosomal recessive inherited demyelinating polyneuropathies (CMT4, mutations are found in the myotubularin-related protein-2 (CMT4B, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (CMT4D, EGR2 (CMT4E, and in the periaksin (CMT4F genes. In axonal inherited neuropathy, mutations are found in KIF1beta (CMT2A and in light neurofilament (CMT2E genes, other forms map to different chromosomal loci (CMT2B, CMT2D, CMT2F. Some suggestions for the diagnostic procedures of patients with CMT are given.

  10. Radioisotopic measurement methods for determining the wear railway brake shoe and its rim wearing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doman, P.

    1979-01-01

    Under operating conditions the wear of brake shoe was tested by a measuring method based on the principle of radioisotopic thickness measurement. It is characteristic to the sensitivity of the method that the wear caused by the fast braking of a train (speed: 100 km/h) as well as the uneven wear distribution were determinable. Surface activating methods assuring the periodic and continuous evaluation were also developed. A test was performed with galvanic surface activation under operating conditions to determine the rim wearing effect of the brake shoe. Apart from the operational tests a new method based on activated wear measurement was also developed. (author)

  11. Dry sliding wear behavior of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composite using Taguchi techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran, T.S.; Prasanna Kumar, M.; Basavarajappa, S.; Viswanatha, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZA-27 alloy is used as matrix material and reinforced with SiC and Gr particles. • Heat treatment was carried out for all specimen. • Dry sliding wear test was done on pin-on-disc apparatus by Taguchi technique. • ZA-27/9SiC–3Gr showed superior wear resistance over the base alloy. • Ceramic mixed mechanical layer on contact surface of composite was formed. - Abstract: Dry sliding wear behavior of zinc based alloy and composite reinforced with SiCp (9 wt%) and Gr (3 wt%) fabricated by stir casting method was investigated. Heat treatment (HT) and aging of the specimen were carried out, followed by water quenching. Wear behavior was evaluated using pin on disc apparatus. Taguchi technique was used to estimate the parameters affecting the wear significantly. The effect of HT was that it reduced the microcracks, residual stresses and improved the distribution of microconstituents. The influence of various parameters like applied load, sliding speed and sliding distance on wear behavior was investigated by means and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Further, correlation between the parameters was determined by multiple linear regression equation for each response. It was observed that the applied load significantly influenced the wear volume loss (WVL), followed by sliding speed implying that increase in either applied load or sliding speed increases the WVL. Whereas for composites, sliding distance showed a negative influence on wear indicating that increase in sliding distance reduces WVL due to the presence of reinforcements. The wear mechanism of the worn out specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The analysis shows that the formation and retention of ceramic mixed mechanical layer (CMML) plays a major role in the dry sliding wear resistance

  12. Effect of distribution of striated laser hardening tracks on dry sliding wear resistance of biomimetic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Some biological surfaces were proved to have excellent anti-wear performance. Being inspired, Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used to create striated biomimetic laser hardening tracks on medium carbon steel samples. Dry sliding wear tests biomimetic samples were performed to investigate specific influence of distribution of laser hardening tracks on sliding wear resistance of biomimetic samples. After comparing wear weight loss of biomimetic samples, quenched sample and untreated sample, it can be suggested that the sample covered with dense laser tracks (3.5 mm spacing) has lower wear weight loss than the one covered with sparse laser tracks (4.5 mm spacing); samples distributed with only dense laser tracks or sparse laser tracks (even distribution) were proved to have better wear resistance than samples distributed with both dense and sparse tracks (uneven distribution). Wear mechanisms indicate that laser track and exposed substrate of biomimetic sample can be regarded as hard zone and soft zone respectively. Inconsecutive striated hard regions, on the one hand, can disperse load into small branches, on the other hand, will hinder sliding abrasives during wear. Soft regions with small range are beneficial in consuming mechanical energy and storing lubricative oxides, however, soft zone with large width (>0.5 mm) will be harmful to abrasion resistance of biomimetic sample because damages and material loss are more obvious on surface of soft phase. As for the reason why samples with even distributed bionic laser tracks have better wear resistance, it can be explained by the fact that even distributed laser hardening tracks can inhibit severe worn of local regions, thus sliding process can be more stable and wear extent can be alleviated as well.

  13. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; Macdougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-06-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita ⁻/⁻ mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita ⁻/⁻ and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita ⁻/⁻ mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita ⁻/⁻ teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  14. Bioactive Polymeric Composites for Tooth Mineral Regeneration: Physicochemical and Cellular Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrtic, Drago; Antonucci, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    Our studies of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based dental materials are focused on the design of bioactive, non-degradable, biocompatible, polymeric composites derived from acrylic monomer systems and ACP by photochemical or chemically activated polymerization. Their intended uses include remineralizing bases/liners, orthodontic adhesives and/or endodontic sealers. The bioactivity of these materials originates from the propensity of ACP, once exposed to oral fluids, to release Ca and PO4 ions (building blocks of tooth and bone mineral) in a sustained manner while spontaneously converting to thermodynamically stable apatite. As a result of ACP's bioactivity, local Ca- and PO4-enriched environments are created with supersaturation conditions favorable for the regeneration of tooth mineral lost to decay or wear. Besides its applicative purpose, our research also seeks to expand the fundamental knowledge base of structure-composition-property relationships existing in these complex systems and identify the mechanisms that govern filler/polymer and composite/tooth interfacial phenomena. In addition to an extensive physicochemical evaluation, we also assess the leachability of the unreacted monomers and in vitro cellular responses to these types of dental materials. The systematic physicochemical and cellular assessments presented in this study typically provide model materials suitable for further animal and/or clinical testing. In addition to their potential dental clinical value, these studies suggest the future development of calcium phosphate-based biomaterials based on composite materials derived from biodegradable polymers and ACP, and designed primarily for general bone tissue regeneration. PMID:22102967

  15. Residual Stresses and Sliding Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-25

    case of rolling contact, taking into account strain hardening during plastic deformation. ..-s calculations (forSAE 52100 at a hardness level of 58.5 R...can reach -800- 1000 MPa. If 033 was comparable to these values, it would indeed effect the wear rate. It is evident that an experimental deter...cc o 40 1 °2 00 I I +A ) S l~lll0 44MUK I CQ E3 e0 El 0 Uc 00 E3 (3 80 j40 c (vclq) SSHHI +ce ce mCQ ce (2E e0 4El EJ) E - 0 El 0 E0 .. t El 0 (vdNp

  16. Reactive correction of a maxillary incisor in single-tooth crossbite following periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2005-05-01

    The reactive correction of a single tooth anterior crossbite following periodontal therapy is described. This case report provides new information regarding correction of a crossbite relationship and con- firms existing reports of tooth movement following periodontal therapy. A 39-year-old woman in good general health presented with a history of recurrent periodontal abscesses of a maxillary incisor. Probing depths of the abscessed tooth ranged from 5 to 12 mm, and class 1 mobility was noted. Radiographs revealed that the tooth had previously been treated endodontically. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was generalized chronic moderate to severe periodontitis. Treatment considerations were complicated by a single-tooth crossbite relationship of the involved incisor and clinical evidence that the periodontal abscess communicated with an apical infection. Treatment of the abscess consisted of cause-related therapy, bone grafting, and occlusal adjustment. Five months after surgical treatment, an edge-to-edge incisal relationship was observed, the first indicator of tooth movement. Further correction to a normal incisal relationship resulted 1 year after modification of the proximal contact. At this time, there was normal probing depth with only slight recession and mobility. Bone fill was radiographically noted. It appears that some cases of maxillary incisor crossbite that are complicated by periodontal disease may be corrected, without orthodontic appliances, following periodontal treatment.

  17. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, N A; El-Somany, I; Mansour, A; Maghraby, A M; Eissa, H; Wieser, A

    2018-03-01

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH pp ) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry.

  18. Tooth labeling in cone-beam CT using deep convolutional neural network for forensic identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Yuma; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Zhou, Xiangrong; Hara, Takeshi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    In large disasters, dental record plays an important role in forensic identification. However, filing dental charts for corpses is not an easy task for general dentists. Moreover, it is laborious and time-consuming work in cases of large scale disasters. We have been investigating a tooth labeling method on dental cone-beam CT images for the purpose of automatic filing of dental charts. In our method, individual tooth in CT images are detected and classified into seven tooth types using deep convolutional neural network. We employed the fully convolutional network using AlexNet architecture for detecting each tooth and applied our previous method using regular AlexNet for classifying the detected teeth into 7 tooth types. From 52 CT volumes obtained by two imaging systems, five images each were randomly selected as test data, and the remaining 42 cases were used as training data. The result showed the tooth detection accuracy of 77.4% with the average false detection of 5.8 per image. The result indicates the potential utility of the proposed method for automatic recording of dental information.

  19. Conversion from tooth enamel dose to organ doses for electron spin resonance dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Saito, Kimiaki; Hamada, Tatsuji

    2002-01-01

    Conversion from tooth enamel dose to organ doses was analyzed to establish a method of retrospective individual dose assessment against external photon exposure by electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry. Dose to tooth enamel was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations using a modified MIRD-type phantom with a teeth part. The calculated tooth enamel doses were verified by measurements with thermo-luminescence dosimeters inserted in a physical head phantom. Energy and angular dependences of tooth enamel dose were compared with those of other organ doses. Additional Monte Carlo calculations were performed to study the effect of human model on the tooth enamel dose with a voxel-type phantom, which was based on computed tomography images of the physical phantom. The data derived with the modified MIRD-type phantom were applied to convert from tooth enamel dose to organ doses against external photon exposure in a hypothesized field, where scattered radiation was taken into account. The results indicated that energy distribution of photons incident to a human body is required to evaluate precisely an individual dose based on ESR dosimetry for teeth. (author)

  20. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Faramawy, N.A.; El-Somany, I. [Ain Shams University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo (Egypt); Mansour, A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Maghraby, A.M.; Eissa, H. [National Institute of Standards (NIS), Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory, Giza (Egypt); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH{sub pp}) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry. (orig.)

  1. The friction wear of electrolytic composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosta, R.

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of wear of galvanic composite coatings Ni-Al 2 O 3 and Ni-41%Fe-Al 2 O 3 . The diameter of small parts of aluminium oxide received 0.5; 3; 5 μm. Investigations of friction sliding were effected on PT3 device at Technical University of Gdansk. Counter sample constituted a funnel made of steel NC6 (750 HV). Increase of wear coatings together with the rise of iron content in matrix is observed. The rise of sizes of ceramic particles caused decrease of wear of composite coatings, but rise of steel funnel wear. The friction coefficient increased after ceramic particle s were built in coatings. The best wear resistance characterized Ni-41%Fe-Al 2 O 3 coatings containing 2.2x10 6 mm -2 ceramic particles. (author)

  2. Tool Wear Monitoring Using Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong Yeul; Ohara, Yasuhiro; Tamaki, Haruo; Suga, Masanobu

    A tool wear monitoring approach considering the nonlinear behavior of cutting mechanism caused by tool wear and/or localized chipping is proposed, and its effectiveness is verified through the cutting experiment and actual turning machining. Moreover, the variation in the surface roughness of the machined workpiece is also discussed using this approach. In this approach, the residual error between the actually measured vibration signal and the estimated signal obtained from the time series model corresponding to dynamic model of cutting is introduced as the feature of diagnosis. Consequently, it is found that the early tool wear state (i.e. flank wear under 40µm) can be monitored, and also the optimal tool exchange time and the tool wear state for actual turning machining can be judged by this change in the residual error. Moreover, the variation of surface roughness Pz in the range of 3 to 8µm can be estimated by the monitoring of the residual error.

  3. Predicting railway wheel wear under uncertainty of wear coefficient, using universal kriging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremona, Marzia A.; Liu, Binbin; Hu, Yang; Bruni, Stefano; Lewis, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Railway wheel wear prediction is essential for reliability and optimal maintenance strategies of railway systems. Indeed, an accurate wear prediction can have both economic and safety implications. In this paper we propose a novel methodology, based on Archard's equation and a local contact model, to forecast the volume of material worn and the corresponding wheel remaining useful life (RUL). A universal kriging estimate of the wear coefficient is embedded in our method. Exploiting the dependence of wear coefficient measurements with similar contact pressure and sliding speed, we construct a continuous wear coefficient map that proves to be more informative than the ones currently available in the literature. Moreover, this approach leads to an uncertainty analysis on the wear coefficient. As a consequence, we are able to construct wear prediction intervals that provide reasonable guidelines in practice. - Highlights: • Wear prediction is of outmost importance for reliability of railway systems. • Wear coefficient is essential in prediction through Archard's equation. • A novel methodology is developed to predict wear and RUL. • Universal kriging is used for wear coefficient and uncertainty estimation. • A simulation study and a real case application are provided.

  4. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  5. Dimethyl Ether: New Advances in Wear Testing: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Sorenson, Spencer C; Jakobsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    The issues addressed in this paper are investigation of the wear mechanisms present in the standard lubricity test for diesel oil: The High frequency reciprocating Rig (HFRR). The HFRR is a laboratory wear test using a ball on disk configuration. The result of a test is the wear scar diameter (WSD...... surfaces with long-range elasticity. This last property has enabled the model to correlate well with experimental results. The outcome of the alkane calculations indicates that the longer ones lubricate better than the shorts ones but not necessarily because of viscosity differences. The reason is more...

  6. Antibiotics to prevent complications following tooth extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Giovanni; Figini, Lara; Sardella, Andrea; Carrassi, Antonio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Furness, Susan

    2012-11-14

    The most frequent indications for tooth extractions are dental caries and periodontal infections, and these extractions are generally done by general dental practitioners. Antibiotics may be prescribed to patients undergoing extractions to prevent complications due to infection. To determine the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the development of infectious complications following tooth extractions. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 25 January 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 1), MEDLINE via OVID (1948 to 25 January 2012), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 25 January 2012) and LILACS via BIREME (1982 to 25 January 2012). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. We included randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trials of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients undergoing tooth extraction(s) for any indication. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias for the included studies and extracted data. We contacted trial authors for further details where these were unclear. For dichotomous outcomes we calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using random-effects models. For continuous outcomes we used mean differences (MD) with 95% CI using random-effects models. We examined potential sources of heterogeneity. The quality of the body of evidence has been assessed using the GRADE tool. This review included 18 double-blind placebo-controlled trials with a total of 2456 participants. Five trials were assessed at unclear risk of bias, thirteen at high risk, and none at low risk of bias. Compared to placebo, antibiotics probably reduce the risk of infection in patients undergoing third molar extraction(s) by approximately 70% (RR 0.29 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.50) P antibiotics to prevent one infection following extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. There is evidence that antibiotics may reduce

  7. Prenatal ultrasound and postmortem histologic evaluation of tooth germs: an observational, transversal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Mariana; Felino, António; Nogueira, Rosete; Valente, Francisco; Braga, Ana Cristina; Vaz, Paula

    2015-05-12

    Hypodontia is the most frequent developmental anomaly of the orofacial complex, and its detection in prenatal ultrasound may indicate the presence of congenital malformations, genetic syndromes and chromosomal abnormalities. To date, only a few studies have evaluated the histological relationship of human tooth germs identified by two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography. In order to analyze whether two-dimensional ultrasonography of tooth germs may be successfully used for identifying genetic syndromes, prenatal ultrasound images of fetal tooth germs obtained from a Portuguese population sample were compared with histological images obtained from fetal autopsies. Observational, descriptive, transversal study. The study protocol followed the ethical principles outlined by the Helsinki Declaration and was approved by the Ethics Committee of the School of Dental Medicine, University of Porto (FMDUP, Porto, Portugal) and of the Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho (CHVNG/EPE, Porto, Portugal) as well as by the CGC Genetics Embryofetal Pathology Laboratory. Eighty-five fetuses examined by prenatal ultrasound screening from May 2011 to August 2012 had an indication for autopsy following spontaneous fetal death or medical termination of pregnancy. Of the 85 fetuses, 37 (43.5%) were randomly selected for tooth germ evaluation by routine histopathological analysis. Fetuses who were up to 30 weeks of gestation, and whose histological pieces were not representative of all maxillary tooth germs was excluded. Twenty four fetus between the 13(th) and 30(th) weeks of gestation fulfilled the parameters to autopsy. Twenty four fetuses were submitted to histological evaluation and were determined the exact number, morphology, and mineralization of their tooth germs. All tooth germs were identifiable with ultrasonography as early as the 13(th) week of gestation. Of the fetuses autopsied, 41.7% had hypodontia (29.1% maxillary hypodontia and 20.9% mandibular hypodontia). This

  8. Quantification of Gear Tooth Damage by Optimal Tracking of Vibration Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, F. K.; Veillette, R. J.; Polyshchuk, V.; Braun, M. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for quantifying the wear or damage of gear teeth in a transmission system. The procedure developed in this study can be applied as a part of either an onboard machine health-monitoring system or a health diagnostic system used during regular maintenance. As the developed methodology is based on analysis of gearbox vibration under normal operating conditions, no shutdown or special modification of operating parameters is required during the diagnostic process. The process of quantifying the wear or damage of gear teeth requires a set of measured vibration data and a model of the gear mesh dynamics. An optimization problem is formulated to determine the profile of a time-varying mesh stiffness parameter for which the model output approximates the measured data. The resulting stiffness profile is then related to the level of gear tooth wear or damage. The procedure was applied to a data set generated artificially and to another obtained experimentally from a spiral bevel gear test rig. The results demonstrate the utility of the procedure as part of an overall health-monitoring system.

  9. Biomechanical Alignment of Main Wear-Pattern on MOM Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Burton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of retrievals, femoral heads and cups are sent for analysis with no designation as to positioning in-vivo. In addition, when patients retain the femoral prosthesis, evidence of neck impingement damage is lost. In this case report we studied head and cup wear-patterns and stripe damage in a novel case that included a large diameter metal-on-metal THA that was retrieved with the head still fused to the stem. This provided anatomical positioning of head wear-pattern and stripe damage as represented by the orientation of the femoral stem in radiographic images. We investigated (1 size, shape and location of head and cup wear-patterns, (2 cup-to-stem impingement damage, and (3 head stripe-wear. The head wear-pattern was elliptical in shape, 40mm diameter with area covering 2200 sq.mm. Its hemispherical ratio was 56% with aspect ratio 1.2 and typical of large-diameter MOM retrievals. Wear-pattern extended from 12° above superior head-margin to approximately 40° inferior to polar axis. Centroidal vector in coronal plane was 13° posterior to polar axis and in transverse plane was 19° superior to polar axis. These vector data corresponded well with biomechanical predictions of resultant load axes in gait studies. Stripe damage was identified on the head, and the cup rim could thereby be aligned to verify neck impingement and also head subluxation mechanisms. Cup wear-pattern was not centrally contained, indicating this patient had experienced repetitive edge-wear during gait. Thinning of the cup rim by 350- 400μm indicated that posterior impingement with repetitive anterior subluxation of the head had created this edge-wear.

  10. Advances and perspectives in tooth tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Nelson; Yelick, Pamela C

    2017-09-01

    Bio-engineered teeth that can grow and remodel in a manner similar to that of natural teeth have the potential to serve as permanent replacements to the currently used prosthetic teeth, such as dental implants. A major challenge in designing functional bio-engineered teeth is to mimic both the structural and anisotropic mechanical characteristics of the native tooth. Therefore, the field of dental and whole tooth regeneration has advanced towards the molecular and nanoscale design of bio-active, biomimetic systems, using biomaterials, drug delivery systems and stem cells. The focus of this review is to discuss recent advances in tooth tissue engineering, using biomimetic scaffolds that provide proper architectural cues, exhibit the capacity to support dental stem cell proliferation and differentiation and sequester and release bio-active agents, such as growth factors and nucleic acids, in a spatiotemporal controlled manner. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies on tooth regeneration appear promising, before tooth tissue engineering becomes a reality for humans, additional research is needed to perfect methods that use adult human dental stem cells, as opposed to embryonic dental stem cells, and to devise the means to generate bio-engineered teeth of predetermined size and shape. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  12. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohamed A.; Mohammed, Abdul Samad; Al-Aqeeli, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  13. Microstructural evolution during dry wear test in magnesium and Mg-Y alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somekawa, Hidetoshi, E-mail: SOMEKAWA.Hidetoshi@nims.go.jp [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Maeda, Shunsuke; Hirayama, Tomoko; Matsuoka, Takashi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe 610-0321 (Japan); Inoue, Tadanobu [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Mukai, Toshiji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-01-20

    The friction and wear properties of pure magnesium and the Mg-Y alloy were investigated using the pin-on-disk configuration. The friction and wear resistance of the Mg-Y alloy was superior to those of pure magnesium. The wear mechanism was abrasion under all the conditions. The deformed microstructural evolutions near the surface region were observed by transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The stress and strain states were also evaluated by finite element analysis (FEA). The deformed microstructures of both alloys consisted of the {l_brace}10-12{r_brace} twinning formation and the FEA results showed the occurrence of plastic deformation even at the beginning of the test. The formation of low angle grain boundaries was also confirmed with an increase in the applied load in the Mg-Y alloy. On the other hand, grain refinement due to dynamic recrystallization was observed in pure magnesium as the wear test progressed. The different microstructures resulted from difference in the surface temperature during the wear test, which was estimated to be around 393 K and 363 K for pure magnesium and the Mg-Y alloy, respectively. The high increment temperature in the fine-grained alloys brought about the occurrence of grain boundary sliding, i.e., material softening, which led to a decrease in the friction and wear properties. The present results indicated that one of the methods for enhancing the friction and wear properties is to increase the dynamic recrystallization temperature.

  14. Recent developments in the use of plastic optical fiber for an embedded wear sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Edward I.; Mastro, Stephen A.; Nemarich, Christopher P.; Korczynski, Joseph F., Jr.; Jarrett, Andrew W.; Jones, Wayne C.

    1999-05-01

    This paper describes recent developments of a practical, low cost embedded plastic optical fiber (POF) wear sensor system for the condition based maintenance of external outboard water lubricated bearings aboard U.S. Navy Ships. The benefit of this measurement system over the status quo is the ability to remotely monitor bearing wear. The Embedded Wear Sensor system (Navy invention disclosure #78,570) features a sacrificial wear fiber embedded into the nitrile rubber bearing. This fiber may also act as a conduit for the transmission of pressure and temperature data that may be resolved into alignment data. The authors selected a commercially-off-the- shelf plastic fiber for the sensor because of its material compatibility with the nitrile rubber bearing staves in terms of flexural modulus and wear properties. Presented herein is a description of the system concept, the results of non-linear finite element analysis, market survey of POF, mold studies, small scale prototyping and abrasive wear testing. A description of the sensor concept and the results of the preliminary finite element analysis of the bearing stave geometry are presented. Preliminary results of molding and glue bonding POF in nitrile rubber and then abrasive wear testing indicate that this is a viable concept.

  15. Wear behavior of Cu-Ag-Cr alloy wire under electrical sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, S.G.; Liu, P.; Ren, F.Z.; Tian, B.H.; Zheng, M.S.; Zhou, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    The wear behavior of a Cu-Ag-Cr alloy contact wire against a copper-base sintered alloy strip was investigated. Wear tests were conducted under laboratory conditions with a special sliding wear apparatus that simulated train motion under electrical current conditions. The initial microstructure of the Cu-Ag-Cr alloy contact wire was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Worn surfaces of the Cu-Ag-Cr alloy wire were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The results indicate that the wear rate of the Cu-Ag-Cr wire increased with increasing electrical current and sliding. Within the studied range of electrical current, the wear rate increases with increasing electrical current and sliding speed. Compared with the Cu-Ag contact wire under the same testing conditions, the Cu-Ag-Cr alloy wire has much better wear resistance. Adhesive, abrasive, and electrical erosion wear are the dominant mechanisms during the electrical sliding processes

  16. Gaussian process regression for tool wear prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dongdong; Chen, Yongjie; Li, Ning

    2018-05-01

    To realize and accelerate the pace of intelligent manufacturing, this paper presents a novel tool wear assessment technique based on the integrated radial basis function based kernel principal component analysis (KPCA_IRBF) and Gaussian process regression (GPR) for real-timely and accurately monitoring the in-process tool wear parameters (flank wear width). The KPCA_IRBF is a kind of new nonlinear dimension-increment technique and firstly proposed for feature fusion. The tool wear predictive value and the corresponding confidence interval are both provided by utilizing the GPR model. Besides, GPR performs better than artificial neural networks (ANN) and support vector machines (SVM) in prediction accuracy since the Gaussian noises can be modeled quantitatively in the GPR model. However, the existence of noises will affect the stability of the confidence interval seriously. In this work, the proposed KPCA_IRBF technique helps to remove the noises and weaken its negative effects so as to make the confidence interval compressed greatly and more smoothed, which is conducive for monitoring the tool wear accurately. Moreover, the selection of kernel parameter in KPCA_IRBF can be easily carried out in a much larger selectable region in comparison with the conventional KPCA_RBF technique, which helps to improve the efficiency of model construction. Ten sets of cutting tests are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the presented tool wear assessment technique. The experimental results show that the in-process flank wear width of tool inserts can be monitored accurately by utilizing the presented tool wear assessment technique which is robust under a variety of cutting conditions. This study lays the foundation for tool wear monitoring in real industrial settings.

  17. Osteoblast and osteoclast behaviors in the turnover of attachment bones during medaka tooth replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoku, Akiko; Chatani, Masahiro; Aono, Kazushi; Inohaya, Keiji; Kudo, Akira

    2016-01-15

    Tooth replacement in polyphyodont is a well-organized system for maintenance of homeostasis of teeth, containing the dynamic structural change in skeletal tissues such as the attachment bone, which is the supporting element of teeth. Histological analyses have revealed the character of tooth replacement, however, the cellular mechanism of how skeletal tissues are modified during tooth replacement is largely unknown. Here, we showed the important role of osteoblasts for controlling osteoclasts to modify the attachment bone during tooth replacement in medaka pharyngeal teeth, coupled with an osterix-DsRed/TRAP-GFP transgenic line to visualize osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In the turnover of the row of attachment bones, these bones were resorbed at the posterior side where most developed functional teeth were located, and generated at the anterior side where teeth were newly erupted, which caused continuous tooth replacement. In the cellular analysis, osteoclasts and osteoblasts were located at attachment bones separately, since mature osteoclasts were localized at the resorbing side and osteoblasts gathered at the generating side. To demonstrate the role of osteoclasts in tooth replacement, we established medaka made deficient in c-fms-a by TALEN. c-fms-a deficient medaka showed hyperplasia of attachment bones along with reduced bone resorption accompanied by a low number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts, indicating an important role of osteoclasts in the turnover of attachment bones. Furthermore, nitroreductase-mediated osteoblast-specific ablation induced disappearance of osteoclasts, indicating that osteoblasts were essential for maintenance of osteoclasts for the proper turnover. Taken together, our results suggested that the medaka attachment bone provides the model to understand the cellular mechanism for tooth replacement, and that osteoblasts act in the coordination of bone morphology by supporting osteoclasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Roentgenologic investigations for the anterior tooth length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Pyo; Ahn, Hyung Kyu [College of Dentistry, Seoul National University , Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-11-15

    The author measured the length of crown, root and tooth on the films which was taken by intraoral bisecting technic with mesh plate on the films. The films were taken from the dry skulls, dentiform, same patients who had to be removed their upper incisors, and the other patients who admitted for dental care. From this serial experiment the results were made as follows: 1. By using the film and mesh plate in the oral cavity, the real tooth length can be measured easily on the film surfaces. 2. The film distortion in the oral cavity can be avoided when taking the film using the mesh plate and film together. 3. When measuring the film, length of crown was elongated and length of root was shortened. 4. When using the well-trained bisecting technic, the real tooth length can be measured directly on the intraoral film.

  19. Effect of drugs on orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sarah Aulia Amrullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response to mechanical forces given to the teeth in orthodontic treatment, which involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structure. Remodeling changes in periodontal tissues are considered to be essential in effecting orthodontic tooth movement which is the base of orthodontic correction. Molecules produced in various diseased tissues or drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients, can influence mechanically stressed periodontal tissue through the circulation and interact with target cell combination of which may be inhibitory, additive or synergize. Medications might have an important influence on the rate of tooth movement, and information on their consumption is essential to adequately discuss treatment planning with patients. Therefore it is imperative to the practitioners being in medical profession, must pay close attention to the drug consumption history of every patient before and during the course of treatment.

  20. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruzell, E.M.; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study was performed to assess the risk of at-home and in-office bleaching procedures, and to recognise potential predictors for side effects. Design Multi-centre, questionnaire-based prospective study with follow-ups at around 14 days and around one year post-treatment. Setting...... General practices and university clinics during the years 2007‑2009 in Scandinavia. Subjects Patients with tooth bleaching as part of the treatment plan. Results The prevalence of experienced tooth sensitivity at first follow-up was independent of bleaching procedure (at-home = 50.3% [n = 143]; in...... attributed to the bleaching treatment in the at-home and in-office groups, respectively. Predictors for side effects were tooth sensitivity, surface loss and gingivitis when observed at inclusion. Treatment-related predictors were bleaching concentration and contact between tray and gingiva. Conclusions...

  1. Estimating Wear Of Installed Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E.; Mcvey, Scott E.

    1993-01-01

    Simple inspection and measurement technique makes possible to estimate wear of balls in ball bearing, without removing bearing from shaft on which installed. To perform measurement, one observes bearing cage while turning shaft by hand to obtain integral number of cage rotations and to measure, to nearest 2 degrees, number of shaft rotations producing cage rotations. Ratio between numbers of cages and shaft rotations depends only on internal geometry of bearing and applied load. Changes in turns ratio reflect changes in internal geometry of bearing provided measurements made with similar bearing loads. By assuming all wear occurs on balls, one computes effective value for this wear from change in turns ratio.

  2. Minimization of PWR reactor control rods wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Moura Angelkorte, Gunther de

    1995-01-01

    The Rod Cluster Control Assemblies (RCCA's) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) have experienced a continuously wall cladding wear when Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) are running. Fretting wear is a result of vibrational contact between RCCA rodlets and the guide cards which provide lateral support for the rodlets when RCCA's are withdrawn from the core. A procedure is developed to minimize the rodlets wear, by the shuffling and axial reposition of RCCA's every operating cycle. These shuffling and repositions are based on measurement of the rodlet cladding thickness of all RCCA's. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Tool wear modeling using abductive networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masory, Oren

    1992-09-01

    A tool wear model based on Abductive Networks, which consists of a network of `polynomial' nodes, is described. The model relates the cutting parameters, components of the cutting force, and machining time to flank wear. Thus real time measurements of the cutting force can be used to monitor the machining process. The model is obtained by a training process in which the connectivity between the network's nodes and the polynomial coefficients of each node are determined by optimizing a performance criteria. Actual wear measurements of coated and uncoated carbide inserts were used for training and evaluating the established model.

  4. Canine and incisor microwear in pitheciids and Ateles reflects documented patterns of tooth use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delezene, Lucas K; Teaford, Mark F; Ungar, Peter S

    2016-09-01

    Platyrrhine species differ in the extent to and the manner in which they use their incisors and canines during food ingestion. For example, Ateles uses its anterior teeth to process mechanically nondemanding soft fruits, while the sclerocarp-harvesting pitheciids rely extensively on these teeth to acquire and process more demanding foods. Pitheciids themselves vary in anterior tooth use, with the pitheciines (Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia) noted to use their robust canines in a variety of ways to predate seeds, while Callicebus, which rarely predates seeds, uses its incisors and exceptionally short canines to scrape tough mesocarp from fruits. To investigate the relationship between tooth use and dental wear, microwear textures were investigated for the anterior teeth of these five genera of platyrrhine primates. Using a white light confocal microscope, 12 microwear texture attributes that reflect feature size, anisotropy, density, and complexity were recorded from high-resolution epoxy casts of the incisors and canines of adult wild-collected Brazilian specimens of Ateles, Callicebus, Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia. Pitheciine canines tend to have deep microwear features and complex, anisotropic microwear textures, while Ateles anterior teeth tend to have very small features, low feature density, and less complex and anisotropic surfaces. Callicebus incisor and canine microwear is generally intermediate in size and complexity between those extremes. These findings align with expectations from reported field observations of tooth use and illustrate the potential for using microwear texture analysis to infer patterns of anterior tooth use in extinct primates. Am J Phys Anthropol 161:6-25, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of Extended-Wear Hearing Technology for Children with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jace; Schafer, Erin; Martella, Natalie; Morais, Mila; Mann, Misty

    2015-01-01

    Research shows that many older children and teenagers who have mild to moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss do not use their hearing instruments during all waking hours. A variety of reasons may contribute toward this problem, including concerns about cosmetics associated with hearing aid use and the inconvenience of daily maintenance associated with hearing instruments. Extended-wear hearing instruments are inserted into the wearer's ear canal by an audiologist and are essentially invisible to outside observers. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential benefits and limitations associated with use of extended-wear hearing instruments in a group of children with hearing loss. A two-way repeated measures design was used to examine performance differences obtained with the participants' daily-wear hearing instruments versus that obtained with extended-wear hearing instruments. Sixteen children, ages 10-17 yr old, with sensorineural hearing loss ranging from mild to moderately severe. Probe microphone measures were completed to evaluate the aided output of device. Behavioral test measures included word recognition in quiet, sentence recognition in noise, aided warble-tone thresholds, and psychophysical loudness scaling. Questionnaires were also administered to evaluate subjective performance with each hearing technology. Data logging suggested that many participants were not using their daily-wear hearing instruments during all waking hours (mean use was less than 6 h/day). Real ear probe microphone measurements indicated that a closer fit to the Desired Sensation Level Version 5 prescriptive targets was achieved with the children's daily-wear instruments when compared to the extended-wear instruments. There was no statistically significant difference in monosyllabic word recognition at 50 or 60 dBA obtained with the two hearing technologies. Sentence recognition in noise obtained with use of the extended-wear devices was, however, significantly

  6. [Cermet cements for milk tooth fillings. Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickel, R; Petschelt, A; Voss, A

    1989-06-01

    106 Ketac-Silver fillings in deciduous molars were reevaluated after 1 to 3.3 years, i.e. 25 month on the average. About 90% of 50 occlusal fillings and about 84% of 56 multisurface restorations were unchanged. Without claiming statistical evidence for their conclusiveness, we consider these results as an indication that cermet cements are a useful alternative to amalgam fillings in deciduous teeth, particularly since the life of these fillings is limited to the time until the milk tooth is physiologically lost.

  7. Disturbances in Tooth Mineralization and Forensic Dental Age Estimations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Dyrgaard; Arge, Sára Oladóttir; Larsen, Sara Tangmose

    When performing a forensic dental age assessment, mineralization disturbances of the teeth and the possible consequences these may have upon the reliability of the assessment must be taken into consideration. Furthermore, mineralization disturbances of a general character in the teeth may be seen...... as an indicator of more systemic insults during tooth formation and thus supplement the examination performed by the forensic pathologist. At our department the forensic dental age assessment is based upon a dental panoramic image, intra oral images of the third molars as well as a clinical photograph...

  8. Tooth-germ damage by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobkowiak, E.M.; Beetke, E.; Bienengraeber, V.; Held, M.; Kittner, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments on animals (four-week-old dogs) were conducted in an investigation made to study the possibility of dose-dependent tooth-germ damage produced by ionizing radiation. The individual doses were 50 R and 200 R, respectively, and they were administered once to three times at weekly intervals. Hyperemia and edemata could be observed on tooth-germ pulps from 150 R onward. Both of these conditions became more acute as the radiation dose increased (from 150 R to 600 R). Possible damage to both the dentin and enamel is pointed out. (author)

  9. Tooth microwear formation rate in Gasterosteus aculeatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, D C; Purnell, M A; Hart, P J B

    2014-05-01

    Tooth microwear feature densities were significantly increased in a population of laboratory-reared three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in four days, after they were transferred from a limnetic feeding regime to a benthic feeding regime. These results show that even in aquatic vertebrates with non-occluding teeth, changes in feeding can cause changes in tooth microwear in just a few days, as in mammals. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. [The importance of wear couples for younger endoprosthesis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, J; Bergschmidt, P; Bader, R; Kluess, D; Besser-Mahuzir, E; Leder, A; Mittelmeier, W

    2007-04-01

    The success and long-term survival rates of modern joint arthroplasty leads to a high patient satisfaction and, together with its technical improvements, has broadened the indications to an increasingly younger population. Limitations to the established systems are the long-term survival rates, which are mainly influenced by wear of the articulating parts and the resulting problems. Beside "classic" long-stemmed cemented shafts articulating with metal against polyethylene, short-stemmed or cup designs with a hard-hard self pairing are increasingly used in total hip arthroplasty. This paper reflects the current state of the art in joint arthroplasty for younger patients with the focus on wear couples and discusses future perspectives. Special interest is focused on the advantages and disadvantages of ceramic bearings, problems with allergies to implant components and the design of endoprostheses with regard to avoidance of impingement.

  11. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth......' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex...

  12. Extended Wearing Trial of Trifield Lens Device for “Tunnel Vision”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Russell L.; Giorgi, Robert G.; Berson, Eliot L.; Peli, Eli

    2009-01-01

    Severe visual field constriction (tunnel vision) impairs the ability to navigate and walk safely. We evaluated Trifield glasses as a mobility rehabilitation device for tunnel vision in an extended wearing trial. Twelve patients with tunnel vision (5 to 22 degrees wide) due to retinitis pigmentosa or choroideremia participated in the 5-visit wearing trial. To expand the horizontal visual field, one spectacle lens was fitted with two apex-to-apex prisms that vertically bisected the pupil on primary gaze. This provides visual field expansion at the expense of visual confusion (two objects with the same visual direction). Patients were asked to wear these spectacles as much as possible for the duration of the wearing trial (median 8, range 6 to 60, weeks). Clinical success (continued wear, indicating perceived overall benefit), visual field expansion, perceived direction and perceived visual ability were measured. Of 12 patients, 9 chose to continue wearing the Trifield glasses at the end of the wearing trial. Of those 9 patients, at long-term follow-up (35 to 78 weeks), 3 reported still wearing the Trifield glasses. Visual field expansion (median 18, range 9 to 38, degrees) was demonstrated for all patients. No patient demonstrated adaptation to the change in visual direction produced by the Trifield glasses (prisms). For difficulty with obstacles, some differences between successful and non-successful wearers were found. Trifield glasses provided reported benefits in obstacle avoidance to 7 of the 12 patients completing the wearing trial. Crowded environments were particularly difficult for most wearers. Possible reasons for long-term discontinuation and lack of adaptation to perceived direction are discussed. PMID:20444130

  13. The Wearing Out of Genre Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Joanna

    1971-01-01

    Scenes and plots wear out in three distinct stages: Innocence, Plausibility, and Decadence. Examines westerns, spy stories, nurse novels, detective stories, science fiction, pornography, avant-garde fiction, etc. (Author/RB)

  14. Eye Wear: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... When You Exercise (National Institute on Aging) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Eye Wear updates by email What's this? GO Related Health Topics Refractive Errors National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  15. The model of the dependence of the abrasive wear value on the maximal linear wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Вишневський

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  The relation of the contact area of the rubber roll with a sample and the maximal linear wear value is found. The mathematical model of the dependence of the wear volume weight value on the maximal dimple depth is presented with the friction on abrasive particles fixed nonrigidly. The relation of volume weight wear with the rubber roll contact surface area with a sample with the friction on abrasive particles fixed nonrigidly is established.

  16. 21 CFR 872.5525 - Preformed tooth positioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5525 Preformed tooth positioner. (a) Identification. A preformed tooth positioner is a plastic device that is an impression of a perfected bite...

  17. Tooth breakage in patients injected with 224Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnabend, E.; Spiess, H.; Mays, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Tooth breakage has been common among the 224 Ra patients, especially those injected as teenagers. The fracture of 1 or more teeth was reported by 26% (8/31) of boys and 23% (7/30) of girls injected with 224 Ra at 16-20 years of age. Combining results from all age groups, the incidence of tooth fractures increased significantly with dose (P=0.01). Unlike the normal loss of permanent teeth by periodontal disease, in which the entire tooth is lost, the tooth loss following 224 Ra injection was primarily from tooth resorption near the gum line causing the tooth crowns to break off easily. Eventually the tooth roots may either become incorporated into the jawbone or are resorbed and replaced with bone. These tooth fractures resembled those observed in the U.S. radium dial painters and in dogs injected with bone-seeking α-emitters. (orig.)

  18. Thin layer activation: measuring wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvigne, T.; Leyman, D.; Oxorn, K.

    1995-01-01

    The technique known as thin layer activation (TLA) is explained and assessed in this article. Widely used, in for example the automotive industry, TLA allows on-line monitoring of the loss of matter from a critical surface, by wear erosion and corrosion. The technique offers extremely high sensitivity thus leading to reduced test times. On-line wear phenomena can be assessed during operation of a mechanical process, even through thick engine walls. (UK)

  19. Biocompatible wear-resistant thick ceramic coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensitisation to immunologically active elements like chromium, cobalt or nickel and debris particle due to wear are serious problems for patients with metallic implants. We tested the approach of using a hard and thick ceramic coating as a wear-resistant protection of titanium implants, avoiding those sensitisation and foreign body problems. We showed that the process parameters strongly influence the coating porosity and, as a consequence, also its hardness.

  20. Third abrasive wear mode: is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Câmara Cozza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose an initial discussion on the characterization of a third abrasive wear mode. The results obtained in a previous work [1] under different test conditions revealed the occurrence of the superposition of the “rolling” and “grooving” abrasive wear modes. This phenomenon was denoted “micro-rolling abrasion” due to the observation that “rolling abrasion” was found to act on “grooving abrasion”.

  1. Tooth Decay Process: How to Reverse It and Avoid a Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info Health Topics Tooth Decay Tooth decay (dental caries) is damage to a tooth that can happen ... Clinical Trials Show All Clinical Trials Data & Statistics Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ...

  2. Microstructure and wear behaviour of aluminium alloys containing embedded nanoscaled lead dispersoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Victoria; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2004-01-01

    We report the early stage friction and wear characteristics of aluminium containing nanosized lead dispersions. The nanocomposite was produced by rapid solidification. The experimental results indicate a significant decrease in friction and wear rate in comparison to its coarse grained counterparts. We show that the observed results suggest an adhesive type of wear mechanism. However, increase in hardness due to refinement of the aluminium grains cannot quantitatively rationalize the results. We explore and discuss the role of nanoscaled lead particles and the mass transport between the sample and counterface via mechanical alloying, in the formation of tribolayers affecting the tribological properties. The plane view and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals significant elongation as well as coarsening of the lead particles during the process of wear. We attempt to understand these results in the framework of moving dislocations and their assistance to the mass transport among the dispersed lead particles

  3. Performance Degradation Analysis of Aviation Hydraulic Piston Pump Based on Mixed Wear Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the mathematical modeling of axial piston pump through dividing the failure development of friction pair into lubrication, mixed lubrication and abrasion. Directing to the wedge-shaped oil film between cylinder block and valve plate, the support force distribution under the temperature variance was obtained. Considering the rough peak of valve plate, the contact load model is built under plastic deformation and elastic deformation and the corresponding wear volume is calculated. Computing the wear and tear along the counter-clockwise, the total amount of friction and wear can be calculated. Simulation and preliminary wear particle monitoring test indicates that proposed modeling and analysis can effectively reflect the real abrasion process of hydraulic piston pump.

  4. Comparison of performance coatings thermally sprayed subject to testing adhesive wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangoni, G.F.; Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R. da

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes and wear resistance adhesive coatings obtained from powders thermally sprayed by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) were evaluated. Based coatings chrome-nickel and tungsten-cobalt are applied in conditions subject to intense wear especially abrasive. With the aim of evaluate the performance of these coatings under conditions of adhesive wear, these coatings samples were tested by the standard ASTM G99. As test parameters were used: Tungsten carbide pin (SAE 52100) with 6 mm diameter, normal load of 50N and a tangential velocity of 0.5 m / s. The worn surfaces of the coatings were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the performance front wear is related to the conditions of adhesion and uniformity of the coating applied. (author)

  5. Wear simulation of apex seal in rotary engine under mixed lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hanying; Zuo, Zhengxing; Liu, Jinxiang

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the wear of apex seal's running face under mixed lubrication is studied. Numerical simulation is carried out by employing the couple model of Reynolds equation, Greenwood and Tripp model and Archard's wear law. The simulation is performed both for one circle and multi circle. In the multi circle simulation, the change of contact position due to wear is considered. A method that is able to find the new contact position based on the updated apex seal's contour profile is proposed, validated and used. The result of multi circle simulation indicates that contact position changes obviously around the maximum swing angles both on leading and trailing sides with the increase number of circles. The wear depth distribution becomes more uniform with the increase of operation circle number.

  6. Stress analysis and collapse time prediction of nuclear fuel cladding tube with wear scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Kim, O. H.; Kim, H. K.; Hu, Y. H.; Kim, J. I.; Kim, K. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this analysis, the stress and collapse time analysis models for nuclear fuel rod with the fretting wear scar were developed in order to evaluate the effects of the wear depth on the integrity of nuclear fuel rod. The stress analysis result shows that the nuclear fuel rod with approximately 60% deep wear scar of the clad wall thickness, meets the allowable stress criteria and the collapse time analysis indicates that the fuel rod with less than roughly 56% deep wear scar of the clad wall thickness has longer collapse time than the expected fuel life-time. The both stress and collapse time results are evaluated to be very reasonable on considering the comparison with the outputs of existing design code for the simple model. However, the developed analysis models and the results will be confirmed by the tests

  7. New laboratory methods to study tooth surface coverage and interproximal plaque control by dentifrice products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Herles, Susan M; Barnes, Virginia M

    2004-01-01

    To develop and test an in vitro tooth model for use in conjunction with laboratory methods to study interproximal effects and efficacy of dentifrices. The application of the model should offer visual evaluation of dentifrice coverage of the tooth surface, and measure dental plaque control at posterior interdental spaces with a dentifrice. The dentifrice products tested with the model were: Colgate Total 2 in 1 Toothpaste and Mouthwash (CTTM), Colgate Total dentifrice (CTD), and Colgate Regular dentifrice (CRD). Extracted human posterior teeth were disinfected, cleaned, aligned, and mounted in denture acrylic. In the area coverage method, tooth surface coverage and penetration of two different forms of dentifrice products (CTTM and CRD) were compared using digital photography. In the interproximal plaque control method, the teeth were coated with human saliva and incubated anaerobically with a mixture of representative oral bacteria for six hours at 37 degrees C. In vitro dental plaque was assessed after brushing the facial surface with one of the three dentifrice products using a clinical plaque scoring index. The area coverage method demonstrated that both dentifrice products tested covered approximately 70% of the facial tooth surface; the CTTM dentifrice coverage on the lingual tooth surface was significantly higher than the coverage for the CRD dentifrice. With the interproximal plaque control method, in the presence of an active ingredient, the CTTM dentifrice had equivalent efficacy to the CTD dentifrice. Both CTTM and CTD were significantly superior to the CRD for interproximal dental plaque control. Using the developed tooth model, two assessment methods have been shown to have the potential to demonstrate tooth surface coverage, and to assess the potential efficacy of a dentifrice for the control of interproximal dental plaque. This process can indicate potential clinical evaluation of an oral care product, and support clinical findings with controlled

  8. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in patient wearing full denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a harmless commensal organism inhabiting the mouths but it can change into pathogen and invade tissue and cause acute and chronic disease. Dentures predispose to infection with Candida in as many as 65% of elderly people wearing full upper dentures. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to discuss thrush in patient wearing full denture which rapidly developed. Case: This paper report a case of 57 year-old man who came to the Oral Medicine Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University with clinical appearance of pseudomembranous candidiasis (thrush. Case Management: Diagnosis of this case is confirmed with microbiology examination. Patient was wearing full upper dentures, and from anamnesis known that patient wearing denture for 24 hours and he had poor oral hygiene. Patient was treated with topical (nystatin oral suspension and miconazole oral gel and systemic (ketoconazole antifungal. Patient also instructed not to wear his denture and cleaned white pseudomembrane on his mouth with soft toothbrush. Conclusion: Denture, habit of wearing denture for 24 hours, and poor oral hygiene are predisposing factors of thrush and it can healed completely after treated with topical and systemic antifungal.

  9. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and oral health information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Friday, May 11, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference ... Resin (White Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Learn what those dental words ...

  10. Tooth mobility changes subsequent to root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth mobility changes in root-fractured permanent teeth and relate this to type of interfragment healing (hard tissue healing (HT), interfragment healing with periodontal ligament (PDL) and nonhealing with interposition of granulation tissue (GT) because...

  11. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Oral Health and Overal Health Headaches and Jaw Pain? Check ... Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  12. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide pe...

  13. Recent Approaches in Tooth Engineering Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švandová, Eva; Veselá, Barbora; Křivánek, J.; Hampl, A.; Matalová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, Suppl 1 (2014), s. 21-29 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/11/1418; GA MZd(CZ) NT11420 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : engineering * tooth * stem cells * culture techniques Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  14. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental Advances Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints and Permissions | Privacy Statement | Terms and Conditions © 1996-2018 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Age effect on orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of age on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement based on critical literature reviews, studies on a standardized orthodontic animal model and a non-invasive clinical investigation. A systematic review was performed on the optimum force for

  16. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental care and ... a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site ...

  17. Cigarette smoking, tooth brushing characteristics, and perceived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted among four hundred non-dental undergraduates of University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria to assess the prevalence of cigarette smoking, tooth brushing characteristics, perceived efficacy in oral self-care and preventing gingivodental diseases among them. The result showed that the perceived ...

  18. Storing tooth segments for optimal esthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuzuner, T.; Turgut, S.; Özen, B.; Kılınç, H.; Bagis, B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A fractured whole crown segment can be reattached to its remnant; crowns from extracted teeth may be used as pontics in splinting techniques. We aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions on tooth segment optical properties after different durations. Study design: Sixty

  19. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... June 1, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Nutrition - Adults When Should My Child First See a Dentist? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist Are You ...

  20. Restoration of the endodontically treated posterior tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polesel

    2014-06-01

    Results and conclusions: Direct adhesive restorations, indirect bonded restorations and traditional full crown are three therapeutic options for the single posterior endodontically treated teeth. The amount of remaining sound tooth structure is the most significant factor influencing the therapeutic approach. The clinician's operative skill is a determining aspect for long-term success of adhesive inlays.

  1. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... oyunlarý bakugan oyunlarý geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About ... mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About ...

  2. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Temporomandibular Joint ... Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  3. Apoptotic cell elimination during early tooth development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Míšek, Ivan; Chovancová, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 7 (2003), s. 34 ISSN 0001-7213. [Congress of the European Association of Veterinary Anatomists/24./. 21.07.2002-25.07.2002, Brno] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/P112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : tooth development Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  4. Bevarage consumption during television viewing and tooth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The study assessed the television (TV) viewing habits, preferred energy and acidic drinks consumed when watching television and the history of tooth sensitivity among adolescents who watched television >2 hours daily (HTV) and <2 hour daily. (LTV). Subjects and Methods: This is a descriptive study conducted in Ife ...

  5. EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattibene, Paola; Callens, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    When tooth enamel is exposed to ionizing radiation, radicals are formed, which can be detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel is based on the (presumed) correlation between the intensity or amplitude of some of the radiation-induced signals with the dose absorbed in the enamel. In the present paper a critical review is given of this widely applied dosimetric method. The first part of the paper is fairly fundamental and deals with the main properties of tooth enamel and some of its model systems (e.g., synthetic apatites). Considerable attention is also paid to the numerous radiation-induced and native EPR signals and the radicals responsible for them. The relevant methods for EPR detection, identification and spectrum analyzing are reviewed from a general point of view. Finally, the needs for solid-state modelling and studies of the linearity of the dose response are investigated. The second part is devoted to the practical implementation of EPR dosimetry using enamel. It concerns specific problems of preparation of samples, their irradiation and spectrum acquisition. It also describes how the dosimetric signal intensity and dose can be retrieved from the EPR spectra. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence of the EPR response and to sources of uncertainties. Results of and problems encountered in international intercomparisons and epidemiological studies are also dealt with. In the final section the future of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel is analyzed.

  6. Death in the life of a tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Tucker, A. S.; Sharpe, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 1 (2004), s. 11-16 ISSN 0022-0345 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/P112 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : apoptosis * tooth development Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.131, year: 2004

  7. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction The History ... Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  8. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bomberman atari oyunlarý bakugan oyunlarý geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral ... dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | ...

  9. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Tooth Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbin Ranjitkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children and adults, and of “silent refluxers” in particular, increases the responsibility of dentists to be alert to this potentially severe condition when observing unexplained instances of tooth erosion. Although gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic occurrence, excessive gastric and duodenal regurgitation combined with a decrease in normal protective mechanisms, including an adequate production of saliva, may result in many esophageal and extraesophageal adverse conditions. Sleep-related GERD is particularly insidious as the supine position enhances the proximal migration of gastric contents, and normal saliva production is much reduced. Gastric acid will displace saliva easily from tooth surfaces, and proteolytic pepsin will remove protective dental pellicle. Though increasing evidence of associations between GERD and tooth erosion has been shown in both animal and human studies, relatively few clinical studies have been carried out under controlled trial conditions. Suspicion of an endogenous source of acid being associated with observed tooth erosion requires medical referral and management of the patient as the primary method for its prevention and control.

  10. Effect of the vitality of the overdenture abutment tooth on stability of the tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ahmad Omar Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: It was concluded that the overdenture over vital abutment teeth was more stable, with a lower incidence of tooth mobility and less attachment loss than overdentures placed on nonvital teeth.

  11. Acute changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local clearance of 125I from the periodontal ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwall, B.; Berg, J.O.; Gazelius, B.; Edwall, L.; Aars, H.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local 125 I clearance from the periodontal ligament (PDL) were monitored simultaneously in cats. Axial tooth movements, reflecting periodontal ligament volume changes, were measured with an ultrasonic transit time technique. Local blood flow changes in the PDL were studied indirectly by measuring the local clearance of 125 I. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk caused an intrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant reduction of the 125 I-clearance. Infusion of noradrenaline induced a similar respone. Stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve during systemic treatment with phentolamine caused an extrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant increase in the clearance of the tracer from the PDL. Intra-arterial infusion of the vasodilator substance P mimicked that response. Fization of the tooth to the jaw bone, thus preventing an intrusive movement, did not change the reductions in clearance seen on sympathetic stimulation, indicating that this blood flow reduction was not dependent on tooth movement. A qualitative relation between PDL blood flow (as measured by local 125 I clearance) and PDL volume (as measured by tooth position) in shown. The two variables measured are suggested to reflect two aspects of blood flow in the PDL

  12. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tooth in a fixed or removable partial denture. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a...

  13. The Importance of Tooth Decay Prevention in Children under Three

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen; Chi, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Tooth decay and tooth loss was once the norm but public health interventions have led to major improvements for most people. Nevertheless, not all children have benefited. Dental disease in young children is unacceptably high. Tooth decay is preventable. Early childhood educators are often the first to notice the problem. Professional…

  14. Tooth-marked small theropod bone: an extremely rare trace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    2001-01-01

    Tooth-marked dinosaur bones provide insight into feeding behaviours and biting strategies of theropod dinosaurs. The majority of theropod tooth marks reported to date have been found on herbivorous dinosaur bones, although some tyrannosaurid bones with tooth marks have also been reported. In 1988...

  15. Wear-resistance of Aluminum Matrix Microcomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kandeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is developed for the study of wear of aluminum alloys AlSi7 obtained by casting, reinforced by TiC microparticles, before and after heat treatment. Tribological study is realized under conditions of friction on counterbody with fixed abrasive. Experimental results were obtained for mass wear, wear rate, wear intensity and wear-resistance of the alloys with different wt% of microparticles.

  16. Regulation and Measurement of the Heat Generated by Automatic Tooth Preparation in a Confined Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fusong; Zheng, Jianqiao; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lyu, Peijun

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and regulate heat generation in the dental pulp cavity and circumambient temperature around a tooth during laser ablation with a femtosecond laser in a confined space. The automatic tooth preparing technique is one of the traditional oral clinical technology innovations. In this technique, a robot controlled an ultrashort pulse laser to automatically complete the three-dimensional teeth preparing in a confined space. The temperature control is the main measure for protecting the tooth nerve. Ten tooth specimens were irradiated with a femtosecond laser controlled by a robot in a confined space to generate 10 teeth preparation. During the process, four thermocouple sensors were used to record the pulp cavity and circumambient environment temperatures with or without air cooling. A statistical analysis of the temperatures was performed between the conditions with and without air cooling (p heat generated in the pulp cavity was lower than the threshold for dental pulp damage. These results indicate that femtosecond laser ablation with air cooling might be an appropriate method for automatic tooth preparing.

  17. EMMPRIN (basigin/CD147) is involved in the morphogenesis of tooth germ in mouse molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Jiao, Ting; Chen, Yuqin; Xu, Chun; Li, Jing; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2010-05-01

    The pattern of gene expression for extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) was revealed in the tooth germ of mouse mandibular molars using quantitative real-time PCR. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical study demonstrated the characteristic distribution of EMMPRIN in the different stages of tooth germ development. To investigate the functional role played by EMMPRIN in tooth germ development, EMMPRIN siRNA interference approach was carried out in cultured mouse mandibles at embryonic day 11.0 (E11.0). The results showed that EMMPRIN siRNA-treated explants exhibited a marked growth inhibition of tooth germ compared to the control and scrambled siRNA-treated explants. Meanwhile, a significant increase in MT1-MMP mRNA expression and a reduction in MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13 and MT2-MMP mRNA expression were observed in the mouse mandibles following EMMPRIN abrogation. The current results indicate that EMMPRIN could thus be involved in the early stage of tooth germ development and morphogenesis, possibly by regulating the expression of MMP genes.

  18. Efficacy of tooth whitening with different calcium phosphate-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Xu, Xiaohui; Lai, Guangyun; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of tooth whitening using different calcium phosphate-based formulations. Teeth were treated with three different hydroxyapatite preparations at different concentrations and with two control preparations; each tooth was treated a total of three times. After application of the last material, hydrodynamic shear force was applied to mimic mechanical loading. After each treatment, tooth color was measured using a dental spectrophotometer, and the mean changes in L*a*b* values between different measurements were expressed as ∆E. The results indicated significant differences between the materials, but neither dose- nor time-dependent associations were found. The suspension containing tricalcium phosphate (10 wt%) showed the most obvious color change (∆E = 2.20 ± 0.90), while the suspension containing zinc-carbonate-apatite (20 wt%) showed the least obvious color change (∆E = 0.91 ± 0.50). Calcium phosphate-based formulations that can adhere to the enamel surface and contribute to tooth whitening have promising tooth-whitening potential. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  19. Periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Lina; Gao, Meiya; Ma, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yang; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2015-08-01

    Calcitonin-related gene peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in orofacial inflammatory pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether periodontal CGRP contributes to orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Closed coil springs were used to deliver forces. Rats were euthanized on 0d, 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 14d following experimental tooth movement. Then, alveolar bones were obtained for immunostaining of periodontal tissues against CGRP. Two hours prior to euthanasia on each day, orofacial pain levels were assessed through rat grimace scale. CGRP and olcegepant (CGRP receptor antagonist) were injected into periodontal tissues to verify the roles of periodontal CGRP in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Periodontal CGRP expression levels and orofacial pain levels were elevated on 1d, 3d, 5d, and 7d following experimental tooth movement. The two indices were significantly correlated with each other and fitted into a dose-response model. Periodontal administration of CGRP could elevate periodontal CGRP expressions and exacerbate orofacial pain. Moreover, olcegepant administration could decrease periodontal CGRP expressions and alleviate orofacial pain. Therefore, periodontal CGRP plays an important role in pain transmission and modulation following experimental tooth movement. We suggest that it may participate in a positive feedback aiming to amplify orofacial pain signals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydroxyapatite coating on damaged tooth surfaces by immersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Byoung-Ki; Ryu, Su-Chak; Sun, Fangfang; Koh, Kwangnak; Han, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jaebeom

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was coated on scratched areas of a human tooth and HAp disks by the immersion method in a HAp colloidal solution (≤20 μm of average diameter dispersed in DI water). The surface morphologies of the scratched area after immersion for 1-3 months were investigated showing that the damaged surfaces were remarkably recovered. Then, the mechanical property and chemical stability of the HAp coating layers on both specimens were determined via the Vickers hardness test and concentration measurement of extracted Ca 2+ ions, respectively, after strong acidic treatment. The cellular behavior of mouse calvaria-derived pre-osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) was also examined on the HAp layers regenerated on micro-scratched HAp disks for the purpose of their potential applications on maxillofacial bone conservation and reconstruction for prosthetic dentistry, and artificial disk preparation of a vertebral column. The notable loss of Ca 2+ ions under a highly acidic condition was not observed in the layers coated by HAp adsorption, indicating that the coating surface was well adhered with the original surfaces of the respective specimen. Moreover, the HAp adsorption did not adversely affect the adhesion, growth and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the coated HAp layers for up to 21 days. These results suggest that the HAp coating on the scratched areas of the tooth would be effectively applicable for the development of long-term prevention of micro-cleavage and tooth health supporters to reduce discoloration and further maxillofacial and orthopedic applications.

  1. External resorption presenting as an intracoronal radiolucent lesion in a pre-eruptive tooth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, C M

    1997-09-01

    A large intracoronal radiolucent lesion in an unerupted permanent molar was found during the routine assessment of a young male Caucasian prior to orthodontic treatment. The tooth was extracted. Histological examination indicated the lesion was caused by external resorption. The defect extended widely into the enamel and dentine, and was repaired in part by bone. The pulp chamber was not involved. The aetiology of these lesions is often obscure but in this case it appeared to have originated in the floor of two developmental pits on the occlusal surface of the tooth.

  2. Quantitive dynamical wear analysis and the convergent quest for significant wear reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, F.; Kirsch, J.; Derry, T.; Marcus, R.

    1984-01-01

    The maturing of nuclear physics has made the development of ion beam modification of materials possible, bringing new skills and prospects to the world of materials science. In the following paper an outline is given of the history of ion beam modification of materials (IBMM) and its use for altering the surface of metals to combat wear and friction, and monitoring wear in engines

  3. Wear mechanisms and friction parameters for sliding wear of micron-scale polysilicon sidewalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsem, D. H.; van der Hulst, R.; Stach, E. A.; Dugger, M. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Ritchie, R. O.

    As tribological properties are critical factors in the reliability of silicon-based microelectromechanical systems, it is important to understand what governs wear and friction. Average dynamic friction, wear volumes and morphology have been studied for polysilicon devices fabricated using the

  4. Microstructure and wear behaviors of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-WS2 high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mao-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Fan, Ji-Wei; He, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Wang, Ming-Di; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2012-02-01

    The high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 coating and wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2 coating were fabricated on 0Cr18Ni9 austenitic stainless steel by laser cladding. Phase constitutions and microstructures were investigated, and the tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc wear tester under dry sliding condition at room-temperature (17 °C), 300 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Results indicated that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2 coating consisted of Cr7C3 primary phase and γ-(Fe,Ni)/Cr7C3 eutectic colony, while the coating added with WS2 was mainly composed of Cr7C3 and (Cr,W)C carbides, with the lubricating WS2 and CrS sulfides as the minor phases. The wear tests showed that the friction coefficients of two coatings both decrease with the increasing temperature, while the both wear rates increase. The friction coefficient of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 is lower than the coating without WS2 whatever at room-temperature, 300 °C, 600 °C, but its wear rate is only lower at 300 °C. It is considered that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 composite coating has good combination of anti-wear and friction-reducing capabilities at room-temperature up to 300 °C.

  5. Analysis of mechanism of carbide tool wear and control by wear process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Hoang Trung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of physic-mechanical and thermal physic properties of hard alloys depending on their chemical composition is conducted. The correlation of cutting properties and regularities of carbide tool wear with cutting conditions and thermal physic properties of tool material are disclosed. Significant influence on the tool wear of not only mechanical, but, in the first place, thermal physic properties of tool and structural materials is established by the researches of Russian scientists, because in the range of industrial used cutting speeds the cause of tool wear are diffusion processes. The directions of intensity decreasing of tool wear by determining rational processing conditions, the choice of tool materials and wear-resistant coating on tool surface are defined.

  6. Effect of spherical Au nanoparticles on nanofriction and wear reduction in dry and liquid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nano-object additives are used in tribological applications as well as in various applications in liquids requiring controlled manipulation and targeting. On the macroscale, nanoparticles in solids and liquids have been shown to reduce friction and wear. On the nanoscale, atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies have been performed in single- and multiple-nanoparticle contact, in dry environments, to characterize friction forces and wear. However, limited studies in submerged liquid environments have been performed and further studies are needed. In this paper, spherical Au nanoparticles were studied for their effect on friction and wear under dry conditions and submerged in water. In single-nanoparticle contact, individual nanoparticles, deposited on silicon, were manipulated with a sharp tip and the friction force was determined. Multiple-nanoparticle contact sliding experiments were performed on nanoparticle-coated silicon with a glass sphere. Wear tests were performed on the nanoscale with AFM as well as on the macroscale by using a ball-on-flat tribometer to relate friction and wear reduction on the nanoscale and macroscale. Results indicate that the addition of Au nanoparticles reduces friction and wear. PMID:23213639

  7. Effect of spherical Au nanoparticles on nanofriction and wear reduction in dry and liquid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Maharaj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nano-object additives are used in tribological applications as well as in various applications in liquids requiring controlled manipulation and targeting. On the macroscale, nanoparticles in solids and liquids have been shown to reduce friction and wear. On the nanoscale, atomic force microscopy (AFM studies have been performed in single- and multiple-nanoparticle contact, in dry environments, to characterize friction forces and wear. However, limited studies in submerged liquid environments have been performed and further studies are needed. In this paper, spherical Au nanoparticles were studied for their effect on friction and wear under dry conditions and submerged in water. In single-nanoparticle contact, individual nanoparticles, deposited on silicon, were manipulated with a sharp tip and the friction force was determined. Multiple-nanoparticle contact sliding experiments were performed on nanoparticle-coated silicon with a glass sphere. Wear tests were performed on the nanoscale with AFM as well as on the macroscale by using a ball-on-flat tribometer to relate friction and wear reduction on the nanoscale and macroscale. Results indicate that the addition of Au nanoparticles reduces friction and wear.

  8. Corrosion and Wear Behaviors of Cr-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.; Mohan, L.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Kumar, V. Praveen; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anandan, C.

    2017-08-01

    A combination of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering techniques has been employed to deposit chromium-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel, silicon and glass substrates. The concentrations of Cr in the coatings are varied by changing the parameters of the bipolar pulsed power supply and the argon/acetylene gas composition. The coatings have been studied for composition, morphology, surface nature, nanohardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance properties. The changes in I D / I G ratio with Cr concentrations have been obtained from Raman spectroscopy studies. Ratio decreases with an increase in Cr concentration, and it has been found to increase at higher Cr concentration, indicating the disorder in the coating. Carbide is formed in Cr-doped DLC coatings as observed from XPS studies. There is a decrease in sp 3/ sp 2 ratios with an increase in Cr concentration, and it increases again at higher Cr concentration. Nanohardness studies show no clear dependence of hardness on Cr concentration. DLC coatings with lower Cr contents have demonstrated better corrosion resistance with better passive behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution, and corrosion potential is observed to move toward nobler (more positive) values. A low coefficient of friction (0.15) at different loads is observed from reciprocating wear studies. Lower wear volume is found at all loads on the Cr-doped DLC coatings. Wear mechanism changes from abrasive wear on the substrate to adhesive wear on the coating.

  9. Microstructure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma sprayed Ni-based coatings after TIG remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianshun, Dong; Xiukai, Zhou; Guolu, Li; Li, Liu; Ran, Wang

    2018-02-01

    Ni based coatings were prepared on steel substrate by means of plasma spraying, and were remelted by TIG (tungsten inert gas arc) method subsequently. The microstructure, microhardness, electrochemical corrosion and corrosive wear resistance under PH = 4, PH = 7 and PH = 10 conditions of the coatings before and after remelting were investigated. The results showed that the TIG remelting obviously reduced the defects and dramatically decreased the coating’s porosity from 7.2% to 0.4%. Metallurgical bonding between the remelted coating and substrate was achieved. Meanwhile, the phase compositions of as-sprayed coating were γ-Ni, Mn5Si2 and Cr2B, while the phase compositions of the remelting coating were Fe3Ni, Cr23C6, Cr2B and Mn5Si2. The microhardness of the coating decreased from 724 HV to 608 HV, but the fracture toughness enhanced from 2.80 MPa m1/2 to 197.3 MPa m1/2 after remelting. After corrosive wear test, the average wear weight loss and 3D morphology of wear scar of two coatings indicated that the wear resistance of the remelted coating was remarkably higher than that of as-sprayed coating. Therefore, TIG remelting treatment was a feasible method to improve the coating’s microstructure and enhance its corrosive wear resistance.

  10. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  11. Assessment of fretting wear in Hanaro fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Hark Rho

    1999-06-01

    Since the first fuel loading on Feb. 1995, various zero-power tests were performed in HANARO and power ascending tests followed. After the initial fuel loading, Hanaro operation staffs inspected only two fuel bundles which were evaluated to have the highest power at the end of each cycle and they did not recognize anything peculiar in the inspected bundles. At the end of 1996, Hanaro staffs found severe wear damages in the fuel components. After that, the 4th cycle core was re-arranged with fresh fuels only to investigate wear phenomena on the fuel components. The fuel inspections have been performed 25 times periodically since the core re-configuration. In this report, fretting wear characteristics of the fuel assemblies were evaluated and summarized. Wear damages of the improved fuel assembly to resolve the wear problem were compared with those of the original fuel assembly. Based on the results of the fuel inspections, we suggest that fuel inspection need not be done for the first 60 pump operation days in order to reduce the potential of damage by a fuel handling error and an operator's burden of the fuel inspection. (author). 6 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs

  12. The unlubricated reciprocating sliding wear of 316 stainless steel in C02 in the temperature range 20 to 6000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1985-11-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of 316 stainless steel in C0 2 has been investigated in the load range 8 - 5ON from 20 to 600 0 C. Wear transitions occurred at all temperatures but were load dependent. At and below 300 0 C wear transitions only took place at low leads whereas above 300 0 C transitions were seen al all loads. The low temperature wear transition, giving an order of magnitude decrease in wear rate was associated with a change in friction behaviour. The friction force across the specimen was initially widely fluctuating and varied from cycle to cycle. After a time, which did not necessarily coincide with the wear transition the cyclic variation in the friction force become much less. This smoother sliding is thought to indicate a trend to oxide -oxide contacts. At higher temperatures wear transitions result in a two orders of magnitude reduction in wear. The corresponding friction transition was similar to the low temperature friction change but also included a marked temporary drop in the coefficient of friction. (author)

  13. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  14. New method of control of tooth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelov, I.; Mantareva, V.; Gisbrecht, A.; Valkanov, S.; Uzunov, Tz.

    2010-10-01

    New methods of control of tooth bleaching stages through simultaneous measurements of a reflected light and a fluorescence signal are proposed. It is shown that the bleaching process leads to significant changes in the intensity of a scattered signal and also in the shape and intensity of the fluorescence spectra. Experimental data illustrate that the bleaching process causes essential changes in the teeth discoloration in short time as 8-10 min from the beginning of the application procedure. The continuation of the treatment is not necessary moreover the probability of the enamel destroy increases considerably. The proposed optical back control of tooth surface is a base for development of a practical set up to control the duration of the bleaching procedure.

  15. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...... mass loss (13.91%) than composite resin preparations with the same width (10.02%). 1/2-inlay cavities had 21.34% of mass loss versus 16.19% for the 1/2-composite resin cavities. Fracture strength means (in kgf) were: GI = 187.65; GII = 143.62; GIII = 74.10; GIV = 164.22; GV = 101.92; GVI = 50...

  16. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.T.

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. On hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analyzed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analyzed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population. (author)

  17. Effect of different dental ceramic systems on the wear of human enamel: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandparsa, Roya; El Huni, Rabie M; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Johnson, Marc I

    2016-02-01

    The wear of tooth structure opposing different advanced dental ceramic systems requires investigation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the wear of advanced ceramic systems against human enamel antagonists. Four ceramic systems (IPS e.max Press, IPS e.max CAD, Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3, and LAVA Plus Zirconia) and 1 control group containing human enamel specimens were used in this study (n = 12). All specimens were fabricated as disks 11 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick. The mesiopalatal cusps of the maxillary third molars were prepared to serve as the enamel styluses. All specimens were embedded individually in 25 mm(3) autopolymerizing acrylic resin blocks. Wear was measured with a cyclic loading machine and a newly designed wear simulator. All enamel styluses (cusps) were scanned using the Activity 880 digital scanner (SmartOptics). Data from the base line and follow-up scans were collected and compared with Qualify 2012 3-dimensional (3D) and 2D digital inspection software (Geomagic), which aligned the models and detected the geometric changes and the wear caused by the antagonist specimen. One-way ANOVA was used to analyze the collected data. After 125,000 bidirectional loading cycles, the mean loss of opposing enamel volume for the enamel disks in the control group was 37.08 μm(3), the lowest mean value for IPS e.max Press system was 39.75 μm(3); 40.58 μm(3) for IPS e.max CAD; 45.08 μm(3) for Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3 system; and 48.66 μm(3) for the Lava Plus Zirconia system. No statically significant differences were found among the groups in opposing enamel volume loss (P=.225) or opposing enamel height loss (P=.149). In terms of opposing enamel height loss, Lava Plus Zirconia system showed the lowest mean value of 27.5 μm. The mean value for the IPS e.max CAD system was 27.91 μm; 29.08 μm for the control enamel; 33.25 μm for the IPS e.max Press system; and 34.75 μm for the Noritake Super Porcelain EX-3 system. Within the

  18. The challenges of treating a fused tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Baratto-Filho, Flares; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Crozeta, Bruno Monguilhott; Baratto, Samantha Pugsley; Campos, Edson Alves; Tomazinho, Flavia Sens Fagundes; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the multidisciplinary treatment involving a permanent maxillary lateral incisor fused to a supernumerary tooth, both presenting pulp necrosis and periapical lesion. A 15-year-old male patient sought treatment complaining of pain, swelling and mobility on the maxillary right lateral incisor. After clinical and radiographic examination, root canal preparation was performed according to the crown-down technique and a calcium hydroxide dressing was placed for 15...

  19. Orthodontic-Surgical Alternatives for Tooth Ankylosis

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo-Mira, Juan Felipe; Velásquez Velásquez, Mariluz

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for tooth ankylosis poses a big challenge in dentistry. Orthosurgical techniques must be included to obtain a satisfactory esthetic and functional result. The treatment options are surgical removal, segmentary osteotomy with immediate repo- sition and segmentary osteotomy with distraction osteogenesis, which can be done using distractors or orthodontics, thus achieving acceptable long-term outcomes. El tratamiento de dientes anquilosados presenta un gran desafio en odontologia. E...

  20. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J.; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations.\\ud \\ud The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence® Boost and Mirawhite® Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 ...

  1. Caspase-7 in molar tooth development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matalová, Eva; Vanden Berghe, T.; Švandová, Eva; Vandenabeele, P.; Healy, C.; Sharpe, P. T.; Tucker, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 11 (2012), s. 1474-1481 ISSN 0003-9969 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600450904 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP502/12/1285 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : tooth * apoptosis * mineralisation Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.549, year: 2012

  2. Clear aligners generations and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Joe; Al-Awadhi, Ebrahim A

    2016-03-01

    Clear aligner technology has evolved over the last 15 years, with these appliances continually being modified to increase the range of tooth movements that they can achieve. However, there is very little clinical research available to show how these appliances achieve their results. This article describes the different generations of clear aligners that are available and highlights their use. However, until more clinical research becomes available, aligners cannot be routinely prescribed as an effective alternative to fixed labial appliances.

  3. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  4. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  5. Overview of PVD wear resistant coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeter, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The combined functionality of wear-resistant and low-friction multilayer coatings has widened application possibilities for a new generation of coated tools. For the first time tool wear mechanisms are comprehensively addressed both at the cutting edge and contact areas away from the edge where chip evacuation is facilitated. Since its recent market introduction a combined TiA1N and WC/C PVD coating has been proven to increase cutting performance in various metal cutting operations, notably drilling and tapping of steels and aluminum alloys. Significant improvements have been obtained under dry as well as with coolant conditions. The results of laboratory metal cutting tests and field trials to date will be described. Correlations between chip formation / wear mechanisms and coating properties are given to explain the effectiveness of this coating. (author)

  6. Duke Power Company's control rod wear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, D.C.; Kitlan, M.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent examinations performed at several foreign and domestic pressurized water reactors have identified significant control rod cladding wear, leading to the conclusion that previously believed control rod lifetimes are not attainable. To monitor control rod performance and reduce safety concerns associated with wear, Duke Power Company has developed a comprehensive control rod wear program for Ag-In-Cd and boron carbide (B 4 C) rods at the McGuire and Catawba nuclear stations. Duke Power currently uses the Westinghouse 17 x 17 Ag-In-Cd control rod design at McGuire Unit 1 and the Westinghouse 17 x 17 hybrid B 4 C control rod design with a Ag-In-Cd tip at McGuire Unit 2 and Catawba Units 1 and 2. The designs are similar, with the exception of the absorber material and clad thickness. There are 53 control rods per unit

  7. ISS protocol for EPR tooth dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onori, S.; Aragno, D.; Fattibene, P.; Petetti, E.; Pressello, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    The accuracy in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dose reconstruction with tooth enamel is affected by sample preparation, dosimetric signal amplitude evaluation and unknown dose estimate. Worldwide efforts in the field of EPR dose reconstruction with tooth enamel are focused on the optimization of the three mentioned steps in dose assessment. In the present work, the protocol implemented at ISS in the framework of the European Community Nuclear Fission Safety project 'Dose Reconstruction' is presented. A combined mechanical-chemical procedure for ground enamel sample preparation is used. The signal intensity evaluation is carried out with powder spectra simulation program. Finally, the unknown dose is evaluated individually for each sample with the additive dose method. The unknown dose is obtained by subtracting a mean native dose from the back-extrapolated dose. As an example of the capability of the ISS protocol in unknown dose evaluation, the results obtained in the framework of the 2nd International Intercomparison on EPR tooth enamel dosimetry are reported

  8. Orthodontic tooth movement with clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Carl T; McGorray, Susan P; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. every two weeks using clear aligners. A duplicate aligner was provided for the second week of each cycle. Weekly polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions were taken, and digital models were fabricated to measure OTM. Initial and final cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained to characterize OTM. Results were compared to data from a similar protocol, where subjects received a new aligner biweekly. No significant difference was found in the amount of OTM between the two groups, with mean total OTM of 1.11 mm. (standard deviation (SD) 0.30) and 1.07 mm. (SD 0.33) for the weekly aligner and biweekly control groups, respectively (P = 0.72). Over eight weeks, in two-week intervals, material fatigue does not play a significant role in the rate or amount of tooth movement.

  9. Surface engineering for enhanced performance against wear

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Surface Engineering constitutes a variety of processes and sub processes. Each chapter of this work covers specific processes by experts working in the area. Included for each topic are tribological performances for each process as well as results of recent research. The reader also will benefit from in-depth studies of diffusion coatings, nanocomposite films for wear resistance, surfaces for biotribological applications, thin-film wear, tribology of thermal sprayed coatings, hardfacing, plating for tribology and high energy beam surface modifications. Material scientists as well as engineers working with surface engineering for tribology will be particularly interested in this work.

  10. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  11. Evaluating the Properties of High-Temperature and Low-Temperature Wear of TiN Coatings Deposited at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Khorrami Mokhori

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research titanium nitride (TiN films were prepared by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition using TiCl4, H2, N2 and Ar on the AISI H13 tool steel. Coatings were deposited during different substrate temperatures (460°C, 480 ° C  and 510 °C. Wear tests were performed in order to study the acting wear mechanisms in the high(400 °C and low (25 °C temperatures by ball on disc method. Coating structure and chemical composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, microhardness and X-ray diffraction. Wear test result was described in ambient temprature according to wear rate. It was evidenced that the TiN coating deposited at 460 °C has the least weight loss with the highest hardness value. The best wear resistance was related to the coating with the highest hardness (1800 Vickers. Wear mechanisms were observed to change by changing wear temperatures. The result of wear track indicated that low-temprature wear has surface fatigue but high-temperature wear showed adhesive mechanism.

  12. Effects of Load and Speed on Wear Rate of Abrasive Wear for 2014 Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabas, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the normal load and sliding speed on wear rate of two-body abrasive wear for 2014 Al Alloy were investigated in detail. In order to understand the variation in wear behaviour with load and speed, wear tests were carried out at a sliding distance of 11 m, a speed of 0.36 m/s, a duration of 30 s and loads in the range 3-11 N using 220 grit abrasive paper, and at a speed range 0.09-0.90 m/s, a load of 5 N and an average sliding distance of 11 m using abrasive papers of 150 grit size under dry friction conditions. Before the wear tests, solution treatment of the 2014 Al alloy was carried out at temperatures of 505 and 520 °C for 1 h in a muffle furnace and then quenched in cold water at 15 °C. Later, the ageing treatment was carried out at 185 °C for 8 h in the furnace. Generally, wear rate due to time increased linearly and linear wear resistance decreased with increasing loads. However, the wear rate was directly proportional to the load up to a critical load of 7 N. After this load, the slope of the curves decreased because the excessive deformation of the worn surface and the instability of the abrasive grains began to increase. When the load on an abrasive grain reaches a critical value, the groove width is about 0.17 of the abrasive grain diameter, and the abrasive grains begin to fail. The wear rate due to time increased slightly as the sliding speed increased in the range 0.09-0.90 m/s. The reason for this is that changes arising from strain rate and friction heating are expected with increasing sliding speeds.

  13. A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunhee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-02-15

    The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

  14. A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

  15. Clinical and socio-behavioral correlates of tooth loss: a study of older adults in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åstrøm Anne N

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focusing 50 year olds and above, this study assessed the frequency, extent and correlates of tooth loss due to various reasons. Frequency and correlates of posterior occluding support was also investigated. Method A cross-sectional household survey was conducted in Pwani region and in Dar es Salaam in 2004/2005. One thousand and thirty-one subjects, mean age 62.9 years participated in a clinical examination and completed interviews. Results The prevalence of tooth loss due to any reason was 83.5 %, due to caries 63.4% and due to other reasons than caries, 32.5%. A total of 74.9% had reduced number of posterior occluding units. Compared to subjects having less than 5 teeth lost due to caries, those with 5 or more lost teeth were more likely to be females, having decayed teeth, confirming dental attendance and to be among the least poor residents. Compared to subjects who had lost less than 5 teeth due to reasons other than caries, those who had lost 5 or more teeth were more likely to be of higher age, having mobile teeth, being males, being very poor and to disconfirm dental attendance when having problems. Predictors of prevalence of tooth loss (1 or more lost tooth due to various reasons and reduced number of occluding units followed similar patterns of relationships. Conclusion The results are consistent with prevalence and extent of tooth loss due to caries and due to reasons other than caries being differently related to disease- and socio- behavioral risk indicators. Caries was the principle cause of tooth loss and molar teeth were the teeth most commonly lost.

  16. Tooth Morphogenesis and FGF4 Expression During Development of Molar Tooth in Three Muroid Rodents: Calomyscus elburzensis (Calomyscidae), Mesocricetus auratus (Cricetidae) and Mus musculus (Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Kordiyeh; Darvish, Jamshid; Matin, Maryam M; Javanmard, Athar Sadat; Kilpatrick, C William

    2017-12-01

    To date, no studies have examined the tooth formation during developmental stages of brush-tailed mice (Calomyscidae) and true hamsters (Cricetidae). Herein, we compared the timing of tooth morphogenesis and FGF4 expression pattern during development of the first lower molar in Goodwin's brush-tailed mouse, Calomyscus elburzensis with two other muroid rodents; the house mouse, Mus musculus (Muridae), model organism for tooth morphogenesis, and the golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus which shares great similarities in cusp pattern with brush-tailed mice. All three species were bred in captivity and developing embryos were isolated at different embryonic days (E). Histological evaluation of lower molars was performed and spatiotemporal pattern of FGF4 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results indicated that morphogenesis of the tooth cusps starts at the beginning of the cap stage of the first lower molar (E14 in house mouse, about E11.5 in golden hamster and E22 in Goodwin's brush-tailed mouse). During the cap to bell stage (E15 in house mouse, E12 in golden hamster and at about E24 in Goodwin's brush-tailed mouse), a decrease in the expression of FGF4 was observed in the mesenchyme, except for the cusp tips. According to our observations, the developmental process of the first lower molar formation in Goodwin's brush-tailed mouse began much later as compared with the other two species. Despite the differences in the temporal pattern of molar development between these three members of the same superfamily (Muroidea), the correlation in the expression of FGF4 with specific stages of tooth morphogenesis supported its regulatory function. Anat Rec, 300:2138-2149, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of sintering temperature on the microstructural evolution and wear behavior of WCp reinforced Ni-based coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-hui; Bai, Yang; Ye, Xu-chu

    2014-12-01

    This article focuses on the microstructural evolution and wear behavior of 50wt%WC reinforced Ni-based composites prepared onto 304 stainless steel substrates by vacuum sintering at different sintering temperatures. The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The wear resistance of the coatings was tested by thrust washer testing. The mechanisms of the decomposition, dissolution, and precipitation of primary carbides, and their influences on the wear resistance have been discussed. The results indicate that the coating sintered at 1175°C is composed of fine WC particles, coarse M6C (M=Ni, Fe, Co, etc.) carbides, and discrete borides dispersed in solid solution. Upon increasing the sintering temperature to 1225°C, the microstructure reveals few incompletely dissolved WC particles trapped in larger M6C, Cr-rich lamellar M23C6, and M3C2 in the austenite matrix. M23C6 and M3C2 precipitates are formed in both the γ/M6C grain boundary and the matrix. These large-sized and lamellar brittle phases tend to weaken the wear resistance of the composite coatings. The wear behavior is controlled simultaneously by both abrasive wear and adhesive wear. Among them, abrasive wear plays a major role in the wear process of the coating sintered at 1175°C, while the effect of adhesive wear is predominant in the coating sintered at 1225°C.

  18. Personal, social, and environmental factors associated with lifejacket wear in adults and children: A systematic literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Peden

    Full Text Available Drowning claims 7% of the global burden of injury-related deaths. Lifejackets are routinely recommended as a drowning prevention strategy; however, a review of related factors regarding lifejacket wear has not previously been investigated.This systematic review examined literature published from inception to December 2016 in English and German languages. The personal, social, and environmental factors associated with lifejacket wear among adults and children were investigated, a quantitative evaluation of the results undertaken, and gaps in the literature identified.Twenty studies, with sample sizes of studies ranging between 20 and 482,331, were identified. Fifty-five percent were cross-sectional studies. All studies were scored IV or V on the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC grading system indicating mostly descriptive and cross-sectional levels of evidence. Factors associated with increased wear included age (mostly children, gender (mostly female, boat type (non-motorised, boat size (small boats, role modelling (children influenced by adult lifejacket wear, and activity (water-skiing, fishing. Factors not associated or inconsistent with lifejacket wear included education, household income, ethnicity, boating ability, confidence in lifejackets, waterway type, and weather and water conditions. Factors associated with reduced lifejacket wear included adults, males, discomfort, cost and accessibility, consumption of alcohol, and swimming ability. Three studies evaluated the impact of interventions.This review identified factors associated with both increased and decreased lifejacket wear. Future research should address the motivational factors associated with individuals' decisions to wear or not wear lifejackets. This, combined with further research on the evaluation of interventions designed to increase lifejacket wear, will enhance the evidence base to support future drowning prevention interventions.

  19. Evaluation of MEMS-Based Wireless Accelerometer Sensors in Detecting Gear Tooth Faults in Helicopter Transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David George; Lambert, Nicholas A.; Wagoner, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnostics capability of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based rotating accelerometer sensors in detecting gear tooth crack failures in helicopter main-rotor transmissions was evaluated. MEMS sensors were installed on a pre-notched OH-58C spiral-bevel pinion gear. Endurance tests were performed and the gear was run to tooth fracture failure. Results from the MEMS sensor were compared to conventional accelerometers mounted on the transmission housing. Most of the four stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing and most of the CI's used gave indications of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS system performed well and lasted the entire test. All MEMS accelerometers gave an indication of failure at the end of the test. The MEMS systems performed as well, if not better, than the stationary accelerometers mounted on the gear box housing with regards to gear tooth fault detection. For both the MEMS sensors and stationary sensors, the fault detection time was not much sooner than the actual tooth fracture time. The MEMS sensor spectrum data showed large first order shaft frequency sidebands due to the measurement rotating frame of reference. The method of constructing a pseudo tach signal from periodic characteristics of the vibration data was successful in deriving a TSA signal without an actual tach and proved as an effective way to improve fault detection for the MEMS.

  20. Cortisol level and hemodynamic changes during tooth extraction at hypertensive and normotensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agani, Zana Bajrami; Benedetti, Alberto; Krasniqi, Vjosa Hamiti; Ahmedi, Jehona; Sejfija, Zana; Loxha, Mergime Prekazi; Murtezani, Arben; Rexhepi, Aida Namani; Ibraimi, Zana

    2015-04-01

    The patients that are subjects to oral-surgical interventions produce large amounts of steroids in comparison with healthy patients which are not a subject to any dental intervention. The aim of research was to determine the level of stress hormone cortisol in serum, arterial blood pressure and arterial pulse, and to compare the effectiveness of the usage of lidocaine with adrenalin in comparison with lidocaine without adrenalin during the tooth extraction. This clinical research includes patients with indication of tooth extraction divided in hypertensive and normotensive patients. There is no important statistical distinction between groups, for the cortisol levels before, during and after tooth extraction regardless of the type of anesthetic used, while we registered higher values of systolic and diastolic values at hypertensive patients, regardless of the type of anesthetic. There is significant systolic and diastolic blood pressure rise in both groups of patients hypertensive and normotensive patients, (regardless of anesthetic used with or without vasoconstrictor), who underwent tooth extraction. The special emphasize is attributed to hypertensive patients where these changes are more significant. As per cortisol level and pulse rate, our results indicate no significant statistical difference in between groups.

  1. Gear Fault Detection Effectiveness as Applied to Tooth Surface Pitting Fatigue Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, David G.; Dempsey, Paula J.; Heath, Gregory F.; Shanthakumaran, Perumal

    2010-01-01

    A study was performed to evaluate fault detection effectiveness as applied to gear-tooth-pitting-fatigue damage. Vibration and oil-debris monitoring (ODM) data were gathered from 24 sets of spur pinion and face gears run during a previous endurance evaluation study. Three common condition indicators (RMS, FM4, and NA4 [Ed. 's note: See Appendix A-Definitions D were deduced from the time-averaged vibration data and used with the ODM to evaluate their performance for gear fault detection. The NA4 parameter showed to be a very good condition indicator for the detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The FM4 and RMS parameters perfomu:d average to below average in detection of gear tooth surface pitting failures. The ODM sensor was successful in detecting a significant 8lDOunt of debris from all the gear tooth pitting fatigue failures. Excluding outliers, the average cumulative mass at the end of a test was 40 mg.

  2. Friction measurement in a hip wear simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikko, Vesa

    2016-05-01

    A torque measurement system was added to a widely used hip wear simulator, the biaxial rocking motion device. With the rotary transducer, the frictional torque about the drive axis of the biaxial rocking motion mechanism was measured. The principle of measuring the torque about the vertical axis above the prosthetic joint, used earlier in commercial biaxial rocking motion simulators, was shown to sense only a minor part of the total frictional torque. With the present method, the total frictional torque of the prosthetic hip was measured. This was shown to consist of the torques about the vertical axis above the joint and about the leaning axis. Femoral heads made from different materials were run against conventional and crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups in serum lubrication. Regarding the femoral head material and the type of polyethylene, there were no categorical differences in frictional torque with the exception of zirconia heads, with which the lowest values were obtained. Diamond-like carbon coating of the CoCr femoral head did not reduce friction. The friction factor was found to always decrease with increasing load. High wear could increase the frictional torque by 75%. With the present system, friction can be continuously recorded during long wear tests, so the effect of wear on friction with different prosthetic hips can be evaluated. © IMechE 2016.

  3. Healthy Contact Lens Wear and Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Jennifer Cope explains some basic steps for proper wear and care of soft contact lenses.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  4. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  5. ERRATUM: Work smart, wear your hard hat

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An error appeared in the article «Work smart, wear your hard hat» published in Weekly Bulletin 27/2003, page 5. The impact which pierced a hole in the hard hat worn by Gerd Fetchenhauer was the equivalent of a box weighing 5 kg and not 50 kg.

  6. Wear determination in braking systems by radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, W.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear behaviour of friction couples has been tested applying loads and sliding speeds. The determination was carried out by direct measurements of the lining material and by surface activation of the opposite material with protons. The application limits of several braking materials could be determined and compared

  7. Combating wear in bulk solids handling plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    A total of five papers presented at a seminar on problems of wear caused by abrasive effects of materials in bulk handling. Topics of papers cover the designer viewpoint, practical experience from the steel, coal, cement and quarry industries to create an awareness of possible solutions.

  8. Reciprocating wear in a steam environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.J.; Gee, M.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Tests to simulate the wear between sliding components in steam power plant have been performed using a low frequency wear apparatus at elevated temperatures under static load, at ambient pressure, in a steam environment. The apparatus was modified to accept a novel method of steam delivery. The materials tested were pre-exposed in a flowing steam furnace at temperature for either 500 or 3000 hours to provide some simulation of long term ageing. The duration of each wear test was 50 hours and tests were also performed on as-received material for comparison purposes. Data has been compared with results of tests performed on non-oxidised material for longer durations and also on tests without steam to examine the effect of different environments. Data collected from each test consists of mass change, stub height measurement and friction coefficient as well as visual inspection of the wear track. Within this paper, it is reported that both pre-ageing and the addition of steam during testing clearly influence the friction between material surfaces. (orig.)

  9. Brake wear warning device: A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    Heat-insulated wire is introduced through brake shoe and partially into brake lining. Wire is connected to positive terminal and light bulb. When brakes wear to critical point, contact between wire and wheel drum grounds circuit and turns on warning light.

  10. Effective tool wear estimation through multisensory information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On-line tool wear monitoring plays a significant role in industrial automation for higher productivity and product quality. In addition, an intelligent system is required to make a timely decision for tool change in machining systems in order to avoid the subsequent consequences on the dimensional accuracy and surface finish ...

  11. Wear-Out Sensitivity Analysis Project Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Adam

    2015-01-01

    During the course of the Summer 2015 internship session, I worked in the Reliability and Maintainability group of the ISS Safety and Mission Assurance department. My project was a statistical analysis of how sensitive ORU's (Orbital Replacement Units) are to a reliability parameter called the wear-out characteristic. The intended goal of this was to determine a worst case scenario of how many spares would be needed if multiple systems started exhibiting wear-out characteristics simultaneously. The goal was also to determine which parts would be most likely to do so. In order to do this, my duties were to take historical data of operational times and failure times of these ORU's and use them to build predictive models of failure using probability distribution functions, mainly the Weibull distribution. Then, I ran Monte Carlo Simulations to see how an entire population of these components would perform. From here, my final duty was to vary the wear-out characteristic from the intrinsic value, to extremely high wear-out values and determine how much the probability of sufficiency of the population would shift. This was done for around 30 different ORU populations on board the ISS.

  12. Craniomandibular trauma and tooth loss in northern dogs and wolves: implications for the archaeological study of dog husbandry and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losey, Robert J; Jessup, Erin; Nomokonova, Tatiana; Sablin, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Archaeological dog remains from many areas clearly show that these animals suffered tooth fractures, tooth loss, trauma, and dental defects during their lives. Relatively little research has explored the meanings of these patterns, particularly for ancient dog remains from small-scale societies of the North. One limiting issue is the lack of comparative data on dental health and experiences of trauma among northern wolves and dogs. This paper examines tooth loss, tooth fracture, enamel hypoplasia, and cranial trauma in a large sample of historic dog and wolf remains from North America and Northern Russia. The data indicate that the dogs more commonly experienced tooth loss and tooth fracture than the wolves, despite reportedly being fed mostly soft foods such as blubber and fish. The higher rates observed in the dogs likely is a result of food stress and self-provisioning through scavenging. The ability to self-provision was likely important for the long-term history of dog use in the north. Dogs also more commonly experienced cranial fractures than wolves, particularly depression fractures on their frontal bones, which were likely the result of blows from humans. Hypoplastic lesions are rare in both wolves and dogs, and probably result from multiple causes, including food stress, disease, and trauma.

  13. Craniomandibular trauma and tooth loss in northern dogs and wolves: implications for the archaeological study of dog husbandry and domestication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Losey

    Full Text Available Archaeological dog remains from many areas clearly show that these animals suffered tooth fractures, tooth loss, trauma, and dental defects during their lives. Relatively little research has explored the meanings of these patterns, particularly for ancient dog remains from small-scale societies of the North. One limiting issue is the lack of comparative data on dental health and experiences of trauma among northern wolves and dogs. This paper examines tooth loss, tooth fracture, enamel hypoplasia, and cranial trauma in a large sample of historic dog and wolf remains from North America and Northern Russia. The data indicate that the dogs more commonly experienced tooth loss and tooth fracture than the wolves, despite reportedly being fed mostly soft foods such as blubber and fish. The higher rates observed in the dogs likely is a result of food stress and self-provisioning through scavenging. The ability to self-provision was likely important for the long-term history of dog use in the north. Dogs also more commonly experienced cranial fractures than wolves, particularly depression fractures on their frontal bones, which were likely the result of blows from humans. Hypoplastic lesions are rare in both wolves and dogs, and probably result from multiple causes, including food stress, disease, and trauma.

  14. 22 CFR 1203.735-212 - Wearing of uniforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 1203.735-212 Wearing of....2b prohibits the purchase from Agency funds of uniforms or any item of personal wearing apparel other...

  15. Investigation of Wear Coefficient of Manganese Phosphate Coated Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ilaiyavel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the properties of the coating in terms of wear resistance is of paramount importance in order to prevent the formation of severe damages. In this study, Wear coefficient of uncoated, Manganese Phosphate coated, Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant on AISI D2 steels was investigated using Archard’s equation. The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The volumetric wear loss and wear coefficient were evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0 m/s under normal load of 40 N and controlled condition of temperature and humidity. Based on the results of the wear test, the Heat treated Manganese Phosphate with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average wear coefficient and the lowest wear loss under 40 N load.

  16. development and performance evaluation of an abrasive wear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    advanced countries are not available in Ghana. This makes ... experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with the soils from the five sites as ... Design of the wear equipment ..... tion of Wear Characteristics of Drill Cultures.

  17. Anisotropy abrasive wear behavior of bagasse fiber reinforced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    parallel orientation (APO) and normal orientation (NO) by using a two body abrasion wear tester. Three different types of abrasives wear behaviour have been observed in the composite in three orientations and follow the following trends: WNO ...

  18. Stochastic Distribution of Wear of Carbide Tools during Machining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... The stochastic point model was used to determine the rate of wear distribution of the carbide tool ... Keywords: cutting speed, feed rate, machining time, tool life, reliability, wear.

  19. Infrared light sensor applied to early detection of tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjumea, Eberto; Espitia, José; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, Cesar

    2017-08-01

    The approach dentistry to dental care is gradually shifting to a model focused on early detection and oral-disease prevention; one of the most important methods of prevention of tooth decay is opportune diagnosis of decay and reconstruction. The present study aimed to introduce a procedure for early diagnosis of tooth decay and to compare result of experiment of this method with other common treatments. In this setup, a laser emitting infrared light is injected in core of one bifurcated fiber-optic and conduced to tooth surface and with the same bifurcated fiber the radiation reflected for the same tooth is collected and them conduced to surface of sensor that measures thermal and light frequencies to detect early signs of decay below a tooth surface, where demineralization is difficult to spot with x-ray technology. This device will can be used to diagnose tooth decay without any chemicals and rays such as high power lasers or X-rays.

  20. Corrosive wear. Evaluation of wear and corrosive resistant materials; Noetningskorrosion. Utvaerdering av noetnings- och korrosionsbestaendiga material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, H.; Hjertsen, D.; Waara, P.; Prakash, B.; Hardell, J.

    2007-12-15

    With a new purchase of a waste conveyer screw at hand, for the 'A-warehouse' at the combined power and heating plant at E.ON Norrkoeping, the request for improved construction materials was raised. The previous screw required maintenance with very short intervals due to the difficult operation conditions. With the new screw the expectation is to manage 6 months of operation without interruption. The environment for the screw has two main components that sets the demand on the materials, on one hand the corrosive products that comes along and which forms at digestion of the waste and on the other hand the abrasive content in the waste. The term of the mechanism is wear-corrosion and can give considerably higher material loss than the two mechanisms wear and corrosion separately. Combination of a strong corrosive environment together with extensive wear is something that we today have limited knowledge about. The overall objective of the project has been to establish better wear and corrosive resistant construction materials for a waste conveyer screw that will lead to reduced operational disturbance costs. The evaluation has been performed in both controlled laboratory environments and in field tests, which has given us a better understanding of what materials are more suitable in this tough environment and has given us a tool for future predictions of the wear rate of the different material. The new conveyer screw, installed in February 2007 and with which the field test have been performed, has considerably reduced the wear of the construction and the target of 6 month maintenance-free operation is met with this screw for all the evaluated materials. The wear along the screw varies very much and with a clear trend for all the materials to increase towards the feeding direction of the screw. As an example, the wear plate SS2377 (stainless duplex steel) has a useful life at the most affected areas that is calculated to be 1077 days of operation with the

  1. Sliding Wear and Fretting Wear of DLC-Based, Functionally Graded Nanocomposite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Pohlchuck, B.; Street, Kenneth W.; Zabinski, J. S.; Sanders, J. H.; Voevodin, A. a.; Wu, R. L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Improving the tribological functionality of diamondlike carbon (DLC) films--developing, good wear resistance, low friction, and high load-carrying capacity-was the aim of this investigation. Nanocomposite coatings consisting of an amorphous DLC (a-DLC) top layer and a functionally graded titanium-titanium carbon-diamondlike carbon (Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC) underlayer were produced on AISI 440C stainless steel substrates by the hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and pulsed-laser deposition. The resultant DLC films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and surface profilometry. Two types of wear experiment were conducted in this investioation: sliding friction experiments and fretting wear experiments. Unidirectional ball-on-disk sliding friction experiments were conducted to examine the wear behavior of an a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC-coated AISI 440C stainless steel disk in sliding contact with a 6-mm-diameter AISI 440C stainless steel ball in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air. Although the wear rates for both the coating and ball were low in all three environments, the humid air and dry nitrogen caused mild wear with burnishing, in the a-DLC top layer, and the ultrahigh vacuum caused relatively severe wear with brittle fracture in both the a-DLC top layer and the Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC underlayer. For reference, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (H-DLC) films produced on a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC nanocomposite coatings by using an ion beam were also examined in the same manner. The H-DLC films markedly reduced friction even in ultrahigh vacuum without sacrificing wear resistance. The H-DLC films behaved much like the a-DLC/Ti-Ti(sub x) C(sub y)-DLC nanocomposite coating in dry nitrogen and humid air, presenting low friction and low wear. Fretting wear experiments were conducted in humid air (approximately 50% relative humidity) at a frequency of 80 Hz and an amplitude of 75 micron on an a

  2. Comparison of two measurement techniques for clinical wear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, M C; Delong, R; Pintado, M R

    1999-01-01

    Clinical wear of restorations is generally evaluated by marginal integrity over time. In this study, both a subjective and an objective method for wear assessment are compared, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each are considered.......Clinical wear of restorations is generally evaluated by marginal integrity over time. In this study, both a subjective and an objective method for wear assessment are compared, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of each are considered....

  3. Water evaporation from substrate tooth surface during dentin treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, Mizuho; Itoh, Kazuo; Gokan, Yuka; Nagai, Yoshitaka; Tani, Chihiro; Hisamitsu, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the quantity of water evaporation from tooth surfaces. The amount of water evaporation was measured using Multi probe adapter MPA5 and Tewameter TM300 (Courage+Khazaka Electric GmbH, Köln, Germany) after acid etching and GM priming of enamel; and after EDTA conditioning and GM priming of dentin. The results indicated that the amount of water evaporation from the enamel surface was significantly less than that from the dentin. Acid etching did not affect the water evaporation from enamel, though GM priming significantly decreased the evaporation (83.48 ± 15.14% of that before priming). The evaporation from dentin was significantly increased by EDTA conditioning (131.38 ± 42.08% of that before conditioning) and significantly reduced by GM priming (80.26 ± 7.43% of that before priming). It was concluded that dentin priming reduced water evaporation from the dentin surface.

  4. Wear Analysis of Top Piston Ring to Reduce Top Ring Reversal Bore Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ilanthirayan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The piston rings are the most important part in engine which controls the lubricating oil consumption and blowby of the gases. The lubricating film of oil is provided to seal of gases towards crankcase and also to give smooth friction free translatory motion between rings and liner. Of the three rings present top ring is more crucial as it does the main work of restricting gases downwards the crankcase. Boundary lubrication is present at the Top dead centre (TDC and Bottom dead centre (BDC of the liner surface. In addition to this, top ring is exposed to high temperature gases which makes the oil present near the top ring to get evaporated and decreasing its viscosity, making metal-metal contact most of the time. Due to this at TDC, excess wear happens on the liner which is termed as Top ring reversal bore wear. The wear rate depends upon many parameters such as lubrication condition, viscosity index, contact type, normal forces acting on ring, geometry of ring face, surface roughness, material property. The present work explores the wear depth for different geometries of barrel ring using Finite Element model with the help of Archard wear law and the same is validated through experimentation. The study reveals that Asymmetric barrel rings have less contact pressure which in turn reduces the wear at Top dead centre.

  5. Wear and Tear of Tyres: A Stealthy Source of Microplastics in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Jan Kole

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wear and tear from tyres significantly contributes to the flow of (micro-plastics into the environment. This paper compiles the fragmented knowledge on tyre wear and tear characteristics, amounts of particles emitted, pathways in the environment, and the possible effects on humans. The estimated per capita emission ranges from 0.23 to 4.7 kg/year, with a global average of 0.81 kg/year. The emissions from car tyres (100% are substantially higher than those of other sources of microplastics, e.g., airplane tyres (2%, artificial turf (12–50%, brake wear (8% and road markings (5%. Emissions and pathways depend on local factors like road type or sewage systems. The relative contribution of tyre wear and tear to the total global amount of plastics ending up in our oceans is estimated to be 5–10%. In air, 3–7% of the particulate matter (PM2.5 is estimated to consist of tyre wear and tear, indicating that it may contribute to the global health burden of air pollution which has been projected by the World Health Organization (WHO at 3 million deaths in 2012. The wear and tear also enters our food chain, but further research is needed to assess human health risks. It is concluded here that tyre wear and tear is a stealthy source of microplastics in our environment, which can only be addressed effectively if awareness increases, knowledge gaps on quantities and effects are being closed, and creative technical solutions are being sought. This requires a global effort from all stakeholders; consumers, regulators, industry and researchers alike.

  6. Wear and Tear of Tyres: A Stealthy Source of Microplastics in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Pieter Jan; Löhr, Ansje J.; Van Belleghem, Frank G. A. J.; Ragas, Ad M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Wear and tear from tyres significantly contributes to the flow of (micro-)plastics into the environment. This paper compiles the fragmented knowledge on tyre wear and tear characteristics, amounts of particles emitted, pathways in the environment, and the possible effects on humans. The estimated per capita emission ranges from 0.23 to 4.7 kg/year, with a global average of 0.81 kg/year. The emissions from car tyres (100%) are substantially higher than those of other sources of microplastics, e.g., airplane tyres (2%), artificial turf (12–50%), brake wear (8%) and road markings (5%). Emissions and pathways depend on local factors like road type or sewage systems. The relative contribution of tyre wear and tear to the total global amount of plastics ending up in our oceans is estimated to be 5–10%. In air, 3–7% of the particulate matter (PM2.5) is estimated to consist of tyre wear and tear, indicating that it may contribute to the global health burden of air pollution which has been projected by the World Health Organization (WHO) at 3 million deaths in 2012. The wear and tear also enters our food chain, but further research is needed to assess human health risks. It is concluded here that tyre wear and tear is a stealthy source of microplastics in our environment, which can only be addressed effectively if awareness increases, knowledge gaps on quantities and effects are being closed, and creative technical solutions are being sought. This requires a global effort from all stakeholders; consumers, regulators, industry and researchers alike. PMID:29053641

  7. Mechanical and abrasive wear characterization of bidirectional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhartha,; Gupta, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated. ► Three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed. ► Results are validated against existing microscopic models of Lancaster and Wang. ► Tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases. ► Chopped glass fiber composites are found better in abrasive wear situations. -- Abstract: Bi-directional and chopped E-glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated in five different (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35) wt% in an epoxy resin matrix. The mechanical characterization of these composites is performed. The three body abrasive wear behavior of fabricated composites has been assessed under different operating conditions. Abrasive wear characteristics of these composites are successfully analysed using Taguchi’s experimental design scheme and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results obtained from these experiments are also validated against existing microscopic models of Ratner-Lancaster and Wang. It is observed that quite good linear relationships is held between specific wear rate and reciprocal of ultimate strength and strain at tensile fracture of these composites which is an indicative that the experimental results are in fair agreement with these existing models. Out of all composites fabricated it is found that tensile strength of bi-directional E-glass fiber reinforced composites increases because of interface strength enhancement. Chopped glass fiber reinforced composites are observed to perform better than bi-directional glass fiber reinforced composites under abrasive wear situations. The morphology of worn composite specimens has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand about dominant wear mechanisms.

  8. Wear and Tear of Tyres: A Stealthy Source of Microplastics in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Pieter Jan; Löhr, Ansje J; Van Belleghem, Frank G A J; Ragas, Ad M J

    2017-10-20

    Wear and tear from tyres significantly contributes to the flow of (micro-)plastics into the environment. This paper compiles the fragmented knowledge on tyre wear and tear characteristics, amounts of particles emitted, pathways in the environment, and the possible effects on humans. The estimated per capita emission ranges from 0.23 to 4.7 kg/year, with a global average of 0.81 kg/year. The emissions from car tyres (100%) are substantially higher than those of other sources of microplastics, e.g., airplane tyres (2%), artificial turf (12-50%), brake wear (8%) and road markings (5%). Emissions and pathways depend on local factors like road type or sewage systems. The relative contribution of tyre wear and tear to the total global amount of plastics ending up in our oceans is estimated to be 5-10%. In air, 3-7% of the particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is estimated to consist of tyre wear and tear, indicating that it may contribute to the global health burden of air pollution which has been projected by the World Health Organization (WHO) at 3 million deaths in 2012. The wear and tear also enters our food chain, but further research is needed to assess human health risks. It is concluded here that tyre wear and tear is a stealthy source of microplastics in our environment, which can only be addressed effectively if awareness increases, knowledge gaps on quantities and effects are being closed, and creative technical solutions are being sought. This requires a global effort from all stakeholders; consumers, regulators, industry and researchers alike.

  9. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Gaete

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells.

  10. Temperament and perception of tooth bleaching results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mehr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . The neurophysiological process of perceiving the results of tooth bleaching requires the correct interaction between the central nervous system and the organs of sight. Exaggerated beliefs concerning defective facial features may enhance inner attitudes about one’s own color of dentition, as well as a feeling of dissatisfaction with the degree of leaching. Objectives. The study aimed to assess the degree of the patient satisfaction with the results of tooth bleaching in relation to their temperament. Material and methods. There were 68 generally healthy volunteers, aged 28–38 years, with external discolorations of the teeth. They had never undergone dental bleaching and their frontal teeth did not have any fillings. After clinical evaluation and the completion of formalities, the patients were asked to fill in Strelau’s temperament questionnaire. Questionnaires and visual status were assessed three times by three doctors: before bleaching, and then 24 hours and two weeks after the home-bleaching operation, which was done with the use of Opalescence (Ultradent in uniform sequence. Results . There were practically no adverse side results, except a periodic dentin hypersensitivity that occurred periodically in 44 patients. The results of the visual assessment performed by the physicians did not differ. The questionnaire data showed that women were more critical of the results in relation to the expectations. Among elancholics, full satisfaction was declared by 41%, whereas among sanguine people, full satisfaction was obtained by 85%. Satisfaction with the aesthetic results was associated with bleaching by at least 4 degrees. Conclusions . Patients’ temperament affects their subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of tooth bleaching, which should be taken into consideration in the patient’s individual dental treatment plan.

  11. Effect of ageing treatment on wear properties and electrical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... was in Cu–Cr–Zr alloy aged at 500°C for 2 h and the most wear loss was in specimens aged at 530°C for 2 h. Furthermore, it was observed that the friction coefficient values resulting from wear rate were overlapped with hardness results and there is a decrease tendency of friction coefficient as wear distance increases.

  12. Increasing Wearing of Prescription Glasses in Individuals with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon, Iser G.; Hagopian, Louis P.; Rodriguez-Catter, Vanessa; Bowman, Lynn G.; Long, Ethan S.; Boelter, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated an intervention for promoting wearing of prescription glasses in 4 individuals with mental retardation who had refused to wear their glasses previously. Distraction through noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) increased independent glasses wearing for 1 of the 4 participants. An intervention consisting of NCR, response cost, and…

  13. Measurement and Evaluation of Wear Frogs Switches ŽSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urda Ján

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the measurement and evaluation of wear frogs switches ZSR. One of the main problems is the oversize wear. The possibilities analysis of this problem is offered through a set of switches and monitoring of selected parameters. One of these parameters is also monitoring the vertical wear

  14. Tooth positioners and their effects on treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravindevaprasad, A; Therese, Beena Agnes

    2013-07-01

    Malocclusion can also be corrected by means of clear removable appliances called as "tooth positioners" or "aligners". A tooth positioner is used to control settling and to minimize or eliminate relapse of the teeth after an orthodontic treatment. In this article, a complete review of the objectives, course of treatment, fabrication, and the materials used for fabrication of tooth positioners along with their importance and disadvantages were discussed. Tooth positioners did improve the overall orthodontic treatment outcome as quantified by the ABO (American Board of orthodontics) objective scoring method. But once the initial occlusal contact was achieved, the vertical movement of teeth was found to be inhibited.

  15. Tooth color: effects on judgments of attractiveness and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosofsky, Alexis; Adkins, Sarah; Bastholm, Robert; Meyer, Leif; Krueger, Lisa; Meyer, Joshua; Torma, Peter

    2003-02-01

    Tooth whitening has become a very popular procedure. Advertisements for whitening products imply that whiter teeth are more attractive than yellower teeth. We tested this idea empirically by manipulating the tooth color of pictures of male and female targets. Participants' ratings of attractiveness were not influenced by tooth color. Exp. 2 yielded a negative correlation between attractiveness and age ratings: targets judged to be older were rated as less attractive. Unless whiter teeth help in some other way, e.g., improved self-esteem or confidence, it seems that tooth whitening procedures or products are not associated with increased attractiveness to others.

  16. Wear of control rod cluster assemblies and of instrumentation thimbles: first results obtained with the vibrateau wear simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.; Hersant, D.

    1993-07-01

    Several REP components are affected by a particular sort of damage called impact/sliding wear. This kind of wear, originating from flow induced vibrations, affects loosely supported tubular structures. The main involved components are: - the RCCAs claddings and the guides tubes, - the instrumentation thimbles, - the fuel rods claddings, - the SG tubes. The R and D Division is concerned with studies aiming to understand and to master the phenomena leading to this wear. The MTC Branch is charged of the study of the wear itself. Tests are carried out on wear rigs to understand and to model wear mechanisms. The following work is related to the two first wear tests campaigns on the VIBRATEAU wear simulator: - a reproducibility test series in order to assess the spreading of the experimental results, - a comparative test series on surface treatments used to improve the components war resistance. (authors). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 4 refs

  17. Autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinós, Carmen; Calpena, Eduardo; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Lupo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy that comprises a complex group of more than 50 diseases, is the most common inherited neuropathy. CMT is generally divided into demyelinating forms, axonal forms and intermediate forms. CMT is also characterized by a wide genetic heterogeneity with 29 genes and more than 30 loci involved. The most common pattern of inheritance is autosomal dominant (AD), although autosomal recessive (AR) forms are more frequent in Mediterranean countries. In this chapter we give an overview of the associated genes, mechanisms and epidemiology of AR-CMT forms and their associated phenotypes.

  18. Thermal induced EPR signals in tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattibene, P.; Aragno, D.; Onori, S.; Pressello, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to detect the effects of temperature on powdered human tooth enamel, not irradiated in the laboratory. Samples were heated at temperature between 350 and 450, at 600 and at 1000 deg. C, for different heating times, between 6 min and 39 h. Changes in the EPR spectra were detected, with the formation of new signals. Possible correlation between the changes in EPR spectra and modifications in the enamel and in the mineral phase of bone detected with other techniques is discussed. The implications for dosimetric applications of signals induced by overheating due to mechanical friction during sample preparation are underlined

  19. ESR dating of tooth enamel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Tiemei; Yang quan; Wu En

    1993-01-01

    Five tooth samples from the palaeoanthropological site of Jinniushan were dated with both electron-spin-resonance (ESR) and uranium-series techniques. The ESR age of about 230 ka is in good agreement with the U-series dating result, which confirms the hypothesis of possible coexistence of Homo erect us and Homo sapiens in China. Problems in ESR dating are discussed such as: 1) inappropriate of simple exponential extrapolation for accumulated dose determination; 2)experimental measurement of alpha detection efficiency and radon emanation and 3)selection of U-uptake model

  20. Relative tooth size at birth in primates: Life history correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D; Muchlinski, Magdalena N; Bucher, Wade R; Vinyard, Christopher J; Bonar, Christopher J; Evans, Sian; Williams, Lawrence E; DeLeon, Valerie B

    2017-11-01

    Dental eruption schedules have been closely linked to life history variables. Here we examine a sample of 50 perinatal primates (28 species) to determine whether life history traits correlate with relative tooth size at birth. Newborn primates were studied using serial histological sectioning. Volumes of deciduous premolars (dp 2 -dp 4 ), replacement teeth (if any), and permanent molars (M 1-2/3 ) of the upper jaw were measured and residuals from cranial length were calculated with least squares regressions to obtain relative dental volumes (RDVs). Relative dental volumes of deciduous or permanent teeth have an unclear relationship with relative neonatal mass in all primates. Relative palatal length (RPL), used as a proxy for midfacial size, is significantly, positively correlated with larger deciduous and permanent postcanine teeth. However, when strepsirrhines alone are examined, larger RPL is correlated with smaller RDV of permanent teeth. In the full sample, RDVs of deciduous premolars are significantly negatively correlated with relative gestation length (RGL), but have no clear relationship with relative weaning age. RDVs of molars lack a clear relationship with RGL; later weaning is associated with larger molar RDV, although correlations are not significant. When strepsirrhines alone are analyzed, clearer trends are present: longer gestations or later weaning are associated with smaller deciduous and larger permanent postcanine teeth (only gestational length correlations are significant). Our results indicate a broad trend that primates with the shortest RGLs precociously develop deciduous teeth; in strepsirrhines, the opposite trend is seen for permanent molars. Anthropoids delay growth of permanent teeth, while strepsirrhines with short RGLs are growing replacement teeth concurrently. A comparison of neonatal volumes with existing information on extent of cusp mineralization indicates that growth of tooth germs and cusp mineralization may be selected for

  1. Clinical evaluation of a newly designed orthodontic tooth brush - A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Saimbi

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the newly designed orthodontic tooth brush is compared with an ordinary tooth brush. Results of this study show that the newly designed orthodontic tooth brush is superior in its cleaning efficiency as compared to the ordinary tooth brush. The results show that plaque removing capacity of orthodontic tooth brush is nearly 95-99%.

  2. Demonstration for the Applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG Tube Wear Defects Formed at the Tube Support Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ki Seok; Cheon, Keun Young; Nam, Min Woo; Min, Kyong Mahn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 applied to the detection of tapered wear volumetric indications and depth sizing within the free span area, loose part not present was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation. The experiment to demonstrate the applicability of EPRI ETSS was performed by the employment of the newly prepared STD tube and resulted in ensuring the effectiveness and equivalency of the EPRI ETSS as well. The authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes. The testing results were reviewed with the influences of SG tube material and the support structure. The impact of the tube materials was insignificant and that of the tube support structure showed somewhat conservative results. The testing resulted in successful demonstration of applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG tube wear defects at the tube support. One of the major flaw mechanisms detected in the currently operating domestic OPR-1000 pressurized water reactors(PWR's) steam generator(SG) tubes is wear defect. In general, wear defect has been constantly detected in the upper tube bundle imposed to the flow induced vibration interaction between tube and its support structure, and the quantity of the affected tubes has also shown the tendency to increase as plant operation life is added. In order to take appropriate measures and maintain the structural integrity for the SG tubes, wear defect is currently categorized as active damage mechanism and the tubes containing 40% or greater wear depth of the nominal tube wall thickness shall be plugged per SGMP(SG Management Program) Recently, a fairly large amplitude of wear defects on the Batwing(BW), one of the upper tube support structures in the SG tubes

  3. Demonstration for the Applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG Tube Wear Defects Formed at the Tube Support Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ki Seok; Cheon, Keun Young; Nam, Min Woo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyong Mahn [Universal Monitoring and Inspection Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 applied to the detection of tapered wear volumetric indications and depth sizing within the free span area, loose part not present was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation. The experiment to demonstrate the applicability of EPRI ETSS was performed by the employment of the newly prepared STD tube and resulted in ensuring the effectiveness and equivalency of the EPRI ETSS as well. The authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes. The testing results were reviewed with the influences of SG tube material and the support structure. The impact of the tube materials was insignificant and that of the tube support structure showed somewhat conservative results. The testing resulted in successful demonstration of applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG tube wear defects at the tube support. One of the major flaw mechanisms detected in the currently operating domestic OPR-1000 pressurized water reactors(PWR's) steam generator(SG) tubes is wear defect. In general, wear defect has been constantly detected in the upper tube bundle imposed to the flow induced vibration interaction between tube and its support structure, and the quantity of the affected tubes has also shown the tendency to increase as plant operation life is added. In order to take appropriate measures and maintain the structural integrity for the SG tubes, wear defect is currently categorized as active damage mechanism and the tubes containing 40% or greater wear depth of the nominal tube wall thickness shall be plugged per SGMP(SG Management Program) Recently, a fairly large amplitude of wear defects on the Batwing(BW), one of the upper tube support structures in the SG

  4. A comparative study of tribological behavior of plasma and D-gun sprayed coatings under different wear modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, G.; Rao, D.S.; Prasad, K.U.M.; Joshi, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, thermal sprayed protective coatings have gained widespread acceptance for a variety of industrial applications. A vast majority of these applications involve the use of thermal sprayed coatings to combat wear. While plasma spraying is the most versatile variant of all the thermal spray processes, the detonation gun (D-gun) coatings have been a novelty until recently because of their proprietary nature. The present study is aimed at comparing the tribological behavior of coatings deposited using the two above techniques by focusing on some popular coating materials that are widely adopted for wear resistant applications, namely, WC-12% Co, Al 2 O 3 , and Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr. To enable a comprehensive comparison of the above indicated thermal spray techniques as well as coating materials, the deposited coatings were extensively characterized employing microstructural evaluation, microhardness measurements, and XRD analysis for phase constitution. The behavior of these coatings under different wear modes was also evaluated by determining their tribological performance when subjected to solid particle erosion tests, rubber wheel sand abrasion tests, and pin-on-disk sliding wear tests. Among all the coating materials studied, D-gun sprayed WC-12% Co, in general, yields the best performance under different modes of wear, whereas plasma sprayed Al 2 O 3 shows least wear resistance to every wear mode

  5. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in lower premolars by orthopantomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameriere, Roberto; De Luca, Stefano; Alemán, Inmaculada; Ferrante, Luigi; Cingolani, Mariano

    2012-01-10

    Accurate age estimation has always been a problem for forensic scientists, and apposition of secondary dentine is often used as an indicator of age. Since 2004, in order to examine patterns of secondary dentine apposition, Cameriere et al. have been extensively studying the pulp/tooth area ratio of the canines by panoramic and peri-apical X-ray images. The main aim of this paper is to examine the relationship between age and age-related changes in the pulp/tooth area ratio in monoradicular teeth, with the exception of canines, by orthopantomography. A total of 606 orthopantomograms of Spanish white Caucasian patients (289 women and 317 men), aged between 18 and 75 years and coming from Bilbao and Granada (Spain), was analysed. Regression analysis of age of monoradicular teeth indicated that the lower premolars were the most closely correlated with age. An ANCOVA did not show significant differences between men and women. Multiple regression analysis, with age as dependent variable and pulp/tooth area ratio as predictor, yielded several formulae. R(2) ranged from 0.69 to 0.75 for a single lower premolar tooth and from 0.79 to 0.86 for multiple lower premolar teeth. Depending on the available number of premolar teeth, the mean of the absolute values of residual standard error, at 95% confidence interval, ranged between 4.34 and 6.02 years, showing that the pulp/tooth area ratio is a useful variable for assessing age with reasonable accuracy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W G; Qi, C X; Li, Y B; He, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions

  7. Wettability modification of human tooth surface by water and UV and electron-beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E.; Reyes-Gasga, José; Elefterie, Florina; Beyens, Christophe; Maschke, Ulrich; Brès, Etienne F.

    2015-01-01

    The wettability of the human tooth enamel and dentin was analyzed by measuring the contact angles of a drop of distilled water deposited on the surface. The samples were cut along the transverse and longitudinal directions, and their surfaces were subjected to metallographic mirror-finish polishing. Some samples were also acid etched until their microstructure became exposed. Wettability measurements of the samples were done in dry and wet conditions and after ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) irradiations. The results indicate that water by itself was able to increase the hydrophobicity of these materials. The UV irradiation momentarily reduced the contact angle values, but they recovered after a short time. EB irradiation raised the contact angle and maintained it for a long time. Both enamel and dentin surfaces showed a wide range of contact angles, from approximately 10° (hydrophilic) to 90° (hydrophobic), although the contact angle showed more variability on enamel than on dentin surfaces. Whether the sample's surface had been polished or etched did not influence the contact angle value in wet conditions. - Highlights: • Human tooth surface wettability changes in dry/wet and UV/EB radiation conditions. • More variability in contact angle is observed on enamel than on dentin surfaces. • Water by itself increases the hydrophobicity of the human tooth surface. • UV irradiation reduces momentarily the human tooth surface hydrophobicity. • EB irradiation increases and maintains the hydrophobicity for a long time

  8. Evaluation of Spur Gear Pair on Tooth Root Bending Stress in Radial Misalignment Contact Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lias M.R.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the effects of radial misalignment contact on the tooth root bending stress values of spur gear pair during the gear meshing cycle. Radial misalignment (H is denoted as the deviation of the pinion nominal position with respect to the gear tooth along the pinion axis to the gear which happened from manufacturing assembly errors (AE. A model based on involute 3D parametric CAD geometry, of spur gear design ISO 6336:2006 is analysed with allowable AE values from minimum 10μm to maximum 40μm with Finite-Element Method (FEM model based methodology using a dynamics module from ANSYS. Main parameters of interest are the Tooth root bending stress (TRBS in H condition with AE along the critical region with respect to face width of pinion-gear section. A comparison between standard High point single tooth contact models (HPSTC to this model showed a good agreement that H with AE had great influence on TRBS as the values’ increase. Radial misalignment influence factor (RMIF was introduced as indication of TRBS values in consideration of H due to AE shows and inverted patterns higher for pinion, give a good justification that the pinion is weaker compared to the gear.

  9. Synthesis and ultrastructure of plate-like apatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Zhi; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Aizawa, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an inorganic constituent compound of human bones and teeth, with superior biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics. Its crystal structure is hexagonal, characterized by a(b)- and c-planes. In vertebrate long bones, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, while in tooth enamel, they have an a(b)-axis orientation. Many methods can be used to synthesize c-axis oriented HAp single crystals; however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on a synthesis method for a(b)-axis oriented HAp single crystals. In this study, we successfully synthesized plate-like HAp crystals at the air–liquid interface of a starting solution via an enzyme reaction of urea with urease. Crystal phase analysis and ultrastructure observations were carried out, and the results indicated that the particles were single crystals, with almost the same a(b)-axis orientation as tooth enamel. It is hoped that by utilizing their unique surface charge and atomic arrangement, the resulting particles can be used as a high-performance biomaterial, capable of adsorbing bio-related substances and a model for tooth enamel. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals at air–liquid interface ► Ultrastructural analysis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals with a high a(b)-axis orientation ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel

  10. Synthesis and ultrastructure of plate-like apatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Zhi, E-mail: zhuang@meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Yoshimura, Hideyuki, E-mail: hyoshi@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Aizawa, Mamoru, E-mail: mamorua@isc.meiji.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is an inorganic constituent compound of human bones and teeth, with superior biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics. Its crystal structure is hexagonal, characterized by a(b)- and c-planes. In vertebrate long bones, HAp crystals have a c-axis orientation, while in tooth enamel, they have an a(b)-axis orientation. Many methods can be used to synthesize c-axis oriented HAp single crystals; however, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on a synthesis method for a(b)-axis oriented HAp single crystals. In this study, we successfully synthesized plate-like HAp crystals at the air–liquid interface of a starting solution via an enzyme reaction of urea with urease. Crystal phase analysis and ultrastructure observations were carried out, and the results indicated that the particles were single crystals, with almost the same a(b)-axis orientation as tooth enamel. It is hoped that by utilizing their unique surface charge and atomic arrangement, the resulting particles can be used as a high-performance biomaterial, capable of adsorbing bio-related substances and a model for tooth enamel. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals at air–liquid interface ► Ultrastructural analysis of plate-like hydroxyapatite crystals ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals with a high a(b)-axis orientation ► Plate-like hydroxyapatite single crystals as a model for tooth enamel.

  11. Wettability modification of human tooth surface by water and UV and electron-beam radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@gmail.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Coyoacan, México, D.F. (Mexico); Elefterie, Florina, E-mail: elefterie_florina@yahoo.com [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Beyens, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.beyens@ed.univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Maschke, Ulrich, E-mail: Ulrich.Maschke@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Brès, Etienne F., E-mail: etienne.bres@univ-lille1.fr [UMET, Bâtiment C6, Université de Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-12-01

    The wettability of the human tooth enamel and dentin was analyzed by measuring the contact angles of a drop of distilled water deposited on the surface. The samples were cut along the transverse and longitudinal directions, and their surfaces were subjected to metallographic mirror-finish polishing. Some samples were also acid etched until their microstructure became exposed. Wettability measurements of the samples were done in dry and wet conditions and after ultraviolet (UV) and electron beam (EB) irradiations. The results indicate that water by itself was able to increase the hydrophobicity of these materials. The UV irradiation momentarily reduced the contact angle values, but they recovered after a short time. EB irradiation raised the contact angle and maintained it for a long time. Both enamel and dentin surfaces showed a wide range of contact angles, from approximately 10° (hydrophilic) to 90° (hydrophobic), although the contact angle showed more variability on enamel than on dentin surfaces. Whether the sample's surface had been polished or etched did not influence the contact angle value in wet conditions. - Highlights: • Human tooth surface wettability changes in dry/wet and UV/EB radiation conditions. • More variability in contact angle is observed on enamel than on dentin surfaces. • Water by itself increases the hydrophobicity of the human tooth surface. • UV irradiation reduces momentarily the human tooth surface hydrophobicity. • EB irradiation increases and maintains the hydrophobicity for a long time.

  12. Wear Improvement of Tools in the Cold Forging Process for Long Hex Flange Nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Shao-Yi; Shih, Po-Yueh

    2015-09-25

    Cold forging has played a critical role in fasteners and has been widely used in automotive production, manufacturing, aviation and 3C (Computer, Communication, and Consumer electronics). Despite its extensive use in fastener forming and die design, operator experience and trial and error make it subjective and unreliable owing to the difficulty of controlling the development schedule. This study used finite element analysis to establish and simulate wear in automotive repair fastener manufacturing dies based on actual process conditions. The places on a die that wore most quickly were forecast, with the stress levels obtained being substituted into the Archard equation to calculate die wear. A 19.87% improvement in wear optimization occurred by applying the Taguchi quality method to the new design. Additionally, a comparison of actual manufacturing data to simulations revealed a nut forging size error within 2%, thereby demonstrating the accuracy of this theoretical analysis. Finally, SEM micrographs of the worn surfaces on the upper punch indicate that the primary wear mechanism on the cold forging die for long hex flange nuts was adhesive wear. The results can simplify the development schedule, reduce the number of trials and further enhance production quality and die life.

  13. Effects of cryogenic treatment on the wear properties of brake discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, D. S.; Shivakumar, P.; Anoop, S.; Chinmay, Kulkarni; Divine, P. V.; Harsha, H. P.

    2017-02-01

    Disc brakes are invariably used in all the automobiles either to reduce the rotational speed of the wheel or to hold the vehicle stationary. During the braking action, the kinetic energy is converted into heat which can result in high temperatures resulting in fading of brake effects. Brake discs produced out of martensite stainless steel (SS410) are expected to exhibit high wear resistance properties with low value of coefficient of friction. These factors increase the useful life of the brake discs with minimal possibilities of brake fade. To study the effects of cryogenic treatment on the wear behaviour, two types of brake discs were cryotreated at 98K for 8 and 24 hours in a specially developed cryotreatment system using liquid nitrogen. Wear properties of the untreated and cryotreated test specimens were experimentally determined using the pin on disc type tribometer (ASTM G99-95). Similarly, the Rockwell hardness (HRC) of the specimens were tested in a hardness tester in accordance with ASTM E18. In this paper, the effects of cryotreatment on the wear and hardness properties of untreated and cryotreated brake discs are presented. Results indicate enhancement of wear properties and hardness after cryogenic treatment compared with the normal brakes discs.

  14. Clinical signs of hypoxia with high-Dk soft lens extended wear: is the cornea convinced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Deborah F

    2003-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of high-Dk soft contact lenses with oxygen transmissibility (Dk/L) beyond the critical level required to avoid corneal edema during overnight wear. The most up-to-date data available on clinical signs of hypoxia with high-Dk contact lenses is reviewed. Chronic corneal edema associated with hypoxia is responsible for the development of large numbers of microcysts, limbal hyperemia, neovascularization, and small increases in myopia. Silicone hydrogel lenses worn continuously for up to 30 nights prevent corneal edema during overnight wear and do not induce a microcyst response. Long-term clinical trials indicate the mean level of limbal redness for patients wearing high-Dk lenses during continuous wear are equivalent to nonlens wearers. No changes in refractive error are associated with continuous wear of high-Dk lenses. High-Dk silicone hydrogel lenses can be worn for up to 3 years with virtual elimination of the hypoxic consequences observed with low-Dk lenses made from conventional lens materials.

  15. Wear characteristics of polished and glazed lithium disilicate ceramics opposed to three ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Akazawa, Nobutaka; Kodaira, Akihisa; Okamura, Kentaro; Matsumura, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the wear characteristics of a heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic material opposed to feldspathic porcelain, a lithium disilicate glass ceramic, and zirconia materials. Ceramic plate specimens were prepared from feldspathic porcelain (EX-3 nA1B), lithium disilicate glass ceramics (e.max CAD MO1/C14), and zirconia (Katana KT 10) and then ground or polished. Rounded rod specimens were fabricated from heat-pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max press LT A3) and then glazed or polished. A sliding wear testing apparatus was used for wear testing. Wear of glazed rods was greater than that of polished rods when they were abraded with ground zirconia, ground porcelain, polished porcelain, or polished lithium disilicate ceramics. For both glazed and polished rods, wear was greater when the rods were abraded with ground plates. The findings indicate that application of a polished surface rather than a glazed surface is recommended for single restorations made of heat-pressed lithium disilicate material. In addition, care must be taken when polishing opposing materials, especially those used in occlusal contact areas. (J Oral Sci 58, 117-123, 2016).

  16. Labiogingival groove: A rare developmental tooth anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Chauhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Labiogingival groove is a congenital morphologic dental anomaly, in which an infolding of the inner enamel epithelium and Hertwig's epithelial root sheath create a groove extending varying depth into root. Epithelial attachment can be breached by gingival irritation secondary to plaque accumulation creating a periodontal defect that spreads to the pulp causing primary periodontal/secondary endodontic. A 12-year-old boy reported with the complaint of painful tooth with pus discharge from labial gingival surface in the maxillary right lateral incisor for 4 months. Intraoral examination revealed bluish red gingiva with loss of contour in relation to maxillary right lateral incisor and purulent discharge in relation to it. A provisional diagnosis of localized gingival abscess in relation to maxillary right incisor (primary periodontic and secondary endodontic involvement was given, and required treatment was carried out. On exposure of the involved tooth, a labiogingival groove was noticed which could have been a contributing factor for the progression of the condition.

  17. Massive clot formation after tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Hunasgi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral surgical procedures mainly tooth extraction can be related with an extended hemorrhage owed to the nature of the process resulting in an "open wound." The attempt of this paper is to present a case of massive postoperative clot formation after tooth extraction and highlight on the oral complications of surgical procedures. A 32-year-old male patient reported to the Dental Clinic for evaluation and extraction of grossly decayed 46. Clinical evaluation of 46 revealed root stumps. Extraction of the root stumps was performed, and it was uneventful. Hemostasis was achieved and postsurgical instructions were specified to the patient. The patient reported to the clinic, the very subsequent morning with a criticism of bleeding at the extraction site. On clinical examination, bleeding was noted from the socket in relation to 46. To control bleeding, oral hemostatic drugs Revici - E (Ethamsylate 500 mg was prescribed and bleeding was stopped in 2 h. However, a massive clot was formed at the extraction site. Further, this clot resolved on its own in 1-week time. Despite the fact that dental extraction is considered to be a minor surgical procedure, some cases may present with life-threatening complications including hemorrhage. Vigilant and significant history taking, physical and dental examinations prior to dental procedures are a must to avoid intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  18. Measurement of opalescence of tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Yu, Bin

    2007-08-01

    Opalescent dental esthetic restoratives look natural and esthetic in any light, react to light in the same manner as the natural tooth and show improved masking effect. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of tooth enamel with reflection spectrophotometers. Color of intact bovine and human enamel was measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes. Two kinds of spectrophotometers were used for bovine and one kind was used for human enamel. The opalescence parameter (OP) was calculated as the difference in yellow-blue color coordinate (CIE Deltab(*)) and red-green color coordinate (CIE Deltaa(*)) between the reflected and transmitted colors. Mean OP value of bovine enamel was 10.6 (+/-1.4) to 19.0 (+/-2.1), and varied by the configuration of spectrophotometers. Mean OP value of human enamel was 22.9 (+/-1.9). Opalescence varied by the configuration of measuring spectrophotometer and the species of enamel. These values could be used in the development of esthetic restorative materials.

  19. Failure of tooth eruption in two patients with cerebral palsy and bruxism-a 10-year follow-up: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufer, Kirsten; Hamadeh, Sinan; Gesch, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze delayed tooth eruption in two children with cerebral palsy who had severe bruxism and to determine whether treatment could influence tooth eruption and alignment. Extraction of primary teeth was carried out and orthodontic treatment was considered due to severe tooth wear of primary teeth, lack of space, and development of a class III malocclusion. Analysis was based on clinical examination, photographs, radiographs, and dental casts. In both patients, early mixed dentition was delayed for more than 5 years. Calcification and root development of posterior permanent teeth corresponded with the chronological age. Root resorption of the severely abraded primary teeth and eruption of their successors were delayed or failed. Eruption of permanent teeth occurred slowly after primary teeth were extracted. Orthodontic treatment succeeded in one patient, achieving a normal overjet in combination with a successful orofacial therapy. The disturbed exfoliation of abraded primary teeth and failure of tooth eruption of the posterior teeth could be linked to the systemic pathology and to bruxism. At age 20, eruption of the canines and premolars remained questionable.

  20. Fretting wear behavior of zirconium alloy in B-Li water at 300 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Lai, Ping; Liu, Qingdong; Zeng, Qifeng; Lu, Junqiang; Guo, Xianglong

    2018-02-01

    The tangential fretting wear of three kinds of zirconium alloys tube mated with 304 stainless steel (SS) plate was investigated. The tests were conducted in an autoclave containing 300 °C pressurized B-Li water for tube-on-plate contact configuration. The worn surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and 3D microscopy. The cross-section of wear scar was examined with transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results indicated that the dominant wear mechanism of zirconium alloys in this test condition was delamination and oxidation. The oxide layer on the fretted area consists of outer oxide layer composed of iron oxide and zirconium oxide and inner oxide layer composed of zirconium oxide.

  1. Exposure and risks from wearing asbestos mitts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tindall Matthew

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very high fibre inhalation exposure has been measured while people were wearing personal protective equipment manufactured from chrysotile asbestos. However, there is little data that relates specifically to wearing asbestos gloves or mitts, particularly when used in hot environments such as those found in glass manufacturing. The aim of this study was to assess the likely personal exposure to asbestos fibres when asbestos mitts were used. Results Three types of work activity were simulated in a small test room with unused mitts and artificially aged mitts. Neither pair of mitts were treated to suppress the dust emission. The measured respirable fibre exposure levels ranged from Conclusion People who wore asbestos mitts were likely to have been exposed to relatively low levels of airborne chrysotile asbestos fibres, certainly much lower than the standards that were accepted in the 1960's and 70's. The cancer risks from this type of use are likely to be very low.

  2. 3D FEM Simulation of Flank Wear in Turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Aldo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio

    2011-05-01

    This work deals with tool wear simulation. Studying the influence of tool wear on tool life, tool substitution policy and influence on final part quality, surface integrity, cutting forces and power consumption it is important to reduce the global process costs. Adhesion, abrasion, erosion, diffusion, corrosion and fracture are some of the phenomena responsible of the tool wear depending on the selected cutting parameters: cutting velocity, feed rate, depth of cut, …. In some cases these wear mechanisms are described by analytical models as a function of process variables (temperature, pressure and sliding velocity along the cutting surface). These analytical models are suitable to be implemented in FEM codes and they can be utilized to simulate the tool wear. In the present paper a commercial 3D FEM software has been customized to simulate the tool wear during turning operations when cutting AISI 1045 carbon steel with uncoated tungsten carbide tip. The FEM software was improved by means of a suitable subroutine able to modify the tool geometry on the basis of the estimated tool wear as the simulation goes on. Since for the considered couple of tool-workpiece material the main phenomena generating wear are the abrasive and the diffusive ones, the tool wear model implemented into the subroutine was obtained as combination between the Usui's and the Takeyama and Murata's models. A comparison between experimental and simulated flank tool wear curves is reported demonstrating that it is possible to simulate the tool wear development.

  3. Predicting knee replacement damage in a simulator machine using a computational model with a consistent wear factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Sawyer, W Gregory; Banks, Scott A; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2008-02-01

    Wear of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene remains a primary factor limiting the longevity of total knee replacements (TKRs). However, wear testing on a simulator machine is time consuming and expensive, making it impractical for iterative design purposes. The objectives of this paper were first, to evaluate whether a computational model using a wear factor consistent with the TKR material pair can predict accurate TKR damage measured in a simulator machine, and second, to investigate how choice of surface evolution method (fixed or variable step) and material model (linear or nonlinear) affect the prediction. An iterative computational damage model was constructed for a commercial knee implant in an AMTI simulator machine. The damage model combined a dynamic contact model with a surface evolution model to predict how wear plus creep progressively alter tibial insert geometry over multiple simulations. The computational framework was validated by predicting wear in a cylinder-on-plate system for which an analytical solution was derived. The implant damage model was evaluated for 5 million cycles of simulated gait using damage measurements made on the same implant in an AMTI machine. Using a pin-on-plate wear factor for the same material pair as the implant, the model predicted tibial insert wear volume to within 2% error and damage depths and areas to within 18% and 10% error, respectively. Choice of material model had little influence, while inclusion of surface evolution affected damage depth and area but not wear volume predictions. Surface evolution method was important only during the initial cycles, where variable step was needed to capture rapid geometry changes due to the creep. Overall, our results indicate that accurate TKR damage predictions can be made with a computational model using a constant wear factor obtained from pin-on-plate tests for the same material pair, and furthermore, that surface evolution method matters only during the initial

  4. Friction and wear properties of novel HDPE--HAp--Al2O3 biocomposites against alumina counterface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodhak, Subhadip; Nath, Shekhar; Basu, Bikramjit

    2009-03-01

    In an effort to enhance physical properties of biopolymers (high-density polyethylene, HDPE) in terms of elastic modulus and hardness, various ceramic fillers, like alumina (Al2O3) and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are added, and therefore it is essential to assess the friction and wear resistance properties of HDPE biocomposites. In this perspective, HDPE composites with varying ceramic filler content (upto 40 vol%) were fabricated under the optimal compression molding conditions and their friction and wear properties were evaluated against Al2O3 at fretting contacts. All the experiments were conducted at a load of 10 N for duration of 100,000 cycles in both dry as well as simulated body fluid (SBF). Such planned set of experiments has been designed to address three important issues: (a) whether the improvement in physical properties (hardness, E-modulus) will lead to corresponding improvement in friction and wear properties; (b) whether the fretting in SBF will provide sufficient lubrication in order to considerably enhance the tribological properties, as compared to that in ambient conditions; and (c) whether the generation of wear debris particles be reduced for various compositionally modified polymer composites, in comparison to unreinforced HDPE. The experimental results indicate the possibility of achieving extremely low coefficient of friction (COF approximately 0.047) as well as higher wear resistance (wear rate in the order of approximately 10(-7) mm3 N(-1) m(-1)) with the newly developed composites in SBF. A low wear depth of 3.5-4 microm is recorded, irrespective of fretting environment. Much effort has been put forward to correlate the friction and wear mechanisms with abrasion, adhesion, and wear debris formation.

  5. Contact Thermal Analysis and Wear Simulation of a Brake Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Békési

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes an experimental test and a coupled contact-thermal-wear analysis of a railway wheel/brake block system through the braking process. During the test, the friction, the generated heat, and the wear were evaluated. It was found that the contact between the brake block and the wheel occurs in relatively small and slowly moving hot spots, caused by the wear and the thermal effects. A coupled simulation method was developed including numerical frictional contact, transient thermal and incremental wear calculations. In the 3D simulation, the effects of the friction, the thermal expansion, the wear, and the temperature-dependent material properties were also considered. A good agreement was found between the results of the test and the calculations, both for the thermal and wear results. The proposed method is suitable for modelling the slowly oscillating wear caused by the thermal expansions in the contact area.

  6. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  7. Wirelessly Interrogated Wear or Temperature Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2010-01-01

    Sensors for monitoring surface wear and/or temperature without need for wire connections have been developed. Excitation and interrogation of these sensors are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. In a sensor of the present type as in the previously reported ones, the capacitance and, thus, the resonance frequency, varies as a known function of the quantity of interest that one seeks to determine. Hence, the resonance frequency is measured and used to calculate the quantity of interest.

  8. Onset wear in self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Acunto, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are very useful for the systematic modification of the physical, chemical and structural properties of a surface by varying the chain length, tail group and composition. Many of these properties can be studied making use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the interaction between the AFM probe tip and the SAMs can also be considered an excellent reference to study the fundamental properties of dissipation phenomena and onset wear for viscoelastic materials on the nanoscale. We have performed a numerical study showing that the fundamental mechanism for the onset wear is a process of nucleation of domains starting from initial defects. An SAM surface repeatedly sheared by an AFM probe tip with enough applied loads shows the formation of progressive damages nucleating in domains. The AFM induced surface damages involve primarily the formation of radicals from the carbon chain backbones, but the deformations of the chains resulting in changes of period lattice also have to be taken into consideration. The nucleation of the wear domains generally starts at the initial surface defects where the energy cohesion between chains is lower. Moreover, the presence of surface defects is consistent with the changes in lateral force increasing the probability of the activation for the removal of carbon debris from the chain backbone. The quantification of the progressive worn area is performed making use of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory for phase transition kinetic processes. The advantage of knowing the general conditions for onset wear on the SAM surfaces can help in studying the fundamental mechanisms for the tribological properties of viscoelastic materials, in solid lubrication applications and biopolymer mechanics

  9. Phenomenological modeling of abradable wear in turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoul, Bérenger; Batailly, Alain; Stainier, Laurent; Legrand, Mathias; Cartraud, Patrice

    2018-01-01

    Abradable materials are widely used as coatings within compressor and turbine stages of modern aircraft engines in order to reduce operating blade-tip/casing clearances and thus maximize energy efficiency. However, rubbing occurrences between blade tips and coating liners may lead to high blade vibratory levels and endanger their structural integrity through fatigue mechanisms. Accordingly, there is a need for a better comprehension of the physical phenomena at play and for an accurate modeling of the interaction, in order to predict potentially unsafe events. To this end, this work introduces a phenomenological model of the abradable coating removal based on phenomena reported in the literature and accounting for key frictional and wear mechanisms including plasticity at junctions, ploughing, micro-rupture and machining. It is implemented within an in-house software solution dedicated to the prediction of full three-dimensional blade/abradable coating interactions within an aircraft engine low pressure compressor. Two case studies are considered. The first one compares the results of an experimental abradable test rig and its simulation. The second one deals with the simulation of interactions in a complete low-pressure compressor. The consistency of the model with experimental observations is underlined, and the impact of material parameter variations on the interaction and wear behavior of the blade is discussed. It is found that even though wear patterns are remarkably robust, results are significantly influenced by abradable coating material properties.

  10. TLA-marker for wear rate monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan-Sion, C.; Plostinaru, D.; Ivan, A.; Catana, M.; Roman, M.

    1992-01-01

    A very effective and promising method of wear monitoring in industry is the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) method. The main feature of this technique is the creation of thin radioactive layers on the investigated surface by irradiation of the sample with an accelerated ion beam (protons, deuterons, 3-He). In the present paper we describe an extension of the TLA-Method to produce radioactive markers to be implanted into heavy object which can hardly be transported to an accelerator for direct surface activation. The sensitivity of wear measuring is usually 1% of the actual layer thickness. It is obvious that the TLA technique has a sensitivity about two orders of magnitude higher than the activation in the bulk volume, produced in a nuclear reactor. Controlling the activation depth (80 - 250 microns) we produced different marker sets with sensitivities of 1 - 3 microns. The TLA markers were used to measure the wear rate of railway-car brake disks and of the railroad. The measured data were corroborated with other physical parameters of interest. (Author)

  11. TLA-marker for wear rate monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stan-Sion, C; Plostinaru, D; Ivan, A [Institute of Atomic Physics, Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-76900 Bucharest, P.O.Box MG-6, (Romania); Catana, M; Roman, M [Institute for Research and Design in Transportation, Bucharest, (Romania)

    1992-01-01

    A very effective and promising method of wear monitoring in industry is the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) method. The main feature of this technique is the creation of thin radioactive layers on the investigated surface by irradiation of the sample with an accelerated ion beam (protons, deuterons, 3-He). In the present paper we describe an extension of the TLA-Method to produce radioactive markers to be implanted into heavy object which can hardly be transported to an accelerator for direct surface activation. The sensitivity of wear measuring is usually 1% of the actual layer thickness. It is obvious that the TLA technique has a sensitivity about two orders of magnitude higher than the activation in the bulk volume, produced in a nuclear reactor. Controlling the activation depth (80 - 250 microns) we produced different marker sets with sensitivities of 1 - 3 microns. The TLA markers were used to measure the wear rate of railway-car brake disks and of the railroad. The measured data were corroborated with other physical parameters of interest. (Author).

  12. Optimized use of cooling holes to decrease the amount of thermal damage on a plastic gear tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demagna Koffi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The full potential of plastic gear usage is limited by not only poor mechanical properties but also equally poor temperature limits and poor heat conduction properties. Cooling holes were developed to decrease the amount of thermal damage on the contact surface. These cooling holes promote increased stress and tooth deflection, thus exerting a negative effect. This article compares various cooling holes for plastic gear configurations and proposes novel cooling holes. Thermal and mechanical simulations that consider specific aspects of plastic gear meshing were performed. The main objective of this article was to verify the best methods for reducing thermal damage through cooling holes. The results indicate the best compromise between the temperature reduction and the mechanical properties of the new tooth geometry. The results also indicate that the simple variations in the cooling holes proposed can improve tooth performance.

  13. SIGNS Molar tooth sign − looking beyond the obvious

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tooth are represented by thick, perpendicular, non-decussated superior cerebellar peduncles, while the 'body' of the molar tooth is formed by the cerebral peduncles of the brainstem with a deep interpeduncular fossa (Fig. 1a).[3]. Diffusion tensor tractography confirms the failure of superior cerebellar peduncle decussation.

  14. A theropod tooth from the Late Triassic of southern Africa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An isolated, large recurved and finely serrated tooth found associated with the prosauropod Euskelosaurus from the Late Triassic part of the Elliot Formation is described here. It is compared to the Triassic thecodonts and carnivorous dinosaurs and its possible affinity is discussed. The tooth possibly belongs to a basal ...

  15. Reasons for tooth mortality as perceived by dental professionals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that among the patients attending dental clinics and hospitals in Udaipur city, dental caries and periodontal disease was found to be the two major causes of tooth mortality. This is probably the first study to report on the trends in tooth loss in general practice in Udaipur ...

  16. Accelerated tooth eruption in children with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shantanu; Cheng, Bin; Kaplan, Selma; Softness, Barney; Greenberg, Ellen; Goland, Robin S; Lalla, Evanthia; Lamster, Ira B

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate tooth eruption in 6- to 14-year-old children with diabetes mellitus. Tooth eruption status was assessed for 270 children with diabetes and 320 control children without diabetes. Data on important diabetes-related variables were collected. Analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Children with diabetes exhibited accelerated tooth eruption in the late mixed dentition period (10-14 years of age) compared to healthy children. For both case patients and control subjects the odds of a tooth being in an advanced eruptive stage were significantly higher among girls than boys. There was also a trend associating gingival inflammation with expedited tooth eruption in both groups. No association was found between the odds of a tooth being in an advanced stage of eruption and hemoglobin A(1c) or duration of diabetes. Patients with higher body mass index percentile demonstrated statistically higher odds for accelerated tooth eruption, but the association was not clinically significant. Children with diabetes exhibit accelerated tooth eruption. Future studies need to ascertain the role of such aberrations in dental development and complications such as malocclusion, impaired oral hygiene, and periodontal disease. The standards of care for children with diabetes should include screening and referral programs aimed at oral health promotion and disease prevention.

  17. Outcome of Endodontically Treated Teeth Diagnosed With Cracked Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    However, variable symptoms complicate the diagnosis (9). In a study of 32 patients presenting with diffuse longstanding orofacial pain eventually...883-92. 22)Byrnjulsen A, Fristad I, Grevstad T, Hals-Kvinnsland I. Incompletely fractured teeth associated with diffuse longstanding orofacial pain ...cracked tooth is highly associated with discomfort. Patients often describe a momentary, sudden, sharp, lancinating pain that results in continuous tooth

  18. Orientation and deformation of mineral crystals in tooth surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Todoh, Masahiro; Niida, Atsushi; Shibuya, Ryota; Kitami, Shunsuke; Tadano, Shigeru

    2012-06-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest material in the human body, and it is mainly composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp)-like mineral particles. As HAp has a hexagonal crystal structure, X-ray diffraction methods can be used to analyze the crystal structure of HAp in teeth. Here, the X-ray diffraction method was applied to the surface of tooth enamel to measure the orientation and strain of the HAp crystals. The c-axis of the hexagonal crystal structure of HAp was oriented to the surface perpendicular to the tooth enamel covering the tooth surface. Thus, the strain of HAp at the surface of teeth was measured by X-ray diffraction from the (004) lattice planes aligned along the c-axis. The X-ray strain measurements were conducted on tooth specimens with intact surfaces under loading. Highly accurate strain measurements of the surface of tooth specimens were performed by precise positioning of the X-ray irradiation area during loading. The strains of the (004) lattice plane were measured at several positions on the surface of the specimens under compression along the tooth axis. The strains were obtained as tensile strains at the labial side of incisor tooth specimens. In posterior teeth, the strains were different at different measurement positions, varying from tensile to compressive types. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Comprehensive Mixture of Tobacco Smoke Components Retards Orthodontic Tooth Movement via the Inhibition of Osteoclastogenesis in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Nagaie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke is a complex mixture of numerous components. Nevertheless, most experiments have examined the effects of individual chemicals in tobacco smoke. The comprehensive effects of components on tooth movement and bone resorption remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that a comprehensive mixture of tobacco smoke components (TSCs attenuated bone resorption through osteoclastogenesis inhibition, thereby retarding experimental tooth movement in a rat model. An elastic power chain (PC inserted between the first and second maxillary molars robustly yielded experimental tooth movement within 10 days. TSC administration effectively retarded tooth movement since day 4. Histological evaluation disclosed that tooth movement induced bone resorption at two sites: in the bone marrow and the peripheral bone near the root. TSC administration significantly reduced the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive osteoclastic cells in the bone marrow cavity of the PC-treated dentition. An in vitro study indicated that the inhibitory effects of TSCs on osteoclastogenesis seemed directed more toward preosteoclasts than osteoblasts. These results indicate that the comprehensive mixture of TSCs might be a useful tool for detailed verification of the adverse effects of tobacco smoke, possibly contributing to the development of reliable treatments in various fields associated with bone resorption.

  20. Obtention, machining and wear of sintered alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Filho, Edson Souza de

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of materials for automotive applications, in particular, valve seat inserts for gasoline combustion engines. The development involved the following activities: processing by powder metallurgy techniques, heat treatment, mechanical and microstructural characterization, machining and wear of materials. This work was undertaken aiming cost reduction of this component by the use of cheaper and less pollutant elements, eliminating the presence of Co and Pb due to their high cost and toxicological effects, respectively. The accomplishment of a thorough research into patents revealed that the materials studied here present particular compositions and were not yet produced. The results of hardness measurements and the transverse radial strength of the studied materials, after heat treatment, revealed superior properties than the commercial alloys applied at the moment. The machining tests of the material without heat treatment indicated a similar behaviour in comparison to the commercial alloy, suggesting that the new alloy chemistry composition was not deleterious in this sense. After heat treatment, the obtained alloys presented a cutting force increase in relation to the commercial alloy. Wear tests results of heat treated materials presented smaller friction coefficient and mass loss than the commercial alloy, in ali cases. This was especially achieved due to the advantages offered by heat treatment allied to the addition of NbC and Ti/W carbides. The materials obtained here showed to be potential candidates to substitute with advantages, valve seat inserts made of Fe-Co alloys for gasoline combustion engines. (author)