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Sample records for tooth wear indices

  1. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  2. The Influence of Behavioural and Sociodemographic Risk Indicators on Erosive Tooth Wear in Flemish Adolescents, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Francisca; Jacquet, Wolfgang; Bottenberg, Peter; Martens, Luc

    2018-01-01

    Although Belgium has recently been ranked as the second highest consumer of soft drinks in Europe, no data on erosive tooth wear (ETW) are currently available. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence and associated risk indicators of ETW in adolescents residing in the region of Flanders, Belgium. Convenience sampling was used to recruit participants from different types of Belgian schools: general and vocational/technical education. Three calibrated dentists performed the dental examinations and a self-reported questionnaire was applied to evaluate risk indicators related with ETW. ETW was classified using the Basic Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE) index, and the overall prevalence was calculated using BEWE sum >0. The Kruskal-Wallis test, the Mann-Whitney U test, and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate frequencies and risk associations. From a total of 613 recruited adolescents (mean age: 15.1 years, SD: 0.8), 48.6% presented at least one affected tooth surface by ETW (BEWE sum >0), 14.4% (n = 88) scored BEWE sum >2, and the highest score obtained was BEWE sum = 8. Two predictive variables were found to have an association with ETW: vocational/technical type of education (OR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.03-2.13) and frequent consumption of soft drinks (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.38-3.14). In conclusion, ETW is a common condition presented with low severity among Flemish adolescents. Additionally, the frequent consumption of soft drinks and being part of a vocational/technical education appear to be risk indicators for ETW in this population. The latter indicates the need for specific orientated oral health promotion programmes for the prevention of ETW in Flemish adolescents. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  4. Tooth Wear Inclination in Great Ape Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Sadler, Jordan; Fiorenza, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Primate dietary diversity is reflected in their dental morphology, with differences in size and shape of teeth. In particular, the tooth wear angle can provide insight into a species' ability to break down certain foods. To examine dietary and masticatory information, digitized polygon models of dental casts provide a basis for quantitative analysis of wear associated with tooth attrition. In this study, we analyze and compare the wear patterns of Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorillagorilla and Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii lower molars, focusing on the degree of inclination of specific wear facets. The variation in wear angles appears to be indicative of jaw movements and the specific stresses imposed on food during mastication, reflecting thus the ecology of these species. Orangutans exhibit flatter wear angles, more typical of a diet consisting of hard and brittle foods, while gorillas show a wear pattern with a high degree of inclination, reflecting thus their more leafy diet. Chimpanzees, on the other hand, show intermediate inclinations, a pattern that could be related to their highly variable diet. This method is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for better understanding the relationship between food, mastication and tooth wear processes in living primates, and can be potentially used to reconstruct the diet of fossil species. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  6. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, M A; Whelton, H P; Shirodaria, S C; O'Mullane, D M; Cronin, M S

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five. A prospective cohort study. At follow-up to a previous study complete data were available for 123 children; fieldwork was conducted in the child's primary school. Measurement of tooth wear used a scoring system modified from the Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index (TWI). Tooth wear which had progressed to dentine was assessed on the occlusal surfaces of the four first permanent molars, the labial, lingual/palatal and incisal surfaces of the six upper and six lower anterior teeth; a total of 40 scoreable surfaces. Demographic data were collected from the parents, and a questionnaire on oral hygiene habits, diet and behaviours was completed by each child. In total 38% (n = 47) of subjects had tooth wear, if incisor teeth only were included, 33% (n = 40) had tooth wear and similarly if the occlusal surfaces of molar teeth only were included 10% (n = 12) had signs of tooth wear. Gender was significantly associated with tooth wear: males had more tooth wear. The presence of tooth wear with dentine exposed in the primary dentition was significantly associated with tooth wear on the occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molars. Males had more tooth wear than females. An association existed between tooth wear recorded at age 5 and molar tooth wear recorded at age 12. Tooth wear is a lifelong cumulative process and should be recorded in both the primary and permanent dentitions.

  7. A panorama of tooth wear during the medieval period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esclassan, Rémi; Hadjouis, Djillali; Donat, Richard; Passarrius, Olivier; Maret, Delphine; Vaysse, Frédéric; Crubézy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a natural phenomenon and a universal occurrence that has existed from the origin of humankind and depends on the way of life, especially diet. Tooth wear was very serious in ancient populations up to the medieval period. The aim of this paper is to present a global view of tooth wear in medieval times in Europe through different parameters: scoring systems, quantity and direction of wear, gender, differences between maxilla and mandible, relations with diet, caries, tooth malpositions and age.

  8. The interactions between attrition, abrasion and erosion in tooth wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis, R Peter; Addy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the result of three processes: abrasion (wear produced by interaction between teeth and other materials), attrition (wear through tooth-tooth contact) and erosion (dissolution of hard tissue by acidic substances). A further process (abfraction) might potentiate wear by abrasion and/or erosion. Knowledge of these tooth wear processes and their interactions is reviewed. Both clinical and experimental observations show that individual wear mechanisms rarely act alone but interact with each other. The most important interaction is the potentiation of abrasion by erosive damage to the dental hard tissues. This interaction seems to be the major factor in occlusal and cervical wear. The available evidence is insufficient to establish whether abfraction is an important contributor to tooth wear in vivo. Saliva can modulate erosive/abrasive tooth wear, especially through formation of pellicle, but cannot prevent it. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Is tooth wear in the primary dentition predictive of tooth wear in the permanent dentition? Report from a longitudinal study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harding, M A

    2010-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of tooth wear in the permanent dentition of a sample of 12-year-old school children and establish whether an association exists between tooth wear recorded now and tooth wear recorded in their primary dentition at age five.

  10. Assessment of the progression of tooth wear on dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoorn-Vis, G.M.G.J.; Wetselaar, P.; Koutris, M.; Visscher, C.M.; Evälahti, M.; Ahlberg, J.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods are available for the grading of tooth wear, but their ability to assess the progression of wear over time has not been studied frequently. The aim was to assess whether the occlusal/incisal grading scale of the Tooth Wear Evaluation System (TWES) was sensitive enough for the detection

  11. Severe tooth wear: European consensus statement on management guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loomans, Bas AC; Opdam, Niek JM; Attin, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a European expert consensus statement on guidelines for the management of severe tooth wear. It focuses on the definition of physiological versus pathological tooth wear and recommends diagnosis, monitoring and counseling to define the activity of the wear. Restorative interven...

  12. Prevalence and distribution of tooth wear among Sri Lankan adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, Nilantha; Ekanayake, Lilani

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence, distribution and sociodemographic factors associated with tooth wear among Sri Lankan adolescents. A total of 1200 17-year-olds were selected from government, private and international schools in the Colombo district of Sri Lanka using a two-stage cluster sampling technique. The data were collected using a pretested, validated self-administered questionnaire and by conducting a clinical examination. Tooth wear was recorded using a modified version of Smith and Knight's tooth wear index. The prevalence of tooth wear among Sri Lankan adolescents was found to be 22.4%. In nearly 13.7%, tooth wear was confined to the enamel, whereas 8.7% had wear lesions extending up to the dentine. Occlusal surface was the most frequently affected surface, while the first molar was the most frequently affected tooth. Tooth wear was significantly associated with the type of school attended, father's occupational status and mother's level of education. The present study found that nearly one-fourth of the adolescents were affected by tooth wear. These findings are in agreement with those from developed countries where tooth wear has been shown to be an emerging oral health problem.

  13. Association between Severity of Tooth Wear and Dentinal Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Ayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Tooth wear (attrition, abrasion, erosion, and abfraction is perceived globally as ever increasing problem. Several outcome of the tooth wear are hypersensitivity, esthetic problems, functional impairment, annoyance to the patient, and fracture of the tooth. Among these, the measurable and more commonly reported outcome is hypersensitivity to stimuli. Although dentin hypersensitivity is a common clinical condition and is generally reported by the patient after experiencing a sharp, short pain caused by one of the several different external stimuli, it is often inadequately understood. None of the scientific literature available till date attempted to establish the relationship between tooth wear and dentin hypersensitivity which could be a key factor in monitoring those patients.  The aim of the study was to estimate the association between severity of teeth wear and sensitivity in the patients with reported dentinal hypersensitivity.Materials & Methods: Fifty patients with dentin hypersensitivity were investigated for tooth wear. Tooth wear measured using exact tooth wear index and level of sensitivity to stimuli was recorded using a numerical rating scale. Results: Enamel wear at cervical region of teeth showed a positive correlation (p=.010, similarly, dentin wear at cervical region of teeth showed positive correlation and significant association (p<.001 with dentinal hypersensitivity.Conclusion: The observation supports a significant association between severities of tooth surface wear and dentinal hypersensitivity.

  14. Tooth -Wear Lesions Among Patients Attending Tertiary Hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tooth wear manifest in the form of abrasion, attrition, erosion and abfraction and can affect the quality of life of the sufferer. This was a prospective study of patients who ... We recommend oral hygiene advice, dietary counseling and regular dental examination for early detection. Key words: Tooth wear, lesion, prospective, ...

  15. Tooth wear: when to treat, why, and how. Part two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    Tooth wear has been described in the literature as physiologic--that is, normal, expected over the life span of an individual, and not creating a pathologic condition. It has also been described in pathologic terms as caused by stress, corrosion, and friction, utilizing a variety of mechanisms and affected by a host of endogenous and exogenous factors. From a clinician's point of view, when should we decide to restore a tooth or change the conditions in the mouth to protect the teeth; and what should we consider using to either prevent or restore abnormal--i.e, pathologic--tooth wear? This review in Part One (Northwest Dentistry, September-October 2009) looked at what is normal, non-pathologic tooth wear and etiologies associated with all forms of tooth wear. Part Two will discuss the effects of tooth wear in enamel and dentin, when it may be advisable to intervene in the wear processes diagnosed on specific patients, and what methods of prevention and restoration can be utilized to restore or maintain the dentition. This review will not look at the need for full mouth reconstruction due to wear.

  16. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Dai

    Full Text Available Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  17. Enamel erosion and mechanical tooth wear in medieval Icelanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Svend; Eliasson, Sigfus Thor

    2016-01-01

    The Icelandic Sagas are an important source of information on the way of life and diet habits in Iceland and possibly other Nordic countries 1000 years ago. Archaeological human skull material worldwide has revealed extensive tooth wear, with the main cause believed to be coarse diet. From a graveyard near volcano Hekla, 66 skeletons dated from before 1104 were excavated. The purpose of this study was to determine the main causes of tooth wear in Icelanders 1000 years ago. Forty-nine skulls were available for research. Two methods were used to evaluate tooth wear and seven for age estimation. An attempt was made to determine the main causes of tooth wear in the light of likely diet and beverage consumption according to a computer search on food and drink customs described in the Icelandic Sagas. Tooth wear was extensive in all groups, increasing with age. The highest score was on first molars, with no difference between sexes. It had all the similarities seen in wear from coarse diet. In some instances it had similar characteristics to those seen in erosion in modern Icelanders consuming excessive amounts of soft drinks. According to the Sagas, acidic whey was a daily drink and used for preservation of food in Iceland until recently. Since acidic whey has considerably high dental erosive potential, it is postulated that consumption of acidic drinks and food, in addition to a coarse and rough diet, played a significant role in the dental wear of ancient Icelanders.

  18. Control of erosive tooth wear: possibilities and rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Campos Serra

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a type of wear caused by non bacterial acids or chelation. There is evidence of a significant increase in the prevalence of dental wear in the deciduous and permanent teeth as a consequence of the frequent intake of acidic foods and drinks, or due to gastric acid which may reach the oral cavity following reflux or vomiting episodes. The presence of acids is a prerequisite for dental erosion, but the erosive wear is complex and depends on the interaction of biological, chemical and behavioral factors. Even though erosion may be defined or described as an isolated process, in clinical situations other wear phenomena are expected to occur concomitantly, such as abrasive wear (which occurs, e.g, due to tooth brushing or mastication. In order to control dental loss due to erosive wear it is crucial to take into account its multifactorial nature, which predisposes some individuals to the condition.

  19. Severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome. A case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeves Ronnaug

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a rare complex multsystemic genetic disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia and obesity, mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, facial dysmorphology and oral abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to explore the prevalence of tooth wear and possible risk factors in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome. Methods Forty-nine individuals (6-40 years with PWS and an age- and sex-matched control group were included. Tooth wear was evaluated from dental casts and intraoral photographs and rated by four examiners using the Visual Erosion Dental Examination (VEDE scoring system and the individual tooth wear index IA. In accordance with the VEDE scoring system, tooth wear was also evaluated clinically. Whole saliva was collected. Results Mean VEDE score was 1.70 ± 1.44 in the PWS group and 0.46 ± 0.36 in the control group (p A was 7.50 (2.60-30.70 in the PWS group and 2.60 (0.90-4.70 among controls (p A; r = 0.82, p A; r = 0.43, p = 0.002. Tooth grinding was also associated with tooth wear in the PWS group, as indicated by the mean VEDE 2.67 ± 1.62 in grinders and 1.14 ± 0.97 in non-grinders (p = 0.001 and median IA values 25.70 (5.48-68.55 in grinders and 5.70 (1.60-9.10 in non-grinders (p = 0.003. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed with tooth wear as the dependent variable and PWS (yes/no, age, tooth grinding and saliva secretion as independent variables. PWS (yes/no, age and tooth grinding retained a significant association with tooth wear, VEDE (p A (p  Conclusions Our study provides evidence that tooth wear, in terms of both erosion and attrition, is a severe problem in Prader-Willi syndrome. There is therefore considerable need for prosthodontic rehabilitation in young adults with PWS.

  20. Tooth wear : a systematic review of treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muts, Erik-Jan; van Pelt, Hans; Edelhoff, Daniel; Krejci, Ivo; Cune, Marco

    2014-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Treatment of tooth wear is increasing. Because no evidence-based guidelines are available, the clinician may have difficulties deciding which treatment option to choose to resolve complex situations. PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review was to identify similarities

  1. Some Socio-demographic attributes as covariates in tooth wear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Association between some socio-demographic attributes and tooth wear among adult male population in a rural community of Igbo-ora, Southwestern Nigeria was investigated in this cross-sectional study. METHODS: Cross-sectional study among 200 consenting adult males in Igbo-ora was carried out ...

  2. Association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding with tooth wear in children with mixed dentition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Restrepo, C.; Manfredini, D.; Manrique, R.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tooth wear has a multifactorial etiology, thus it should be assessed within a multiple-variable framework. The objective of this investigation was to assess the association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding (STG) with tooth wear in children with mixed

  3. The correction of occlusal vertical dimension on tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostiny Rostiny

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The loss of occlusal vertical dimension which is caused by tooth wear is necessarily treated to regain vertical dimension. Correctional therapy should be done as early possible. In this case, simple and relatively low cost therapy was performed. In unserve loss of occlusal vertical dimension, partial removable denture could be used and the improvement of lengthening anterior teeth using composite resin to improve to regain vertical dimensional occlusion.

  4. The correction of occlusal vertical dimension on tooth wear

    OpenAIRE

    Rostiny, Rostiny

    2007-01-01

    The loss of occlusal vertical dimension which is caused by tooth wear is necessarily treated to regain vertical dimension. Correctional therapy should be done as early possible. In this case, simple and relatively low cost therapy was performed. In unserve loss of occlusal vertical dimension, partial removable denture could be used and the improvement of lengthening anterior teeth using composite resin to improve to regain vertical dimensional occlusion.

  5. Aspects of wear and tear of tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill

    2010-03-01

    Lifestyle factors and the increased longevity of the dentition due to greater life expectancy have resulted in greater wear and tear (cracking) of teeth. Often there exists interplay between damage and repair. An understanding of these mechanisms of damage and repair will assist the clinician in correct diagnosis and treatment planning. Preventive strategies as well as interdisciplinary measures are required for optimal outcomes. However, are some of our restorative interventions causing further damage to tooth structure?

  6. Tooth wear and feeding ecology in mountain gorillas from Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany, Jordi; Imanizabayo, Olive; Romero, Alejandro; Vecellio, Veronica; Glowacka, Halszka; Cranfield, Michael R; Bromage, Timothy G; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Stoinski, Tara S; McFarlin, Shannon C

    2016-03-01

    Ecological factors have a dramatic effect on tooth wear in primates, although it remains unclear how individual age contributes to functional crown morphology. The aim of this study is to determine how age and individual diet are related to tooth wear in wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) from Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. We calculated the percent of dentine exposure (PDE) for all permanent molars (M1-M3) of known-age mountain gorillas (N = 23), to test whether PDE varied with age using regression analysis. For each molar position, we also performed stepwise multiple linear regression to test the effects of age and percentage of time spent feeding on different food categories on PDE, for individuals subject to long-term observational studies by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International's Karisoke Research Center. PDE increased significantly with age for both sexes in all molars. Moreover, a significant effect of gritty plant root consumption on PDE was found among individuals. Our results support prior reports indicating reduced tooth wear in mountain gorillas compared to western gorillas, and compared to other known-aged samples of primate taxa from forest and savanna habitats. Our findings corroborate that mountain gorillas present very low molar wear, and support the hypothesis that age and the consumption of particular food types, namely roots, are significant determinants of tooth wear variation in mountain gorillas. Future research should characterize the mineral composition of the soil in the Virunga habitat, to test the hypothesis that the physical and abrasive properties of gritty foods such as roots influence intra- and interspecific patterns of tooth wear. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Comparative analyses of tooth wear in free-ranging and captive wild equids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L A; Müller, D W H; Schwitzer, C; Kaiser, T M; Castell, J C; Clauss, M; Schulz-Kornas, E

    2016-03-01

    Captive breeding has played a crucial role in the conservation of threatened equid species. Grazing ruminants and rhinoceros in captivity have less abrasion-dominated tooth wear than their free-ranging conspecifics, with potential negative consequences for their health. However, a similar study on wild equids in captivity is missing. The aim was to establish if different tooth wear patterns are exhibited by free-ranging and captive equids. Cross-sectional study of museum specimens comparing free-ranging and captive equids. Dental casts of maxillary cheek teeth of 228 museum specimens (122 from free-ranging and 106 from captive individuals) of 7 wild equid species were analysed using the extended mesowear method. Although teeth showing specific abnormalities were not scored, the presence of focal overgrowths (hooks) of the rostral premolars (106, 206) was recorded. Captive Equus ferus przewalskii, E. grevyi, E. hemionus, E. quagga boehmi and E. zebra hartmannae have less abrasion-dominated tooth wear on their premolars than their free-ranging conspecifics (P<0.001). Fewer differences were exhibited between populations in the molars. No differences were exhibited in the distal cusp of the molars (110, 210) between populations, except in a small sample of E. kiang. Captive equids exhibited more homogeneous wear along the tooth row whereas free-ranging equids exhibited a tooth wear gradient, with more abrasion on premolars than molars. There were more rostral hooks on the premolars (106, 206) in the captive than the free-ranging population (P = 0.02). Captive equids did experience less abrasion-dominated tooth wear than their free-ranging conspecifics, but the differences in tooth wear were less pronounced than those between captive and free-ranging wild ruminant and rhinoceros species. This indicates that feeding regimes for captive equids deviate less from natural diets than those for captive ruminants and rhinoceros but that factors leading to hook

  8. Tooth wear and associated risk factors in a sample of Australian primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, A; Brearley Messer, L

    2013-06-01

    Anecdotally, tooth wear is increasing, perhaps attributable to diet. The irreversible surface loss may result in sensitivity and loss of form and function. Little data exist on the prevalence of tooth wear in Australian children. This study investigated consumption of potentially erosive foods and drinks, examining the prevalence, distribution of tooth wear and associations in a sample of children. Parents of 350, 6-12-year-olds reported their child's oral hygiene, dietary intake, medical and dental histories; 154 children (subsample) were examined. Associations were studied with single and multivariable analyses. Tooth wear was parentally reported for 17% (59 children of the study population) and observed in 66% (102 of the subsample), particularly affecting primary teeth. Significant risk factors for parentally reported tooth wear were: consuming 2-4 cups soft drink/day (OR = 9.52), citrus flavoured sweets/gums ≥1/day (5.10), citrus fruits 1-2/wk (4.28); tooth grinding (5.32); medical condition present (2.48); male gender (2.80). Drinking 2-4 cups fruit juice/day was a significant risk factor for both parentally reported (3.23) and observed tooth wear (3.97). Tooth wear appeared under-reported as some parents were unaware their child's teeth were affected. Significant risk factors for tooth wear were identifiable from children's histories. Risk factors should be addressed early so that tooth wear in the primary dentition does not affect permanent teeth. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  9. [Tooth wear in Hindu betel nut chewers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerreth, Karolina

    2006-01-01

    Literature data describe the impact of certain factors on oral health. Very well known is habitual chewing of different plant products, including tobacco, which depending on the geographical area and the substances used, have various names. It has been estimated that approximately 200 million residents of the West Pacific Rim and South-East Asia indulge in betel chewing. Betel is composed of a leaf of the betel pepper, lime, tobacco and the nut of the areca palm. This study aimed to assess the degree of abrasive changes in residents of the Korunalaya Leprosy Care Center. The examinations were carried out on 85 patients (45 females and 40 males), aged 35-95 years, at the local dental surgery. Patients had their teeth assessed and they were further interviewed as to the duration of their habit with regard to their sex and age (35-44; 45-64 and > or = 65 years). The abrasive changes were evaluated using Gerasimov's 7-degree scale. Interview data indicate that 71.76% of the patients were habitual betel chewers. Among female patients, third-degree abrasion was the most frequent change while among males--fifth degree (53.3% and 45.0%, respectively). The abrasive changes, increasing with age, can be attributed to the duration of betel chewing. It is worth noticing that a vegetarian diet can be a contributing factor to abrasion as most of the food consumed by Hindus are plants.

  10. Development of a gear vibration indicator and its application in gear wear monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chongqing; Smith, Wade A.; Randall, Robert B.; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-08-01

    Gear tooth wear is an inevitable phenomenon and has a significant influence on gear dynamic features. Although vibration analysis has been widely used to diagnose localised gear tooth faults, its techniques for gear wear monitoring have not been well-established. This paper aims at developing a vibration indicator to evaluate the effects of wear on gear performance. For this purpose, a gear state vector is extracted from time synchronous averaged gear signals to describe the gear state. This gear state vector consists of the sideband ratios obtained from a number of tooth meshing harmonics and their sidebands. Then, two averaged logarithmic ratios, ALR and mALR, are defined with fixed and moving references, respectively, to provide complementary information for gear wear monitoring. Since a fixed reference is utilised in the definition of ALR, it reflects the cumulated wear effects on the gear state. An increase in the ALR value indicates that the gear state deviates further from its reference condition. With the use of a moving reference, the indicator mALR shows changes in the gear state within short time intervals, making it suitable for wear process monitoring. The efficiency of these vibration indicators is demonstrated using experimental results from two sets of tests, in which the gears experienced different wear processes. In addition to gear wear monitoring, the proposed indicators can be used as general parameters to detect the occurrence of other faults, such as a tooth crack or shaft misalignment, because these faults would also change the gear vibrations.

  11. Toothbrushing after an erosive attack: will waiting avoid tooth wear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Lussi, Jonas; Carvalho, Thiago S; Cvikl, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if storage for up to 4 h in human saliva results in a decrease of erosive tooth wear (ETW) and in an increase of surface microhardness (SMH) of enamel samples after an erosive attack with subsequent abrasion. Furthermore, we determined the impact of individual salivary parameters on ETW and SMH. Enamel samples were distributed into five groups: group 1 had neither erosion nor saliva treatment; groups 2-5 were treated with erosion, then group 2 was placed in a humid chamber and groups 3-5 were incubated in saliva for 30 min, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively. After erosion and saliva treatments, all groups were treated with abrasion. Surface microhardness and ETW were measured before and after erosion, incubation in saliva, and abrasion. Surface microhardness and ETW showed significant changes throughout the experiment: SMH decreased and ETW increased in groups 2-5, regardless of the length of incubation in saliva. The results of groups 3-5 (exposed to saliva) were not significantly different from those of group 2 (not exposed to saliva). Exposure of eroded enamel to saliva for up to 4 h was not able to increase SMH or reduce ETW. However, additional experiments with artificial saliva without proteins showed protection from erosive tooth wear. The recommendation to postpone toothbrushing of enamel after an erosive attack should be reconsidered. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  12. Association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding with tooth wear in children with mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Claudia; Manfredini, Daniele; Manrique, Ruben; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2017-12-20

    Tooth wear has a multifactorial etiology, thus it should be assessed within a multiple-variable framework. The objective of this investigation was to assess the association of dietary habits and parental-reported sleep tooth grinding (STG) with tooth wear in children with mixed dentition. One hundred twenty-one (N = 121) subjects (mean age 9.6 years) participated in a cross-sectional study. Wear of 1637 teeth was evaluated using the screening module of the Tooth Wear Evaluation System (TWES). Parental-report of STG was evaluated by means of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), whilst dietary habits were investigated by means of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Food-Frequency Questionnaire (HBSC-FFQ). Data were analyzed with the Spearman correlation test and ordinal-multiple-variable regression analyses. Odds Ratio (OR) and ordinal OR were obtained for the independent variables included in the models. Parental-report of STG is not associated with tooth wear in the mixed dentition; some dietary habits were found to be correlated with specific tooth wear patterns, but the correlation values were weak. Associations were found between dietary habits and the increase-to-increase severity of occlusal/incisal and non-occlusal/non-incisal tooth wear of some teeth (OR > 2). A strong correlation of dietary habits and sleep tooth grinding with tooth wear in the mixed dentition was not demonstrated. However, dietary habits showed to have effects in terms of increase-to-increase severity.

  13. The relationship between tooth wear in the primary and permanent dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Peres, S H C; Sales-Peres, A C; Marsicano, J A; Carvalho, C A P; Carvalho, F S; Lauris, J R P; Sales-Peres, A

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between tooth wear in primary and permanent dentition in 7 to 10-year-old school children, in 2007. An epidemiological cross-sectional survey was conducted by trained, calibrated examiners, using the dental wear index (DWI). The cluster sample consisted of 764 children (382 boys, 382 girls) attending 4 public schools selected in different regions of the city. The DWI was proposed to evaluate primary and permanent teeth, coded as letters and numbers, respectively. Data were collected via clinical examinations performed outdoors under natural light, following the WHO recommendations and using a dental mirror and probe. Proportions and confidence intervals were used to describe the prevalence of dental wear. The Mann-Whitney and the Odds Ratio (OR) tests were used to compare the tooth wear prevalence between primary and permanent teeth according to surface (p tooth wear. The tooth wear was mostly seen on the occlusal/incisal surfaces (47%), involving enamel or enamel-dentine. Tooth wear in primary teeth was found in canines and molars (93%) and in permanent teeth in molars (34%). There was significant difference between primary and permanent teeth (p primary teeth was greater in boys than in girls (p = 0.02) but not in permanent teeth. The results suggest that 7 to 10-year-old children with tooth wear in primary teeth had more chances of developing tooth wear in permanent dentition. However, the findings of this study are not conclusive as the associations described are not causal.

  14. Knowledge, attitude and practice of tooth wear among adults in Bertam, Penang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nurfarhana Farah; Roslan, Husniyati; Noor, Siti Noor Fazliah Mohd

    2016-12-01

    Tooth wear is an oral lesion with multifactorial causes. The prevalence is increasing with an increasing age. Knowledge of tooth wear is part of oral health and essential requirements are needed to modify health related behaviors. This study was aimed to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice of tooth wear and to compare with the socio-demographic factors. A cross-sectional study using a modified version of self-administered questionnaire was distributed among 390 adults (aged more than 18 years old) from three government institutions in Bertam, Penang. A total of 349 (89.5%) subjects had participated in this study with 55.3% were males and majority of the subjects were Malays. About 58.2% had low level of knowledge with mean score at 20.8. Meanwhile, 93.4% subjects had a positive attitude and 84.2% had poor level of practice on oral hygiene. The low mean score of knowledge among subjects was not necessary an indicator that attitude and practice were affected. However, identification of etiological factors emphasizes on educational approaches, and empowerment of patients and community towards awareness are the most important factors for preventive strategies.

  15. Morphological and Functional Parameters in Patients with Tooth Wear before and after Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sierpinska, Teresa; Kuc, Joanna; Golebiewska, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Advanced tooth wear often results in lost vertical dimension and impacts facial aesthetics. Complex restorative treatment can replace the lost tooth structure and improve functional occlusal and facial skeleton parameters. Purpose: The aim of the study is to assess changes in the morphological and functional occlusal parameters of the facial skeleton after prosthetic rehabilitation that increased lost occlusal vertical dimension. Material and Methodology: 50 patients with advanced tooth wear ...

  16. Occlusal tooth wear in patients of a dental school's prosthodontic department in Xi'an, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, M.; Zhang, Q.; Witter, D.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Ma, C.; Zhang, S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the relationships between occlusal tooth wear and occlusal conditions, chewing side preference, and occlusal guidance scheme. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 257 Chinese adult dental school patients were categorized according to a hierarchical functional classification system.

  17. Tooth wear and feeding ecology in mountain gorillas from Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Galbany, Jordi; Imanizabayo, Olive; Romero, Alejandro; Vecellio, Veronica; Glowacka, Halszka; Cranfield, Michael R.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Stoinski, Tara S.; McFarlin, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ecological factors have a dramatic effect on tooth wear in primates, although it remains unclear how individual age contributes to functional crown morphology. The aim of this study is to determine how age and individual diet are related to tooth wear in wild mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) from Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Material and Methods: We calculated the percent of dentine exposure (PDE) for all permanent molars (M1–M3) of known-age mountain gorillas (N ...

  18. Type and timing of dietary acid intake and tooth wear among American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zwaylif, Lynn H; O'Toole, Saoirse; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2018-01-11

    To explore the interrelationship between type and timing of dietary acid intake and tooth wear among American adults. This study used data from 3,586 adults, aged 18 years and older, who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-04. Information on four types of acidic food and beverages (fruits, fruit juices, alcoholic drinks, and soft drinks) and timing of consumption (meals versus snacks, defined according to percentage of total energy intake, self-reported eating occasion, and time of day) was extracted from two 24-hour dietary recalls. The association of the type and timing of dietary acid intake with the number of surfaces with moderate-to-severe tooth wear was assessed in Hurdle models to account for the excess zero counts and over-dispersion. Models were adjusted for socio-demographic factors, acid reflux medication, and dental insurance coverage. The daily intake of soft drinks was associated with tooth wear, while those of fruits, fruit juices, and alcoholic drinks were not. The consumption of soft drinks with meals was the only factor consistently associated with tooth wear, irrespective of the method used to define meals versus snacks. The above associations were found with the number of surfaces with tooth wear (among those with the condition), but not with the odds of having tooth wear (among all participants). The consumption of soft drinks with meals was associated with moderate-to-severe tooth wear among American adults. Other acidic foods and beverages were not associated with tooth wear, regardless of their timing of consumption. © 2018 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. Impact wear behavior of human tooth enamel under simulated chewing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; Zeng, Yangyang; Wen, Jian; Zheng, Liang; Zhou, Zhongrong

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies mostly focused on the sliding wear behavior of human teeth, and little effort has been made so far to study the impact wear of human teeth. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact wear process and mechanism of human tooth enamel and the influence of water content within enamel. In this paper, the impact wear behaviors of fresh and dried human tooth enamel against SiC ceramic have been investigated using a specially designed impact test machine. Tests lasting up to 5×10(3), 5×10(4), 2.5×10(5), 5.5×10(5), 8×10(5) and 1×10(6) cycles were conducted, respectively. Results showed that for the fresh enamel, the surface damage was dominated by plastic deformation at the early stage of impact wear. Iridescent rings appeared around the impact mark as a result of the accumulation and spread of plastic deformation. As the impact wear progressed, delamination occurred on the surface of enamel, and thus the iridescent rings gradually disappeared. Wear loss increased rapidly with the increase of impact cycles. When a wear particle layer was formed on the enamel surface, the wear rate decreased. It was found that the surface hardness of enamel increased with the impact cycles, and no cracks appeared on the cross section of wear scar. Compared with the fresh enamel, the fracture toughness of dried enamel decreased, and thus there were microcracks appearing on the cross section of wear scar. More obvious delamination occurred on the worn surface of dried enamel, and no iridescent rings were observed. The wear loss of dried enamel was higher than that of fresh enamel. In summary, the impact wear behavior of sound human tooth enamel was metal-like to some degree, and no subsurface cracking occurred. The water content within enamel could increase its fracture toughness and protect the surface from impact wear. The wear mechanism of human tooth enamel is determined by its microstructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wear resistance of a modified polymethyl methacrylate artificial tooth compared to five commercially available artificial tooth materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonwanon, Pranithida; Yodmongkol, Sirasa; Chantarachindawong, Rojcharin; Thaweeboon, Sroisiri; Thaweeboon, Boonyanit; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2015-08-01

    Wear resistance is a limitation of artificial denture teeth. Improving the wear resistance of conventional artificial denture teeth is of value to prosthodontic patients. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the wear resistance and hardness of modified polymethyl methacrylate artificial denture teeth compared to 5 commercially available artificial tooth materials. This study evaluated 180 artificial denture teeth (6 groups) that included 3 groups of conventional artificial teeth (MajorDent, Cosmo HXL, and Gnathostar), 2 groups of composite resin artificial teeth (Endura and SR Orthosit PE), and 1 group of modified surface artificial teeth. The flattened buccal surface of each tooth (n=15) was prepared for investigation with the Vickers hardness test and the elucidate wear test (n=15) by using a brushing machine. Each group was loaded for 18,000 cycles, at 2 N, and 150 rpm. The wear value was identified with a profilometer. The data were statistically analyzed by using 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Turkey honestly significant difference tests (α=.001). The tribologies were observed under a scanning electron microscope, and the cytotoxicities were evaluated by MTT assay. The Vickers hardnesses ranged from 28.48 to 39.36. The wear depths and worn surface area values ranged from 1.12 to 10.79 μm and from 6.74 to 161.95 μm(2). The data revealed that the modified artificial denture teeth were significantly harder and exhibited significantly higher wear resistance than did the conventional artificial teeth (Ppolymethyl methacrylate modified surface artificial denture teeth was not significantly different from that of the composite resin artificial denture teeth, with the exceptions that the surface was harder and more wear resistant. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of erosive tooth wear and associated factors in a group of Mexican adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aragón Pineda, Álvaro Edgar; Borges-Yáñez, Socorro Aída; Lussi, Adrian; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Angeles Medina, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Erosive tooth wear is the irreversible loss of dental hard tissue as a result of chemical processes. When the surface of a tooth is attacked by acids, the resulting loss of structural integrity leaves a softened layer on the tooth's surface, which renders it vulnerable to abrasive forces. The authors' objective was to estimate the prevalence of erosive tooth wear and to identify associated factors in a sample of 14- to 19-year-old adolescents in Mexico. The authors performed a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample (N = 417) of adolescents in a school in Mexico City, Mexico. The authors used a questionnaire and an oral examination performed according to the Lussi index. The prevalence of erosive tooth wear was 31.7% (10.8% with exposed dentin). The final logistic regression model included age (P < .01; odds ratio [OR], 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.26-2.13), high intake of sweet carbonated drinks (P = .03; OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.06-3.07), and xerostomia (P = .04; OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.05-5.09). Erosive tooth wear, mainly on the mandibular first molars, was associated with age, high intake of sweet carbonated drinks, and xerostomia. Knowledge regarding erosive tooth wear in adolescents with relatively few years of exposure to causal factors will increase the focus on effective preventive measures, the identification of people at high risk, and early treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence, distribution and background variables of smooth-bordered tooth wear in teenagers in the hague, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkom, H.M. van; Truin, G.J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; König, K.G.G.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Roeters, F.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The purposes of the study were: (1) to assess the prevalence and distribution of smooth-bordered tooth wear in teenagers, and (2) to investigate the relationship between smooth-bordered tooth wear and social background, dietary pattern, drinking habits, oral hygiene practices and caries prevalence.

  3. Tooth wear in captive rhinoceroses (Diceros, Rhinoceros, Ceratotherium: Perissodactyla) differs from that of free-ranging conspecifics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, L.A.; Müller, D.W.H.; Schwitzer, C.; Kaiser, T.M.; Codron, D.; Schulz, E.; Clauss, M.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear can affect body condition, reproductive success and life expectancy. Poor dental health is frequently reported in the zoo literature, and abrasion-dominated tooth wear, which is typical for grazers, has been reported in captive browsing ruminants. The aim of this study was to test if a

  4. Multifactorial analysis of factors associated with the incidence and progression of erosive tooth wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Aidi, H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Truin, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent erosive tooth wear, early diagnosis and identification of causative factors are essential. The aim of the present 3-year longitudinal study was to investigate the association between a broad collection of biological and behavioural factors and the incidence and progression of erosive

  5. Severe tooth wear in Prader-Willi syndrome. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeves, Ronnaug; Espelid, Ivar; Storhaug, Kari; Sandvik, Leiv; Nordgarden, Hilde

    2012-05-28

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare complex multsystemic genetic disorder characterized by severe neonatal hypotonia, endocrine disturbances, hyperphagia and obesity, mild mental retardation, learning disabilities, facial dysmorphology and oral abnormalities. The purpose of the present study was to explore the prevalence of tooth wear and possible risk factors in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome. Forty-nine individuals (6-40 years) with PWS and an age- and sex-matched control group were included. Tooth wear was evaluated from dental casts and intraoral photographs and rated by four examiners using the Visual Erosion Dental Examination (VEDE) scoring system and the individual tooth wear index IA. In accordance with the VEDE scoring system, tooth wear was also evaluated clinically. Whole saliva was collected. Mean VEDE score was 1.70 ± 1.44 in the PWS group and 0.46 ± 0.36 in the control group (p Prader-Willi syndrome. There is therefore considerable need for prosthodontic rehabilitation in young adults with PWS.

  6. Clinical measurement of palatal tooth wear following coating by a resin sealing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Geeta; Wilson, Ron; Watson, Timothy F; Bartlett, David

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that coating eroded teeth with a resin-based dentin bonding agent gave protection from tooth wear. Nineteen adults with palatal tooth wear exposing dentin were recruited, following referral by their general dental practitioner. Alternate teeth were coated with the resin adhesive, while the uncoated teeth acted as controls. Accurate impressions of the eroded teeth, onto which were cemented machined stainless steel discs to act as reference areas, were scanned with a non-contacting laser profilometer at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. The mean thickness of resin at baseline application was 0.15 mm and, from 0 to 6 months, the rate of wear of the control teeth was higher than those covered with Seal & Protect. There was a statistically significant difference in "wear" measured between resin covered and control teeth at three months. The Inter Class Correlations (repeated measurements) for the step heights obtained for the original and repeat impressions was excellent at 0.99. This study shows that coating eroded teeth with a resin-based adhesive has the potential to prevent further tooth wear.

  7. Unravelling the Functional Biomechanics of Dental Features and Tooth Wear

    OpenAIRE

    Benazzi, Stefano; Nguyen, Huynh Nhu; Kullmer, Ottmar; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Most of the morphological features recognized in hominin teeth, particularly the topography of the occlusal surface, are generally interpreted as an evolutionary functional adaptation for mechanical food processing. In this respect, we can also expect that the general architecture of a tooth reflects a response to withstand the high stresses produced during masticatory loadings. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA), with an advanced loading concept derived from i...

  8. Associated factors of tooth wear among Malaysian 16-year-olds: a case-control study in Kota Bharu, Kelantan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerah, N B; Mastura, N; bin Ismail, A R; Sadiq, M A

    2012-03-01

    To determine the associated factors of tooth wear (TW) among 16-year-old school children. A random selection of secondary school children from 8 government secondary schools in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia, participated in this case-control study. The Smith and Knight Tooth Wear Index and WHO criteria were used to chart tooth wear and dental caries respectively. Saliva analyses used standards recommended by GC Asia Dental. Self-administered questionnaire provided socio-demographic profile of the family, general knowledge of tooth wear, oral hygiene, food and drinks practices and other associated variables for tooth wear. Analysis using multiple logistic regression was performed. Of the 576 children sampled, 40% of the 460 controls were male as were 57% of the 116 in the case group. Multivariate analysis showed gender, monthly household income, carbonated drinks, caries experience, pool swimming, duration of intake of orange juice and hydration rate and viscosity were significantly associated with wear. The factors associated with tooth wear were similar to those encountered in other studies. Oral health promotion activities should emphasise those factors which can be changed. The erosive potential of some foods and drinks require further investigation.

  9. Age determination in roe deer - a new approach to tooth wear evaluated on known age individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høye, Toke Thomas

    2006-01-01

    integrated in a scoring system. Permanent cheek teeth emerge in May-July in the year after birth, which enables precise age determination of individuals with deciduous premolars. For individuals with permanent cheek teeth, the method provides the correct age for all individuals younger than 13 months...... measures of tooth wear can provide the basis for age determination in ungulate species that are otherwise difficult to age....

  10. The tooth wear evaluation system: a modular clinical guideline for the diagnosis and management planning of worn dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetselaar, P; Lobbezoo, F

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial condition, leading to the loss of dental hard tissues, viz. enamel and dentine. Tooth wear can be divided into the subtypes mechanical wear (attrition and abrasion) and chemical wear (erosion). Because of its multifactorial aetiology, tooth wear can manifest itself in many different representations, and therefore, it can be difficult to diagnose and manage the condition. A systematic approach is a sine qua non. In the below-described tooth wear evaluation system (TWES), all necessary tools for a clinical guideline are present in different modules. This allows the dental clinician, in a general practitioner setting as well as in a referral practice setting, to perform a state-of-the-art diagnostic process. To avoid the risk of a too cumbersome usage, the dental clinician can select only those modules that are appropriate for a given setting. The modules match with each other, which is indispensable and essential when different modules of the TWES are compared. With the TWES, it is possible to recognise the problem (qualifying), to grade its severity (quantifying), to diagnose the likely causes and to monitor (the progress of) the condition. In addition, a proposal for the classification of tooth wear is made. Further, it is possible to determine when to start a treatment, to make the decision which kind of treatment to apply and to estimate the level of difficulty of a restorative treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Use of dentifrices to prevent erosive tooth wear: harmful or helpful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Magalhães

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the loss of dental hard tissues caused by non-bacterial acids. Due to acid contact, the tooth surface becomes softened and more prone to abrasion from toothbrushing. Dentifrices containing different active agents may be helpful in allowing rehardening or in increasing surface resistance to further acidic or mechanical impacts. However, dentifrices are applied together with brushing and, depending on how and when toothbrushing is performed, as well as the type of dentifrice and toothbrush used, may increase wear. This review focuses on the potential harmful and helpful effects associated with the use of dentifrices with regard to erosive wear. While active ingredients like fluorides or agents with special anti-erosive properties were shown to offer some degree of protection against erosion and combined erosion/abrasion, the abrasive effects of dentifrices may increase the surface loss of eroded teeth. However, most evidence to date comes from in vitro and in situ studies, so clinical trials are necessary for a better understanding of the complex interaction of active ingredients and abrasives and their effects on erosive tooth wear.

  12. Mimicking and Measuring Occlusal Erosive Tooth Wear with the "Rub&Roll" and Non-contact Profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Jan L; Truin, Gert-Jan; Loomans, Bas A C; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M

    2018-02-02

    Chewing, drinking, and occasional tooth grinding will result in physiological tooth wear during a lifetime. Extreme challenges, such as bruxism or habitual chewing on foreign objects, may lead to excessive wear. Recently, the role of erosion in accelerating mechanical tooth wear has been recognized, but the interplay between chemical and mechanical wear processes has not been extensively studied. Our laboratory recently introduced a novel oral wear simulation device, the Rub&Roll, that enables the user to perform wear and loading studies separately or simultaneously in an erosive and/or abrasive environment. This manuscript describes an application of the device: the combined mechanical and erosive loading of extracted human (pre)molars in a simulated chewing movement, with a controlled application of force, velocity, fluid, and time, and the application of non-contact profilometry in visualizing and measuring the resulting wear pattern. The occlusal morphology that was created in the experiment with the highest loading level is very similar to the clinical presentation of erosive wear.

  13. Tooth wear and gingival recession in 210 orthodontically treated patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijuskovic, Marco; Gebistorf, Meret C; Pandis, Nikolaos; Renkema, Anne M; Fudalej, Piotr S

    2017-11-14

    To assess the association between tooth wear (TW) and gingival recession (GR). Two hundred and ten orthodontically treated participants (100 males) were evaluated. GR and TW were rated independently by four raters on plaster models at four time points: before treatment (T1), mean age 13.8 years (SD = 3.7); after treatment (T2), mean age 16.7 years (SD = 3.9); 3 years after treatment (T3), mean age 19.7 years (SD = 4.2); and 7 years after treatment (T4), mean age 23.9 years (SD = 4.8). Univariable and mulitvariable random effects logistic regression analyses were performed with scores for GR as dependent variables and with TW, age, gender, dental segments (maxillary and mandibular anterior and posterior segments), time points, and Angle classification as independent variables. Method reliability was assessed with kappa statistics. Mandibular incisors, mandibular and maxillary first premolars and maxillary first molars were most vulnerable to GR. The prevalence of GR increased during the observation period. At T1 20.5% participants had one or more recession sites, at T4 85.7 % of the participants had at least one GR. There was evidence of association between moderate/severe TW and GR-for a tooth with moderate/severe wear, the odds of recession were 23% higher compared to a tooth with no/mild wear (odds ratio 1.23; 95% CI: 1.08-1.40; P = 0.002). Age, dental segment, and time were also significant recession predictors, whereas gender was not. There is evidence that moderate/severe TW is associated with the presence of gingival recession. Clinical significance of this can be limited. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Does erosive tooth wear affect the oral health-related quality of life of preschool children?

    OpenAIRE

    TELLO, Gustavo; OLIVEIRA, Luciana Butini; MURAKAMI, Christiana; BONINI, Gabriela Cunha; ABANTO, Jenny; BÖNECKER, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of erosive tooth wear on the Oral Health-Related Quality of life (OHRQoL) of preschool children. Methods: Dental examinations were conducted on 815 children aged 3-4 years during the Children’s Vaccination National Day when their parents were also invited to answer the Brazilian Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (B-ECOHIS). ETW prevalence and severity were measured using a modified version of the O’Brien index (1...

  15. Clinical monitoring of tooth wear progression in patients over a period of one year using CAD/CAM

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Khaled E.; Whitters, John; Ju, Xiangyang; Pierce, S. Gareth; MacLeod, Charles N.; Murray, Colin A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clinically monitor the progression of tooth wear over a period of 1 year in a cohort of referred tooth wear patients through the use of a computer-aided design/ computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) scanner and a standardized scanning/assessment methodology. Materials and Methods: Polyether impressions were made of 11 participants (130 teeth) at baseline and at 1 year. Impressions were poured in type IV dental stone and the anterior teeth were 3D scanne...

  16. Forensic Age Estimation of Chinese Malaysian Adults by Evaluating Occlusal Tooth Wear Using Modified Kim’s Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Kit Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Evaluation of dental attrition is an easy and relatively accurate approach to estimating the age of an adult either ante- or postmortem for some specific population. Dental attrition represents a progressive physiological age change that can be measured using variety of indices to aid as an adjunct in forensic age estimation. Some of the previously proposed indices have their own practical limitations. This paper focuses on using modified Kim’s criteria to score dental attrition to estimate the age of Chinese Malaysian adults and validate it. Methodology. Tooth wear was evaluated on 190 dental models of Chinese Malaysian adults (age range: 20–60 years using modified Kim’s index to custom-derive a population specific linear equation. The same equation was validated further on new 60 dental casts. Results and Conclusion. Regression analysis revealed good correlation between age and teeth wear and lower standard error of estimate. Test of regression on a test sample (n=30 pairs, age range: 20–60 years showed insignificant difference between predicted versus the actual age with statistically acceptable mean absolute difference. These data suggest that modified Kim’s index can be used effectively in forensic age estimation.

  17. Risk indicators for tooth loss in adult workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Jesus Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth loss continues to be a prevalent condition in Brazilian adults and elderly individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study, conducted among workers in a wholesale grocery chain in the State of São Paulo, was to identify risk indicators for tooth loss in adults. The presence of caries and periodontal status were examined in 387 adults aged 20-64 years, according to World Health Organization criteria. Two outcomes were analyzed: loss of one or more teeth, and loss of four or more teeth. Independent variables analyzed were demographic and socioeconomic factors, clinical conditions, use of dental services, and self-perceived oral health. Poisson regression models were used for multivariate statistical analysis. Participants were missing a mean of 5.38 teeth, and 76.9% (n = 297 had lost at least one tooth; the most frequently lost teeth were permanent molars. Older age and the presence of visible dental biofilm were associated significantly with the two tooth loss outcomes (p < 0.05. Individuals who had visited the dentist 3 or more years previously showed a lower prevalence of tooth loss (prevalence ratio = 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.91. Those with lower household incomes were significantly more likely to have lost four or more teeth (prevalence ratio = 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.70. Study results indicated that age and dental biofilm were risk indicators for tooth loss, independently of socioeconomic factors. These risk indicators should be considered when planning oral health programs for adults.

  18. The functional and palaeoecological implications of tooth morphology and wear for the megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian of Alberta, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan C Mallon

    Full Text Available Megaherbivorous dinosaurs were exceptionally diverse on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia, and a growing body of evidence suggests that this diversity was facilitated by dietary niche partitioning. We test this hypothesis using the fossil megaherbivore assemblage from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian of Alberta as a model. Comparative tooth morphology and wear, including the first use of quantitative dental microwear analysis in the context of Cretaceous palaeosynecology, are used to infer the mechanical properties of the foods these dinosaurs consumed. The phylliform teeth of ankylosaurs were poorly adapted for habitually processing high-fibre plant matter. Nevertheless, ankylosaur diets were likely more varied than traditionally assumed: the relatively large, bladed teeth of nodosaurids would have been better adapted to processing a tougher, more fibrous diet than the smaller, cusp-like teeth of ankylosaurids. Ankylosaur microwear is characterized by a preponderance of pits and scratches, akin to modern mixed feeders, but offers no support for interspecific dietary differences. The shearing tooth batteries of ceratopsids are much better adapted to high-fibre herbivory, attested by their scratch-dominated microwear signature. There is tentative microwear evidence to suggest differences in the feeding habits of centrosaurines and chasmosaurines, but statistical support is not significant. The tooth batteries of hadrosaurids were capable of both shearing and crushing functions, suggestive of a broad dietary range. Their microwear signal overlaps broadly with that of ankylosaurs, and suggests possible dietary differences between hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines. Tooth wear evidence further indicates that all forms considered here exhibited some degree of masticatory propaliny. Our findings reveal that tooth morphology and wear exhibit different, but complimentary, dietary signals that combine to support the hypothesis

  19. The functional and palaeoecological implications of tooth morphology and wear for the megaherbivorous dinosaurs from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Jordan C; Anderson, Jason S

    2014-01-01

    Megaherbivorous dinosaurs were exceptionally diverse on the Late Cretaceous island continent of Laramidia, and a growing body of evidence suggests that this diversity was facilitated by dietary niche partitioning. We test this hypothesis using the fossil megaherbivore assemblage from the Dinosaur Park Formation (upper Campanian) of Alberta as a model. Comparative tooth morphology and wear, including the first use of quantitative dental microwear analysis in the context of Cretaceous palaeosynecology, are used to infer the mechanical properties of the foods these dinosaurs consumed. The phylliform teeth of ankylosaurs were poorly adapted for habitually processing high-fibre plant matter. Nevertheless, ankylosaur diets were likely more varied than traditionally assumed: the relatively large, bladed teeth of nodosaurids would have been better adapted to processing a tougher, more fibrous diet than the smaller, cusp-like teeth of ankylosaurids. Ankylosaur microwear is characterized by a preponderance of pits and scratches, akin to modern mixed feeders, but offers no support for interspecific dietary differences. The shearing tooth batteries of ceratopsids are much better adapted to high-fibre herbivory, attested by their scratch-dominated microwear signature. There is tentative microwear evidence to suggest differences in the feeding habits of centrosaurines and chasmosaurines, but statistical support is not significant. The tooth batteries of hadrosaurids were capable of both shearing and crushing functions, suggestive of a broad dietary range. Their microwear signal overlaps broadly with that of ankylosaurs, and suggests possible dietary differences between hadrosaurines and lambeosaurines. Tooth wear evidence further indicates that all forms considered here exhibited some degree of masticatory propaliny. Our findings reveal that tooth morphology and wear exhibit different, but complimentary, dietary signals that combine to support the hypothesis of dietary niche

  20. Meta-analysis of the prevalence of tooth wear in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corica, A; Caprioglio, A

    2014-12-01

    To conduct a meta-analysis of all the studies published in literature over the past three decades on the prevalence of dental erosion in preschool children. The Pubmed data base revealed only one systematic review on the prevalence of tooth wear in children up to 5 years old. The search included works published from January 1982 to September 2012, using the following combinations of keywords: 1) "dental erosion" AND "children"; 2) "dental erosion in primary dentition"; 3) "dental" AND "attrition" AND "prevalence". The inclusion criteria for papers on tooth wear were the deciduous dentition observed only on the palatal and buccal sides with the distinction of erosion, attrition and abrasion. We took into consideration only randomized control trials. We excluded articles not written in English, case reports, historical and forensic studies, in vitro and in vivo studies. In case of doubt and/or when an abstract was not available, the full text copy of the article was examined. The first search on Pubmed revealed 29 articles, the same found in the study of Kreulen [2010], however we selected only multicentric studies focused on children of age below 5 years old, in which only the primary dentition (D) and only anterior teeth (incisors) were considered. Both forest plot and scatter plot showed the prevalence of dental erosion in primary dentition, and that older children had a more severe dental erosion. Dental erosion should be considered a paediatric dentistry pathological entity as well as dental caries, and it can be related to more severe systemic diseases such as Gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, taking care of these little patients is important because they might suffer persentiveness, and also pulpal pathology caused by the typical structure of deciduous teeth, where the pulp cavity is wide and close to the dentine and the enamel.

  1. A Case Report of Tooth Wear Associated with a Patient's Inappropriate Efforts to Reduce Oral Malodor Caused by Endodontic Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoneda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case of severe tooth wear associated with a patient's inappropriate efforts to reduce oral malodor. A 72-year-old male patient visited our breath clinic complaining of strong breath odor. Former dentists had performed periodontal treatments including scaling and root planing, but his oral malodor did not decrease. His own subsequent breath odor-reducing efforts included daily use of lemons and vinegar to reduce or mask the odor, eating and chewing hard foods to clean his teeth, and extensive tooth brushing with a hard-bristled toothbrush. Oral malodor was detected in our breath clinic by several tests, including an organoleptic test, portable sulphide monitor, and gas chromatography. Although patient's oral hygiene and periodontal condition were not poor on presentation, his teeth showed heavy wear and hypersensitiving with an unfitted restoration on tooth 16. Radiographic examination of the tooth did not reveal endodontic lesion, but when the metal crown was removed, severe pus discharge and strong malodor were observed. When this was treated, his breath odor was improved. After dental treatment and oral hygiene instruction, no further tooth wear was observed; he was not concerned about breath odor thereafter.

  2. Consensus Report of the European Federation of Conservative Dentistry: Erosive tooth wear – diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Thiago S; Colon, Pierre; Ganss, Carolina; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Lussi, Adrian; Schlueter, Nadine; Schmalz, Gottfried; Shellis, Peter R; Björg Tveit, Anne; Wiegand, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increased focus on erosive tooth wear (ETW), the European Federation of Conservative Dentistry (EFCD) considered ETW as a relevant topic for generating this consensus report. This report is based on a compilation of the scientific literature, an expert conference, and the approval by the General Assembly of EFCD. ETW is a chemical-mechanical process resulting in a cumulative loss of hard dental tissue not caused by bacteria, and it is characterized by loss of the natural surface morphology and contour of the teeth. A suitable index for classification of ETW is the basic erosive wear examination (BEWE). Regarding the etiology, patient-related factors include the predisposition to erosion, reflux, vomiting, drinking and eating habits, as well as medications and dietary supplements. Nutritional factors relate to the composition of foods and beverages, e.g., with low pH and high buffer capacity (major risk factors), and calcium concentration (major protective factor). Occupational factors are exposition of workers to acidic liquids or vapors. Preventive management of ETWaims at reducing or stopping the progression of the lesions. Restorative management aims at reducing symptoms of pain and dentine hypersensitivity, or to restore esthetic and function, but it should only be used in conjunction with preventive strategies. Effective management of ETW includes screening for early signs of ETW and evaluating all etiological factors. ETW is a clinical condition, which calls for the increased attention of the dental community and is a challenge for the cooperation with other medical specialities.

  3. Quantification of incisal tooth wear in upper anterior teeth: conventional vs new method using toolmakers microscope and a three-dimensional measuring technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Sghaireen, Mohd G; Alzarea, Bader K; Lynch, Edward

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to quantify tooth wear in upper anterior teeth using a new CAD-CAM Laser scanning machine, tool maker microscope and conventional tooth wear index. Fifty participants (25 males and 25 females, mean age = 25 ± 4 years) were assessed for incisal tooth wear of upper anterior teeth using Smith and Knight clinical tooth wear index (TWI) on two occasions, the study baseline and 1 year later. Stone dies for each tooth were prepared and scanned using the CAD-CAM Laser Cercon System. Scanned images were printed and examined under a toolmaker microscope to quantify tooth wear and then the dies were directly assessed under the microscope to measure tooth wear. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was used to analyze the data. TWI scores for incisal edges were 0-3 and were similar at both occasions. Score 4 was not detected. Wear values measured by directly assessing the dies under the toolmaker microscope (range = 113 - 150 μm, mean = 130 ± 20 μm) were significantly more than those measured from Cercon Digital Machine images (range=52-80 μm, mean = 68 ± 23 μm) and both showed significant differences between the two occasions. Wear progression in upper anterior teeth was effectively detected by directly measuring the dies or the images of dies under toolmaker microscope. Measuring the dies of worn dentition directly under tool maker microscope enabled detection of wear progression more accurately than measuring die images obtained with Cercon Digital Machine. Conventional method was the least sensitive for tooth wear quantification and was unable to identify wear progression in most cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk indicators for tooth loss in adult workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Marília Jesus; Rihs, Lílian Berta; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de

    2012-01-01

    Tooth loss continues to be a prevalent condition in Brazilian adults and elderly individuals. The aim of this cross-sectional study, conducted among workers in a wholesale grocery chain in the State of São Paulo, was to identify risk indicators for tooth loss in adults. The presence of caries and periodontal status were examined in 387 adults aged 20-64 years, according to World Health Organization criteria. Two outcomes were analyzed: loss of one or more teeth, and loss of four or more teeth. Independent variables analyzed were demographic and socioeconomic factors, clinical conditions, use of dental services, and self-perceived oral health. Poisson regression models were used for multivariate statistical analysis. Participants were missing a mean of 5.38 teeth, and 76.9% (n = 297) had lost at least one tooth; the most frequently lost teeth were permanent molars. Older age and the presence of visible dental biofilm were associated significantly with the two tooth loss outcomes (p adults.

  5. Monolithic zirconia crowns in the aesthetic zone in heavy grinders with severe tooth wear - An observational case-series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Torbjørn Leif; Schriwer, Christian; Øilo, Marit; Gjengedal, Harald

    2018-02-13

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with monolithic zirconia crowns in patients with severe tooth wear (≥1/3 of the tooth crown) in the aesthetic zone. The historical prospective study sample consisted of 13 patients previously treated with a total of 84 monolithic zirconia crowns. The patients had been treated in a private clinic in Bergen, Norway, in the period 2012 to 2014. All patients were men, aged 35-67 years (mean age 56.3 years) and had been in need of prosthetic rehabilitation because of severe tooth wear in the aesthetic zone. Technical complications as well as biologic findings were registered when the crowns had been in function one to three years (mean 20 months). The patients completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding satisfaction with aesthetic and function. No biological complications were registered in 79 of the crowns (94%), and technical complications were registered in only two patients. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic and function of the monolithic zirconia crowns and would choose the same treatment modality if they were to be treated again. Within the limitations of this study, we conclude that the rate of clinical complications was low and that the patients were satisfied with the aesthetic as well as the function of the monolithic zirconia crowns. Monolithic zirconia crowns may provide a valid treatment modality in the aesthetic zone in patients with severe tooth wear. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. The evolutionary paradox of tooth wear: simply destruction or inevitable adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Benazzi

    Full Text Available Over the last century, humans from industrialized societies have witnessed a radical increase in some dental diseases. A severe problem concerns the loss of dental materials (enamel and dentine at the buccal cervical region of the tooth. This "modern-day" pathology, called non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs, is ubiquitous and worldwide spread, but is very sporadic in modern humans from pre-industrialized societies. Scholars believe that several factors are involved, but the real dynamics behind this pathology are far from being understood. Here we use an engineering approach, finite element analysis (FEA, to suggest that the lack of dental wear, characteristic of industrialized societies, might be a major factor leading to NCCLs. Occlusal loads were applied to high resolution finite element models of lower second premolars (P2 to demonstrate that slightly worn P2s envisage high tensile stresses in the buccal cervical region, but when worn down artificially in the laboratory the pattern of stress distribution changes and the tensile stresses decrease, matching the results obtained in naturally worn P2s. In the modern industrialized world, individuals at advanced ages show very moderate dental wear when compared to past societies, and teeth are exposed to high tensile stresses at the buccal cervical region for decades longer. This is the most likely mechanism explaining enamel loss in the cervical region, and may favor the activity of other disruptive processes such as biocorrosion. Because of the lack of dental abrasion, our masticatory apparatus faces new challenges that can only be understood in an evolutionary perspective.

  7. Impact of dentifrice abrasivity and remineralization time on erosive tooth wear in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buedel, Sarah; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick T; Eckert, George J; Hara, Anderson T

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the in vitro effects of simulated dentifrice slurry abrasivity (L-low, M-medium and H-high) and remineralization time (0, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) on erosive tooth wear. Enamel and root dentin specimens were prepared from bovine incisors (n= 8) and submitted to a cycling protocol including erosion, remineralization at the test times, and brushing with each of the tested slurries, for 5 days. Dental surface loss (SL) was determined by optical profilometry. Data was analyzed using mixed-model ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (alpha= 0.05). SL generally increased along with the increase in slurry abrasive level, with significance dependent upon the specific substrate and remineralization times. H showed the highest SL on both enamel and dentin; remineralization for 30 minutes reduced SL significantly (Pabrasive dentifrice slurries were able to reduce toothbrushing abrasion on both enamel and root dentin. This protection was enhanced by remineralization for all abrasive levels on enamel, but only for L on root dentin. High-risk erosion patients should avoid highly abrasive toothpastes, as remineralization can only partially compensate for their deleterious effects on eroded dental surfaces. Lower abrasive toothpastes are recommended. Copyright©American Journal of Dentistry.

  8. Human diet in the early medieval period: Tooth wear, mastication, enamel thickness and its relationship to social stratification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ibrová, A.; Dupej, J.; Stránská, Petra; Velemínský, P.; Poláček, Lumír; Velemínská, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 162, S64 (2017), s. 226 ISSN 0002-9483. [Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists /86./. 19.04.2017-22.04.2017, New Orleans] Institutional support: RVO:67985912 ; RVO:68081758 Keywords : Early Middle Ages * human diet * anthropology * tooth wear * Central Europe Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology; AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology (ARUB-Q) OBOR OECD: Archaeology; Archaeology (ARUB-Q) http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajpa.23210/pdf

  9. Association between traditional oral hygiene methods with tooth wear, gingival bleeding, and recession: A descriptive cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Shah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral hygiene maintenance is crucial for prevention of various oral diseases. Oral hygiene practices across the country vary largely and people in peri-urban and rural areas use traditional methods of oral hygiene like powders, bark, oil and salt etc. Their effect on oral soft and hard tissues need to be studied to understand their beneficial and/ or harmful effects on maintenance of oral hygiene and prevention or causation of oral diseases. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the plaque-cleaning efficacy, gingival bleeding, recession and tooth wear with different traditional oral hygiene methods as compared to use of toothpaste-toothbrush, the most accepted method of oral hygiene practice. Study Design: Hospital based cross sectional analytical study. Results: Total 1062 traditional oral hygiene method users were compared with same number of toothpaste-brush users. The maximum number in the former group used tooth powder (76% as compared to other indigenous methods, such as use of bark of trees etc and out of tooth powder users; almost 75% reported using red toothpowder. The plaque scores and gingival bleeding & recession were found to be more in traditional oral hygiene method users. The toothwear was also more severe among the toothpowder users. Conclusions: Traditional methods were found to be inferior in plaque control as was documented by increased bleeding and gingival recession. Its effect on hard tissues of teeth was very damaging with higher tooth wear scores on all surfaces.

  10. Association between traditional oral hygiene methods with tooth wear, gingival bleeding, and recession: A descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Naseem; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Jain, Veena; Logani, Ajay

    2018-01-01

    Oral hygiene maintenance is crucial for prevention of various oral diseases. Oral hygiene practices across the country vary largely and people in peri-urban and rural areas use traditional methods of oral hygiene like powders, bark, oil and salt etc. Their effect on oral soft and hard tissues need to be studied to understand their beneficial and/ or harmful effects on maintenance of oral hygiene and prevention or causation of oral diseases. This study aimed to assess the plaque-cleaning efficacy, gingival bleeding, recession and tooth wear with different traditional oral hygiene methods as compared to use of toothpaste-toothbrush, the most accepted method of oral hygiene practice. Hospital based cross sectional analytical study. Results: Total 1062 traditional oral hygiene method users were compared with same number of toothpaste-brush users. The maximum number in the former group used tooth powder (76%) as compared to other indigenous methods, such as use of bark of trees etc and out of tooth powder users; almost 75% reported using red toothpowder. The plaque scores and gingival bleeding & recession were found to be more in traditional oral hygiene method users. The toothwear was also more severe among the toothpowder users. Traditional methods were found to be inferior in plaque control as was documented by increased bleeding and gingival recession. Its effect on hard tissues of teeth was very damaging with higher tooth wear scores on all surfaces.

  11. The influence of tooth brushing supervision on the dental plaque index and toothbrush wear in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Maíra Wambier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of tooth brushing supervision in one or more sessions on dental plaque removal and toothbrush wear. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 3- to 5-year-old children received new toothbrushes and attended a puppet theater about oral health. Forty-nine children were randomly selected and divided into 3 groups (GI=20; GII=14; GIII=14. Fones' brushing method was demonstrated to the GI and GII groups to evaluate the following: the professional direct supervision and tooth brushing training in five sessions (GI, the professional direct supervision and a one-training session (GII and the puppet theater influence only (GIII-control group. The dental plaque index (IPL was recorded at baseline (T0, after 24 days (T1 and after 46 days (T2 and toothbrush wear (ID was recorded on T1 and T2. The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Friedman test (IPL, as well as the one-way ANOVA and the paired Student's t-test (ID (p<0.05 were employed to analyze the data. RESULT: GI showed a significant difference from the others groups in T1 and T2 (p<0.01.The index of toothbrush wear increased (p<0.0001 from 24 days (0.52±0.35mm to 46 days (0.90±0.48mm, but there was no significant association between toothbrush wear and plaque index for T1 (r=0.230-p= 0.116 as well as for T2 (r=0.226-p=0.121. CONCLUSION: The multiple sessions of professional supervision were effective to reduce the dental plaque index, which was not influenced by toothbrush wear, showing continuous oral hygiene motivation needs.

  12. In-vitro wear of natural tooth surface opposed with zirconia reinforced lithium silicate glass ceramic after accelerated ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Salma M; Swain, Michael V

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of different pH media on zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate glass ceramic and how they interact with opposing dentition after being aged in different pH cycling and high temperature conditions. Twenty-five rectangular shaped specimens were prepared from lithium silicate reinforced with zirconia blanks (Suprinity, Vita Zahnfabrick) and stored in different pH media (3 & 7.2) for different periods (24h & 7 days) at temperature (55°C). After their surface roughness (Ra) evaluation, aged ceramic specimens were subjected to cyclic abrasive wear with opposing natural teeth enamel for 150,000 cycles using a chewing simulator. Weight loss and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were used to evaluate the cyclic wear results. After different pH storage, ceramic group stored at 3 pH for 1-W (1 week) gave significantly higher mean Ra value (0.618μm±0.117) than control lowest mean value (0.357μm±0.054) before cyclic wear. On the other hand, it caused the least significant weight loss value (0.004gm±0.001) to opposing tooth enamel. There was significant tooth enamel weight loss (0.043gm±0.004) when opposed with ceramic group stored in 3 pH media for 24h (24-H). Their SEM images showed a prominent wear scar on enamel cusp tip. There was a significant increase in surface roughness Ra of ceramic material after abrasive cyclic wear. Great attention should be paid to Ra of this type of glass ceramic even if it is considered as minimal values. It can induce a significant amount of enamel tooth wear after a period equivalent to one year of intra-oral function rather than the significantly higher surface Ra of such ceramic type can do. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of oral hygiene habits, oral hygiene practices and tooth wear among fertilizer factory workers of Northern India: A Cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asawa, Kailash; Bhat, Nagesh; Tak, Mridula; Bapat, Salil; Chaturvedi, Pulkit; Philip-George, Pradeep; Chitkara, Neha; Patel, Maulikkumar-Natubhai; Shinde, Kushal; Sidhu, Prabhjot-Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between oral hygiene habits & practices and severity of tooth wear lesion varies from community to community and also from occupation to occupation. The present study was conducted with to assess oral hygiene habits & practices and tooth wear among fertilizer factory workers of Punjab, India. Material and Methods A descriptive cross sectional survey was conducted among 965 male workers who were aged between 19–58 years, who were the workers of fertilizers factory of Bathinda, India. An interview on the demographic profile, oral hygiene practices, and adverse habits followed a clinical examination for recording the Tooth Wear (Smith and Knight Index 1984) using Type III examination. The Chi–square test and a Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis were used for the statistical analysis. Confidence interval and p-value set at 95% and ≤ 0.05 respectively. Results In the present study majority (47.2%) of the study population used chew sticks for cleaning their teeth. Overall prevalence of adverse habits was reported (92.4%). Study population showed higher prevalence of tooth wear (77.1%). Best predictors identified for Tooth Wear were oral hygiene practices, adverse habits, years of work experience and age respectively. Conclusions Considerable percentages of fertilizer factory workers have demonstrated a higher prevalence of tooth surface loss. This may be useful in designing the investigations that aim to further explore the causes for these findings and more importantly to plan oral health promotion program implementing both preventive and curative strategies. Key words:Tooth wear, smith & knight index, fertilizer factory. PMID:26644843

  14. Anterior tooth wear and retention type until 5 years after orthodontic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Kiliaridis, S.; Renkema, A.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study occlusal wear of anterior teeth in orthodontic patients retained with different retainers until 5 years post-treatment, and to investigate whether type of retention influences occlusal wear. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Orthodontic patients (n=222), aged 15 years maximally at the start

  15. Rates of anterior tooth wear in Middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Martinón-Torres, M; Sarmiento, S; Lozano, M; Arsuaga, J L; Carbonell, E

    2003-10-14

    This study presents quantitative data on the rates of anterior tooth wear in a Pleistocene human population. The data were obtained for the hominin sample of the Sima de los Huesos site in Atapuerca, Spain. The fossil record belongs to a minimum of 28 individuals of the same biological population, assigned to the species Homo heidelbergensis. We have estimated the original and the preserved crown height of the mandibular incisors (I1 and I2) of 11 individuals, whose age at death can be ascertained from the mineralization stage and tooth eruption. Results provide a range of 0.276-0.348 and 0.288-0.360 mm per year for the mean wear rate of the mandibular I1 and I2, respectively, in individuals approximately 16-18 years old. These data suggest that incisors' crowns would be totally worn out toward the fifth decade of life. Thus, we expect the life expectancy of this population to be seriously limited. These data, which could be contrasted with results obtained on hominins at other sites, could be of interest for estimating the death age of adult individuals.

  16. Three-dimensional in vitro measurements of tooth wear using fluoridated dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mashhadani, A; Plygkos, I; Bozec, L; Rodriguez, J M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in wear of human enamel and dentine in vitro using a 3D measurement method comparing silica versus non-silica containing fluoridated dentifrices (Colgate Total(™) [CT] or Fluor Protector Gel(™) [FPG]). Mounted native enamel (n = 36) and polished dentine (n = 36) samples were subjected to 10 wear cycles. Each cycle consisted of: (1) 1 hour remineralization in artificial saliva (AS); (2) 10 minute erosion (0.3% citric acid; pH = 2.8); (3) 2 minute toothbrush abrasion in AS (G1, control) or a slurry of 3:1 by weight of AS:dentifrice (G2 = CT; G3 = FPG) under a load of 2 N. Each group contained 12 enamel and 12 dentine samples. Paired pre- and post-wear scans made with a contacting scanner were digitally superimposed using ball bearings as datum. Mean and (SD) enamel wear was G1 = 21.9 μm (6.4); G2 = 15.2 μm (2.8); G3 = 16.9 μm (3.2). Enamel wear was not different between dentifrices (p = 0.99). Both dentifrices resulted in less enamel wear compared to the control (p Dental Association.

  17. Risk factors for tooth wear lesions among patients attending the dental clinic of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital, Benin City: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeigbemen A Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with tooth wear lesions in patients attending a dental clinic. Context: Tooth wear lesions entail the loss of dental hard tissues in the absence of caries or trauma. They include abrasion, attrition, and erosion. The etiology is often related to habits leading to insidious symptoms with similar presentations in both community and hospital patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved patients attending the outpatient dental clinic of a Nigerian Teaching Hospital over a 3-month period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to elicit information from the respondents. Results: A total of 152 respondents aged 17–80 years and above, comprising 86 males (56.6%, and 66 females (43.3% constituted the study population. The Binis were the most represented 34.2%, followed by the Esans 21.1%, while the least represented were the Yorubas (6.6%. The occupations represented in this study include civil servants (30.3%, unskilled workers (23.7%, and non-medical professionals (7.9%. Tooth wear lesions were present in 55.3% of the respondents. Attrition accounted for 29.6%, Abrasion (11.8%, combination of attrition and abrasion (4.6%, and abfraction (2.0%. There was a statistically significant association between tooth wear lesions and age, occupation, sensitivity or pain, tooth cleaning aids, toothbrush texture brushing technique, intake of carbonated beverages, and method of intake. Conclusion: Tooth wear lesions such as attrition and abrasion were prevalent among the respondents in this hospital setting and, therefore, represent an important group of dental problems among this population. It is, therefore, important to direct the appropriate oral health awareness program for the prevention, early detection, and management of these conditions.

  18. Soft drink, software and softening of teeth: a case report of tooth wear in the mixed dentition due to a combination of dental erosion and attrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambon, D.L.; Brand, H.S.; Nieuw Amerongen, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a 9-year-old boy with severe tooth wear as a result of drinking a single glass of soft drink per day. This soft drink was consumed over a period of one to two hours, while he was gaming intensively on his computer. As a result, a deep bite, enamel cupping, sensitivity of

  19. Innovative measuring system for wear-out indication of high power IGBT modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Ørndrup; Due, Jens; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2011-01-01

    Power converter failures are a major issue in modern Wind turbines. One of the key elements of power converters for high power application is the IGBT modules. A test bench capable of performing an accelerated wear-out test through power cycling of IGBT modules has been made. In the test bench...... it is possible to stress the IGBT module in a real life working point, controlling the voltage, current and phase of the device under test. An analysis of failure mechanisms has been carried out, indicating that VCE can be used as an sign of wear out of the IGBT module. Therefore an innovative measuring system...... for VCE monitoring with an accuracy as low as a few mV has been implemented. The measurements on the IGBT in the test bench show that it is possible to monitor VCE and use this as an indicator of wear-out....

  20. Survey of Condition Indicators for Condition Monitoring Systems (Open Access)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-29

    Signal is effective for detecting gear scuffing, tooth pitting and tooth crack faults. Periodic faults like tooth breakage normally can have impact of 1...generalized gear fault indicator, sensitive to gear wear/scuffing/pitting and tooth bending due to crack root. However, FM0 is not a good indicator for...inspection revealed the cracked tooth . One of the Condition Indicators that is very sensitive to gear tooth pitting, scuffing and bending is

  1. Predatory behaviour of carnivorous dinosaurs: Ecological interpretations based on tooth marked dinosaur bones and wear patterns of theropod teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    Predation marks on bones are a source on information on the feeding behaviour of the carnivores involved. Although predator damaged bone is common in the fossil record, published reports of such marks on dinosaur bones are rare. Patterns of bone modification by mammalian carnivores overlap patterns...... left by theropod dinosaurs.Differences in tooth morphology can also be correlated with characteristics of the marks left by the teeth. In a study of tooth marks on dinosaur bones from the Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta, Canada, it was possible to identify the feeding theropods to family, generic...... different taxa and different skeletal elements produced some interesting results. The frequency of tooth marked dinosaur bones is higher than expected. Up to 14 % of the observed hadrosaur bones were predator damaged. The lower incidence of damage in ceratopsian bones can be explained by the fact...

  2. Quantitative three-dimensional microtextural analyses of tooth wear as a tool for dietary discrimination in fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Mark; Seehausen, Ole; Galis, Frietson

    2012-01-01

    Resource polymorphisms and competition for resources are significant factors in speciation. Many examples come from fishes, and cichlids are of particular importance because of their role as model organisms at the interface of ecology, development, genetics and evolution. However, analysis of trophic resource use in fishes can be difficult and time-consuming, and for fossil fish species it is particularly problematic. Here, we present evidence from cichlids that analysis of tooth microwear based on high-resolution (sub-micrometre scale) three-dimensional data and new ISO standards for quantification of surface textures provides a powerful tool for dietary discrimination and investigation of trophic resource exploitation. Our results suggest that three-dimensional approaches to analysis offer significant advantages over two-dimensional operator-scored methods of microwear analysis, including applicability to rough tooth surfaces that lack distinct scratches and pits. Tooth microwear textures develop over a longer period of time than is represented by stomach contents, and analyses based on textures are less prone to biases introduced by opportunistic feeding. They are more sensitive to subtle dietary differences than isotopic analysis. Quantitative textural analysis of tooth microwear has a useful role to play, complementing existing approaches, in trophic analysis of fishes—both extant and extinct. PMID:22491979

  3. Multifactorial logistic regression analysis of factors associated with the incidence of erosive tooth wear among adults at different ages in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Sasaki, Y; Takagaki, T; Sadr, A; Tagami, J

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with the incidence of erosive tooth wear (ETW) among adults at different ages in Tokyo using multifactorial logistic regression analysis. The study sample consisted of a total of 1108 subjects aged 15 to 89 years in Tokyo, Japan. Two examiners evaluated ETW in a full-mouth recording. The subjects were asked to complete a self-administered daily diet, habit, and health condition questionnaire. Subjects who had frequent acid consumption or gastric reflux and at least one tooth with initial enamel wear were placed in the ETW-positive group, and the remainder of the subjects was placed in the ETW-negative group. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify factors collectively associated with ETW. Logistic regression analysis showed that greater frequencies of carbonated or sports drink consumption were associated with higher incidence of ETW for all age groups except for 70-89 years. Adults in the 30-39-year group who reported suffering from heartburn were about 22.3 times more likely to develop ETW, while 40-49-year adults who had repeated vomiting were about 33.5 times more likely to exhibit ETW compared with those who did not experience vomiting. Age-specific dietary habits were clearly observed among adults at different ages in Tokyo, and there were significant differences in intrinsic and extrinsic factors between ETW-positive and ETW-negative groups for each age group. Both greater frequency of carbonated and sports drink consumption were associated with higher incidence of ETW among adults at different ages in Tokyo.

  4. XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices in sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Gasga, José, E-mail: jreyes@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Piñeiro, Esmeralda L., E-mail: esmemapi@gmail.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Rodríguez-Álvarez, Galois, E-mail: galoisborre@yahoo.com [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Tiznado-Orozco, Gaby E., E-mail: gab0409@yahoo.com.mx [Unidad Académica de Odontología, Universidad Autónoma de Nayarit, Edificio E7, Ciudad de la Cultura “Amado Nervo”, C.P. 63190 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); García-García, Ramiro, E-mail: ramiro@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica s/n., Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacán 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2013-12-01

    The crystallinity index (CI) is a measure of the percentage of crystalline material in a given sample and it is also correlated to the degree of order within the crystals. In the literature two ways are reported to measure the CI: X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Although the CI determined by these techniques has been adopted in the field of archeology as a structural order measure in the bone with the idea that it can help e.g. in the sequencing of the bones in chronological and/or stratigraphic order, some debate remains about the reliability of the CI values. To investigate similarities and differences between the two techniques, the CI of sound human tooth enamel and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP) was measured in this work by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), at room temperature and after heat treatment. Although the (CI){sub XRD} index is related to the crystal structure of the samples and the (CI){sub FTIR} index is related to the vibration modes of the molecular bonds, both indices showed similar qualitative behavior for heat-treated samples. At room temperature, the (CI){sub XRD} value indicated that enamel is more crystalline than synthetic HAP, while (CI){sub FTIR} indicated the opposite. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) images were also used to corroborate the measured CI values. - Highlights: • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices for tooth enamel and synthetic HAP were obtained. • SEM and TEM images were more correlated with (CI){sub XRD} than with (CI){sub FTIR}. • Regardless of the temperature, (CI){sub XRD} and (CI){sub FTIR} showed similar behavior. • XRD and FTIR crystallinity indices resulted in a fast and qualitative measurement.

  5. Similar associations of tooth microwear and morphology indicate similar diet across marsupial and placental mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary B Christensen

    Full Text Available Low-magnification microwear techniques have been used effectively to infer diets within many unrelated mammalian orders, but the extent to which patterns are comparable among such different groups, including long extinct mammal lineages, is unknown. Microwear patterns between ecologically equivalent placental and marsupial mammals are found to be statistically indistinguishable, indicating that microwear can be used to infer diet across the mammals. Microwear data were compared to body size and molar shearing crest length in order to develop a system to distinguish the diet of mammals. Insectivores and carnivores were difficult to distinguish from herbivores using microwear alone, but combining microwear data with body size estimates and tooth morphology provides robust dietary inferences. This approach is a powerful tool for dietary assessment of fossils from extinct lineages and from museum specimens of living species where field study would be difficult owing to the animal's behavior, habitat, or conservation status.

  6. Frequency and risk indicators of tooth decay among pregnant women in France: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Kaminski, Monique; Lelong, Nathalie; Musset, Anne-Marie; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women's medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d. = 2.8). Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR = 1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45]), lower educational level (aOR = 1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23]) and dental plaque (aOR = 1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]). The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations.

  7. Reduced wear of enamel with novel fine and nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharopoulos, Antonios; Chen, Xiaohui; Hill, Robert; Cattell, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Leucite glass-ceramics used to produce all-ceramic restorations can suffer from brittle fracture and wear the opposing teeth. High strength and fine crystal sized leucite glass-ceramics have recently been reported. The objective of this study is to investigate whether fine and nano-scale leucite glass-ceramics with minimal matrix microcracking are associated with a reduction in in vitro tooth wear. Human molar cusps (n=12) were wear tested using a Bionix-858 testing machine (300,000 simulated masticatory cycles) against experimental fine crystal sized (FS), nano-scale crystal sized (NS) leucite glass-ceramics and a commercial leucite glass-ceramic (Ceramco-3, Dentsply, USA). Wear was imaged using Secondary Electron Imaging (SEI) and quantified using white-light profilometry. Both experimental groups were found to produce significantly (pceramic) loss than the FS group. Increased waviness and damage was observed on the wear surfaces of the Ceramco-3 glass-ceramic disc/tooth group in comparison to the experimental groups. This was also indicated by higher surface roughness values for the Ceramco-3 glass-ceramic disc/tooth group. Fine and nano-sized leucite glass-ceramics produced a reduction in in vitro tooth wear. The high strength low wear materials of this study may help address the many problems associated with tooth enamel wear and restoration failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, psychiatric indicators and quality of life: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Joana L.C.; Marques, Wilson; Hallak, Jaime E.C.; Osório, Flávia L.

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to conduct a systematic literature review regarding the associations between psychiatric symptoms, functional impairments, and quality of life in patients with CMT (Charcot–Marie–Tooth). The PUBMED, PsycInfo, SCIELO, and LILACS electronic databases were used, and the following search terms were employed: CMT, HMSN (hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy), mental disorder, quality of life, psychiatry, psychiatric, and psychological without the use of time-limit filters. According to the adopted inclusion criteria, 20 studies were included and appraised. These studies indicated that patients with CMT exhibited an increased trend toward depressive symptoms compared with the general population. In addition, CMT patients were exposed to a higher risk of reduced quality of life and significant sleep impairment. Considering the comorbidity of CMT with other psychiatric disorders, the heterogeneity of the instruments used to evaluate the psychiatric symptoms compromised the ability to compare the studies examined. Our results indicate a need for a systematic evaluation of these conditions to minimize the impairments and decreased quality of life caused by CMT. PMID:24654889

  9. Frequency and risk indicators of tooth decay among pregnant women in France: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Noel Vergnes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Little is known on the prevalence of tooth decay among pregnant women. Better knowledge of tooth decay risk indicators during pregnancy could help to develop follow-up protocols for women at risk, along with better prevention strategies. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth per woman in a large sample of pregnant women in France, and to study associated risk indicators. METHODS: A secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from a French multicentre case-control study was performed. The sample was composed of 1094 at-term women of six maternity units. A dental examination was carried out within 2 to 4 days post-partum. Socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics were obtained through a standardised interview with the women. Medical characteristics were obtained from the women's medical records. Risk indicators associated with tooth decay were identified using a negative binomial hurdle model. RESULTS: 51.6% of the women had tooth decay. The mean number of decayed teeth among women having at least one was 3.1 (s.d. = 2.8. Having tooth decay was statistically associated with lower age (aOR = 1.58, 95%CI [1.03,2.45], lower educational level (aOR = 1.53, 95%CI [1.06,2.23] and dental plaque (aOR = 1.75, 95%CI [1.27,2.41]. The number of decayed teeth was associated with the same risk indicators and with non-French nationality and inadequate prenatal care. DISCUSSION: The frequency of tooth decay and the number of decayed teeth among pregnant women were high. Oral health promotion programmes must continue to inform women and care providers about the importance of dental care before, during and after pregnancy. Future research should also assess the effectiveness of public policies related to oral health in target populations of pregnant women facing challenging social or economic situations.

  10. Impact of wear and diet on molar row geometry and topography in the house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Sabrina; Ledevin, Ronan

    2017-09-01

    Dental evolution affects the geometry of the tooth, but the adaptive relevance of these changes is related to tooth sharpness, complexity, and relief (topography). On a set of laboratory mice, we assessed how wear related to age and food consistency affected molar geometry and topography. Three groups of laboratory inbred mice (C57BL/6J strain) were considered: Four week old mice close to weaning, six month old mice fed on regular rodent pellets, and six month old mice fed on rodent pellets that were powdered and served as jelly. Their upper and lower molar rows were imaged in 3D. The geometry of the surfaces was quantified using a template describing the whole surface of the rows. Topographic indices were estimated on the same surfaces. The geometry of the molar rows was heavily affected by age-related wear. Food consistency affected mostly the upper molar row, which was more worn and less helical in soft food eaters. Tooth sharpness and relief decreased with age-related wear. Tooth relief was lower in soft food eaters, but only on the upper molar row. Tooth complexity was insensitive to wear. The primary factor affecting tooth geometry and topography is age-related wear, as wear erodes the molar surfaces. Tooth complexity, however, appears to be insensitive to wear, making this index relevant for comparison of tooth morphology among wild mice of unknown age. Soft food eaters displayed more worn teeth, with less helical molar row occlusal surface, possibly because behavior and jaw morphology were disturbed due to this unusual food resource. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coffee Intake as a Risk Indicator for Tooth Loss in Korean Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Seok; Han, Kyungdo; Ryu, Jae-Jun; Choi, Yeon-Jo; Park, Jun-Beom

    2018-02-05

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between coffee intake and tooth loss. This study hypothesized that the intake of coffee would increase the prevalence of tooth loss in Korean adults. Subject information was obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2010-2011. Sociodemographic and lifestyle variables, anthropometric and biochemical status, metabolic health and glucose tolerance status, as well as oral health behaviors were evaluated. The number of remaining teeth was negatively associated with the frequency of coffee intake (p-value coffee consumers had significantly higher levels of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (all p-value coffee on a daily basis were more likely to have fewer remaining teeth. The prevalence of having less than 20 remaining teeth was 69% higher in groups with daily coffee intake than those with coffee intake of less than once a month after adjustment for potential covariates (Odds Ratio [95% CI] = 1.69 [1.35, 2.13]). In conclusion, daily coffee consumption is closely associated with tooth loss in Korean adults.

  12. Explore the electron work function as a promising indicative parameter for supplementary clues towards tailoring of wear-resistant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Lu, Hao; Bin Yu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Wang, Rongfeng [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China); Hua, Guomin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Yan, Xianguo [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China); Parent, Leo [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada T9H 3E3 (Canada); Tian, Harry [Metallurgical/Materials R& D, GIW Industries, Grovetown, GA 30813-2842 (United States); Chung, Reinaldo [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada T9H 3E3 (Canada); Li, Dongyang, E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada)

    2016-07-04

    For materials used under dynamic loading conditions such as impact and impact wear, an appropriate balance between hardness and toughness is highly desired. However, determination of such a balance is challenging, since the toughness depends on both the mechanical strength and ductility, which complicates the judgement and control. Besides, local defects, poor phases and interfaces all could trigger local cracking and consequent global failure. These undesired structural or microstructural imperfections increase the difficulty in controlling the hardness-toughness balance. In this article, using high-Cr cast irons (HCCI) as example, we demonstrate that electron work function is a promising indicative parameter for supplementary clues to adjust the balance between hardness and toughness for HCCIs towards improved performance.

  13. Tooth damage in captive orcas (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John; Visser, Ingrid N; Ventre, Jeffrey; Waltz, Jordan; Loch, Carolina

    2017-12-01

    Tooth damage as a result of oral stereotypies is evident in captive orca, yet little research on the topic exists. This study examines the associations between dental pathology, sex, facility, duration of captivity and other factors in captive orca. We evaluated mandibular and maxillary teeth from dental images of 29 captive orca owned by a US-based theme park. Each tooth was scored for coronal wear, wear at or below gum line and bore holes. Fractured and missing teeth were also noted. Summary statistics described the distribution and severity of pathologies; inferential statistics examined how pathologies differed between sexes, between wild-captured and captive-born orcas and between captive orca at four facilities. We also evaluated how dental pathology and duration of captivity were related. Approximately 24% of whales exhibited "major" to "extreme" mandibular coronal tooth wear, with coronal wear and wear at or below gum line highly correlated. More than 60% of mandibular teeth 2 and 3 exhibited fractures. Bore holes were observed primarily among anterior mandibular teeth, with more than 61% of teeth 2 and 3 bearing evidence of having been drilled. Four of five orca with the highest age-adjusted tooth pathology indices were captive-born. Various dental pathologies were observed across all whales, with pathologies beginning at a young age. Oral stereotypies exhibited by captive orca contributed to the observed dental damage. By making dental and health records of captive whales publicly available, the theme park industry is uniquely positioned to provide further insight into dental pathology and resultant health consequences in captive orca. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detecting gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarized the results of a study in which three different vibration diagnostic methods were used to detect gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh. The NASA spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig was used to produce unseeded fault, natural failures of four face gear specimens. During the fatigue tests, which were run to determine load capacity and primary failure mechanisms for face gears, vibration signals were monitored and recorded for gear diagnostic purposes. Gear tooth bending fatigue and surface pitting were the primary failure modes found in the tests. The damage ranged from partial tooth fracture on a single tooth in one test to heavy wear, severe pitting, and complete tooth fracture of several teeth on another test. Three gear fault detection techniques, FM4, NA4*, and NB4, were applied to the experimental data. These methods use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain. Method NA4* was able to conclusively detect the gear tooth fractures in three out of the four fatigue tests, along with gear tooth surface pitting and heavy wear. For multiple tooth fractures, all of the methods gave a clear indication of the damage. It was also found that due to the high contact ratio of the face gear mesh, single tooth fractures did not significantly affect the vibration signal, making this type of failure difficult to detect.

  15. Smoking and drinking as risk indicators for tooth loss in middle-aged Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morse, Douglas E; Avlund, Kirsten; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate tobacco and alcohol consumption as risk indicators for missing teeth in late middle-aged Danes. METHOD: In all, 1,517 Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) participants received a clinical oral examination that included number of teeth. Information on smoking......, drinking, and various covariates was obtained using self-administered, structured questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression (dependent variable: 6+ vs.

  16. Wear behavior of human enamel against lithium disilicate glass ceramic and type III gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahreum; Swain, Michael; He, Lihong; Lyons, Karl

    2014-12-01

    The wear behavior of human enamel that opposes different prosthetic materials is still not clear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare the friction and wear behavior of human tooth enamel that opposes 2 indirect restorative materials: lithium disilicate glass ceramic and Type III gold. Friction-wear tests on human enamel (n=5) that opposes lithium disilicate glass ceramic (n=5) and Type III gold (n=5) were conducted in a ball-on-flat configuration with a reciprocating wear testing apparatus. The wear pairs were subjected to a normal load of 9.8 N, a reciprocating amplitude of approximately 200 μm, and a reciprocating frequency of approximately 1.6 Hz for up to 1100 cycles per test under distilled water lubrication. The frictional force of each cycle was recorded, and the corresponding friction coefficient for different wear pairs was calculated. After wear testing, the wear scars on the enamel specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Type III gold had a significantly lower steady-state friction coefficient (P=.009) and caused less wear damage on enamel than lithium disilicate glass ceramic. Enamel that opposed lithium disilicate glass ceramic exhibited cracks, plow furrows, and surface loss, which indicated abrasive wear as the prominent wear mechanism. In comparison, the enamel wear scar that opposed Type III gold had small patches of gold smear adhered to the surface, which indicated a predominantly adhesive wear mechanism. A lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance were observed when human enamel was opposed by Type III gold than by lithium disilicate glass ceramic in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and acidulated phosphate fluoride gel on erosive enamel wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam HajeNorouz Ali Tehrani

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that although either CPP-ACP or APF can protect enamel against wear, their combination provides significant enamel wear reduction. These findings would lead to new strategies for the clinical management of tooth wear.

  18. Occlusal wear and occlusal condition in a convenience sample of young adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, A. van 't; Kreulen, C.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study progression of tooth wear quantitatively in a convenient sample of young adults and to assess possible correlations with occlusal conditions. METHODS: Twenty-eight dental students participated in a three-year follow up study on tooth wear. Visible wear facets on full arch gypsum

  19. Gear wear monitoring by modulation signal bispectrum based on motor current signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiliang; Gu, Fengshou; Mansaf, Haram; Wang, Tie; Ball, Andrew D.

    2017-09-01

    Gears are important mechanical components for power transmissions. Tooth wear is one of the most common failure modes, which can present throughout a gear's lifetime. It is significant to accurately monitor gear wear progression in order to take timely predictive maintenances. Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is an effective and non-intrusive approach which is able to monitor faults from both electrical and mechanical systems. However, little research has been reported in monitoring the gear wear and estimating its severity based on MCSA. This paper presents a novel gear wear monitoring method through a modulation signal bispectrum based motor current signal analysis (MSB-MCSA). For a steady gear transmission, it is inevitable to exist load and speed oscillations due to various errors including wears. These oscillations can induce small modulations in the current signals of the driving motor. MSB is particularly effective in characterising such small modulation signals. Based on these understandings, the monitoring process was implemented based on the current signals from a run-to-failure test of an industrial two stages helical gearbox under a moderate accelerated fatigue process. At the initial operation of the test, MSB analysis results showed that the peak values at the bifrequencies of gear rotations and the power supply can be effective monitoring features for identifying faulty gears and wear severity as they exhibit agreeable changes with gear loads. A monotonically increasing trend established by these features allows a clear indication of the gear wear progression. The dismantle inspection at 477 h of operation, made when one of the monitored features is about 123% higher than its baseline, has found that there are severe scuffing wear marks on a number of tooth surfaces on the driving gear, showing that the gear endures a gradual wear process during its long test operation. Therefore, it is affirmed that the MSB-MSCA approach proposed is reliable

  20. Changes in food processing and occlusal dental wear during the early agricultural period in northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James T

    2008-01-01

    Crown dimensions and occlusal surface wear rate and wear plane were evaluated using paired first and second mandibular molars from a sample of 84 Early Agricultural period (1600 B.C.-A.D. 200) skeletons from northwest Mexico. Although this period represents a major shift in subsistence strategies in the Sonoran Desert, from food-foraging to agriculture, archaeological and dental pathology studies have identified this period as one of relative dietary stability. It was therefore predicted that very little variation in occlusal wear would have occurred between the early phase (San Pedro: 1600-800 B.C.) and late phase (Cienega: 800 B.C.-A.D. 200). Comparison of crown diameters identified some phenotypic differences between sexes but not between archaeological phases. Molar occlusal surfaces were then divided into four quadrants, and wear scores recorded for each quadrant. Principle axis analysis was performed between total wear scores of paired, adjacent first and second mandibular molars to assess rate and occlusal wear plane over time. The analysis demonstrated that both wear rate and wear plane increased from the early to the late phase of the Early Agricultural period. These results indicate that although diet may have indeed remained stable during this period in the Sonoran Desert increases in the rate of wear and wear plane may reflect changes in food-processing techniques. It is suggested that more intensive processing of agricultural products during the Cienega phase simultaneously softened the diet to create more tooth-contact wear and introduced more grit to cause faster and more angled wear on the molar occlusal surfaces. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Relationship between indication for tooth extraction and outcome of immediate implants: A retrospective study with 5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona, Beatriz; Tarazona-Álvarez, Pablo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this retrospective study were to evaluate the survival rate of a series of immediate implants after 3 years of follow-up and to study the relationship between survival and indication for tooth extraction. A retrospective study of patients treated with immediate implants between January 2003 and December 2008 was carried out. All patients receiving at least one post-extraction implant and a minimum follow-up of 5 years were included. After 60 months, 30 immediate implants had been lost in 17 patients, yielding a total implant success rate of 93.8%. None of the implants placed failed after the extraction of included canines (100% success rate). In 20 failed implants the reason for extraction had been severe periodontal disease (91.8% SR), in 4 endodontic failure (88.6%SR), in 3 unrestorable caries (95.9% SR), in 1 untreatable fracture (95.2% SR) and in 2 improvement of prosthetic design (98.1% SR). No statistically significant influence was found between immediate implant failure and the reason for tooth extraction (p=0.11). The use of immediate implants is a successful alternative to replace missing teeth for severe periodontal disease, periapical pathology or by decay or untreatable fractures. Some reasons, such as periodontal disease itself is associated with a success rate significantly below the overall average. Similarly, the prosthetic design is associated with a better prognosis than all other reasons. Key words:Tooth extraction, immediate implants, success rate.

  2. Tooth extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several teeth using the methods above. For an impacted tooth , the surgeon may have to cut a flap ... loosens or damages teeth Tooth injury from trauma Impacted teeth that are causing problems, such as wisdom teeth ( ...

  3. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Chan S, Alessandrini EA. Dental injuries. In: Selbst ...

  4. [Clinical observation on the characteristics of occlusion and tooth abrasion in patients with cracked tooth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Zheng-mei; Ling, Jun-qi

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the occlusal characteristics and the condition of tooth abrasion in patients with cracked tooth and to discuss the etiology of the cracked tooth and the relationships between occlusal disorder, tooth abrasion and cracked tooth. Twenty-seven patients with cracked tooth were selected. The occlusal courses were recorded by T-ScanIII system in intercuspal position, protrusive movement and lateral movement. Teeth with cracked tooth were regarded as the cracked tooth group, and the healthy adjacent teeth as the control group. The distribution of premature contact, occlusal interference, the center of occlusal force were examined. The abrasive conditions of the two groups were recorded according to the Smith tooth wear index and compared. There were more teeth with occlusal interference in cracked tooth group (20 teeth) than in the control group (6 teeth), which was significantly different (OR = 5.67, chi(2) = 8.45, P = 0.003). In 24 patients with single affected tooth, the center of occlusal force (COF) located in the inside and outside ellipse were 6 teeth (25%) and 18 teeth (75%) respectively, Z test showed that there were statistical differences between the cracked tooth group and normal people. In cracked tooth group, the proportion of the teeth with abrasion was higher in teeth with occlusal interference than those without occlusal interference (chi(2) = 4.79, P = 0.029). The formation of the cracked tooth was related to the occlusal disorder and associated with the tooth abrasion.

  5. Vital tooth bleaching with Nightguard vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, V B; Robinson, F G

    1997-01-01

    Between July 1994 and May 1996, several landmark articles were published concerning the safety and efficacy of vital tooth bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide in a customfitted tray. The American Dental Association (ADA) published guidelines for ADA acceptance, and three products received approval. Long-term clinical trials on 38 patients indicated 92% successful bleaching after 6 weeks of treatment. Results were stable in 74% of the patients at 1.5 years, and in 62% of the patients at 3-year follow-up with no further treatment. Clinical pulpal studies and periodontal studies indicated no detrimental safety problems, although some laboratory cell studies suggested concerns. The noncarcinogenic potential of 10% carbamide peroxide was established in animal studies. Successful bleaching of tetracycline-stained teeth was achieved after 6 months of treatment, with no tooth problems detected clinically or by scanning electron micrograph. Extended treatment times are effective on other stains from dentinogenesis imperfecta or nicotine. On insertion in the mouth, 10% carbamide peroxide elevated the pH in the tray and saliva. After 4 hours of clinical wear, over 60% of the newer, thicker materials (Opalescence [Ultraclent Products, South Jordon, UT] and Platinum [Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Canton, MA]) was present and active in the tray. Nightguard vital bleaching seems to be the most cost-efficient, user-friendly, patient-accepted method of bleaching teeth available to the profession and is safe and effective. Over-the-counter products can have harmful effects on tooth structure and may not lighten teeth.

  6. Eye Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eye wear protects or corrects your vision. Examples are Sunglasses Safety goggles Glasses (also called eyeglasses) Contact ... jobs and some sports carry a risk of eye injury. Thousands of children and adults get eye ...

  7. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-01-01

    Background Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. Methods The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted ...

  8. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, Y.S. [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States); Kingsbury, G.R. [Kingsbury (G.R.), Lyndhurst, OH (United States)

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  9. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - ...

  10. Tooth polishing: The current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Alankar Sawai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy teeth and gums make a person feel confident and fit. As people go about their daily routines and with different eating and drinking habits, the tooth enamel turns yellowish or gets stained. Polishing traditionally has been associated with the prophylaxis procedure in most dental practices, which patients know and expect. However, with overzealous use of polishing procedure, there is wearing of the superficial tooth structure. This would lead to more accumulation of local deposits. Also, it takes a long time for the formation of the fluoride-rich layer of the tooth again. Hence, now-a-days, polishing is not advised as a part of routine oral prophylaxis procedure but is done selectively based on the patients′ need. The article here, gives an insight on the different aspects of the polishing process along with the different methods and agents used for the same.

  11. A solution to the worn tooth conundrum in primate functional anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Peter S; M'Kirera, Francis

    2003-04-01

    Worn teeth are a bane to paleobiologists interested in the diets of human ancestors and other fossil primates. Although worn teeth dominate fossil assemblages, their shapes are usually not used to reconstruct the diets of extinct species. The problem is that traditional studies of primate dental functional anatomy have focused on unworn morphology. This has limited most functional analyses to only a few well-represented fossil species. This paper introduces a method to characterize and compare worn occlusal morphology in primates using laser scanning and geographic information systems technologies. A study of variably worn chimpanzee and gorilla molars indicates that differences between these species in tooth shape remain consistent at given stages of wear. Although cusp slope decreases with wear in both taxa, angularity values remain unchanged. These results indicate that African ape teeth wear in a manner that keeps them mechanically efficient for fracturing specific foods. Studies of changes in tooth shape with wear add a new dimension to dental functional anatomy, and offer a more complete picture of dental-dietary adaptations. Also, given how rare unworn teeth are in the fossil record, the ability to include worn specimens in analyses opens the door to reconstructing the diets of many more extinct primate groups, allowing us to better understand the adaptive radiation of our order.

  12. Smokeless tobacco use, tooth loss and oral health issues among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Smokeless tobacco user were more likely to have poor oral hygiene, dental caries, gingival recession, leukoplakia, erythroplakia, abnormal growth, tooth wear lesion, experienced tooth loss and edentulousnss than non smokeless tobacco users. However, the significantly associated lesions with smokeless tobacco use ...

  13. Tooth Enamel δ13C and δ18O Variations in Modern and Archaeological Horses From Northern Kazakhstan as Indicators of Regional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M. T.; Rosenmeier, M. F.; Stacy, E. M.; Olsen, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the oxygen and carbon isotope values of tooth enamel were measured in forty-one modern and twenty-three Copper Age (3600 - 3100 B.C.) horse specimens from the grassland steppe region of northern Kazakhstan. Modern tooth enamel δ13C and δ18O values were compared with the carbon isotopic compositions of local vegetation and the δ18O values of meteoric waters. Tooth enamel isotope values within the Copper Age specimens (attributed to the so-called Botai culture) were, in turn, compared with modern samples. Average carbon isotopic values within modern bulk tooth enamel samples ranged between -13.7 and -12.0‰ (VPDB). This suggests that the diet of modern northern Kazakhstani horses is comprised almost entirely of C3 plants (considering enamel-diet fractionation factors) consistent with documented grassland compositions within the region. The observed amplitude of δ13C variations within individual teeth (typically less than ~2‰) suggests only minimal seasonal variation in the δ13C of grasses attributed to heat and water stress. Alternatively, the minimal seasonal changes observed within intra-tooth δ13C values may be the direct result of fodder provisioning. Ingested water δ18O values derived from oxygen isotope ratios within bulk tooth enamel samples appear statistically indistinguishable from estimates of regional precipitation, suggesting that Kazakhstani horse tooth enamel δ18O measurements may be used as a direct estimate of the oxygen isotopic composition of meteoric waters. Intra-tooth oxygen isotopic variations therefore reflect the pronounced seasonal variability in precipitation δ18O values tied to temperature changes and amount effects observed annually within Kazakhstan. However, these intra-tooth isotopic variations exhibit slightly reduced amplitudes relative to meteoric water values, suggesting that horses likely consume water from buffered sources such as lakes and wells. Average bulk tooth enamel δ13C values within

  14. Wear Fast, Die Young: More Worn Teeth and Shorter Lives in Iberian Compared to Scottish Red Deer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F J Pérez-Barbería

    Full Text Available Teeth in Cervidae are permanent structures that are not replaceable or repairable; consequently their rate of wear, due to the grinding effect of food and dental attrition, affects their duration and can determine an animal's lifespan. Tooth wear is also a useful indicator of accumulative life energy investment in intake and mastication and their interactions with diet. Little is known regarding how natural and sexual selection operate on dental structures within a species in contrasting environments and how these relate to life history traits to explain differences in population rates of tooth wear and longevity. We hypothesised that populations under harsh environmental conditions should be selected for more hypsodont teeth while sexual selection may maintain similar sex differences within different populations. We investigated the patterns of tooth wear in males and females of Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus in Southern Spain and Scottish red deer (C. e. scoticus across Scotland, that occur in very different environments, using 10343 samples from legal hunting activities. We found higher rates of both incisor and molar wear in the Spanish compared to Scottish populations. However, Scottish red deer had larger incisors at emergence than Iberian red deer, whilst molars emerged at a similar size in both populations and sexes. Iberian and Scottish males had earlier tooth depletion than females, in support of a similar sexual selection process in both populations. However, whilst average lifespan for Iberian males was 4 years shorter than that for Iberian females and Scottish males, Scottish males only showed a reduction of 1 year in average lifespan with respect to Scottish females. More worn molars were associated with larger mandibles in both populations, suggesting that higher intake and/or greater investment in food comminution may have favoured increased body growth, before later loss of tooth efficiency due to severe wear. These

  15. Enamel wear opposing polished and aged zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J O; Janyavula, S; Lawson, N C; Lucas, T J; Cakir, D

    2014-01-01

    Aging of dental zirconia roughens its surface through low temperature degradation. We hypothesized that age-related roughening of zirconia crowns may cause detrimental wear to the enamel of an opposing tooth. To test our hypothesis, we subjected artificially aged zirconia and reference specimens to simulated mastication in a wear device and measured the wear of an opposing enamel cusp. Additionally, the roughness of the pretest surfaces was measured. The zirconia specimens, artificially aged by autoclave, showed no significant increase in roughness compared to the nonaged specimens. Furthermore, no significant difference in material or opposing enamel wear between the aged and nonaged zirconia was seen. All zirconia specimens showed less material and opposing enamel wear than the enamel to enamel control or veneering porcelain specimens. Scanning electron micrographs showed relatively smooth surfaces of aged and nonaged zirconia following wear testing. The micrographs of the veneering ceramic showed sharp fractured edges and fragments of wear debris. Zirconia may be considered a wear-friendly material for restorations opposing enamel, even after simulated aging.

  16. Changes in orientation of attritional wear facets with implications for jaw motion in a mixed longitudinal sample of Propithecus edwardsi from Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatch, Stephanie; Boyer, Doug M; King, Stephen J; Bunn, Jonathan M; Jernvall, Jukka; Wright, Patricia C

    2011-09-01

    In many mammalian species, the progressive wearing down of the teeth that occurs over an individual's lifetime has the potential to change dental function, jaw movements, or even feeding habits. The orientation of phase-I wear facets on molars reveals the direction of jaw movement during the power stroke of mastication. We investigated if and how molar wear facets change with increasing wear and/or age by examining a mixed longitudinal dataset of mandibular tooth molds from wild Propithecus edwardsi (N = 32 individuals, 86 samples). Measurements of the verticality of wear facets were obtained from three-dimensional digital models generated from μCT scans. Results show that verticality decreases over the lifetime of P. edwardsi, a change that implies an increasingly lateral translation of the jaw as the teeth move into occlusion. A more transverse phase-I power stroke supports the hypothesis that these animals chew to maximize longevity and functionality of their teeth, minimizing the "waste" of enamel, while maintaining sharp shearing crests. Results of this study indicate that wear facet verticality is more closely correlated with age than overall amount of tooth wear, measured as area of exposed dentin, suggesting that age-related changes in cranial morphology may be more responsible for adjustments in jaw motion over the lifetimes of Propithecus than wear-related changes inthe shape of occluding teeth. Finally, the rate of decrease in wear facet verticality with age is greater in males than in females suggesting differences in development and/or access to resources between the sexes in this species. 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Investigation on wear characteristic of biopolymer gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Wafiuddin Bin Md; Daing Idris, Daing Mohamad Nafiz Bin; Sofian, Azizul Helmi Bin; Basrawi, Mohamad Firdaus bin; Khalil Ibrahim, Thamir

    2017-10-01

    Polymer is widely used in many mechanical components such as gear. With the world going to a more green and sustainable environment, polymers which are bio based are being recognized as a replacement for conventional polymers based on fossil fuel. The use of biopolymer in mechanical components especially gear have not been fully explored yet. This research focuses on biopolymer for spur gear and whether the conventional method to investigate wear characteristic is applicable. The spur gears are produced by injection moulding and tested on several speeds using a custom test equipment. The wear formation such as tooth fracture, tooth deformation, debris and weight loss was observed on the biopolymer spur gear. It was noted that the biopolymer gear wear mechanism was similar with other type of polymer spur gears. It also undergoes stages of wear which are; running in, linear and rapid. It can be said that the wear mechanism of biopolymer spur gear is comparable to fossil fuel based polymer spur gear, thus it can be considered to replace polymer gears in suitable applications.

  18. Relationship Between Simulated Gap Wear and Generalized Wear of Resin Luting Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miayazaki, M

    The relationship between the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of resin luting cements was investigated. Five resin luting cements, G-Cem LinkForce (GL), Multilink Automix (MA), NX3 Nexus, Panavia V5 (PV), and RelyX Ultimate were evaluated and subsequently subjected to a wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki (Alabama) wear simulation device. Half of the specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 seconds and the other half were not photo-cured. The simulated gap and generalized wear were generated using a flat-ended stainless steel antagonist. Wear testing was performed in a water slurry of polymethyl methacrylate beads, and the simulated gap and generalized wear were determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) in conjunction with the Proscan and AnSur 3D software. A strong relationship was found between the gap wear and generalized wear simulation models. The simulated gap wear and generalized wear of the resin luting cements followed similar trends in terms of both volume loss and mean depth of wear facets with each curing method. Unlike the simulated gap wear and generalized wear of GL and PV, those of MA, NX, and RU were influenced by the curing method. The results of this study indicate that simulated gap wear of resin luting cements is very similar to simulated generalized wear. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing method.

  19. Autogenous tooth transplantation: an alternative to replace extracted tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard treatment to replace missing tooth is dental implants, however, in certain cases, such as in young patients its placement is contraindicated. Autogenous tooth transplantation, which has been widely done in Scandinavian countries for many years, may become a good alternative to overcome this problem. Purpose: This article attempted to provide information about the indication, treatment planning, surgical technique and the successful result of autogenous tooth transplantation. Case: A fifteen year old male patient presented with large caries and periapical disease of his lower left first molar, which was partially erupted and the roots was not fully formed in radiograph. Case management: Autogenous tooth transplantation procedure was performed consisting of extraction of #36, odontectomy of #38 followed by its implantation to socket #36 and fixation of the transplanted tooth to the adjacent teeth. Post operative evaluation was done on regular basis within 18 months period. There was no complaint, the tooth was clinically stable and no evidence of periodontal problem. Serial radiographs showed healing of alveolar bone and periodontal tissue, and the complete root formation was evident by 18 months post operatively. Conclusion: Autogenous tooth transplantation is a potential alternative to replace extracted tooth. Provided that the case be properly planned and operation carefully performed, successful result of this treatment can be achieved.

  20. A Quantitative Study of Hunter-Schreger Brands in the Tooth Enamel of Camelus Dromedarius

    OpenAIRE

    Radhi, Ameera

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Hunter-Schreger Bands (HSBs) are an optical phenomenon seen in mammalian tooth enamel related to orientation changes in the enamel prisms. HSBs are considered a factor in the development and progress of certain clinical conditions, including tooth wear, the resistance of enamel to fracture, cracked tooth syndrome, enamel bonding, abfraction, and vital tooth bleaching. They can also be used for personal identification in automated systems. No previous investigations have descr...

  1. Nanoscale friction and wear maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Nikhil S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-04-28

    Friction and wear are part and parcel of all walks of life, and for interfaces that are in close or near contact, tribology and mechanics are supremely important. They can critically influence the efficient functioning of devices and components. Nanoscale friction force follows a complex nonlinear dependence on multiple, often interdependent, interfacial and material properties. Various studies indicate that nanoscale devices may behave in ways that cannot be predicted from their larger counterparts. Nanoscale friction and wear mapping can help identify some 'sweet spots' that would give ultralow friction and near-zero wear. Mapping nanoscale friction and wear as a function of operating conditions and interface properties is a valuable tool and has the potential to impact the very way in which we design and select materials for nanotechnology applications.

  2. Wear monitoring of single point cutting tool using acoustic emission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It clearly indicates that the three stages of wear viz., Stage I, where the rate of wear is low, Stage II, where the rate of wear is moderate and. Stage III, where the rate of wear is faster and leading to the termination of tool life. In stage I, 0 to 8.5 min of the machining operation the tool wear is in the range of 0–8.3 μm only.

  3. The wear of polished and glazed zirconia against enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janyavula, Sridhar; Lawson, Nathaniel; Lawson, Nathaniel; Cakir, Deniz; Beck, Preston; Ramp, Lance C; Burgess, John O

    2013-01-01

    The wear of tooth structure opposing anatomically contoured zirconia crowns requires further investigation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the roughness and wear of polished, glazed, and polished then reglazed zirconia against human enamel antagonists and compare the measurements to those of veneering porcelain and natural enamel. Zirconia specimens were divided into polished, glazed, and polished then reglazed groups (n=8). A veneering porcelain (Ceramco3) and enamel were used as controls. The surface roughness of all pretest specimens was measured. Wear testing was performed in the newly designed Alabama wear testing device. The mesiobuccal cusps of extracted molars were standardized and used as antagonists. Three-dimensional (3D) scans of the specimens and antagonists were obtained at baseline and after 200 000 and 400 000 cycles with a profilometer. The baseline scans were superimposed on the posttesting scans to determine volumetric wear. Data were analyzed with a 1-way ANOVA and Tukey Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) post hoc tests (α=.05) Surface roughness ranked in order of least rough to roughest was: polished zirconia, glazed zirconia, polished then reglazed zirconia, veneering porcelain, and enamel. For ceramic, there was no measureable loss on polished zirconia, moderate loss on the surface of enamel, and significant loss on glazed and polished then reglazed zirconia. The highest ceramic wear was exhibited by the veneering ceramic. For enamel antagonists, polished zirconia caused the least wear, and enamel caused moderate wear. Glazed and polished then reglazed zirconia showed significant opposing enamel wear, and veneering porcelain demonstrated the most. Within the limitations of the study, polished zirconia is wear-friendly to the opposing tooth. Glazed zirconia causes more material and antagonist wear than polished zirconia. The surface roughness of the zirconia aided in predicting the wear of the opposing dentition

  4. Millisecond bearing wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatchley, C.; Sioshansi, P.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclides have been widely used for many purposes in medicine, metals, transportation, manufacturing and research. Approximately 200 artificially produced nuclides are commercially available from reactors or accelerator sources. Another 400 or so have properties which may make them useful if satisfactory methods of production can be developed. One of the most economically important industrial applications of radionuclides has been in wear measurement and condition monitoring in reciprocating engines. The general techniques developed for this purpose have also been applied in a number of other areas besides engine or lubrication studies. The wear of floor wax applied to linoleum, for example, has been measured by mixing shortlived radionuclides in the wax. In those applications where the material is tagged and then followed, the radionuclides are termed ''tracers,'' similar to the medical tracer materials used to measure uptake or metabolism of biologically active chemicals in the body. The alternate function for the radionuclides is to act as ''markers'' which indicate the amount of material which is remaining at the location of the original activation. Both approaches require that the debris removed from the surface must be carried away from the original site. The first application of radioactive tracers as a diagnostic tool in engines was in 1949. In this technique, an entire wearing part such as a piston ring or gear was first exposed to neutrons in a nuclear reactor. This caused the entire volume of the part to become radioactive. The part was next installed and exposed to wear in the operating engine. Detectors placed near the oil line, an oil filter or a sediment trap then determined the amount of debris from the part by counting the gamma rays escaping from the debris

  5. Ceramic wear maps: Zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Hsu, S.M.; Shen, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The wear characteristics of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) are represented by a set of three-dimensional wear maps under dry and lubricated conditions. Water, paraffin oil, and a formulated oil were used as lubricants. Different wear regions were identified as a function of load, speed, and lubrication environment. Sudden increases in wear, identified as ear transitions, were found at certain loads and speeds. The onset of wear transitions was moderated by the presence of a lubricant. Below the wear transitions, the wear was mild and the wear mechanism was predominantly plastic deformation and microfracture. Above the wear transitions, the wear was severe, dominated by brittle fracture and third-body abrasion. Different fluids had different effects on wear. Water had a deleterious effect on wear for this material. The presence of oil lubricants effectively reduced friction and moderated wear. Under high load and high speed, additional stress induced by a thermal gradient within a small area contributed significantly to wear. A critical velocity model was found to describe the locations of the wear transition zones successfully

  6. The cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christoper D; McConnell, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of the cracked tooth syndrome (CTS). The condition refers to an incomplete fracture of a vital posterior tooth that occasionally extends into the pulp. A lack of awareness of the condition coupled with its varied clinical features can make diagnosis of CTS difficult. Common symptoms include an uncomfortable sensation or pain from a tooth that occurs while chewing hard foods and which ceases when the pressure is withdrawn. The patient is often unable to identify the offending tooth or quadrant involved, and may report a history of numerous dental procedures with unsatisfactory results. Successful diagnosis and management requires an awareness of the existence of CTS and the appropriate diagnostic tests. Management options depend on the nature of the symptoms and extent of the lesion. These options include routine monitoring, occlusal adjustments, placement of a cast restoration and endodontic treatment. A decision flowchart indicating the treatment options available to the dental practitioner is presented.

  7. The effect of a carbonated beverage on the wear of human enamel and dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Hiyasat, A S; Saunders, W P; Sharkey, S W; Smith, G M

    1998-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of a carbonated beverage on the wear of human enamel and three dental ceramics: a conventional porcelain (Vitadur Alpha), a hydrothermal low-fusing ceramic (Duceram-LFC), and a machinable ceramic (Vita Mark II). Tooth-against-ceramic specimens (10 per group) were tested in a wear machine under a load of 40 N, at a rate of 80 cycles per minute, and for a total of 25,000 cycles. The test was performed in distilled water or with intermittent exposure to a carbonated beverage (Coca-Cola). Wear was determined by measuring the height reduction of the tooth specimens and the depth of wear track in the ceramic specimens. ANOVA revealed a significant difference among the groups for both enamel and ceramic wear (p Mark II. However, with exposure to the carbonated beverage, the enamel wear produced by Duceram-LFC did not differ significantly from that produced by Alpha porcelain, and Vita Mark II produced the least amount of enamel wear. Overall, exposure to the carbonated beverage significantly increased the enamel wear. The wear of Duceram-LFC and Vita Mark II increased with exposure to the carbonated beverage. It was concluded that exposure to the carbonated beverage accelerated the enamel wear and decreased the wear resistance of Duceram-LFC and Vita Mark II ceramics. Overall, Vita Mark II was shown to be the most resistant to wear and also significantly less abrasive than conventional Alpha porcelain.

  8. Scanning-electron-microscope used in real-time study of friction and wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Small friction and wear apparatus built directly into scanning-electron-microscope provides both dynamic observation and microscopic view of wear process. Friction and wear tests conducted using this system have indicated that considerable information can readily be gained.

  9. A new in situ model to study erosive enamel wear, a clinical pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, J.L.; Truin, G.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop an in situ model for erosive wear research which allows for more clinically relevant exposure parameters than other in situ models and to show tooth site-specific erosive wear effect of an acid challenge of orange juice on enamel. METHODS: This pilot study included 6

  10. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin-on-disc tests of tungsten carbide pins against silicon carbide discs were performed and wear rate, mechanism and friction maps constructed. Correlations were observed between the wear mode and the friction of the pin-disc interface, and between the qualitative incidence of disruptive wear mec...

  11. Tool Wear Mechanisms during Cutting of Soda Lime Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konneh, Mohamed; Nasima Bagum, Mst.; Yeakub Ali, Mohammad; Arif, Tasnim Firdaus Bt. Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Soda lime glass milling has high performance application. It is a challenging task to achieve fracture free surface on this material due to its brittle nature. High-speed end milling is capable to achieve ductile mode in an enhance flexibility. In this research, end milling of soda lime using uncoated carbide tool was performed where spindle speed varied from 20,000 to 40,000 rpm, cutting depth from 10 to 30 µm and feed rate from 5 to 20 mm/min in dry condition. The effects of cutting parameters (cutting speed, feed per tooth and depth of cut) on tool flank wear as well as wear mechanisms of tool flank investigated. Investigation showed that feed per edge has most influencing effect followed by cutting speed and depth of cut on flank wear and the main wear mechanism is abrasion wear. In some cases, oxidation, thermal diffusion and recast layer on tool flank also observed.

  12. Abrasive wear of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.; Wilson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the wear behavior of a variety of advanced materials. Among the many materials under evaluation are intermetallic alloys based on the compounds: Fe 3 Al, Ti 3 Al, TiAl, Al 3 Ti, NiAl and MoSi 2 . The high hardness, high modulus, low density, and superior environmental stability of these compounds make them attractive for wear materials. This paper reports on the abrasive wear of alloys and composites based on the above compounds. The abrasive wear behavior of these alloys and composites are compared to other engineering materials used in wear applications

  13. Dental wear, wear rate, and dental disease in the African apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgart, Alison A

    2010-06-01

    The African apes possess thinner enamel than do other hominoids, and a certain amount of dentin exposure may be advantageous in the processing of tough diets eaten by Gorilla. Dental wear (attrition plus abrasion) that erodes the enamel exposes the underlying dentin and creates additional cutting edges at the dentin-enamel junction. Hypothetically, efficiency of food processing increases with junction formation until an optimal amount is reached, but excessive wear hinders efficient food processing and may lead to sickness, reduced fecundity, and death. Occlusal surfaces of molars and incisors in three populations each of Gorilla and Pan were videotaped and digitized. The quantity of incisal and molar occlusal dental wear and the lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were measured in 220 adult and 31 juvenile gorilla and chimpanzee skulls. Rates of dental wear were calculated in juveniles by scoring the degree of wear between adjacent molars M1 and M2. Differences were compared by principal (major) axis analysis. ANOVAs compared means of wear amounts. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the relationship between molar wear and incidence of dental disease. Results indicate that quantities of wear are significantly greater in permanent incisors and molars and juvenile molars of gorillas compared to chimpanzees. The lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were predominantly suboptimal. Western lowland gorillas have the highest quantities of wear and the most molars with suboptimal wear. The highest rates of wear are seen in Pan paniscus and Pan t. troglodytes, and the lowest rates are found in P.t. schweinfurthii and G. g. graueri. Among gorillas, G. b. beringei have the highest rates but low amounts of wear. Coefficients between wear and dental disease were low, but significant when all teeth were combined. Gorilla teeth are durable, and wear does not lead to mechanical senescence in this sample.

  14. Bionic design perspectives based on the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZR Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Human teeth are the important masticatory organ and therefore are subjected to friction and wear everyday. Both the loading condition and the environment are relatively complex in the mouth, however, normally human teeth can serve in mouth all their time with excellent wear resistance in most people. Obviously, through the process of human evolution, human teeth have become a natural anti-wear system that far outclasses the best engineering anti-wear systems at present. To understand the excellent anti-wear properties of human teeth, we need to look into what act as the wear resisting elements of human teeth. In this paper, based on the results obtained by the authors and from literatures, the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function was summarized. Particular attention was paid to the multi-scale anti-wear mechanism caused by the unique hierarchical structure of human teeth, the self-repair mechanism by tooth remineralization, and the cooperating lubrication mechanism of salivary pellicle upon tooth surface and the hydration proteins within the tooth. Based on the formation mechanism of dental anti-wear function, some bionic design perspectives were discussed and future research directions are recommended.

  15. Tooth cusp sharpness as a dietary correlate in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaume, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Mammalian molars have undergone heavy scrutiny to determine correlates between morphology and diet. Here, the relationship between one aspect of occlusal morphology, tooth cusp radius of curvature (RoC), and two broad dietary categories, folivory and frugivory, is analyzed in apes. The author hypothesizes that there is a relationship between tooth cusp RoC and diet, and that folivores have sharper teeth than frugivores, and further test the correlation between tooth cusp RoC and tooth cusp size. Eight measures of tooth cusp RoC (two RoCs per cusp) were taken from 53 M(2) s from four species and subspecies of frugivorous apes (Pongo pygmaeus, Pan troglodytes troglodytes, Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, and Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and two subspecies of folivorous apes (Gorilla beringei beringei, and Gorilla beringei graueri). Phylogenetically corrected ANOVAs were run on the full dataset and several subsets of the full dataset, revealing that, when buccolingual RoCs are taken into account, tooth cusp RoCs can successfully differentiate folivores and frugivores. PCAs revealed that folivores consistently had duller teeth than frugivores. In addition, a weak, statistically significant positive correlation exists between tooth cusp size and tooth cusp RoC. The author hypothesizes differences in tooth cusp RoC are correlated with wear rates, where, per vertical unit of wear, duller cusps will have a longer length of exposed enamel ridge than sharper cusps. More data need to be gathered to determine if the correlation between tooth cusp RoC and tooth cusp size holds true when small primates are considered. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Unique method of tooth replacement in durophagous placodont marine reptiles, with new data on the dentition of Chinese taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neenan, James M; Li, Chun; Rieppel, Olivier; Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Muscio, Giuseppe; Scheyer, Torsten M

    2014-05-01

    The placodonts of the Triassic period (~252-201 mya) represent one of the earliest and most extreme specialisations to a durophagous diet of any known reptile group. Exceptionally enlarged crushing tooth plates on the maxilla, dentary and palatine cooperated to form functional crushing areas in the buccal cavity. However, the extreme size of these teeth, combined with the unusual way they occluded, constrained how replacement occurred. Using an extensive micro-computed tomographic dataset of 11 specimens that span all geographic regions and placodont morphotypes, tooth replacement patterns were investigated. In addition, the previously undescribed dental morphologies and formulae of Chinese taxa are described for the first time and incorporated into the analysis. Placodonts have a unique tooth replacement pattern and results follow a phylogenetic trend. The plesiomorphic Placodus species show many replacement teeth at various stages of growth, with little or no discernible pattern. On the other hand, the more derived cyamodontoids tend to have fewer replacement teeth growing at any one time, replacing teeth unilaterally and/or in functional units, thus maintaining at least one functional crushing area at all times. The highly derived placochelyids have fewer teeth and, as a result, only have one or two replacement teeth in the upper jaw. This supports previous suggestions that these taxa had an alternative diet to other placodonts. Importantly, all specimens show at least one replacement tooth growing at the most posterior palatine tooth plates, indicating increased wear at this point and thus the most efficient functional crushing area. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment planning: cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Eric M; Williamson, Anne

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the cracked tooth, one of the five major classifications of longitudinal tooth fractures: 1) craze line; 2) cuspal fracture; 3) cracked tooth; 4) split tooth; and 5) vertical root fracture. The term "longitudinal tooth fracture" was first introduced by Rivera (Personal Communication, Iowa City, IA, 1996) and has two meanings. The first implies distance (length), particularly in the vertical (occlusal-cervical) plane, as illustrated by longitudinal lines on a map. The second indicates that these fractures occur over a period of time. Therefore, the term longitudinal tooth fracture applies to fractures that have both a distance and a time component. Thus, fractures are described that are not related to impact trauma (which occurs primarily in incisors), in which the distance (length) component may be similar, but is immediate instead of over a period of time.

  18. Polymer wear evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerbon, Mikkel; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wear plays an increasing role in manufacturing of machine parts for e.g. medical devices. Some of these have an expected lifetime of five to eight years during which very little wear of the components is acceptable. Too much wear compromises the dosage accuracy of the device and thereby...... the safety of the patients. Prediction of the wear of polymers is complicated by the low thermal conductivity of this kind of material. It implies that any acceleration of testing conditions by increased contact pressure and/or sliding velocity will make the polymer fail due to exaggerated heat buildup....... This is not the kind of wear observed in medical devices. In the present work a method was developed capable of evaluating the wear progression in polymer-polymer contacts. The configuration of the setup is injection moulded specimens consisting of an upper part having a toroid shape and a lower flat part. The sliding...

  19. Abrasive wear behaviour of electrodeposited nanocrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daehyun

    cases when the former two parameters are poor indicators such as for heat-treated Ni-P with high P content and nanocrystalline Co. The results of this study have shown that both nanocrystalline Ni and Ni-P coatings could be of significant technological importance in the area of wear resistant coatings.

  20. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  1. Tool Wear Analysis due to Machining In Super Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polishetty Ashwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents tool wear study when a machinability test was applied using milling on Super Austenitic Stainless Steel AL6XN alloy. Eight milling trials were performed under two cutting speeds, 100 m/min and 150 m/min, combined with two feed rates at 0.1mm/tooth and 0.15 mm/tooth and two depth of cuts at 2 mm and 3 mm. An Alicona 3D optical surface profilometer was used to scan cutting inserts flank and rake face areas for wear. Readings such as maximum and minimum deviations were extracted and used to analyse the outcomes. Results showed various types of wear were generated on the tool rake and flank faces. The common formed wear was the crater wear. The formation of the build-up edge was observed on the rake face of the cutting tool.

  2. Overview of Tooth Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessitated by crowns and bridges. Bonding involves the attachment of tooth-colored fillings to natural teeth with ... Drugs Mentioned In This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names tetracycline ACHROMYCIN V Tooth Disorders Overview of ...

  3. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  4. Analysis of split tooth as an unstudied reason for tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaghae, Ifueko Patience; Azodo, Clement Chinedu

    2014-09-10

    Split tooth is an unstudied reason for tooth extraction. The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze split tooth as a reason for extraction in a dental clinic in Benin City. The prospective study was carried out on 669 patients having tooth extraction between May, 2005 and December, 2012. Over the period of the study, diagnosis and tooth extraction were done by three dentists of more five years practice experience. The indications for tooth extraction were noted with specific interest on those diagnosed as split tooth without restoration. Data was entered into Microsoft excel, sorted and transported into SPSS (SPSS version 16.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Split teeth constituted for 39 (5%) of extracted teeth. This 39 extractions were done in 38 patients meaning that two split teeth were extracted on separate occasions from same patient. The majority 23 (61%) of extracted split tooth were done in patients in the fifth decade of life. More of the split tooth extraction were performed in males 28 (72%) than females 11 (28%). Overall mandibular teeth were more affected than the maxillary teeth and the most affected teeth were mandibular second molars 23 (59%) while the least affected were the mandibular first premolars 1 (3%) and the third molars 1 (3%). The reported masticatory accident as aetiology, were biting on stone 21 (53%) or piece of bone 10 (26%) while eating. A few 3 (8%) were suspected bruxists. The majority 25 (65%) visited the dental clinic 3-6 months after the incident and onset of symptoms. Split tooth constitute a reasonable common reason for tooth extraction and this was most common in the fifth decade of life. It is therefore important to improve early diagnosis of a cracked tooth in order to prevent the progression of the crack tooth to split tooth.

  5. Tooth Eruption without Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the diffic...

  6. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-01-01

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

  7. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-06-09

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Coping with cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, F W

    1996-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome typically poses a diagnostic challenge for the dentist. Symptoms include tenderness to biting on certain foods, often poorly localized, and occasional thermal sensitivity. Knowing where to look for this entity, especially in the mandibular molar region, can be especially helpful. Treatment of the tooth depends on the degree of pulpal involvement and the extent of the crack. Cuspal coverage is required of all cracked posterior teeth that are retainable. Root canal therapy is included if symptoms persist or if pulpal pathosis exists at the outset. Cracks extending beyond the osseous crest indicate a poor prognosis. Armed with this knowledge, the dentist can overcome many cracked tooth dilemmas, resulting in satisfaction for both patient and practitioner alike.

  9. Wear Behavior of an Ultra-High-Strength Eutectoid Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alok; Maity, Joydeep

    2018-02-01

    Wear behavior of an ultra-high-strength AISI 1080 steel developed through incomplete austenitization-based combined cyclic heat treatment is investigated in comparison with annealed and conventional hardened and tempered conditions against an alumina disk (sliding speed = 1 m s-1) using a pin-on-disk tribometer at a load range of 7.35-14.7 N. On a gross scale, the mechanism of surface damage involves adhesive wear coupled with abrasive wear (microcutting effects in particular) at lower loads. At higher loads, mainly the abrasive wear (both microcutting and microploughing mechanisms) and evolution of adherent oxide are observed. Besides, microhardness of matrix increases with load indicating substantial strain hardening during wear test. The rate of overall wear is found to increase with load. As-received annealed steel with the lowest initial hardness suffers from severe abrasive wear, thereby exhibiting the highest wear loss. Such a severe wear loss is not observed in conventional hardened and tempered and combined cyclic heat treatment conditions. Combined cyclic heat-treated steel exhibits the greatest wear resistance (lowest wear loss) due to its initial high hardness and evolution of hard abrasion-resistant tribolayer during wear test at higher load.

  10. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Abstract. Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To ... Some medications cause salivary hypofunction and dental erosion; drugs ...

  11. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  12. Comparative Investigation on Tool Wear during End Milling of AISI H13 Steel with Different Tool Path Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesta, Erry Yulian T.; Riza, Muhammad; Avicena

    2018-03-01

    Tool wear prediction plays a significant role in machining industry for proper planning and control machining parameters and optimization of cutting conditions. This paper aims to investigate the effect of tool path strategies that are contour-in and zigzag tool path strategies applied on tool wear during pocket milling process. The experiments were carried out on CNC vertical machining centre by involving PVD coated carbide inserts. Cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were set to vary. In an experiment with three factors at three levels, Response Surface Method (RSM) design of experiment with a standard called Central Composite Design (CCD) was employed. Results obtained indicate that tool wear increases significantly at higher range of feed per tooth compared to cutting speed and depth of cut. This result of this experimental work is then proven statistically by developing empirical model. The prediction model for the response variable of tool wear for contour-in strategy developed in this research shows a good agreement with experimental work.

  13. Tooth eruption without roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-P

    2013-03-01

    Root development and tooth eruption are very important topics in dentistry. However, they remain among the less-studied and -understood subjects. Root development accompanies rapid tooth eruption, but roots are required for the movement of teeth into the oral cavity. It has been shown that the dental follicle and bone remodeling are essential for tooth eruption. So far, only limited genes have been associated with root formation and tooth eruption. This may be due to the difficulties in studying late stages of tooth development and tooth movement and the lack of good model systems. Transgenic mice with eruption problems and short or no roots can be used as a powerful model for further deciphering of the cellular, molecular, and genetic mechanisms underlying root formation and tooth eruption. Better understanding of these processes can provide hints on delivering more efficient dental therapies in the future.

  14. Uneven distribution of enamel in the tooth crown of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela E. Winkler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Unworn teeth of herbivorous mammals are not immediately functional. They have to be partially worn to expose enamel ridges which can then act as shear-cutting blades to break the food down. We use the Plains Zebra (Equus quagga as a hypsodont, herbivorous model organism to investigate how initial wear of the tooth crown is controlled by underlying structures. We find that the enamel proportion is smaller at the apical half of the tooth crown in all upper tooth positions and suggest that lower enamel content here could promote early wear. Besides this uneven enamel distribution, we note that the third molar has a higher overall enamel content than any other tooth position. The M3 is thus likely to have a slightly different functional trait in mastication, resisting highest bite forces along the tooth row and maintaining functionality when anterior teeth are already worn down.

  15. Uneven distribution of enamel in the tooth crown of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    Unworn teeth of herbivorous mammals are not immediately functional. They have to be partially worn to expose enamel ridges which can then act as shear-cutting blades to break the food down. We use the Plains Zebra (Equus quagga) as a hypsodont, herbivorous model organism to investigate how initial wear of the tooth crown is controlled by underlying structures. We find that the enamel proportion is smaller at the apical half of the tooth crown in all upper tooth positions and suggest that lower enamel content here could promote early wear. Besides this uneven enamel distribution, we note that the third molar has a higher overall enamel content than any other tooth position. The M3 is thus likely to have a slightly different functional trait in mastication, resisting highest bite forces along the tooth row and maintaining functionality when anterior teeth are already worn down.

  16. Primary culprit for tooth loss!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuvvula, Sailavanya; Chava, Vijay Kumar; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    In order to facilitate planning for dental health services and to progress strategies to continue the reduction in tooth loss, it is important to identify the factors that result in such loss. therefore the aim of the study is to investigate the major cause for tooth extraction. to examine whether the major reason for tooth extraction is dental caries or periodontal disease. The study is carried out among the dental practitioners in our district. A questionnaire containing 10 items was distributed to the dental practitioners, which included age, gender, no of teeth indicated for extraction, the reason for extraction, and the periodontal parameters that are involved with the extracted tooth and were requested to complete the form on every extraction they were to undertake. the study form was collected at the end of the study period and data was subjected to statistical analysis. A total of 502 patients were enrolled during the study period, and a total of 1055 teeth were extracted for several reasons. we found that 51.14%extractions are due to dental caries in case of 20-30years age groups, which is more when compared to tooth loss due to periodontal diseases in this age group. whereas in case of >40years of age group periodontal diseases account for 54.11%, and dental caries accounts for only 29.11%. Showing more teeth were lost due to periodontal disease. therefore we concluded that, caries is the dominant reason for extraction in patients with 20-30 years of age while periodontal disease accounts for the majority of tooth extraction in patients older than 40 years.

  17. Corrosion and corrosion-friction properties of plasma cladding wear-resistant layer on Fe-based alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dekun; Yu, Ruoqi; Chen, Kai; Yang, Xuehui; Liu, Yuan; Yin, Yan

    2018-02-01

    Plasma cladding technology is used to prepare a plasma cladding gradient wear-resistant layer, and the corrosion and corrosion-friction properties of the plasma cladding wear-resistant layer are analyzed. The results indicate that under pure immersion corrosion, the plasma gradient cladding wear-resisting layer has better corrosion resistance compared with that of single cladding specimen. No obvious corrosion traces occur on the corrosion surface. Under corrosion-friction conditions, the variety law of friction coefficient can be divided into four stages: rapid decline zone, slight increase zone, fluctuation zone and steady zone. The fluctuation ranges of friction coefficient and wear loss greatly reduce compared with those of dry friction. Furthermore, the wear scar has no obvious corrosion traces. The wear mechanism of the substrate is corrosion wear, adhesive wear, abrasive wear and fatigue wear, while the plasma cladding gradient wear-resistant layer is given priority to with adhesive wear and abrasive wear.

  18. Computed tomography to quantify tooth abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofmehl, Lukas; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Filippi, Andreas; Hotz, Gerhard; Berndt-Dagassan, Dorothea; Kramis, Simon; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography, also termed digital volume tomography, has become a standard technique in dentistry, allowing for fast 3D jaw imaging including denture at moderate spatial resolution. More detailed X-ray images of restricted volumes for post-mortem studies in dental anthropology are obtained by means of micro computed tomography. The present study evaluates the impact of the pipe smoking wear on teeth morphology comparing the abraded tooth with its contra-lateral counterpart. A set of 60 teeth, loose or anchored in the jaw, from 12 dentitions have been analyzed. After the two contra-lateral teeth were scanned, one dataset has been mirrored before the two datasets were registered using affine and rigid registration algorithms. Rigid registration provides three translational and three rotational parameters to maximize the overlap of two rigid bodies. For the affine registration, three scaling factors are incorporated. Within the present investigation, affine and rigid registrations yield comparable values. The restriction to the six parameters of the rigid registration is not a limitation. The differences in size and shape between the tooth and its contra-lateral counterpart generally exhibit only a few percent in the non-abraded volume, validating that the contralateral tooth is a reasonable approximation to quantify, for example, the volume loss as the result of long-term clay pipe smoking. Therefore, this approach allows quantifying the impact of the pipe abrasion on the internal tooth morphology including root canal, dentin, and enamel volumes.

  19. Rubber glove wearing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Takada, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    Rubber groves are attached each to an upper end of a glove putting vessel having an air-sucking hole on the bottom by enlarging an opening end of the rubber glove and turning back the inside to the outside. When the sucking device is operated, air in the glove putting device is sucked and the rubber glove is expanded by an atmospheric pressure. After expansion of the rubber glove to some extent, the sucking device is stopped, and presence or absence of failures of the rubber glove is confirmed by shrinkage of the rubber glove and by an indication value of a pressure gauge for detecting the pressure change in the vessel. Then, a hand is inserted to the expanded rubber glove, and a detaching switch in the vessel is pushed by a finger tip. A detaching piece at the upper end of the vessel is protruded outwardly to enlarge the turned-back portion of the rubber glove to easily release the rubber glove from the putting vessel, and the rubber glove is put on. This enables to wear the rubber glove and conduct failure test simultaneously. Further, a user can put on the rubber glove without touching the outside of the rubber glove. (I.N.)

  20. Efficacy of TiF4 and NaF varnish and solution: a randomized in situ study on enamel erosive-abrasive wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Flávia Mauad; Rios, Daniela; Buzalaf, Marília A R; Magalhães, Ana Carolina

    2014-05-01

    This in situ/ex vivo study analysed the anti-erosive/abrasive effect of TiF4 and NaF varnish and solution on enamel wear. Twelve subjects took part in this study which was performed in three periods (phases) with the duration of 5 days each. Each two human enamel specimens per subject were pretreated with experimental NaF varnish or solution (phase A), experimental-TiF4 varnish or solution (phase B) and placebo varnish or untreated control (phase C). The specimens were worn in palatal appliances; one enamel specimen, from each treatment, was subjected to erosion (ERO; cola soft drink, 4 × 90 s/day), and the other specimen was subjected to erosion plus abrasion (ERO + ABR; tooth brushing, 2 × 10 s/day). The tooth wear was quantified by a contact profilometer (micrometre) and analysed using two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni's test (n = 12 subjects, p wear (around 25 %) significantly compared to the control and placebo varnish. There were no significant differences among the fluoride formulations and between the conditions ERO and ERO + ABR. Therefore, it can be concluded that TiF4 has the same protective potential as NaF formulations to reduce human enamel wear under this experimental in situ model. In vitro studies have indicated a better anti-erosive/abrasive effect of TiF4 compared to NaF varnish. The present in situ study does not support the previous findings. Therefore, any of the tested professional fluoride varnishes in principle could be able to partially reduce enamel wear.

  1. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engqvist, H.; Ederyd, S.; Uhrenius, B.; Hogmark, S.

    2001-01-01

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  2. Occlusal wear and occlusal condition in a convenience sample of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Spijker, A; Kreulen, C M; Bronkhorst, E M; Creugers, N H J

    2015-01-01

    To study progression of tooth wear quantitatively in a convenient sample of young adults and to assess possible correlations with occlusal conditions. Twenty-eight dental students participated in a three-year follow up study on tooth wear. Visible wear facets on full arch gypsum casts were assessed using a flatbed scanner and measuring software. Regression analyses were used to assess possible associations between the registered occlusal conditions 'occlusal guidance scheme', 'vertical overbite', 'horizontal overbite', 'depth of sagittal curve', 'canine Angle class relation', 'history of orthodontic treatment', and 'self-reported grinding/clenching' (independent variables) and increase of wear facets (dependent variable). Mean increase in facet surface areas ranged from 1.2 mm2 (premolars, incisors) to 3.4 mm2 (molars); the relative increase ranged from 15% to 23%. Backward regression analysis showed no significant relation for 'group function', 'vertical overbite', 'depth of sagittal curve', 'history of orthodontic treatment' nor 'self-reported clenching. The final multiple linear regression model showed significant associations amongst 'anterior protected articulation' and 'horizontal overbite' and increase of facet surface areas. For all teeth combined, only 'anterior protected articulation' had a significant effect. 'Self reported grinding' did not have a significant effect (p>0.07). In this study 'anterior protected articulation' and 'horizontal overbite', were significantly associated with the progression of tooth wear. Self reported grinding was not significantly associated with progression of tooth wear. Occlusal conditions such as anterior protected articulation and horizontal overbite seem to have an effect on the progression of occlusal tooth wear in this convenient sample of young adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Theory of powdery rubber wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, B N J

    2009-12-02

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes Φ(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  4. Theory of powdery rubber wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-12-02

    Rubber wear typically involves the removal of small rubber particles from the rubber surface. On surfaces with not too sharp roughness, e.g. most road surfaces, this involves (slow) crack propagation. In this paper I shall present a theory of mild rubber wear. I shall derive the distribution of wear particle sizes PHI(D), which is in excellent agreement with experiment. I shall also show that the calculated wear rate is consistent with experimental data for tire tread block wear.

  5. Power Consumption Optimization in Tooth Gears Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatnikov, N.; Harlamov, G.; Kanatnikova, P.; Pashmentova, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper reviews the issue of optimization of technological process of tooth gears production of the power consumption criteria. The authors dwell on the indices used for cutting process estimation by the consumed energy criteria and their applicability in the analysis of the toothed wheel production process. The inventors proposed a method for optimization of power consumptions based on the spatial modeling of cutting pattern. The article is aimed at solving the problem of effective source management in order to achieve economical and ecological effect during the mechanical processing of toothed gears. The research was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project No. 17-79-10316).

  6. Nitrogen implantation of steels: A treatment which can initiate sustained oxidative wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, E.B.; Reinbold, R.; Missouri Univ., Rolla; Kohser, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Falex wear tests on mild (SAE 3135) steel samples treated by either nitrogen implantation (2.5x10 17 N 2 + cm -2 at 180 keV) or low temperature (about 315 0 C) oxidation are reported. The results show that both treatments lead to about an order-of-magnitude reduction in the long-term wear rate of the steel. In addition to the wear rate measurements, the wear member asymmetry behavior, scanning electron microscopy studies, Auger spectra and sputter profiles all indicate that the wear modes induced by both treatments are the same and are oxidative wear. These results confirm the previously proposed initiator-sustainer wear model in which implanted nitrogen simply acts as an initiator of favorable oxidative wear but is not directly involved in maintaining the sustained wear resistance. Possible mechanisms for both the initiation process and the sustained wear process are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  7. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a process that occurs over time. Here's how tooth decay develops: Plaque forms. Dental plaque is a clear sticky film that coats ... by a lack of saliva, which helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and plaque from your teeth. Substances found in saliva also help counter the ...

  8. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovec, J. [Dental Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Hrvatski trg 6, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Filipic, C. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Levstik, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: adrijan.levstik@ijs.si

    2005-07-15

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters -bar {sub v0} and {sigma}{sub v}, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  9. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipic, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-01-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters -bar v0 and σ v , indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy

  10. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  11. Corticotomias alveolares na Ortodontia: indicações e efeitos na movimentação dentária Alveolar corticotomies in orthodontics: Indications and effects on tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauro Douglas Oliveira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a busca pelo aumento na eficiência dos tratamentos ortodônticos é uma constante em diversas áreas da Ortodontia atual. A realização de corticotomias alveolares pouco antes da aplicação de forças ortodônticas vem sendo sugerida como uma forma de potencializar a movimentação dentária e, consequentemente, o tratamento ortodôntico como um todo. OBJETIVO: o presente artigo revê a perspectiva histórica dessa abordagem terapêutica, apresenta e ilustra com casos clínicos suas principais indicações e, por fim, discute os fundamentos biológicos que justificam sua utilização.INTRODUCTION: The systematic search for increased efficiency in orthodontic treatment is shared by several areas of orthodontics. Performing alveolar corticotomies shortly before the application of orthodontic forces has been suggested as a method to enhance tooth movement and, consequently, orthodontic treatment as a whole. OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the historical perspective of this therapeutic approach, presents and illustrates with clinical cases its main indications and finally discusses the biological reasons underlying its use.

  12. The autogenous immediate implant supported single-tooth restoration: a 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Jacopo; Sönmez, Ayse Burçin

    2012-01-01

    When replacing a missing tooth in the esthetic zone, the implant supported single tooth restoration can result in a very natural and pleasing solution for the patient, being also a conservative procedure that preserves the adjacent remaining dentition. Immediate implant placement with an immediate provisional crown can avoid stressful and uncomfortable healing time for the patient who no longer has to wear an interim removable appliance. In selected clinical situations, excellent tooth esthetics for implant supported single tooth restorations can be achieved by using the natural extracted tooth as both provisional and final restoration. No longterm data is available today as far as the survival rate of such restorations and the predictability of such a treatment modality. This case report describes a technique for utilizing the patient's extracted tooth for the fabrication of an inconspicuous final anterior restoration, reporting a 5-year follow-up.

  13. [Mechanisms of tooth eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, J C

    2014-04-01

    Tooth eruption is of the utmost importance for the normal development of the dentition and the face. Since the 1980s, it has been known that the tooth germ itself is not essential for facilitating the processes that make tooth eruption possible. For that reason, recent research on the regulatory mechanisms of tooth eruption has focused mainly on the enamel organ and the dental follicle. Different regulatory mechanisms act on the occlusal and the apical sides of an erupting tooth. On the occlusal side osteoclast differentiation is stimulated. This leads to the development of an eruption canal, a process in which macrophages and matrix metalloproteases also play an important role. On the apical side the most important factors are the transcription factor RUNX2 and the bone morphogenic protein 2. They are responsible for the deposition of trabecular bone in that area. Many regulatory mechanisms which are involved in tooth eruption are also active in other developmental processes. This explains that certain syndromes can also have an effect on the tooth eruption process.

  14. Comparative wear mapping techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcock, J.; Sørensen, Ole Toft; Jensen, S.

    1996-01-01

    Pin surfaces were analysed by laser profilometry. Two roughness parameters, R(a) and the fractal dimension, were investigated as a first step towards methods of quantitative wear mechanism mapping. Both parameters were analysed for their relationship to the severity and prevalence of a mechanism....

  15. Brush seal shaft wear resistant coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Harold

    1995-03-01

    Brush seals suffer from high wear, which reduces their effectiveness. This work sought to reduce brush seal wear by identifying and testing several industry standard coatings. One of the coatings was developed for this work. It was a co-sprayed PSZ with boron-nitride added for a high temperature dry lubricant. Other coatings tested were a PSZ, chrome carbide and a bare rotor. Testing of these coatings included thermal shocking, tensile testing and wear/coefficient of friction testing. Wear testing consisted of applying a coating to a rotor and then running a sample tuft of SiC ceramic fiber against the coating. Surface speeds at point of contact were slightly over 1000 ft/sec. Rotor wear was noted, as well as coefficient of friction data. Results from the testing indicates that the oxide ceramic coatings cannot withstand the given set of conditions. Carbide coatings will not work because of the need for a metallic binder, which oxidizes in the high heat produced by friction. All work indicated a need for a coating that has a lubricant contained within itself and the coating must be resistant to an oxidizing environment.

  16. Autogenous tooth transplantation for replacing a lost tooth: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Youn Kang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The autogenous tooth transplantation is an alternative treatment replacing a missing tooth when a suitable donor tooth is available. It is also a successful treatment option to save significant amount of time and cost comparing implants or conventional prosthetics. These cases, which required single tooth extraction due to deep caries and severe periodontal disease, could have good results by transplanting non-functional but sound donor tooth to the extraction site.

  17. Improving of wear resistance of alloys with metastable austenite structure in abrasion wearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.; Brykov, N.N.; Pugachev, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of grain composition of abrasive masses upon the wear resistance of alloys having a metastable austenitic structure is studied. The investigations have been carried out on Kh12F1 steel, using diffraction and hardness measurements and the metallographic analysis. Experimental data indicate that the specific wear of the stable alloys increases substantially with the size of abrasive particles. As regards the metastable alloys, the increase in the size of the abrasive grains has little effect upon the specific wear, as the increasing abradability of the grains is compensated for by the strengthening of the rubbing surfaces, this resulting from the ability of the metal surface layer to underao structure transformations in the course of wear

  18. [Wear intensity and surface roughness of microhybrid composite and ceramic occlusal veneers on premolars after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Y; Jiang, T; Cheng, M X; Zhang, Y W

    2018-02-18

    To evaluate the wear intensity and surface roughness of occlusal veneers on premolars made of microhybrid composite resin or two kinds of ceramics in vitro after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests. In the study,24 fresh extracted human premolars without root canal treatment were prepared (cusps reduction of 1.5 mm in thickness to simulate middle to severe tooth wear, the inclinations of cusps were 20°). The prepared teeth were restored with occlusal veneers made of three different materials: microhybrid composite, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate ceramic in the thickness of 1.5 mm. The occlusal veneers were cemented with resin cement. The specimens were fatigued using the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests after being stored in water for 72 h. The wear of specimens was measured using gypsum replicas and 3D laser scanner before and after the thermocycling and cyclic mechanical loading tests and the mean lost distance (mm) was used to indicate the level of wear. The surfaces of occlusal contact area were observed and the surface roughness was recorded using 3D laser scanning confocal microscope before and after the fatigue test. Differences between the groups were compared using ONE-way ANOVA(Pmechanical loading tests. The mean wear of microhybrid composite group, heat-pressed lithium disilicate ceramic group, and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic group was (-0.13±0.03) mm, (-0.05±0.01) mm and (-0.05±0.01) mm, the wear of microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two ceramic groups(PCAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic (P=0.010). From the view of wear speed, microhybrid composite was significantly higher than the two kinds of ceramics, but it was similar to enamel when the opposing tooth was natural. The surface roughness before the themocycling and cyclic mechanical loading test of microhybrid composite was significantly

  19. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are two options for replacement: First, a removable partial denture may be used to replace the missing tooth. ... appearance look and feel more natural than a removable partial denture. However, it does require grinding down the support ...

  20. To Tell the Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Sparkling Smile Holiday Workshop Thanksgiving Back to School Fourth of July Fun Tooth Fairy Sugar Wars Valentine's Day Halloween Defeat Monster Mouth! Color and Count Puzzle Fun Oral Health Made Easy ...

  1. Do Laboratory Results Concerning High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomers versus Amalgam for Tooth Restorations Indicate Similar Effect Direction and Magnitude than that of Controlled Clinical Trials? - A Meta-Epidemiological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Mickenautsch

    Full Text Available A large percentage of evidence concerning dental interventions is based on laboratory research. The apparent wealth of laboratory evidence is sometimes used as basis for clinical inference and recommendations for daily dental practice. In this study two null-hypotheses are tested: whether trial results from laboratory and controlled clinical trials concerning the comparison of high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC to amalgam for restorations placed in permanent posterior teeth have: (i similar effect direction and (ii similar effect magnitude.7 electronic databases were searched, as well as reference lists. Odds ratios (OR and Standardised Mean Differences (SMD with 95% Confidence intervals were computed for extracted dichotomous and continuous data, respectively. Pooled effect estimates for laboratory and clinical data were computed to test for effect direction. Odds ratios were converted into SMDs. SMDs from laboratory and clinical data were statistically compared to test for differences in effect magnitude. The analysed results were further investigated within the context of potential influencing or confounding factors using a Directed acyclic graph.Of the accepted eight laboratory and nine clinical trials, 13 and 21 datasets could be extracted, respectively. The pooled results of the laboratory datasets were highly statistically significant in favor of amalgam. No statistically significant differences, between HVGICs and amalgam, were identified for clinical data. For effect magnitude, statistically significant differences between clinical and laboratory trial results were found. Both null-hypotheses were rejected.Laboratory results concerning high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam for tooth restorations do not indicate similar effect direction and magnitude than that of controlled clinical trials.

  2. Assessment of wear facets produced by the ACTA wear machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana R; Larsen, Liselotte; Dowling, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    the 2D profile technique ranks RBC materials in terms of in-vitro wear performance. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Confidence in the wear volume measurements can only be achieved if the wear facet is analysed with sufficient resolution using a 3D digital measurement technique. However, the employment of 2D....... The mean wear depth was measured using the traditionally employed 2D and compared with the 3D profilometric (digital) techniques. Data were submitted to analyses of variance, Tukey's post hoc tests and Independent Samples Student's t-tests (where appropriate) at p... for mean wear depth calculations were similar whether the 2D or 3D techniques were employed. However, the mean wear depth values obtained from the 3D digital technique were significantly increased for two of the five RBC materials compared with the 2D methodology. The total volumetric wear data provided...

  3. The cracked tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  4. Effect of acidic agents on the wear behavior of a polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Xu, Zhou; Arola, Dwayne D; Min, Jie; Zhao, Peng; Gao, Shanshan

    2017-10-01

    Polymer infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) materials exhibit desirable properties for replacement of tooth structure. However, their durability and their integrity in various oral environments, remain relatively unknown. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of acidic agents on the wear behavior of PICNs. Twenty specimens were randomly assigned to four groups and then immersed in either deionized water (control) or acidic agents (2% acetic acid, citric acid or lactic acid solutions) at 37℃ for 4 weeks. Changes in the surface microhardness (SMH) and roughness were measured. Reciprocating wear tests were performed under artificial saliva to 10,000 cycles, and the coefficient of friction (COF) and wear depth were quantified to assess the wear behavior. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the wear morphology. Acid erosion decreased the SMH and increased surface roughness of the PICN, especially in lactic acid solution. For less than 2800 cycles, the acetic acid and citric acid groups showed higher COF and wear depths due to combined ceramic and polymer wear; the lactic acid group showed smaller COF and wear depth, due to a wear debris layer that acted as solid lubricant. Beyond 2800 cycles, all four groups exhibited similar COF values, as well as wear depth and wear morphology. Overall, acid erosion had a significant effect on the surface wear history of the PICN, but no effect on its long-term wear properties. Overall, the depth of acidic degradation of the PICN was rather limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mouthguard and sports drinks on tooth surface pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Y; Yang, T-C; Miyanaga, H; Tanaka, Y; Ikebe, K; Akimoto, N

    2014-09-01

    The influence of sports drinks and mouthguards on the pH level of tooth surface was examined. A custom-made mouthguard was fabricated for each subject. The pH level was measured by electric pH meter with sensitivity of 0.01 up to 30 min. Sports drinks (pH=3.75) containing 9.4% sugar were used in this study. Measurements were performed on a cohort of 23 female subjects without a mouthguard (control), wearing a mouthguard only (MG), wearing a mouthguard after 30 ml sports drink intake (SD+MG), wearing a mouthguard during a 5-min jogging exercise (MG+EX) and wearing a mouthguard during jogging after sports drink intake (SD+MG+EX). For 7 male subjects, the same measurements were performed while a sports drink was taken over the mouthguard (MG+SD, MD+EX+SD). MG showed statistically higher pH level than control (psports drinks were taken over the mouthguard, no significant differences in pH level were observed among the different conditions.Within the limitations of this study, it was suggested that wearing a mouthguard during exercise is in itself not a possible risk factor for dental caries, while wearing a mouthguard after consuming sports drinks is. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Relationship between food habits and tooth erosion occurrence in Malaysian University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Lee, Mei Tee; Ali, Nor Hazirah Muhammad; Samynathan, Selvamary; Jie, Ying Phor; Ismail, Noor Hasnani; Bibiana Hui Ying, Yong; Wei Seng, Yeo; Yahya, Nurul Asyikin

    2012-04-01

    Tooth erosion is a growing dental problem; however, the role of diet in the aetiology of tooth erosion is unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the association between tooth erosion occurrence and the consumption of acidic foods and drinks among undergraduate university students. A total of 150 undergraduate students (33 males and 117 females) aged 19 to 24 years at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia participated in this study. The Basic Erosive Wear Examination was used to assess the occurrence of tooth erosion. Information regarding dental hygiene practices, usual dietary habits, and consumption of acidic foods and drinks was obtained through a structured questionnaire. In all, 68% of subjects had tooth erosion. Subjects who reported having received information about healthy eating were less likely to have tooth erosion (χ(2) [1, N = 150] = 7.328, P = 0.007). The frequencies of milk (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.13-0.67) and tea/coffee (adjusted OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.19-0.95) consumption were negatively associated with tooth erosion. Dental hygiene practice, the frequency and amount of acidic food and drink intake, and body mass index classification were not significantly associated with the risk of tooth erosion (P > 0.05). A high prevalence of tooth erosion was observed among this group of students. Preventive measures, such as dietary advice and increased consumption of milk at a younger age, may reduce the occurrence of tooth erosion among this age group.

  7. Tooth eruption and browridge formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M D

    1982-05-01

    One of the most reasonable hypotheses regarding the functional significance of the browridge is that the supraorbital torus forms in response to masticatory stress during development. Oyen, Walker, and Rice (1979) have recently proposed a model that tests this hypothesis: if browridges are functionally related to masticatory stresses on the cranial vault, then changes in the biomechanics of the masticatory system ought to be reflected by changes in the browridge. To test their model they attempted to relate biomechanical discontinuities resulting from tooth eruption to episodes of bone deposition on the supraorbital tori of a developmental series of dry Papio crania. This paper reports on a parallel test of the model on a cross-sectional sample of Australian Aboriginal juvenile crania. This sample showed no relation between tooth eruption and the supraorbital surface morphology thought to be indicative of active bone deposition. It is also demonstrated that no significant relationship between tooth eruption and episodes of bone deposition is shown by the Papio sample. It is concluded that the use of small cross-sectional samples of dry crania does not provide a valid test of the model.

  8. In Vitro Investigation of Wear of CAD/CAM Polymeric Materials Against Primary Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Won Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of polymeric computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing CAD/CAM materials on antagonistic primary tooth wear. Five CAD/CAM polymeric materials were examined: Vipi Block Monocolor (VBM, Yamahachi polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA (YAP, Mazic Duro (MZD, Vita Enamic (ENA, and Pekkton (PEK. All of the specimens were tested in a thermomechanical loading machine with the primary canine as the antagonist (50 N, 1.2 × 105 cycles, 1.7 Hz, 5/55 °C. The wear losses of the antagonist tooth and the restorative materials were calculated using reverse modelling software and an electronic scale. VBM and ENA showed significantly higher antagonist tooth wear than PEK (p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference observed among VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05. PEK showed the largest value in both material volumetric and weight losses. In terms of material volumetric losses, there was no significant difference between all of the groups (p > 0.05. In terms of material weight losses, PEK was significantly larger than ENA (p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference between VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05. Volumetric and weight losses of materials showed similar wear behaviour. However, the wear patterns of antagonists and materials were different, especially in PEK.

  9. Improvement of wear resistance for C45 steel using plasma nitriding, nitrocarburizing and nitriding/ manganese phosphating duplex treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. V.; Kusmič, D.; Pospíchal, M.; Dobrocký, D.

    2017-02-01

    This article focuses on effect of plasma nitriding, nitrocarburizing and nitriding/manganese phosphating duplex treatments to wear resistance of C45 steel substrate. The wear test “ball on disc” was conducted to evaluate the coefficient of friction and wear rate using the BRUKER UMT-3 tribometer. The analysis results indicated that nitrocarburizing obtained the best wear resistance; the worst wear resistance was plasma nitriding. Manganese phosphating coating enabled to reduce the coefficient of friction enhanced wear resistance nitrided layer. The used surface treatments also improve non-equal wear of tempered surface over the sliding track.

  10. Occlusal relief changes with molar wear in Pan troglodytes troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'kirera, Francis; Ungar, Peter S

    2003-06-01

    Most research on primate tooth form-function relationships has focused on unworn teeth. This study presents a morphological comparison of variably worn lower second molars (M(2)s) of lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla; n=47) and common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes; n=54) using dental topographic analysis. High-resolution replicas of occlusal surfaces were prepared and scanned in 3D by laser scanning. The resulting elevation data were used to create a geographic information system (GIS) for each tooth. Occlusal relief, defined as the ratio of 3D surface area to 2D planometric area of the occlusal table, was calculated and compared between wear stages, taxa, and sexes. The results failed to show a difference in occlusal relief between males and females of a given taxon, but did evince differences between wear stages and between taxa. A lack of significant interaction between wear stage and taxon factors suggests that differences in occlusal relief between chimpanzees and gorillas are maintained throughout the wear sequence. These results add to a growing body of information on how molar teeth change with wear, and how differences between primate species are maintained at comparable points throughout the wear sequence. Such studies provide new insights into form-function relationships, which will allow us to infer certain aspects of diet in fossils with worn teeth.

  11. Biomaterial Selection for Tooth Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhenglin; Nie, Hemin; Wang, Shuang; Lee, Chang Hun; Li, Ang; Fu, Susan Y.; Zhou, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are native or synthetic polymers that act as carriers for drug delivery or scaffolds for tissue regeneration. When implanted in vivo, biomaterials should be nontoxic and exert intended functions. For tooth regeneration, biomaterials have primarily served as a scaffold for (1) transplanted stem cells and/or (2) recruitment of endogenous stem cells. This article critically synthesizes our knowledge of biomaterial use in tooth regeneration, including the selection of native and/or synthetic polymers, three-dimensional scaffold fabrication, stem cell transplantation, and stem cell homing. A tooth is a complex biological organ. Tooth loss represents the most common organ failure. Tooth regeneration encompasses not only regrowth of an entire tooth as an organ, but also biological restoration of individual components of the tooth including enamel, dentin, cementum, or dental pulp. Regeneration of tooth root represents perhaps more near-term opportunities than the regeneration of the whole tooth. In the adult, a tooth owes its biological vitality, arguably more, to the root than the crown. Biomaterials are indispensible for the regeneration of tooth root, tooth crown, dental pulp, or an entire tooth. PMID:21699433

  12. Adhesive, abrasive and oxidative wear in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1985-01-01

    Ion implantation is increasingly being used to provide wear resistance in metals and cemented tungsten carbides. Field trials and laboratory tests indicate that the best performance is achieved in mild abrasive wear. This can be understood in terms of the classification of wear modes (adhesive, abrasive, oxidative etc.) introduced by Burwell. Surface hardening and work hardenability are the major properties to be enhanced by ion implantation. The implantation of nitrogen or dual implants of metallic and interstitial species are effective. Recently developed techniques of ion-beam-enhanced deposition of coatings can further improve wear resistance by lessening adhesion and oxidation. In order to support such hard coatings, ion implantation of nitrogen can be used as a preliminary treatment. There is thus emerging a versatile group of related hard vacuum treatments involving intense beams of nitrogen ions for the purpose of tailoring metal surfaces to resist wear. (Auth.)

  13. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  14. Wear of polymers and composites

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelbary, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    In the field of tribology, the wear behaviour of polymers and composite materials is considered a highly non-linear phenomenon. Wear of Polymers and Composites introduces fundamentals of polymers and composites tribology. The book suggests a new approach to explore the effect of applied load and surface defects on the fatigue wear behaviour of polymers, using a new tribometer and thorough experiments. It discusses effects of surface cracks, under different static and cyclic loading parameters on wear, and presents an intelligent algorithm, in the form of a neural network, to map the relations

  15. Diffusion wear studies of HSS tools by gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, V.C.

    1979-01-01

    During the machinino. of plain carbon steels with HSS tools diffusion of some elements particularly carbon and chromium has been observed with the help of an electron probe micro-analyser. The disadvantage of the probe is that it gives only spot analysis and measurement of wear of individual elements over several metres of chips becomes a cumbersome affair. Gamma spectrometry presents a rapid method for wear studies of individual elements. A 100 channel scintillation spectrometer was used simultaneously with the radio-active tool wear tests for this ourpose. The study was undertaken of only those radioelements whose gamma energy could be easily distinguished, which in the case of HSS tools are W, Cr and Co. In this method the gamma energy of W, Cr and Co was measured and the energy curves were plotted. Then the specific activity was calculated. Knowing the specific activities it is possible to calculate the transfer of individual elements i.e. the mass of element in gm/gm of tool wear. W and Co unlike Cr did not show the same trend in all the samples. This could be because wear occurs by abrasion and adhesion and by diffusion as well. In the abrasion and adhesion, wear process elements will be in proportion to that obtaining in the HSS matrix or in the carbides in HSS. The regular trend of wear of chromium indicates its wear by diffusion and this has also been established by electron probe micro-analysis. (auth.)

  16. Influence of heat treatment on the wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Hanxiang; Qin, Jie; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shihong

    2017-01-01

    Wear phenomenon has caused severe damage or failure of fracturing tools in oil and gas industry. In this paper, influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties and wear resistance of fracturing tool made of lamellar graphite grey cast iron were investigated. The surface composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic microscope. Sliding wear tests were performed to study the tribological behavior. Tests results showed that wear rates of treated specimens decreased by 33 %. Besides, worn morphology and wear debris were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive Xray spectra (EDS). Wear failure mechanisms of specimens were identified. Furthermore, on-site experiment results indicated that wear loss of treated samples decreased by 37.5 %. The wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools can be improved obviously by the heat treatment

  17. Influence of heat treatment on the wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Chao; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Hanxiang; Qin, Jie; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Shihong [China University of Petroleum, Qingdao (China)

    2017-02-15

    Wear phenomenon has caused severe damage or failure of fracturing tools in oil and gas industry. In this paper, influence of heat treatment on the mechanical properties and wear resistance of fracturing tool made of lamellar graphite grey cast iron were investigated. The surface composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and metallographic microscope. Sliding wear tests were performed to study the tribological behavior. Tests results showed that wear rates of treated specimens decreased by 33 %. Besides, worn morphology and wear debris were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy dispersive Xray spectra (EDS). Wear failure mechanisms of specimens were identified. Furthermore, on-site experiment results indicated that wear loss of treated samples decreased by 37.5 %. The wear life of hydraulic fracturing tools can be improved obviously by the heat treatment.

  18. Pure mechanical wear loss measurement in corrosive wear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Jiang Xiaoxia 1992 Metall. Sinica 28 B57. Jiang Xiaoxia and Li Sizuo 1991 Chemical Machinery 18 150. (in Chinese). Madson B W 1988 Wear 123 127. Pitt C H 1986 Corrosion 42 312. Schumacher W 1985 Wear of Materials 558. Tomlison W J 1991 Tribo. Inter. 2 67. Yue Zhongying 1987 Solid Lubrication 7 65 (in Chinese).

  19. Pure mechanical wear loss measurement in corrosive wear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The method for the measurement of the pure mechanical wear loss for 321 stainless steel, 1045 steel and pure iron in the study of the synergy between corrosion and wear was studied. The methods studied included the measurement in distilled water, by cathodic protection and by adding inhibitor KI, and all were ...

  20. A comparison between indirect and objective wear-time assessment of removable orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Timm C; Meyer-Gutknecht, Hannes; Mayer, Nicolai; Weber, Joachim; Weimer, Katja

    2017-04-01

    Patients do not always adhere to the wear times prescribed for removable orthodontic appliances. We evaluated the validity and usability of indirect wear-time assessment methods by comparing wear-time estimates with microelectronically measured wear times in patients with removable orthodontic appliances. Wear times of 33 expansion plates, 34 functional appliances, and 42 retention plates of patients aged 6-20 years (12.3±2.9 years, 50.5% female) were indirectly determined by practitioners using a questionnaire assessing five parameters on a 5-point Likert scale: appliance handling, appliance appearance, bite shift, tooth movement, and appliance fit. The perceived difficulty in assessing each parameter was rated. Actual wear times were evaluated with microelectronic sensors in the appliances. Regression analyses revealed that practitioners' decisions about wear times varied depending on the type of appliance and criteria used, with only one standard criterion best predicting estimated wear time for each appliance. Different standard criteria were better predictors of measured wear time: 22.3% of wear-time variability was explained by expansion plate appearance, 31.2% by functional appliance handling, and 18.8% by retainer fitting. However, practitioners rated the difficulty of assessment in most cases as 'easy'. The study was not double blinded for technical reasons, and practitioners may have considered the evaluation criteria more carefully than in normal daily practice. Practitioners' decisions about wear times based on standard criteria strongly vary depending on the type of appliance and criteria used. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. The abrasive effect of a porcelain and a nickel-chromium alloy on the wear of human enamel and the influence of a carbonated beverage on the rate of wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil; Patil, Narendra P; Patil, Sanjayagouda B

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the abrasive effect of a porcelain and an Ni-Cr alloy on the wear of human enamel, and the influence of a carbonated beverage on the rate of wear. Tooth specimens were prepared by embedding 48 freshly extracted mandibular first premolars in acrylic. Twenty-four of these specimens were abraded against Ni-Cr, and the remaining 24 against porcelain in artificial saliva and carbonated beverage media, respectively (n = 12), on a specially designed abrasive testing machine at a constant load of 40 N with 6 mm amplitude for 15,000 cycles. The cusp heights of the tooth specimens were measured both before and after abrasion using a profile projector. The abraded cast specimens were subjected to profilometry for computing the surface roughness; the abrading media was subjected to atomic absorption spectrophotometry for analyzing Ni and Cr ion levels. Data obtained were statistically analyzed. Porcelain specimens in a medium of carbonated beverage caused the highest wear of tooth specimens. The lowest wear of tooth specimens was Ni-Cr specimens in artificial saliva medium. Carbonated beverage caused significantly higher wear of tooth specimens when abraded against Ni-Cr and porcelain specimens than did artificial saliva. The mean quantitative surface roughness of porcelain specimens was significantly higher than that of Ni-Cr specimens, irrespective of the medium in which abrasion testing was conducted. There was no statistically significant difference between the concentrations of Ni ions released in artificial saliva and carbonated beverage media. Also, there was no statistically significant difference between the concentrations of Cr ions released in artificial saliva and carbonated beverage media. The wear of human enamel was significantly higher in the presence of carbonated beverage than artificial saliva and against porcelain when compared with Ni-Cr. The surface roughness of porcelain in the presence of carbonated beverage was

  2. [Infants wearing teething necklaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefer, A; Casasoprana, A; Cascarigny, F; Claudet, I

    2012-10-01

    Numerous infants wear teething necklaces, a quack remedy with a real risk of strangulation or aspiration of small beads. Evaluate parental perceptions and beliefs about the use of teething necklaces and analyze parental knowledge about the associated dangers. Between March and July 2011, in three different pediatric units of a tertiary children's hospital and a general hospital in Toulouse and Montauban (southwest France), voluntary parents were invited to be interviewed about their child wearing a teething necklace. The interviews were conducted following an anthropological approach: they were recorded and then fully transcribed and analyzed. Parents were informed that the conversation was recorded. During the study period, 48 children were eligible. Eleven families refused to participate, 29 parents were interviewed face to face. The children's mean age was 14 years ± 7 months, the male:female ratio was equal to 0.8 (12 boys, 15 girls). The mean age of children when necklace wearing was started was equal to 4 ± 2 months. The mean mother's age was 31 ± 5 years and 33 ± 4 years for fathers. The parents' religion was mostly Catholic (60%). Teething necklaces were mainly made of amber (n=23). Sales information about the risks associated with the necklaces was for the most part absent (92%). The most frequent positive parental perceptions were analgesic properties and a soothing remedy (73%); a birth accessory and memory (64%); an esthetic accessory (60%); a protective amulet (60%); and an alternative or additional element to other traditional therapeutics (55%). The negative parental perceptions (n=4) were an unnecessary accessory, costume jewelry, a pure commercial abuse of a popular belief, a dangerous item with a risk of strangulation, and the absence of proof of its efficacy. Although parents concede that teeth eruption is benign, they fear its related symptoms. To a natural phenomenon a natural response: they use a necklace to satisfy the analogy. The

  3. Tyre and road wear prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Both tyre wear and road polishing are complex phenomenon, which are obviously strongly related; the energy that polishes the road is the energy that wears the tyre. The both depend non-linearly on numerous parameters, like materials used, vehicle and road usage, environmental conditions (i.e.

  4. Prolonging contact lens wear and making contact lens wear safer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulks, Gary N

    2006-02-01

    To summarize the present status of safety and efficacy of contact lens wear. Literature review. Ovid Medline searches were performed on records from 1966 through 2005 using keywords: keratitis, contact lens complications, extended-wear contact lenses, and silicone-hydrogel contact lenses. Patients desire comfort, clarity of vision, and prolonged contact lens wear when contact lenses are used to correct refractive error. Practitioners desire patient satisfaction but also require maintenance of the integrity of the eye and no complications that jeopardize vision or health of the eye. Improvements in the oxygen permeability of the contact lens materials, design of the contact lens and its surface, and solutions for the maintenance of the lens have reduced but not eliminated the risks of infection, inflammation, and conjunctival papillary reaction associated with contact lens wear. The lessons of past and recent history suggest that patient education and practitioner participation in the management of contact lens wear continue to be critical factors for patient satisfaction and safety in the extended wear of contact lenses. The availability of highly oxygen permeable contact lenses has increased the tolerance and safety of extended contact lens wear, but patient instruction and education in proper use and care of lenses is required and caution is advised.

  5. [Research progress on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tooth eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiyan, Huang; Nanquan, Rao; Shuhao, Xu; Xiaobing, Li

    2016-06-01

    Tooth eruption is a series of complicated physiological processes occurring once the crown is formed completely, as well as when the tooth moves toward the occasion plane. As such, the tooth moves through the alveolar bone and the oral mucosa until it finally reaches its functional position. Most studies indicate that the process of tooth eruption involves the alveolar bone, dental follicles, osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and multiple cytokines. Dental follicles regulate both resorption and formation of the alveolar bone, which is required for tooth eruption. Furthermore, root formation with periodontal ligament facilitates continuous tooth eruption. However, the exact mechanism underlying tooth eruption remains unclear. Hence, this review describes the recent research progress on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tooth eruption.

  6. La huella de contacto entre flancos como indicador de la precisión de la transmisión por engranaje de tornillo sinfín. // The tooth contact pattern as indicator of the cylindrical wormgearing precision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rivero Llerena

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación es la creación de un procedimiento que permita evaluar el grado de precisión de latransmisión por tornillo sinfín, teniendo en cuenta los errores de fabricación y montaje propios de cada tecnología deelaboración. Se utilizó un método teórico, que combinado con las mediciones físicas de la huella de contacto, dieron lugar aun procedimiento que se fundamenta en el empleo de nomogramas que contienen los parámetros del contacto entre flancos.Se aprecia que el procesamiento de las imágenes digitales de la huella, permite establecer determinadas características decalidad del par engranado.Palabras claves: Engranaje de tornillo sinfín, grado de precisión, huella de contacto, montaje._________________________________________________________________________________Abstract:The objective of this investigation is the establishment of a procedure to evaluate the degree of accuracy of the wormgear transmission, taking into account the manufacturing errors and assembly. A theoretical method was used andcombined with the physical measurement of tooth contact pattern, giving as result a procedure focused on the use ofnomograms related to contact parameters between faces. It can be appreciated that digital image processing of toothcontact pattern give the possibility of state gear quality featuresKey words: Worm gear, accuracy, tooth contact patter.

  7. Cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tanumihardja

    2009-01-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome is usually found in daily dental practice. The incidence of cracks teeth tends to increasing. People are living longer and keeping their teeth longer. As a consequence, people have more complex restoration and endodontic treatment, leaving teeth more prone to cracks. In addition, stressful lives may provoke unconscious habits such as clenching and bruxism which can induce cracks in teeth. However, many cracks teeth can be saved nowadays when the character...

  8. Chick tooth induction revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jinglei; Cho, Sung-Won; Ishiyama, Mikio; Mikami, Masato; Hosoya, Akihiro; Kozawa, Yukishige; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2009-07-15

    Teeth have been missing from Aves for almost 100 million years. However, it is believed that the avian oral epithelium retains the molecular signaling required to induce odontogenesis, and this has been widely examined using heterospecific recombinations with mouse dental mesenchyme. It has also been argued that teeth can form from the avian oral epithelium owing to contamination of the mouse mesenchyme with mouse dental epithelial cells. To investigate the possibility of tooth formation from chick oral epithelium and the characteristics of possible chick enamel, we applied LacZ transgenic mice during heterospecific recombination and examined the further tooth formation. Transmission electron microscopy was used to identify the two tissues during development after heterospecific recombination. No mixing was detected between chick oral epithelium and mouse dental mesenchyme after 2 days, and secretory ameloblasts with Tomes' processes were observed after 1 week. Teeth were formed after 3 weeks with a single cusp pattern, possibly determined by epithelial factors, which is similar to that of the avian tooth in the late Jurassic period. These recombinant teeth were smaller than mouse molars, whereas perfect structures of both ameloblasts and enamel showed histological characteristics similar to those of mice. Together these observations consistent with previous report that odontogenesis is initially directed by species-specific mesenchymal signals interplaying with common epithelial signals. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Digital assessment of occlusal wear patterns on occlusal stabilization splints: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korioth, T W; Bohlig, K G; Anderson, G C

    1998-08-01

    If masticatory load distribution is task-dependent, then the pattern of wear on an acrylic resin occlusal splint over time may affect clinical outcome. This pilot study quantitatively assessed posterior wear after 3 months on the occlusal surfaces of maxillary stabilization splints. Subjects with known history of nocturnal bruxism were given heat-cured full-arch acrylic resin occlusal stabilization splints to be worn nocturnally for 3 months. Splint occlusion was adjusted at appliance delivery and was refined at the baseline session 1 to 2 weeks later. No further adjustment of the splint surface was performed during the 3-month study period. Sequential impressions of the splint occlusal surface provided epoxy resin models that were digitized and analyzed through specialized software. Changes in the digitized splint surface from baseline to 3 months allowed comparison of wear facets between splint sides and among tooth locations. Splint wear was asymmetric between sides and uneven between dental locations. For full coverage occlusal splints, the appliance wear phenomenon can be site specific and, if left undisturbed, may yield two extremes of high wear and a zone of low wear in-between.

  10. Beeswax as dental filling on a neolithic human tooth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bernardini

    Full Text Available Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual's death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling.

  11. Beeswax as dental filling on a neolithic human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Coppa, Alfredo; Mancini, Lucia; Dreossi, Diego; Eichert, Diane; Turco, Gianluca; Biasotto, Matteo; Terrasi, Filippo; De Cesare, Nicola; Hua, Quan; Levchenko, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual's death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling.

  12. Osteopatologias e alterações dentárias em Otaria byronia (Pinnipedia, Otariidae da costa do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Osteopathologies and tooth alterations in Otaria byronia (Pinnipedia, Otariidae from Rio Grande do Sul coast, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Rodrigues Braunn

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone diseases and tooth alterations in 47 specimens of Otaria byronia (Blainville, 1820, from southern Brazilian coast, were analized. Tooth wear and the associated bone pathologies were determined, as well as their percentuals. The main infection was osteomyelitis associated with tooth alterations, such as fractures and attrition, both of them exposing the pulp chamber. Tooth attrition increases with age, favoring fractures and their complications, including osteomyelitis, causing a high frequency of them in specimens presenting more pronounced tooth wear. In one specimen tuberculosis was found in the maxilla, perhaps primarily pulmonary. The high frequency of enamel hypoplasia might reflect cyclic food deficit. Infections and tooth fractures might be related to behaviour, such as fishermen interaction, territorial fighting, and accidents during food capture.

  13. Dry sliding wear behaviour of organo-modified montmorillonite filled epoxy nanocomposites using Taguchi's techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashmi; Renukappa, N.M.; Suresha, B.; Devarajaiah, R.M.; Shivakumar, K.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful fabrication of OMMT filled epoxy nanocomposites by high-shear mixing mehod. → Systematic tribological behaviour of the nanocomposites was made using Taguchi method. → Worn surface morphologies of the samples were discussed for different wear mechanisms. → Generation of wear data for sliding/bearing parts for different industries. -- Abstract: The aim of the research article is to study the dry sliding wear behaviour of epoxy with different wt.% of organo-modified montmorillonite (OMMT) filled nanocomposites. An orthogonal array (L 9 ) was used to investigate the influence of tribological parameters. The results indicate that the sliding distance emerges as the most significant factor affecting wear rate of epoxy nanocomposites. Experimental results showed that the inclusion of 5 wt.% OMMT nanofiller increased the wear resistance of the epoxy nanocomposite significantly. Furthermore, the worn surfaces of the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the wear mechanisms and to correlate them with the wear test results.

  14. Impaired tooth eruption: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, C E E; Chabikuli, N J; Nzima, N

    2005-11-01

    Eruption is the continuous process of movement of a tooth from its developmental location inside the jaw to its functional location in the mouth. Impaired tooth eruption, where this process is disturbed, is common in dental practice. It may manifest either as delayed or complete absence of eruption. Although unerupted teeth are usually asymptomatic, they may cause cosmetic and pathologic complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a review on the pathogenesis and differential radiographic interpretation of impaired tooth eruption.

  15. Wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper several aspects of the wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals, ceramics and super-hard materials (CBN) in machining cast iron are discussed, with particular attention being given to high-speed machining of different cast iron grades. The influence of machining parameters, microstructure, composition and mechanical and chemical properties of the cutting tool and the work-piece material on wear are considered. (author)

  16. Relative cheek-tooth size in Australopithecus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, H M

    1984-07-01

    Until the discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, cheek-tooth megadontia was unequivocally one of the defining characteristics of the australopithecine grade in human evolution along with bipedalism and small brains. This species, however, has an average postcanine area of 757 mm2, which is more like Homo habilis (759 mm2) than A. africanus (856 mm2). But what is its relative cheek-tooth size in comparison to body size? One approach to this question is to compare postcanine tooth area to estimated body weight. By this method all Australopithecus species are megadont: they have cheek teeth 1.7 to 2.3 times larger than modern hominoids of similar body size. The series from A. afarensis to A. africanus to A. robustus to A. boisei shows strong positive allometry indicating increasing megadontia through time. The series from H. habilis to H. erectus to H. sapiens shows strong negative allometry which implies a sharp reduction in the relative size of the posterior teeth. Postcanine megadontia in Australopithecus species can also be demonstrated by comparing tooth size and body size in associated skeletons: A. afarensis (represented by A.L. 288-1) has a cheek-tooth size 2.8 times larger than expected from modern hominoids; A. africanus (Sts 7) and A. robustus (TM 1517) are over twice the expected size. The evolutionary transition from the megadont condition of Australopithecus to the trend of decreasing megadontia seen in the Homo lineage may have occurred between 3.0 and 2.5 m.y. from A. afarensis to H.habilis but other evidence indicates that it is more likely to have occurred between 2.5 to 2.0 m.y. from an A. africanus-like form to H. habilis.

  17. [Tooth eruption disturbances and syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterkamp, B C M; Ockeloen, C W; Carels, C E L; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2014-04-01

    In the tooth eruption mechanism, various disturbances can appear as a result of gene mutations, a consequence of which can be that tooth eruption does not occur. There are 5 syndromes which involve the complete failure of several or even all teeth to erupt, specifically: cleidocranial dysplasia, Gardner's syndrome, osteopetrosis, mucopolysaccharidosis and GAPO syndrome. Some are very rare and will seldom be encountered in a dental practice, but they show how vulnerable the tooth eruption mechanism is. Dentists are generally the ones who identify a tooth eruption problem in a patient. Since syndromes can be associated with other disorders, additional investigation by a clinical geneticist is always important when a syndrome is suspected.

  18. Three-dimensional anatomy of equine incisors: tooth length, enamel cover and age related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Patricia; Lüpke, Matthias; Seifert, Hermann; Staszyk, Carsten

    2013-12-09

    Equine incisors are subjected to continuous occlusal wear causing multiple, age related changes of the extragingival crown. It is assumed that the occlusal wear is compensated by continued tooth elongation at the apical ends of the teeth. In this study, μCT-datasets offered the opportunity to analyze the three-dimensional appearance of the extra- and intraalveolar parts of the enamel containing dental crown as well as of the enamel-free dental root. Multiple morphometric measurements elucidated age related, morphological changes within the intraalveolar part of the incisors. Equine incisors possess a unique enamel cover displaying large indentations on the mesial and distal sides. After eruption tooth elongation at the apical end outbalances occlusal wear for two to four years resulting in increasing incisor length in this period of time. Remarkably, this maximum length is maintained for about ten years, up to a tooth age of 13 to 15 years post eruption. Variances in the total length of individual teeth are related to different Triadan positions (central-, middle- and corner incisors) as well as to the upper and lower arcades. Equine incisors are able to fully compensate occlusal wear for a limited period of time. However, after this ability ceases, it is expected that a diminished intraalveolar tooth length will cause massive changes in periodontal biomechanics. The time point of these morphodynamic and biomechanical changes (13 to 15 years post eruption) occurs in coincidence with the onset of a recently described destructive disease of equine incisor (equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis) in aged horses. However, further biomechanical, cell biological and microbiological investigations are needed to elucidate a correlation between age related changes of incisor morphology and this disease.

  19. Three-dimensional anatomy of equine incisors: tooth length, enamel cover and age related changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Equine incisors are subjected to continuous occlusal wear causing multiple, age related changes of the extragingival crown. It is assumed that the occlusal wear is compensated by continued tooth elongation at the apical ends of the teeth. In this study, μCT-datasets offered the opportunity to analyze the three-dimensional appearance of the extra- and intraalveolar parts of the enamel containing dental crown as well as of the enamel-free dental root. Multiple morphometric measurements elucidated age related, morphological changes within the intraalveolar part of the incisors. Results Equine incisors possess a unique enamel cover displaying large indentations on the mesial and distal sides. After eruption tooth elongation at the apical end outbalances occlusal wear for two to four years resulting in increasing incisor length in this period of time. Remarkably, this maximum length is maintained for about ten years, up to a tooth age of 13 to 15 years post eruption. Variances in the total length of individual teeth are related to different Triadan positions (central-, middle- and corner incisors) as well as to the upper and lower arcades. Conclusion Equine incisors are able to fully compensate occlusal wear for a limited period of time. However, after this ability ceases, it is expected that a diminished intraalveolar tooth length will cause massive changes in periodontal biomechanics. The time point of these morphodynamic and biomechanical changes (13 to 15 years post eruption) occurs in coincidence with the onset of a recently described destructive disease of equine incisor (equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis) in aged horses. However, further biomechanical, cell biological and microbiological investigations are needed to elucidate a correlation between age related changes of incisor morphology and this disease. PMID:24321365

  20. Wear behaviour of Al 261

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mathan Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Al 2618 matrix material was mixed with the Silicon Nitride (Si3N4, Aluminium Nitride (AlN and Zirconium Boride (ZrB2 reinforced particles. AMC was synthesized successfully by the stir casting method with the various X-wt.% of reinforcements (X = 0,2,4,6,8. Tribological behaviour was studied in this composite with various temperature conditions. The working conditions were Temperature (°C, Load (N, Velocity (m/s and Sliding Distances (m. Before wear testing the mechanical behaviour has been analysed. EDAX was confirmed by the matrix material composition. The Al 2618 alloy and the reinforcement mixers were confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction analysis. Wear rate (mm3/m, Wear resistance (m/mm3, Specific Wear rate (m/Nm and Co-efficient of friction (μ were analysed with various conditions. The worn surfaces were analysed before and after wear testing by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Influence of process parameters and Percentage of contribution were analysed by Taguchi and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA methods. Genetic Algorithm (GA was adopted for optimizing the best and mean of the wear rate and to identify the exact influence of input parameters.

  1. The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behaviour of metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Y.; Ozdin, K.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of abrasive particle size on the wear behavior of the SiC particle-reinforced aluminium composites produced by liquid metallurgy was investigated under different sizes of SiC grits at a fixed speed. The results show that the wear loss of composite was considerably lower than that of aluminium alloy. The wear loss increased linearly with sliding distance for both materials, but indicating a considerable difference. It increased with increasing SiC abrasive particles. Moreover, SEM examination indicates that abrasive wear observed for the matrix alloy. The depth of wear grooves decreased with decreasing the abrasive particle size and load. For the composites, wear surfaces were found to be a quite smooth indicating that no abrasive grooves appeared

  2. High-speed wear testing of selected ceramics in abrasive slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailov, Arnold; Levänen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Due to increased production speeds in modern process environments, the loading conditions in sliding contact applications have become more challenging. Therefore it is important to have good understanding of wear mechanisms in high-speed sliding conditions. A wear testing device was manufactured for the purpose of cost-efficient simulation of water-containing high-speed sliding conditions. Sliding speeds up to 40 meters per second can be achieved while abrasive-containing slurry is fed into the contact interface of material samples and a rubber coated drum. High-speed wear tests were run with three ceramic materials: silicon nitride, silicon carbide and partially stabilized zirconia. Wear behavior of these ceramics was analyzed as a function of sliding speed and slurry composition. Results indicate that in mild wear region increase in sliding speed reduced overall wear, whereas in severe wear conditions increasing speed accelerated wear. A transition from mild to severe wear was observed for silicon carbide when tested in alumina-containing slurry. For the materials that had high enough hardness, wear rates were dictated by the respective order of fracture toughness. Visual inspection of the worn samples supported the interpretation of wear mode transition

  3. Critical component wear in heavy duty engines

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, P A

    2011-01-01

    The critical parts of a heavy duty engine are theoretically designed for infinite life without mechanical fatigue failure. Yet the life of an engine is in reality determined by wear of the critical parts. Even if an engine is designed and built to have normal wear life, abnormal wear takes place either due to special working conditions or increased loading.  Understanding abnormal and normal wear enables the engineer to control the external conditions leading to premature wear, or to design the critical parts that have longer wear life and hence lower costs. The literature on wear phenomenon r

  4. On the Determination of the Gear Teeth Wear Using an Inductive Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Atamanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem to measure the teeth wear of rotating gear wheels and a possibility to create simple, reliable and inexpensive mobile systems of diagnostics allowing to record the wear in the course of use are presently relevant. The paper presents implemented technical solutions as a result of work. The aim of the work was to prove experimentally that it is possible to measure the teeth wear of a gear wheel using a passive inductive sensor and a positioning disk. The technique to determine the wear uses a phase-chronometric method developed at BMSTU.To reach the objective, an experimental installation was designed and made. Works are performed, and experimental results of used stationary inductive sensors of passive type to measure the ferromagnetic gear wheels wear of reducers in use are received. The technique for defining the points at the output signal of the inductive sensor, which correspond to the specified points of the tooth profile and, in particular, to the profile points on a pitch circle of the tooth of gear wheel has been developed. Experiments allowed us to define the main dependences of signal parameters on the sizes and arrangement of the sensor magnet with respect to the passing tooth in the course of rotation, as well as on the number of the sensor coil turns, speed of gear wheel rotation, and on the gap size between the end face of the sensor and the top of a tooth.The technique for positioning the sensor with respect to tooth has been deve loped. In particular, it allows us to position a sensor at any point of the involute, including also a point of the profile on a pitch circle. This is necessary to adjust the sensor. The conducted researches allowed us to develop a technique for exact measuring system adjustment to a hitch circle of the gear wheel and to develop for this purpose a system of diagnostics and measurement of teeth wear with the wheel being rotated. The results of work performed at the JSC ELARA in Cheboksary city

  5. An Evaluation of High Velocity Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Stachowiak (Ed.), Wear: Materials, Mechanisms and Practice. Chichester, England: John Wiley and Sons. 10. Hooser, M. (2007). Rail dimensions...NV, 10-13 Jan 2000. , AIAA 2000-0155 13. Hutchings, I. M. (2005). The Challenge of Wear. In G. W. Stachowiak (Ed.), Wear: Materials, Mechanisms and...Kato, K. (2005). Classification of Wear Mechanisms/Models. In G. W. Stachowiak (Ed.), Wear: Materials, mechanisms and practice. Chichester, England

  6. [Tooth eruption disturbances and syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.A.M. van; Ockeloen, C.W.; Carels, C.E.L.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the tooth eruption mechanism, various disturbances can appear as a result of gene mutations, a consequence of which can be that tooth eruption does not occur. There are 5 syndromes which involve the complete failure of several or even all teeth to erupt, specifically: cleidocranial dysplasia,

  7. Broken or knocked out tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Broken or knocked out tooth URL of this page: // ... and fluid solution. Consider buying 1 for your home first aid kit . Also ... If your tooth is badly broken, your nerve endings may be exposed. You will ...

  8. Tooth Fairy guilty of favouritism!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patcas, Raphael; van Waes, Hubertus Jm; Daum, Moritz M; Landolt, Markus A

    2017-12-11

    To determine the proportion of children visited by the Tooth Fairy, the child-related factors that influence the likelihood of her visit, and the parent-related variables that affect the amount of money the Tooth Fairy leaves. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Zürich, Switzerland. 3617 parents of children (mean age of children, 6.8 years; 51.9% girls) who had lost at least one deciduous tooth received a self-developed questionnaire; 1274 questionnaires were returned (35.2%). Primary outcome variables were the Tooth Fairy's visit after tooth loss and the amount of money given in case of a visit. Child- and parent-related variables were assessed as predictors of the main outcomes. Most parents (71.0%) reported that the Tooth Fairy visited their child. She usually exchanged the lost tooth for money (55.8% of visits) or placed money next to the tooth (40.7%); rarely did she take the tooth without pecuniary substitution. The Tooth Fairy left an average of 7.20 Swiss francs (approximately AU$9.45). The Tooth Fairy favoured visiting for the teeth of older children (odds ratio [OR], per year, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.09-3.21), of boys (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.09-6.42), and of children who believed in her (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.77-9.64). The amount of money was influenced by maternal, but not paternal socio-demographic factors, including level of education (OR, per level, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92) and country of origin (OR, Western countries v non-Western countries, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.20-4.62). The Tooth Fairy does not visit all children after tooth loss, displaying clear preferences in her choice of business partners. The odds of a visit are dramatically increased if she is believed in, and the value of a deciduous tooth is influenced by socio-demographic factors.

  9. In vitro wear of four ceramic materials and human enamel on enamel antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Jun; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the wear of four different ceramics and human enamel. The ceramics used were lithium disilicate glass (e.max Press), leucite-reinforced glass (GN-Ceram), yttria-stabilized zirconia (Aadva Zr), and feldspathic porcelain (Porcelain AAA). Hemispherical styli were fabricated with these ceramics and with tooth enamel. Flattened enamel was used for antagonistic specimens. After 100,000 wear cycles of a two-body wear test, the height and volume losses of the styli and enamel antagonists were determined. The mean and standard deviation for eight specimens were calculated and statistically analyzed using a non-parametric (Steel-Dwass) test (α = 0.05). GN-Ceram exhibited greater stylus height and volume losses than did Porcelain AAA. E.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli showed no significant differences, and Aadva Zr exhibited the smallest stylus height and volume losses. The wear of the enamel antagonist was not significantly different among GN-Ceram, e.max Press, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. Aadva Zr resulted in significantly lower wear values of the enamel antagonist than did GN-Ceram, Porcelain AAA, and enamel styli. In conclusion, leucite-reinforced glass, lithium disilicate glass, and feldspathic porcelain showed wear values closer to those for human enamel than did yttria-stabilized zirconia. © 2016 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz; Taktak, Suekrue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, the wear and adhesion properties of BDI were investigated. → Boro-tempering process under several heat treatment conditions was examined. → Optical microscope, SEM and XRD analysis were carried out to investigate the microstructure. → It was observed that boro-tempering process improves micro-hardness and wear properties of ductile irons. -- Abstract: In this study, adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron (BDI) were investigated. Boro-tempering was carried out on two stage processes i.e. boronizing and tempering. At the first stage, ductile iron samples were boronized by using pack process at 900 o C for 1, 3, and 5 h and then, secondly tempered at 250, 300, 350, and 400 o C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of boro-tempered samples showed that FeB and Fe 2 B phases were found on the surface of the samples. The Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test was used to assess the adhesion of boride layer. Test result showed that adhesion decreased with increasing boriding time and increased with increasing tempering temperature. Dry sliding wear tests of these samples were performed against Al 2 O 3 ball at a constant sliding speed and loads of 5 and 10 N. Wear tests indicated that boro-tempering heat treatment increased wear resistance of ductile iron. In addition, it was found that while wear rate of boro-tempered samples decreased with increasing boriding time, there is no significant affect of tempering temperature on wear rate.

  11. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  12. [Study on the appropriate parameters of automatic full crown tooth preparation for dental tooth preparation robot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F S; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y P; Sun, Y C; Wang, D X; Lyu, P J

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To further study the most suitable parameters for automatic full crown preparation using oral clinical micro robot. Its purpose is to improve the quality of automated tooth preparing for the system and to lay the foundation for clinical application. Methods: Twenty selected artificial resin teeth were used as sample teeth. The micro robot automatic tooth preparation system was used in dental clinic to control the picosecond laser beam to complete two dimensional cutting on the resin tooth sample according to the motion planning path. Using the laser scanning measuring microscope, each layer of cutting depth values was obtained and the average value was calculated. The monolayer cutting depth was determined. The three-dimensional (3D) data of the target resin teeth was obtained using internal scanner, and the CAD data of full-crown tooth preparation was designed by CAD self-develged software. According to the depth of the single layer, 11 complete resin teeth in phantom head were automatically prepared by the robot controlling the laser focused spot in accordance with the layer-cutting way. And the accuracy of resin tooth preparation was evaluated with the software. Using the same method, monolayer cutting depth parameter for cutting dental hard tissue was obtained. Then 15 extracted mandibular and maxillary first molars went through automatic full crown tooth preparation. And the 3D data of tooth preparations were obtained with intra oral scanner. The software was used to evaluate the accuracy of tooth preparation. Results: The results indicated that the single cutting depth of cutting resin teeth and in vitro teeth by picosecond laser were (60.0±2.6) and (45.0±3.6) μm, respectively. Using the tooth preparation robot, 11 artificial resin teeth and 15 complete natural teeth were automatically prepared, and the average time were (13.0±0.7), (17.0±1.8) min respectively. Through software evaluation, the average preparation depth of the occlusal surface

  13. Effect of tooth brush abrasion and thermo-mechanical loading on direct and indirect veneer restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Sawaljanow, Alexander; Behr, Michael; Kolbeck, Carola; Preis, Verena

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toothbrush abrasion and in vitro aging on ceramic (indirect technique) and composite veneers (direct technique). Identical composite and individual human incisors were restored with industrially preformed composite veneers, indirectly produced ceramic veneers, and direct composite restorations. Surface roughness was determined before and after tooth brushing. A 5-year period of oral service was simulated by thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML). After TCML, all specimens were examined with microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Specimens without failures during TCML were loaded until failure. analysis of variance; Bonferroni's post hoc analysis, Kaplan-Meier-Log Rank test (α = 0.05). Tooth brushing yielded a non-significant increase (p = 0.560) in roughness in all materials (industrial veneer, 0.12+/-0.07 μm, direct restoration, 0.18+/-0.14 μm, ceramic, 0.35+/-0.16 μm). No significant differences in roughness could be determined between the materials, neither before nor after testing (p teeth, direct and preformed composite veneers on composite teeth showed no failures or damages. Two ceramic veneers showed cracking in the labial area. After TCML of human teeth, transmission microscopy indicated a facial crack in a ceramic veneer and chipping in the cervical area of a preformed veneer. Two direct composite veneers lost retention. No significantly different survival rates were found between the three veneer groups. Fracture force on human teeth varied between 527.8+/-132.4 N (ceramic), 478.3+/-165.4 N (preformed composite), and 605.0+/-263.5 N (direct composite). All materials revealed comparable wear resistance. Indirect ceramic, direct restorative composite, and preformed composite veneers showed comparable failure rates and satisfying longevity. The results indicate similar longevity of the chosen materials for veneer restorations.

  14. Wear of primary teeth caused by opposed all-ceramic or stainless steel crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ik-Hyun; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Ju, Sung-Won; Lee, Tae-Kyoung; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of full-coverage all-ceramic zirconia, lithium disilicate glass-ceramic, leucite glass-ceramic, or stainless steel crowns on antagonistic primary tooth wear. MATERIALS AND METHODS There were four study groups: the stainless steel (Steel) group, the leucite glass-ceramic (Leucite) group, the lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (Lithium) group, and the monolithic zirconia (Zirconia) group. Ten flat crown specimens were prepared per group; opposing teeth were prepared using primary canines. A wear test was conducted over 100,000 chewing cycles using a dual-axis chewing simulator and a 50 N masticating force, and wear losses of antagonistic teeth and restorative materials were calculated using a three-dimensional profiling system and an electronic scale, respectively. Statistical significance was determined using One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (PZirconia (1.426±0.477 mm3), and Steel groups (0.397±0.192 mm3). Mean volume losses in the Leucite and Lithium groups were significantly greater than in the Steel group (PZirconia and Steel groups (P>.05). CONCLUSION Leucite glass-ceramic and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic cause more primary tooth wear than stainless steel or zirconia. PMID:26949487

  15. Functional constraints on tooth morphology in carnivorous mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smits Peter D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The range of potential morphologies resulting from evolution is limited by complex interacting processes, ranging from development to function. Quantifying these interactions is important for understanding adaptation and convergent evolution. Using three-dimensional reconstructions of carnivoran and dasyuromorph tooth rows, we compared statistical models of the relationship between tooth row shape and the opposing tooth row, a static feature, as well as measures of mandibular motion during chewing (occlusion, which are kinetic features. This is a new approach to quantifying functional integration because we use measures of movement and displacement, such as the amount the mandible translates laterally during occlusion, as opposed to conventional morphological measures, such as mandible length and geometric landmarks. By sampling two distantly related groups of ecologically similar mammals, we study carnivorous mammals in general rather than a specific group of mammals. Results Statistical model comparisons demonstrate that the best performing models always include some measure of mandibular motion, indicating that functional and statistical models of tooth shape as purely a function of the opposing tooth row are too simple and that increased model complexity provides a better understanding of tooth form. The predictors of the best performing models always included the opposing tooth row shape and a relative linear measure of mandibular motion. Conclusions Our results provide quantitative support of long-standing hypotheses of tooth row shape as being influenced by mandibular motion in addition to the opposing tooth row. Additionally, this study illustrates the utility and necessity of including kinetic features in analyses of morphological integration.

  16. Age estimation in older adults: Use of pulp/tooth ratios calculated from tooth sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ortenzio, Lori; Prowse, Tracy; Inskip, Michael; Kahlon, Bonnie; Brickley, Megan

    2018-03-01

    Accurate age estimates are foundational for bioarchaeological research, yet the ability to accurately age older adult skeletons remains elusive. This study uses a new version of pulp/tooth area calculations to investigate chronological age of older archaeological individuals. Pulp/tooth area ratios were calculated on modern control teeth (n = 10) that were first radiographed and then sectioned for comparative analysis. Pulp/tooth area ratios were determined on sectioned teeth using ImageJ software for: (a) modern individuals of known age (n = 26); (b) individuals from Belleville, Ontario, Canada (1821-1874) with documented age (n = 50); and (c) Belleville individuals with skeletally estimated age (n = 122). Calculations from tooth sections on modern teeth (n = 10) resulted in a mean absolute error (MAE) of ±3.9 years, whereas the radiographic method for the same teeth had an MAE of ±14.45 years. Results indicate that sectioned pulp/tooth area ratios are a significant predictor of chronological age (p age estimations between modern and archaeological individuals, or with respect to tooth type, sex, or intra/inter-observer estimations. This study provides a new more accurate method for estimating age-at-death, particularly for individuals in the 50+ age category. Sectioning the teeth and directly measuring exposed pulp chambers results in age estimations that were within ±4.15 years for both modern and archaeological individuals, thus presenting a method that will enhance the ability to age older individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2016-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-01-07

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2014-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  1. Brief communication: Comparative patterns of enamel thickness topography and oblique molar wear in two Early Neolithic and medieval population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luyer, Mona; Rottier, Stéphane; Bayle, Priscilla

    2014-09-01

    Enamel thickness has been linked to functional aspects of masticatory biomechanics and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary plastic trait, selectively responsive to dietary changes, wear and tooth fracture. European Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic hunter-gatherers mainly show a flat wear pattern, while oblique molar wear has been reported as characteristic of Neolithic agriculturalists. We investigate the relationships between enamel thickness distribution and molar wear pattern in two Neolithic and medieval populations. Under the assumption that dietary and/or non-dietary constraints result in directional selective pressure leading to variations in enamel thickness, we test the hypothesis that these two populations will exhibit significant differences in wear and enamel thickness patterns. Occlusal wear patterns were scored in upper permanent second molars (UM2) of 64 Neolithic and 311 medieval subadult and adult individuals. Enamel thickness was evaluated by microtomography in subsamples of 17 Neolithic and 25 medieval individuals. Eight variables describing enamel thickness were assessed. The results show that oblique molar wear is dominant in the Neolithic sample (87%), while oblique wear affects only a minority (42%) of the medieval sample. Moreover, in the Neolithic molars, where buccolingually directed oblique wear is dominant and greatest enamel lost occurs in the distolingual quadrant, thickest enamel is found where occlusal stresses are the most important-on the distolingual cusp. These results reveal a correlation between molar wear pattern and enamel thickness that has been associated to dietary changes. In particular, relatively thicker molar enamel may have evolved as a plastic response to resist wear. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A clinical investigation of the efficacy of a tooth-whitening gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielski, Chester; Conforti, Nicholas; Stewart, Bernal; Chaknis, Pat; Petrone, Margaret E; DeVizio, William; Volpe, Anthony R; Proskin, Howard M

    2003-08-01

    significant (P tooth shade lightening relative to baseline, thereby maintaining the tooth shade lightening that was evident at 3 weeks. The results of this clinical study indicate that after once-daily use at night for 2 or 3 weeks, the tooth-whitening gel provided statistically significant tooth shade lightening relative to baseline tooth shade for up to at least 6 months and also provided statistically significant tooth shade lightening relative to a commercially available dentifrice after 2 and 3 weeks of product use.

  3. Factors affecting dental biofilm in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study is to investigate the amount and the distribution of biofilm in patients wearing fixed appliances and its relation with age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing, and patient motivation. Methods The sample comprised 52 patients (15.5 ± 3.6 years old, 30 females and 22 males wearing fixed orthodontic appliances. Dental biofilm was assessed using a modified plaque index (PI. A questionnaire was used to collect patient’s information, including gender, age, treatment motivation, and frequency of tooth brushing. Results Gingival (PI score = 0.9 ± 0.7, mesial (0.8 ± 0.6, and distal (0.8 ± 0.5 areas accumulated more biofilm than occlusal areas (0.3 ± 0.3 (P < 0.038. The maxillary lateral incisors (1.1 ± 0.8 and maxillary canines (1.0 ± 0.8 had more biofilm than other teeth (P < 0.05. The maxillary arch (0.8 ± 0.7 had significantly more biofilm than mandibular arch (0.6 ± 0.6 (P = 0.042. No significant difference was found between the right side (0.7 ± 0.7 and left side (0.7 ± 0.6 (P = 0.627. Less biofilm was found in females (0.6 ± 0.5, adults (0.3 ± 0.3, and “self-motivated” patients (0.3 ± 0.3, compared with males (0.9 ± 0.5, children (0.8 ± 0.6, and “family-motivated” patients (1.1 ± 0.5 (P < 0.001. The amount of biofilm was associated with self-report of the frequency of daily tooth brushing (P < 0.001. Conclusions Patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances have the highest biofilm accumulation on the maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary canines, particularly in the gingival area and areas behind arch wires. Less biofilm was observed in female and adult patients and in those who were self-motivated and brushed their teeth more often.

  4. Calculation of wear (f.i. wear modulus) in the plastic cup of a hip joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The wear equation is applied to the wear process in a hip joint prosthesis and a wear modulus is defined. The sliding distance, wear modulus, wear volume, wear area, contact angle and the maximum normal stress were calculated and the theoretical calculations applied to test results. During the wear

  5. Complications associated with cheek tooth extraction in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Edward T; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Baratt, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    Common indications for cheek tooth extraction in the horse include dental fracture, periodontal disease, severe decay/ caries, mandibular fracture with alveolar/tooth involvement, and periapical abscess. Complications secondary to extraction of cheek teeth are prevalent. Typical complications may include retained root tip(s), collateral damage of neighboring teeth and alveolar bone, mandibular fracture non-union or delayed union, cemental ankylosis, dilacerated root(s), oroantral/oronasal fistula, palatal deviation of cheek teeth, bone sequestration, sinus involvement, alveolar plug failure, and palatine artery laceration. This paper presents a series of cases that had complications following cheek tooth extraction. Anticipation of problematic extractions, recognition of complications, and appropriate treatment will aid the clinician in managing the inevitable cheek tooth extraction complication.

  6. Risk indicators for Peri-implantitis. A cross-sectional study with 916 implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalago, Haline Renata; Schuldt Filho, Guenther; Rodrigues, Mônica Abreu Pessoa; Renvert, Stefan; Bianchini, Marco Aurélio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify systemic and local risk indicators associated with peri-implantitis. One hundred eighty-three patients treated with 916 osseointegrated titanium implants, in function for at least 1 year, were included in the present study. The implants were installed at the Foundation for Scientific and Technological Development of Dentistry (FUNDECTO) - University of Sao Paulo (USP) - from 1998 to 2012. Factors related to patient's systemic conditions (heart disorders, hypertension, smoking habits, alcoholism, liver disorders, hepatitis, gastrointestinal disease, diabetes mellitus I and II, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, menopause, osteoporosis, active periodontal disease, history of periodontal disease and bruxism), implant's characteristics (location, diameter, length, connection, shape, and antagonist), and clinical parameters (wear facets, periodontal status on the adjacent tooth, plaque accumulation on the adjacent tooth, modified plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, bleeding on probing, width of keratinized tissue and marginal recession). An increased risk of 2.2 times for history of periodontal disease (PD), 3.6 times for cemented restorations compared to screw-retained prostheses, 2.4 times when wear facets were displayed on the prosthetic crown and 16.1 times for total rehabilitations when compared to single rehabilitations were found. Logistic regression analysis did not show any association between the implant's characteristics and peri-implantitis. A history of periodontal disease, cemented prostheses, presences of wear facets on the prosthetic crown and full mouth rehabilitations were identified as risk indicators for peri-implantitis. Implants' characteristics were not related to the presence of peri-implantitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Tooth fragment reattachment technique on a pluri traumatized tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice; Frank Lipari; Angelo Lizio; Gabriel Cervino; Marco Cicciù

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes and analyses a tooth fragment reattachment technique used to resolve crown fractures of the anterior teeth. This treatment allows a conservative approach to traumatic coronal lesions offering a better possibility of maintaining aesthetics and function. The authors have illustrated here a clinical case of a fractured incisor. This case is characterized by several traumas on the same tooth that required different therapeutic solutions. We used an easy and ultra-conser...

  8. Influence of Multiple Bionic Unit Coupling on Sliding Wear of Laser-Processed Gray Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Zhang, Peng; Sui, Qi; Zhao, Kai; Zhou, Hong; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, in effort to improve the sliding wear resistance of gray cast iron under wet lubrication conditions, specimens with different bionic units were manufactured and modified according to bionic theory. Inspired by the structure and appearance of biological wear-resistant skin, two kinds of bionic units were processed by laser on the specimen surfaces. We investigated the wear resistance properties of the samples via indentation method and then observed the wear surface morphology of specimens and the stress distributions. The results indicated that coupling the bionic units enhanced the wear resistance of the cast iron considerably compared to the other samples. We also determined the mechanism of wear resistance improvement according to the results.

  9. Severe wear and fracture of zirconia heads against alumina inserts in hip simulator studies with microseparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Todd D; Tipper, Joanne L; Insley, Gerard; Streicher, Robert M; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2003-09-01

    The wear of zirconia femoral heads against alumina acetabular inserts with swing-phase microseparation was investigated in a hip joint simulator. Under mild microseparation conditions, the wear was very low, with an average wear rate of 0.05 mm(3)/million cycles reported over 5 million cycles of testing. However, under severe microseparation conditions representative of greater joint laxity, the wear rate of zirconia against alumina increased by 2 orders of magnitude, producing severe wear and, in one case, femoral head fracture. The adverse results of this study indicate that the combination of a zirconia femoral head articulating against an alumina acetabular insert is not recommended for clinical use. The results further raise concerns over the suitability of conventional simulators in evaluating the wear of ceramic hip prostheses.

  10. Wear behavior of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plant operating condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-Sup; Hong, Jin-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Nam; Jang, Ki-Sang

    2003-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed on steam generator tubes materials at steam generator operating temperature. The material surfaces react with oxygen to form oxides. The oxide properties such as formation rate and mechanical properties are varied with the test temperature and alloy composition. So, it is important to investigate the wear properties of each steam generator tube materials in steam generator operating condition. The tests results indicated that the wear coefficient in work rate model of alloy 690 was faster than that of alloy 800. From the scanning electron microscopy observation, the wear scars were similar each other and worn surfaces were covered with oxide layers. It seemed that the oxide layers were formed by wear debris sintering or cold welding and these layer properties affected the wear rate of steam generator tube materials. (author)

  11. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W G; Li, Y B; Wang, X Y; Sun, J P; Wu, G X

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  12. Comparison between PEEK and Ti6Al4V concerning micro-scale abrasion wear on dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, M; Buciumeanu, M; Henriques, B; Silva, F S; Souza, J C M; Gomes, J R

    2016-07-01

    In the oral cavity, abrasive wear is predictable at exposed tooth or restorative surfaces, during mastication and tooth brushing. Also, wear can occur at contacting surfaces between the Ti-based prosthetic structures and implants in presence of abrasive compounds from food or toothpaste. Thus, the aim of this work was to compare the abrasive wear resistance of PEEK and Ti6Al4V on three-body abrasion related to different hydrated silica content and loads. Surfaces of Ti6Al4V or PEEK cylinders (8mm diameter and 4mm height) were wet ground on SiC papers and then polished with 1µm diamond paste. After that, surfaces were ultrasonically cleaned in propyl alcohol for 15min and then in distilled water for 10min. Micro-scale abrasion tests were performed at 60rpm and on different normal loads (0.4, 0.8 or 1.2N) after 600 ball revolutions using suspensions with different weight contents of hydrated silica. After abrasive tests, wear scars on flat samples were measured to quantify the wear volume and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to identify the dominant wear mechanisms. Results showed a higher volume loss rate on PEEK than that recorded on Ti6Al4V,, when subjected to three-body abrasion tests involving hydrated silica suspensions. An increase in volume loss was noted on both tested materials when the abrasive content or load was increased. PEEK was characterized by less wear resistance than that on Ti6Al4V after micro-scale abrasion wear in contact with hydrated silica particles, as commonly found in toothpastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Wear resistance of cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    S. Pietrowski; G. Gumienny

    2008-01-01

    In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  14. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  15. The wear rates and performance of three mold insert materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Z.W.; Leong, M.H.; Liu, X.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a rapidly solidified aluminum alloy was compared with beryllium copper and 6061 aluminum alloys in terms of their wear rates, hardness and performance as mold insert materials. A Vickers hardness measuring machine and a tribometer were used to determine the hardness values and wear rates of the materials. Three sets of mold inserts were made of these materials, and the insert surfaces and the molded plastic lens surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope and a surface profilometer, respectively. The investigation results indicate that the BeCu alloy has the lowest wear rate, while aluminum 6061-T6 has the highest wear rate. Although the rapidly solidified aluminum alloy is not as hard as the BeCu alloy, the differences between their wear rates and hardness values are not as great as the differences between aluminum 6061-T6 and the BeCu alloy. The results also indicate that the rapidly solidified aluminum alloy performs much better than aluminum 6061-T6 in molding of plastic lenses and is comparable to the BeCu alloy. It is able to attain finer surfaces of the molded plastic lenses. This is an important finding, and this means that the rapidly solidified aluminum alloy can replace the BeCu alloy as a good mold insert material, because beryllium (Be) is a toxic element. The finding gives the industry a better choice for selection of mold insert materials.

  16. Hunter-Schreger Band patterns in human tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher D; O'Sullivan, Victor R; Dockery, Peter; McGillycuddy, Catherine T; Sloan, Alastair J

    2010-08-01

    Using light microscopy, we examined Hunter-Schreger Band (HSB) patterns on the axial and occlusal/incisal surfaces of 160 human teeth, sectioned in both the buccolingual and mesiodistal planes. We found regional variations in HSB packing densities (number of HSBs per mm of amelodentinal junction length) and patterns throughout the crown of each class of tooth (maxillary and mandibular: incisor, canine, premolar, and molar) examined. HSB packing densities were greatest in areas where functional and occlusal loads are greatest, such as the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and the incisal regions of incisors and canines. From this it is possible to infer that the behaviour of ameloblasts forming enamel prisms during amelogenesis is guided by genetic/evolutionary controls that act to increase the fracture and wear resistance of human tooth enamel. It is suggested that HSB packing densities and patterns are important in modern clinical dental treatments, such as the bonding of adhesive restorations to enamel, and in the development of conditions, such as abfraction and cracked tooth syndrome.

  17. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  18. Nanoscale chemical tomography of buried organic-inorganic interfaces in the chiton tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2011-01-13

    Biological organisms possess an unparalleled ability to control the structure and properties of mineralized tissues. They are able, for example, to guide the formation of smoothly curving single crystals or tough, lightweight, self-repairing skeletal elements. In many biominerals, an organic matrix interacts with the mineral as it forms, controls its morphology and polymorph, and is occluded during mineralization. The remarkable functional properties of the resulting composites-such as outstanding fracture toughness and wear resistance-can be attributed to buried organic-inorganic interfaces at multiple hierarchical levels. Analysing and controlling such interfaces at the nanometre length scale is critical also in emerging organic electronic and photovoltaic hybrid materials. However, elucidating the structural and chemical complexity of buried organic-inorganic interfaces presents a challenge to state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Here we show that pulsed-laser atom-probe tomography reveals three-dimensional chemical maps of organic fibres with a diameter of 5-10 nm in the surrounding nano-crystalline magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) mineral in the tooth of a marine mollusc, the chiton Chaetopleura apiculata. Remarkably, most fibres co-localize with either sodium or magnesium. Furthermore, clustering of these cations in the fibre indicates a structural level of hierarchy previously undetected. Our results demonstrate that in the chiton tooth, individual organic fibres have different chemical compositions, and therefore probably different functional roles in controlling fibre formation and matrix-mineral interactions. Atom-probe tomography is able to detect this chemical/structural heterogeneity by virtue of its high three-dimensional spatial resolution and sensitivity across the periodic table. We anticipate that the quantitative analysis and visualization of nanometre-scale interfaces by laser-pulsed atom-probe tomography will contribute greatly to our understanding not

  19. NSAIDs in orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Karthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response toward a mechanical force. The movement is induced by prolonged application of controlled mechanical forces, which create pressure and tension zones in the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, causing remodeling of tooth sockets. Orthodontists often prescribe drugs to manage pain from force application to biologic tissues. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are the drugs usually prescribed. NSAIDs block prostaglandin synthesis and result in slower tooth movement. Prostaglandins have been found to play a direct role in bone resorption. Aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, vadecoxib, and celecoxib are the commonly prescribed drugs. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice for orthodontic pain without affecting orthodontic tooth movement.

  20. Complications Caused by Contact Lens Wearing

    OpenAIRE

    Beljan, Jasna; Beljan, Kristina; Beljan, Zdravko

    2013-01-01

    Complications in wearing contact lenses are very rare and caused by poor maintenance, over-extended wear and wearing of contact lenses in a polluted environment. Regular control by a professional person can efficiently reduce the number of complications. This paper describes the most common risks factors for complications, and complications of wearing contact lenses with the classification according to the anatomic parts of the eye: eyelids, tear film, limbus, corneal epithelium, corneal stro...

  1. SEM Analysis of Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Azinović, Zoran; Keros, Jadranka; Buković, Dino; Azinović, Ana

    2003-01-01

    SEM analysis contains researches of tooth enamel surfaces of two populations. First group of samples is tooth enamel of prehistorically ancestor from Vu~edol and the second group of samples is enamel of modern Croatian citizen. Even on small number of human teeth samples from cooperage site of Vu~edol (3,000 BC) and today’s Croatian people, we can conclude about chewing biometry of prehistorically ancestors and today’s modern Croatian people, comparing interspecifically the mor...

  2. Orthodontic tooth movement and bioelectricity.

    OpenAIRE

    Karanth H; Shetty K

    2001-01-01

    Research in the field of orthodontics is now focused on the biology of tooth movement. Advanced molecular biology techniques has showed the researchers new avenue towards finding answers to the questions asked for the last few decades. Now it is possible for the researches to explore the lacunae in the field. One such field is, pharmaco-therapeutically or electrophysiologically enhancing the rate of tooth movement, improving the stability of the results, augmenting the anchorage. The voltage ...

  3. Abrasive wear of enamel by bioactive glass-based toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asad; Mneimne, Mohammed; Zou, Li Fong; Hill, Robert G; Gillam, David G

    2014-10-01

    To determine the abrasivity of a 45S5 bioactive glass based toothpaste on enamel as a function of the particle size and shape of the glass. 45S5 glass was synthesized ground and sieved to give various particle sized fractions toothpastes and their tooth brush abrasivity measured according to BS EN ISO11609 methodology. Enamel loss increased with increasing particle size. The percussion milled powder exhibited particles that had sharp edges and the pastes were significantly more abrasive than the pastes made with round ball milled powders. One interesting observation made during the present study was that there was preferential wear of the enamel at the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ), particularly with the coarse particle sized pastes.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF ANGULAR BALL BEARING WEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Savchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Wearing process of balls in an angular ball bearing has been investigated in the paper. Force affecting a separator from the side of balls is determined theoretically. Wear rate may be calculated with a formula for abrasive wear while substituting numerical parameter values of the investigated ball bearing for formula symbols.

  5. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  6. Consideration of Wear Rates at High Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    tionally, the texts by Bayer [3; 4], Rabinowicz [30], and Stachowiak [32] thoroughly cover the topic of wear mechanisms. A summary of the material is...Metals at High Sliding Speeds,” Wear, 44(1):109–125, August 1977. 32. Stachowiak , G. W. Wear - Materials, Mechanisms and Practice. Tribology in

  7. Dental wear caused by association between bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux disease: a rehabilitation report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Aparecida de Godoi Machado

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Bruxism is a pathological activity of the stomatognathic system that involves tooth grinding and clenching during parafunctional jaw movements. Clinical signs of bruxism are mostly related to dental wear and muscular and joint discomforts, but a large number of etiological factors can be listed, as local, systemic, psychological and hereditary factors. The association between bruxism, feeding and smoking habits and digestive disorders may lead to serious consequences to dental and related structures, involving dental alterations (wear, fractures and cracks, periodontal signs (gingival recession and tooth mobility and muscle-joint sensivity, demanding a multidisciplinary treatment plan. This paper presents a case report in which bruxism associated with acid feeding, smoking habit and episodes of gastric reflow caused severe tooth wear and great muscular discomfort with daily headache episodes. From the diagnosis, a multidisciplinary treatment plan was established. The initial treatment approach consisted of medical follow up with counseling on diet and smoking habits and management of the gastric disorders. This was followed by the installation of an interocclusal acrylic device in centric relation of occlusion (CRO for reestablishment of the occlusal stability, vertical dimension of occlusion, anterior guides and return to normal muscle activity (90-day use approximately. After remission of initial symptoms, oral rehabilitation was implemented in CRO by means of full resin composite restorations and new interocclusal device for protection of restorations. Satisfactory esthetics, improved function and occlusal stability were obtained after oral rehabilitation. The patient has attended annual follow-ups for the past 2 years. The multidisciplinary treatment seems to be the key for a successful rehabilitation of severe cases of dental wear involving the association of different health disorders.

  8. DENTAL WEAR CAUSED BY ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BRUXISM AND GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE: A REHABILITATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Branco, Carolina Assaf; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra; Fernandes, Alfredo Júlio; Soares, Carlos José

    2007-01-01

    Bruxism is a pathological activity of the stomatognathic system that involves tooth grinding and clenching during parafunctional jaw movements. Clinical signs of bruxism are mostly related to dental wear and muscular and joint discomforts, but a large number of etiological factors can be listed, as local, systemic, psychological and hereditary factors. The association between bruxism, feeding and smoking habits and digestive disorders may lead to serious consequences to dental and related structures, involving dental alterations (wear, fractures and cracks), periodontal signs (gingival recession and tooth mobility) and muscle-joint sensivity, demanding a multidisciplinary treatment plan. This paper presents a case report in which bruxism associated with acid feeding, smoking habit and episodes of gastric reflow caused severe tooth wear and great muscular discomfort with daily headache episodes. From the diagnosis, a multidisciplinary treatment plan was established. The initial treatment approach consisted of medical follow up with counseling on diet and smoking habits and management of the gastric disorders. This was followed by the installation of an interocclusal acrylic device in centric relation of occlusion (CRO) for reestablishment of the occlusal stability, vertical dimension of occlusion, anterior guides and return to normal muscle activity (90-day use approximately). After remission of initial symptoms, oral rehabilitation was implemented in CRO by means of full resin composite restorations and new interocclusal device for protection of restorations. Satisfactory esthetics, improved function and occlusal stability were obtained after oral rehabilitation. The patient has attended annual follow-ups for the past 2 years. The multidisciplinary treatment seems to be the key for a successful rehabilitation of severe cases of dental wear involving the association of different health disorders. PMID:19089153

  9. Influence of personality on tooth shade selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Al-Shehri, Khalid Saleh; Assiri, Hassan Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Mushabab AbdulRahman

    2016-01-01

    The harmonious shade matching of restorations with adjacent natural teeth is a prerequisite for a successful esthetic restoration. Color is a combined effect of the physical properties of an object, the light source, and the perception of the observer. The interpretation of color is influenced by both the physiological and psychological health of an individual. It is critical to understand the influence of an individual's psychological state on the shade selection procedure to achieve better shade matching and post-treatment patient counseling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of personality on tooth shade selection capability. Two porcelain fused to metal (PFM) discs were fabricated. A reference shade was determined using a spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade, Vita). The personalities of volunteers were identified using a Myers- Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) questionnaire. The volunteers visually identified the shade of the two PFM discs under a controlled light source. The mean color difference was determined between the visual and the spectrophotometer values. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc comparison tests to ascertain the difference between the groups. The groups that performed better in tooth shade selection were ENTJ (2.923 ± 2.36), ISTJ (3.086 ± 2.56), ENFJ (3.197 ± 2.936), and ESTJ (3.431± 2.78). The groups INTP (9.383 ± 3.30), ISTP (9.133 ± 3.44), ISFP (8.737 ± 2.81), and INTJ (8.480 ± 3.35) showed poor tooth shade selection ability. The Kruskal- Wallis test showed lower mean rank for group ENTJ (89.75), followed by ISTJ (92.25), and ENFJ (94.80). Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there was a statistically significant difference between the different personalities with regard to tooth shade selection ability.

  10. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [10] on the wear rates of graphite-/ZrC-reinforced bulk me- tallic glass composites indicates that adding a low volume content of graphite and especially of ZrC generated a sig- nificant decrease in a coefficient of friction and the compos- ites displayed an even lower wear rate than 100Cr6 bearing steel. Recently, Kwon et al ...

  11. Variables affecting orthodontic tooth movement with clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, Justin R; McGorray, Susan P; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we examined the impacts of age, sex, root length, bone levels, and bone quality on orthodontic tooth movement. Clear aligners were programmed to move 1 central incisor 1 mm over the course of 8 weeks. Thirty subjects, ages 19 to 64, were enrolled, and measurements were made on digital models (percentage of tooth movement goal achieved). Morphometric features and bone quality were assessed with cone-beam computed tomography. Data from this study were combined with data from 2 similar studies to increase the power for some analyses. The mean percentage of tooth movement goal achieved was 57% overall. Linear regression modeling indicated a cubic relationship between age and tooth movement, with a decreasing rate of movement from ages 18 to 35 years, a slightly increasing rate from ages 35 to 50, and a decreasing rate from ages 50 to 70. The final decreasing trend was not apparent for women. As would be expected, the correlation was significant between the percentage of the goal achieved and the cone-beam computed tomography superimposed linear measures of tooth movement. A significant negative correlation was found between tooth movement and the measurement apex to the center of rotation, but bone quality, as measured by fractal dimension, was not correlated with movement. The relationship between age and tooth movement is complex and might differ for male and female patients. Limited correlations with cone-beam computed tomography morphology and rate of tooth movement were detected. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Wear Resistance of Sintered Composite Hardfacings under Different Abrasive Wear Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    SIMSON, Taavi; KULU, Priit; SURŽENKOV, Andrei; TARBE, Riho; GOLJANDIN, Dmitri; TARRASTE, Marek; VILJUS, Mart; TRAKSMAA, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The article focuses on vacuum liquid phase sintered (PM) composite hardfacings and their behaviour under different abrasive wear conditions. Hardfacings studied contained 30 – 50 vol % fine, coarse or multimodal (fine and coarse) hardmetal reinforcement. For wear resistance studies, we used the Abrasive Rubber Wheel Wear (ARWW) test as a three-body abrasive wear test, the Abrasive Wheel Wear (AWW) test as a two-body abrasive wear test and the Abrasive-Impact Erosion wear (AIEW) test as an abr...

  13. Influence of axial feed in hobbing with minimal quantity lubrication (MQL on wear of the hob and cutting forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech STACHURSKI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper evaluation of the influence of axial feed on the hob wear in hobbing with minimal quantity lubrication technique has been done. As a work material C45 carbon steel has been investigated. Wear resistance of the hob made from high speed steel HS6-5-2 without coating has been investigated. For comparison tests with conventional fluid supply method have been carried out. Gears have been generated with full depth of cut and with two axial feed with constant cutting speed value. During hobbing cutting forces have been measured by experimental stand. Tool wear has been measured directly as a width of flank wear land of the hob cutter teeth. During investigation any significant wear changes on the rake faces haven’t been detected, so those results haven’t been taken into consideration. A constant length of cut parameter has been established as a criteria value. Results of investigation have been presented in the form of graphs describing changes of wear land width parameter in comparison to the most loaded tooth wear land parameter. Also changes of cutting forces in time are presented too. On the base of obtained results conclusion has been formulated that MQL technique might be used as an alternative solution for supplying cutting fluid into the cutting zone during hobbing process.

  14. Comparative Study of Vibration Condition Indicators for Detecting Cracks in Spur Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanadic, Nenad; Ardis, Paul; Hood, Adrian; Thurston, Michael; Ghoshal, Anindya; Lewicki, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an empirical study on the tooth breakage failure mode in spur gears. Of four dominant gear failure modes (breakage, wear, pitting, and scoring), tooth breakage is the most precipitous and often leads to catastrophic failures. The cracks were initiated using a fatigue tester and a custom-designed single-tooth bending fixture to simulate over-load conditions, instead of traditional notching using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). The cracks were then propagated on a dynamometer. The ground truth of damage level during crack propagation was monitored with crack-propagation sensors. Ten crack propagations have been performed to compare the existing condition indicators (CIs) with respect to their: ability to detect a crack, ability to assess the damage, and sensitivity to sensor placement. Of more than thirty computed CIs, this paper compares five commonly used: raw RMS, FM0, NA4, raw kurtosis, and NP4. The performance of combined CIs was also investigated, using linear, logistic, and boosted regression trees based feature fusion.

  15. Prevention of erosive/abrasive enamel wear due to orange juice modified with dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Fj; Günthart, N; Sener, B; Attin, T

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the erosive/abrasive enamel wear after contact with orange juices modified with different dietary supplements. A total of 96 bovine enamel samples were prepared and allocated to eight groups (1-8; n = 12). Samples were eroded (120 s) in 200 ml of the following eight solutions: 1: water (control), 2: orange juice, 3: water + calcium effervescent tablet, 4: orange juice + calcium effervescent tablet, 5: water + 0.75 g acid/base regulating powder (Probase), 6: water + 0.375 g Probase, 7: orange juice + 0.75 g Probase and 8: orange juice + 0.375 g Probase. After erosion, the samples were brushed with 40 brushing strokes (load 2.5 N). Enamel wear was measured using surface profilometry after 20 and 40 cycles of erosion/abrasion respectively. Highest mean enamel wear (± SD) after 20 and 40 cycles of erosion/abrasion was observed for the unmodified orange juice (group 2) (0.605 ± 0.240 μm; 1.375 ± 0.496 μm respectively). The enamel wear in all other groups (3-8) was significantly lower (P abrasive enamel wear induces by orange juice and tooth brushing could be reduced significantly by modification with free available dietary supplements. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-years Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Hamidreza; Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Jamali, Zahra; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Hazem, Kameliya; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods. 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy’s scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of firstprimary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times. PMID:26236432

  17. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-year Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Poureslami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods. 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy’s scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of first primary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P <0.001. No significant correlation was observed between the eruption time of first primary and first permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times.

  18. Does Timing of Eruption in First Primary Tooth Correlate with that of First Permanent Tooth? A 9-years Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Hamidreza; Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Erfanparast, Leila; Sohrabi, Azin; Jamali, Zahra; Ghertasi Oskouei, Sina; Hazem, Kameliya; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Predicting the teeth eruption time is a valuable tool in pediatric dentistry since it can affects scheduling dental and orthodontic treatments. This study investigated the relationship between the eruption time of first primary and permanent teeth and the variation in the eruption time considering socioeconomic status (SES) in a 9-year population- based cohort study. Materials and methods . 307 subjects were examined at bimonthly intervals during the first and second years of life and then at six-month intervals until the eruption of first permanent tooth. Eruption times of primary and permanent tooth were recorded for each child. A modified form of Kuppuswamy's scale was used to assess the SES. Results. Among 267 subjects completed all follow-ups, the eruption time for first primary and permanent teeth indicated a direct strong correlation; in that one month delayed or early eruption of firstprimary tooth resulted in 4.21 months delayed or early eruption of first appearing permanent tooth (r = 0.91, n = 267, P eruption time of first primary and first permanent teeth and SES (P = 0.67, P = 0.75, respectively). Conclusion. The eruption timing for the first primary tooth had a correlation with the first permanent tooth eruption tim-ing, while SES did not have any influence on eruption times.

  19. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Girot, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  20. Wear Resistance of High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat SIDDIQUE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wear resistance of high-volume fly ash concrete (HVFA intended for pavement applications is presented in this paper. In India, yearly production of fly ash is more than 100 million tons. Majority of fly ash is of Class F type. Out of which 20-25% is being utilized in cement-based materials. In order to increase its percentage utilization, an investigation was carried out for its large scale utilization. Concrete mixtures were prepared by replacing cement with 40, 50, and 60% of fly ash. Experiments were conducted for fresh concrete properties, compressive strength and wear resistance. Test results indicated that wear resistance of concrete having cement replacement up to 40% was comparable to the normal concrete. Beyond 40% fly ash content, concretes exhibited slightly lower resistance to wear in relation non-fly ash concretes. There is very good correlation between wear resistance and compressive strength (R2 value between 0.8482 and 0.9787 depending upon age.

  1. Patient compliance and its influence on contact lens wearing problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, M J; Carney, L G

    1986-12-01

    One hundred consecutively presenting patients, fifty from each of two contact lens clinics, were questioned about the procedures encountered in care and maintenance of their contact lenses and asked to demonstrate their use of those procedures. Their clinic records were then analyzed for the occurrence of signs and symptoms that were related potentially to noncompliance with instructions and procedures, and that could not be otherwise explained. Only 26% of patients were fully complaint. Noncompliance with instructions was related strongly to the occurrence of signs and symptoms indicative of potential wearing problems. Improvements in the level of patient compliance with instructions is likely to bring about increased patient success with contact lens wearing.

  2. Influence of Cycle Temperature on the Wear Resistance of Vermicular Iron Derivatized with Bionic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yan; Ren, Luquan

    2016-11-01

    Depending on their applications, such as in brake discs, camshafts, etc., the wear behavior of vermicular iron is influenced by the thermal cycling regime. The failure of a working part during its service life is a consequence of both thermal fatigue and wear. Previously, the wear and thermal fatigue resistance properties of vermicular iron were separately investigated by researchers, rather than a study combining these two factors. In the present work, the effect of cycle temperature on the wear resistance of specimens with bionic units processed by laser has been investigated experimentally. The wear behavior pre- and post-thermal cycling has also been investigated, and the influence of different cycle temperatures on the wear resistance is discussed. The results indicate that the thermal cycling regime brought about negative influences with varying degrees, on the material properties, such as the microstructures, micro-hardness, cracks, and oxidation resistance properties. All these factors synergistically reduced the wear resistance of vermicular iron. In particular, the negative influence apparently increased with an increase in cycle temperature. Nevertheless, the post-thermal-cycle wear resistance of the specimens with bionic units was superior to those without bionic units. Hence, the laser bionic process is an effective way to improve the performance of vermicular iron in combined thermal cycling and wear service conditions.

  3. Wear behavior of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal versus titanium and titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbara, Tsunemichi; Yajima, Yasutomo [Department of Oral Implantology, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan); Yoshinari, Masao, E-mail: yosinari@tdc.ac.jp [Division of Oral Implant Research, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) on the two-body wear behavior of titanium (Ti). Two-body wear tests were performed using TZP, two grades of cp-Ti or Ti alloy in distilled water, and the cross-sectional area of worn surfaces was measured to evaluate the wear behavior. In addition, the surface hardness and coefficient of friction were determined and an electron probe microanalysis performed to investigate the underlying mechanism of wear. The hardness of TZP was much greater than that of Ti. The coefficient of friction between Ti and Ti showed a higher value than the Ti/TZP combination. Ti was more susceptible to wear by both TZP and Ti than TZP, indicating that the mechanism of wear between TZP and Ti was abrasive wear, whereas that between Ti and Ti was adhesive wear. No remarkable difference in the amount of wear in Ti was observed between TZP and Ti as the opposite material, despite the hardness value of Ti being much smaller than that of TZP. (communication)

  4. Impact Fretting Wear Behavior of Alloy 690 Tubes in Dry and Deionized Water Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhen-Bing; Peng, Jin-Fang; Qian, Hao; Tang, Li-Chen; Zhu, Min-Hao

    2017-07-01

    The impact fretting wear has largely occurred at nuclear power device induced by the flow-induced vibration, and it will take potential hazards to the service of the equipment. However, the present study focuses on the tangential fretting wear of alloy 690 tubes. Research on impact fretting wear of alloy 690 tubes is limited and the related research is imminent. Therefore, impact fretting wear behavior of alloy 690 tubes against 304 stainless steels is investigated. Deionized water is used to simulate the flow environment of the equipment, and the dry environment is used for comparison. Varied analytical techniques are employed to characterize the wear and tribochemical behavior during impact fretting wear. Characterization results indicate that cracks occur at high impact load in both water and dry equipment; however, the water as a medium can significantly delay the cracking time. The crack propagation behavior shows a jagged shape in the water, but crack extended disorderly in dry equipment because the water changed the stress distribution and retarded the friction heat during the wear process. The SEM and XPS analysis shows that the main failure mechanisms of the tube under impact fretting are fatigue wear and friction oxidation. The effect of medium(water) on fretting wear is revealed, which plays a potential and promising role in the service of nuclear power device and other flow equipments.

  5. Microstructure and elevated temperature wear behavior of induction melted Fe-based composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ge; Meng, Huimin; Liu, Junyou

    2014-10-01

    Fe-based composite coating prepared onto the component of guide wheel using ultrasonic frequency inductive cladding (UFIC) technique has been investigated in terms of microstructure, phase constitutions, microhardness and elevated temperature wear behavior by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers microhardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results indicated that the primary phase in the coating contained austenite γ-Fe, eutectic γ-Fe/(Cr,Fe)2B, boride (Cr,Fe)2B and precipitation enriched in Mo. The average microhardness of the coating was 760 ± 10 HV0.2, which was three times higher than that of the substrate. With increasing temperature, the friction coefficients of the coating and high-chromium cast iron decreased gradually while the wear rates increased during dry sliding wear condition. The relative wear resistance of the coating was 1.63 times higher than that of the high-chromium cast iron at 500 °C, which was ascribed to the hard borides with high thermal stability uniformly embedded in the coating and the formation of dense transfer layer formed onto the worn surface. The high temperature wear mechanism of the coating was dominated by mild abrasive wear. The study revealed that Fe-based composite coating had excellent high temperature wear resistance under dry sliding wear condition.

  6. Dry sliding wear of Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Akbarzadeh Chiniforush

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of dry sliding wear are presented for ductile irons with composition Fe-3.56C-2.67Si-0.25Mo-0.5Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5 in wt.% with applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N for austempering temperatures of 270, 320, and 370 °C after austenitizing at 870 °C for 120 min. The mechanical property measurements show that the grades of the ASTM 897M: 1990 Standard can be satisfied for the selected austempering conditions. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Observations indicate that wear is due to subsurface fatigue with cracks nucleated at deformed graphite nodules.

  7. Friction and wear in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the design of a safe and reliable sodium-cooled reactor one of the more important problem areas is that of friction and wear of components immersed in liquid sodium or exposed to sodium vapor. Sodium coolant at elevated temperatures may severely affect most oxide-bearing surface layers which provide corrosion resistance and, to some extent, lubrication and surface hardness. Consequently, accelerated deterioration may be experienced on engaged-motion contact surfaces, which could result in unexpected reactor shutdown from component malfunction or failure due to galling and seizure. An overall view of the friction and wear phenomena encountered during oscillatory rubbing of surfaces in high-temperature, liquid-sodium environments is presented. Specific data generated at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) on this subject is also presented. (U.S.)

  8. Wear resistance of hydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, MA; Abenojar, J.; Pantoja, M.; López de Armentia, S.

    2017-05-01

    Nature has been an inspiration source to develop artificial hydrophobic surfaces. During the latest years the development of hydrophobic surfaces has been widely researched due to their numerous ranges of industrial applications. Industrially the use of hydrophobic surfaces is being highly demanded. This is why many companies develop hydrophobic products to repel water, in order to be used as coatings. Moreover, these coating should have the appropriated mechanical properties and wear resistance. In this work wear study of a hydrophobic coating on glass is carried out. Hydrophobic product used was Sika Crystal Dry by Sika S.A.U. (Alcobendas, Spain). This product is currently used on car windshield. To calculate wear resistance, pin-on-disk tests were carried out in dry and water conditions. The test parameters were rate, load and sliding distance, which were fixed to 60 rpm, 5 N and 1000 m respectively. A chamois was used as pin. It allows to simulate a real use. The friction coefficient and loss weight were compared to determinate coating resistance

  9. Wear of dragline wire ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayawansa, D.; Kuruppu, M.; Mashiri, F.; Bartosiewicz, H. [Monash University (Caulfield Campus), Caulfield East, Vic. (Australia). Department of Mechanical Engineering,

    2005-07-01

    Wire ropes are one of the most heavily used components in a dragline. Hoist ropes are subjected to fatigue due to the cyclic nature of load handling as well as due to rope bending over the sheaves and the drum under load. This leads to wire breaks due to fatigue. Accumulation of a number of wire breaks close to each other can have a detrimental effect on the rope. Furthermore, to allow for the increasing demand for higher load capacity coupled with the inconvenience of having very large ropes, the factor of safety is often compromised, which increases the wear rate. Drag ropes are also subjected to heavy loads. More importantly, they are allowed to drag along the rough mine surface subjecting them to external physical abrasion. This makes the life of drag ropes one of the lowest among those used in a dragline. Suspension and IBS ropes are relatively uniformly loaded during their regular usage although they need to withstand dynamic load cycles as well as bending. Hence they tend to last for a number of years on average. The paper analyses the wear types and their severity of each of these rope applications, and suggests methods to determine rope wear rates and the resulting rope life. The paper further gives suggestions for good operating and maintenance practice that can extend the rope life and help reduce the large expenditure associated with every major rope change in a dragline. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Investigation of the time-dependent wear behavior of veneering ceramic in porcelain fused to metal crowns during chewing simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiawen; Tian, Beimin; Wei, Ran; Wang, Weiguo; Zhang, Hongyun; Wu, Xiaohong; He, Lin; Zhang, Shaofeng

    2014-12-01

    The excessive abrasion of occlusal surfaces in ceramic crowns limits the service life of restorations and their clinical results. However, little is known about the time-dependent wear behavior of ceramic restorations during the chewing process. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the dynamic evolution of the wear behavior of veneering porcelain in PFM crowns as wear progressed, as tested in a chewing simulator. Twenty anatomical metal-ceramic crowns were prepared using Ceramco III as the veneering porcelain. Stainless steel balls served as antagonists. The specimens were dynamically loaded in a chewing simulator with 350N up to 2.4×10(6) loading cycles, with additional thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C. During the testing, several checkpoints were applied to measure the substance loss of the crowns' occlusal surfaces and to evaluate the microstructure of the worn areas. After 2.4×10(6) cycles, the entire wear process of the veneering porcelain in the PFM crowns revealed three wear stages (running-in, steady and severe wear stages). The occlusal surfaces showed traces of intensive wear on the worn areas during the running-in wear stage, and they exhibited the propagation of cracks in the subsurface during steady wear stage. When the severe wear stage was reached, the cracks penetrated the ceramic layer, causing the separation of porcelain pieces. It also exhibited a good correlation among the microstructure, the wear loss and the wear rate of worn ceramic restorations. The results suggest that under the conditions of simulated masticatory movement, the wear performance of the veneering porcelain in PFM crowns indicates the apparent similarity of the tribological characteristics of the traditional mechanical system. Additionally, the evaluation of the wear behavior of ceramic restorations should be based on these three wear stages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modelling and measurement of wear particle flow in a dual oil filter system for condition monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Morten; Eriksen, René Lynge; Fich, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Wear debris is an indicator of the health of machinery, and the availability of accurate methods for characterising debris is important. In this work, a dual filter model for a gear oil system is used in conjunction with operational data to indicate three different system operating states...... boundary condition for particle burst phenomenon, the release of wear particles from a pleated mesh filter is measured in a test rig and included in the model. The findings show that a dual filter model, with startup phenomenon included, can describe trends in the wear particle flow observed in the gear...... oil. Using this model it is possible to draw conclusions on the filtration system performance and wear generation in the gears. Limitations of the proposed model are the lack of ability to describe noise and random burst spikes attributed to measurement error distributions. Trending of gear wear...

  12. Wear Resistance of Sintered Composite Hardfacings under Different Abrasive Wear Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taavi SIMSON

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on vacuum liquid phase sintered (PM composite hardfacings and their behaviour under different abrasive wear conditions. Hardfacings studied contained 30 – 50 vol % fine, coarse or multimodal (fine and coarse hardmetal reinforcement. For wear resistance studies, we used the Abrasive Rubber Wheel Wear (ARWW test as a three-body abrasive wear test, the Abrasive Wheel Wear (AWW test as a two-body abrasive wear test and the Abrasive-Impact Erosion wear (AIEW test as an abrasive-erosive wear test. Tested materials were compared to Hardox 400 steel and CDP112 wear plate (Castolin Eutectic® Ltd.. It was found that under three-body abrasion conditions (ARWW test hardfacings with high content of spehrical coarse reinforcement are suitable; their wear resistance is about two times higher than that of unreinforced hardfacings. Under two-body abrasive wear (AWW test, hardfacings with a high content of coarse reinforcement are recommended; their wear resistance is up to eight times higher than that of unreinforced hardfacings from the figures and graphs mentioned in the text. Under abrasive-erosive wear (AIEW test, unreinforced ductile materials are recommended; they have two to three times higher wear resistance than composite hardfacings reinforced with fine or multimodal reinforcement.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.3.16323

  13. The role of fluoride and casein phosphopeptide/amorphous calcium phosphate in the prevention of erosive/abrasive wear in an in vitro model using hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Attin, T

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of various fluoride compounds and casein phosphopeptide/amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on the reduction of erosive/abrasive tooth wear. Forty enamel samples were prepared from bovine lower incisors, stratified and allocated to 4 groups (1-4). Samples in group 1 remained untreated and served as negative controls. The test samples were treated for 2 min/day as follows: group 2 amine/sodium fluoride gel (pH 4.8; 12,500 ppm), group 3 sodium fluoride gel (pH 7.1; 12,500 ppm) and group 4 CPP-ACP-containing mousse. De- and remineralization cycling was performed for 20 days with 6 erosive attacks for 20 s with HCl (pH 3.0) per day. Samples were stored in artificial saliva between cycles and overnight. Toothbrushing (15 s; 60 strokes/min; load 2.5 N) with a toothpaste slurry was performed each day before the first and 1 h after the last erosive exposure. Tooth wear was measured by comparing baseline surface profiles with the corresponding posttreatment profiles. Tooth wear was significantly reduced in groups 2 and 3 compared with group 1, while the enamel loss of group 4 was not significantly lower compared to the negative control group 1. Between the fluoride groups 2 and 3, no significant difference in tooth wear was recorded. Erosive/abrasive tooth wear under the conditions used could be reduced significantly by the daily application of fluoride gels, irrespective of the fluoride compound, while the application of CPP-ACP-containing mousse was less effective. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The development of complex tooth shape in reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldrich eZahradnicek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reptiles have a diverse array of tooth shapes, from simple unicuspid to complex multicuspid teeth, reflecting functional adaptation to a variety of diets and eating styles. In addition to cusps, often complex longitudinal labial and lingual enamel crests are widespread and contribute to the final shape of reptile teeth. The simplest shaped unicuspid teeth have been found in piscivorous or carnivorous ancestors of recent diapsid reptiles and they are also present in some extant carnivores such as crocodiles and snakes. However, the ancestral tooth shape for squamate reptiles is thought to be bicuspid, indicating an insectivorous diet. The development of bicuspid teeth in lizards has recently been published, indicating that the mechanisms used to create cusps and crests are very distinct from those that shape cusps in mammals. Here, we introduce the large variety of tooth shapes found in lizards and compare the morphology and development of bicuspid, tricuspid and pentacuspid teeth, with the aim of understanding how such tooth shapes are generated. Next, we discuss whether the processes used to form such morphologies are conserved between divergent lizards and whether the underlying mechanisms share similarities with those of mammals. In particular, we will focus on the complex teeth of the chameleon, gecko, varanus and anole lizards using SEM and histology to compare the tooth crown morphology and embryonic development.

  15. Effect of Orthodontic Tooth Movement on Salivary Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiven Adhitya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Aspartate aminotransferase is one of biological indicator in gingival crevicular fluid (CGF. Force orthodontic application could increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in CGF. However, the increase activity of aspartate aminotransferase in saliva due to orthodontic force and its correlation between aspartate aminotransferase activity and tooth movement remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate application orthodontic force on the aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva based on the duration of force and finding correlation between tooth movement and aspartate aminotransferase activity. Methods: Twenty saliva samples collected before extraction of first premolar, at the time of force application for canine retraction and after force application. The canines retraction used 100 grams of interrupted force (module chain for thirty days. The collection of saliva and the measurement of tooth movement were carried out 1 day, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, and 28 days after force application. The measurement of aspartate aminotransferase activity in saliva was done using spectrophotometer. Results: Application of orthodontic force influences the salivary aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=25.290, p=0.000. Furthermore, tooth movement correlated with aspartate aminotransferase activity (F=0.429, p=0.000. Conclusion: Aspartate aminotransferase activity could be used as tooth movement indicator that related to the duration of force application.DOI : 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.128

  16. Influence of graphite filler on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresha, B.; Ramesh, B.N.; Subbaya, K.M.; Ravi Kumar, B.N.; Chandramohan, G.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of graphite filler additions on two-body abrasive wear behaviour of compression moulded carbon-epoxy (C-E) composites have been evaluated using reciprocating wear unit and pin-on-disc wear unit under single pass and multi-pass conditions respectively. The carbon fabric used in the present study is a plain one; each warp fiber pass alternately under and over each weft fiber. The fabric is symmetrical, with good stability and reasonable porosity. Abrasive wear studies were carried out under different loads/abrading distance using different grades of SiC abrasive paper (150 and 320 grit size). Graphite filler in C-E reduced the specific wear rate. Further, the wear volume loss drops significantly with increase in graphite content. Comparative wear performance of all the composites showed higher specific wear rate in two-body wear (single-pass conditions) compared to multi-pass conditions. Further, the tribo-performance of C-E indicated that the graphite filler inclusion resulted in enhancement of wear behaviour significantly. Wear mechanisms were suggested and strongly supported by worn surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy.

  17. [Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field on orthodontic tooth movement through transmission electromicroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q

    1991-01-01

    This experiment is to observe the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on orthodontic tooth movement of guinea pigs through transmission electron microscope (TEM). 14-days observations indicate that PEMF could accelerate the rate of orthodontic tooth movement as a result of the increase in quantity of active cell without changing the ultrastructures of cells and have no unfavorable effects on periodontal tissues.

  18. Clinical study to evaluate the wear of natural enamel antagonist to zirconia and metal ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhe, Kailas; Jain, Veena; Pruthi, Gunjan; Shah, Naseem

    2015-09-01

    Tooth wear is a complex process, which, if not prevented, may adversely affect the integrity of the stomatognathic system. Different restorative dental materials may affect the amount of wear on natural enamel antagonists. The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate and compare the wear of enamel opposing natural enamel, zirconia, and metal ceramic crowns after 1 year. Ten participants between 18 and 35 years of age requiring 2 complete crowns, 1 on either side of maxillary or mandibular molar region, and having healthy natural teeth in the opposing arch were selected. For each participant, 1 monolithic polished zirconia crown and 1 glazed metal ceramic crown were fabricated and cemented. To evaluate the wear of the antagonistic natural enamel (premolar and molar), polyvinyl siloxane impressions were made immediately (baseline) and at 1 year after cementation. The wear of natural enamel against natural enamel was evaluated as the control. The resulting casts were scanned (using a 3D white light scanner), and 3D software was used to calculate the maximum amount of linear wear. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to analyze data. Mean ±SD occlusal wear of the antagonistic enamel 1 year after the cementation of metal ceramic crowns was 69.20 ±4.10 μm for premolar teeth and 179.70 ±8.09 μm for molar teeth, whereas for zirconia crowns, it was 42.10 ±4.30 μm for premolar teeth and 127.00 ±5.03 μm for molar teeth. Occlusal wear of natural enamel opposing natural enamel was 17.30 ±1.88 μm in the premolar region and 35.10 ±2.60 μm in the molar region. The Bonferroni post hoc test revealed that the occlusal wear of antagonistic enamel 1 year after the cementation of a metal ceramic crown was significantly higher (Pzirconia crown or natural enamel. Zirconia crowns led to less wear of antagonist enamel than metal ceramic crowns, but more than natural enamel. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by

  19. On gear tooth stiffness evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of gear stiffness is important for determining the load distribution between the gear teeth when two sets of teeth are in contact. Two factors have a major influence on the stiffness; firstly the boundary condition through the gear rim size included in the stiffness calculation...... and secondly the size of the contact. In the FE calculation the true gear tooth root profile is applied. The meshing stiffnesses of gears are highly non-linear, it is however found that the stiffness of an individual tooth can be expressed in a linear form assuming that the contact width is constant. © 2014...... Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Incisor inclination and perceived tooth colour changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucchi, Philip; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2017-10-01

    Social attractiveness is influenced by a variety of different smile-related factors. We evaluated whether the degree of upper central incisor proclination can result in tooth colour change. Forty young adult subjects (20-25 years) in good health with a complete sound dentition were selected. The subjects were seated in standardized light conditions with an above-directed light source. Their natural head position was stated as 0 degrees. To mimic the range of possible anterior torque movements they were asked to tilt their heads upward +15 degrees (upward tilting) and downward -15 degrees (downward tilting). Frontal macro photographs, parallel to the Frankfort plane of the patient's natural head position were taken at the three head angulations (+15, 0, and -15 degrees ). Photographs were analysed for colour differences at the centre of the incisor clinical crowns with a CIE L*a*b* colour model based software. A paired t-test was used to test for significance between each value for each inclination. Differences were found between the CIE L*a*b* colour values for: upward tilting, downward tilting, and -15 to +15 degrees (total tilting) except for b* values for downward tilting. As the inclination of the subject's head changed downward, the upper incisors were retroclined and the CIE L*a*b* values indicated a darker and less green but redder colour component. As the inclination of the subject's head changed upwards the upper incisors were proclined and the L*a*b* values indicated a lighter and less green and yellow but redder and bluer colour component. Proclination of upper incisors caused lighter tooth colour parameters compared to retroclined incisors and colour changes. Orthodontic change of upper incisor inclination may induce alterations on how tooth colour is perceived.

  1. Proteomic analysis of human tooth pulp: proteomics of human tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    The unique pulp-dentin complex demonstrates strong regenerative potential, which enables it to respond to disease and traumatic injury. Identifying the proteins of the pulp-dentin complex is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of regeneration, tissue calcification, defense processes, and the reparation of dentin by dental pulp. The lack of knowledge of these proteins limits the development of more efficient therapies. The proteomic profile of human tooth pulp was investigated and compared with the proteome of human dentin and blood. The samples of tooth pulp were obtained from 5 sound permanent human third molars of 5 adults (n = 5). The extracted proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and identified by correlating mass spectra to the proteomic databases. A total of 342 proteins were identified with high confidence, and 2 proteins were detected for the first time in an actual human sample. The identified tooth pulp proteins have a variety of functions: structural, catalytic, transporter, protease activity, immune response, and many others. In a comparison with dentin and blood plasma, 140 (pulp/dentin) shared proteins were identified, 37 of which were not observed in plasma. It can be suggested that they might participate in the unique pulp-dentin complex. This proteomic investigation of human tooth pulp, together with the previously published study of human dentin, is one of the most comprehensive proteome lists of human teeth to date. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  3. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  4. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Child First See a Dentist? The History of Dental Advances Why is Oral Health Important for Men? What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | ...

  5. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Why is Oral ... Tooth Decay? The History of Dental Advances Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a ...

  6. The cracked tooth syndrome: an elusive diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, J C; Gobetti, J P

    1996-10-01

    The authors review the literature and present a case of cracked tooth syndrome. Special emphasis is placed on diagnostic problems associated with this syndrome. The case report demonstrates classic and atypical features of cracked tooth syndrome.

  7. Tooth Loss and Perceived Masticatory Ability in Post-Menopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunga Riadiani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-menopausal women experience physiological hormonal changes that reduce bone density which leads to tooth loss and presumably affect masticatory function. Objective: This study aims to determine association between tooth loss and masticatory ability in post-menopausal women. Methods: Cross sectional study of 95 post-menopausal women at Posbindu Lansia Pergeri Depok, West Java was performed. Subjects answered questionnaires and intra oral examination was performed. Chi square analysis was conducted to relate age, menopausal period, education level, tooth loss and denture use with masticatory ability. Results: 47% subjects lost >10 teeth, 27% subjects lost 6-10 teeth and 26% subjects lost <6 teeth. Seventy-six percent of subjects did not wear dentures. Menopausal period, tooth loss, and age had significant correlation with masticatory ability (p<0.05. Conclusions: This study concludes that masticatory ability in post-menopausal women is significantly affected by length of menopausal period, tooth loss and age (p<0.05.

  8. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela E Winkler

    Full Text Available The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3 in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth.

  9. Structural Morphology of Molars in Large Mammalian Herbivores: Enamel Content Varies between Tooth Positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Daniela E; Kaiser, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of dental tissues in mammalian herbivores can be very different from taxon to taxon. While grazers tend to have more elaborated and complexly folded enamel ridges, browsers have less complex enamel ridges which can even be so far reduced that they are completely lost. The gradient in relative enamel content and complexity of structures has so far not been addressed within a single species. However, several studies have noted tooth position specific wear rates in small mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs) which may be related to individual tooth morphology. We investigate whether differentiated enamel content by tooth position is also to be found in large herbivores. We use CT-scanning techniques to quantify relative enamel content in upper and lower molar teeth of 21 large herbivorous mammal species. By using a broad approach and including both perissodactyls and artiodactyls, we address phylogenetic intraspecific differences in relative enamel content. We find that enamel is highly unevenly distributed among molars (upper M1, M2, M3 and lower m1, m2, m3) in most taxa and that relative enamel content is independent of phylogeny. Overall, relative enamel content increases along the molar tooth row and is significantly higher in lower molars compared to upper molars. We relate this differential enamel content to prolonged mineralisation in the posterior tooth positions and suggest a compensatory function of m3 and M3 for functional losses of anterior teeth.

  10. Wear of Steel and Ti6Al4V Rollers in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Timothy L.; Shareef, Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    This investigation was prompted by results of a qualification test of a mechanism to be used for the James Webb Space Telescope. Post-test inspections of the qualification test article revealed some loose wear debris and wear of the steel rollers and the mating Ti6Al4V surfaces. An engineering assessment of the design and observations from the tested qualification unit suggested that roller misalignment was a controlling factor. The wear phenomena were investigated using dedicated laboratory experiments. Tests were done using a vacuum roller rig for a range of roller misalignment angles. The wear in these tests was mainly adhesive wear. The measured wear rates were highly correlated to the misalignment angle. For all tests with some roller misalignment, the steel rollers lost mass while the titanium rollers gained mass indicating strong adhesion of the steel with the titanium alloy. Inspection of the rollers revealed that the adhesive wear was a two-way process as titanium alloy was found on the steel rollers and vice versa. The qualification test unit made use of 440F steel rollers in the annealed condition. Both annealed 440F steel rollers and hardened 440C rollers were tested in the vacuum roller rig to investigate possibility to reduce wear rates and the risk of loose debris formation. The 440F and 440C rollers had differing wear behaviors with significantly lesser wear rates for the 440C. For the test condition of zero roller misalignment, the adhesive wear rates were very low, but still some loose debris was formed

  11. Occlusal splints for treating sleep bruxism (tooth grinding).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, C R; Silva, A B; Machado, M A; Saconato, H; Prado, G F

    2007-10-17

    effective for treating sleep bruxism. Indication of its use is questionable with regard to sleep outcomes, but it may be that there is some benefit with regard to tooth wear. This systematic review suggests the need for further investigation in more controlled RCTs that pay attention to method of allocation, outcome assessment, large sample size, and sufficient duration of follow up. The study design must be parallel, in order to eliminate the bias provided by studies of cross-over type. A standardisation of the outcomes of the treatment of sleep bruxism should be established in the RCTs.

  12. A tall rostral hook in a medieval horse premolar tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viranta, Suvi; Mannermaa, Kristiina

    2017-06-01

    Development of dental abnormalities due to improper occlusal wear is common among modern domestic horses. This phenomenon often is attributed to jaw conformation. Rostral mandibular hooks may develop in horses with underjet or mandibular prognathism, a condition where the lower jaw protrudes forward, beyond the upper jaw. Less abrasive diet, free of phytoliths and matrix-like plant fibers, also may promote enamel and focal overgrowths of equine dentition. Here we report a rostral mandibular hook in a lower premolar tooth of a medieval horse, found in a spring deposit in Levänluhta, Osthrobothnia, Finland. To our knowledge, this is the first such report from a medieval horse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphometry, Microstructure, and Wear Pattern of Neornithischian Dinosaur Teeth From the Upper Cretaceous Iharkút Locality (Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virág, Attila; Ősi, Attila

    2017-08-01

    Teeth of iguanodontian ornithopods and ceratopsians could be remarkably similar, thus the referral of isolated dental material to particular neornithischian clades can be highly problematic. These groups are represented by the rhabdodontid Mochlodon vorosi and the basal coronosaurian Ajkaceratops kozmai in the Upper Cretaceous Csehbánya Formation at Iharkút (western Hungary). Whereas teeth of Mochlodon are common elements at the locality, no dental material belonging to Ajkaceratops was identified until now. Here we used mathematical statistical approaches, as well as tooth wear and dental microstructure analysis in order to decide whether the teeth previously referred to Mochlodon can be treated as a homogenous sample, or some remains belong rather to Ajkaceratops. According to our results, there was a striking morphological and structural convergence between the teeth of both taxa. However, the wear study revealed the existence of two different patterns within the sample. One is characterized by straight and parallel microstriations that suggest orthal movements during the jaw closure. This pattern was associated with Mochlodon. The other pattern appeared only on a few teeth, and it can be differentiated by its distinctive curved microstriations that indicate circumpalinal chewing. Because curved striations have never been described in ornithopods, but are found in several neoceratopsians, this pattern was associated here with Ajkaceratops. Here we present the first teeth that can provisionally be referred to the latter genus. We believe that the methodology discussed in this article will facilitate distinguishing ceratopsian and ornithopod teeth in other localities as well. Anat Rec, 300:1439-1463, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Radiation tagging measures wear at speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Jon.

    1994-01-01

    A new non-invasive technique for performing accelerated wear and corrosion analysis is particularly relevant to power transmission systems. Wear tests that would normally take days or weeks to complete can now be performed in hours. A tiny patch of the wearing component is made mildly radioactive and the drop in activity as material is worn away is monitored. Known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), the technology was originally developed and pioneered in-house by the Atomic Energy Authority. Since then, the dominant partner has been the automotive sector where TLA has been used extensively for engine wear and lubrication performance analysis. However, TLA could be used in any wear or corrosion environment. Applications include wear analysis of machine tool cutting surfaces, pump impellers and brake linings to the corrosion monitoring of process plant and pipelines. (author)

  15. Wear mechanisms in ceramic hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, Matthew; Goswami, Tarun

    2004-01-01

    The wear in hip implants is one of the main causes for premature hip replacements. The wear affects the potential life of the prosthesis and subsequent removals of in vivo implants. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review various joints that show lower wear rates and consequently higher life. Ceramics are used in hip implants and have been found to produce lower wear rates. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ceramics compared to other implant materials. Different types of ceramics that are being used are reviewed in terms of the wear characteristics, debris released, and their size together with other biological factors. In general, the wear rates in ceramics were lower than that of metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene combinations.

  16. Durability analysis of gneiss using wear resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Ernandes Dias Filho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted in gneiss in Santo Antonio de Pádua, RJ, BR, including durability analysis of the rock using slake durability test. Rocks in the region of Pádua are mostly used for ornamental purposes. A lab equipment was developed to evaluate the influence of rotation in the test, allowing for the speed variation of 7 RPM to 238 RPM. This study could be implemented in a wide variety of rock materials, targeting them according to their lifetime in the project. With variation of the wear levels, increasing weight loss was observed until the inertia moment in which the sample holds to the machine wall. The results indicate an increase in linear mass loss. These procedures allow a more precise analysis of durability than can be applied in different different regions of the world.

  17. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in r...

  18. Plasma Plume Characterization of the HERMeS During a 1722-hr Wear Test Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Williams, George J.; Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Gilland, James H.; Herman, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    A 1722-hr wear test campaign of NASA's 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding was completed. This wear test campaign, completed in 2016, was divided into four segments including an electrical configuration characterization test, two short duration tests, and one long wear test. During the electrical configuration characterization test, the plasma plume was examined to provide data to support the down select of the electrical configuration for further testing. During the long wear tests, the plasma plume was periodically examined for indications of changes in thruster behavior. Examination of the plasma plume data from the electrical configuration characterization test revealed a correlation between the plume properties and the presence of a conduction path through the front poles. Examination of the long wear test plasma plume data revealed that the plume characteristics remained unchanged during testing to within the measurement uncertainty.

  19. The Delamination Theory of Wear - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    purposes: to predict wear arnd to reduce wear, Mathematical modelo are necessary in order to predict wear 40 qualitatively. They are also useful in the...Jersey 08540 The Ohio State University 116 West 19th Avenue Dr. E. Rudy .I Columbus, Ohio 43210 Oregon Graduate Center 19600 N.W. Walker Road Mr. W...Smith Baverton, Oregon 97005 Code 2832 Naval Ship Research and Development Dr. W. Ruff I Annopolis, Maryland 21401 National Bureau of Standards Department

  20. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yu Pan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration.

  1. AUTOGENOUS TOOTH TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    ABSTRACT. A case of autotransplantation of a tooth in a 26 year old female African cleft palate patient is reported. This case report emphasizes the possibility and success of autotransplantation in our centre, it also emphasizes that transplantation is only technique sensitive but less equipment sensitive. It further stresses.

  2. Stem cells for tooth engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bluteau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Tooth development results from sequential and reciprocal interactions between the oral epithelium and the underlying neural crest-derived mesenchyme. The generation of dental structures and/or entire teeth in the laboratory depends upon the manipulation of stem cells and requires a synergy of all cellular and molecular events that finally lead to the formation of tooth-specific hard tissues, dentin and enamel. Although mesenchymal stem cells from different origins have been extensively studied in their capacity to form dentin in vitro, information is not yet available concerning the use of epithelial stem cells. The odontogenic potential resides in the oral epithelium and thus epithelial stem cells are necessary for both the initiation of tooth formation and enamel matrix production. This review focuses on the different sources of stem cells that have been used for making teeth in vitro and their relative efficiency. Embryonic, post-natal or even adult stem cells were assessed and proved to possess an enormous regenerative potential, but their application in dental practice is still problematic and limited due to various parameters that are not yet under control such as the high risk of rejection, cell behaviour, long tooth eruption period, appropriate crown morphology and suitable colour. Nevertheless, the development of biological approaches for dental reconstruction using stem cells is promising and remains one of the greatest challenges in the dental field for the years to come.

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a group of genetic nerve disorders. It is named after the three doctors who first identified it. ... a nerve biopsy. There is no cure. The disease can be so mild you don't realize ...

  4. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebeena Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  5. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, Sivakumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-08-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  6. Diagnosis of cracked tooth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Sebeena; Thangavel, Boopathi; Mathew, Chalakuzhiyil Abraham; Kailasam, SivaKumar; Kumaravadivel, Karthick; Das, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The incidences of cracks in teeth seem to have increased during the past decade. Dental practitioners need to be aware of cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) in order to be successful at diagnosing CTS. Early diagnosis has been linked with successful restorative management and predictably good prognosis. The purpose of this article is to highlight factors that contribute to detecting cracked teeth.

  7. Determination of rail wear and short-time wear measurements of rails applying radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohmann, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    An energetic model has been developed for calculating rail wear. Short-time wear tests on rails after surface activation and following activity measurements showed a good agreement with the calculated values

  8. Structure effect on wear resistance of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepina, A.I.; Sidorova, L.I.; Tolstenko, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of wear resistance on hardness of steels with different microstructure is studied under conditions of gas-abrasion wear of surface layers. It is found out that at the same hardness the wear resistance of α-alloys is higher than that of γ-alloys in spite of considerable surface hardening of austenitic alloys. Fracture of surface in the process of abrasive wear occurs after achievement of definite values of microhardness and the width of a diffraction line for each structural class of alloys [ru

  9. Friction & Wear Under Very High Electromagnetic Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowan, Richard S; Danyluk, Steven; Moon, Francis; Ford, J. C; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes initial progress toward advancing the fundamental understanding of the friction, wear and mechanics of interfaces subjected to extreme electromagnetic stress, high relative...

  10. Influence on the wear resistance of the particle size used in coatings of Alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A; Guzmán, R; Ramirez, Z Y

    2017-01-01

    In the literature, it is common to find that the size of the particles used in coatings through thermal spraying processes influences the hardness and wear resistance thereof; this project aimed to quantify the importance of this parameter in the adhesive and abrasive wear resistance when aluminium oxide is deposited on a substrate of AISI 1020 steel, through a thermal spraying by flame process. The methodology consisted of: a) morphological characterization of the powder used in the coatings by scanning electron microscopy, b) deposition of coatings, c) testing of adhesive and abrasive wear (ASTM G99-05 Standard test method for wear testing with a pin-on-disk apparatus and ASTM G65–04 Standard test method for measuring abrasion using dry sand/rubber wheel apparatus ), and d) statistical analysis to determine the influence of particle size on wear resistance. The average size of the powder used for coatings was 92, 1690, 8990 and 76790nm. The obtained results allow to identify an inversely proportional behaviour between particle size and wear resistance, in both types of wear (adhesive and abrasive) is shown a logarithmic trend indicating an increase in loss mass during the test as the particle size is also increased and therefore a decrease in wear resistance of the coating. (paper)

  11. Influence on the wear resistance of the particle size used in coatings of Alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Guzmán, R.; Ramirez, Z. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the literature, it is common to find that the size of the particles used in coatings through thermal spraying processes influences the hardness and wear resistance thereof; this project aimed to quantify the importance of this parameter in the adhesive and abrasive wear resistance when aluminium oxide is deposited on a substrate of AISI 1020 steel, through a thermal spraying by flame process. The methodology consisted of: a) morphological characterization of the powder used in the coatings by scanning electron microscopy, b) deposition of coatings, c) testing of adhesive and abrasive wear (ASTM G99-05 Standard test method for wear testing with a pin-on-disk apparatus and ASTM G65-04 Standard test method for measuring abrasion using dry sand/rubber wheel apparatus), and d) statistical analysis to determine the influence of particle size on wear resistance. The average size of the powder used for coatings was 92, 1690, 8990 and 76790nm. The obtained results allow to identify an inversely proportional behaviour between particle size and wear resistance, in both types of wear (adhesive and abrasive) is shown a logarithmic trend indicating an increase in loss mass during the test as the particle size is also increased and therefore a decrease in wear resistance of the coating.

  12. Diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of the cracked tooth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurtsen, Werner; Schwarze, Thomas; Günay, Huesamettin

    2003-06-01

    Many morphologic, physical, and iatrogenic factors, such as deep grooves, pronounced intraoral temperature fluctuation, poor cavity preparation design, and wrong selection of restorative materials, may predispose posterior teeth to an incomplete fracture. The resulting cracked tooth syndrome is frequently associated with bizarre symptoms that may complicate diagnosis and can persist for many years. Epidemiologic data reveal that splits or fractures are the third most common cause of tooth loss in industrialized countries, primarily affecting maxillary molars and premolars and mandibular molars. This finding indicates that the cracked tooth syndrome is of high clinical importance. Thus, at-risk teeth should be reinforced early, for instance by castings with cusp coverage or by internal splinting with adhesive ceramic restorations.

  13. Leukotrienes in orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, A H; Tatakis, D N; Dziak, R

    1989-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) are products of arachidonic acid conversion. PGs have an established role in mediating orthodontic tooth movement. The role of LTs in modulating or mediating orthodontic tooth movement was investigated in this study. One hundred thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were used; the animals weighed 300 to 400 gm with equal numbers of male and female rats. They were divided into five main groups of 24 animals each and a sham group of 12 animals. An orthodontic appliance was placed and activated on all the animals except the sham group; in this group the appliances were not active. Each main group was given one of the following treatments daily: distilled water, 5% gum arabic solution, PG synthesis inhibitor indomethacin, LT synthesis inhibitor AA861, and a combination of both drugs. Each group was divided into six subgroups of four animals; the animals were killed at either 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 14 days, and tooth movement measured. The three sham subgroups received distilled water and were killed at 1, 7, or 10 days. The first maxillary molar (the moved tooth) and surrounding tissues were removed from all animals in the sham group and the subgroups killed at 1, 7, and 10 days in the gum arabic solution group and the LT synthesis inhibitor group. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were extracted, measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA), and standardized per milligram of protein in the sample. A significant inhibition of tooth movement occurred beginning on day 7 in the indomethacin, AA861, and combination groups; there was no significant difference among these groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Wear pattern, dental function, and jaw mechanism in the Late Cretaceous ankylosaur Hungarosaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osi, Attila; Barrett, Paul M; Földes, Tamás; Tokai, Richárd

    2014-07-01

    Feeding in thyreophoran dinosaurs is poorly understood. Although the group existed for over 130 million years, only the Early Jurassic basal thyreophoran Scelidosaurus harrisonii and the Late Cretaceous ankylosaurid Euoplocephalus tutus have been studied from this perspective in detail. In contrast to the earlier, conservative hypothesis of a simple "orthal pulping" feeding mode with no or limited tooth-tooth contact, recent studies have demonstrated precise dental occlusion with differing jaw mechanisms in these two species. Here, we describe the first detailed study of feeding related characters in a nodosaurid ankylosaur, Hungarosaurus tormai, from the Late Cretaceous of Hungary. Dental wear patterns comprising small, apical, and low-angled facets on the maxillary and steep, extended, and bowl-like facets on the dentary teeth reveal sophisticated tooth-tooth contact in this basal nodosaurid. The presence of two different scratch generations (vertical and low-angled) on the dentary teeth unambiguously demonstrate a multiphasic powerstroke, which is further supported by the morphology of the quadrate-articular and mandibular symphyseal joints and by the architecture of the reconstructed jaw adductors. Chewing started with an initial slicing phase associated with orthal movement that was followed by a retractive powerstroke with significant occlusal contact. Because of the curved tooth rows, these movements were probably facilitated by some mediolateral translation and/or axial rotation of the mandibles to produce precise shearing along the whole tooth row. These results demonstrate that complex jaw mechanisms and dental occlusion were more widespread among thyreophorans than thought previously and that palinal movement was present in at least two ankylosaurian lineages. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Biogeneric tooth: a new mathematical representation for tooth morphology in lower first molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Albert; Blanz, Volker; Hickel, Reinhard

    2005-08-01

    A mathematical representation of tooth morphology may help to improve and automate restorative computer-aided design processes, virtual dental education, and parametric morphology. However, to date, no quantitative formulation has been identified for the description of dental features. The aim of this study was to establish and to validate a mathematical process for describing the morphology of first lower molars. Stone replicas of 170 caries-free first lower molars from young patients were measured three-dimensionally with a resolution of about 100,000 points. First, the average tooth was computed, which captures the common features of the molar's surface quantitatively. For this, the crucial step was to establish a dense point-to-point correspondence between all teeth. The algorithm did not involve any prior knowledge about teeth. In a second step, principal component analysis was carried out. Repeated for 3 different reference teeth, the procedure yielded average teeth that were nearly independent of the reference (less than +/- 40 microm). Additionally, the results indicate that only a few principal components determine a high percentage of the three-dimensional shape variability of first lower molars (e.g. the first five principal components describe 52% of the total variance, the first 10 principal components 72% and the first 20 principal components 83%). With the novel approach presented in this paper, surfaces of teeth can be described efficiently in terms of only a few parameters. This mathematical representation is called the 'biogeneric tooth'.

  16. Simulated studies of wear and friction in total hip prosthesis components with various ball sizes and surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swikert, M. A.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a newly designed total hip joint simulator. The apparatus closely simulates the complex motions and loads of the human hip in normal walking. The wear and friction of presently used appliance configurations and materials were determined. A surface treatment of the metal femoral ball specimens was applied to influence wear. The results of the investigation indicate that wear can be reduced by mechanical treatment of metal femoral ball surfaces. A metallographic examination and surface roughness measurements were made.

  17. Alternate paddle configuration for improved wear resistance in the saltstone mixer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-09-23

    same way. The wear rate from wear test 2a was approximately double the wear rate from wear test 2b for paddle pairs 4 and 5. For both configurations, there was little or no wear on paddle pairs 1, 2, 3 and 6 based on mass change, indicating that the un-wetted and fully wetted premix materials cause less wear than the partially wetted premix. Additionally, inspection of the wear surface of the paddles showed more deformation on the flat paddles than the helical paddles which was consistent with the wear rates. Aligning of the auger discharge flight with paddle pair 1 resulted in a lower wear rate paddle pair 1 rather than having them misaligned with the feed augers. During the paddle wear tests, polishing wear was observed on the inside barrel of the mixer. The polishing wear is evident on the upper housing clamshell and the lower housing clamshell primarily at paddle pairs 4 and 5, which is the transition region of the mixer. Wear on the mixer barrel increases the space between the paddles and the barrel, resulting in increased grout build up on the barrel. Since the mixer barrel cannot be reconfigured or replaced in the SPF, the method for mitigating wear on the barrel is to move the more viscous grout through the transition region as quickly as possible. In addition, the location of the liquid inlet does not allow for sufficient cleaning of the mixer since residual grout remains on paddle pairs 1 - 4. As the paddles continue to wear and the self-cleaning capability of the paddles is lost, the lack of sufficient flushing would aid in grout build up between the barrel and the paddles which could eventually lead to decreased throughput capacity of the dry feeds. Changing the paddle configuration from flat to helical resulted in no change to the rheological properties of the grout mixture. Both tests produced a grout that is within the processing range of the SPF. Based on the results of this testing, it is recommended for the currently installed SPF mixer that paddle

  18. Comparison of pattern of failure of resin composite restorations in non-carious cervical lesions with and without occlusal wear facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginni, Adeleke Oke; Adeleke, Adeyinka Adedayo

    2014-07-01

    Many studies have reported the clinical problems associated with resin composite restorations in NCCLs. None has compared these clinical problems in NCCLs with and without occlusal wear facets. The present study sets out to determine the proportion of NCCLs that presents occlusal wear facets, and to compare the failure pattern of resin composite restorations in NCCLs with and without occlusal wear facets. Teeth with NCCLs were classified into two groups, those with and without occlusal wear facets. Both groups were restored using micro hybrid resin composite. The restorations were evaluated at the end of 2 years concerning post-operative sensitivity, retention, marginal integrity, marginal discolouration, wear, and secondary caries, using the USPHS criteria. Statistical analysis compared the ratings of each criterion between the two groups using Pearson's χ(2) or Fisher's exact test. About one-third (33.8%) of teeth with NCCLs presented with occlusal wear facets, more NCCLs with occlusal wear facets in mandibular teeth (44.7%) than maxillary teeth (24.5%). Retention rate of composite resin restorations in NCCLs with and without occlusal wear facets was 63.9% and 74.4% respectively at the end of 2 years. More marginal discolouration and defects were observed in restorations in NCCLs with occlusal wear facets, the differences were not statistically significant (p>0.05). The decline in ratings of marginal discolouration and defects, and the lower retention rate of restorations in NCCLs with occlusal wear facets may support the role of occlusal stress and tooth flexure as a cause of failure of restorations in NCCLs. The ability to distinguish between stress induced lesions (with occlusal wear facets) and other cervical lesions will have important ramifications for the success of their restorations because they are not subjected to the same physical forces that are responsible for the deterioration of the restoration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  20. Tongue piercing: impact of time and barbell stem length on lingual gingival recession and tooth chipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Allison; Moore, Alisa; Williams, Elly; Stephens, Joni; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2002-03-01

    The increasing popularity of tongue piercing has prompted several case reports documenting oral complications of this practice. However, there are no studies assessing potentially significant parameters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of time (years of wear) and tongue barbell size (stem length) on gingival recession and tooth chipping. Fifty-two adults (mean age 22) with tongue piercings were examined for gingival recession on the lingual aspect of the 12 anterior teeth and for tooth chipping anywhere in the mouth. Subjects were grouped according to years of wear (0 to 2, 2 to 4, and 4+ years) and barbell stem length (long > or =1.59 cm, or short barbells for 2 or more years. Tooth chipping was found on molars and premolars in 47% of subjects with a tongue piercing for 4+ years. Tongue piercing is associated with lingual recession of mandibular anterior teeth and chipping of posterior teeth. Long-term use of a tongue barbell increases the prevalence of these complications. Barbell stem length appears to differentially affect prevalence of recession and chipping. Since the overwhelming majority of subjects with tongue piercings are young adults, cessation efforts are needed to target this population.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Human Tooth Pulp: Proteomics of Human Tooth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eckhardt, Adam; Jágr, Michal; Pataridis, Statis; Mikšík, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 12 (2014), s. 1961-1966 ISSN 0099-2399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/0453; GA MZd(CZ) NT14324 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : dentin * human pulp * tandem mass spectrometry * tooth proteome * 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 3.375, year: 2014

  2. Abrasive tool wear in metal forming processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masen, Marc Arthur

    2004-01-01

    In this work a model is presented that quantifies this abrasive tool wear. The foundation of the model is on the level of surface roughness. The surface micro-geometry of both the abrasive surface and the wearing tool are measured using an interferometer. Based on this data, the surface geometry in

  3. Truck tyre wear assessment and prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Montanaro, F.; Donadio, D.; Gelosa, E.; Vis, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tyre wear is a complex phenomenon. It depends non-linearly on numerous parameters, like tyre compound and design, vehicle type and usage, road conditions and road surface characteristics, environmental conditions (e.g., temperature) and many others. Yet, tyre wear has many economic and ecological

  4. Vibrational characteristics and wear of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmugar, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel rod wear, due to vibration, is a continuing concern in the design of liquid-cooled reactors. In my report, the methodology and models that are used to predict fuel rod vibrational response and vibratory wear, in a light water reactor environment, are discussed. This methodology is being followed at present in the design of Westinghouse Nuclear Fuel. Fuel rod vibrations are expressed as the normal bending modes, and sources of rod vibration are examined with special emphasis on flow-induced mechanisms in the stable flow region. In a typical Westinghouse PWR fuel assembly design, each fuel rod is supported at multiple locations along the rod axis by a square-shaped 'grid cell'. For a fuel rod /grid support system, the development of small oscillatory motions, due to fluid flow at the rod/grid interface, results in material wear. A theoretical wear mode is developed using the Archard Theory of Adhesive Wear as the basis. Without question certainty, fretting wear becomes a serious problem if it progresses to the stage where the fuel cladding is penetrated and fuel is exposed to the coolant. Westinghouse fuel is designed to minimize fretting wear by limiting the relative motion between the fuel rod and its supports. The wear producing motion between the fuel rod and its supports occurs when the vibration amplitude exceeds the slippage threshold amplitude

  5. Wear Calculation Approach for Sliding - Friction Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springis, G.; Rudzitis, J.; Lungevics, J.; Berzins, K.

    2017-05-01

    One of the most important things how to predict the service life of different products is always connected with the choice of adequate method. With the development of production technologies and measuring devices and with ever increasing precision one can get the appropriate data to be used in analytic calculations. Historically one can find several theoretical wear calculation methods but still there are no exact wear calculation model that could be applied to all cases of wear processes because of difficulties connected with a variety of parameters that are involved in wear process of two or several surfaces. Analysing the wear prediction theories that could be classified into definite groups one can state that each of them has shortcomings that might impact the results thus making unnecessary theoretical calculations. The offered wear calculation method is based on the theories of different branches of science. It includes the description of 3D surface micro-topography using standardized roughness parameters, explains the regularities of particle separation from the material in the wear process using fatigue theory and takes into account material’s physical and mechanical characteristics and definite conditions of product’s working time. The proposed wear calculation model could be of value for prediction of the exploitation time for sliding friction pairs thus allowing the best technologies to be chosen for many mechanical details.

  6. Straylight Measurements in Contact Lens Wear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Engelbrecht, Leonore A.; van Vliet, Johannes M. J.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.; van den Berg, Thomas J. T. P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: (1) To quantify the effect of contact lens wear on straylight in rigid and soft contact lens wearers and (2) to relate findings to morphological changes and subjective complaints. Methods: Straylight was measured using the Oculus C-Quant during contact lens wear and after contact lens

  7. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ordered intermetallic alloy (Johnson et al 1990, 1994,. 1996; Maupin et al 1992, 1993; Tu and Liu 1997; Kim and Kim 1998). Maupin et al (1992, 1993) had shown that the Fe3Al alloy having DO3 structure possesses mar- ginally lower wear rate than those with B2 structure. The wear resistance of Fe3Al alloy was found to ...

  8. Corrosion of amalgams under sliding wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, K; Meletis, E I

    1996-05-01

    During mastication, dental amalgams are simultaneously subjected to corrosion by the oral environment and to a sliding-wear process by biting forces. In the present study, the effect of sliding wear on the corrosion behavior of two high-copper dental amalgams was investigated. An experimental apparatus was utilized that allows electrochemical testing under sliding-wear conditions. Corrosion potential measurements and anodic polarization scans were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl solution under sliding wear to characterize the behavior of two commercial, high-copper, single composition dental amalgams. In addition, long duration tests were conducted to assess possible corrosion and wear synergistic effects. The results showed that sliding wear caused a sharp reduction in the corrosion potential, a significant increase in the corrosion rate and a decrease in the repassivation rate of both amalgams. These effects are due to the mechanical removal by the wear process of the surface protective film formed on dental amalgams. The simultaneous action of sliding wear and corrosion can also induce embrittlement that leads to cracking. The present evidence suggests that this cracking may be one of the major contributors to marginal failures of dental amalgam restorations.

  9. Dry sliding wear behavior of heat treated hybrid metal matrix composite using Taguchi techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiran, T.S.; Prasanna Kumar, M.; Basavarajappa, S.; Viswanatha, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ZA-27 alloy is used as matrix material and reinforced with SiC and Gr particles. • Heat treatment was carried out for all specimen. • Dry sliding wear test was done on pin-on-disc apparatus by Taguchi technique. • ZA-27/9SiC–3Gr showed superior wear resistance over the base alloy. • Ceramic mixed mechanical layer on contact surface of composite was formed. - Abstract: Dry sliding wear behavior of zinc based alloy and composite reinforced with SiCp (9 wt%) and Gr (3 wt%) fabricated by stir casting method was investigated. Heat treatment (HT) and aging of the specimen were carried out, followed by water quenching. Wear behavior was evaluated using pin on disc apparatus. Taguchi technique was used to estimate the parameters affecting the wear significantly. The effect of HT was that it reduced the microcracks, residual stresses and improved the distribution of microconstituents. The influence of various parameters like applied load, sliding speed and sliding distance on wear behavior was investigated by means and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Further, correlation between the parameters was determined by multiple linear regression equation for each response. It was observed that the applied load significantly influenced the wear volume loss (WVL), followed by sliding speed implying that increase in either applied load or sliding speed increases the WVL. Whereas for composites, sliding distance showed a negative influence on wear indicating that increase in sliding distance reduces WVL due to the presence of reinforcements. The wear mechanism of the worn out specimen was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The analysis shows that the formation and retention of ceramic mixed mechanical layer (CMML) plays a major role in the dry sliding wear resistance

  10. Effect of distribution of striated laser hardening tracks on dry sliding wear resistance of biomimetic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Some biological surfaces were proved to have excellent anti-wear performance. Being inspired, Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used to create striated biomimetic laser hardening tracks on medium carbon steel samples. Dry sliding wear tests biomimetic samples were performed to investigate specific influence of distribution of laser hardening tracks on sliding wear resistance of biomimetic samples. After comparing wear weight loss of biomimetic samples, quenched sample and untreated sample, it can be suggested that the sample covered with dense laser tracks (3.5 mm spacing) has lower wear weight loss than the one covered with sparse laser tracks (4.5 mm spacing); samples distributed with only dense laser tracks or sparse laser tracks (even distribution) were proved to have better wear resistance than samples distributed with both dense and sparse tracks (uneven distribution). Wear mechanisms indicate that laser track and exposed substrate of biomimetic sample can be regarded as hard zone and soft zone respectively. Inconsecutive striated hard regions, on the one hand, can disperse load into small branches, on the other hand, will hinder sliding abrasives during wear. Soft regions with small range are beneficial in consuming mechanical energy and storing lubricative oxides, however, soft zone with large width (>0.5 mm) will be harmful to abrasion resistance of biomimetic sample because damages and material loss are more obvious on surface of soft phase. As for the reason why samples with even distributed bionic laser tracks have better wear resistance, it can be explained by the fact that even distributed laser hardening tracks can inhibit severe worn of local regions, thus sliding process can be more stable and wear extent can be alleviated as well.

  11. Asphalt wear and pollution transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Asa [Division of Traffic Engineering, Lulea University of Technology Lulea (Sweden)

    1996-09-06

    Studded tires cause extensive wear of road surfaces during winter producing small particles. Besides transporting different adsorbed pollutants these particles also discharge metal ions by their own natural content. The major part (95%) of the asphalt is composed of stone fractions. The rest consists mainly of bitumen, which contains trace quantities of metals. Laboratory studies in this study have demonstrated different adsorbing properties of metal ions, as well as differences in adsorption when comparing stone materials. Two stone materials, a gabbro and a porphyry, have been tested for their adsorption properties concerning Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd. The gabbro showed better adsorption capacity than the porphyry. Gabbro has coarser grains, it is softer, and also has a higher content of most metals compared to the porphyry. In all tests lead and copper are more adsorbed than zinc and cadmium. All metal ions are released at about the same pH ({approx}4)

  12. Role of plastic deformation in wear of copper and copper - 10-percent-aluminum alloy in cryogenic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    High-purity copper specimens and a copper-aluminum (10%) alloy specimen were subjected to sliding against Type 440 C in cryogenic fuel environments. It was found that virtually all wear occurred by the plastic deformation of a recrystallized layer extending to about 10 micrometers below the wear scar surface of the copper or copper alloy. The wear debris was in the form of a layered structure adhering to the exit region of the wear scar. Measurements on the high purity copper specimens indicated that the wear rate was proportional to the applied load and to the sliding velocity squared. A physical model of the wear process is proposed to account for these observations.

  13. Complications caused by contact lens wearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beljan, Jasna; Beljan, Kristina; Beljan, Zdravko

    2013-04-01

    Complications in wearing contact lenses are very rare and caused by poor maintenance, over-extended wear and wearing of contact lenses in a polluted environment. Regular control by a professional person can efficiently reduce the number of complications. This paper describes the most common risks factors for complications, and complications of wearing contact lenses with the classification according to the anatomic parts of the eye: eyelids, tear film, limbus, corneal epithelium, corneal stroma and corneal endothelium. Every complication has been described by the characteristic signs and symptoms, etiology and pathology, as well as therapy and prognosis. The paper describes how to select adequate customers as contact lens users, with proper education in order to ensure minimal incidence of complications due to contact lens wear, thus attracting a lot of satisfied and healthy customers.

  14. The friction wear of electrolytic composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosta, R.

    2002-01-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of wear of galvanic composite coatings Ni-Al 2 O 3 and Ni-41%Fe-Al 2 O 3 . The diameter of small parts of aluminium oxide received 0.5; 3; 5 μm. Investigations of friction sliding were effected on PT3 device at Technical University of Gdansk. Counter sample constituted a funnel made of steel NC6 (750 HV). Increase of wear coatings together with the rise of iron content in matrix is observed. The rise of sizes of ceramic particles caused decrease of wear of composite coatings, but rise of steel funnel wear. The friction coefficient increased after ceramic particle s were built in coatings. The best wear resistance characterized Ni-41%Fe-Al 2 O 3 coatings containing 2.2x10 6 mm -2 ceramic particles. (author)

  15. Indirect restorations for severe tooth wear: Fracture risk and layer thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamburger, J.T.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study investigated static failure risk related to restoration layer thickness for different indirect materials and compare them to direct composites. METHODS: Two ceramics (IPS e-max CAD, EmpressCAD (Ivoclar Vivadent)), two indirect composites (Estenia (Kuraray), Sinfony

  16. Multidisciplinary treatment of tooth wear in a patient with Asperger’s Syndrome and dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetselaar, P.; Vermaire, J.H.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes a patient who is referred by his home physician to a centre for special dental care because of the presence of severe oral pain with an existing dental phobia. The patient has Asperger's Syndrome. Besides his extreme fear for dental treatment and several deep carious

  17. Towards tooth friendly soft drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahi, Jafar; Fazilati, Mohamad; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2009-10-01

    Most soft drinks contain high concentration of simple carbohydrates and have a pH of 3 or even lower. Therefore, they are harmful for tooth structure. A tooth friendly soft drink (T.F.S.D) should have the following characteristics and elements; fluoride (approximately 1 ppm), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (2%), xylitol (4-6g/serving), tea polyphenols (2-4 mg/ml), cranberry extract (250 mg/ml of the flavonoids quercetin and myricetin), sugar free, pH close to 5.5 and super oxygenation (240,000 ppm) vs. carbonation. T.F.S.D can be packaged in a container which gaseous oxygen is dissolved in a liquid in the form of bubbles. However, looking at opportunities for so-called sophisticated soft drinks, T.F.S.D will be an example for a functional and health oriented soft drink.

  18. Pink tooth phenomenon: an enigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapar, Raveena; Choudhry, Swati; Sinha, Anju; Bali, Ruchita; Shukla, Deepika

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of pink teeth is a common phenomenon which has been observed after death in certain circumstances on post-mortem examination. Extra fibrinolytic activity of pulp facilitates rapid breakdown of red blood cells and diffusion of hemoglobin and its derivatives to flow into dentine. We reviewed various studies on pink tooth phenomenon which have stated the various factors that lead to pink tooth formation. Most of the authors have stressed that post-mortem pink teeth must not be considered as a reliable odontological parameter for determining cause of death. No correlation has been found between the occurrence of pink teeth and the cause of death but condition of the surroundings certainly plays an important role in the development of this phenomenon. This paper reviews the factors and conditions responsible for formation of pink teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Retrospective Study of Association between Displacement of Maxillary Canine and Tooth Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, E; Lee, K; An, S; Song, J; Ra, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interrelationships between displacement of maxillary canine and tooth agenesis in age from 10 to 19 years. The panoramic radiographs of 128 subjects with displacement of maxillary canine and 600 subjects without displacement of maxillary canine were examined. The panoramic radiographs taken between 2003 and 2013 were used for diagnosis other related dental anomalies, including permanent tooth agenesis and small maxillary lateral incisor. Patients with maxillary canine displacement had a significantly higher prevalence rate of permanent tooth agenesis excluding of third molars (p agenesis of maxillary lateral incisor (p 0.05). This study indicates that there is positive relationship between displacement of maxillary canine, small maxillary lateral incisor and permanent tooth agenesis. Especially, maxillary lateral incisor and maxillary second premolar have strong association with maxillary canine displacement. Consequently, permanent tooth agenesis and small maxillary lateral incisor can be a predictor of maxillary canine displacement.

  20. Visualization of Tooth for Non-Destructive Evaluation from CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hui; Chae, Ok Sam [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This paper reports an effort to develop 3D tooth visualization system from CT sequence images as a part of the non-destructive evaluation suitable for the simulation of endodontics, orthodontics and other dental treatments. We focus on the segmentation and visualization for the individual tooth. In dental CT images teeth are touching the adjacent teeth or surrounded by the alveolar bones with similar intensity. We propose an improved level set method with shape prior to separate a tooth from other teeth as well as the alveolar bones. Reconstructed 3D model of individual tooth based on the segmentation results indicates that our technique is a very conducive tool for tooth visualization, evaluation and diagnosis. Some comparative visualization results validate the non-destructive function of our method.

  1. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eLiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids versus snakes: (i the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element. The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as

  2. Varanoid Tooth Eruption and Implantation Modes in a Late Cretaceous Mosasaur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Reed, David A.; Cecchini, Giancarlo M.; Lu, Xuanyu; Ganjawalla, Karan; Gonzales, Carol S.; Monahan, Richard; Luan, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Erupting teeth are some of the oldest witnesses of developmental processes in the vertebrate fossil record and provide an important resource for vertebrate cladistics. Here, we have examined a mosasaur jaw fragment from central Texas using ultrathin ground section histology and 3D tomographic imaging to assess features critical for the cladistic placement of mosasaurs among varanoids vs. snakes: (i) the orientation of replacement teeth compared to the major tooth axis, (ii) the occurrence of resorption pits, and (iii) the mode of tooth implantation/attachment to the tooth bearing element (TBE). The replacement tooth studied here developed in an inclined position slightly distal of the deciduous parent tooth, similar to another varanoid squamate, the Gila monster Heloderma suspectum. Ground sections and tomographs also demonstrated that the replacement tooth attachment apparatus was entirely intact and that there was no evidence of mechanical deformation. Sections and tomographs further illustrated that the replacement tooth was located within a bony crypt and the inclination of the crypt matched the inclination of the replacement tooth. These preparations also revealed the presence of a resorption pit within the boundaries of the deciduous tooth that surrounded the developing replacement tooth. This finding suggests that developing mosasaur teeth developed within the walls of resorption pits similar to varanoid tooth germs and unlike developing snake teeth which are surrounded by fibrous connective tissue integuments. Finally, mosasaurs featured pseudo-thecodont tooth implantation with teeth anchored within a socket of mineralized tissue by means of a mineralized periodontal ligament. Together, these data indicate that the moderate inclination of the erupting mosasaur tooth studied here is neither a result of postmortem displacement nor a character representative of snakes, but rather a shared character between Mosasaurs and other varanoids such as Heloderma. In

  3. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  4. Corticision: A Flapless Procedure to Accelerate Tooth Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Guk

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement results from applied forces to the teeth evoking cellular responses in the teeth and their surrounding tissues, including the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva. It is advantageous for the orthodontist to be well informed of the detailed process of the biological events that unfold during tooth movement, since some of these details may differ from one person to another due to biological differences such as periodontal metabolism or alveolar bone density. This led us to emphasize that orthodontics is a field of endeavor where the integration of mechanics and biology is materialized, and to affirm the fact that tooth movement is conducted in individual human beings, each composed of a unique and intricate physiological system. Biological variations may be the foundation of the differences that are frequently observed in the outcomes of orthodontic treatment in particular with reference to treatment duration between patients with similar malocclusions and who were treated identically. A wide diversity of clinical trials has been carried out to control the tissue resistance to facilitate orthodontic tooth movement, which involves biomechanical, pharmaceutical, surgical, electrical regimens or tissue engineering technology. The term 'Corticision' is a neologism which indicates 'cortical bone incision'. It is a minimally invasive periodontal procedure without flap elevation, thus accelerating tooth movement with an enhanced turnover rate of the surrounding structures. This chapter introduces the technical procedure, and the biological background of how such a minor surgical procedure can receive the accelerated tooth movement with impunity and thereby shorten the duration of treatment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [A tooth or an implant--literature based decision making].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar On, H; Sharon, E; Lipovezky-Adler, M; Haramaty, O; Smidt, A

    2014-07-01

    The common use of dental implants in the daily practice led to a profound change in the available treatment strategies. The option of replacing a diagnosed doubtful tooth with an implant has become widely accepted and often used. The prognosis systems in use today are based on the three major disciplines: endodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics. Combining these three may impair and bias the decision making process and increase the tendency to base it on subjective clinical experience and personal preference. Reading and reviewing the relevant literature gives no clear tool for use. Root canal treatment is considered a highly predictable treatment procedure and a treated tooth is affected mainly by the quality and type of the fabricated restoration and the risk of caries. Periodontal treatment followed by a suitable maintenance regimen will likely allow long term tooth survival. When comparing the success rates of natural teeth rehabilitation versus implant supported restorations, it appears that with implants an additional treatment is demanded along the years. This coincides with the fact that to date there is no consensus regarding the extent of perimplantitis and perimucositis that is to be expected around a restored implant. In addition, a peri implant tissue problem or a failure of a dental implant may prove to be more challenging than a failure of a tooth. It is important to remember that a dental implant is made to substitute a missing tooth and it is a treatment modality with known and clear indications for rehabilitation of an edentulous space. The aim of this paper is to review and discuss the various aspects of whether to maintain a compromised or a doubtful tooth or to prefer a treatment modality using dental implants. In conclusion it is advised here, to incorporate the discussed issues in the decision making process towards the most suitable treatment plan.

  6. Adhesive Wear of Rollers in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeef, Iqbal; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    This work was done to support NASA's James Webb Space Telescope that is equipped with a Near Infrared Camera and Spectrograph and Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). A MSA mechanism's qualification test in cryogenic vacuum at 30deg K for 96K cycles resulted in roller wear and formation of some debris. Lab tests in vacuum were conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to understand the wear of Ti6Al4V mated with 440F steel rollers. Misalignment angle was found to have the most significant effect on debris formation. At misalignment angle of 1.4deg, significant amount of wear debris were formed within 50,000 cycles. Very few wear particles were found for a zero misalignment angle, and the total wear was small even after 367,000 cycles. The mode of wear in all the tests was attributed to adhesion, which was clearly evident from video records as well as the plate-like amalgamated debris material from both rollers. The adhesive wear rate was found to be approximately proportional to the misalignment angle. The wear is a two-way phenomenon, and the mixing of both roller materials in wear debris was confirmed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and EDX spectra. While there was a net loss of mass from the steel rollers, XRF and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra showed peaks of Ti on steel rollers, and peaks of Fe on Ti rollers. These results are useful for designers in terms of maintaining appropriate tolerances to avoid misalignment of rolling elements and the resulting severe wear

  7. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  8. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reilly, Mary M

    2011-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the commonest inherited neuromuscular disorder affecting at least 1 in 2,500. Over the last two decades, there have been rapid advances in understanding the molecular basis for many forms of CMT with more than 30 causative genes now described. This has made obtaining an accurate genetic diagnosis possible but at times challenging for clinicians. This review aims to provide a simple, pragmatic approach to diagnosing CMT from a clinician\\'s perspective.

  9. Tooth brushing for oral prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruaki Hayasaki, DDS, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of plaque and debris is essential for the prevention of inflammatory periodontal diseases and dental caries, because plaque is the primary etiological factor in the introduction and development of both of these infection-oriented diseases. Plaque removal with a toothbrush is the most frequently used method of oral hygiene. Powered toothbrushes were developed beginning in the 1960s and are now widely used in developed countries. The bristles of a toothbrush should be able to reach and clean efficiently most areas of the mouth, and recently the design of both manual and powered toothbrushes has focused on the ability to reach and clean interproximal tooth surfaces. An individual's tooth brushing behavior, including force, duration, motivation and motion, are also critical to tooth brushing efficacy. Dental floss and the type of toothpaste play additional important roles as auxiliary tools for oral prophylaxis. Dental professionals should help their care-receivers’ meet the requirements of oral hygiene to maintain their QOL. This article reviews these topics.

  10. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa’a M. Salloum

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement.

  11. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H; Snider, T N; Wimer, H F; Yamada, S S; Yang, T; Holmbeck, K; Foster, B L

    2016-01-01

    indicate that MT1-MMP activity in the dental mesenchyme, and not in epithelial-derived HERS, is essential for proper tooth root formation and eruption. In summary, our studies point to an indispensable role for MT1-MMP-mediated matrix remodeling in tooth eruption through effects on bone formation, soft tissue remodeling and organization of the follicle/PDL region. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Matrix Biology. All rights reserved.

  12. Beta-Catenin and Plakoglobin Expression during Zebrafish Tooth Development and Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Verstraeten

    Full Text Available We analyzed the protein distribution of two cadherin-associated molecules, plakoglobin and β-catenin, during the different stages of tooth development and tooth replacement in zebrafish. Plakoglobin was detected at the plasma membrane already at the onset of tooth development in the epithelial cells of the tooth. This pattern remained unaltered during further tooth development. The mesenchymal cells only showed plakoglobin from cytodifferentiation onwards. Plakoglobin 1a morpholino-injected embryos showed normal tooth development with proper initiation and differentiation. Although plakoglobin is clearly present during normal odontogenesis, the loss of plakoglobin 1a does not influence tooth development. β-catenin was found at the cell borders of all cells of the successional lamina but also in the nuclei of surrounding mesenchymal cells. Only membranous, not nuclear, β-catenin, was found during morphogenesis stage. However, during cytodifferentiation stage, both nuclear and membrane-bound β-catenin was detected in the layers of the enamel organ as well as in the differentiating odontoblasts. Nuclear β-catenin is an indication of an activated Wnt pathway, therefore suggesting a possible role for Wnt signalling during zebrafish tooth development and replacement.

  13. Molecular Genetics of Supernumerary Tooth Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Ping; Fan, Jiabing

    2011-01-01

    Summary Despite advances in the knowledge of tooth morphogenesis and differentiation, relatively little is known about the aetiology and molecular mechanisms underlying supernumerary tooth formation. A small number of supernumerary teeth may be a common developmental dental anomaly, while multiple supernumerary teeth usually have a genetic component and they are sometimes thought to represent a partial third dentition in humans. Mice, which are commonly used for studying tooth development, only exhibit one dentition, with very few mouse models exhibiting supernumerary teeth similar to those in humans. Inactivation of Apc or forced activation of Wnt/β(catenin signalling results in multiple supernumerary tooth formation in both humans and in mice, but the key genes in these pathways are not very clear. Analysis of other model systems with continuous tooth replacement or secondary tooth formation, such as fish, snake, lizard, and ferret, is providing insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying succesional tooth development, and will assist in the studies on supernumerary tooth formation in humans. This information, together with the advances in stem cell biology and tissue engineering, will pave ways for the tooth regeneration and tooth bioengineering. PMID:21309064

  14. [Assessment of tooth bleaching efficacy with spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhao; Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the changes in CIE L*, a*, and b* at cervical, body, and incisal sites after tooth bleaching by using a spectrophotometer. Sixty-seven intact and healthy maxillary central incisors were in-vestigated. These incisors were darker than A3 according to the Vita Classical shade guide. The CIE tooth shade parameters L*, a*, and b* were simultaneously recorded at three tooth areas (cervical, body, and incisal) with a spectrophotometer before and after tooth bleaching (35%H2O2 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating). The shade dif-ferential (DeltaE) was calculated. ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson correlation analysis were used for data analysis. The efficacy rates of tooth bleaching were satisfactory, with 86.6%, 86.6%, and 85.1% in the cervical, body, and incisal sites, respectively. The average values of DeltaE were 5.09, 4.44, and 4.40 in the cervical, body, and incisal sites. Tooth bleaching significantly increased L* and significantly decreased a* and b* in all tooth areas (P spectrophotometer could objectively evaluate the whitening effect of tooth bleaching at the different tooth sites. The tooth bleaching system (35%H202 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating) exerts powerful bleaching actions in most of the tooth areas investigated. The order of tooth bleaching effectiveness is cervicalbody>incisal. Yellow coloration is decreased mainly at the cervical site, and brightness was increased mostly at theincisal site. The effectiveness of tooth bleaching increases as the baseline b* value increases.

  15. Biomechanical Alignment of Main Wear-Pattern on MOM Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Burton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of retrievals, femoral heads and cups are sent for analysis with no designation as to positioning in-vivo. In addition, when patients retain the femoral prosthesis, evidence of neck impingement damage is lost. In this case report we studied head and cup wear-patterns and stripe damage in a novel case that included a large diameter metal-on-metal THA that was retrieved with the head still fused to the stem. This provided anatomical positioning of head wear-pattern and stripe damage as represented by the orientation of the femoral stem in radiographic images. We investigated (1 size, shape and location of head and cup wear-patterns, (2 cup-to-stem impingement damage, and (3 head stripe-wear. The head wear-pattern was elliptical in shape, 40mm diameter with area covering 2200 sq.mm. Its hemispherical ratio was 56% with aspect ratio 1.2 and typical of large-diameter MOM retrievals. Wear-pattern extended from 12° above superior head-margin to approximately 40° inferior to polar axis. Centroidal vector in coronal plane was 13° posterior to polar axis and in transverse plane was 19° superior to polar axis. These vector data corresponded well with biomechanical predictions of resultant load axes in gait studies. Stripe damage was identified on the head, and the cup rim could thereby be aligned to verify neck impingement and also head subluxation mechanisms. Cup wear-pattern was not centrally contained, indicating this patient had experienced repetitive edge-wear during gait. Thinning of the cup rim by 350- 400μm indicated that posterior impingement with repetitive anterior subluxation of the head had created this edge-wear.

  16. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Hussein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  17. Two-body wear performance of dental colored zirconia after different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunyang; Zhao, Jing; Si, Wenjie; Wang, Xinzhi

    2016-10-01

    Colored zirconia is widely used in dental clinical practice; however, data pertaining to its wear resistance after different surface treatments are sparse. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the 2-body wear resistance of dental colored zirconia after different glazing and polishing treatments. Standardized specimens were prepared from dental zirconia (internal and external staining and no staining) and subjected to different surface treatments. The stained zirconia and control ceramics were polished with a Robinson brush and polishing paste or polishing kits, while the nonstained zirconia was airborne-particle abraded and glazed. The specimens were then abraded against steatite antagonists using a pin-on-disk wear tester. The wear depth for the specimens was measured using confocal microscopy. Wear areas on the steatite antagonists were measured by using an optical microscope. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the wear pattern of the zirconia specimens. All data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Tamhane test for post hoc analysis (α=.05). The surfaces polished using the Robinson brush and paste showed no wear. The wear depth of the unglazed surfaces was 42.27 ±3.21 ∼84.15 ±2.57 μm and 87.75 ±9.36 and 91.76 ±13.58 μm for the glazed surfaces. The antagonist wear area was 1.79 ±0.21 ∼2.69 ±0.34 mm 2 (unglazed) and 3.34 ±0.29 ∼4.51 ±0.88 mm 2 (glazed). SEM revealed chipping fractures, and peeling cracks were observed on the glazed zirconia surfaces, indicating a combination of fatigue and abrasive wear. The results of this in vitro study suggest that highly polished zirconia shows the least wear, including antagonist wear. Furthermore, glazed zirconia can be significantly more abrasive than polished zirconia. The wear properties of internally and externally stained zirconia are similar. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Application of grey-taguchi method for optimization of dry sliding wear properties of aluminum MMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriyala, Rajesh; Alluru, Gopala Krishna; Penmetsa, Rama Murthy Raju; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan

    2012-09-01

    Through a pin-on-disc type wear setup, the dry sliding wear behavior of SiC-reinforced aluminum composites produced using the molten metal mixing method was investigated in this paper. Dry sliding wear tests were carried on SiC-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) and its matrix alloy sliding against a steel counter face. Different contact stresses, reinforcement percentages, sliding distances, and sliding velocities were selected as the control variables, and the responses were selected as the wear volume loss (WVL) and coefficient of friction (COF) to evaluate the dry sliding performance. An L25 orthogonal array was employed for the experimental design. Initially, the optimization of the dry sliding performance of the SiC-reinforced MMCs was performed using grey relational analysis (GRA). Based on the GRA, the optimum level parameters for overall grey relational grade in terms of WVL and COF were identified. Analysis of variance was performed to determine the effect of individual factors on the overall grey relational grade. The results indicated that the sliding velocity was the most effective factor among the control parameters on dry sliding wear, followed by the reinforcement percentage, sliding distance, and contact stress. Finally, the wear surface morphology and wear mechanism of the composites were investigated through scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rizwan M; McGarry, Frederick J; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Harris, William H

    2003-08-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) is widely performed to recover hip joint functions lost by trauma or disease and to relieve pain. The major cause of failure in THR is the wear of the ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component. The dominant wear mechanism in THR occurs through adhesion and abrasion. While poor consolidation of UHMWPE is known to increase the incidence of a different damage mode, delamination, which is the dominant wear mechanism in tibial inserts but uncommon in THR, the effect of consolidation on adhesive and abrasive wear of UHMWPE is not clear. In this study UHMWPE resin was subjected to hot isostatic pressing under a pressure of 138MPa at different temperatures (210 degrees C, 250 degrees C, and 300 degrees C) to achieve varying degrees of consolidation. The extent of consolidation was determined by optical microscopy using thin sections, and by scanning electron microscopy using cryofractured and solvent etched specimens. Wear behavior of the samples with varying degree of consolidation was determined using a bi-directional pin-on-disc machine simulating conditions in a hip joint. Increasing the processing temperature decreased the incidence of fusion defects and particle boundaries reflecting the powder flakes of the virgin resin, improving the consolidation. However, the bi-directional pin-on-disc wear rate did not change with the processing temperature, indicating that adhesive and abrasive wear is independent of the extent of consolidation in the range of parameters studied here.

  20. Wear resistance of alloy вт-22 with non-ferrous alloys at reverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.М. Хімко

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article presents the results of tests of non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22 with aviation non-ferrous alloys in reverse sliding friction. The main objective of the work is the selection of the optimum combination of materials depending on changes in loading conditions. Study of alloy ВТ-22 wear resistance was carried out in pairs with БрОФ-10-1, БрБ2, БрАЖ-9-4, ВТ-22, МЛ5, Д16Т, 7Х21ГАН5Ш and 95Х18Ш. The dependencies of the materials wear at pressures 10, 20 and 30 Mpa we determined. The linear nature of titanium alloy wear curves indicates that the change in the wear mechanism occurs gradually. The histograms of non-ferrous materials wear and the total wear of the friction pair are presented. It is established that the bronze БрАЖ-9-4 is the most preferable material for contact with non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22, the least wear among the tested materials. The established coefficients of the titanium alloy ВТ-22 friction in pair with aviation structural non-ferrous alloys are presented. The results of research will be relevant for the engineering industry, where non hardened titanium alloy ВТ-22 in pair with non-ferrous alloys is applied.

  1. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  2. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  3. Gaussian process regression for tool wear prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dongdong; Chen, Yongjie; Li, Ning

    2018-05-01

    To realize and accelerate the pace of intelligent manufacturing, this paper presents a novel tool wear assessment technique based on the integrated radial basis function based kernel principal component analysis (KPCA_IRBF) and Gaussian process regression (GPR) for real-timely and accurately monitoring the in-process tool wear parameters (flank wear width). The KPCA_IRBF is a kind of new nonlinear dimension-increment technique and firstly proposed for feature fusion. The tool wear predictive value and the corresponding confidence interval are both provided by utilizing the GPR model. Besides, GPR performs better than artificial neural networks (ANN) and support vector machines (SVM) in prediction accuracy since the Gaussian noises can be modeled quantitatively in the GPR model. However, the existence of noises will affect the stability of the confidence interval seriously. In this work, the proposed KPCA_IRBF technique helps to remove the noises and weaken its negative effects so as to make the confidence interval compressed greatly and more smoothed, which is conducive for monitoring the tool wear accurately. Moreover, the selection of kernel parameter in KPCA_IRBF can be easily carried out in a much larger selectable region in comparison with the conventional KPCA_RBF technique, which helps to improve the efficiency of model construction. Ten sets of cutting tests are conducted to validate the effectiveness of the presented tool wear assessment technique. The experimental results show that the in-process flank wear width of tool inserts can be monitored accurately by utilizing the presented tool wear assessment technique which is robust under a variety of cutting conditions. This study lays the foundation for tool wear monitoring in real industrial settings.

  4. Mechanisms of tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, G E; King, G J

    2008-05-01

    Teeth move through alveolar bone, whether through the normal process of tooth eruption or by strains generated by orthodontic appliances. Both eruption and orthodontics accomplish this feat through similar fundamental biological processes, osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis, but there are differences that make their mechanisms unique. A better appreciation of the molecular and cellular events that regulate osteoclastogenesis and osteogenesis in eruption and orthodontics is not only central to our understanding of how these processes occur, but also is needed for ultimate development of the means to control them. Possible future studies in these areas are also discussed, with particular emphasis on translation of fundamental knowledge to improve dental treatments.

  5. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation. PMID:24174765

  6. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Nagappa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  7. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, G; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-09-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  8. Test Tube Tooth: The Next Big Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Preeti; Tahir, Mohammed; Yadav, Harsh; Sureka, Rakshit; Garg, Aarti

    2016-06-01

    Unlike some vertebrates and fishes, humans do not have the capacity for tooth regeneration after the loss of permanent teeth. Although artificial replacement with removable dentures, fixed prosthesis and implants is possible through advances in the field of prosthetic dentistry, it would be ideal to recreate a third set of natural teeth to replace lost dentition. For many years now, researchers in the field of tissue engineering have been trying to bioengineer dental tissues as well as whole teeth. In order to attain a whole tooth through dental engineering, that has the same or nearly same biological, mechanical and physical properties of a natural tooth, it's necessary to deal with all the cells and tissues which are concerned with the formation, maintenance and repair of the tooth. In this article we review the steps involved in odontogenesis or organogenesis of a tooth and progress in the bioengineering of a whole tooth.

  9. Interactions between dodecyl phosphates and hydroxyapatite or tooth enamel: relevance to inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Siân B; Barbour, Michele E; Shellis, R Peter; Rees, Gareth D

    2014-05-01

    Tooth surface modification is a potential method of preventing dental erosion, a form of excessive tooth wear facilitated by softening of tooth surfaces through the direct action of acids, mainly of dietary origin. We have previously shown that dodecyl phosphates (DPs) effectively inhibit dissolution of native surfaces of hydroxyapatite (the type mineral for dental enamel) and show good substantivity. However, adsorbed saliva also inhibits dissolution and DPs did not augment this effect, which suggests that DPs and saliva interact at the hydroxyapatite surface. In the present study the adsorption and desorption of potassium and sodium dodecyl phosphates or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) to hydroxyapatite and human tooth enamel powder, both native and pre-treated with saliva, were studied by high performance liquid chromatography-mass Spectrometry. Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to analyse residual saliva and surfactant on the substrates. Both DPs showed a higher affinity than SDS for both hydroxyapatite and enamel, and little DP was desorbed by washing with water. SDS was readily desorbed from hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the phosphate head group is essential for strong binding to this substrate. However, SDS was not desorbed from enamel, so that this substrate has surface properties different from those of hydroxyapatite. The presence of a salivary coating had little or no effect on adsorption of the DPs, but treatment with DPs partly desorbed saliva; this could account for the failure of DPs to increase the dissolution inhibition due to adsorbed saliva. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Predominant factor determining wear properties of β-type and (α+β)-type titanium alloys in metal-to-metal contact for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The predominant factor determining the wear properties of a new titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) was investigated for TNTZ and Ti64 combinations in metal-to-metal contacting bio-implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damages were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron-back scattered diffraction analysis. The volume loss of TNTZ is found to be larger than that of Ti64, regardless of the mating material. The wear track of TNTZ exhibits the galled regions and severe plastic deformation with large flake-like debris, indicative of delamination wear, which strongly suggests the occurrence of adhesive wear. Whereas, the wear track of Ti64 have a large number of regular grooves and microcuttings with cutting chip-like wear debris and microfragmentation of fine oxide debris, indicative of abrasive wear combined with oxidative wear. This difference in the wear type is caused by severe and mild subsurface deformations of TNTZ and Ti64, respectively. The lower resistance to plastic shearing for TNTZ compared to that of Ti64 induces delamination, resulting in a higher wear rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimization of PWR reactor control rods wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Moura Angelkorte, Gunther de

    1995-01-01

    The Rod Cluster Control Assemblies (RCCA's) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) have experienced a continuously wall cladding wear when Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) are running. Fretting wear is a result of vibrational contact between RCCA rodlets and the guide cards which provide lateral support for the rodlets when RCCA's are withdrawn from the core. A procedure is developed to minimize the rodlets wear, by the shuffling and axial reposition of RCCA's every operating cycle. These shuffling and repositions are based on measurement of the rodlet cladding thickness of all RCCA's. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Prediction of wear rates in comminution equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lucas Roald Dörig; Fundal, Erling; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    -resistant high chromium white cast iron (21988/JN/HBW555XCr21), a heat-treated wear resistant steel (Hardox 400) and a plain carbon construction steel (S235). Quartz, which accounts for the largest wear loss in the cement industry, was chosen as abrasive. Other process parameters such as velocity (1–7 m....../s) and pressure (70–1400 kPa) were chosen to closely imitate real industrial processes. The authors are aware that a number of wear mechanisms such as erosion, fatigue and abrasion may occur simultaneously in comminution equipment. Nonetheless, this paper aims at discussing abrasion only due to its large...

  13. Efficiency of wear and decalcification technique for estimating the age of estuarine dolphin Sotalia guianensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydney, Nicolle V; Monteiro-Filho, Emygdio L A

    2011-03-01

    Most techniques used for estimating the age of Sotalia guianensis (van Beneden, 1864) (Cetacea; Delphinidae) are very expensive, and require sophisticated equipment for preparing histological sections of teeth. The objective of this study was to test a more affordable and much simpler method, involving of the manual wear of teeth followed by decalcification and observation under a stereomicroscope. This technique has been employed successfully with larger species of Odontoceti. Twenty-six specimens were selected, and one tooth of each specimen was worn and demineralized for growth layers reading. Growth layers were evidenced in all specimens; however, in 4 of the 26 teeth, not all the layers could be clearly observed. In these teeth, there was a significant decrease of growth layer group thickness, thus hindering the layers count. The juxtaposition of layers hindered the reading of larger numbers of layers by the wear and decalcification technique. Analysis of more than 17 layers in a single tooth proved inconclusive. The method applied here proved to be efficient in estimating the age of Sotalia guianensis individuals younger than 18 years. This method could simplify the study of the age structure of the overall population, and allows the use of the more expensive methodologies to be confined to more specific studies of older specimens. It also enables the classification of the calf, young and adult classes, which is important for general population studies.

  14. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  15. Effect of post-welding heat treatment on wear resistance of cast-steel die with surfacing layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wujiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The wear resistance capability of die surfacing layer under different Post-Welding Heat Treatments (PWHT was analysed by Finite Element (FE simulation and experiments. Taking hot forging process of a crankshaft as an example, a wear model of the hot forging die coated with surfacing layer was established using FE software DEFORM-3D. The simulation results indicated that the wear resistance capability of the die surfacing layer is optimal when tempering temperature and holding time are 550 °C and 4 h respectively. To verify the wear computational results, 16 groups of PWHT orthogonal wear tests were performed at a temperature of 400 °C, which is a similar temperature to that occurs in an actual hot forging die. The wear-test result showed a good agreement with the FE simulation. SEM observation of the wear debris on 16 specimens showed that oxidative wear is dominant when the temperature was in 400 °C. Furthermore, when tempering temperature and holding time were 550 °C and 4 h respectively, the carbide alloy dispersively distributes in the metallographic structure, which helps to improve the wear resistance of the surfacing layer.

  16. A Factorial Design to Numerically Study the Effects of Brake Pad Properties on Friction and Wear Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Wahlström

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne particulate emissions originating from the wear of pads and rotors of disc brakes contribute up to 50% of the total road emissions in Europe. The wear process that takes place on a mesoscopic length scale in the contact interfaces between the pads and rotors can be explained by the creation and destruction of contact plateaus. Due to this complex contact situation, it is hard to predict how changes in the wear and material parameters of the pad friction material will affect the friction and wear emissions. This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of different parameters of the pad friction material on the coefficient of friction and wear emissions. A full factorial design is developed using a simplified version of a previously developed cellular automaton approach to investigate the effect of four factors on the coefficient of friction and wear emission. The simulated result indicates that a stable third body, a high specific wear, and a relatively high amount of metal fibres yield a high and stable mean coefficient of friction, while a stable third body, a low specific wear, a stable resin, and a relatively high amount of metal fibres give low wear emissions.

  17. Wnt signaling during tooth replacement in zebrafish (Danio rerio: pitfalls and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann eHuysseune

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The canonical (β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling pathway has emerged as a likely candidate for regulating tooth replacement in continuously renewing dentitions. So far, the involvement of canonical Wnt signaling has been experimentally demonstrated predominantly in amniotes. These studies tend to show stimulation of tooth formation by activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of tooth formation when blocking the pathway. Here, we report a strong and dynamic expression of the soluble Wnt inhibitor dickkopf1 (dkk1 in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio tooth germs, suggesting an active repression of Wnt signaling during morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation of a tooth, and derepression of Wnt signaling during start of replacement tooth formation. To further analyse the role of Wnt signaling, we used different gain-of-function approaches. These yielded disjunct results, yet none of them indicating enhanced tooth replacement. Thus, masterblind (mbl mutants, defective in axin1, mimic overexpression of Wnt, but display a normally patterned dentition in which teeth are replaced at the appropriate times and positions. Activating the pathway with LiCl had variable outcomes, either resulting in the absence, or the delayed formation, of first-generation teeth, or yielding a regular dentition with normal replacement, but no supernumerary teeth or accelerated tooth replacement.The failure so far to influence tooth replacement in the zebrafish by perturbing Wnt signaling is discussed in the light of (i potential technical pitfalls related to dose- or time-dependency, (ii the complexity of the canonical Wnt pathway, and (iii species-specific differences in the nature and activity of pathway components. Finally, we emphasize the importance of in-depth knowledge of the wild-type pattern for reliable interpretations. It is hoped that our analysis can be inspiring to critically assess and elucidate the role of Wnt signaling in tooth development in polyphyodonts.

  18. Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pordeus Isabela A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers. Methods A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test. Results Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75. There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p Conclusions In general, there was low agreement between observed tooth brushing and mothers' reports. Moreover, the different methods of estimation resulted in differences in the frequencies of tooth brushing habits, indicative of reporting bias. Data regarding children's tooth-brushing habits as reported by mothers should be considered with caution in epidemiological surveys on fluoridated dentifrice use and the risk of dental fluorosis.

  19. Experience of racism and tooth brushing among pregnant Aboriginal Australians: exploring psychosocial mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, J; Jamieson, L M; Priest, N; Parker, E J; Roberts-Thomson, K F; Lawrence, H P; Broughton, J; Paradies, Y

    2014-09-01

    Despite burgeoning evidence regarding the pathways by which experiences of racism influence health outcomes, little attention has been paid to the relationship between racism and oral health-related behaviours in particular. We hypothesised that self-reported racism was associated with tooth brushing, and that this association was mediated by perceived stress and sense of control and moderated by social support. Data from 365 pregnant Aboriginal Australian women were used to evaluate tooth brushing behaviour, sociodemographic factors, psychosocial factors, general health, risk behaviours and racism exposure. Bivariate associations were explored and hierarchical logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for tooth brushing. Perceived stress and sense of control were examined as mediators of the association between self-reported racism and tooth brushing using binary mediation with bootstrapping. High levels of self-reported racism persisted as a risk indicator for tooth brushing (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.27,0.98) after controlling for significant covariates. Perceived stress mediated the relationship between self-reported racism and tooth brushing: the direct effect of racism on tooth brushing was attenuated, and the indirect effect on tooth brushing was significant (beta coefficient -0.09; bias-corrected 95%CI -0.166,-0.028; 48.1% of effect mediated). Sense of control was insignificant as a mediator of the relationship between racism and tooth brushing. High levels of self-reported racism were associated with non-optimal tooth brushing behaviours, and perceived stress mediated this association among this sample of pregnant Aboriginal women.. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  20. Analysis of tooth tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timchenko, E.V.; Timchenko, P.E.; Kulabukhova, A.Yu.; Volova, L.T.; Rosenbaum, A.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of healthy tooth tissue and tooth tissues during caries disease are presented. Features of Raman spectrum of tooth tissues during caries disease are obtained: the main changes are detected at wavenumbers 956 cm -1 .1069 cm -1 . corresponding to phosphates. and 1241 cm -1 . 1660 cm -1 . corresponding to collagen III and collagen I. respectively. Were introduced criteria allowing to detect caries and to identify weakening of tooth tissues. preceding the caries. The reliability of research results is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. (paper)

  1. Cracked tooth syndrome: Overview of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Shamimul; Singh, Kuldeep; Salati, Naseer

    2015-01-01

    Pain is defined as an ?unpleasant sensory and emotional feeling which is associated with actual or potential injury of tissue or expressed in terms of such injury.? Tooth pain usually refers to pain around the teeth or jaws mainly as a result of a dental condition. Mostly, toothaches are caused by a carious cavity, a broken tooth, an exposed tooth root or gum disease. The toothache may sometimes be the result of radiating pain from structures in the vicinity of tooth and jaws (cardiac pain, e...

  2. Cryopreservation of periodontal ligament cells with magnetic field for tooth banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, M; Kamada, H; Kawata, T; Koseki, H; Abedini, S; Kojima, S; Motokawa, M; Fujita, T; Ohtani, J; Tsuka, N; Matsuda, Y; Sunagawa, H; Hernandes, R A M; Ohwada, N; Tanne, K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a long-term tooth cryopreservation method that can be used for tooth autotransplantation. Human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells were frozen in 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) using a programmed freezer with a magnetic field. Cells were cryopreserved for 7 days at -150 degrees C. Immediately after thawing, the number of surviving cells was counted and the cells were cultured; cultured cells were examined after 48 h. Results indicated that a 0.01 mT of a magnetic field, a 15-min hold-time, and a plunging temperature of -30 degrees C led to the greatest survival rate of PDL cells. Based on these findings, whole teeth were cryopreserved under the same conditions for 1 year. The organ culture revealed that the PDL cells of cryopreserved tooth with a magnetic field could proliferate as much as a fresh tooth, although the cells did not appear in the cryopreserved tooth without a magnetic field. Histological examination and the transmission electron microscopic image of cryopreserved tooth with a magnetic field did not show any destruction of cryopreserved cells. In contrast, severe cell damage was seen in cells frozen without a magnetic field. These results indicated that a magnetic field programmed freezer is available for tooth cryopreservation. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [The importance of wear couples for younger endoprosthesis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, J; Bergschmidt, P; Bader, R; Kluess, D; Besser-Mahuzir, E; Leder, A; Mittelmeier, W

    2007-04-01

    The success and long-term survival rates of modern joint arthroplasty leads to a high patient satisfaction and, together with its technical improvements, has broadened the indications to an increasingly younger population. Limitations to the established systems are the long-term survival rates, which are mainly influenced by wear of the articulating parts and the resulting problems. Beside "classic" long-stemmed cemented shafts articulating with metal against polyethylene, short-stemmed or cup designs with a hard-hard self pairing are increasingly used in total hip arthroplasty. This paper reflects the current state of the art in joint arthroplasty for younger patients with the focus on wear couples and discusses future perspectives. Special interest is focused on the advantages and disadvantages of ceramic bearings, problems with allergies to implant components and the design of endoprostheses with regard to avoidance of impingement.

  4. Mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling limits tooth number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Elina; Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Balic, Anamaria; Jussila, Maria; Thesleff, Irma

    2018-02-21

    Tooth agenesis is one of the predominant developmental anomalies in humans, usually affecting the permanent dentition generated by sequential tooth formation and, in most cases, caused by mutations perturbing epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In addition, loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt feedback inhibitor AXIN2 lead to human tooth agenesis. We have investigated the functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during sequential formation of molar teeth using mouse models. Continuous initiation of new teeth, which is observed after genetic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the oral epithelium, was accompanied by enhanced expression of Wnt antagonists and a downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the dental mesenchyme. Genetic and pharmacological activation of mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling negatively regulated sequential tooth formation, an effect partly mediated by Bmp4. Runx2 , a gene whose loss-of-function mutations result in sequential formation of supernumerary teeth in the human cleidocranial dysplasia syndrome, suppressed the expression of Wnt inhibitors Axin2 and Drapc1 in dental mesenchyme. Our data indicate that increased mesenchymal Wnt signaling inhibits the sequential formation of teeth, and suggest that Axin2 / Runx2 antagonistic interactions modulate the level of mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling, underlying the contrasting dental phenotypes caused by human AXIN2 and RUNX2 mutations. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. The cracked tooth conundrum: terminology, classification, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, William

    2008-10-01

    To provide an overview of the clinical features, diagnosis, classification and management of cracked teeth which may be a diagnostic challenge in clinical practice. Cracks may initiate from coronal tooth structure or from within the root and affect healthy or root treated teeth. There are many terminologies and classifications in the literature for cracked teeth that can be as confusing as the array of clinical symptoms which are associated with this condition. The term "cracked tooth syndrome" is misleading as there are a range of symptoms that do not form a distinct and reliable pattern. Symptoms will vary with teeth that have healthy pulps, for teeth with inflamed or necrotic pulps, and for teeth that have been root treated. The American Association of Endodontists have classified five specific variations of cracked teeth; craze line, fractured cusp, cracked tooth, split tooth, and vertical root fracture. The importance of differentiating dentin, pulpal and periodontal pain for diagnosis and treatment for these specific entities will be elaborated. A decision flow chart indicating the treatment options available is presented.

  6. Characteristics of highly cross-linked polyethylene wear debris in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Ryan M.; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread implementation of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) liners to reduce the clinical incidence of osteolysis, it is not known if the improved wear resistance will outweigh the inflammatory potential of HXLPE wear debris generated in vivo. Thus, we asked: What are the differences in size, shape, number, and biological activity of polyethylene wear particles obtained from primary total hip arthroplasty revision surgery of conventional polyethylene (CPE) versus remelted or annealed HXLPE liners? Pseudocapsular tissue samples were collected from revision surgery of CPE and HXLPE (annealed and remelted) liners, and digested using nitric acid. The isolated polyethylene wear particles were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Tissues from both HXLPE cohorts contained an increased percentage of submicron particles compared to the CPE cohort. However, the total number of particles was lower for both HXLPE cohorts, as a result there was no significant difference in the volume fraction distribution and specific biological activity (SBA; the relative biological activity per unit volume) between cohorts. In contrast, based on the decreased size and number of HXLPE wear debris there was a significant decrease in total particle volume (mm3/g of tissue). Accordingly, when the SBA was normalized by total particle volume (mm3/gm tissue) or by component wear volume rate (mm3/year), functional biological activity of the HXLPE wear debris was significantly decreased compared to the CPE cohort. Indications for this study are that the osteolytic potential of wear debris generated by HXLPE liners in vivo is significantly reduced by improvements in polyethylene wear resistance. PMID:23436587

  7. Use of microhardness as a simple means of estimating relative wear resistance of carbide thermal spray coatings: Part 2. wear resistance of cemented carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Michael; Roman, Itzhak

    2002-12-01

    A selection of WC-Co and Cr3C2-25%NiCr coatings produced by plasma spray and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) deposition techniques were subjected to various wear tests designed to simulate abrasion, cavitation, sliding, and particle erosion type wear mechanisms. All of the coatings were at least 200 µm thick and were deposited onto stainless steel substrates. In Part 1 of this contribution, the microstructures of the coatings were characterized and their mechanical properties were assessed using microindentation procedures. In this second part of the article, the behavior of the coatings when subjected to the various wear tests is reported and the utility of microhardness testing as an indication of relative wear resistance is discussed. It is shown that correctly performed, appropriate microhardness measurements are a good indication of abrasion resistance and sliding wear resistance, and also correlate well with cavitation resistance in Cr3C2-NiCr. The measurements were less useful for predicting erosion resistance for both Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co, however, and for abrasion resistance when WC-Co was ground against SiC. Here the contribution of micromechanisms involving fracturing and brittle failure is greater than that indicated by the coating microhardness, which is essentially a measurement of resistance to plastic deformation under equilibrium conditions.

  8. Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigeti, Kinga; Lupski, James R

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders presenting with the phenotype of a chronic progressive neuropathy affecting both the motor and sensory nerves. During the last decade over two dozen genes have been identified in which mutations cause CMT. The disease illustrates a multitude of genetic principles, including diverse mutational mechanisms from point mutations to copy number variation (CNV), allelic heterogeneity, age-dependent penetrance and variable expressivity. Population based studies have determined the contributions of the various genes to disease burden enabling evidence-based approaches to genetic testing. PMID:19277060

  9. The Wearing Out of Genre Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Joanna

    1971-01-01

    Scenes and plots wear out in three distinct stages: Innocence, Plausibility, and Decadence. Examines westerns, spy stories, nurse novels, detective stories, science fiction, pornography, avant-garde fiction, etc. (Author/RB)

  10. STUDIES ON TOOL WEAR CONDITION MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Metin ERTUNÇ

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, wear mechanisms on cutting tools, especially for the drill bits, during the cutting operation have been investigated. As the importance of full automation in industry has gained substantial importance, tool wear condition monitoring during the cutting operation has been the subject of many investigators. Tool condition monitoring is very crucial in order to change the tool before breakage. Because tool breakage can cause considerable economical damage to both the machine tool and workpiece. In this paper, the studies on the monitoring of drill bit wear in literature have been introduced; the direct/indirect techniques used and sensor fusion techniques have been summarized. The methods which were proposed to determine tool wear evolution as processing the sensor signals collected have been provided and their references have been given for detailed information.

  11. Microleakage in different primary tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Wen-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Microleakage may cause tooth sensitivity, secondary caries, discoloration and even failure of the restoration. In order to overcome these potential problems, materials that are able to bind to the tooth structure have been developed, such as composite resin and glass ionomer cement. The purpose of the study was to compare microleakage arising from amalgam (Am), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), Ketac-Silver (KS), and GI filling with banding (GI+B) when these materials are used for class II restoration of a primary molar. Fifty primary molars were collected and class II cavities were prepared on each tooth. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups (Am, CR, GI, KS, and GI+B), each of which received a different material as part of the restoration. The restored teeth then underwent 100 cycles of thermocycling that consisted of 55°C for 30 seconds, 19°C for 20 seconds, and 5°C for 30 seconds. The teeth were then immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin solution for 24 hours. Afterwards, the teeth were embedded and sectioned mesiodistally through the center of each restoration. Dye penetration associated with the occlusal and cervical margins of each restoration was then assessed. Cervical leakage was greater than occlusal leakage in the CR, GI and KS groups (p < 0.05). When leakage on occlusal margin was examined, however, the Am group showed greater leakage than the CR, GI, and GI+B groups (p < 0.05). When leakage on the cervical margin was examined, the Am group showed greater leakage than the GI and GI+B groups, while the KS group showed greater leakage than the GI+B group (p < 0.05). Restorations using GI and GI+B indicated that these materials performed better than the other materials in this study overall. However, none of the materials were entirely devoid of leakage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  12. Third abrasive wear mode: is it possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Câmara Cozza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to propose an initial discussion on the characterization of a third abrasive wear mode. The results obtained in a previous work [1] under different test conditions revealed the occurrence of the superposition of the “rolling” and “grooving” abrasive wear modes. This phenomenon was denoted “micro-rolling abrasion” due to the observation that “rolling abrasion” was found to act on “grooving abrasion”.

  13. Biocompatible wear-resistant thick ceramic coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensitisation to immunologically active elements like chromium, cobalt or nickel and debris particle due to wear are serious problems for patients with metallic implants. We tested the approach of using a hard and thick ceramic coating as a wear-resistant protection of titanium implants, avoiding those sensitisation and foreign body problems. We showed that the process parameters strongly influence the coating porosity and, as a consequence, also its hardness.

  14. Thin layer activation: measuring wear and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvigne, T.; Leyman, D.; Oxorn, K.

    1995-01-01

    The technique known as thin layer activation (TLA) is explained and assessed in this article. Widely used, in for example the automotive industry, TLA allows on-line monitoring of the loss of matter from a critical surface, by wear erosion and corrosion. The technique offers extremely high sensitivity thus leading to reduced test times. On-line wear phenomena can be assessed during operation of a mechanical process, even through thick engine walls. (UK)

  15. Comparison of performance coatings thermally sprayed subject to testing adhesive wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangoni, G.F.; Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R. da

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes and wear resistance adhesive coatings obtained from powders thermally sprayed by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) were evaluated. Based coatings chrome-nickel and tungsten-cobalt are applied in conditions subject to intense wear especially abrasive. With the aim of evaluate the performance of these coatings under conditions of adhesive wear, these coatings samples were tested by the standard ASTM G99. As test parameters were used: Tungsten carbide pin (SAE 52100) with 6 mm diameter, normal load of 50N and a tangential velocity of 0.5 m / s. The worn surfaces of the coatings were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the performance front wear is related to the conditions of adhesion and uniformity of the coating applied. (author)

  16. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in patient wearing full denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a harmless commensal organism inhabiting the mouths but it can change into pathogen and invade tissue and cause acute and chronic disease. Dentures predispose to infection with Candida in as many as 65% of elderly people wearing full upper dentures. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to discuss thrush in patient wearing full denture which rapidly developed. Case: This paper report a case of 57 year-old man who came to the Oral Medicine Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University with clinical appearance of pseudomembranous candidiasis (thrush. Case Management: Diagnosis of this case is confirmed with microbiology examination. Patient was wearing full upper dentures, and from anamnesis known that patient wearing denture for 24 hours and he had poor oral hygiene. Patient was treated with topical (nystatin oral suspension and miconazole oral gel and systemic (ketoconazole antifungal. Patient also instructed not to wear his denture and cleaned white pseudomembrane on his mouth with soft toothbrush. Conclusion: Denture, habit of wearing denture for 24 hours, and poor oral hygiene are predisposing factors of thrush and it can healed completely after treated with topical and systemic antifungal.

  17. Development and Performance Evaluation of an Abrasive Wear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The wear of tillage tools is a major source of economic constraints to local farmers. Estimating wear in the field is time consuming and expensive. Abrasive wear testing machines developed in advanced countries are not available in Ghana. This makes the study of wear related problems at laboratory levels difficult in the ...

  18. Psychosocial Aspect of Anterior Tooth Discoloration among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty two (65.9%), 47 (50.0%) and 38 (40.4%) respectively reported that it prevented them from freely answering questions, smiling and interacting. After oral examination, 120 (31.2%) subjects had one form of anterior tooth discoloration. The cause of tooth discoloration in the majority 64 (16.7%) of the participants was due ...

  19. psychosocial aspect of anterior tooth discoloration among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    discoloration on the psychosocial well being of adolescents with a view to providing information that will aid the ... Keywords: Psychosocial, Anterior tooth discolouration, Adolescents. Ann Ibd. Pg. Med 2011. Vol.9, No.2 94-99 ... often results in loss of self-esteem and damage to physical and mental health.9,10 Tooth ...

  20. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Posture! Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? Men: Looking for a Better Job? Start by Visiting the Dentist Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of a Tooth Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | Reprints ...

  1. Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Historic Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    The earliest report on orthodontic tooth movement in the English literature was published in 1911. Oppenheim carried out studies on baboons to determine what histologic changes occurred during tooth movement. Reitan and many others carried out research into the nature of tooth movement. The pressure-tension model of tooth movement developed from these studies, whereby the two sides of the tooth responded to forces as if in isolation. A second theory, proposed by Stuteville in 1938, was the hydraulic theory of tooth movement. In this theory, fluid from the vasculature, lymphatic system and intercellular spaces responds to the forces of tooth movement, damping the force and limiting movement. Bien and Baumrind expanded on this theory with their own studies in the 1960s. It is clear that both the pressure-tension and fluid flow concepts have merit, but considerable work needs to be done to ascertain the details so that tooth movement can be managed and controlled. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  3. [Sensitivity of the tooth cervix. A new therapeutic alternative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, J; Sunfeld, R H; de Castro, M A; Quintella, L P

    1990-01-01

    The cervical hypersensitivity tooth was analysed and treated by application of a varnish with high fluoride ions content (Duraphat) and of a glass ionomer cement usually indicated to cavity lining (XR-ionomer-Kerr). This technique was applied in sixty-seven teeth of Clinic Graduation patients (Faculdade de Odontologia de Araçatuba) and demonstrated a high index of satisfactory results. The clinical findings of this study relate that, this technique is more one method of choose by clinicians.

  4. Visual and digital comparative tooth colour assessment methods and atomic force microscopy surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundlingh, A A; Grossman, E S; Shrivastava, S; Witcomb, M J

    2013-10-01

    This study compared digital and visual colour tooth colour assessment methods in a sample of 99 teeth consisting of incisors, canines and pre-molars. The teeth were equally divided between Control, Ozicure Oxygen Activator bleach and Opalescence Quick bleach and subjected to three treatments. Colour readings were recorded at nine intervals by two assessment methods, VITA Easyshade and VITAPAN 3D MASTER TOOTH GUIDE, giving a total of 1782 colour readings. Descriptive and statistical analysis was undertaken using a GLM test for Analysis of Variance for a Fractional Design set at a significance of P colour assessment showed significance for the independent variables of treatment, number of treatments, tooth type and the combination tooth type and treatment. Digital colour assessment indicated treatment and tooth type to be of significance in tooth colour change. Poor agreement was found between visual and digital colour assessment methods for Control and Ozicure Oxygen Activator treatments. Surface roughness values increased two-fold for Opalescence Quick specimens over the two other treatments, implying that increased light scattering improved digital colour reading. Both digital and visual colour matching methods should be used in tooth bleaching studies to complement each other and to compensate for deficiencies.

  5. Wear-resistance of Aluminum Matrix Microcomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kandeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is developed for the study of wear of aluminum alloys AlSi7 obtained by casting, reinforced by TiC microparticles, before and after heat treatment. Tribological study is realized under conditions of friction on counterbody with fixed abrasive. Experimental results were obtained for mass wear, wear rate, wear intensity and wear-resistance of the alloys with different wt% of microparticles.

  6. Mathematical description of tooth flank surface of globoidal worm gear with straight axial tooth profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połowniak, Piotr; Sobolak, Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    In this article, a mathematical description of tooth flank surface of the globoidal worm and worm wheel generated by the hourglass worm hob with straight tooth axial profile is presented. The kinematic system of globoidal worm gear is shown. The equation of globoid helix and tooth axial profile of worm is derived to determine worm tooth surface. Based on the equation of meshing the contact lines are obtained. The mathematical description of globoidal worm wheel tooth flank is performed on the basis of contact lines and generating the tooth side by the extreme cutting edge of worm hob. The presented mathematical model of tooth flank of TA worm and worm wheel can be used e.g. to analyse the contact pattern of the gear.

  7. Accelerated orthodontic tooth movement: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hechang; Williams, Ray C; Kyrkanides, Stephanos

    2014-11-01

    Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement can significantly reduce treatment duration and risks of side effects. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement is chiefly determined by the remodeling of tissues surrounding the roots; this in turn is under the control of molecular mechanisms regulating cellular behaviors in the alveolar bone and periodontal ligament. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying accelerated orthodontic tooth movement, and the clinical and experimental methods that accelerate orthodontic tooth movement with possible molecular mechanisms. The review also shows directions for future studies to develop more clinically applicable methods to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An approach to understanding tribological behaviour of dental composites through volumetric wear loss and wear mechanism determination; beyond material ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaie, Asmaa; Bubb, Nigel L; Franklin, Paul; Dowling, Adam H; Fleming, Garry J P; Wood, David J

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the fundamental wear mechanisms of six resin-based composite (RBC) formulations during short-term in vitro wear testing. RBC materials were condensed into rectangular bar-shaped specimens and light irradiated using the ISO 4049 specimen manufacture and irradiation protocol. Wear testing (n=10 specimens for each RBC) was performed on a modified pin-on-plate wear test apparatus and wear facets were analysed for wear volume loss using a white light profilometer. The wear tested RBC specimens and their corresponding antagonists were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively to determine the wear mechanism. Data generated using the profilometer showed variations in the mean total wear volume (mm 3 ) between the RBCs tested (ptribology of the system rather than relying on a simple wear ranking for the RBC materials as is routinely the case in dental research studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tooth whitening: what we now know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Current research about tooth whitening shows that it is safe and effective when manufacturer's protocol is followed, yet there are risks of which the profession and users should be aware. This update provides a summary of current research and assessment of the safety and efficacy of tooth whitening regimens. Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures by the public. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision. The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening. Current reports in the literature are reviewed that are related to the use of peroxide based whitening methods. These reports include in vitro studies for method optimization and mechanism as well as clinical studies on effects of various whitening regimens. When manufacturer's instructions are followed, hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide based tooth whitening is safe and effective. Patients should be informed of the risks associated with tooth whitening and instructed on identification of adverse occurrences so that they may seek professional help as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Matthews

    2005-05-01

    This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston

  11. Quantitive dynamical wear analysis and the convergent quest for significant wear reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, F.; Kirsch, J.; Derry, T.; Marcus, R.

    1984-01-01

    The maturing of nuclear physics has made the development of ion beam modification of materials possible, bringing new skills and prospects to the world of materials science. In the following paper an outline is given of the history of ion beam modification of materials (IBMM) and its use for altering the surface of metals to combat wear and friction, and monitoring wear in engines

  12. In vitro wear of resin-based materials--simultaneous corrosive and abrasive wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correr, Gisele Maria; Bruschi Alonso, Roberta Caroline; Correr Sobrinho, Lourenço; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Ferracane, Jack Liborio

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the wear of resin-based materials caused by the association of abrasive and corrosive processes. Twenty specimens were prepared for each material, cast in epoxy in acrylic rings, polished, and profiled with an MTS 3D Profiler. Antagonists were made from deciduous molars. Specimens were distributed into eight groups (n = 10), according to the material (Filtek Supreme, Point 4, Dyract AP, and Fuji II LC) and the type of slurry (neutral and acidic), and then cycled 100,000 times in the OHSU oral wear simulator. The specimens were cleaned and reprofiled. Volume loss and maximum depth were determined. ANOVA and Tukey's test were used for data analysis (p wear facet on the antagonist was also measured. Composites displayed less wear than the compomer and the resin-modified glass ionomer. Significant differences also were found for cusp wear, with a significant positive correlation shown between cusp and material wear. The acidic slurry significantly increased the wear of the materials compared to the neutral slurry. Exposure to acidic slurry accelerated the wear of resin-based materials.

  13. Wear mechanisms and friction parameters for sliding wear of micron-scale polysilicon sidewalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsem, D. H.; van der Hulst, R.; Stach, E. A.; Dugger, M. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Ritchie, R. O.

    As tribological properties are critical factors in the reliability of silicon-based microelectromechanical systems, it is important to understand what governs wear and friction. Average dynamic friction, wear volumes and morphology have been studied for polysilicon devices fabricated using the

  14. Measuring Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) Tooth Growth and Eruption by Fluorescence Markers and Bur Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Fabia; Müller, Jacqueline; Clauss, Marcus; Kircher, Patrick; Geyer, Hans; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2016-03-01

    Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and rodents possess continuously growing teeth, and dental problems are a major health issue in these species. Knowledge of tooth growth characteristics is required to adequately treat dental problems and advise owners concerning diets. Most research was performed using bur marks and measuring eruption and wear manually. However, this method cannot be applied to teeth less rostral than the first premolar; therefore, for evaluation of molars, other methods are needed. We evaluated the use of fluorochromes xylenol orange and calcein green to measure growth rates of rabbit teeth and compared this method to results obtained by manually measuring the distance between a bur mark and the gingival margin of the same tooth (eruption) and by measuring the distance between the bur mark and the apex of the same tooth on computed tomography scans (growth). Apical fluorochrome measurements correlated well with eruption and growth rates obtained with bur marks, whereas measurements coronal to the pulp cavity did not. Growth rates were approximately 1.9 mm/wk for maxillary and 2.2 mm/wk for mandibular incisors. Growth rates of premolars were 2.14 ± 0.28 mm/wk in rabbits on a grass/rice hulls/sand pelleted diet and 0.93 ± 0.18 mm/wk in rabbits on a hay diet. Growth of molars could only be assessed using the measurement in dentin on the wall of the pulp cavity, which does not account for the real growth. However, being similar to this measurement in premolars, one could hypothesize similar growth in molars as in premolars. We conclude that the application of fluorochrome staining can be used to measure tooth growth in teeth that are not accessible for bur marks or in animals that are too small to assess tooth eruption or growth by bur marks.

  15. Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carolina C; Oliveira, Maria J; Pordeus, Isabela A; Paiva, Saul M

    2011-09-03

    Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers. A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months) from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test. Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75). There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p brushed their teeth alone (33.8%) and those who did not rinse their mouths during brushing (42.0%) were higher than those reported by the mothers (12.1%, 18.9% and 6.5%, respectively; p brushing and mothers' reports. Moreover, the different methods of estimation resulted in differences in the frequencies of tooth brushing habits, indicative of reporting bias. Data regarding children's tooth-brushing habits as reported by mothers should be considered with caution in epidemiological surveys on fluoridated dentifrice use and the risk of dental fluorosis.

  16. Wear Behavior of AZ31/Al2O3 Magnesium Matrix Surface Nanocomposite Fabricated via Friction Stir Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizieh, Mahdi; Larki, Arsham Norouzi; Tahmasebi, Mehdi; Bavi, Mehdi; Alizadeh, Ehsan; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to produce magnesium-based surface nanocomposites via friction stir processing and to investigate the effect of tool rotational speed on the microstructure, hardness and wear behavior. The surface of the nanocomposites was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes, as well as through microhardness and wear tests. The results indicated that with the increase in rotational speed, the grain size of the surface nanocomposites increased, but its hardness decreased despite the improved distribution of Al2O3 nanoparticles. It was also found that the wear resistance has a direct relation to the distribution of the Al2O3 nanoparticles. Furthermore, the addition of nano-Al2O3 changed the wear mechanism from the adhesive mode in the as-received AZ31 to the abrasive mode in the nanocomposite specimens. The rotational speed of 1400 rpm was an optimum parameter to achieve a suitable composite layer with the highest wear resistance.

  17. Mechanism of human tooth eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Human eruption is a unique developmental process in the organism. The aetiology or the mechanism behind eruption has never been fully understood and the scientific literature in the field is extremely sparse. Human and animal tissues provide different possibilities for eruption analyses, briefly...... discussed in the introduction. Human studies, mainly clinical and radiological, have focused on normal eruption and gender differences. Why a tooth begins eruption and what enables it to move eruptively and later to end these eruptive movements is not known. Pathological eruption courses contribute......, and the ability of the periodontal ligament to adapt to eruptive movements. Animal studies and studies on normal and pathological eruption in humans can support and explain different aspects in the new theory. The eruption mechanism still needs elucidation and the paper recommends that future research on eruption...

  18. Microstructure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma sprayed Ni-based coatings after TIG remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianshun, Dong; Xiukai, Zhou; Guolu, Li; Li, Liu; Ran, Wang

    2018-02-01

    Ni based coatings were prepared on steel substrate by means of plasma spraying, and were remelted by TIG (tungsten inert gas arc) method subsequently. The microstructure, microhardness, electrochemical corrosion and corrosive wear resistance under PH = 4, PH = 7 and PH = 10 conditions of the coatings before and after remelting were investigated. The results showed that the TIG remelting obviously reduced the defects and dramatically decreased the coating’s porosity from 7.2% to 0.4%. Metallurgical bonding between the remelted coating and substrate was achieved. Meanwhile, the phase compositions of as-sprayed coating were γ-Ni, Mn5Si2 and Cr2B, while the phase compositions of the remelting coating were Fe3Ni, Cr23C6, Cr2B and Mn5Si2. The microhardness of the coating decreased from 724 HV to 608 HV, but the fracture toughness enhanced from 2.80 MPa m1/2 to 197.3 MPa m1/2 after remelting. After corrosive wear test, the average wear weight loss and 3D morphology of wear scar of two coatings indicated that the wear resistance of the remelted coating was remarkably higher than that of as-sprayed coating. Therefore, TIG remelting treatment was a feasible method to improve the coating’s microstructure and enhance its corrosive wear resistance.

  19. Wear resistance of machine tools' bionic linear rolling guides by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqiang; Liu, Botao; Guo, Zhengcai

    2017-06-01

    In order to improve the rolling wear resistance (RWR) of linear rolling guides (LRG) as well as prolong the life of machine tools, various shape samples with different units spaces ranged from 1 to 5 mm are designed through the observation of animals in the desert and manufactured by laser cladding. Wear resistance tests reproducing closely the real operational condition are conducted by using a homemade linear reciprocating wear test machine, and wear resistance is evaluated by means of weight loss measurement. Results indicate that the samples with bionic units have better RWR than the untreated one, of which the reticulate treated sample with unit space 3 mm present the best RWR. More specifically, among the punctuate treated samples, the mass loss increases with the increase of unit space; among the striate treated samples, the mass loss changes slightly with the increase of unit space, attaining a minimum at the unit space of 4 mm; among the reticulate treated samples, with the increase of unit space, the mass loss initially decreases, but turns to increase after reaching a minimum at the unit space of 3 mm. Additionally, the samples with striate shape perform better wear resistance than the other shape groups on the whole. From the ratio value of laser treated area to contacted area perspective, that the samples with ratio value between 0.15 and 0.3 possess better wear resistance is concluded.

  20. Effect of spherical Au nanoparticles on nanofriction and wear reduction in dry and liquid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nano-object additives are used in tribological applications as well as in various applications in liquids requiring controlled manipulation and targeting. On the macroscale, nanoparticles in solids and liquids have been shown to reduce friction and wear. On the nanoscale, atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies have been performed in single- and multiple-nanoparticle contact, in dry environments, to characterize friction forces and wear. However, limited studies in submerged liquid environments have been performed and further studies are needed. In this paper, spherical Au nanoparticles were studied for their effect on friction and wear under dry conditions and submerged in water. In single-nanoparticle contact, individual nanoparticles, deposited on silicon, were manipulated with a sharp tip and the friction force was determined. Multiple-nanoparticle contact sliding experiments were performed on nanoparticle-coated silicon with a glass sphere. Wear tests were performed on the nanoscale with AFM as well as on the macroscale by using a ball-on-flat tribometer to relate friction and wear reduction on the nanoscale and macroscale. Results indicate that the addition of Au nanoparticles reduces friction and wear. PMID:23213639

  1. Effect of spherical Au nanoparticles on nanofriction and wear reduction in dry and liquid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Maharaj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nano-object additives are used in tribological applications as well as in various applications in liquids requiring controlled manipulation and targeting. On the macroscale, nanoparticles in solids and liquids have been shown to reduce friction and wear. On the nanoscale, atomic force microscopy (AFM studies have been performed in single- and multiple-nanoparticle contact, in dry environments, to characterize friction forces and wear. However, limited studies in submerged liquid environments have been performed and further studies are needed. In this paper, spherical Au nanoparticles were studied for their effect on friction and wear under dry conditions and submerged in water. In single-nanoparticle contact, individual nanoparticles, deposited on silicon, were manipulated with a sharp tip and the friction force was determined. Multiple-nanoparticle contact sliding experiments were performed on nanoparticle-coated silicon with a glass sphere. Wear tests were performed on the nanoscale with AFM as well as on the macroscale by using a ball-on-flat tribometer to relate friction and wear reduction on the nanoscale and macroscale. Results indicate that the addition of Au nanoparticles reduces friction and wear.

  2. Corrosion and Wear Behaviors of Cr-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.; Mohan, L.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Kumar, V. Praveen; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anandan, C.

    2017-08-01

    A combination of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering techniques has been employed to deposit chromium-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel, silicon and glass substrates. The concentrations of Cr in the coatings are varied by changing the parameters of the bipolar pulsed power supply and the argon/acetylene gas composition. The coatings have been studied for composition, morphology, surface nature, nanohardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance properties. The changes in I D / I G ratio with Cr concentrations have been obtained from Raman spectroscopy studies. Ratio decreases with an increase in Cr concentration, and it has been found to increase at higher Cr concentration, indicating the disorder in the coating. Carbide is formed in Cr-doped DLC coatings as observed from XPS studies. There is a decrease in sp 3/ sp 2 ratios with an increase in Cr concentration, and it increases again at higher Cr concentration. Nanohardness studies show no clear dependence of hardness on Cr concentration. DLC coatings with lower Cr contents have demonstrated better corrosion resistance with better passive behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution, and corrosion potential is observed to move toward nobler (more positive) values. A low coefficient of friction (0.15) at different loads is observed from reciprocating wear studies. Lower wear volume is found at all loads on the Cr-doped DLC coatings. Wear mechanism changes from abrasive wear on the substrate to adhesive wear on the coating.

  3. Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL and its Effect on Tool Wear During Miniature Drilling :an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norsalawani Binti Mohamad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Miniature drilling is widely used in industries including electronics and reconstructive surgeries to create small sized holes. Chip removal and effective supply of coolant are the two limiting factors that make the process more complex compared to other meso scale machining processes and also contribute to the tool wear. The tool wear in the process is mainly caused by the interaction, motion and chip production between the tool and work piece. Uniform supply of coolant must be ensured to reach the drilled cavity to keep the tool wear to a minimal level. This study includes experimental investigation of the tool condition after applying Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL system as a greener approach as the name indicates. The tool condition with MQL has also been compared with dry and flood cooling. Two different types of drill bit materials (High Speed Steel and Carbide have been tested under same experimental condition to drill through Aluminum Alloy 6061 and it has been found that overall performance in terms of tool condition after applying MQL was better compared to the other two methods. The overall wear propagation area was measured for both the conditions. It was seen, the wear propagation covered minimal area with MQL while for flood and dry condition wear was spread over a bigger area on flank.

  4. Assessment of fretting wear in Hanaro fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Lim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Hark Rho

    1999-06-01

    Since the first fuel loading on Feb. 1995, various zero-power tests were performed in HANARO and power ascending tests followed. After the initial fuel loading, Hanaro operation staffs inspected only two fuel bundles which were evaluated to have the highest power at the end of each cycle and they did not recognize anything peculiar in the inspected bundles. At the end of 1996, Hanaro staffs found severe wear damages in the fuel components. After that, the 4th cycle core was re-arranged with fresh fuels only to investigate wear phenomena on the fuel components. The fuel inspections have been performed 25 times periodically since the core re-configuration. In this report, fretting wear characteristics of the fuel assemblies were evaluated and summarized. Wear damages of the improved fuel assembly to resolve the wear problem were compared with those of the original fuel assembly. Based on the results of the fuel inspections, we suggest that fuel inspection need not be done for the first 60 pump operation days in order to reduce the potential of damage by a fuel handling error and an operator's burden of the fuel inspection. (author). 6 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs

  5. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  6. Brake wear particle emissions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoratos, Theodoros; Martini, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    Traffic-related sources have been recognized as a significant contributor of particulate matter particularly within major cities. Exhaust and non-exhaust traffic-related sources are estimated to contribute almost equally to traffic-related PM10 emissions. Non-exhaust particles can be generated either from non-exhaust sources such as brake, tyre, clutch and road surface wear or already exist in the form of deposited material at the roadside and become resuspended due to traffic-induced turbulence. Among non-exhaust sources, brake wear can be a significant particulate matter (PM) contributor, particularly within areas with high traffic density and braking frequency. Studies mention that in urban environments, brake wear can contribute up to 55 % by mass to total non-exhaust traffic-related PM10 emissions and up to 21 % by mass to total traffic-related PM10 emissions, while in freeways, this contribution is lower due to lower braking frequency. As exhaust emissions control become stricter, relative contributions of non-exhaust sources-and therefore brake wear-to traffic-related emissions will become more significant and will raise discussions on possible regulatory needs. The aim of the present literature review study is to present the state-of-the-art of the different aspects regarding PM resulting from brake wear and provide all the necessary information in terms of importance, physicochemical characteristics, emission factors and possible health effects.

  7. Tooth Decay Process: How to Reverse It and Avoid a Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding Dental Care Home Health Info Health Topics Tooth Decay Tooth decay (dental caries) is damage to a tooth that can happen ... hole in a tooth, called a cavity. If tooth decay is not treated, it can cause pain, infection, ...

  8. The unlubricated reciprocating sliding wear of 316 stainless steel in C02 in the temperature range 20 to 6000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1985-11-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of 316 stainless steel in C0 2 has been investigated in the load range 8 - 5ON from 20 to 600 0 C. Wear transitions occurred at all temperatures but were load dependent. At and below 300 0 C wear transitions only took place at low leads whereas above 300 0 C transitions were seen al all loads. The low temperature wear transition, giving an order of magnitude decrease in wear rate was associated with a change in friction behaviour. The friction force across the specimen was initially widely fluctuating and varied from cycle to cycle. After a time, which did not necessarily coincide with the wear transition the cyclic variation in the friction force become much less. This smoother sliding is thought to indicate a trend to oxide -oxide contacts. At higher temperatures wear transitions result in a two orders of magnitude reduction in wear. The corresponding friction transition was similar to the low temperature friction change but also included a marked temporary drop in the coefficient of friction. (author)

  9. Evaluation of autogenous tooth transplantation for replacement of the missing or unrestorable mandibular molar tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahiduj Jaman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the functional and occlusal stability of autogenous tooth transplantation. A total of 30 patients were included. Among them, 21 participants received transplanted first molar and the remaining 9 received transplanted second molar. In all the cases, donor tooth were third molar. In each participant, extraction of un-restorable first or second molar tooth was performed which was then replaced by atrumatic extracted third molar tooth. Each third molar tooth was placed in the recipient extracted socket, followed by the evaluation of the occlusion and then stabilized with arch bar and ligature wire. Clinical follow-up evaluation was performed at 15 days, 3 and 12 months in respect to occlusal stability, tooth mobility and periodontal status. It was found that 23 transplanted tooth were successful and the remaining 7 tooth need long-term observation for the final outcome, which was statistically significant. It can be concluded that the autogenous tooth transplantation can replace missing tooth to ensure the preservation of function, aesthetic and to prevent bone resorption of the missing area of the jaw, which can lead to exceptional esthetic and functional outcome.

  10. Spectroscopic investigations of carious tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thareja, R K; Sharma, A K; Shukla, Shobha

    2008-11-01

    We report on the elemental composition of healthy and infected part of human tooth using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). We have used prominent constituent transitions in laser-excited tooth to diagnose the state of the tooth. A nanosecond laser pulse (355nm, 5ns) was used as an ablating pulse and the sodium (3s2S-3p2P) at 588.99 and (3s2S-3p2P) at 589.99nm, strontium (5s21S-1s5P) at 460.55nm, and calcium (3d3D-4f 3F0) at 452.55nm transitions for spectroscopic analysis. The spectroscopic observations in conjunction with discriminate analysis showed that calcium attached to the hydroxyapatite structure of the tooth was affected severely at the infected part of the tooth. The position-time plots generated from two-dimensional (2D) images conclusively showed a decrease in calcium concentration in the infected region of the irradiated tooth. Using the technique, we could distinguish between the healthy and carious parts of the tooth with significant accuracy.

  11. Tooth Retained Implant: No More an Oxymoron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontally af-fected teeth are treated in one of the two ways. (1 Tooth retention after periodontal surgery, in which the degree of regeneration achieved is unpredictable. (2 Tooth extrac-tion and implant placement. Implants have an osseointegrated surface which does not provide adequate shock absorption. Regeneration can be achieved by resecting the crown of the affected tooth and submerging the root. This technique has not had a clinical application so far as the tooth becomes difficult to restore. Placing an implant within the root can make the retained root restorable. At the same time, as the implant is placed within the root surface it achieves a periodontal integration which dampens occlusal forces better than osseointegration. Therefore, such a “tooth retained implant” may serve as an additional treatment option with significant benefits over tooth retention and implant placement alone. The hypothesis: Implants placed within retained roots have shown cementum deposition and attachment of periodontal ligament fibers over their surface. This periodontal attachment may be able to dam-pen forces better than in an osseointegrated implant. Moreover, since an implant is being placed, the crown of the tooth can be resected and submerged. This prevents epithelial migration, allows for the periodontal ligament cells to populate the wound and favors regeneration.Evaluation of the hypothesis: The technique of placing implants within cavities prepared in the root and then submerging them are simple for any practitioner placing implants routinely.

  12. An abrasive wear study of ordered Fe[sub 3]Al. [Fe[sub 73]Al[sub 27], Fe[sub 76]Al[sub 24], Fe[sub 77]Al[sub 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, H.E.; Wilson, R.D.; Hawk, J.A. (US Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center, OR (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Abrasive wear research has been conducted on ordered iron aluminide intermetallics. Pin-on-drum abrasive wear tests were performed on samples of varying long-range order. Wear surfaces were examined with optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The wear mechanism consisted of microplowing, micromachining and microfracture. Compositional variation near Fe[sub 3]Al and the degree of long-range ordering had only minor effects on the abrasive wear rates of iron aluminide samples. TEM analysis of the wear surfaces indicated that significant plastic deformation and recrystallization had occurred. The abrasive wear rates were compared with those of well-known abrasive wear-resistant materials. (orig.).

  13. Friction and Wear in Timing Belt Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Stojanovic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Timing belt tooth goes into contact with a drive pulley, stretched to the maximum, because of the previous tension. When the contact begins the peak of the belt tooth makes the contact with the outer surface of the pulley teeth. The process of the teeth entering into the contact zone is accompanied with the relative sliding of their side surfaces and appropriate friction force. The normal force value is changing with the parabolic function, which also leads to the changes of the friction force. The biggest value of the normal force and of the friction force is at the tooth root. Hollow between teeth and the tip of the pulley teeth are also in contact. Occasionally, the face surface of the belt and the flange are also in contact. The friction occurs in those tribomechanical systems, also. Values of these friction forces are lower compared with the friction force, which occurs at the teeth root.

  14. Assessment of performance parameters for EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, A.; Fattibene, P.; Shishkina, E.A.; Ivanov, D.V.; De Coste, V.; Guettler, A.; Onori, S.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of a comparison between three laboratories, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal-to-dose response curves were measured for sets of 30 tooth enamel samples and the variance of EPR measurements in dependence on absorbed dose was evaluated, in nine combinations of laboratory of sample preparation and EPR evaluation, respectively. As a test for benchmarking of EPR evaluation, the parameters 'critical dose' and 'limit of detection' were proposed as performance parameters following definitions from chemical-metrology, and a model function was suggested for analytical formulation of the dependence of the variance of EPR measurement on absorbed dose. First estimates of limits of detection by weighted and unweighted fitting resulted in the range 101-552 and 67-561 mGy, respectively, and were generally larger with weighted than with unweighted fitting. Indication was found for the influence of methodology of sample preparation and applied EPR measurement parameters on performance of EPR dosimetry with tooth enamel

  15. Dental anomaly patterns associated with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Su Ji; Lee, Je Woo; Song, Ji Hyun

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between tooth agenesis and the occurrence of other dental anomalies in children and adolescents. Panoramic radiographs of 195 subjects with tooth agenesis, except for the third molar, were retrospectively examined and compared with a non-agenesis control group of 600 subjects. Their ages ranged from 7 to 15 years. Panoramic and periapical radiographs were used to analyze the presence of other associated dental anomalies. The occurrences of these anomalies were compared with those in the non-agenesis group. Subjects with tooth agenesis showed a significantly higher prevalence of a small maxillary lateral incisor (17.7%), distoangulation of the mandibular second premolar (6.5%), delayed development of a permanent tooth (10.8%), and hypo-occlusion of a primary molar (11.8%). In contrast, the prevalence of a supernumerary tooth was higher in the control group, and no difference was observed in the prevalence of ectopic eruption of a first molar. According to the agenesis area, microdontia of the maxillary lateral incisors occurred more often in patients with anterior or premolar agenesis than in the molar agenesis groups. Distoangulation of the mandibular second premolars, delayed tooth development, and hypo-occlusion of the primary molars were associated with premolar tooth agenesis. A small maxillary lateral incisor, distoangulation of the mandibular second premolar, delayed development of a permanent tooth, and hypo-occlusion of a primary molar were frequently associated with tooth agenesis, providing additional evidence of a genetic interrelationship in the causes of these dental anomalies.

  16. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  17. The mechanics of wear in slurry dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with the pumping of abrasive slurries which exposes machinery and parts to an exceedingly large number of modes of wear, probably representing all possible modes that can be conceived. The term ''slurry'' as defined implies that the abrasive solids are mixed with a liquid, usually water, which can combine with certain soluble elements from the solids or from the atmosphere to form an insidious combination of corrosion-abrasion. The various wear modes are described and exemplified with drawings and photographs. A discussion on wear reduction and operating practices is included. A brief description of the ASTM G75 Miller Number Test for slurry abrasivity and a proposed Slurry Abrasion Resistance Test for the effect of slurries on materials is included

  18. Duke Power Company's control rod wear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culp, D.C.; Kitlan, M.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Recent examinations performed at several foreign and domestic pressurized water reactors have identified significant control rod cladding wear, leading to the conclusion that previously believed control rod lifetimes are not attainable. To monitor control rod performance and reduce safety concerns associated with wear, Duke Power Company has developed a comprehensive control rod wear program for Ag-In-Cd and boron carbide (B 4 C) rods at the McGuire and Catawba nuclear stations. Duke Power currently uses the Westinghouse 17 x 17 Ag-In-Cd control rod design at McGuire Unit 1 and the Westinghouse 17 x 17 hybrid B 4 C control rod design with a Ag-In-Cd tip at McGuire Unit 2 and Catawba Units 1 and 2. The designs are similar, with the exception of the absorber material and clad thickness. There are 53 control rods per unit

  19. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  20. Overview of PVD wear resistant coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeter, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The combined functionality of wear-resistant and low-friction multilayer coatings has widened application possibilities for a new generation of coated tools. For the first time tool wear mechanisms are comprehensively addressed both at the cutting edge and contact areas away from the edge where chip evacuation is facilitated. Since its recent market introduction a combined TiA1N and WC/C PVD coating has been proven to increase cutting performance in various metal cutting operations, notably drilling and tapping of steels and aluminum alloys. Significant improvements have been obtained under dry as well as with coolant conditions. The results of laboratory metal cutting tests and field trials to date will be described. Correlations between chip formation / wear mechanisms and coating properties are given to explain the effectiveness of this coating. (author)

  1. Quantitative wear particle analysis for osteoarthritis assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meizhai; Lord, Megan S; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The aims of this study were (1) to quantitatively characterise the boundary and surface features of wear particles present in the synovial fluid of patients, (2) to select key numerical parameters that describe distinctive particle features and enable osteoarthritis assessment and (3) to develop a model to assess osteoarthritis conditions using comprehensive wear debris information. Discriminant analysis was used to statistically group particles based on differences in their numerical parameters. The analysis methods agreed with the clinical osteoarthritis grades in 63%, 50% and 61% of particles for no osteoarthritis, mild osteoarthritis and severe osteoarthritis, respectively. This study has revealed particle features specific to different osteoarthritis grades and provided further understanding of the cartilage degradation process through wear particle analysis - the technique that has the potential to be developed as an objective and minimally invasive method for osteoarthritis diagnosis.

  2. Tooth fractures in canine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capik, I.; Ledecky, V.; Sevcik, A.

    2001-01-01

    Tooth fractures constitute a considerable fraction of all tooth diseases. Out of the 5,370 dogs treated during four years, 492 were presented with dental problems and 28.3 % of the latter were treated for tooth fractures. Canines were the most frequently affected teeth (38.8 %), followed by premolars (33.1 %), incisors (25.9 %), and molars (2.2 %), 55.4 % of the patients with canine and incisor fractures being large breed dogs. Fractures of premolars (mostly of 108, 208) were divided evenly irrespective of breed or body size. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment yielded good therapeutic results in most cases, but repeated treatment was necessary in some patients

  3. Prevalence and genetic basis of tooth agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Shimizu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tooth agenesis or hypodontia is one of the most common anomalies of the human dentition, characterized by the developmental absence of one or more teeth. Many studies have reported that the prevalence of congenital absence of permanent teeth varies from 3% to 11% among European and Asian populations. Recent advances in the fields of molecular biology and human genetics have improved our understanding of the cause of tooth agenesis. In this review, we assess the previous literature on prevalence of tooth agenesis comparing the Japanese with other racial populations, and describe the recent genetic studies associated with hypodontia in human and mouse models.

  4. Properties of tooth enamel in great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J-W; Morris, Dylan; Constantino, Paul J; Lucas, Peter W; Smith, Tanya M; Lawn, Brian R

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study has been made of human and great ape molar tooth enamel. Nanoindentation techniques are used to map profiles of elastic modulus and hardness across sections from the enamel-dentin junction to the outer tooth surface. The measured data profiles overlap between species, suggesting a degree of commonality in material properties. Using established deformation and fracture relations, critical loads to produce function-threatening damage in the enamel of each species are calculated for characteristic tooth sizes and enamel thicknesses. The results suggest that differences in load-bearing capacity of molar teeth in primates are less a function of underlying material properties than of morphology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. In vitro tooth cleaning efficacy of manual toothbrushes around brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätzle, Marc; Imfeld, Thomas; Sener, Beatrice; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this laboratory study was to assess the potential cleaning efficacy of nine different toothbrushes around brackets in vitro. Standard and Mini Diamond brackets were fixed on coloured teeth in a special model, coated with white titanium oxide, brushed in a machine with different manual toothbrushes (three different types: planar, staged, and v-shaped bristle field), and tested with a horizontal motion for 1 minute. After brushing, the teeth were scanned and the black surfaces were planimetrically assessed using a grey scale. Tooth areas which were black again after brushing indicated tooth surface contact of the filaments. The remaining white tooth areas around the brackets indicated 'plaque-retentive' niches. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Kruskal-Wallis one-way test of variance for individual comparison. Bonferroni adjustment was used for multiple testing, and comparison of bracket size with Wilcoxon signed rank test. In the most critical area of 2 mm around the brackets, there was no statistically significant difference between the different toothbrushes evaluated. The untouched area ranged from 11 to 26 per cent of the initially whitened tooth surface. By pooling the toothbrushes according to their design, the median cleaning efficacy of the v-shaped (73.1 per cent) and staged (75.6 per cent) toothbrushes resulted in significantly superior cleaning efficacy than planar toothbrushes (60.7 per cent) for standard brackets. For mini bracket type, staged toothbrushes showed a significantly better mean cleaning efficacy (77.8 per cent) than planar (65 per cent) and v-shaped (72.4 per cent) toothbrushes. Staged and v-shaped brush designs resulted in superior cleaning efficacy of teeth with fixed orthodontic attachments than toothbrushes with a planar bristle field. None of the tested toothbrushes showed a consistent, significantly higher cleaning efficacy than the others in this in vitro experiment.

  6. Wear Analysis of Wind Turbine Gearbox Bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Xu, Hanbing [ORNL; Parten, Randy J [ORNL; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Geer, Tom [ORNL

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this effort was to investigate and characterize the nature of surface damage and wear to wind turbine gearbox bearings returned from service in the field. Bearings were supplied for examination by S. Butterfield and J. Johnson of the National Wind Technology Center (NREL), Boulder, Colorado. Studies consisted of visual examination, optical and electron microscopy, dimensional measurements of wear-induced macro-scale and micro-scale features, measurements of macro- and micro-scale hardness, 3D imaging of surface damage, studies of elemental distributions on fracture surfaces, and examinations of polished cross-sections of surfaces under various etched and non-etched conditions.

  7. Surface engineering for enhanced performance against wear

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Surface Engineering constitutes a variety of processes and sub processes. Each chapter of this work covers specific processes by experts working in the area. Included for each topic are tribological performances for each process as well as results of recent research. The reader also will benefit from in-depth studies of diffusion coatings, nanocomposite films for wear resistance, surfaces for biotribological applications, thin-film wear, tribology of thermal sprayed coatings, hardfacing, plating for tribology and high energy beam surface modifications. Material scientists as well as engineers working with surface engineering for tribology will be particularly interested in this work.

  8. The effect of microstructure on abrasive wear of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kešner, A.; Chotëborský, R.; Linda, M.

    2017-09-01

    Abrasive wear of agricultural tools is one of the biggest problems in currently being. The amount of abrasive wear, depending on the microstructure, has been investigated in this work. Steels 25CrMo4 and 51CrV4 were used in this work to determine the effect of the microstructure on the abrasive wear. These steels are commonly used for components that have to withstand abrasive wear.SEM analysis was used to detect the microstructure. The standardized ASTM G65 method was used to compare the abrasive wear of steels. The results show that the abrasive wear depends on the microstructure of steels.

  9. Hyperglycemia and xerostomia are key determinants of tooth decay in type 1 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chih-Ko; Harris, Stephen E; Mohan, Sumathy; Horn, Diane; Fajardo, Roberto; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; Jorgensen, James; Macdougall, Mary; Abboud-Werner, Sherry

    2012-06-01

    Insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and oral diseases are closely interrelated. Poor metabolic control in diabetics is associated with a high risk of gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth loss. Salivary flow declines in diabetics and patients suffer from xerostomia. Reduced saliva predisposes to enamel hypomineralization and caries formation; however, the mechanisms that initiate and lead to progression of tooth decay and periodontitis in type 1 DM have not been explored. To address this issue, we analyzed tooth morphology in Akita ⁻/⁻ mice that harbor a point mutation in the Ins2 insulin gene, which leads to progressive hyperglycemia. Mandibles from Akita ⁻/⁻ and wild-type littermates were analyzed by microCT, scanning EM and histology; teeth were examined for amelogenin (Amel) and ameloblastin (Ambn) expression. Mice were injected with pilocarpine to assess saliva production. As hyperglycemia may alter pulp repair, the effect of high glucose levels on the proliferation/differentiation of cultured MD10-F2 pulp cells was also analyzed. Results showed that Akita ⁻/⁻ mice at 6 weeks of age showed chalky white incisors that correlated with marked hyperglycemia and impaired saliva production. MicroCT of Akita ⁻/⁻ teeth revealed excessive enamel wearing and hypomineralization; immunostaining for Amel and Ambn was decreased. A striking feature was invasion of dentinal tubules with Streptococcus mitis and microabcesses that originated in the coronal pulp and progressed to pulp necrosis and periapical periodontitis. High levels of glucose also inhibited MD10-F2 cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia in combination with reduced saliva in a model of type1 DM leads to decreased enamel mineralization/matrix proteins and predisposes to excessive wearing and decay. Importantly, hyperglycemia adversely affects enamel matrix proteins and pulp repair. Early detection and treatment of hyperglycemia

  10. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Jong Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  11. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun-Jong; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry have aimed at tooth structure regeneration; however, the application in other than tooth structures has been attempted extensively. The availability from discarded or removed teeth can be an innate benefit as a source of autologous cells. Their origin from the neural crest results in exploitation of neurological and numerous other applications. This review briefly highlights current and future perspectives of the regenerative applications of tooth derived stem cells in areas beyond tooth regeneration.

  12. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emic, Michael D; Whitlock, John A; Smith, Kathlyn M; Fisher, Daniel C; Wilson, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days). Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size), and derived titanosaurs and diplodocoids independently evolved the highest known tooth replacement rates among archosaurs.

  13. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  14. Effects of Load and Speed on Wear Rate of Abrasive Wear for 2014 Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabas, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the normal load and sliding speed on wear rate of two-body abrasive wear for 2014 Al Alloy were investigated in detail. In order to understand the variation in wear behaviour with load and speed, wear tests were carried out at a sliding distance of 11 m, a speed of 0.36 m/s, a duration of 30 s and loads in the range 3-11 N using 220 grit abrasive paper, and at a speed range 0.09-0.90 m/s, a load of 5 N and an average sliding distance of 11 m using abrasive papers of 150 grit size under dry friction conditions. Before the wear tests, solution treatment of the 2014 Al alloy was carried out at temperatures of 505 and 520 °C for 1 h in a muffle furnace and then quenched in cold water at 15 °C. Later, the ageing treatment was carried out at 185 °C for 8 h in the furnace. Generally, wear rate due to time increased linearly and linear wear resistance decreased with increasing loads. However, the wear rate was directly proportional to the load up to a critical load of 7 N. After this load, the slope of the curves decreased because the excessive deformation of the worn surface and the instability of the abrasive grains began to increase. When the load on an abrasive grain reaches a critical value, the groove width is about 0.17 of the abrasive grain diameter, and the abrasive grains begin to fail. The wear rate due to time increased slightly as the sliding speed increased in the range 0.09-0.90 m/s. The reason for this is that changes arising from strain rate and friction heating are expected with increasing sliding speeds.

  15. Mechanism of action and morphologic changes in the alveolar bone in response to selective alveolar decortication-facilitated tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloul, S Susan; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Morgan, Elise F; Carvalho, Roberto S; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test if corticotomy-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling underlie orthodontic tooth movement and how selective alveolar decortication enhances the rate of tooth movement. A total of 114 Sprague-Dawley rats were included in 3 treatment groups: selective alveolar decortication alone (SADc); tooth movement alone (TM); and "combined" therapy (SADc + TM). Surgery was performed around the buccal and palatal aspects of the left maxillary first molar tooth and included 5 decortication dots on each side. Tooth movement was performed on the first molar using a 25-g Sentalloy spring. Measurements were done at baseline (day 0: no treatment rendered) and on days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42. Microcomputed tomography, Faxitron analyses, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) of expressed mRNAs were used to assess changes. The combined group showed increased tooth movement (P = 0.04) at 7 days compared with the tooth movement group with significantly decreased bone volume (62%; P = 0.016) and bone mineral content (63%; P = 0.015). RNA markers of osteoclastic cells and key osteoclastic regulators (M-CSF [macrophage colony-stimulating factor], RANKL [receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand], OPG [osteoprotegerin], calcitonin receptor [CTR], TRACP-5b [tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b], cathepsin K [Ctsk]) all showed expression indicating increased osteoclastogenesis in the combined group. RNA markers of osteoblastic cells (OPN [osteopontin], BSP [bone sialoprotein], OCN [osteocalcin]) also showed increased anabolic activity in response to the combination of alveolar decortication and tooth movement. The data suggest that the alveolar decortication enhances the rate of tooth movement during the initial tooth displacement phase; this results in a coupled mechanism of bone resorption and bone formation during the earlier stages of treatment, and this mechanism underlies the rapid orthodontic tooth movement

  16. Sliding wear of conventional and nanostructured cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, K. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Fischer, T.E. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The sliding wear mechanisms of cemented carbide and the effects of the microstructure scale on the wear resistance were investigated by performing a series of unlubricated sliding wear tests in air with pins of WC-Co composites sliding against silicon nitride disks. In the first approximation, the wear rate is proportional to the hardness with a wear coefficient k=6.9x10{sup -6} for all materials. In the conventional cermets, the wear coefficient k also depends on the grain size; materials with smaller WC grains exhibit a smaller wear resistance. This reduction, however, does not extend to the nanostructured materials which exhibit the above value for k: Their wear resistance is higher than that of conventional cermets in proportion to their hardness. The data can also be expressed in terms of cobalt content: The lower the cobalt content, the lower the wear; but two different such dependencies exist, one for the conventional and one for the nanostructured materials with lower wear. The sliding wear of WC-Co composites occurs on a very small scale: The worn surfaces show no evidence of fracture of plastic deformation. This wear behavior is explained by the hexagonal structure and the anisotropic mechanical behavior of the WC grains that are capable of shear in a limited number of planes but are not capable of triaxial deformation. The higher wear resistance of the nanostructured composites is related to their hardness which decreases the real area of contact. (orig.)

  17. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Pregnancy and Oral Health Headaches and Jaw Pain? Check Your Posture! Men: ... Start by Visiting the Dentist Why is Oral Health Important for Men? What is Baby Bottle Tooth ...

  18. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... April 7, 2018 About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health The History of Dental ... Orofacial Pain? What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life of ...

  19. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health What is Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? What is ... The History of Dental Advances Why is Oral Health Important for Men? How Do I Care for ...

  20. Life of a Tooth: A Visual Timeline

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Is My Child at Risk for Early Childhood Tooth Decay? What is a Composite Resin (White Filling)? How Do I Care for My Child's Baby Teeth? Learn what those dental words mean. The Life ...

  1. Immediate tooth replacement using fiber-reinforced composite and natural tooth pontic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Motevasselian, Fariba

    2010-01-01

    The loss and replacement of anterior maxillary teeth poses several challenges. In patients refusing implant surgery, when minimal tooth reduction is desired, a fiber-reinforced composite fixed-partial denture may be used as a conservative alternative to a conventional fixed-partial denture for replacement of a single missing tooth. This article describes a clinical technique and six-year follow-up. The patient presented with a missing maxillary central incisor due to localized juvenile periodontitis. The abutment teeth were clinically stable. The advantage of supragingival margins and minimal tooth structure removal made the bonded bridge with a natural tooth pontic a viable procedure for this compromised restorative situation.

  2. Comparative study of gene expression during tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X F; Zhao, Y B; Zhang, F M; Han, P Y

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to understand tooth eruption by comparing the gene expression during tooth eruption and orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Orthodontic force was applied on maxillary molars for 2, 4, 7 and 14 days to study tooth movement. Mice at PN 0, 7, 10, 15 and 21 were fixed to observe tooth eruption. Comparative study of two procedures was assessed by haematoxylin and eosin, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and in situ hybridization for matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)2, 13, bone sialoprotein (Bsp) and osteocalcin (Ocn). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and expression of Mmp2, 13 were obviously detectable in the compression region during OTM. They were also identified in the occlusal and apical region of alveolar bone during tooth eruption. Strong expression of Bsp and Ocn was detectable at the tension side during OTM. These genes were also expressed in the inner lateral region of alveolar bone adjacent to the tooth, but absent in the inner surface of the occlusal and root apical regions during tooth eruption. The process of alveolar bone metabolism during developmental eruption and OTM shares the same mechanism. Internal force, as the orthodontic force for OTM, may be initiating factor for tooth eruption.

  3. Impacted supernumerary tooth in coronoid process: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Se; Lee, Je Ho; Park, Hyok; Jung, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog [Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Impaction of tooth is a situation in which an unerupted tooth is wedged against another tooth or teeth or otherwise located so that it cannot erupt normally. The supernumerary tooth is also called as hyperdontia and defined as the condition of having additional tooth to the regular number of teeth. The most common supernumerary tooth is a mesiodens, which is a mal-formed, peg-like tooth that occurs between the maxillary incisors. The supernumerary tooth is commonly impacted but they are frequently impacted on maxilla. Ectopic impaction of supernumerary tooth on mandibular condyle, coronoid process, ascending ramus, and pterygomandibular space is very rare condition. In this case, we report a case of impacted supernumerary tooth on mandibular sigmoid notch without definite pathologic change.

  4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find they can overcome them just by wearing boots or high-top shoes to support the ankles. ... people with more proximal weak- ness, there’s the knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), which extends up the ...

  5. Association between Tooth Agenesis and Skeletal Malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Maria Guerra; Trevizan, Mariana; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; da Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Horta, Karla Carpio; Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Küchler, Erika Calvano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between tooth agenesis and skeletal malocclusions in Brazilian non-syndromic orthodontic patients. Pretreatment orthodontic records of 348 patients of both genders and with various skeletal malocclusions were examined. Tooth agenesis was evaluated in panoramic radiographs. Angular measurements were taken from lateral cephalometric radiographs to classify the patient's malocclusion as skeletal Class I, Class II and Class III. Subjects were divided into 2 groups, "with tooth agenesis" and "without tooth agenesis". Chi-square or Fisher exact test was used to compare categorical data. ANOVA with Tukey's post-test was used for means comparisons. An alpha of 5% was established. From 348 analysed patients, 28 presented tooth agenesis. There was no difference between genders (P = 0.27) nor mean age (P = 0.16). The most prevalent skeletal malocclusion was Class I (63.11%), followed by Class II (25.94%), and Class III (10.95%). The mean of congenitally missing teeth was 1.3 (SD 0.13). Thirteen subjects had premolar agenesis, 13 upper lateral incisor agenesis, 4 lower incisor agenesis and 2 molars agenesis. The group with tooth agenesis presented A point-nasion-B point (ANB) angle smaller (1.66 [SD 2.52]) than the group without tooth agenesis (2.86 [SD 2.49]) (P = 0.01). ANB angle had a negative correlation with the number of congenitally missing teeth (P = 0.039; r = -0.39). Tooth agenesis is associated with a smaller A point-nasion-B point angle and is negatively correlated with the number of congenitally missing teeth.

  6. Alveolar bone resorption after tooth extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Popovski, Stipica

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar ridge resorption has long been considered an unavoidable consequence of tooth extraction. Atrophy of the alveolar bone may cause significant esthetic and surgical problems in implantation, as well as at prosthetic and restorative dentistry. Alveolar ridge prophylaxis immediately upon tooth extraction may reduce such sequelae for both, the treating dentist and the patient. Attempts to reduce alveolar bone resorption have included the placement of natural roots, root analogues, and...

  7. Tooth surface treatment strategies for adhesive cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Rohr, Nadja; Fischer, Jens

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tooth surface pre-treatment steps on shear bond strength, which is essential for understanding the adhesive cementation process. MATERIALS AND METHODS Shear bond strengths of different cements with various tooth surface treatments (none, etching, priming, or etching and priming) on enamel and dentin of human teeth were measured using the Swiss shear test design. Three adhesives (Permaflo DC, Panavia F 2.0, and Panavia V5) and one sel...

  8. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  9. Orthodontic Tooth Movement with Clear Aligners

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Carl T.; McGorray, Susan P.; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. ev...

  10. Ultrasonographic Detection of Tooth Flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.; Ghorayeb, S. R.

    2010-02-01

    The goal of our work is to adapt pulse-echo ultrasound into a high resolution imaging modality for early detection of oral diseases and for monitoring treatment outcome. In this talk we discuss our preliminary results in the detection of: demineralization of the enamel and dentin, demineralization or caries under and around existing restorations, caries on occlusal and interproximal surfaces, cracks of enamel and dentin, calculus, and periapical lesions. In vitro immersion tank experiments are compared to results from a handpiece which uses a compliant delay line to couple the ultrasound to the tooth surface. Because the waveform echoes are complex, and in order to make clinical interpretation of ultrasonic waveform data in real time, it is necessary to automatically interpret the signals. We apply the dynamic wavelet fingerprint algorithms to identify and delineate echographic features that correspond to the flaws of interest in teeth. The resulting features show a clear distinction between flawed and unflawed waveforms collected with an ultrasonic handpiece on both phantom and human cadaver teeth.

  11. Complex single-tooth restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Burgess, John O

    2002-04-01

    There are many options for restoring the decimated dentition. [43] Excellent results can be obtained with many of the materials currently available. The restorative option will depend on the size and location of the lesion, adequate isolation for adhesive restorations, caries rate, the patient's age, the aesthetic needs of the patient, occlusal habits, maintenance of maximum tooth structure, the skill of the dentist, and the longevity desired for the restoration. Amalgam is a cost-effective material, and when used properly, it can provide many years of service. Aesthetic demands, the desire to strengthen teeth, [44] and concern about the safety of mercury in amalgam have increased the use of direct composites, ceramic material, and indirect composites. The main drawback with these materials, however, is their increased technique sensitivity and concerns about their longevity. Gold continues to be a cost-effective and predictable material if placed properly. Full-coverage gold or porcelain fused to metal provides long-term predictability but is more destructive and not as aesthetically appealing. The wide varieties of materials available provide both a challenge and an opportunity to place the most effective material for a particular patient. A thorough understanding of the available materials and their appropriate use is needed to achieve a long-lasting restoration that serves the patient's needs.

  12. Endodontic therapy or single tooth implant? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Lozada, Jaime; Puterman, Israel; White, Shane N

    2008-06-01

    Should a tooth with pulpal involvement be saved through endodontic therapy, or extracted and replaced with a single tooth implant? Within the limitations of the existing literature, this systematic review of treatment outcomes found that initial endodontic treatment had a high long-term survival rate, equivalent to replacement of a missing tooth with an implant-supported restoration. Single tooth implants should be considered as the first treatment option for patients requiring extraction and tooth replacement.

  13. ERRATUM: Work smart, wear your hard hat

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    An error appeared in the article «Work smart, wear your hard hat» published in Weekly Bulletin 27/2003, page 5. The impact which pierced a hole in the hard hat worn by Gerd Fetchenhauer was the equivalent of a box weighing 5 kg and not 50 kg.

  14. Wear-Out Sensitivity Analysis Project Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Adam

    2015-01-01

    During the course of the Summer 2015 internship session, I worked in the Reliability and Maintainability group of the ISS Safety and Mission Assurance department. My project was a statistical analysis of how sensitive ORU's (Orbital Replacement Units) are to a reliability parameter called the wear-out characteristic. The intended goal of this was to determine a worst case scenario of how many spares would be needed if multiple systems started exhibiting wear-out characteristics simultaneously. The goal was also to determine which parts would be most likely to do so. In order to do this, my duties were to take historical data of operational times and failure times of these ORU's and use them to build predictive models of failure using probability distribution functions, mainly the Weibull distribution. Then, I ran Monte Carlo Simulations to see how an entire population of these components would perform. From here, my final duty was to vary the wear-out characteristic from the intrinsic value, to extremely high wear-out values and determine how much the probability of sufficiency of the population would shift. This was done for around 30 different ORU populations on board the ISS.

  15. Healthy Contact Lens Wear and Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Jennifer Cope explains some basic steps for proper wear and care of soft contact lenses.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/4/2014.

  16. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth); Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  17. Effective tool wear estimation through multisensory information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On-line tool wear monitoring plays a significant role in industrial automation for higher productivity and product quality. In addition, an intelligent system is required to make a timely decision for tool change in machining systems in order to avoid the subsequent consequences on the dimensional accuracy and surface finish ...

  18. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  19. Sliding wear resistance of iron aluminides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    severe wear and erosion applications include cobalt- based alloys, high manganese stainless steels, and other chromium containing alloys. There is considerable inte- rest in replacing cobalt-based alloys for erosion resistance in nuclear power applications because of the problems with exposure of maintenance workers to ...

  20. Lubrication And Wear Of Hot Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Deadmore, D.; Miyoshi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of experiments on tribological properties of ceramics. Describes friction and wear characteristics of some ceramics under consideration for use in gas turbines, diesel engines, and Stirling engines. Discusses formulation of composite plasma-sprayed ceramics containing solid lubricant additives, and data for carbide- and oxide-based composite coatings for use at temperatures up to at least 900 degree C.