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Sample records for tonic immobility reaction

  1. Tonic immobility during sexual assault - a common reaction predicting post-traumatic stress disorder and severe depression.

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    Möller, Anna; Söndergaard, Hans Peter; Helström, Lotti

    2017-08-01

    Active resistance is considered to be the 'normal' reaction during rape. However, studies have indicated that similar to animals, humans exposed to extreme threat may react with a state of involuntary, temporary motor inhibition known as tonic immobility. The aim of the present study was to assess the occurrence of tonic immobility during rape and subsequent post-traumatic stress disorder and severe depression. Tonic immobility at the time of the assault was assessed using the Tonic Immobility Scale in 298 women who had visited the Emergency clinic for raped women within 1 month of a sexual assault. Information about the assault and the victim characteristics were taken from the structured clinical data files. After 6 months, 189 women were assessed regarding the development of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Of the 298 women, 70% reported significant tonic immobility and 48% reported extreme tonic immobility during the assault. Tonic immobility was associated with the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (OR 2.75; 95% CI 1.50-5.03, p = 0.001) and severe depression (OR 3.42; 95% CI 1.51-7.72, p = 0.003) at 6 months. Further, previous trauma history (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.48-3.77, p stress disorder and severe depression. Knowledge of this reaction in sexual assault victims is important in legal matters and for healthcare follow up. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Tonic immobility differentiates stress responses in PTSD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fragkaki, I; Stins, J.F.; Roelofs, K.; Jongedijk, R.A.; Hagenaars, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tonic immobility (TI) is a state of physical immobility associated with extreme stress and the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is unknown whether TI is associated with a distinct actual stress response, i.e., objective immobility measured by a

  3. Predictors of tonic immobility during traumatic events

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    Arturo Bados

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tonic immobility (TI is a possible reaction to danger that is facilitated by intense fear, physical restraint and perceived inability to escape. Other variables that could affect TI, such as the type and characteristics of traumatic events and personal characteristics have been little or no studied. The present study evaluated the power of these variables to predict TI in a sample of 273 college students who had experienced at least one traumatic event. Of the sample, 7.7% and 13.2% responded with TI according to the two stricter definitions adopted. Most of the variables were significantly associated with TI in univariate analyses. However, in a multiple regression analysis, only certain features of the events (occurrence of physical/sexual abuse, number of different types of events experienced and certain reactions to them (perception of how traumatic were the events, severe fear response were significant predictors of TI. Since these predictors explained only 25% of the variance, the influence of other variables -such as neuroticism, negative affectivity and perceived lack of personal control or resources to cope with traumatic events- should be investigated.

  4. Tonic immobility differentiates stress responses in PTSD.

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    Fragkaki, Iro; Stins, John; Roelofs, Karin; Jongedijk, Ruud A; Hagenaars, Muriel A

    2016-11-01

    Tonic immobility (TI) is a state of physical immobility associated with extreme stress and the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is unknown whether TI is associated with a distinct actual stress response, i.e., objective immobility measured by a stabilometric platform. This study made a first step in exploring this as well as differences in body sway responses between PTSD patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that PTSD would be related to increased body sway under stress, whereas TI would be related to decreased body sway under stress. Eye closure was selected as a PTSD-relevant stress induction procedure. Body sway and heart rate (HR) were measured in 12 PTSD patients and 12 healthy controls in four conditions: (1) maintaining a stable stance with eyes open, (2) with eyes closed, (3) during a mental arithmetic task with eyes open, and (4) with eyes closed. As predicted, PTSD patients showed increased body sway from eyes open to eyes closed compared to controls and this effect was eliminated by executing the arithmetic task. Most importantly, retrospective self-reported TI was associated with lower body sway increases in PTSD and higher body sway decreases in controls from eyes-open to eyes-closed conditions. These preliminary findings suggest that eye closure has a different effect on PTSD patients than controls and that high self-reported TI might indicate a distinct stress response pattern, i.e., a proneness for immobility. It may be relevant to take such individual differences in stress-response into account in PTSD treatment.

  5. Tonic immobility and factors influencing its duration in rats.

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    Tikal, K

    1991-01-01

    The author developed a method for inducing tonic immobility (paroxysmal inhibition) in rats and mice. By means of a plexiglass plate and plexiglass box the rat is immobilised, rotated at 180 degrees and subjected to constant pressure corresponding to the weight of the plexiglass plate. This way it is possible to prolong substantially tonic immobility in rats without using foregoing time consuming and interfering, so called sensitizing procedures. The duration of TI can be influenced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacological interventions. A longer duration of TI appeared to be typical for rats tending to react in other situations with anxiety, motor inhibition and submission.

  6. Peritraumatic tonic immobility is associated with PTSD symptom severity in Brazilian police officers: a prospective study

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    Deborah B. Maia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peritraumatic reactions feature prominently among the main predictors for development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Peritraumatic tonic immobility (PTI, a less investigated but equally important type of peritraumatic response, has been recently attracting the attention of researchers and clinicians for its close association with traumatic reactions and PTSD. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTI, peritraumatic panic, and dissociation as predictors of PTSD symptoms in a cohort of police recruits (n=132. Methods: Participants were asked to complete the following questionnaires during academy training and after the first year of work: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version (PCL-C, Physical Reactions Subscale (PRS, Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ, Tonic Immobility Scale (TIS, and Critical Incident History Questionnaire. Results: Employing a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model, we found that each additional point in the TIS was associated with a 9% increment in PCL-C mean scores (RM = 1.09, whereas for PRS, the increment was 7% (RM = 1.07. As the severity of peritraumatic dissociation increased one point in the PDEQ, the chance of having at least one symptom in the PCL-C increased 22% (OR = 1.22. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the need to expand investigation on the incidence and impact of PTI on the mental health of police officers.

  7. Peritraumatic tonic immobility is associated with PTSD symptom severity in Brazilian police officers: a prospective study.

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    Maia, Deborah B; Nóbrega, Augusta; Marques-Portella, Carla; Mendlowicz, Mauro V; Volchan, Eliane; Coutinho, Evandro S; Figueira, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Peritraumatic reactions feature prominently among the main predictors for development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Peritraumatic tonic immobility (PTI), a less investigated but equally important type of peritraumatic response, has been recently attracting the attention of researchers and clinicians for its close association with traumatic reactions and PTSD. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTI, peritraumatic panic, and dissociation as predictors of PTSD symptoms in a cohort of police recruits (n=132). Participants were asked to complete the following questionnaires during academy training and after the first year of work: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version (PCL-C), Physical Reactions Subscale (PRS), Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ), Tonic Immobility Scale (TIS), and Critical Incident History Questionnaire. Employing a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model, we found that each additional point in the TIS was associated with a 9% increment in PCL-C mean scores (RM = 1.09), whereas for PRS, the increment was 7% (RM = 1.07). As the severity of peritraumatic dissociation increased one point in the PDEQ, the chance of having at least one symptom in the PCL-C increased 22% (OR = 1.22). Our findings highlight the need to expand investigation on the incidence and impact of PTI on the mental health of police officers.

  8. Immobility reaction at birth in newborn infant.

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    Rousseau, Pierre Victor; Francotte, Jacques; Fabbricatore, Maria; Frischen, Caroline; Duchateau, Delphine; Perin, Marie; Gauthier, Jean-Marie; Lahaye, Willy

    2014-08-01

    To describe an immobility reaction (IR) that was not previously reported at or immediately after birth in human newborns. We analyzed 31 videos of normal term vaginal deliveries recorded from Time 0 of birth defined as the as the moment that lies between the birth of the thorax and the pelvis of the infant. We searched for perinatal factors associated with newborn's IR. IR at birth was observed in 8 of the 31 newborns. The main features of their behavior were immobilization, frozen face, shallow breathing and bradycardia. One of the 8 newborns had sudden collapse 2h after birth. We found significant relationships between maternal prenatal stress (PS) and IR (p=.037), and a close to significant one between infants' lividness at Time 0 and IR (p=.053). The first breath of the 31 newborns occurred before and was not associated with the first cry (psyndrome. This first report of an IR reaction at birth in human infants could open up new paths for improving early neonatal care. Further research is needed for maternal PS, stress hormones, umbilical cord blood pH measurements in IR newborns. The challenge of education and support for parents of IR newborns is outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Feeling psychologically restrained: the effect of social exclusion on tonic immobility

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    Nora Mooren

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: A variety of studies have demonstrated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms in victims of bullying. Because bullying with only relational aggression, such as social exclusion, does not involve physical aggression that could explain PTSD symptoms, it remains unclear why these relational aggression situations are also linked to PTSD symptoms. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the fear-response tonic immobility (Ti can occur during social exclusion. Since Ti, as an indicator of peritraumatic dissociation, is an important predictor of PTSD symptoms, we expected that the presence of Ti during social exclusion might contribute to possible explanations of PTSD symptoms in victims of relational aggression. Method: Social exclusion was manipulated by a virtual Cyberball game in which participants were excluded and included by virtual confederates. During the game, Ti was measured, both physiologically (heart rate and psychologically (subjective symptoms. Also, the underlying concepts of Ti, high levels of fear and psychological restraint (threatened sense of control, were measured. Results: Excluded participants experienced higher levels of subjective and physiological Ti symptoms (lower heart rates in comparison to social inclusion. Also, as expected, social exclusion resulted in higher levels of fear and psychological restraint in comparison to social inclusion. Conclusion: Social exclusion can evoke symptoms of Ti, fear, and psychological restraint, which might be important mechanisms to consider in explaining PTSD symptoms after relational forms of bullying in the absence of physical aggression. Limitations: The sample only contains healthy, female participants. Whether our results translate to bullying victims of relational aggression is therefore not known. Also, the physiological measurement of Ti (average heart rate was rather limited and could be expanded in future studies.

  10. The mesencephalic GCt-ICo complex and tonic immobility in pigeons (Columba livia): a c-Fos study.

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    Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Lino-de-Oliveira, C; Marino-Neto, J

    2017-04-01

    Tonic immobility (TI) is a response to a predator attack, or other inescapable danger, characterized by immobility, analgesia and unresponsiveness to external stimuli. In mammals, the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and deep tectal regions control the expression of TI as well as other defensive behaviors. In birds, little is known about the mesencephalic circuitry involved in the control of TI. Here, adult pigeons (both sex, n = 4/group), randomly assigned to non-handled, handled or TI groups, were killed 90 min after manipulations and the brains processed for detection of c-Fos immunoreactive cells (c-Fos-ir, marker for neural activity) in the mesencephalic central gray (GCt) and the adjacent nucleus intercollicularis (ICo). The NADPH-diaphorase staining delineated the boundaries of the sub nuclei in the ICo-GCt complex. Compared to non-handled, TI (but not handling) induced c-Fos-ir in NADPH-diaphorase-rich and -poor regions. After TI, the number of c-Fos-ir increased in the caudal and intermediate areas of the ICo (but not in the GCt), throughout the rostrocaudal axis of the dorsal stratum griseum periventriculare (SGPd) of the optic tectum and in the n. mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd), which is part of the ascending auditory pathway. These data suggest that inescapable threatening stimuli such as TI may recruit neurons in discrete areas of ICo-GCt complex, deep tectal layer and in ascending auditory circuits that may control the expression of defensive behaviors in pigeons. Additionally, data indicate that the contiguous deep tectal SCPd (but not GCt) in birds may be functionally comparable to the mammalian dorsal PAG.

  11. Correlation between the duration of perphenazine catalepsy and pressure maintained tonic immobility under the influence of beta-sympathotropic agents.

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    Tikal, K

    1989-10-01

    In rats the effect of i.p. applied beta-adrenomimetic isoprenaline (ISO) 0.4 mg/kg, sulbutamol (SAL) 2mg/kg, beta-adrenoblocker propranolol (PRO) 2 mg/kg and metipranolol (MET) 4 mg/kg on the duration of perphenazine-induced catalepsy (CAT) and pressure-maintained tonic immobility (TI) was studied. It appeared that a mild constant pressure on the rat body permitted to measure the length of duration of TI in adult rats. The time course of changes in the duration of CAT and TI was repeatedly measured in one-hour intervals with different results. While ISO had no effect on the duration of CAT, SAL prolonged it. Both beta-symathomimetic compounds prolonged the duration of TI. PRO and MET shortened the duration of CAT. PRO did not influence, MET failed in the first phase but in the second phase it significantly prolonged TI duration. In spite of a certain affinity of both phenomena the two, that is, CAT and TI were not parallely influenced by the betasympathotropic agents used.

  12. Effect of genotype and transport on tonic immobility and heterophil/lymphocyte ratio in two local Italian breeds and Isa Brown hens kept under free-range conditions

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    Michele De Marco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of transport and genotype on the welfare and fear response of laying hens through a comparison of three breeds reared in free-range conditions: a commercial strain, the Isa Brown (IBh, and two local chicken breeds, the Bionda Piemontese (BPh and the Bianca di Saluzzo (BSh. After a journey of 67 km (75 min from the farmhouse of origin to the experimental station, ninety hens, divided according to breed, were free-range reared for two months. Body weight (BW, tonic immobility (TI, red and white blood cells, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L ratio and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP were assessed at four different sampling times: at the farmhouse of origin (T1, at 1 day (T2, 15 days (T3 and at 2 months (T4 after arrival at the experimental station. No statistical differences were found between the four sampling times for BW, total red and white blood parameters. cells or for AGP. An increase in the H/L ratio (P<0.05 was recorded at time T2 for IBh and BSh, compared to BPh (P<0.05. TI was significantly higher (P<0.05 for the local breeds, BPh and BSh, than for the commercial strain IBh. The results of this study suggest that genetic and adaptive differences can affect both, physiological and ethological parameters.

  13. Peritraumatic tonic immobility is associated with posttraumatic stress symptoms in undergraduate Brazilian students A imobilidade tônica peritraumática está associada aos sintomas do transtorno de estresse pós-traumático em estudantes brasileiros de graduação

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    Liana Catarina L Portugal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tonic immobility is a defensive reaction occurring under extreme life threats. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD reporting peritraumatic tonic immobility show the most severe symptoms and a poorer response to treatment. This study investigated the predictive falue of tonic immobility for posttraumatic stress symptoms in a non-clinical sample. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-eight college students exposed to various life threatening events were selected to participate. The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version (PCL-C and tonic immobility questions were used. Linear regression models were fitted to investigate the association between peritraumatic tonic immobility and PCL-C scores. Peritraumatic dissociation, peritraumatic panic reactions, negative affect, gender, type of trauma, and time since trauma were considered as confounding variables. RESULTS: We found significant association between peritraumatic tonic immobility and PTSD symptoms in a non-clinical sample exposed to various traumas, even after regression controlled for confounding variables (β = 1.99, p = 0.017. CONCLUSIONS: This automatic reaction under extreme life threatening stress, although adaptive for defense, may have pathological consequences as implied by its association with PTSD symptoms.OBJETIVO: A imobilidade tônica é uma resposta defensiva que ocorre sob ameaça extrema à vida. Pacientes com transtorno de estresse pós-traumático (TEPT que relatam imobilidade tônica peritraumática são os que apresentam os sintomas mais graves e a pior resposta ao tratamento. Este estudo investigou o valor preditivo da imobilidade tônica para os sintomas de TEPT em uma amostra não clínica. MÉTODOS: Os participantes da pesquisa foram 198 estudantes universitários expostos a traumas diversos. A versão brasileira do Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Civilian Version (PCL-C e questões referentes à imobilidade tônica foram

  14. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from the basolateral or central amygdala increases the tonic immobility response in guinea pigs: an innate fear behavior.

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    Donatti, Alberto Ferreira; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade

    2011-11-20

    The tonic immobility (TI) behavior is an innate response associated with extreme threat situations such as a predator attack. Several studies have provided evidence suggesting an important role for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the regulation of the endocrine system, defensive behaviors and behavioral responses to stress. TI has been shown to be positively correlated with the basal plasma levels of corticosterone. CRF receptors and neurons that are immunoreactive to CRF are found in many cerebral regions, especially in the amygdaloid complex. Previous reports have demonstrated the involvement of the basolateral amygdaloid (BLA) and central amygdaloid (CeA) nuclei in the TI response. In this study, we evaluated the CRF system of the BLA and the CeA in the modulation of the TI response in guinea pigs. The activation of CRF receptors in the BLA and in the CeA promoted an increase in the TI response. In contrast, the inhibition of these receptors via alpha-helical-CRF(9-41) decreased the duration of the TI response. Moreover, neither the activation nor inhibition of CRF receptors in the BLA or the CeA altered spontaneous motor activity in the open-field test. These data suggest that the activation of the CRF receptors in the BLA or the CeA probably potentiates fear and anxiety, which may be one of the factors that promote an increase in the TI behavior. Therefore, these data support the role of the CRF system in the control of emotional responses, particularly in the modulation of innate fear. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating the Self-Protective Potential of Immobility in Victims of Rape.

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    de Heer, Brooke A; Jones, Lynn C

    2017-04-01

    Using a nationwide sample of reported rape cases collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI; 389 victims; 89% stranger rapes), this study investigates assumptions about self-protective behaviors for rape victims. Past research on victim resistance strategies often specifies active resistance as self-protective, inadvertently underestimating the potential for biologically based reactions, such as tonic immobility, to be self-protective as well. Results confirm that rape victims who were verbally and physically immobile during the attack were less likely to be injured and have force used against them. In addition, victims who were verbally immobile suffered a less severe attack. The results indicate that immobility may protect the victim from increased injury, force, and severity of the attack. Implications for the legal and public definition of consent are discussed.

  16. Arthur Simons (1877-1942) and Tonic Neck Reflexes With Hemiplegic "Mitbewegungen" (Associated Reactions): Cinematography From 1916-1919.

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    Holdorff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Tonic neck reflexes were investigated by Rudolf Magnus and Adriaan de Kleijn in animals and men in 1912 and eventually by Arthur Simons, a neurologist in Berlin and coworker of Hermann Oppenheim. Simons studied these reflexes in hemiplegic patients, who were mainly victims of World War I. This work became his most important contribution and remained unsurpassed for many years. The film (Filmarchiv, Bundesarchiv [Film Archive, National Archive] Berlin) with Simons as an examiner shows 11 war casualties with brain lesions that occurred between 1916 and 1919. The injuries reveal asymmetric neck reflexes with "Mitbewegungen," that is, flexion or extension on the hemiplegic side. Mitbewegungen is identical with Francis Walshe's "associated reactions" caused by neck rotation and/or by cocontraction of the nonaffected extremities, for example, by closing of the fist (Walshe). The knowledge of the neck reflexes is important in acute neurology and in rehabilitation therapy of hemiplegics for antispastic positions. Simons' investigations were conducted in the early era of increasing use of cinematography in medical studies. The film had been nearly forgotten until its rediscovery in 2010.

  17. Recalled Peritraumatic Reactions, Self-Reported PTSD, and the Impact of Malingering and Fantasy Proneness in Victims of Interpersonal Violence Who Have Applied for State Compensation

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    Kunst, Maarten; Winkel, Frans Willem; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the associations between three types of peritraumatic reactions (dissociation, distress, and tonic immobility) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of 125 victims of interpersonal violence who had applied for compensation with the Dutch Victim Compensation Fund (DCVF). In addition, the…

  18. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

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    ... tonic-clonic seizures have vision, taste, smell, or sensory changes, hallucinations, or dizziness before the seizure. This ... longer (called the post-ictal state) Loss of memory (amnesia) about the seizure episode Headache Weakness of ...

  19. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

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    Ahmad K. Rahal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI. After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  20. Sarcoidosis Presenting as Bilateral Vocal Fold Immobility.

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    Hintze, Justin M; Gnagi, Sharon H; Lott, David G

    2018-05-01

    Bilateral true vocal fold paralysis is rarely attributable to inflammatory diseases. Sarcoidosis is a rare but important etiology of bilateral true vocal fold paralysis by compressive lymphadenopathy, granulomatous infiltration, and neural involvement. We describe the first reported case of sarcoidosis presenting as bilateral vocal fold immobility caused by direct fixation by granulomatous infiltration severe enough to necessitate tracheostomy insertion. In addition, we discuss the presentation, the pathophysiology, and the treatment of this disease with a review of the literature of previously reported cases of sarcoidosis-related vocal fold immobility. Sarcoidosis should therefore be an important consideration for the otolaryngologist's differential diagnosis of true vocal fold immobility. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The impact of luminance on tonic and phasic pupillary responses to sustained cognitive load.

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    Peysakhovich, Vsevolod; Vachon, François; Dehais, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Pupillary reactions independent of light conditions have been linked to cognition for a long time. However, the light conditions can impact the cognitive pupillary reaction. Previous studies underlined the impact of luminance on pupillary reaction, but it is still unclear how luminance modulates the sustained and transient components of pupillary reaction - tonic pupil diameter and phasic pupil response. In the present study, we investigated the impact of the luminance on these two components under sustained cognitive load. Fourteen participants performed a novel working memory task combining mathematical computations with a classic n-back task. We studied both tonic pupil diameter and phasic pupil response under low (1-back) and high (2-back) working memory load and two luminance levels (gray and white). We found that the impact of working memory load on the tonic pupil diameter was modulated by the level of luminance, the increase in tonic pupil diameter with the load being larger under lower luminance. In contrast, the smaller phasic pupil response found under high load remained unaffected by luminance. These results showed that luminance impacts the cognitive pupillary reaction - tonic pupil diameter (phasic pupil response) being modulated under sustained (respectively, transient) cognitive load. These findings also support the relationship between the locus-coeruleus system, presumably functioning in two firing modes - tonic and phasic - and the pupil diameter. We suggest that the tonic pupil diameter tracks the tonic activity of the locus-coeruleus while phasic pupil response reflects its phasic activity. Besides, the designed novel cognitive paradigm allows the simultaneous manipulation of sustained and transient components of the cognitive load and is useful for dissociating the effects on the tonic pupil diameter and phasic pupil response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-6 on cataleptic immobility and locomotor activity in mice.

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    Bazovkina, Daria V; Tibeikina, Marina A; Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2011-01-10

    Catalepsy (animal hypnosis, tonic immobility) is a type of passive defensive behavior. Its exaggerated form is a syndrome of some psychopathological disorders. Numerous neurotransmitters have impact on the regulation of catalepsy. In this paper we demonstrated the involvement of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the mechanism of cataleptic immobility. Effects of exogenous IL-6 treatment (7.5 and 10μg/kg, i.p) or stimulation of endogenous IL-6 secretion with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration (50, 100 and 200μg/kg, i.p.) on catalepsy and locomotor activity were studied in adult C57BL/6 male mice. IL-6 induced catalepsy in 70% (7.5μg/kg) or 72.7% (10μg/kg) of animals with no effect on locomotor activity. LPS administration reduced distance travelled and number of rears in the open field at any dose used, however, only high doses (100 or 200μg/kg) of the toxin induced catalepsy in 50% of mice. This result indicates that IL-6 is involved in the regulation of catalepsy, this effect is specific and does not arise from inhibition of locomotor activity. The study provides a new evidence on participation of IL-6 in mechanisms of abnormal behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Incidence of vocal fold immobility in patients with dysphagia.

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    Leder, Steven B; Ross, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    This study prospectively investigated the incidence of vocal fold immobility, unilateral and bilateral, and its influence on aspiration status in a referred population of 1452 patients for a dysphagia evaluation from a large, urban, tertiary-care, teaching hospital. Main outcome measures included overall incidence of vocal fold immobility and aspiration status, with specific emphasis on age, etiology, and side of vocal fold immobility, i.e., right, left, or bilateral. Overall incidence of vocal fold immobility was 5.6% (81 of 1452 patients), including 47 males (mean age 55.7 yr) and 34 females (mean age 59.7 yr). In the subgroup of patients with vocal fold immobility, 31% (25 of 81) exhibited unilateral right, 60% (49 of 81) unilateral left, and 9% (7 of 81) bilateral impairment. Overall incidence of aspiration was found to be 29% (426 of 1452) of all patients referred for a swallow evaluation. Aspiration was observed in 44% (36 of 81) of patients presenting with vocal fold immobility, i.e., 44% (11 of 25) unilateral right, 43% (21 of 49) unilateral left, and 57% (4 of 7) bilateral vocal fold immobility. Left vocal fold immobility occurred most frequently due to surgical trauma. A liquid bolus was aspirated more often than a puree bolus. Side of vocal fold immobility and age were not factors that increased incidence of aspiration. In conclusion, vocal fold immobility, with an incidence of 5.6%, is not an uncommon finding in patients referred for a dysphagia evaluation in the acute-care setting, and vocal fold immobility, when present, was associated with a 15% increased incidence of aspiration when compared with a population already being evaluated for dysphagia.

  4. Glucocorticoid treatment, immobility, and constipation are associated with nutritional risk.

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    Gutzwiller, Jean-Pierre; Aschwanden, Josef; Iff, Samuel; Leuenberger, Michèle; Perrig, Martin; Stanga, Zeno

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis of this clinical study was to determine whether glucocorticoid use and immobility were associated with in-hospital nutritional risk. One hundred and one patients consecutively admitted to the medical wards were enrolled. Current medical conditions, symptoms, medical history, eating and drinking habits, diagnosis, laboratory findings, medications, and anthropometrics were recorded. The Nutrition Risk Score 2002 (NRS-2002) was used as a screening instrument to identify nutritional risk. The results confirmed that glucocorticoid use and immobility are independently associated with nutritional risk determined by the NRS-2002. Constipation could be determined as an additional cofactor independently associated with nutritional risk. Glucocorticoid treatment, immobility, and constipation are associated with nutritional risk in a mixed hospitalized population. The presence of long-time glucocorticoid use, immobility, or constipation should alert the clinician to check for nutritional status, which is an important factor in mortality and morbidity.

  5. Khamiras, a natural cardiac tonic: An overview

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    Sayeed Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Unani system of Medicine (Unanipathy, which originated in Greece, is based on the principles proposed by Galen, a Greek practitioner. Since then, many Arab and Persian scholars have contributed to the system. Among them Ibn-e-Sina, an Arab philosopher and Physicist who wrote ′Kitab-al-shifa′ are worth mentioning. This system has an extensive and inspiring record in India. It was introduced in India around the tenth century A.D with the spread of Islamic civilization. At present, Unanipathy has become an important part of the Indian system of Medicine. Unani medicines have been used since ancient times, as medicines for the treatment of various ailments. In spite of the great advances observed in modern medicine in recent decades, Unani drugs still make an important contribution to healthcare. The Unani system of medicine is matchless in treating chronic diseases like arthritis, asthma, mental, cardiac, and digestive disorders, urinary infections, and sexual diseases. The medicines administered go well with the temperament of the patient, thus speeding up the process of recovery and also reducing the risk of drug reaction. The Unani system of medicine recognizes the influence of the surroundings and ecological conditions on the state of health of human beings. The system aims at restoring the equilibrium of various elements and faculties of the human body. It has laid down six essential prerequisites for the prevention of diseases and places great emphasis, on the one hand, on the maintenance of proper ecological balance, and on the other, on keeping water, food, and air free from pollution. These essentials, known as ′Asbab-e-Sitta Zarooriya′, are air, food, and drink, bodily movement and repose, psychic movement and repose, sleep and wakefulness, and excretion and retention. The Unani system is a secular system in temperament and is popular among the masses. In Unani medicine, although the general preference is for single drugs

  6. Khamiras, a natural cardiac tonic: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sayeed; Rehman, Shabana; Ahmad, Aftab M; Siddiqui, Khalid M; Shaukat, Seemin; Khan, Masood Shah; Kamal, Y T; Jahangir, Tamanna

    2010-04-01

    The Unani system of Medicine (Unanipathy), which originated in Greece, is based on the principles proposed by Galen, a Greek practitioner. Since then, many Arab and Persian scholars have contributed to the system. Among them Ibn-e-Sina, an Arab philosopher and Physicist who wrote 'Kitab-al-shifa' are worth mentioning. This system has an extensive and inspiring record in India. It was introduced in India around the tenth century A.D with the spread of Islamic civilization. At present, Unanipathy has become an important part of the Indian system of Medicine. Unani medicines have been used since ancient times, as medicines for the treatment of various ailments. In spite of the great advances observed in modern medicine in recent decades, Unani drugs still make an important contribution to healthcare. The Unani system of medicine is matchless in treating chronic diseases like arthritis, asthma, mental, cardiac, and digestive disorders, urinary infections, and sexual diseases. The medicines administered go well with the temperament of the patient, thus speeding up the process of recovery and also reducing the risk of drug reaction. The Unani system of medicine recognizes the influence of the surroundings and ecological conditions on the state of health of human beings. The system aims at restoring the equilibrium of various elements and faculties of the human body. It has laid down six essential prerequisites for the prevention of diseases and places great emphasis, on the one hand, on the maintenance of proper ecological balance, and on the other, on keeping water, food, and air free from pollution. These essentials, known as 'Asbab-e-Sitta Zarooriya', are air, food, and drink, bodily movement and repose, psychic movement and repose, sleep and wakefulness, and excretion and retention. The Unani system is a secular system in temperament and is popular among the masses. In Unani medicine, although the general preference is for single drugs, compound formulations are also

  7. Glucocorticoids facilitate the retention of acquired immobility during forced swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Korte, C C; De Kloet, E R

    1985-01-01

    The adrenalectomy-induced decrease in the level of immobility during a 5 min retest period in the Porsolt swimming test could be reversed by glucocorticoids administered s.c. 15 min after the initial forced swimming exposure. The synthetic glucocorticoids dexamethasone and RU 28362 were active in

  8. The Choice of Sports Nutrition Tonics for Weight Lifters

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Chen

    2015-01-01

    The study selected sports tonics which can increase levels of anabolic hormones, promote synthesis of the protein in weightlifters’ bodies, improve proportion of energize of phosphagen system in weightlifting exercise. A theoretical analysis of the biological function for the sports tonics that weight lifters selected are carried. Results indicate that heme iron, lycopene and chromium and zinc (Zn) can be used as sports tonics for weight lifters, at the same time the effect will be better if ...

  9. Vocal Fold Immobility due to Birth Trauma: A Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Jad; North, Lauren M; Bougie, David; Robey, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Objectives To describe the present understanding of birth trauma-related vocal fold immobility and quantitatively compare it with idiopathic congenital vocal fold immobility to explore whether it is a discrete entity. Data Sources PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane databases. Review Methods English-language, observational, or experimental studies involving infants with idiopathic congenital or birth trauma-related vocal fold immobility were included. Data from these studies were pooled with our institution's vocal fold immobility database, with the resultant idiopathic congenital and birth trauma cohorts compared regarding patterns and outcomes of immobility. Results The search returned 288 articles, with 24 meeting inclusion criteria. Of studies reviewing all-cause immobility, 8 of 9 (88.9%) identified birth trauma as an etiology, although birth trauma definitions and proposed mechanisms of immobility varied. The study subjects, combined with our institution's database, yielded 188 idiopathic congenital and 113 birth trauma cases. Compared with idiopathic congenital cases, birth trauma cases had a higher proportion of unilateral immobility (72 of 113 [63.7%] vs 52 of 188 [27.7%], P vocal fold immobility warrant further investigation, these findings suggest that it is distinct from idiopathic congenital vocal fold immobility, with a unique presentation and potentially more favorable outcomes. This can inform counseling and management for infants with otherwise unexplained immobility but known birth trauma.

  10. Swallowing function in pediatric patients with bilateral vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeffrey; Tibbetts, Kathleen M; Wu, Derek; Nassar, Michel; Tan, Melin

    2017-02-01

    Infants with bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) often have poor swallow function in addition to potential airway compromise. While there are several reports on BVFI and its effect on patients' airway status, little is known about long term swallow function. We aim to characterize the swallowing function over time in pediatric patients with bilateral vocal fold immobility. A retrospective review of medical records of infants diagnosed with BVFI at a tertiary care children's hospital between 2005 and 2014 was conducted. Patient demographics, nature and etiology of immobility, laryngoscopy findings, comorbidities, and swallow outcomes at diagnosis and follow-up were recorded. Swallowing outcomes as measured by presence or absence of a gastrostomy tube were compared by etiology, vocal fold status, and normal or developmentally delay using the Fisher's exact test. 110 patients with a diagnosis of vocal fold immobility were identified. Twenty-nine (26%) had BVFI and twenty-three had complete medical records. Etiologies of vocal fold immobility include cardiac related in 13% (3/23), idiopathic in 30% (7/23) prolonged intubation in 26% (6/23) central neurologic in 22% (5/23), trauma in 4% (1/23), and infection in 4% (1/23). Average follow-up time was 44 months (range 5-94 months). Ten patients (56.5%) required a gastrostomy tube at time of diagnosis. Of this cohort who received gastrostomy tubes, three (30%) ultimately transitioned to complete oral feeds. Return of vocal fold mobility did not correlate with swallow function. In those with non-neurologic etiologies, the need for gastrostomy tube at end of follow up was unlikely. There was a statistically significant difference in the percentage of gastrostomy tube-free children at most recent follow up in patients who were normally developed (86%) versus those who were developmentally delayed (33%) (p = 0.02). We characterized the swallowing function of 23 pediatric patients with BVFI. Comorbidities are significant

  11. alpha2 adrenoceptors are involved in the regulation of the gripping-induced immobility episodes in taiep rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguibar, José R; Cortés, Ma Del Carmen; Valencia, Jaime; Arias-Montaño, José A

    2006-10-01

    In 1989 Holmgren et al. (Holmgren et al. 1989 Lab Anim Sci 39:226-228) described a new mutant rat that developed a progressive motor disturbance during its lifespan. The syndrome is characterized by a tremor in the hind limbs followed by ataxia, episodes of tonic immobility, epilepsy, and paralysis. The acronym of these symptoms (taiep) became the name of this autosomic, recessive mutant rat. The taiep rats are neurological mutant animals with a hypomyelination, followed by a progressive demyelination process. At 7-8 months of age, taiep rats develop immobility episodes (IEs) characterized by a cortical desynchronization, associated with the theta rhythm in the hippocampus and changes of the nucal electromyogram (EMG), whose pattern is like rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. These rats also show an altered sleep pattern with an equal REM sleep distribution. This study analyzed therole of alpha(2) adrenoceptors in the expression of gripping-induced IEs in 8-month-old male taiep rats. The alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and xylacine increased the frequency of gripping-induced IEs whereas the alpha(2) antagonists yohimbine and idazoxandecreased or prevented such episodes. These findings correlate with the pharmacological observations in narcoleptic dogs and humans in which alpha(2) adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the modulation of cataplexy. Unexpectedly, the repetitive administration of clonidine resulted in jumping behavior, indicative of phasic activation of extensor musculature. Taken together, our results show that alpha(2) adrenoceptors are involved in the modulation in gripping-induced IEs and after the administration of several doses of clonidine produced phasic motor activation.

  12. Context-Dependent Modulation of GABAAR-Mediated Tonic Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Bijal; Bright, Damian P; Mortensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Tonic GABA currents mediated by high-affinity extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, are increasingly recognized as important regulators of cell and neuronal network excitability. Dysfunctional GABAA receptor signaling that results in modified tonic GABA currents is associated with a number o...

  13. A comparative bear model for immobility-induced osteopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, P. E.; Vaughan, M. R.; Farley, S.; Matula, G. J. Jr; Convertino, V. A.; Matson, W. R.

    1998-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are seeking solutions to the human problem of osteopenia, or immobility-induced bone loss. Bears, during winter dormancy, appear uniquely exempted from the debilitating effects of immobility osteopenia. NIH and ESA, Inc. are creating a large database of metabolic information on human ambulatory and bedrest plasma samples for comparison with metabolic data obtained from bear plasma samples collected in different seasons. The database generated from NASA's HR113 human bedrest study showed a clear difference between plasma samples of ambulatory and immobile subjects through cluster analysis using compounds determined by high performance liquid chromatography with coulometric electrochemical array detection (HPLC-EC). We collected plasma samples from black bears (Ursus americanus) across 4 seasons and from 3 areas and subjected them to similar analysis, with particular attention to compounds that changed significantly in the NASA human study. We found seasonal differences in 28 known compounds and 33 unknown compounds. A final database contained 40 known and 120 unknown peaks that were reliably assayed in all bear and human samples; these were the primary data set for interspecies comparison. Six unidentified compounds changed significantly but differentially in wintering bears and immobile humans. The data are discussed in light of current theories regarding dormancy, starvation, and anabolic metabolism. Work is in progress by ESA Laboratories on a larger database to confirm these findings prior to a chemical isolation and identification effort. This research could lead to new pharmaceuticals or dietary interventions for the treatment of immobility osteopenia.

  14. The control of tonic pain by active relief learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suyi; Mano, Hiroaki; Lee, Michael; Yoshida, Wako; Kawato, Mitsuo; Robbins, Trevor W; Seymour, Ben

    2018-02-27

    Tonic pain after injury characterises a behavioural state that prioritises recovery. Although generally suppressing cognition and attention, tonic pain needs to allow effective relief learning to reduce the cause of the pain. Here, we describe a central learning circuit that supports learning of relief and concurrently suppresses the level of ongoing pain. We used computational modelling of behavioural, physiological and neuroimaging data in two experiments in which subjects learned to terminate tonic pain in static and dynamic escape-learning paradigms. In both studies, we show that active relief-seeking involves a reinforcement learning process manifest by error signals observed in the dorsal putamen. Critically, this system uses an uncertainty ('associability') signal detected in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex that both controls the relief learning rate, and endogenously and parametrically modulates the level of tonic pain. The results define a self-organising learning circuit that reduces ongoing pain when learning about potential relief. © 2018, Zhang et al.

  15. The control of tonic pain by active relief learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroaki; Lee, Michael; Yoshida, Wako; Kawato, Mitsuo; Robbins, Trevor W

    2018-01-01

    Tonic pain after injury characterises a behavioural state that prioritises recovery. Although generally suppressing cognition and attention, tonic pain needs to allow effective relief learning to reduce the cause of the pain. Here, we describe a central learning circuit that supports learning of relief and concurrently suppresses the level of ongoing pain. We used computational modelling of behavioural, physiological and neuroimaging data in two experiments in which subjects learned to terminate tonic pain in static and dynamic escape-learning paradigms. In both studies, we show that active relief-seeking involves a reinforcement learning process manifest by error signals observed in the dorsal putamen. Critically, this system uses an uncertainty (‘associability’) signal detected in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex that both controls the relief learning rate, and endogenously and parametrically modulates the level of tonic pain. The results define a self-organising learning circuit that reduces ongoing pain when learning about potential relief. PMID:29482716

  16. Renal physiology in elderly persons with severe immobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carlos; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Pangre, Norma; DiTrolio, Julio; Jauregui, Ricardo; De Miguel, Raul; Stefanidis, Ioanis; Imperiali, Nora; Algranati, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The immobility syndrome (IS) is a common condition in the elderly and consists of a reduction in the capacity to perform daily activities because of motor function deterioration. This syndrome leads to characteristic structural and physiological changes in the body, but renal physiology studies have not been conducted on this population. For this reason, we decided to study prospectively changes in renal function in these individuals. We enrolled into this study 17 volunteers over 64 years of age, all of whom lived in the same nursing home. The patients were divided into two groups: nine healthy mobile persons and eight others who suffered from severe IS. Exclusion criteria were the presence of any disease or use of any drug that could induce water and electrolytes alteration. Blood and urine samples were drawn to measure sodium, potassium, creatinine, urea, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and uric acid in order to obtain their fractional excretion. Plasma osmolality and vasopressin were also measured. Total body water and lean body mass were obtained by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Statistical analysis was performed applying Student's t-test (P = 0.01) and Pearson's correlation test. A significant difference in body water composition was found between the groups. Thus in the IS group plasma sodium level was slightly lower and total water content was significantly higher than in the mobile subjects: 140 +/- 5 vs. 143 +/- 1 mmol/l (P = 0.01); 61 +/- 8% vs. 50 +/- 10% (P immobility syndrome than in healthy mobile elderly. In contrast with the mobile group, for which there was a good positive correlation between plasma osmolality and plasma vasopressin, for individuals with IS there was no correlation between plasma osmolality and plasma vasopressin.

  17. Vocal fold immobility: a longitudinal analysis of etiology over 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Laura H Swibel; Benninger, Michael S; Deeb, Robert H

    2007-10-01

    To determine the current etiology of vocal fold immobility, identify changing trends over the last 20 years, and compare results to historical reports. The present study is a retrospective analysis of all patients seen within a tertiary care institution between 1996 and 2005 with vocal fold immobility. The results were combined with a previous study of patients within the same institution from 1985 through 1995. Results were compared to the literature. The medical records of all patients assigned a primary or additional diagnostic code for vocal cord paralysis were obtained from the electronic database. Eight hundred twenty-seven patients were available for analysis (435 from the most recent cohort), which is substantially larger than any reported series to date. Vocal fold immobility was most commonly associated with a surgical procedure (37%). Nonthyroid surgeries (66%), such as anterior cervical approaches to the spine and carotid endarterectomies, have surpassed thyroid surgery (33%) as the most common iatrogenic causes. These data represent a change from historical figures in which extralaryngeal malignancies were considered the major cause of unilateral immobility. Thyroidectomy continues to cause the majority (80%) of iatrogenic bilateral vocal fold immobility and 30% of all bilateral immobility. This 20-year longitudinal assessment revealed that the etiology of unilateral vocal fold immobility has changed such that there has been a shift from extralaryngeal malignancies to nonthyroid surgical procedures as the major cause. Thyroid surgery remains the most common cause of bilateral vocal fold immobility.

  18. Relationship between tonic and phasic craving for alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily E. Hartwell

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple measures are utilized to assess alcohol craving, often interchangeably. Little is known about the relationship between tonic and phasic craving. This study fills this gap in the literature by examining the association between tonic levels of alcohol craving and phasic craving for alcohol that is provoked by alcohol administration. Methods: Forty-three non-treatment seeking problem drinkers underwent an initial interview and two laboratory testing sessions, where either alcohol or a saline placebo was administered intravenously. Tonic craving was assessed via the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale (PACS and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS at the initial interview. Phasic craving was assessed during the laboratory sessions (i.e., alcohol and saline administrations, single blinded at baseline and at 3 subsequent breath alcohol concentrations (0.02, 0.04, and 0.06 g/dl. Results: There was a main effect of PACS in predicting phasic craving across both saline and alcohol administration conditions (p  0.10, predicted phasic craving during alcohol, as compared to saline administration. Conclusion: In sum, tonic craving captured by the OCDS was predictive of phasic craving during alcohol administration whereas the PACS more generally captured the increase in phasic craving. Therefore, these measures of tonic craving may function differently in capturing the experience of phasic craving. Implications for the utilization of the PACS and OCDS as well as assessments of craving in alcoholism research are discussed. Keywords: Alcohol, Craving, Assessment

  19. New Uses of Hawthorn Fruits in Tonic Wines Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andruţa Elena MUREŞAN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tonic wines are true natural elixirs, having the property to fortify the organism. To achieve a complex product and to supplement the antioxidant properties of the wine, the hawthorn fruits were added. They completed the product by maceration, so that the tonic wine got major active substances which have great medicinal value being effective in treating cardiovascular diseases. The content of polyphenols of tonic wine is about six times higher than in simple wine, the hawthorn representing a product rich in polyphenols (510.2 mg GAE/100g. Antioxidant capacity increased when hawthorn fruits were added, as they have an important contribution in terms of new product antioxidant properties. Hawthorn, honey and rosemary added extra minerals in the total dry extract. The relative density increased due to the substances present in hawthorn. The concentration of alcohol slightly increased due to the fermentation which triggers during maceration. The acidity of the new tonic wine developed here was higher, as compared to the simple wine. Higher acidity also contributed to the palatability, the new tonic wine showing a pleasant refreshing taste.

  20. GABA-independent GABAA Receptor Openings Maintain Tonic Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I.; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Herd, Murray B.; Kersanté, Flavie; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Linthorst, Astrid C.E.; Semyanov, Alexey; Belelli, Delia; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) produces two forms of inhibition: ‘phasic’ inhibition generated by the rapid, transient activation of synaptic GABAARs by presynaptic GABA release, and tonic inhibition generated by the persistent activation of peri- or extrasynaptic GABAARs which can detect extracellular GABA. Such tonic GABAAR-mediated currents are particularly evident in dentate granule cells in which they play a major role in regulating cell excitability. Here we show that in rat dentate granule cells in ex-vivo hippocampal slices, tonic currents are predominantly generated by GABA-independent GABAA receptor openings. This tonic GABAAR conductance is resistant to the competitive GABAAR antagonist SR95531, which at high concentrations acts as a partial agonist, but can be blocked by an open channel blocker picrotoxin. When slices are perfused with 200 nM GABA, a concentration that is comparable to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations but is twice that measured by us in the hippocampus in vivo using zero-net-flux microdialysis, negligible GABA is detected by dentate granule cells. Spontaneously opening GABAARs, therefore, maintain dentate granule cell tonic currents in the face of low extracellular GABA concentrations. PMID:23447601

  1. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding major immobility complications among bedridden patients: A prospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Xinmei; Cao, Jing; Li, Zheng; Wan, Xia; Li, Jiaqian; Jiao, Jing; Liu, Ge; Liu, Ying; Li, Fangfang; Song, Baoyun; Jin, Jingfen; Liu, Yilan; Wen, Xianxiu; Cheng, Shouzhen; Wu, Xinjuan

    2018-05-01

    To gain insight into nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding major immobility complications (pressure ulcers, pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis and urinary tract infections) and explore the correlation of nurses' knowledge and attitudes with the incidence of these complications. Immobility complications have adverse consequences, and effective management requires appropriate knowledge, attitudes and skills. Evidence about nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding immobility complications is lacking. Cross-sectional study. A total of 3,903 nurses and 21,333 bedridden patients from 25 hospitals in China were surveyed. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding major immobility complications were assessed using researcher-developed questionnaires. The content validity, reliability and internal consistency of the questionnaires were validated through expert review and a pilot study. The incidence of major immobility complications among bedridden patients from selected wards was surveyed by trained investigators. Correlations between knowledge, attitudes and the incidence of major immobility complications were evaluated with multilevel regression models. Mean knowledge scores were 64.07% for pressure ulcers, 72.92% for deep vein thrombosis, 76.54% for pneumonia and 83.30% for urinary tract infections. Mean attitude scores for these complications were 86.25%, 84.31%, 85.00% and 84.53%, respectively. Knowledge and attitude scores were significantly higher among nurses with older age, longer employment duration, higher education level, previous training experience and those working in tertiary hospitals or critical care units. Nurses' knowledge about pressure ulcers was negatively related to the incidence of pressure ulcers, and attitude towards pneumonia was negatively correlated with the incidence of pneumonia. Clinical nurses have relatively positive attitudes but inadequate knowledge regarding major immobility complications. Improved knowledge and attitudes regarding

  2. The effects of analgesics on central processing of tonic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lelic, Dina; Hansen, Tine M; Mark, Esben Bolvig

    2017-01-01

    to tonic pain is modified by oxycodone (opioid) and venlafaxine (SNRI). Methods Twenty healthy males were included in this randomized, cross-over, double-blinded study. 61-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded before and after five days of treatment with placebo, oxycodone (10 mg extended release......Introduction Opioids and antidepressants that inhibit serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (SNRI) are recognized as analgesics to treat moderate to severe pain, but the central mechanisms underlying their analgesia remain unclear. This study investigated how brain activity at rest and exposed...... b.i.d) or venlafaxine (37.5 mg extended release b.i.d) at rest and during tonic pain (hand immersed in 2 °C water for 80 s). Subjective pain and unpleasantness scores of tonic pain were recorded. Spectral analysis and sLORETA source localization were done in delta (1–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8...

  3. Resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia is associated with tonic positive emotionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oveis, Christopher; Cohen, Adam B; Gruber, June; Shiota, Michelle N; Haidt, Jonathan; Keltner, Dacher

    2009-04-01

    Resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSAREST) indexes important aspects of individual differences in emotionality. In the present investigation, the authors address whether RSAREST is associated with tonic positive or negative emotionality, and whether RSAREST relates to phasic emotional responding to discrete positive emotion-eliciting stimuli. Across an 8-month, multiassessment study of first-year university students (n = 80), individual differences in RSAREST were associated with positive but not negative tonic emotionality, assessed at the level of personality traits, long-term moods, the disposition toward optimism, and baseline reports of current emotional states. RSAREST was not related to increased positive emotion, or stimulus-specific emotion, in response to compassion-, awe-, or pride-inducing stimuli. These findings suggest that resting RSA indexes aspects of a person's tonic positive emotionality. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. [Case of acute pain of herpes zoster with preceding immobility of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Kimiko

    2012-07-01

    A 62-year-old-man treated for nephrotic syndrome with steroid developed acute pain of herpes zoster after immobility of the shoulder. Steroids might have suppressed the first symptoms of pain. But immobility probably appeared as VZV infection developing to spinal ventral root. Suprascapular nerve block was effective for severe pain of the right arm. Sympathetic nerve contained in suprascapular nerve might have been blocked. Sympathetically maintained pain may occur when primary afferent neurons are excited by inflammation due to VZV infection. Pain was abolished 17 weeks after the onset of rash using blocks three times and amitriptyrin and valproic acid. Immobility was resolved seven months after the onset of rash.

  5. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sigge N.; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done......, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain...

  6. Anti-dandruff Hair Tonic Containing Lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisripipat, Wannee; Lourith, Nattaya; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree

    2015-01-01

    Natural remedies for treating dandruff are becoming popular. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, split-head efficacy evaluation was conducted 30 Thai volunteers aged 20-60 years experiencing dandruff measured at level 3 on D-Squame® scale. An easy to use hair tonic containing essential oil of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) active against lipophilic yeasts was developed and then evaluated for efficacy and preference. The base formulation with the significantly highest preference (p lemongrass oil hair tonics with 5, 10, or 15% reduced dandruff significant (p lemongrass oil seems to be the most effective preparation. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. Lateralizing value of unilateral relative ictal immobility in patients with refractory focal seizures--Looking beyond unilateral automatisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Priya; Kaul, Bhavna; Shukla, Garima; Srivastava, Achal; Singh, Mamta Bhushan; Goyal, Vinay; Behari, Madhuri; Suri, Ashish; Gupta, Aditya; Garg, Ajay; Gaikwad, Shailesh; Bal, C S

    2015-12-01

    Ictal motor phenomena play a crucial role in the localization of seizure focus in the management of refractory focal epilepsy. While the importance of unilateral automatisms is well established, little attention is paid to the contralateral relatively immobile limb. In cases where automatisms mimic clonic or dystonic movements and in the absence of previously well-established signs, unilateral relative ictal immobility (RII) is potentially useful as a lateralizing sign. This study was carried out to examine the lateralizing value of this sign and to define its characteristics among patients of refractory focal epilepsy. VEEGs of 69 consecutive patients of refractory focal epilepsy who had undergone epilepsy surgery at our center over last four years were reviewed and analyzed for the presence of RII. Unilateral RII was defined as a paucity of movement in one limb lasting for at least 10s while the contralateral limb showed purposive or semi-purposive movements (in the absence of tonic or dystonic posturing or clonic movements in the involved limb). The findings were seen in the light of VEEG, radiological and nuclear imaging data, and with post-surgical outcome. Unilateral RII as a lateralizing sign was found in 24 of 69 patients (34.78%), consisting of both temporal and extra temporal epilepsy, with 100% concordance with VEEG and MRI data. All patients demonstrating this sign had a good post-surgical outcome. RII, when well characterized is a frequent and reliable lateralizing sign in patients of refractory focal epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting mortality and incident immobility in older Belgian men by characteristics related to sarcopenia and frailty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, C; Goemaere, S; De Buyser, S

    2018-01-01

    and bone mineral density scores were the most important predictors. INTRODUCTION: Machine learning principles were used to predict 5-year mortality and 3-year incident severe immobility in a population of older men by frailty and sarcopenia characteristics. METHODS: Using prospective data from 1997 on 264......There is an increasing awareness of sarcopenia in older people. We applied machine learning principles to predict mortality and incident immobility in older Belgian men through sarcopenia and frailty characteristics. Mortality could be predicted with good accuracy. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D...... the most important predictors of immobility. Sarcopenia assessed by lean mass estimates was relevant to mortality prediction but not immobility prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Using advanced statistical models and a machine learning approach 5-year mortality can be predicted with good accuracy using a Bayesian...

  9. SIT (seated immobility thromboembolism) syndrome: a 21st century lifestyle hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Richard; Heuser, Patricia; Raymond, Nigel

    2005-04-01

    The association between prolonged seated immobility and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is well recognised in relation to travel. In this case series, we report the occurrence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE) following prolonged sitting in relation to work and/or recreation. The cases were characterised by the considerable length of time the individuals sat, the extensive nature of the VTE events in young individuals without other recognised risk factors, and the lack of recognition by the attending doctors of seated immobility as the likely major risk factor. While recognising that the association may be coincidental rather than causal, we propose the acronym 'SIT' (seated immobility thromboembolism) syndrome to encompass all forms of seated immobility associated with VTE.

  10. Inhibition of Progesterone Metabolism Mimics the Effect of Progesterone Withdrawal on Forced Swim Test Immobility

    OpenAIRE

    Beckley, Ethan H.; Finn, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    Withdrawal from high levels of progesterone in rodents has been proposed as a model for premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Forced swim test (FST) immobility, used to model depression, was assessed in intact female DBA/2J mice following progesterone withdrawal (PWD) or treatment with the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Following 5 daily progesterone injections (5 mg/kg IP) FST immobility increased only in mice withdrawn for 3 days (p < .05). In another experiment, 3 days of PW...

  11. Vocal fold immobility and aspiration status: a direct replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Steven B; Suiter, Debra M; Duffey, Dianne; Judson, Benjamin L

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this direct replication study was to confirm the incidence of vocal fold immobility (VFI) and its relationship to pharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration. Using a single-group consecutively referred case series, a total of 2,650 participants underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing between August 2003 and December 2007. Main outcome measures included overall incidence of VFI and aspiration status, with specific emphasis on age, gender, etiology and pharyngeal phase bolus flow characteristics, and side of VFI (right, left, or bilateral). These data were compared to and then combined with the original study (n = 1,452) for a total of 4,102 participants. Results indicated that the incidence of VFI was 4.3% (112/2,650), i.e., 27% (31/112) unilateral right, 58% (65/112) unilateral left, and 14% (16/112) bilateral. Incidence of aspiration was 22% (580/2,650). Of those with VFI, 40% (45/112) aspirated, i.e., 42% (13/31) unilateral right, 37% (24/65) unilateral left, and 50% (8/16) bilateral. An individual with VFI had 2.50 times the odds of aspirating as someone without VFI (95% CI = 1.86-3.37). For liquid aspiration, the odds ratio (OR) = 2.41 (95% CI = 1.77-3.28), and for puree aspiration, OR = 2.08 (95% CI = 1.47-2.93). Left VFI occurred most frequently due to surgical trauma. Liquid was aspirated more often than a puree. Males exhibited VFI more often than females. Side of VFI and age were not factors that increased the incidence of aspiration significantly. It was confirmed that VFI is not an uncommon finding during dysphagia testing and, when present, increased the odds of aspiration compared to a population already being evaluated for dysphagia.

  12. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome increases immobility-induced neuromuscular weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Heidrun; Helming, Marc; Unterbuchner, Christoph; Lenz, Andrea; Neff, Frauke; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Blobner, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Inflammation and immobility are comorbid etiological factors inducing muscle weakness in critically ill patients. This study establishes a rat model to examine the effect of inflammation and immobilization alone and in combination on muscle contraction, histology, and acetylcholine receptor regulation. Prospective, randomized, experimental study. Animal laboratory of a university hospital. Sprague-Dawley rats. To produce systemic inflammation, rats (n = 34) received three consecutive intravenous injections of Corynebacterium parvum on days 0, 4, and 8. Control rats (n = 21) received saline. Both groups were further divided to have one hind limb either immobilized by pinning of knee and ankle joints or sham-immobilized (surgical leg). The contralateral nonsurgical leg of each animal served as control (nonsurgical leg). After 12 days, body weight and muscle mass were significantly reduced in all C. parvum animals compared with saline-injected rats. Immobilization led to local muscle atrophy. Normalized to muscle mass, tetanic contraction was reduced in the surgical leg after immobilization (7.64 +/- 1.91 N/g) and after inflammation (8.71 +/- 2.0 N/g; both p < .05 vs. sham immobilization and saline injection, 11.03 +/- 2.26 N/g). Histology showed an increase in inflammatory cells in all C. parvum-injected animals. Immobilization in combination with C. parvum injection had an additive effect on inflammation. Acetylcholine receptors were increased in immobilized muscles and in all muscles of C. parvum-injected animals. The muscle weakness in critically ill patients can be replicated in our novel rat model. Inflammation and immobilization independently lead to muscle weakness.

  13. Immobility, inheritance and plasticity of shape of the yeast nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrulis Erik D

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since S. cerevisiae undergoes closed mitosis, the nuclear envelope of the daughter nucleus is continuous with that of the maternal nucleus at anaphase. Nevertheless, several constitutents of the maternal nucleus are not present in the daughter nucleus. The present study aims to identify proteins which impact the shape of the yeast nucleus and to learn whether modifications of shape are passed on to the next mitotic generation. The Esc1p protein of S. cerevisiae localizes to the periphery of the nucleoplasm, can anchor chromatin, and has been implicated in targeted silencing both at telomeres and at HMR. Results Upon increased Esc1p expression, cell division continues and dramatic elaborations of the nuclear envelope extend into the cytoplasm. These "escapades" include nuclear pores and associate with the nucleolus, but exclude chromatin. Escapades are not inherited by daughter nuclei. This exclusion reflects their relative immobility, which we document in studies of prezygotes. Moreover, excess Esc1p affects the levels of multiple transcripts, not all of which originate at telomere-proximal loci. Unlike Esc1p and the colocalizing protein, Mlp1p, overexpression of selected proteins of the inner nuclear membrane is toxic. Conclusion Esc1p is the first non-membrane protein of the nuclear periphery which – like proteins of the nuclear lamina of higher eukaryotes – can modify the shape of the yeast nucleus. The elaborations of the nuclear envelope ("escapades" which appear upon induction of excess Esc1p are not inherited during mitotic growth. The lack of inheritance of such components could help sustain cell growth when parental nuclei have acquired potentially deleterious characteristics.

  14. Bitterness values for traditional tonic plants of southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, D K; van Wyk, B-E

    2013-06-03

    Bitterness values have been determined for southern African plant species that are traditionally used as tonics (imbizas or 'musa-pelo) to alleviate the symptoms of stress and a variety of ailments related to the digestive system. To measure and present, for the first time, the bitterness values of 15 of the best-known and most widely used tonic plants in southern Africa in order to find a rationale for their traditional use in improving appetite and treating digestive ailments. Most of the plants were found to be very bitter, with bitterness values comparable to those reported for internationally well-known bitter tonics such as Artemisia absynthium L. and Gentiana lutea L. The relatively high bitterness values obtained for all of the plants indicate that their alleged value in improving digestion and appetite may at least be partly ascribed to the bitter tonic (amarum) effect, i.e., the stimulation of gastric juices via the nervus vagus. It may be interesting to examine the chemical compounds responsible for the bitter taste, as well as the possible links between bitterness and the anecdotal anti-stress properties ascribed to these species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adie’s Tonic Pupil in Systemic Sclerosis: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare association of Adie’s tonic pupil in a patient with systemic sclerosis who was otherwise systemically stable. This paper is an effort to unravel whether the tonic pupil and systemic sclerosis are an association by chance (which may be the case or systemic sclerosis is the source of the tonic pupil.

  16. Relationship between adaptation and cardiovascular response to tonic cold and heat pain Adaptability to tonic pain and cardiovascular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoize, L; Chalaye, P; Lafrenaye, S; Marchand, S; Dallel, R

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of adaptation to tonic pain are not elucidated. We hypothesized that the adaptability to tonic pain is related to the cardiovascular system. Twenty-six subjects received over two sessions in a random order: tonic cold (7 ± 0.2 °C) and heat pain (47.5 ± 0.5 °C) on the hand for 5 min. Pain intensity, blood pressure (BP), and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. Pain experience during the heat (HIT) and cold (CIT) immersion tests exhibited different average time courses, being approximated with a linear and cubic function, respectively. In each test, two groups of participants could be identified based on the time course of their tonic thermal pain: one-third of participants were pain adaptive and two-thirds non adaptive. The adaptive group exhibited higher initial pain, lower last pain, and shorter latency to peak pain than the non-adaptive one. Interestingly, some participants were adaptive to both pain stimuli, most were not. HIT as well as CIT produced a stable elevation of BP. However, BP was higher during CIT than HIT (p = 0.034). HR was also increased during CIT and HIT, but the two tests differed with respect to the time course of responses. Finally, the intensity and time course of pain rating to both HIT and CIT correlated with neither BP nor HR responses. These results suggest that individual sensitivity and adaptability to tonic thermal pain is related to the intensity of initial pain rating and the latency to peak pain but not to cardiovascular responses. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  17. The immobility produced by intermittent swim stress is not mediated by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Rabbett, Sarah; Lyckland, Jennifer; Drugan, Robert C

    2008-05-01

    Exposure to uncontrollable stressors such as intermittent swim stress (ISS) produces a behavioral syndrome that resembles behavioral depression including immobility in a Forced Swim Test (FST) and escape learning deficits. The results of previous studies suggest that stress causes a temporary sensitization of the brain serotonin (5-HT) system that is necessary and sufficient for producing behavioral depression. If this hypothesis is true in the ISS paradigm, then enhancing or inhibiting 5-HT transmission during stress should exacerbate or block the development of behavioral depression, respectively. The selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) was administered prior to ISS or confinement; 24 h later the FST was used to detect behavioral immobility. ISS, but not FLX, significantly increased immobility in the FST. The purported 5-HT uptake enhancer tianeptine (TPT) was administered in place of FLX. Again ISS increased immobility in the FST, but TPT had no effect. These results suggested that 5-HT is not a critical mediator of ISS induced behavioral depression. However, some authors have raised concern that TPT does not act directly on 5-HT. Therefore, the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, para-chlorophenylaline (PCPA) was administered to deplete central 5-HT before stress. PCPA did not alter immobility in the FST. Finally, a sub-chronic regimen of FLX given after ISS, but before the FST, was without effect on reversing the ISS-induced immobility. Taken together, these experiments indicate that ISS produces a significant behavioral depression manifested as increased immobility but offer no support of the hypothesis that 5-HT is a critical mediator of these effects.

  18. [Evaluation of the primary caregiver syndrome when caring for elderly adults with immobility syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cariño, Elizabeth María; Jiménez-Herrera, Blanca L; Serrano-Miranda, Tirzo A

    2012-01-01

    Caregiver syndrome may develop in caregivers of elderly adults. To evaluate the repercussions of the immobility syndrome present in elderly adults on their primary caregivers as well as to determine the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of the elderly adult and caregiver. The study population included patients over 65 recruited in the Geriatric Rehabilitation Department, with the diagnosis of immobility syndrome and that required a primary caregiver. A questionnaire including socio-demographic variables was applied to all patients and caregivers, and the Zarit scale was also applied to caregivers in order to determine the presence of caregiver syndrome. Analysis was performed with descriptive statistical methods; Student's t test and Fisher's test were used for comparisons between strata. 75 patients and their caregivers were evaluated; patient average age was 75.9 years and 85.3% were female. 50.7% (38 cases) had mild immobility. The average caregiver's age was 50.6%, 70.7% were female and 57.3% were the patient's daughter. Caregiver syndrome was detected in 60% of them: 57.7% had mild symptoms and in 42.2%, symptoms were moderate to severe. No statistically significant association was established between the development of caregiver syndrome and the degree of patient immobility. Caregivers of patients with immobility syndrome are at high risk of developing caregiver syndrome, thus underscoring the need to include primary caregiver support programs.

  19. [Immobility syndrome in patients being care for in a home care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Pedrazuela, C; Lázaro del Nogal, M; Verdejo Bravo, C; Royuela Arte, T; Torrijos Torrijos, M; Ribera Casado, J M

    1995-10-01

    to asses in a group of elderly patients included in a Home Care Unit, the level of immobility, the functional status based on the Katz's index and the Red Cross scale, and their medical, psychological and social consequences. assessment of elderly patients visited during three consecutive months, through and standardized protocol with 14 items related with the previous aspects. 114 elderly patients (71% females) were visited during this time. The mean age was 82.4 years. 71 patients (65.7%) had immobility, with a mean age of 83.4 years and females predominance. Based on the level of immobility, 24 patients were in bed and 44 patients were able to be in bed-armchair. 74% of the patients were severely disabled on the activities daily living (Katz G); 85% of the patients had a severe physical disability (Red Cross scale 4-5), whereas a lower percentage (36%) had severe mental disability (Red Cross scale 4-5). Neurological disorders were the most frequent etiology of immobility (72%), with only one cause in 27 patients, two causes in 20 patients and more than three causes in 24 patients. Medical consequences were the most frequent, mainly urinary and chest infections, pressure sores and constipation. Immobility's syndrome represents a common medical problem in the geriatric care, related specially with the neurological and osteo-articular disorders, conditioning a high mobility.

  20. Role of tonic inhibition in associative reward conditioning in Lymnaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Marra

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the strength of excitatory synaptic connections are known to underlie associative memory formation in the molluscan nervous system but less is known about the role of synaptic inhibition. Tonic or maintained synaptic inhibition has an important function in controlling the Lymnaea feeding system and is known to suppress feeding in the absence of food or in satiated animals. Tonic inhibition to the feeding network is provided by the N3t interneuron that has inhibitory monosynaptic connection with the central pattern generator interneuron, the N1M. Here we asked whether a reduction in the level of tonic inhibition provided by the N3t cell could play a role in reward conditioning? Semi-intact preparations made from hungry snails were conditioned using a previously-developed one-trail chemical conditioning paradigm. We recorded electrical activity in a feeding motoneuron, the B3, at various time-points after conditioning. This allowed us to measure the frequency of spike activity in the N3t interneuron and monitor fictive feeding patterns that generate the rhythmic movements involved in food ingestion. We show that there is a reduction in N3t spiking at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours after conditioning but not at 10 minutes and 30 minutes and the reduction in N3t firing inversely correlates with an increase in the conditioned fictive feeding response. Computer simulation of N3t-N1M interactions suggests that changes in N3t firing are sufficient to explain the increase in the fictive feeding activity produced by conditioning. A network model is presented that summarizes evidence suggesting that reward conditioning in Lymnaea is due to the combined effects of reduced tonic inhibition and enhanced excitatory synaptic connections between the CS pathway and feeding command neurons.

  1. Inhibition of progesterone metabolism mimics the effect of progesterone withdrawal on forced swim test immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, Ethan H; Finn, Deborah A

    2007-10-01

    Withdrawal from high levels of progesterone in rodents has been proposed as a model for premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Forced swim test (FST) immobility, used to model depression, was assessed in intact female DBA/2J mice following progesterone withdrawal (PWD) or treatment with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Following 5 daily progesterone injections (5 mg/kg IP) FST immobility increased only in mice withdrawn for 3 days (pimmobility. PWD and finasteride treatment, both of which reduce allopregnanolone levels, were associated with increased FST immobility in female DBA/2J mice. These findings suggest that decreased levels of the GABAergic neurosteroid allopregnanolone contribute to symptoms of PWD. Future studies of PWD may provide information about human conditions that are associated with hormone changes such as premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression.

  2. Swimming immobility time decreased in prenatally x-irradiated microcephalic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Misako; Kiyono, Sigehiro; Shibagaki, Masamitsu

    1986-01-01

    Pregnant rats were X-irradiated (150 R) on gestation day 17, and the offspring were weaned at 21 days of age. After recording the spontaneous activity for one hour using Animex apparatus at 40 days of age, male offspring were tested for swimming immobility time on two consecutive days at 62 days of age. All X-irradiated pups were microcephalic, and their mean total brain weight was 78.5 % of the control group. Although no difference was found in spontaneous activity between the two groups, swimming immobility time was significantly shortened in the microcephalic group. The results suggest that the swimming immobility time is an indicator of adaptability to novel situation rather than an expression of helplessness, lowered mood or depressed state as originally proposed by Porsolt et al. (author)

  3. Changes of spontaneous oscillatory activity to tonic heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiwei; Hu, Li; Zhang, Zhiguo; Hu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Transient painful stimuli could induce suppression of alpha oscillatory activities and enhancement of gamma oscillatory activities that also could be greatly modulated by attention. Here, we attempted to characterize changes in cortical activities during tonic heat pain perception and investigated the influence of directed/distracted attention on these responses. We collected 5-minute long continuous Electroencephalography (EEG) data from 38 healthy volunteers during four conditions presented in a counterbalanced order: (A) resting condition; (B) innoxious-distracted condition; (C) noxious-distracted condition; (D) noxious-attended condition. The effects of tonic heat pain stimulation and selective attention on oscillatory activities were investigated by comparing the EEG power spectra among the four experimental conditions and assessing the relationship between spectral power difference and subjective pain intensity. The change of oscillatory activities in condition D was characterized by stable and persistent decrease of alpha oscillation power over contralateral-central electrodes and widespread increase of gamma oscillation power, which were even significantly correlated with subjective pain intensity. Since EEG responses in the alpha and gamma frequency band were affected by attention in different manners, they are likely related to different aspects of the multidimensional sensory experience of pain. The observed contralateral-central alpha suppression (conditions D vs. B and D vs. C) may reflect primarily a top-down cognitive process such as attention, while the widespread gamma enhancement (conditions D vs. A) may partly reflect tonic pain processing, representing the summary effects of bottom-up stimulus-related and top-down subject-driven cognitive processes.

  4. Changes of spontaneous oscillatory activity to tonic heat pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Peng

    Full Text Available Transient painful stimuli could induce suppression of alpha oscillatory activities and enhancement of gamma oscillatory activities that also could be greatly modulated by attention. Here, we attempted to characterize changes in cortical activities during tonic heat pain perception and investigated the influence of directed/distracted attention on these responses. We collected 5-minute long continuous Electroencephalography (EEG data from 38 healthy volunteers during four conditions presented in a counterbalanced order: (A resting condition; (B innoxious-distracted condition; (C noxious-distracted condition; (D noxious-attended condition. The effects of tonic heat pain stimulation and selective attention on oscillatory activities were investigated by comparing the EEG power spectra among the four experimental conditions and assessing the relationship between spectral power difference and subjective pain intensity. The change of oscillatory activities in condition D was characterized by stable and persistent decrease of alpha oscillation power over contralateral-central electrodes and widespread increase of gamma oscillation power, which were even significantly correlated with subjective pain intensity. Since EEG responses in the alpha and gamma frequency band were affected by attention in different manners, they are likely related to different aspects of the multidimensional sensory experience of pain. The observed contralateral-central alpha suppression (conditions D vs. B and D vs. C may reflect primarily a top-down cognitive process such as attention, while the widespread gamma enhancement (conditions D vs. A may partly reflect tonic pain processing, representing the summary effects of bottom-up stimulus-related and top-down subject-driven cognitive processes.

  5. Modulation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors by synaptic and tonic zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles T; Radford, Robert J; Zastrow, Melissa L; Zhang, Daniel Y; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Lippard, Stephen J; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-05-19

    Many excitatory synapses contain high levels of mobile zinc within glutamatergic vesicles. Although synaptic zinc and glutamate are coreleased, it is controversial whether zinc diffuses away from the release site or whether it remains bound to presynaptic membranes or proteins after its release. To study zinc transmission and quantify zinc levels, we required a high-affinity rapid zinc chelator as well as an extracellular ratiometric fluorescent zinc sensor. We demonstrate that tricine, considered a preferred chelator for studying the role of synaptic zinc, is unable to efficiently prevent zinc from binding low-nanomolar zinc-binding sites, such as the high-affinity zinc-binding site found in NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Here, we used ZX1, which has a 1 nM zinc dissociation constant and second-order rate constant for binding zinc that is 200-fold higher than those for tricine and CaEDTA. We find that synaptic zinc is phasically released during action potentials. In response to short trains of presynaptic stimulation, synaptic zinc diffuses beyond the synaptic cleft where it inhibits extrasynaptic NMDARs. During higher rates of presynaptic stimulation, released glutamate activates additional extrasynaptic NMDARs that are not reached by synaptically released zinc, but which are inhibited by ambient, tonic levels of nonsynaptic zinc. By performing a ratiometric evaluation of extracellular zinc levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, we determined the tonic zinc levels to be low nanomolar. These results demonstrate a physiological role for endogenous synaptic as well as tonic zinc in inhibiting extrasynaptic NMDARs and thereby fine tuning neuronal excitability and signaling.

  6. Modulation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors by synaptic and tonic zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles T.; Radford, Robert J.; Zastrow, Melissa L.; Zhang, Daniel Y.; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    Many excitatory synapses contain high levels of mobile zinc within glutamatergic vesicles. Although synaptic zinc and glutamate are coreleased, it is controversial whether zinc diffuses away from the release site or whether it remains bound to presynaptic membranes or proteins after its release. To study zinc transmission and quantify zinc levels, we required a high-affinity rapid zinc chelator as well as an extracellular ratiometric fluorescent zinc sensor. We demonstrate that tricine, considered a preferred chelator for studying the role of synaptic zinc, is unable to efficiently prevent zinc from binding low-nanomolar zinc-binding sites, such as the high-affinity zinc-binding site found in NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Here, we used ZX1, which has a 1 nM zinc dissociation constant and second-order rate constant for binding zinc that is 200-fold higher than those for tricine and CaEDTA. We find that synaptic zinc is phasically released during action potentials. In response to short trains of presynaptic stimulation, synaptic zinc diffuses beyond the synaptic cleft where it inhibits extrasynaptic NMDARs. During higher rates of presynaptic stimulation, released glutamate activates additional extrasynaptic NMDARs that are not reached by synaptically released zinc, but which are inhibited by ambient, tonic levels of nonsynaptic zinc. By performing a ratiometric evaluation of extracellular zinc levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, we determined the tonic zinc levels to be low nanomolar. These results demonstrate a physiological role for endogenous synaptic as well as tonic zinc in inhibiting extrasynaptic NMDARs and thereby fine tuning neuronal excitability and signaling. PMID:25947151

  7. Influence of phasic and tonic dopamine release on receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob Kristoffer Kisbye; Herrik, Kjartan F; Berg, Rune W

    2010-01-01

    Tonic and phasic dopamine release is implicated in learning, motivation, and motor functions. However, the relationship between spike patterns in dopaminergic neurons, the extracellular concentration of dopamine, and activation of dopamine receptors remains unresolved. In the present study, we...... develop a computational model of dopamine signaling that give insight into the relationship between the dynamics of release and occupancy of D(1) and D(2) receptors. The model is derived from first principles using experimental data. It has no free parameters and offers unbiased estimation...

  8. Antisense to the glucocorticoid receptor in hippocampal dentate gyrus reduces immobility in forced swim test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S.M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Buwalda, B; Bouman, S.D.; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    Immobility time of rats in the forced swim test was reduced after bilateral infusion of an 18-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide targeted to the glucocorticoid receptor mRNA into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Vehicle-, sense- and scrambled sequence-treated animals spent

  9. Preoperative immobility significantly impacts the risk of postoperative complications in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Rana M; Helm, Melissa; Gould, Jon C; Kindel, Tammy L

    2018-03-05

    Preoperative immobility in general surgery patients has been associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications. It is unknown if immobility affects bariatric surgery outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of immobility on 30-day postoperative bariatric surgery outcomes. This study took place at a university hospital in the United States. The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program 2015 data set was queried for primary minimally invasive bariatric procedures. Preoperative immobility was defined as limited ambulation most or all the time. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine if immobile patients are at increased risk (odds ratio [OR]) for 30-day complications. There were 148,710 primary minimally invasive bariatric procedures in 2015. Immobile patients had an increased risk of mortality (OR 4.59, Pbariatric surgery outcomes. Immobile patients have a significantly increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study provides an opportunity for the development of multiple quality initiatives to improve the safety and perioperative complication profile for immobile patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inpatient injection laryngoplasty for vocal fold immobility: When is it really necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Steven; Ebersole, Barbara; Jamal, Nausheen

    To compare pulmonary and swallow outcomes of injection laryngoplasty when performed in the acute versus subacute setting in head & neck and thoracic cancer patients presenting with new onset unilateral vocal fold immobility. Case series with chart review at an academic cancer center over a 2year period. Based on swallow evaluation, patients diagnosed with vocal fold immobility were grouped into an unsafe swallow group, injected as inpatients, and a safe swallow group, for whom injection laryngoplasty was delayed to the outpatient setting or not performed. Rates of pneumonia, diet recommendations, and swallow outcomes were compared between groups. 24 patients with new-onset vocal fold immobility were evaluated. 7 underwent injection in the inpatient setting, 12 in the outpatient setting, and 5 did not undergo injection. There was no perceived difference in speech and swallow outcomes between the inpatient and outpatient injection groups. Injection laryngoplasty shows promise as an effective intervention for reducing aspiration risk and improving diet normalcy in patients with dysphagia as a result of unilateral vocal fold immobility. In patients determined to have a safe swallow, delay of injection laryngoplasty is not detrimental to swallow outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Talkin' 'bout the ghetto: popular culture and urban imaginaries of immobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaffe, R.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the ghetto, referring to specifically urban experiences of sociospatial marginalization, has played a prominent role in black popular culture. This article explores the role of the ghetto as a discursive space of immobility and traces its global journey as a mobile imaginary. Focusing

  12. Circadian variation of the effects of immobility on symptoms of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Martin; Dumont, Marie; Paquet, Jean; Desautels, Alex; Fantini, Maria Livia; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2005-07-01

    It is now well established that symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) are worsened by immobility and that their severity fluctuates according to a circadian pattern with a maximum occurring in the late evening or during the night. However, no study has ever attempted to dissociate these two effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nycthemeral variations in the effects of duration of immobility on symptoms of RLS. A 28-hour modified constant routine protocol. Sleep Disorders Center, Montreal Sacré-Coeur Hospital. Seven patients with primary RLS (3 men, 4 women; mean age: 43.9 years) and seven controls matched for age (42.4 years) and gender. None. A 40-minute Suggested Immobilization Test (SIT) was repeated every 2 hours during the 28-hour protocol in order to quantify both subjective leg discomfort and periodic leg movements (PLM). Regarding leg discomfort, a two-way ANOVA performed on patients' data revealed a significant interaction (p = 0.037) between Time within the SIT and Time of day. Simple effect analyses performed to decompose the interaction showed that the increase in leg discomfort with duration of immobility was found only on SIT 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12, which corresponds to the period between 21:20 and 08:00. In addition, in patients, a significant circadian variation (p immobility is closely linked to their intrinsic circadian variation.

  13. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  14. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic–clonic epileptic seizures are defined as “sustained tonic” muscle contraction lasting a few seconds to minutes. Visual inspection of the surface electromyogram (EMG) during seizures contributed considerably to a better understanding and accurat...

  15. A Rare Case Report of Immobility-Induced Hypercalcemia in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Neha; Kaminski, Beth; MacLeish, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Immobility-induced hypercalcemia is a rare cause of hypercalcemia in children, and to our knowledge it has never been reported in an infant. Infants and children are in a state of high bone turnover. Therefore, they are prone to the imbalance of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity that occurs with prolonged immobilization, leading to hypercalcemia. Here we present the case of an infant with hypercalcemia who presented with fatigue, irritability, and failure to thrive after prolonged immobilization. Therapeutic interventions were conservative and included hydration and increased mobility leading to complete resolution. This case highlights the importance of including this rare entity in a differential diagnosis of hypercalcemia as well as screening postsurgical patients with prolonged immobility for hypercalcemia. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    OpenAIRE

    Gnagi, Sharon H.; Howard, Brittany E.; Hoxworth, Joseph M.; Lott, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding ...

  17. Serotonergic-postsynaptic receptors modulate gripping-induced immobility episodes in male taiep rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguibar, José R; Cortés, M C; Ita, M L

    2009-09-01

    The Taiep rat is a myelin mutant with a motor syndrome characterized by tremor, ataxia, immobility, epilepsy, and paralysis. The rat shows a hypomyelination followed by a progressive demyelination. During immobilities taiep rats show a REM-like sleep pattern and a disorganized sleep-wake pattern suggesting taiep rats as a model of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Our study analyzed the role of postsynaptic serotonin receptors in the expression of gripping-induced immobility episodes (IEs) in 8-month-old male taiep rats. The specific postsynaptic serotonin agonist +/-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (+/-DOI) decreased the frequency of gripping-induced IEs, but that was not the case with alpha-methyl-serotonin maleate (alpha-methyl-5HT), a nonspecific postsynaptic agonist. Although the serotonin antagonists, ketanserine and metergoline, produced a biphasic effect, first a decrease followed by an increase with higher doses, similar effects were obtained with a mean duration of gripping-induced IEs. These findings correlate with the pharmacological observations in narcoleptic dogs and humans in which serotonin-reuptake inhibitors improve cataplexy, particularly in long-term treatment that could change the serotonin receptor levels. Polysomnographic recordings showed an increase in the awakening time and a decrease in the slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep concomitant with a decrease in immobilities after use of +/-DOI, this being stronger with the highest dose. Taken together, our results show that postsynaptic serotonin receptors are involved in the modulation in gripping-induced IEs caused by the changes in the organization of the sleep-wake cycle in taiep rats. It is possible that specific agonists, without side effects, could be a useful treatment in human narcoleptic patients. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Vocal fold immobility from a primary minor salivary gland small-cell carcinoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert L; Wilson, Patrick A

    2009-02-01

    Small-cell carcinoma of a minor salivary gland is a rare and to the best of our knowledge previously unreported cause of vocal fold immobility. We describe the case of a 68-year-old woman who presented with hoarseness, dysphagia, and weight loss. Examination revealed left vocal fold immobility. She had no other obvious abnormality of the upper airway, neck, or skin. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 4-cm submucosal oropharyngeal mass with extension to the parapharyngeal space and involvement of the carotid sheath and the foramen ovale at the skull base; imaging also revealed cervical adenopathy. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy identified the mass as a small-cell carcinoma, a finding that was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Extensive tumor invasion and multiple comorbidities precluded an aggressive management strategy, and the patient was treated palliatively. She died of her disease shortly after her diagnosis. Vocal fold immobility of unknown etiology mandates imaging from the skull base to the upper mediastinum.

  19. Effects of immobility on sensory and motor symptoms of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Martin; Lavigne, Gilles; Desautels, Alex; Poirier, Gaétan; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is defined by an irresistible need to move associated with leg paresthesia. Two additional features are essential for diagnosis: (1) worsening of symptoms at rest with temporary relief by activity, and (2) worsening of symptoms during the evening and/or during the night. The suggested immobilization test (SIT) has been developed to evaluate the presence of these criteria. This test quantifies leg movements and leg discomfort during a 1-hour period of immobility prior to bedtime. We used the SIT to evaluate the effects of immobility on leg discomfort and leg movements experienced by 19 patients with RLS and 19 control subjects. Results show that immobility significantly worsens both leg discomfort and periodic leg movements (PLM) in patients with RLS but not in controls. Patients with RLS showed a higher leg discomfort score (32.6 +/- 15.1 mm vs. 5.7 +/- 7.9 mm; P < 0.00001), a greater maximum leg discomfort value (63.4 +/- 27.4 mm vs. 13.7 +/- 23.0 mm; P < 0.00001) and a greater PLM index (88.4 +/- 62.6 vs. 10.4 +/- 20.6; P < 0.00004) than control subjects. These results further validate the use of the SIT as a diagnostic and research tool for RLS and confirm the contention of the International RLS study group that RLS symptoms worsen at rest. Copyright 2001 Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Sex-Specific Diurnal Immobility Induced by Forced Swim Test in Wild Type and Clock Gene Deficient Mice

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    Ningyue Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The link between alterations in circadian rhythms and depression are well established, but the underlying mechanisms are far less elucidated. We investigated the circadian characteristics of immobility behavior in wild type (WT mice and mice with mutations in core Clock genes. Methods: All mice were tested with forced swim test (FST at 4 h intervals. Results: These experiments revealed significant diurnal rhythms associated with immobility behavior in both male and female WT mice with sex-different circadian properties. In addition, male mice showed significantly less immobility during the night phase in comparison to female mice. Female Per1Brdm1 mice also showed significant rhythmicity. However, the timing of rhythmicity was very different from that observed in female wild type mice. Male Per1Brdm1 mice showed a pattern of rhythmicity similar to that of wild type mice. Furthermore, female Per1Brdm1 mice showed higher duration of immobility in comparison to male Per1Brdm1 mice in both daytime and early night phases. Neither Per2Brdm1 nor ClockΔ19 mice showed significant rhythmicity, but both female Per2Brdm1 and ClockΔ19 mice had lower levels of immobility, compared to males. Conclusions: This study highlights the differences in the circadian characteristics of immobility induced by FST in WT, ClockΔ19, Per1, and Per2 deficient mice.

  1. Luminal nucleotides are tonic inhibitors of renal tubular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Extracellular ATP is an essential local signaling molecule in all organ systems. In the kidney, purinergic signaling is involved in an array of functions and this review highlights those of relevance for renal tubular transport. RECENT FINDINGS: Purinergic receptors are express...... discovered as an important signaling compartment in which local purinergic signaling determines an inhibitory tone for renal tubular transport. Blocking components of this system leads to tubular hyper-absorption, volume retention and elevated blood pressure.......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Extracellular ATP is an essential local signaling molecule in all organ systems. In the kidney, purinergic signaling is involved in an array of functions and this review highlights those of relevance for renal tubular transport. RECENT FINDINGS: Purinergic receptors are expressed...... in all renal tubular segments and their stimulation generally leads to transport inhibition. Recent evidence has identified the tubular lumen as a restricted space for purinergic signaling. The concentrations of ATP in the luminal fluids are sufficiently high to inflict a tonic inhibition of renal...

  2. A study on the 'Yin-tonic' component of the Chinese herb Zhimu sarsasapogenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yuansheng; Yi Ningyu; Wang Yongqing; Dai Xiangdong; Xia Zongqin

    1991-01-01

    Sarsasapogenin was extracted from the Chinese herb Zhimu(Anemerrhena Asphodeloides Bunge) and its pharmacological action was compared with ZM decoction (ZM) in 'Hyperthyroid' mice. 125 I-Pindolol binding assay revealed that the maximum binding capacity (RT) of brain beta-adrenoceptors of the models was significantly higher than normal and that repeated oral administrations of either ZM or SAR reduced the elevated RT to nearly normal. The peak value of plasma cAMP after a single dose of isoproterenol (ISO) was also significantly higher in the models than in control. Again oral administrations of either ZM or SAR reduced the response of plasma cAMP to ISO to nearly normal. However, in vitro competitive binding assay indicated that neither SAR nor its succinyl derivative had any direct binding reaction with beta adrenoceptors. It is therefore concluded that SAR is an important component of Zhimu and the mechanism of its 'Yin-tonic' action is probably a down-regulation of the beta-adrenoceptors rather than direct occupation of receptor binding sites

  3. The effect of GABAmimetics on the duration of immobility in the forced swim test in albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zahaf, Najwa Ahmed; Salem Elhwuegi, Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    Studies regarding the role of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in depression are conflicting. Therefore, it was decided to examine the effect of different drugs that enhance the GABA system on the time of immobility induced by the forced swim test (FST). Adult albino mice were divided into several groups of six animals. Each group received an intraperitoneal injection of either imipramine (10, 20, or 30 mg/kg), diazepam (0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg), vigabatrin (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg), zolpidem (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or alprazolam (1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg). Control groups received the appropriate vehicle. One hour after injection, the duration of immobility was measured for 5 min in the FST. The percentage change in the duration of immobility from the control was calculated for each group. The statistical test of the difference between the treated and the control groups was calculated using unpaired Student's t-test. Imipramine produced a significant dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility (78, 74, and 56%, respectively). Different doses of diazepam, vigabatrin, and zolpidem produced a significant increase in the duration of immobility (119, 126, and 128%), (116, 124, and 128%), and (108, 109, and 119%), respectively. The two low doses of alprazolam produced a significant increase (115 and 120%), while the high dose produced a significant decrease in the duration of immobility (74%). Increasing central GABAergic activity by different mechanisms has resulted in a depressant-like activity measured as an increase in the duration of immobility in the FST model of depression.

  4. Mapping brain activity on the verge of a photically induced generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig R; Wolff, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In a photosensitive patient intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) accidentally provoked a generalized tonic-clonic seizure during simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Before seizure onset, IPS consistently induced generalized...

  5. Bilateral vocal fold immobility in a patient with overlap syndrome rheumatoid arthritis/systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Galbiati, Valentina; Bacciu, Andrea; Zeni, Silvana; Fantini, Flavio

    2007-10-01

    Bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) can be the result of a primary disorder or as an iatrogenic complication of surgery or intubation. Laryngeal involvement can be a rare complication of connective tissue disorders and it usually occurs in association with other symptoms and signs that indicate active disease. We present a case of BVFI in a patient with an overlap syndrome rheumatoid arthritis/systemic sclerosis, referred to our division because of dysphonia and dyspnea. The video-laryngostroboscopy showed the presence of BVFI. Physical examination, blood tests, lung and neck high resolution computed tomography scans did not demonstrate significant abnormalities. She was treated with pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone with slow improvement.

  6. Insulin reduces neuronal excitability by turning on GABA(A channels that generate tonic current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Jin

    Full Text Available Insulin signaling to the brain is important not only for metabolic homeostasis but also for higher brain functions such as cognition. GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid decreases neuronal excitability by activating GABA(A channels that generate phasic and tonic currents. The level of tonic inhibition in neurons varies. In the hippocampus, interneurons and dentate gyrus granule cells normally have significant tonic currents under basal conditions in contrast to the CA1 pyramidal neurons where it is minimal. Here we show in acute rat hippocampal slices that insulin (1 nM "turns on" new extrasynaptic GABA(A channels in CA1 pyramidal neurons resulting in decreased frequency of action potential firing. The channels are activated by more than million times lower GABA concentrations than synaptic channels, generate tonic currents and show outward rectification. The single-channel current amplitude is related to the GABA concentration resulting in a single-channel GABA affinity (EC(50 in intact CA1 neurons of 17 pM with the maximal current amplitude reached with 1 nM GABA. They are inhibited by GABA(A antagonists but have novel pharmacology as the benzodiazepine flumazenil and zolpidem are inverse agonists. The results show that tonic rather than synaptic conductances regulate basal neuronal excitability when significant tonic conductance is expressed and demonstrate an unexpected hormonal control of the inhibitory channel subtypes and excitability of hippocampal neurons. The insulin-induced new channels provide a specific target for rescuing cognition in health and disease.

  7. GABA-A Receptors Mediate Tonic Inhibition and Neurosteroid Sensitivity in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2018-01-01

    Neurosteroids like allopregnanolone (AP) are positive allosteric modulators of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors. AP and related neurosteroids exhibit a greater potency for δ-containing extrasynaptic receptors. The δGABA-A receptors, which are expressed extrasynaptically in the dentate gyrus and other regions, contribute to tonic inhibition, promoting network shunting as well as reducing seizure susceptibility. Levels of endogenous neurosteroids fluctuate with ovarian cycle. Natural and synthetic neurosteroids maximally potentiate tonic inhibition in the hippocampus and provide robust protection against a variety of limbic seizures and status epilepticus. Recently, a consensus neurosteroid pharmacophore model has been proposed at extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors based on structure-activity relationship for functional activation of tonic currents and seizure protection. Aside from anticonvulsant actions, neurosteroids have been found to be powerful anxiolytic and anesthetic agents. Neurosteroids and Zn 2+ have preferential affinity for δ-containing receptors. Thus, Zn 2+ can prevent neurosteroid activation of extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptor-mediated tonic inhibition. Recently, we demonstrated that Zn 2+ selectively inhibits extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors and thereby fully prevents AP activation of tonic inhibition and seizure protection. We confirmed that neurosteroids exhibit greater sensitivity at extrasynaptic δGABA-A receptors. Overall, extrasynaptic GABA-A receptors are primary mediators of tonic inhibition in the brain and play a key role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and other neurological disorders. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuromyelitis optica: association with paroxysmal painful tonic spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnero Contentti, E; Leguizamón, F; Hryb, J P; Celso, J; Pace, J L Di; Ferrari, J; Knorre, E; Perassolo, M B

    2016-10-01

    Paroxysmal painful tonic spasms (PPTS) were initially described in multiple sclerosis (MS) but they are more frequent in neuromyelitis optica (NMO). The objective is to report their presence in a series of cases of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD), as well as to determine their frequency and clinical features. We conducted a retrospective assessment of medical histories of NMO/NMOSD patients treated in 2 hospitals in Buenos Aires (Hospital Durand and Hospital Álvarez) between 2009 and 2013. Out of 15 patients with NMOSD (7 with definite NMO and 8 with limited NMO), 4 presented PPTS (26.66%). PPTS frequency in the definite NMO group was 57.14% (4/7). Of the 9 patients with longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM), 44.44% (9/15) presented PPTS. Mean age was 35 years (range, 22-38 years) and all patients were women. Mean time between NMO diagnosis and PPTS onset was 7 months (range, 1-29 months) and mean time from last relapse of LETM was 30 days (range 23-40 days). LETM (75% cervicothoracic and 25% thoracic) was observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in all patients. Control over spasms and pain was achieved in all patients with carbamazepine (associated with gabapentin in one case). No favourable responses to pregabalin, gabapentin, or phenytoin were reported. PPTS are frequent in NMO. Mean time of PPTS onset is approximately one month after an LETM relapse, with extensive cervicothoracic lesions appearing on the MRI scan. They show an excellent response to carbamazepine but little or no response to pregabalin and gabapentin. Prospective studies with larger numbers of patients are necessary in order to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Tibetan Precious Pills as Therapeutics and Rejuvenating Longevity Tonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gerke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tibetan precious pills are frequently attributed with a variety of efficacies, from “magical” powers, prevention of poisoning and infectious diseases, protection from harmful spirits and exposure to diseases while travelling, to rejuvenating and prolonging life through clearing the senses and promoting strength and vigor. They are prescribed as strong medicines for severe diseases, but are also advertised as rejuvenating tonics for the healthy. This paper explores the rejuvenating qualities attributed to precious pills in terms of how they are currently advertised, how rejuvenation is and has been explained in Tibetan works on precious pills, and how Tibetan physicians understand these attributes. How do these domains interact and refer to each other? I compare aspects of rejuvenation in precious pill formulas with contemporary presentations of precious pills online and on published leaflets given out to patients in India and elsewhere. In Tibetan medical texts certain precious pills that contain the complex and processed mercury-sulfide ash called tsotel in addition to a large variety of other medicinal substances are presented as “precious pills” or rinchen rilbu, and only some of those are said to have rejuvenating effects on the body; most are primarily prescribed for specific diseases. The practice of giving precious pills to the healthy emerges more prominently in eighteenth to nineteenth century manuals on administering precious pills (Czaja 2015, which parallels the establishment of influential medical and monastic networks that promoted the making of tsotel and precious pills. I argue that precious pills have more recently widened their specific therapeutic target beyond that of medicine into becoming popular pills for rejuvenation, even if they do not contain tsotel, as part of pharmaceutical commodification. I also show how presentations of precious pills as “rejuvenating” are deeply linked to their availability.

  10. Effects of chronic cocaine, morphine and methamphetamine on the mobility, immobility and stereotyped behaviors in crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola; Rincon, Natalia; Orfanakos, Vasiliki Bessie; Brechtel, Leanne; Wormack, Leah; Richardson, Erika; Huber, Robert; Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2017-08-14

    The worth of crayfish as a model system for studies of addiction was not previously recognized because a drug-reward phenomenon had not been documented in this model system. In our previous experiments, we demonstrate that the crayfish natural reward pathways are sensitive to human drugs of abuse. This finding supports crayfish as a suitable model to characterize specific behaviors that are relevant in drug addiction research, and the current study builds on our previous findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate unconditioned neurobehavioral effects of repeated treatment regimens using cocaine, morphine, and methamphetamine for three consecutive days. We analyzed mobility, immobility and characterized stereotypic behaviors following intracardial infusions of 2.0μg/g or 10.0μg/g doses of cocaine, morphine, and methamphetamine for three days. The results showed that systemic cocaine, morphine, and methamphetamine increased mobility at a low dose of 2.0μg/g more effectively than a high dose of 10.0μg/g, while simultaneously showing that the high dose exerted a more prominent effect in increasing immobility. Moreover, systemic cocaine, morphine, and methamphetamine injections have discerning effects towards a group of defined unconditioned stereotyped behavioral patterns associated with each drug, rather than a shared universal behavioral effect. These findings provide insight into the behavioral and pharmacological basis responsible for the unconditioned effects of these drugs in crayfish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm presenting as left vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagi, Sharon H; Howard, Brittany E; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Lott, David G

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner's syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  12. Acute Contained Ruptured Aortic Aneurysm Presenting as Left Vocal Fold Immobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon H. Gnagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To recognize intrathoracic abnormalities, including expansion or rupture of aortic aneurysms, as a source of acute onset vocal fold immobility. Methods. A case report and review of the literature. Results. An 85-year-old female with prior history of an aortic aneurysm presented to a tertiary care facility with sudden onset hoarseness. On laryngoscopy, the left vocal fold was immobile in the paramedian position. A CT scan obtained that day revealed a new, large hematoma surrounding the upper descending aortic stent graft consistent with an acute contained ruptured aortic aneurysm. She was referred to the emergency department for evaluation and treatment by vascular surgery. She was counseled regarding surgical options and ultimately decided not to pursue further treatment. Her vocal fold immobility was subsequently treated via office-based injection medialization two weeks after presentation and again 5 months after the initial injection which dramatically improved her voice. Follow-up CT scan at 8 months demonstrated a reduction of the hematoma. The left vocal cord remains immobile to date. Conclusion. Ortner’s syndrome, or cardiovocal syndrome, is hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy caused by cardiovascular pathology. It is a rare condition and, while typically presenting gradually, may also present with acute symptomatology.

  13. Im/mobilities and dis/connectivities in medical globalisation: How global is Global Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Hansjörg; Mattes, Dominik

    2018-03-01

    The interdisciplinary, politically contested field of Global Health has often been described as a consequence of, and response to, an intensification of the mobilities of, and connectivities between, people, pathogens, ideas, and infrastructure across national borders and large distances. However, such global mobilities and connectivities are not as omnidirectional and unpatterned as the rhetoric of many Global Health actors suggests. Instead, we argue that they are suffused by a plethora of institutional, national, and global political agendas, and substantially shaped by transnational and postcolonial power relations. Furthermore, the configurations that are typically subsumed under the category of Global Health represent only a minor part of the range of im/mobilities and dis/connectivities that are essential for understanding transformations of epidemiological patterns, health care infrastructures, and the responses to health-related challenges in a globalising world. In order to broaden such a limiting analytical perspective, we propose to expand the analytical focus in studying Global Health phenomena by paying close attention to the myriad ways in which particular im/mobilities and dis/connectivities constitute medicine and well-being in global and transnational settings. Pursuing a conceptual shift from studies of 'Global Health' to studying 'medical globalization' may carve out new analytical ground for such an endeavour.

  14. Identification of multiple genetic loci in the mouse controlling immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elnaga, Ahmed F; Torigoe, Daisuke; Fouda, Mohamed M; Darwish, Ragab A; Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Morimatsu, Masami; Agui, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is one of the most famous psychiatric disorders in humans in all over the countries and considered a complex neurobehavioral trait and difficult to identify causal genes. Tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) are widely used for assessing depression-like behavior and antidepressant activity in mice. A variety of antidepressant agents are known to reduce immobility time in both TST and FST. To identify genetic determinants of immobility duration in both tests, we analyzed 101 F2 mice from an intercross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 106 microsatellite markers revealed three loci (two significant and one suggestive) and five suggestive loci controlling immobility time in the TST and FST, respectively. Results of QTL analysis suggest a broad description of the genetic architecture underlying depression, providing underpinnings for identifying novel molecular targets for antidepressants to clear the complex genetic mechanisms of depressive disorders.

  15. Microelement composition of the herbs with hypoglycemic and tonic actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaev, T.A.; Ibragimova, E.A.; Nazirova, E.R.; Samarkhodjaeva, N.R.; Nalbandyan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Diabetes mellitus is a heavy disease with complex neuroendocrinal pathogenesis, which disturbs all stages of metabolism, including exchange of microelements. A significant role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is given to copper, zinc, chromium, manganese - microelements directly participating in carbohydrate exchange. Usage of microelements in medicine as inorganic salts has not found a wide application. It is known, that the majority of vitaminous-mineral complexes represent a mechanical mix of artificial vitamins and microelements. The available facts testify that such inorganic forms of minerals are poorly assimilated by an organism, and moreover can block the assimilation of organic forms, what results in a gradual increase of deficiency in these microelements in organism. Scientists know around 300 plants possessing hypoglycemising effect to a greater or lesser extent. Using the method of neutron-activation analysis we have investigated the microelement composition of some of herbs possessing hypoglycemising and tonic action. On the basis of these data our group has developed the structure of a phytocompound, which includes 15 components, Spirulina platensis and mumiyo containing the balanced amount of easily assimilated organically connected minerals. The analysis of received data shows, that the developed phytocompound contains significant amount of Mn, Cu, Zn and in smaller amounts Co. Calculations show, that the daily need of an organism for copper, manganese, zinc and iodine is completely satisfied by the phytocompound. The data on analysis of element structure of Spirulina platensis and mumiyo evidence the presence of a wide spectrum of the majority of microelements in these preparations, and the content of copper and manganese in Spirulina platensis exceeds their content in mumiyo 1,5-2 times, and the presence of chromium is almost 20 times higher. The complex of the developed phytocompound, Spirulina platensis and mumiyo is suggested

  16. Microelement composition of the herbs with hypoglycemic and tonic actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaev, T A; Ibragimova, E A; Nazirova, E R; Samarkhodjaeva, N R; Nalbandyan, A A [Institute of Biochemistry, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2004-10-01

    Full text: Diabetes mellitus is a heavy disease with complex neuroendocrinal pathogenesis, which disturbs all stages of metabolism, including exchange of microelements. A significant role in pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is given to copper, zinc, chromium, manganese - microelements directly participating in carbohydrate exchange. Usage of microelements in medicine as inorganic salts has not found a wide application. It is known, that the majority of vitaminous-mineral complexes represent a mechanical mix of artificial vitamins and microelements. The available facts testify that such inorganic forms of minerals are poorly assimilated by an organism, and moreover can block the assimilation of organic forms, what results in a gradual increase of deficiency in these microelements in organism. Scientists know around 300 plants possessing hypoglycemising effect to a greater or lesser extent. Using the method of neutron-activation analysis we have investigated the microelement composition of some of herbs possessing hypoglycemising and tonic action. On the basis of these data our group has developed the structure of a phytocompound, which includes 15 components, Spirulina platensis and mumiyo containing the balanced amount of easily assimilated organically connected minerals. The analysis of received data shows, that the developed phytocompound contains significant amount of Mn, Cu, Zn and in smaller amounts Co. Calculations show, that the daily need of an organism for copper, manganese, zinc and iodine is completely satisfied by the phytocompound. The data on analysis of element structure of Spirulina platensis and mumiyo evidence the presence of a wide spectrum of the majority of microelements in these preparations, and the content of copper and manganese in Spirulina platensis exceeds their content in mumiyo 1,5-2 times, and the presence of chromium is almost 20 times higher. The complex of the developed phytocompound, Spirulina platensis and mumiyo is suggested

  17. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce eBeverlin II

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control.

  18. Attenuated Tonic and Enhanced Phasic Release of Dopamine in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra D Badgaiyan

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD is a hypodopaminergic or hyperdopaminergic condition. Different sets of data suggest either hyperactive or hypoactive dopamine system. Since indirect methods used in earlier studies have arrived at contradictory conclusions, we directly measured the tonic and phasic release of dopamine in ADHD volunteers. The tonic release in ADHD and healthy control volunteers was measured and compared using dynamic molecular imaging technique. The phasic release during performance of Eriksen's flanker task was measured in the two groups using single scan dynamic molecular imaging technique. In these experiments volunteers were positioned in a positron emission tomography (PET camera and administered a dopamine receptor ligand (11C-raclopride intravenously. After the injection PET data were acquired dynamically while volunteers either stayed still (tonic release experiments or performed the flanker task (phasic release experiments. PET data were analyzed to measure dynamic changes in ligand binding potential (BP and other receptor kinetic parameters. The analysis revealed that at rest the ligand BP was significantly higher in the right caudate of ADHD volunteers suggesting reduced tonic release. During task performance significantly lower ligand BP was observed in the same area, indicating increased phasic release. In ADHD tonic release of dopamine is attenuated and the phasic release is enhanced in the right caudate. By characterizing the nature of dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission in ADHD, the results explain earlier findings of reduced or increased dopaminergic activity.

  19. Social closure, micro-class immobility and the intergenerational reproduction of the upper class: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggera, Lucia; Barone, Carlo

    2017-06-01

    This article assesses how processes of social closure enhance intergenerational immobility in the regulated professions and thus promote persistence at the top of the occupational hierarchy. We compare four European countries (GB, Germany, Denmark and Sweden) that differ considerably in their degree of professional regulation and in their broader institutional arrangements. We run log-linear and logistic regression models on a cumulative dataset based on three large-scale surveys with detailed and highly comparable information at the level of unit occupations. Our analyses indicate that children of licensed professionals are far more likely to inherit the occupation of their parents and that this stronger micro-class immobility translates into higher chances of persistence in the upper class. These results support social closure theory and confirm the relevance of a micro-class approach for the explanation of social fluidity and of its cross-national variations. Moreover, we find that, when children of professionals do not reproduce the micro-class of their parents, they still display disproportionate chances of persistence in professional employment. Hence, on the one hand, processes of social closure erect barriers between professions and fuel micro-class immobility at the top. On the other hand, the cultural proximity of different professional groups drives intense intergenerational exchanges between them. Our analyses indicate that these micro- and meso-class rigidities work as complementary routes to immobility at the top. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  20. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility: incidence and pathophysiology of aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaee, Abtin; Murry, Thomas; Zschommler, Anne; Desloge, Rosemary B

    2005-04-01

    The objective was to examine the incidence and pathophysiology of aspiration in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility presenting with dysphagia. Retrospective review of flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing (FEESST) data and medical records in two tertiary medical care centers. The data for all patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility who underwent FEESST between 2000 and 2003 were reviewed. Eighty-one patients (45 male and 36 female patients) were included in the study. The mean age was 59 years. The most common causes or origins were iatrogenic (42%), malignancy (23%), and neurological (18%). The immobility was left-sided in 59% of patients. A majority of the patients exhibited laryngeal edema/erythema (90%), difficulty with secretions (60%), and decreased laryngopharyngeal sensation (83%). The laryngeal adductor reflex was absent in 34% of the patients. An aspiration rate of 35% was detected with thin liquids. Trials of purees revealed a 76% rate of pooling, 44% rate of spillage, 32% rate of penetration, 18% rate of aspiration, and 24% rate of regurgitation. Rates of penetration and aspiration with purees were significantly higher in patients who had decreased laryngopharyngeal sensation, absent pharyngeal squeeze, and absent laryngeal adductor reflex. Dysphagia in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility is demonstrated during FEESST by pooling, spillage, penetration, and aspiration. The pathophysiology of dysphagia is multifactorial with decreased sensation and limitation of airway protective mechanisms both acting as contributing factors.

  1. Characterization of a novel model of tonic heat pain stimulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naert, A.L.; Kehlet, H.; Kupers, R.

    2008-01-01

    .2+/-0.4, females scoring higher than men (7.4+/-0.5 vs. 5.2+/-0.5; pstimulation period after which they stabilized. A strong interindividual variability was observed in the time profiles of the pain ratings over the course of the 7-min...... tonic heat pain stimulation and compared the responses on this test with other measures of pain. In 58 normal volunteers, we applied a 7-min lasting contact heat stimulation of 47 degrees C to the upper leg while participants constantly rated their pain. Average pain rating during the 7-min period was 6...... stimulation period. The model showed a good test-retest reproducibility. Tonic heat pain ratings only correlated moderately with the pain threshold while stronger correlations were observed with pain tolerance and ratings of suprathreshold phasic heat pain. We conclude that the tonic heat model is a suitable...

  2. Slow-tonic muscle fibers and their potential innervation in the turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Robert J; Pierce, Patricia A; McDonagh, Jennifer C; Stuart, Douglas G

    2005-04-01

    A description is provided of the ratio of slow-tonic vs. slow- and fast-twitch fibers for five muscles in the adult turtle, Pseudemys (Trachemys) scripta elegans. The cross-sectional area of each fiber type and an estimation of the relative (weighted) cross-sectional area occupied by the different fiber types are also provided. Two hindlimb muscles (flexor digitorum longus, FDL; external gastrocnemius, EG) were selected on the basis of their suitability for future motor-unit studies. Three neck muscles (the fourth head of testo-cervicis, TeC4; the fourth head of retrahens capitus collique, RCCQ4; transversalis cervicis, TrC) were chosen for their progressively decreasing oxidative capacity. Serial sections were stained for myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), NADH-diaphorase, and alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-GPDH). Conventional fiber-type classification was then performed using indirect markers for contraction speed and oxidative (aerobic) vs. glycolytic (anaerobic) metabolism: i.e., slow oxidative (SO, including slow-twitch and possibly slow-tonic fibers), fast-twitch, oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and fast-twitch glycolytic (Fg) fibers. Slow-tonic fibers in the SO class were then revealed by directing the monoclonal antibody, ALD-58 (raised against the slow-tonic fiber myosin heavy chain of chicken anterior latissimus dorsi), to additional muscle cross sections. All five of the tested muscles contained the four fiber types, with the ATPase-stained fibers including both slow-tonic and slow-twitch fibers. The extreme distributions of SO fibers were in the predominately glycolytic TrC vs. the predominately oxidative TeC4 muscle (TrC-SO, 9%; FOG, 20%; Fg, 71% vs. TeC4-SO, 58%: FOG, 16%; Fg, 25%). Across the five muscles, the relative prevalence of slow-tonic fibers (4-47%) paralleled that of the SO fibers (9-58%). TeC4 had the highest prevalence of slow-tonic fibers (47%). The test muscles exhibited varying degrees of regional concentration of each

  3. Phasic and tonic neuron ensemble codes for stimulus-environment conjunctions in the lateral entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiw, Maryna; Insel, Nathan; Cui, Younghua; Finney, Caitlin; Morrissey, Mark D; Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori

    2017-07-06

    The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) is thought to bind sensory events with the environment where they took place. To compare the relative influence of transient events and temporally stable environmental stimuli on the firing of LEC cells, we recorded neuron spiking patterns in the region during blocks of a trace eyeblink conditioning paradigm performed in two environments and with different conditioning stimuli. Firing rates of some neurons were phasically selective for conditioned stimuli in a way that depended on which room the rat was in; nearly all neurons were tonically selective for environments in a way that depended on which stimuli had been presented in those environments. As rats moved from one environment to another, tonic neuron ensemble activity exhibited prospective information about the conditioned stimulus associated with the environment. Thus, the LEC formed phasic and tonic codes for event-environment associations, thereby accurately differentiating multiple experiences with overlapping features.

  4. The Immune Effects of an African Traditional Energy Tonic in In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlungisi Ngcobo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the African traditional medicines (ATM are formulated as energy tonics to boost and maintain immune defences. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the immune effects of a traditional energy tonic using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, THP-1 monocytes, and bacteria infected rats. When tested in mitogen and peptidoglycan stimulated PBMCs, this energy tonic showed minimal cytotoxicity, while in acute toxicity studies in rats it did not exhibit any significant toxicity at doses up to 2000 mg/mL/kg. The energy tonic doses between 100 and 10 μg/mL were shown to stimulate secretion of cytokines and increase sIL-2R levels in PHA-treated PBMCs. Similar doses in PG-S. aureus-stimulated PBMCs significantly (p<0.05 increased IL-1α, IL-2, and GM-CSF while causing a significant (p<0.05 decrease in sIL-2R levels. NF-κβ transcriptional activity was increased in LPS stimulated THP-1 cells. In Sprague Dawley rats pretreated with the energy tonic and then infected with S. aureus, there were insignificant increases in cytokines and sIL-2R when compared to bacteria infected only and 5% Enrofloxacin treated rats. Posttreatment with energy tonic doses after infection with S. aureus did not enhance inflammatory cytokines significantly but changed the immune response profile and decreased corticosterone levels. This ATM showed promising immunomodulatory effects on isolated immune cells and modulated the immune response of rat models infected with S. aureus.

  5. Sex-Dependent Effects of Stress on Immobility Behavior and VTA Dopamine Neuron Activity: Modulation by Ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Cortés, Millie; Grace, Anthony A

    2017-10-01

    Stress constitutes a risk factor across several psychiatric disorders. Moreover, females are more susceptible to stress-related disorders, such as depression, than males. Although dopamine system underactivation is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, little is known about the female dopamine system at baseline and post-stress. The effects of chronic mild stress were examined on ventral tegmental area dopamine neuron activity and forced swim test immobility by comparing male and female rats. The impact of a single dose of the rapid antidepressant ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) on forced swim test immobility and ventral tegmental area function was then tested. Baseline ventral tegmental area dopamine activity was comparable in both sexes. At baseline, females exhibited roughly double the forced swim test immobility duration than males, which corresponded to ~50% decrease in ventral tegmental area dopamine population activity compared with similarly treated (i.e., post-forced swim test) males. Following chronic mild stress, there was greater immobility duration in both sexes and reduced ventral tegmental area dopamine neuron activity by approximately 50% in males and nearly 75% in females. Ketamine restored behavior and post-forced swim test ventral tegmental area dopamine activity for up to 7 days in females as well as in both male and female chronic mild stress-exposed rats. These data suggest increased female susceptibility to depression-like phenotypes (i.e., greater immobility, ventral tegmental area hypofunction) is associated with higher dopamine system sensitivity to both acute and repeated stress relative to males. Understanding the neural underpinnings of sex differences in stress vulnerability will provide insight into mechanisms of disease and optimizing therapeutic approaches in both sexes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  6. Pediatric vocal fold immobility: natural history and the need for long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Jad; Martin, Timothy; Beste, David; Robey, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE The clinical course and outcomes of pediatric vocal fold immobility (VFI) vary widely in the literature, and follow-up in these patients varies accordingly. A better understanding of the natural history of pediatric VFI is crucial to improved management. OBJECTIVE To characterize the natural history of pediatric VFI, including symptoms and rates of resolution and surgical intervention. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective review at an academically affiliated private pediatric otolaryngology practice in a metropolitan area of all patients seen between July 15, 2001, and September 1, 2012, with a diagnosis of complete or partial VFI. After elimination of 92 incomplete or duplicate files, 404 patient records were reviewed for demographic characteristics, etiologies, symptoms, follow-up, resolution, and interventions. Follow-up records were available for 362 patients (89.6%). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Resolution of VFI confirmed by repeated laryngoscopy, length of follow-up, and surgical intervention rates. RESULTS Among the 404 patients, left VFI was present in 66.8%, right VFI in 7.9%, and bilateral VFI in 25.3%. Median (range) age at presentation was 2.9 (0-528.1) months. Major etiological categories included cardiac surgery in 68.8%, idiopathic immobility in 21.0%, and neurologic disease in 7.4%. At presentation, 61.4%experienced dysphonia, 54.0%respiratory symptoms, and 49.5%dysphagia. Tracheotomy was performed in 25.7%and gastrostomy in 40.8%. Median (range) duration of follow-up among the 89.6%of patients with follow-up was 17.2 (0.2-173.5) months. Resolution evidenced by laryngoscopy was found in 28.0%, with a median (range) time to resolution of 4.3 (0.4-38.7) months. In patients without laryngoscopic resolution, median follow-up was 26.0 months, and 28.9% reported symptomatic resolution. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The natural history of pediatric VFI involves substantial morbidity, with lasting symptoms and considerable rates of surgical

  7. Detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures by a wireless wrist accelerometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Polster, T.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the clinical reliability of a wrist-worn, wireless accelerometer sensor for detecting generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Seventy-three consecutive patients (age 6-68 years; median 37 years) at risk of having GTCS and who were admitted to the long-term video-elec...

  8. The Roles of Phasic and Tonic Dopamine in Tic Learning and Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Tiago V; Conceição, Vasco A

    2017-09-15

    Tourette syndrome (TS) prominently involves dopaminergic disturbances, but the precise nature of those disturbances has remained elusive. A substantial body of empirical work and recent computational models have characterized the specific roles of phasic and tonic dopamine (DA) in action learning and selection, respectively. Using insights from this work and models, we suggest that TS involves increases in both phasic and tonic DA, which produce increased propensities for tic learning and expression, respectively. We review the evidence from reinforcement-learning and habit-learning studies in TS, which supports the idea that TS involves increased phasic DA responses; we also review the evidence that tics engage the habit-learning circuitry. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that tics are exaggerated, maladaptive, and persistent motor habits reinforced by aberrant, increased phasic DA responses. Increased tonic DA amplifies the tendency to execute learned tics and also provides a fertile ground of motor hyperactivity for tic learning. We review evidence suggesting that antipsychotics may counter both the increased propensity for tic expression, by increasing excitability in the indirect pathway, and the increased propensity for tic learning, by shifting plasticity in the indirect pathway toward long-term potentiation (and possibly also through more complex mechanisms). Finally, we review evidence suggesting that low doses of DA agonists that effectively treat TS decrease both phasic and tonic DA, thereby also reducing the propensity for both tic learning and tic expression, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Case of Devic’s Syndrome Presenting with Tonic Spasm: Response to Levetiracetam Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Leventoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica or Devic’s syndrome is a rare autoimmune disorder which is characterized by inflammatory demyelination of the optic nerves and the spinal cord. Clinically, it causes visual loss in one or both eyes, and numbness or paralysis of the arms and legs. Although tonic spasm is the most frequent movement disorder occuring in MS, it has not been definetely described clinical entity for Devic’s syndrome. We hereby describe a case of Devic’s syndrome with tonic spasms treated with levetiracetam as a new approach and discussed the results of the treatment. A 52-year-old woman with Devic’s syndrome with the complaint of painful tonic spasms primarily affecting the abdomen was given levetiracetam therapy. Levetiracetam therapy resulted in a good response in our patient. Levetiracetam can be a new choice for the treatment of painful tonic spasm with Devic’s syndrome. However, more detailed studies are necessary to investigate efficacy of levetiracetam.

  10. First-ever generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adults in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First-ever generalised tonic-clonic seizures in adults in the emergency room: Review of cranial computed tomography of 76 cases in a tertiary hospital in Benin-city, Nigeria. ... Clinical and CT diagnoses agreed only in 8.4% of the cases.

  11. Tonic inhibition by orphanin FQ/nociceptin of noradrenaline neurotransmission in the amygdala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawahara, Y; Hesselink, M.B.; van Scharrenburg, G; Westerink, B.H.C.

    2004-01-01

    The present microdialysis study investigated whether nociceptin/orphanin FQ exerts a tonic inhibition of the release of noradrenaline in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala in awake rats. The non-peptide competitive nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor antagonist J-113397 (20 mg/kg

  12. Some Ghanaian herbal blood tonics as sources of Iron and other ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Pb) ... Maximum estimated daily dosages of less than 1 mg/day of iron was obtained for all the herbal tonics, except the Madam Catherine brand which had 2.17 mg, compared with the required daily intake of 10 – 15 mg.

  13. Quality control of Chinese herbal tonic wine by high performance liquid chromatography fingerprint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, X.J.; Zhang, H.; Wang, W.F.; Li, B.; Yang Zhu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    Herbal tonic wines are alcoholic drinks in which medicinal herbs are soaked and extracted. These drinks are considered having various health functions. However, the quality of herbal products is largely influenced by the origin and harvest season of the herbs. Due to its high commercial value,

  14. Unilateral Adie's tonic pupil and viral hepatitis: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karadžić Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adie’s (tonic pupil is a neuro-ophthalmological disorder characterized by a tonically dilated pupil, which is unresponsive to light. It is caused by damage to postganglionic fibers of the parasympathetic innervation of the eye, usually by a viral or bacterial infection. Adie’s syndrome includes diminished deep tendon reflexes. Outline of Cases. We report data of a 59-year-old female with unequal pupil sizes. She complained of blurred vision and headache mainly while reading. She had a 35-year history of hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis. On exam, left pupil was mydriatic and there was no response to light and at slit lamp we saw segments of the sphincter constrict. We performed 0.125% pilocarpine test and there was a remarkable reduction of size in the left pupil. The second case is a 55-year-old female who was referred to the University Eye Clinic because of a headache and mydriatic left pupil. She had diabetes mellitus type 2, as well as hepatitis A virus 20 years earlier. On exam, the left pupil was mydriatic, with no response to light. Test with diluted pilocarpine was positive. Neurological examinations revealed no abnormality in either case so we excluded Adie’s syndrome. Conclusion. Adie’s tonic pupil is benign neuro-ophthalmological disorder of unknown etiology. Most patients commonly present no symptoms and anisocoria is noticed accidentally. Although the etiology is unknown, there are some conditions that cause tonic pupil. It may be a part of a syndrome in which tonic pupil is associated with absent deep tendon reflexes.

  15. Enhanced GABAA-Mediated Tonic Inhibition in Auditory Thalamus of Rats with Behavioral Evidence of Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sametsky, Evgeny A; Turner, Jeremy G; Larsen, Deb; Ling, Lynne; Caspary, Donald M

    2015-06-24

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role for inhibitory neurotransmitter dysfunction in the pathology of tinnitus. Opposing hypotheses proposed either a pathologic decrease or increase of GABAergic inhibition in medial geniculate body (MGB). In thalamus, GABA mediates fast synaptic inhibition via synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and persistent tonic inhibition via high-affinity extrasynaptic GABAARs. Given that extrasynaptic GABAARs control the firing mode of thalamocortical neurons, we examined tonic GABAAR currents in MGB neurons in vitro, using the following three groups of adult rats: unexposed control (Ctrl); sound exposed with behavioral evidence of tinnitus (Tin); and sound exposed with no behavioral evidence of tinnitus (Non-T). Tonic GABAAR currents were evoked using the selective agonist gaboxadol. Months after a tinnitus-inducing sound exposure, gaboxadol-evoked tonic GABAAR currents showed significant tinnitus-related increases contralateral to the sound exposure. In situ hybridization studies found increased mRNA levels for GABAAR δ-subunits contralateral to the sound exposure. Tin rats showed significant increases in the number of spikes per burst evoked using suprathreshold-injected current steps. In summary, we found little evidence of tinnitus-related decreases in GABAergic neurotransmission. Tinnitus and chronic pain may reflect thalamocortical dysrhythmia, which results from abnormal theta-range resonant interactions between thalamus and cortex, due to neuronal hyperpolarization and the initiation of low-threshold calcium spike bursts (Walton and Llinás, 2010). In agreement with this hypothesis, we found tinnitus-related increases in tonic extrasynaptic GABAAR currents, in action potentials/evoked bursts, and in GABAAR δ-subunit gene expression. These tinnitus-related changes in GABAergic function may be markers for tinnitus pathology in the MGB. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/359369-12$15.00/0.

  16. Effect of Vocal Fold Medialization on Dysphagia in Patients with Unilateral Vocal Fold Immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Daniel J; Venkatesan, Naren N; Strong, Brandon; Kuhn, Maggie A; Belafsky, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    The effect of vocal fold medialization (VFM) on vocal improvement in persons with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI) is well established. The effect of VFM on the symptom of dysphagia is uncertain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate dysphagia symptoms in patients with UVFI pre- and post-VFM. Case series with chart review. Academic tertiary care medical center. The charts of 44 persons with UVFI who underwent VFM between June 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, were abstracted from a prospectively maintained database at the University of California, Davis, Voice and Swallowing Center. Patient demographics, indications, and type of surgical procedure were recorded. Self-reported swallowing impairment was assessed with the validated 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) before and after surgery. A paired samples t test was used to compare pre- and postmedialization EAT-10 scores. Forty-four patients met criteria and underwent either vocal fold injection (73%) or thyroplasty (27%). Etiologies of vocal fold paralysis were iatrogenic (55%), idiopathic (29%), benign or malignant neoplastic (9%), traumatic (5%), or related to the late effects of radiation (2%). EAT-10 (mean ± SD) scores improved from 12.2 ± 11.1 to 7.7 ± 7.2 after medialization (P dysphagia and report significant improvement in swallowing symptoms following VFM. The symptomatic improvement appears to be durable over time. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  17. Pharyngeal weakness and upper esophageal sphincter opening in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domer, Amanda S; Leonard, Rebecca; Belafsky, Peter C

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate pharyngeal strength and upper esophageal sphincter opening in patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI). Case control study. Charts of individuals with UVFI who underwent a videofluoroscopic swallow study were reviewed. To exclude confounding variables associated with pharyngeal weakness, inclusion was limited to patients with iatrogenic and idiopathic UVFI. Data abstracted included patient demographics, etiology of UVFI, pharyngeal constriction ratio (PCR), and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening (UESmax). Data were compared to age/gender-matched controls with no history of dysphagia or UVFI. Discrete variables were analyzed using a chi-square test of independence, and an independent samples t test was used to compare the UVFI and control groups (P = 0.05). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare iatrogenic and idiopathic UVFI groups. The mean age of the cohort (n = 25) was 61 (±14 SD) years and 52% was female. The etiologies of UVFI were iatrogenic (n = 17) and idiopathic (n = 8). Thirty-eight percent of UVFI patients (n = 25) aspirated compared to 0% of controls (P  0.05). Individuals with UVFI of iatrogenic and idiopathic etiologies with subjective dysphagia demonstrate objective evidence of pharyngeal weakness. The increased prevalence of aspiration in this population may not be solely the result of impaired airway protection. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Arytenoid and posterior vocal fold surgery for bilateral vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, VyVy N; Rosen, Clark A

    2011-12-01

    Many procedures exist to address the airway restriction often seen with bilateral vocal fold immobility. We review the most recent studies involving arytenoid and/or posterior vocal fold surgery to provide an update on the issues related to these procedures. Specific focus is placed on selection of the surgical approach and operative side, use of adjunctive therapies, and outcome measures including decannulation rate, revision and complication rate, and postoperative results. Ten studies were identified between 2004 and 2011. Modifications to the orginal transverse cordotomy and medial arytenoidectomy techniques continue to be investigated to seek improvement in dyspnea symptoms with minimal decline in voice and/or swallowing function. Decannulation rates for these approaches are high. Postoperative dysphagia appears to be less commonly observed but requires continued study. The use of mitomycin-C in these procedures has been poorly studied to date. Both transverse cordotomy and medial arytenoidectomy procedures result in high success rates. However, many questions related to these procedures remain unanswered, particularly with respect to preoperative and postoperative evaluations of voice quality, swallowing function, and pulmonary status. There is need for rigorous prospective clinical studies to address these many issues further.

  19. Recovery of vocal fold immobility following isolated patent ductus arteriosus ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brent G; Jabbour, Jad; Hehir, David A; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Beste, David; Martin, Timothy; Woods, Ronald; Robey, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Identify laryngoscopic and functional outcomes of infants with vocal fold immobility (VFI) following patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) ligation and identify predictors of recovery. Retrospective review of patients with VFI following PDA ligation from 2001 to 2012 at a single institution. Inclusion criteria were: (1) PDA ligation as only cardiac surgical procedure; (2) left VFI documented by laryngoscopy; (3) minimum follow up 120 days, with at least 2 laryngoscopies performed. Resolution of VFI was determined at follow-up laryngoscopy. Univariate logistic regression models were used to identify variables associated with VFI recovery. 66 subjects were included with median follow up of 3.0 (± 2.1) years. The mean gestational age was 24.5 ± 1.4 weeks, mean birth weight 673 ± 167 g, and mean age at procedure was 18.6 ± 14.3 days. Patients presented with respiratory symptoms (39%), dysphonia (78%) and dysphagia (55%). Resolution of VFI was observed in 2/66 (3%) patients. Recovery was documented at 20 days and 11 months respectively. Respiratory symptoms, dysphagia, and dysphonia persisted at last follow up in 11%, 47%, and 20% of patients. VFI associated with ligation of the ductus arteriosus has a low rate of recovery. Clinical symptoms frequently persist, and as such regular follow-up by otolaryngologists to mitigate morbidity is indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Endo-extralaryngeal Laterofixation of the Vocal Folds in Patients with Bilateral Vocal Fold Immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Susanne; Teymoortash, Afshin; Hanschmann, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral vocal fold paralysis can result in shortness of breath and severe dyspnea which can be life-threatening. Thirty-five patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis who underwent endo-extralaryngeal laterofixation according to Lichtenberger were retrospectively analyzed regarding etiology, symptoms, treatment and complications. In 27 patients, laterofixation of the vocal cord alone was performed. Eight patients underwent laterofixation and additional posterior chordectomy of the opposite vocal cord according to Dennis and Kashima. The time of intervention ranged from 1 day to 38 years after the onset of bilateral vocal cord immobility. The intraoperative course was uneventful in all patients. None of the patients had postoperative aspiration. Postoperative voice function was acceptable in all patients. Complications of suture laterofixation were laryngeal edema, formation of fibrin, and malposition of the suture. Laterofixation of the vocal cords according to Lichtenberger is a safe and easy method that can be used as a first-stage treatment of vocal cord paralysis. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressant-like activity of Sonchus oleraceus in mouse models of immobility tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Fabiana Cardoso; Padilha, Marina de Mesquita; Alves-da-Silva, Geraldo; Soncini, Roseli; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to evaluate the putative antidepressant-like effects of hydroethanolic and dichloromethanic extracts from the aerial parts of Sonchus oleraceus (Family Asteraceae) on the performance of male mice in the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) models predictive of depression. The hydroethanolic and dichloromethanic extracts, both in doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, were orally administered 1 hour before carrying out the FST or the TST. The immobility time in both the FST and the TST was significantly reduced by acute oral treatment with the extracts (dose range, 100-300 mg/kg), without accompanying changes in ambulation, as assessed in an open-field test. This excluded the possibility that the effect of the extracts is due to an activation of locomotion. The efficacy of the extracts was found to be comparable to that of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg, p.o.). The present study provides evidence for an antidepressant-like effect of the active principle(s) present in the extracts of S. oleraceus in mice. Therefore, a standardized S. oleraceus extract or its purified constituents could be of potential interest for the treatment of depressive disorders.

  2. Acromegaly Presenting With Bilateral Vocal Fold Immobility: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Timothy; Dziegielewski, Peter T; Singh, Praby; Seemann, Robert

    2016-11-01

    To present a case of bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVCI) in a patient with acromegaly and review the current literature describing this presentation. Case report and literature review. Academic tertiary care center. English language literature search of online journal databases. A 56-year-old man presented with 3 months of progressive stridor and shortness of breath. Transnasal flexible endoscopy revealed BVCI. A tracheostomy was performed to secure his airway. Further history was suggestive of acromegaly and imaging demonstrated a pituitary macroadenoma. The diagnosis of acromegaly was made. The patient was treated with octreotide followed by an endoscopic trans sphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma. Sixteen months after his initial presentation, a right laser arytenoidectomy was performed and the patient was subsequently decannulated. In the literature to date, 11 cases of BVCI in acromegaly have been reported. These patients often present with stridor and require a tracheostomy. With treatment of their acromegaly, these patients may regain vocal fold mobility and may be decannulated. Acromegaly with BVCI is a rare presentation. Acute management of the airway of patients with acromegaly presenting with BVCI typically requires a tracheostomy. A period of 15 months should be allowed for restoration of vocal fold mobility before airway opening procedures are considered. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Factorial correspondence analysis of fear-related behaviour traits in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon-Grasteau, S; Roussot, O; Delaby, C; Faure, J M.; Mills, A; Leterrier, C; Guéméné, D; Constantin, P; Mills, M; Lepape, G; Beaumont, C

    2003-02-28

    Factorial correspondence analysis was performed on 341 quails from a F2 cross between two lines divergently selected on the duration of tonic immobility over 29 generations. Several fear- or stress-related traits were recorded, i.e. tonic immobility duration, number of inductions needed to induce tonic immobility, open-field behaviour (time spent walking, latency before first movement and number of defecations), asymmetry of tibia lengths and corticosterone concentration after restraint stress. Variables were categorised in classes and analysed by factorial correspondence analysis. The first axis was mostly described by open-field behaviour, and the second by tonic immobility traits (duration of tonic immobility and number of inductions), which showed that these behaviours were almost independent. No relationship was found between axes of the factorial correspondence analysis and corticosterone concentration or asymmetry of tibia lengths, showing that these variables reflected other characteristics of stress susceptibility than those described by tonic immobility and open-field behaviour. These results show that reaction to stress of quails is a multidimensional trait and cannot be summarised by one trait.

  4. Involvement of central opioid systems in human interferon-α induced immobility in the mouse forced swimming test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Mitsuhiro; Kitano, Yutaka; Komiyama, Chika; Hirohashi, Masaaki; Takasuna, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which human interferon-α (IFN-α) increases the immobility time in a forced swimming test, an animal model of depression.Central administration of IFN-α (0.05–50 IU per mouse, i.cist.) increased the immobility time in the forced swimming test in mice in a dose-dependent manner.Neither IFN-β nor -γ possessed any effect under the same experimental conditions.Pre-treatment with an opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (1 mg kg−1, s.c.) inhibited the prolonged immobility time induced by IFN-α (60 KIU kg−1, i.v. or 50 IU per mouse. i.cist.).Peripheral administration of naloxone methiodide (1 mg kg−1, s.c.), which does not pass the blood–brain barrier, failed to block the effect of IFN-α, while intracisternal administration of naloxone methiodide (1 nmol per mouse) completely blocked.The effect of IFN-α was inhibited by a μ1-specific opioid receptor antagonist, naloxonazine (35 mg kg−1, s.c.) and a μ1/μ2 receptor antagonist, β-FNA (40 mg kg−1, s.c.). A selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (3 mg kg−1, s.c.) and a κ-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (20 mg kg−1, s.c.), both failed to inhibit the increasing effect of IFN-α.These results suggest that the activator of the central opioid receptors of the μ1-subtype might be related to the prolonged immobility time of IFN-α, but δ and κ-opioid receptors most likely are not involved. PMID:10903965

  5. Bilateral vocal fold immobility: a 13 year review of etiologies, management and the utility of the empey index

    OpenAIRE

    Brake, Maria K.; Anderson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) is a rare diagnosis causing dyspnea, dysphonia and dysphagia. Management depends on respiratory performance, airway patency, vocal ability, and quality-of-life priorities. The authors review the presentation, management and outcome in patients diagnosed with BVFI. The utility and efficacy of the Empey index (EI) and the Expiratory Disproportion Index (EDI) are evaluated as an objective monitoring tools for BVFI patients. Methods A 13-year retr...

  6. Laryngeal chondrosarcoma of the arytenoid cartilage presenting as bilateral vocal fold immobility: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Xu, Wen; Liu, Honggang; Chen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    To describe an atypical case of laryngeal chondrosarcoma of arytenoid cartilage presenting as bilateral vocal fold immobility and to avoid potential missed diagnosis. Our case study included a detail history, physical and radiological examination, laryngeal electromyography (LEMG), and surgical treatment and pathology analysis. We compared it with the previously discussed cases of chondrosarcoma of arytenoid cartilage in the literature. Chondrosarcomas of the arytenoid cartilage is rare, and to date only approximately 10 cases have been reported. We reported a case of a 51-year-old man with 1 month of persistent dyspnea presenting with bilateral vocal fold immobility without neoplasms in larynx. The LEMG showed no obvious abnormality. The cervical-enhanced computed tomography (CT) found no significant signs of a mass except for localized high-density areas in arytenoid cartilage. Right arytenoidectomy and biopsy were performed under general anesthesia with CO2 laser with the pathological diagnosis of chondroma. A total laryngectomy was performed 2 years later, and low-grade chondrosarcoma was the final diagnosis. Laryngeal chondrosarcomas of the arytenoid cartilage are rare. It is easily neglected, especially in those cases presenting with idiopathic vocal fold immobility without any obvious signs of neoplasms. The LEMG and laryngeal CT are necessary. Sometimes, a biopsy of the arytenoid cartilage is essential. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacological analysis of the activation and receptor properties of the tonic GABA(CR current in retinal bipolar cell terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M Jones

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition in the central nervous system (CNS can occur via rapid, transient postsynaptic currents and via a tonic increase in membrane conductance, mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs respectively. Retinal bipolar cells (BCs exhibit a tonic current mediated by GABA(CRs in their axon terminal, in addition to synaptic GABA(AR and GABA(CR currents, which strongly regulate BC output. The tonic GABA(CR current in BC terminals (BCTs is not dependent on vesicular GABA release, but properties such as the alternative source of GABA and the identity of the GABA(CRs remain unknown. Following a recent report that tonic GABA release from cerebellar glial cells is mediated by Bestrophin 1 anion channels, we have investigated their role in non-vesicular GABA release in the retina. Using patch-clamp recordings from BCTs in goldfish retinal slices, we find that the tonic GABA(CR current is not reduced by the anion channel inhibitors NPPB or flufenamic acid but is reduced by DIDS, which decreases the tonic current without directly affecting GABA(CRs. All three drugs also exhibit non-specific effects including inhibition of GABA transporters. GABA(CR ρ subunits can form homomeric and heteromeric receptors that differ in their properties, but BC GABA(CRs are thought to be ρ1-ρ2 heteromers. To investigate whether GABA(CRs mediating tonic and synaptic currents may differ in their subunit composition, as is the case for GABA(ARs, we have examined the effects of two antagonists that show partial ρ subunit selectivity: picrotoxin and cyclothiazide. Tonic and synaptic GABA(CR currents were differentially affected by both drugs, suggesting that a population of homomeric ρ1 receptors contributes to the tonic current. These results extend our understanding of the multiple forms of GABAergic inhibition that exist in the CNS and contribute to visual signal processing in the retina.

  8. Assessment of patient experience with unilateral vocal fold immobility: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David O; McKiever, Monique E; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Jacobson, Barbara; Penson, David F

    2014-09-01

    Systematically moving toward patient-centered care for unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI) requires comprehensive understanding of the variability of actual patient experiences. This rigorous qualitative study assesses UVFI-related disability and proposes a preliminary taxonomy of UVFI patient experience. (1) Semistructured interviews and (2) taxonomy development. Consecutive UVFI patients presenting July to September, 2012, prospectively underwent open-ended interviews investigating how UVFI affected their quality of life (QOL) and had caused disability. Comments reported by >20% were synthesized into axes based on content similarity. Variables were arranged into a preliminary taxonomy of UVFI patient experience, which was evaluated for four attributes of face validity. The majority of 39 patients had "extensive" baseline voice use (56%) and an iatrogenic etiology (62%). Taxonomy of patient experience included three main axes of symptomatic classification: (1) voice, (2) swallowing, and (3) breathing-all with intrinsic (physical and emotional) and extrinsic (social) subaxes that describe major impacts on QOL. Voice complaints were 100% penetrant, whereas breathing and swallowing symptoms afflicted 76% and 66%, respectively, of interviewees. Of affected patients, solid and liquid dysphagia was experienced by 70% and 63%, respectively. Of dyspneic patients, shortness of breath existed with talking (97%) and exercise (72%). Persistent throat congestion (76%), weakened cough (62%), globus (62%), and dysfunctional valsalva (41%) were frequent. Patient experience with UVFI has been incompletely characterized. This qualitative assessment and preliminary taxonomy highlight several related patient experiences not well documented in the literature or incorporated into currently available metrics. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the spontaneous and gripping-induced immobility episodes on taiep rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Ma Del Carmen; Gavito, Berenice; Ita, Martha L; Valencia, Jaime; Eguibar, José R

    2005-11-01

    In 1989, we described a new autosomic-recessive myelin-mutant rat that develops a progressive motor syndrome characterized by tremor, ataxia, immobility episodes (IEs), epilepsy, and paralysis. taiep is the acronym of these symptoms. The rat developed a hypomyelination, followed by demyelination. At an age of 7-8 months, taiep rats developed IEs, characterized electroencephalographically by REM sleep-like cortical activity. In our study, we analyzed the ontogeny of gripping-induced IEs between 5 and 18 months, their dependence to light-dark changes, sexual dimorphism, and susceptibility to mild stress. Our results showed that IEs start at an age of 6.5 months, with a peak frequency between 8.5 and 9.5 months. IEs have two peaks, one in the morning (0800-1000 h) and a second peak in the middle of the night (2300-0100 h). Spontaneous IEs showed an even distribution with a mean of 3 IEs every 2 h. IEs are sexually dimorphic being more common in male rats. The IEs can be induced by gripping the rat by the tail or the thorax, but most of the IEs were produced by gripping the tail. Mild stress produced by i.p. injection of physiological saline significantly decreased IEs. These results suggested that IEs are dependent on several biological variables, which are caused by hypomyelination, followed by demyelization, which causes alterations in the brainstem and hypothalamic mechanisms responsible for the sleep-wake cycle regulation, producing emergence of REM sleep-like behavior during awake periods. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. A novel dual-wavelength laser stimulator to elicit transient and tonic nociceptive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoxi; Liu, Tianjun; Wang, Han; Yang, Jichun; Chen, Zhuying; Hu, Yong; Li, Yingxin

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a new laser stimulator to elicit both transient and sustained heat stimulation with a dual-wavelength laser system as a tool for the investigation of both transient and tonic experimental models of pain. The laser stimulator used a 980-nm pulsed laser to generate transient heat stimulation and a 1940-nm continuous-wave (CW) laser to provide sustained heat stimulation. The laser with 980-nm wavelength can elicit transient pain with less thermal injury, while the 1940-nm CW laser can effectively stimulate both superficial and deep nociceptors to elicit tonic pain. A proportional integral-derivative (PID) temperature feedback control system was implemented to ensure constancy of temperature during heat stimulation. The performance of this stimulator was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo animal experiments. In vitro experiments on totally 120 specimens fresh pig skin included transient heat stimulation by 980-nm laser (1.5 J, 10 ms), sustained heat stimulation by 1940-nm laser (50-55 °C temperature control mode or 1.5 W, 5 min continuous power supply), and the combination of transient/sustained heat stimulation by dual lasers (1.5 J, 10 ms, 980-nm pulse laser, and 1940-nm laser with 50-55 °C temperature control mode). Hemoglobin brushing and wind-cooling methods were tested to find better stimulation model. A classic tail-flick latency (TFL) experiment with 20 Wistar rats was used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of transient and tonic pain stimulation with 15 J, 100 ms 980-nm single laser pulse, and 1.5 W constant 1940-nm laser power. Ideal stimulation parameters to generate transient pain were found to be a 26.6 °C peak temperature rise and 0.67 s pain duration. In our model of tonic pain, 5 min of tonic stimulation produced a temperature change of 53.7 ± 1.3 °C with 1.6 ± 0.2% variation. When the transient and tonic stimulation protocols were combined, no significant difference was observed depending on the order

  11. Painful tonic spasms and brainstem involvement in a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Filip, Corina; Ungureanu, Aurelian; Cernuşcă-Miţaru, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory-demyelinating disease of the central nervous system classically characterized by optic neuritis and severe myelitis. New diagnostic criteria defined neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder as limited forms of NMO or diverse neurologic presentations in the presence of specific antiaquaporin-4 antibodies. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman admitted in our department for recurrent attacks of optic neuritis, tetraparesis with severe painful tonic spasms of the left limbs and brainstem involvement. Painful tonic spasms have been described as movement disorders associated with multiple sclerosis, but a growing number of reports describe them in cases of NMO. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Painful tonic heat stimulation induces GABA accumulation in the prefrontal cortex in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Danielsen, Else R; Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known on pain-induced neurotransmitter release in the human cerebral cortex. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) during tonic painful heat stimulation to test the hypothesis of increases in both glutamate and GABA, two neurotransmitters with a key role...... that GABA is released in the human cerebral cortex during painful stimulation. The results are in line with animal findings on the role of GABA in pain processing and with studies in humans showing analgesic efficacy of GABA-related drugs in clinical pain conditions....... in pain processing. Using a 3T MR scanner, we acquired spectra from the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) in 13 healthy right-handed subjects at rest and during painful heat stimulation. The painful stimulus consisted of a suprathreshold painful tonic heat pulse, which was delivered to the right...

  13. Absence-like and tonic seizures in aspartoacylase/attractin double-mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohma, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Matalon, Reuben; Surendran, Sankar; Tyring, Stephen; Kitada, Kazuhiro; Sasa, Masashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2007-04-01

    The Spontaneously Epileptic Rat (SER), a double-mutant for tremor and zitter mutations, shows spontaneous occurrences of absence-like and tonic seizures. Several lines of evidence suggest that the combined effect of Aspa and Atrn mutations is the most likely cause of the epileptic phenotype of the SER. To address this issue, we produced a new double-mutant mouse line carrying both homozygous Aspa-knockout and Atrn(mg-3J) mutant alleles. The Aspa/Atrn double-mutant mice exhibited absence-like and tonic seizures that were characterized by the appearance of 5-7 Hz spike-wave-like complexes and low voltage fast waves on EEGs. These results demonstrate directly that the simultaneous loss of the Aspa and Atrn gene functions causes epileptic seizures in the mouse and suggest that both Aspa and Atrn deficiencies might be responsible for epileptic seizures in the SER.

  14. An integrative theory of the phasic and tonic modes of dopamine modulation in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Jean-Claude; Burnod, Yves

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a model of both tonic and phasic dopamine (DA) effects on maintenance of working memory representations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The central hypothesis is that DA modulates the efficacy of inputs to prefrontal pyramidal neurons to prevent interferences for active maintenance. Phasic DA release, due to DA neurons discharges, acts at a short time-scale (a few seconds), while the tonic mode of DA release, independent of DA neurons firing, acts at a long time-scale (a few minutes). The overall effect of DA modulation is modeled as a threshold restricting incoming inputs arriving on PFC neurons. Phasic DA release temporary increases this threshold while tonic DA release progressively increases the basal level of this threshold. Thus, unlike the previous gating theory of phasic DA release, proposing that it facilitates incoming inputs at the time of their arrival, the effect of phasic DA release is supposed to restrict incoming inputs during a period of time after DA neuron discharges. The model links the cellular and behavioral levels during performance of a working memory task. It allows us to understand why a critical range of DA D1 receptors stimulation is required for optimal working memory performance and how D1 receptor agonists (respectively antagonists) increase perseverations (respectively distractability). Finally, the model leads to several testable predictions, including that the PFC regulates DA neurons firing rate to adapt to the delay of the task and that increase in tonic DA release may either improve or decrease performance, depending on the level of DA receptors stimulation at the beginning of the task.

  15. Contact heat-evoked temporal summation: tonic versus repetitive-phasic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Michal; Granovsky, Yelena; Sprecher, Elliot; Nir, Rony-Reuven; Yarnitsky, David

    2006-06-01

    Temporal summation (TS) is usually evoked by repetitive mechanical or electrical stimuli, and less commonly by tonic heat pain. The present study aimed to examine the TS induction by repetitive-phasic versus tonic heat pain stimuli. Using 27 normal volunteers, we compared the extent of summation by three calculation methods: start-to-end pain rating difference, percent change, and double-logarithmic regression of successive ratings along the stimulation. Subjects were tested twice, and the reliability of each of the paradigms was obtained. In addition, personality factors related to pain catastrophizing and anxiety level were also correlated with the psychophysical results. Both paradigms induced significant TS, with similar increases for the repetitive-phasic and the tonic paradigms, as measured on 0-100 numerical pain scale (from 52.9+/-11.7 to 80.2+/-15.5, p<0.001; and from 38.5+/-13.3 to 75.8+/-18.3, p<0.001, respectively). The extent of summation was significantly correlated between the two paradigms, when calculated by absolute change (r=0.543, p=0.004) and by regression (r=0.438, p=0.025). Session-to-session variability was similar for both paradigms, relatively large, yet not biased. As with other psychophysical parameters, this poses some limitations on TS assessment in individual patients over time. The extent of TS induced by both paradigms was found to be associated with anxiety level and pain catastrophizing. Despite some dissimilarity between the repetitive-phasic and the tonic paradigms, the many similarities suggest that the two represent a similar physiological process, even if not precisely the same. Future clinical applications of these tests will determine the clinical relevance of the TS paradigms presented in this study.

  16. THIP, a hypnotic and antinociceptive drug, enhances a tonic GABAA receptor mediated conductance in mouse neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun; Jensen, Kimmo

    2006-01-01

    its cellular actions in the neocortex are uncertain, we studied the effects of THIP on neurons in slices of frontoparietal neocortex of 13- to 19-day-old (P13-19) mice. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that the clinically relevant THIP concentration of 1 μM induced a robust tonic GABA...... suggest that THIP activates an extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated conductance in the neocortex, which may alter the cortical network activity....

  17. The Effects of Active Straight Leg Raising on Tonicity and Activity of Pelvic Stabilizer Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Shadmehr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Active straight leg raising (SLR test is advocated as a valid diagnostic method in diagnosis of sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction that can assess the quality of load transfer between trunk and lower limb. The aim of this study is Comparison of changes in tonicity and activity of pelvic stabilizer muscles during active SLR, between healthy individuals and patients with sacroiliac joint pain. Materials & Methods: A case – control study was designed in 26 women (19-50 years old. With use of simple sampling, surface electromyography from rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, adductor longus, erector spine, gluteus maximus and biceps femoris was recorded in 26 subjects (15 healthy females and 11 females with sacroiliac pain in resting position and during active SLR test. Resting muscle tonicity and rms during ramp time and hold time in active SLR test were assessed by non parametric-two independent sample test. Results: Biceps femoris activity in resting position was significantly larger in patients group (P<0.05. During the active SLR, the women with sacroiliac joint pain used much less activity in some pelvic stabilizer muscles compared to the healthy subjects (P<0.05. Conclusion: The increased resting tonicity of biceps femoris and decreased activity of pelvic stabilizer muscles in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain, suggests an alteration in the strategy for lumbopelvic stabilization that may disrupt load transference through the pelvis.

  18. Opposite effect of ATP on contraction force of tonic and phasic skeletal muscles in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, S N; Kamaliev, R R; Teplov, A Yu; Ziganshin, A U

    2011-07-01

    Experiments in vitro showed that ATP and adenosine equally suppressed contractions of frog m. sartorius, which belongs to the phasic type muscles. Adenosine receptors antagonist 8-SPT abolished the effect of adenosine, but did not change the effect of ATP. This fact proves the independence of signaling pathways of these purines. ATP produced an opposite effect on the tonic muscle m. cruralis and increased the force of its contraction. Adenosine produced an inhibitory effect on the force of m. cruralis contration. In this case, 8-SPT also eliminated the effect of adenosine, but did not change the effect of ATP. The potentiating effect of ATP was blocked by suramin, a nonselective antagonist of P2 receptors, which attests to their involvement into the effects of this purine. The opposite effects of purinergic regulation reflect fundamental differences in functional organization of phasic and tonic muscular systems. It was hypothesized that the increase in contraction force under the effect of ATP is a mechanism providing maitenance of the contracted state of tonic muscle without appreciable metabolic costs.

  19. Role of tonic GABAergic currents during pre- and early postnatal rodent development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner eKilb

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last three decades it became evident that the GABAergic system plays an essential role for the development of the central nervous system, by influencing the proliferation of neuronal precursors, neuronal migration and differentiation, as well as by controlling early activity patterns and thus formation of neuronal networks. GABA controls neuronal development via depolarizing membrane responses upon activation of ionotropic GABA receptors. However, many of these effects occur before the onset of synaptic GABAergic activity and thus require the presence of extrasynaptic tonic currents in neuronal precursors and immature neurons. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the role of tonic GABAergic currents during early brain development. In this review we compare the temporal sequence of the expression and functional relevance of different GABA receptor subunits, GABA synthesizing enzymes and GABA transporters. We also refer to other possible endogenous agonists of GABAA receptors. In addition, we describe functional consequences mediated by the GABAergic system during early developmental periods and discuss current models about the origin of extrasynaptic GABA and/or other endogenous GABAergic agonists during early developmental states. Finally, we present evidence that tonic GABAergic activity is also critically involved in the generation of physiological as well as pathophysiological activity patterns before and after the establishment of functional GABAergic synaptic connections.

  20. Regional deposition of saline aerosols of different tonicities in normal and asthmatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, P.R.; Gonda, I.; Anderson, S.D.; Bailey, D.; Bautovich, G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonisotonic aerosols are frequently used in the diagnosis and therapy of lung disease. The purpose of this work was to study the difference in the pattern of deposition of aerosols containing aqueous solutions of different tonicities. 99m Technetium-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA)-labelled saline aerosols, with mass median aerodynamic diameter 3.7-3.8 μm and geometric standard deviation 1.4, were inhaled under reproducible breathing conditions on two occasions. Hypotonic and hypertonic solutions were used in 11 normals subjects, isotonic and hypertonic solutions in 9 asthmatics. The regional deposition was quantified by a penetration index measured with the help of a tomographic technique. There was a small but significant increase (6.7%) in the penetration index of the hypotonic as compared to the hypertonic aerosols in the normal subjects. The region that was markedly affected was the trachea. The differences in the penetration of the isotonic and hypertonic aerosols in the asthmatics appeared to be strongly dependent on the state of the airways at the time of the study. These findings can be interpreted in terms of effects of growth or shrinkage of nonisotonic aerosols, as well as of airway narrowing, on regional deposition of aerosols. Tonicity of aerosols appears to affect their deposition both through physical and physiological mechanisms. This should be taken into account when interpreting the effects of inhaled aqueous solutions of various tonicities in patients in vivo. (au) (44 refs.)

  1. Characterization of a novel model of tonic heat pain stimulation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naert, Arne L G; Kehlet, Henrik; Kupers, Ron

    2008-08-15

    The vast majority of the experimental pain studies have used acute, phasic heat stimuli to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms of pain. However, the validity of these models for understanding clinical forms of pain is questionable. We here describe the characteristics of a model of prolonged tonic heat pain stimulation and compared the responses on this test with other measures of pain. In 58 normal volunteers, we applied a 7-min lasting contact heat stimulation of 47 degrees C to the upper leg while participants constantly rated their pain. Average pain rating during the 7-min period was 6.2+/-0.4, females scoring higher than men (7.4+/-0.5 vs. 5.2+/-0.5; pPain ratings showed a steady increase during the first half of the stimulation period after which they stabilized. A strong interindividual variability was observed in the time profiles of the pain ratings over the course of the 7-min stimulation period. The model showed a good test-retest reproducibility. Tonic heat pain ratings only correlated moderately with the pain threshold while stronger correlations were observed with pain tolerance and ratings of suprathreshold phasic heat pain. We conclude that the tonic heat model is a suitable model that can be applied without excessive discomfort in the majority of subjects and offers a valuable addition to the armamentarium of experimental pain models. The model can be particularly suitable for brain imaging receptor binding studies which require long stimulation periods.

  2. Role of Peripheral Alpha2 Adrenergic Receptors in Tonic Pain During Different Stages of Estrous Cycle in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    AR Abyazi Shelmani; M Taherianfard

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Estrogen and progesterone are supposed to modify pain sensitivity. However, the actual role of each of these steroid hormones in this respect is not well known. Plasma concentrations of these hormones show variation during estrous cycle. The role of alpha2 receptors in tonic pain has been pointed out. The aim of the present study was to investigate the agonist and antagonist effect of alpha2 adrenergic receptors on tonic pain sensitivity during all stages of estrous cycle in fem...

  3. Tonic 4-1BB Costimulation in Chimeric Antigen Receptors Impedes T Cell Survival and Is Vector-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Gomes-Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antigen-independent tonic signaling by chimeric antigen receptors (CARs can increase differentiation and exhaustion of T cells, limiting their potency. Incorporating 4-1BB costimulation in CARs may enable T cells to resist this functional exhaustion; however, the potential ramifications of tonic 4-1BB signaling in CAR T cells remain unclear. Here, we found that tonic CAR-derived 4-1BB signaling can produce toxicity in T cells via continuous TRAF2-dependent activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB pathway and augmented FAS-dependent cell death. This mechanism was amplified in a non-self-inactivating gammaretroviral vector through positive feedback on the long terminal repeat (LTR promoter, further enhancing CAR expression and tonic signaling. Attenuating CAR expression by substitution with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector minimized tonic signaling and improved T cell expansion and anti-tumor function. These studies illuminate the interaction between tonic CAR signaling and the chosen expression platform and identify inhibitory properties of the 4-1BB costimulatory domain that have direct implications for rational CAR design.

  4. Etiology and long-term functional swallow outcomes in pediatric unilateral vocal fold immobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbetts, Kathleen M; Wu, Derek; Hsu, Jeffrey V; Burton, William B; Nassar, Michel; Tan, Melin

    2016-09-01

    Unilateral vocal fold immobility (UVFI) results in deficits in phonatory, respiratory, and swallow function of the pediatric patient. Little is known about long-term functional swallow outcomes. Medical records of children diagnosed with UVFI between 2005 and 2014 at a tertiary children's hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Etiology, laryngoscopy findings, and swallow status at diagnosis and follow-up were recorded. Swallow outcomes were compared by etiology using Fisher's exact test. McNemar's test was used to identify correlations between return of mobility and swallow recovery. Rates of pneumonia were compared with initial swallow evaluation results using a two-tailed t-test. Eighty-eight patients with UVFI were identified and 73 patients (47% female, mean age 14.4 months, standard deviation (SD) 26.7 months) had complete medical records. Mean follow up time was 52.7 months (SD 36.8 months). Etiologies included cardiothoracic surgery (68.5%), idiopathic (12.3%), prolonged intubation (11.0%), central nervous system (CNS) abnormality (5.5%), and non-cardiac iatrogenic injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (2.7%). Forty-seven patients underwent a follow up laryngoscopy, and recovery of vocal fold (VF) mobility was documented in 42.6% (20/47). At diagnosis, 31.5% fed orally, compared with 79.5% at follow-up. Direct correlation between recovery of VF mobility and swallow recovery was not demonstrated. Cardiac etiologies demonstrated higher rates of swallow recovery than CNS abnormalities (p = 0.0393). Twenty-five children aspirated on initial modified barium swallow (MBS) and 10 children developed pneumonias at some point during the follow up period. There was no significant difference in rates of pneumonia in patients with and without aspiration on MBS. Recovery of swallow in children with UVFI does not directly parallel return of VF mobility. Long-term swallow outcome is favorable in this population. Initial MBS does not indicate ultimate swallow outcome

  5. The application of artificial vision to the monitoring of immobility and the position of patients in external therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piombo, Ch.; Petit, J.L.; Costa, A.; Lagrange, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The result of a radiation treatment is linked to the accuracy of the patient's position, his immobility during the treatment time and the repeatability of the patient's position during the various sessions. The psychological aspects which prevent the use of immobilisation constraints have lead radiotherapists to examine the use of artificial vision to perform qualimetry based on immobility and repositioning. As concerns immobility monitoring: the image of the scene, sampled according to a reference grid to reduce the size of the information, is compared in real time to a file which constitutes the reference to the initial position. This enables the detection of non stationary points which are indicative of local movements. To eliminate the artefacts, a check is performed over the eight neighbouring points of each sample, and only the points which represent a real movement are considered. As the quality of detection is linked to the computation time, observation windows are determined by the physician during the first session which enable detection to be limited to observation of the defined fields only. As concerns position monitoring: the positional differences between the position corresponding to the first session taken as a reference, and the position under observation to be monitored, result from the measurements obtained by the co-location of a vector modelling the current image with the vector modelling in the same manner the reference image limited by a window over the part of the image visualising the target volume. A successive presentation is made of the environmental specifications, the heuristics involved in the processing of images providing the elimination of acquisition chain interference, variations in the brightness of treatment rooms and natural physiological movements such as the blinking of cyclids, and the experimental results obtained on site

  6. Chronic exercise prevents repeated restraint stress-provoked enhancement of immobility in forced swimming test in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Jang-Kyu; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    We assessed whether chronic treadmill exercise attenuated the depressive phenotype induced by restraint stress in ovariectomized mice (OVX). Immobility of OVX in the forced swimming test was comparable to that of sham mice (CON) regardless of the postoperative time. Immobility was also no difference between restrained mice (exposure to periodic restraint for 21 days; RST) and control mice (CON) on post-exposure 2nd and 9th day, but not 15th day. In contrast, the immobility of ovariectomized mice with repeated stress (OVX + RST) was profoundly enhanced compared to ovariectomized mice-alone (OVX), and this effect was reversed by chronic exercise (19 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks; OVX + RST + Ex) or fluoxetine administration (20 mg/kg, OVX + RST + Flu). In parallel with behavioral data, the immunoreactivity of Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX) in OVX was significantly decreased by repeated stress. However, the reduced numbers of Ki-67- and DCX-positive cells in OVX + RST were restored in response to chronic exercise (OVX + RST + Ex) and fluoxetine (OVX + RST + Flu). In addition, the expression pattern of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase IV (CaMKIV) was similar to that of the hippocampal proliferation and neurogenesis markers (Ki-67 and DCX, respectively). These results suggest that menopausal depression may be induced by an interaction between repeated stress and low hormone levels, rather than a deficit in ovarian secretion alone, which can be improved by chronic exercise.

  7. Enhancement of the anti-immobility action of antidepressants by risperidone in the forced swimming test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóż, Zofia; Kabziński, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of antidepressants (ADs) belonging to different pharmacological groups and risperidone (an atypical antipsychotic drug), given separately or jointly, on immobility time in the forced swimming test in male C57BL/6J mice. The antidepressants: citalopram, fluvoxamine, sertraline, reboxetine, milnacipran (5 and 10 mg/kg), or risperidone in low doses (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) given alone did not change the immobility time of mice in the forced swimming test. Co-treatment with reboxetine or milnacipran (10 mg/kg) and risperidone in a lower dose of 0.05 mg/kg or with sertraline, reboxetine (5 and 10 mg/kg), citalopram, fluvoxamine, milnacipran (10 mg/kg) and risperidone in a higher dose of 0.1 mg/kg produced antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test. WAY100635 (a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist) inhibited the effects induced by co-administration of ADs and risperidone. Active behavior in the forced swimming test was not a consequence of an increased general activity, since the combined treatment with ADs and risperidone failed to enhance the locomotor activity of mice. The obtained results indicate that a low dose of risperidone enhances the activity of ADs in an animal model of depression, and that, among other mechanisms, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play a role in these effects.

  8. Altered Neuromodulatory Drive May Contribute to Exaggerated Tonic Vibration Reflexes in Chronic Hemiparetic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob G. McPherson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Exaggerated stretch-sensitive reflexes are a common finding in elbow flexors of the contralesional arm in chronic hemiparetic stroke, particularly when muscles are not voluntarily activated prior to stretch. Previous investigations have suggested that this exaggeration could arise either from an abnormal tonic ionotropic drive to motoneuron pools innervating the paretic limbs, which could bring additional motor units near firing threshold, or from an increased influence of descending monoaminergic neuromodulatory pathways, which could depolarize motoneurons and amplify their responses to synaptic inputs. However, previous investigations have been unable to differentiate between these explanations, leaving the source(s of this excitability increase unclear. Here, we used tonic vibration reflexes (TVRs during voluntary muscle contractions of increasing magnitude to infer the sources of spinal motor excitability in individuals with chronic hemiparetic stroke. We show that when the paretic and non-paretic elbow flexors are preactivated to the same percentage of maximum prior to vibration, TVRs remain significantly elevated in the paretic arm. We also show that the rate of vibration-induced torque development increases as a function of increasing preactivation in the paretic limb, even though the amplitude of vibration-induced torque remains conspicuously unchanged as preactivation increases. It is highly unlikely that these findings could be explained by a source that is either purely ionotropic or purely neuromodulatory, because matching preactivation should control for the effects of a potential ionotropic drive (and lead to comparable tonic vibration reflex responses between limbs, while a purely monoaminergic mechanism would increase reflex magnitude as a function of preactivation. Thus, our results suggest that increased excitability of motor pools innervating the paretic limb post-stroke is likely to arise from both ionotropic and

  9. MR imaging findings of generalized tonic clonic seizure induced brain changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Chung, Jin Il; Yonn, Pyeong Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Joo Hee [College of Medicine, Yonsei Unversity, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate MRI signal changes in the brain induced by generalized tonic clonic seizure. Six patients who underwent MRI within three days of generalized tonic clonic seizure were retrospectively reviewed. Diffusion -weighted images were added in three patients during initial examination, and in six, the follow-up MRI was performed nine days to five months after the onset of seizure. We evaluated the patterns of signal change, location of the lesion and degree of contrast enhancement, and the signal change seen on diffusion weighted images. We also compared the signal changes seen on initial and follow-up MRI. In all six patients, MR images showed focally increased T2 signal intensity, and swelling and increased volume of the involved cortical gyrus. In five, the lesion was mainly located in the cortical gray matter and subcortical white matter; namely, in the bilateral cingulate gyri, and the bilateral parieto-occipital, left parietal, left frontoparietal, and left temporal lobe. In the remaining patient, the lesion was located in the right hippocampus. Two patients showed bilateral lesions and one showed multiple lesions. In four patients, T1-weighted images revealed decreased signal intensity of the same location, and in one, gyral contrast enhancement was noted. On diffusion-weighted images, three patients showed increased signal intensity. Follow-up MRI demonstrated complete resolution of the abnormal signal change (n=3D5), or a decrease (n=3D1). A transient increase in MR signal intensity with increased volume was noted in cortical and subcortical white matter after generalized tonic clonic seizure. This finding reflects the vasogenic and cytotoxic edema induced by seizure and can help exclude etiologic lesions such as tumors, inflammation and demyelinating disease that induce epilepsy. (author)

  10. MR imaging findings of generalized tonic clonic seizure induced brain changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Chung, Jin Il; Yonn, Pyeong Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Joo Hee

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate MRI signal changes in the brain induced by generalized tonic clonic seizure. Six patients who underwent MRI within three days of generalized tonic clonic seizure were retrospectively reviewed. Diffusion -weighted images were added in three patients during initial examination, and in six, the follow-up MRI was performed nine days to five months after the onset of seizure. We evaluated the patterns of signal change, location of the lesion and degree of contrast enhancement, and the signal change seen on diffusion weighted images. We also compared the signal changes seen on initial and follow-up MRI. In all six patients, MR images showed focally increased T2 signal intensity, and swelling and increased volume of the involved cortical gyrus. In five, the lesion was mainly located in the cortical gray matter and subcortical white matter; namely, in the bilateral cingulate gyri, and the bilateral parieto-occipital, left parietal, left frontoparietal, and left temporal lobe. In the remaining patient, the lesion was located in the right hippocampus. Two patients showed bilateral lesions and one showed multiple lesions. In four patients, T1-weighted images revealed decreased signal intensity of the same location, and in one, gyral contrast enhancement was noted. On diffusion-weighted images, three patients showed increased signal intensity. Follow-up MRI demonstrated complete resolution of the abnormal signal change (n=3D5), or a decrease (n=3D1). A transient increase in MR signal intensity with increased volume was noted in cortical and subcortical white matter after generalized tonic clonic seizure. This finding reflects the vasogenic and cytotoxic edema induced by seizure and can help exclude etiologic lesions such as tumors, inflammation and demyelinating disease that induce epilepsy. (author)

  11. Automated real-time detection of tonic-clonic seizures using a wearable EMG device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Henning, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of automated detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) using a wearable surface EMG device. METHODS: We prospectively tested the technical performance and diagnostic accuracy of real-time seizure detection using a wearable surface EMG device....... The seizure detection algorithm and the cutoff values were prespecified. A total of 71 patients, referred to long-term video-EEG monitoring, on suspicion of GTCS, were recruited in 3 centers. Seizure detection was real-time and fully automated. The reference standard was the evaluation of video-EEG recordings...

  12. Investigating the affective component of pain: no startle modulation by tonic heat pain in startle responsive individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Claudia; Schaller, Jörg; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Experimental tonic pain has been assumed to equal clinical pain by triggering sizeable affective responses. A psycho-physiological indicator of defensive affective-motivational responses is the startle reflex. However, earlier studies have not provided unequivocal evidence for a potentiation of the startle reflex during tonic contact heat pain. The demonstration of modulating effects of pain on the startle reflex might require very intense tonic stimulation and investigation of subjects, who are particularly sensitive to startle potentiation by threatening cues. We investigated a sample of healthy subjects (N=20), who had shown pronounced startle amplitude potentiation in response to attack pictures. Noxious stimulation was provided by hand immersion into a hot water bath, which is a tonic pain model known for intense and summated stimulation. Modulation of the startle reflex was attempted by use of two stimulation intensities (42 °C, 46 °C) and one control condition (no stimulation). Even in these favorable conditions, we did not observe startle potentiation under painful stimulation in comparison to non-painful conditions although subjects reported to be experiencing moderate to high pain. Our findings indicate that tonic heat pain does not trigger defensive affective-motivational responses as measured by the startle reflex when it is applied in a predictable and thus non-threatening fashion. Future research should investigate the effects of manipulations of threat on startle responses to painful stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of a glycine transporter-1 inhibitor and D-serine on MK-801-induced immobility in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Koike, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Kohnosuke; Kambe, Daiji; Kaku, Ayaka; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2015-02-01

    Glutamatergic dysfunction, particularly the hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The positive modulation of the glycine site on the NMDA receptor has been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for schizophrenia. However, its efficacy against negative symptoms, which are poorly managed by current medications, has not been fully addressed. In the present study, the effects of the positive modulation of the glycine site on the NMDA receptor were investigated in an animal model of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The subchronic administration of MK-801 increased immobility in the forced swimming test in rats without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity. The increased immobility induced by MK-801 was attenuated by the atypical antipsychotic clozapine but not by either the typical antipsychotic haloperidol or the antidepressant imipramine, indicating that the increased immobility induced by subchronic treatment with MK-801 in the forced swimming test may represent a negative symptom of schizophrenia. Likewise, positive modulation of the glycine sites on the NMDA receptor using an agonist for the glycine site, D-serine, and a glycine transporter-1 inhibitor, N-[(3R)-3-([1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yloxy)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-N-methylglycine hydrochloride (NFPS), significantly reversed the increase in immobility in MK-801-treated rats without reducing the immobility time in vehicle-treated rats. The present results show that the stimulation of the NMDA receptor through the glycine site on the receptor either directly with D-serine or by blocking glycine transporter-1 attenuates the immobility elicited by the subchronic administration of MK-801 and may be potentially useful for the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analgesia induced by morphine microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus: effects on tonic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dualé, Christian; Sierralta, Fernando; Dallel, Radhouane

    2007-07-01

    One of the possible sites of action of the analgesic effect of morphine is the Nucleus Raphe Magnus, as morphine injected into this structure induces analgesia in transient pain models. In order to test if morphine in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus is also analgesic in a tonic pain model, 5 microg of morphine or saline (control) were microinjected into the Nucleus Raphe Magnus of the rat. Analgesic effects were assessed following nociceptive stimulation using transient heating of the tail (phasic pain) and subcutaneous orofacial injection of 1.5 % formalin (tonic pain). While morphine was strongly analgesic for the tail-flick response (p <0.0001 compared to control), analgesia on the response to formalin was also observed for both early (p = 0.007) and late responses (p = 0.02). However, the response to formalin was not completely blunted. These results suggest that the Nucleus Raphe Magnus is not the exclusive site of action of morphine-induced analgesia in clinical conditions.

  15. Do Tonic Itch and Pain Stimuli Draw Attention towards Their Location?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette I. M. van Laarhoven

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although itch and pain are distinct experiences, both are unpleasant, may demand attention, and interfere with daily activities. Research investigating the role of attention in tonic itch and pain stimuli, particularly whether attention is drawn to the stimulus location, is scarce. Methods. In the somatosensory attention task, fifty-three healthy participants were exposed to 35-second electrical itch or pain stimuli on either the left or right wrist. Participants responded as quickly as possible to visual targets appearing at the stimulated location (ipsilateral trials or the arm without stimulation (contralateral trials. During control blocks, participants performed the visual task without stimulation. Attention allocation at the itch and pain location is inferred when responses are faster ipsilaterally than contralaterally. Results. Results did not indicate that attention was directed towards or away from the itch and pain location. Notwithstanding, participants were slower during itch and pain than during control blocks. Conclusions. In contrast with our hypotheses, no indications were found for spatial attention allocation towards the somatosensory stimuli. This may relate to dynamic shifts in attention over the time course of the tonic sensations. Our secondary finding that itch and pain interfere with task performance is in-line with attention theories of bodily perception.

  16. Role of SM22 in the differential regulation of phasic vs. tonic smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mehboob

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary proteomics studies between tonic vs. phasic smooth muscles identified three distinct protein spots identified to be those of transgelin (SM22). The latter was found to be distinctly downregulated in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) SMC. The major focus of the present studies was to examine the differential molecular control mechanisms by SM22 in the functionality of truly tonic smooth muscle of the IAS vs. the adjoining phasic smooth muscle of the RSM. We monitored SMC lengths before and after incubation with pFLAG-SM22 (for SM22 overexpression), and SM22 small-interfering RNA. pFLAG-SM22 caused concentration-dependent and significantly greater relaxation in the IAS vs. the RSM SMCs. Conversely, temporary silencing of SM22 caused contraction in both types of the SMCs. Further studies revealed a significant reverse relationship between the levels of SM22 phosphorylation and the amount of SM22-actin binding in the IAS and RSM SMC. Data showed higher phospho-SM22 levels and decreased SM22-actin binding in the IAS, and reverse to be the case in the RSM SMCs. Experiments determining the mechanism for SM22 phosphorylation in these smooth muscles revealed that Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor) but not Gö-6850 (protein kinase C inhibitor) caused concentration-dependent decreased phosphorylation of SM22. We speculate that SM22 plays an important role in the regulation of basal tone via Rho kinase-induced phosphorylation of SM22. PMID:25617350

  17. [The use of prokinetics for the correction of motor and tonic digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, I V; Samsonov, A A; Karmanova, E A; Ivanchenko, E A

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal tonic-motor activity is a key component in pathogenesis of many digestive disorders. Secondary disturbance of tonic-motor activity of digestive organs and the accompanying symptoms are known to develop in conjunction with diseases of other organs and systems, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, myotonic muscular dystrophy, amyloidosis, hyper- and hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, etc. Disturbed motor activity in the gastro-duodenal region most frequently underlies functional dyspepsia, i.e. a group of symptoms unrelated to organic, systemic and metabolic diseases. Prokinetics are an important class of medicinal products for the treatment of all clinical forms of dyspepsia. One of the new ones is itopride hdrochloride having combined mechanism of action. Clinical studies of this drug revealed its high efficiency in patients with functional dyspepsia, chronic gastritis, and diabetic gastroparesis. It is well tolerated by the patients and produces no serious side effects. Inclusion of this drug in therapy improves the outcome of the treatment of disturbed motor activity of the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Precipitating factors and therapeutic outcome in epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Saher, M S; Burr, W; Elger, C E

    2000-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of precipitating factors and therapy on the outcome of epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Retrospective analysis of data from 34 patients (mean age at seizure onset 19 years; mean duration of follow-up 9.2 years) suffering from epilepsy of either cryptogenic or remote symptomatic (n = 19), or idiopathic (n = 15) etiology. The total number of seizures in all patients was 146. Without treatment 97 seizures manifested during 90.5 years without treatment (1.07 seizures/year), during treatment with carbamazepine or valproate 49 seizures occurred within 224 years (0.2 seizures/year). The frequency of seizures was significantly lower during treatment. Precipitating factors were found in relation to 31% of seizures in patients with remote symptomatic or cryptogenic epilepsy, and for 51% of seizures in patients with idiopathic epilepsy. There was a low frequency of seizures in patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Precipitating factors are common. Antiepileptic drug treatment is effective.

  19. Tonic pain and continuous EEG: prediction of subjective pain perception by alpha-1 power during stimulation and at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Rony-Reuven; Sinai, Alon; Moont, Ruth; Harari, Eyal; Yarnitsky, David

    2012-03-01

    Pain neurophysiology has been chiefly characterized via event-related potentials (ERPs), which are exerted using brief, phase-locked noxious stimuli. Striving for objectively characterizing clinical pain states using more natural, prolonged stimuli, tonic pain has been recently associated with the individual peak frequency of alpha oscillations. This finding encouraged us to explore whether alpha power, reflecting the magnitude of the synchronized activity within this frequency range, will demonstrate a corresponding relationship with subjective perception of tonic pain. Five-minute-long continuous EEG was recorded in 18 healthy volunteers under: (i) resting-state; (ii) innocuous temperature; and (iii) psychophysically-anchored noxious temperature. Numerical pain scores (NPSs) collected during the application of tonic noxious stimuli were tested for correlation with alpha-1 and alpha-2 power. NPSs and alpha power remained stable throughout the recording conditions (Ps⩾0.381). In the noxious condition, alpha-1 power obtained at the bilateral temporal scalp was negatively correlated with NPSs (Ps⩽0.04). Additionally, resting-state alpha-1 power recorded at the bilateral temporal scalp was negatively correlated with NPSs reported during the noxious condition (Ps⩽0.038). Current findings suggest alpha-1 power may serve as a direct, objective and experimentally stable measure of subjective perception of tonic pain. Furthermore, resting-state alpha-1 power might reflect individuals' inherent tonic pain responsiveness. The relevance of alpha-1 power to tonic pain perception may deepen the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the processing of prolonged noxious stimulation. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SNT-1 functions as the Ca2+ sensor for tonic and evoked neurotransmitter release in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Haowen; Wang, Wei; Chandra, Mintu; Collins, Brett M; Hu, Zhitao

    2018-05-14

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) binds Ca 2+ through its tandem C2 domains (C2A and C2B) and triggers Ca 2+ -dependent neurotransmitter release. Here we show that snt-1 , the homolog of mammalian Syt1, functions as the Ca 2+ sensor for both tonic and evoked neurotransmitter release at the C. elegans neuromuscular junction. Mutations that disrupt Ca 2+ binding in double C2 domains of SNT-1 significantly impaired tonic release, whereas disrupting Ca 2+ binding in a single C2 domain had no effect, indicating that the Ca 2+ binding of the two C2 domains is functionally redundant for tonic release. Stimulus-evoked release was significantly reduced in snt-1 mutants, with prolonged release latency as well as faster rise and decay kinetics. Unlike tonic release, evoked release was triggered by Ca 2+ binding solely to the C2B domain. Moreover, we showed that SNT-1 plays an essential role in the priming process in different subpopulations of synaptic vesicles with tight or loose coupling to Ca 2+ entry. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We showed that SNT-1 in C. elegans regulates evoked neurotransmitter release through Ca 2+ binding to its C2B domain, a similar way to Syt1 in the mouse CNS and the fly NMJ. However, the largely decreased tonic release in snt-1 mutants argues SNT-1 has a clamping function. Indeed, Ca 2+ -binding mutations in the C2 domains in SNT-1 significantly reduced the frequency of the miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC), indicating that SNT-1 also acts as a Ca 2+ sensor for tonic release. Therefore, revealing the differential mechanisms between invertebrates and vertebrates will provide significant insights into our understanding how synaptic vesicle fusion is regulated. Copyright © 2018 the authors.

  1. Agreement between clinical and laboratory methods assessing tonic and cross-link components of accommodation and vergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Pascaline; Priot, Anne-Emmanuelle; Philippe, Matthieu; Fuchs, Philippe; Roumes, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    Several tests are available to optometrists for investigating accommodation and vergence. This study sought to investigate the agreement between clinical and laboratory methods and to clarify which components are actually measured when tonic and cross-link of accommodation and vergence are assessed. Tonic vergence, tonic accommodation, accommodative vergence (AC/A) and vergence accommodation (CA/C) were measured using several tests. Clinical tests were compared to the laboratory assessment, the latter being regarded as an absolute reference. The repeatability of each test and the degree of agreement between the tests were quantified using Bland-Altman analysis. The values obtained for each test were found to be stable across repetitions; however, in most cases, significant differences were observed between tests supposed to measure the same oculomotor component. Tonic and cross-link components cannot be easily assessed because proximal and instrumental responses interfere with the assessment. Other components interfere with oculomotor assessment. Specifically, accommodative divergence interferes with tonic vergence estimation and the type of accommodation considered in the AC/A ratio affects its magnitude. Results on clinical tonic accommodation and clinical CA/C show that further investigation is needed to clarify the limitations associated with the use of difference of Gaussian as visual targets to open the accommodative loop. Although different optometric tests of accommodation and vergence rely on the same basic principles, the results of this study indicate that clinical and laboratory methods actually involve distinct components. These differences, which are induced by methodological choices, must be taken into account, when comparing studies or when selecting a test to investigate a particular oculomotor component. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  2. Reward and behavioral factors contributing to the tonic activity of monkey pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons during saccade tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Okada

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg in the brainstem plays a role in controlling reinforcement learning and executing conditioned behavior. We previously examined activity of PPTg neurons in monkeys during a reward-conditioned, visually guided saccade task, and reported that a population of these neurons exhibited tonic responses throughout the task period. These tonic responses might depend on prediction of the upcoming reward, successful execution of the task, or both. Here, we sought to further distinguish these factors and to investigate how each contributes to the tonic neuronal activity of the PPTg. In our normal visually guided saccade task, the monkey initially fixated on the central fixation target, then made saccades to the peripheral saccade target, and received a juice reward after the saccade target disappeared. Most of the tonic activity terminated shortly after the reward delivery, when the monkey broke fixation. To distinguish between reward and behavioral epochs, we then changed the task sequence for a block of trials, such that the saccade target remained visible after the reward delivery. Under these visible conditions, the monkeys tended to continue fixating on the saccade target even after the reward delivery. Therefore, the prediction of the upcoming reward and the end of an individual trial were separated in time. Regardless of the task conditions, half of the tonically active PPTg neurons terminated their activity around the time of the reward delivery, consistent with the view that PPTg neurons might send reward prediction signals until the time of reward delivery, which is essential for computing reward prediction error in reinforcement learning. On the other hand, the other half of the tonically active PPTg neurons changed their activity dependent on the task condition. In the normal condition, the tonic responses terminated around the time of the reward delivery, while in the visible condition, the activity

  3. Reward and Behavioral Factors Contributing to the Tonic Activity of Monkey Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus Neurons during Saccade Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ken-Ichi; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) in the brainstem plays a role in controlling reinforcement learning and executing conditioned behavior. We previously examined the activity of PPTg neurons in monkeys during a reward-conditioned, visually guided saccade task, and reported that a population of these neurons exhibited tonic responses throughout the task period. These tonic responses might depend on prediction of the upcoming reward, successful execution of the task, or both. Here, we sought to further distinguish these factors and to investigate how each contributes to the tonic neuronal activity of the PPTg. In our normal visually guided saccade task, the monkey initially fixated on the central fixation target (FT), then made saccades to the peripheral saccade target and received a juice reward after the saccade target disappeared. Most of the tonic activity terminated shortly after the reward delivery, when the monkey broke fixation. To distinguish between reward and behavioral epochs, we then changed the task sequence for a block of trials, such that the saccade target remained visible after the reward delivery. Under these visible conditions, the monkeys tended to continue fixating on the saccade target even after the reward delivery. Therefore, the prediction of the upcoming reward and the end of an individual trial were separated in time. Regardless of the task conditions, half of the tonically active PPTg neurons terminated their activity around the time of the reward delivery, consistent with the view that PPTg neurons might send reward prediction signals until the time of reward delivery, which is essential for computing reward prediction error in reinforcement learning. On the other hand, the other half of the tonically active PPTg neurons changed their activity dependent on the task condition. In the normal condition, the tonic responses terminated around the time of the reward delivery, while in the visible condition, the activity continued

  4. Rapid small-angle X-ray diffraction of a tonically contracting molluscan smooth muscle recorded with imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Y.; Okada, K.; Yoshida, O.; Seto, T.; Amemiya, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns from the anterior byssus retractor muscles of Mytilus edulis contracting tonically in response to stimulation with acetylcholine were recorded in a 30 s exposure with synchrotron radiation and a high-sensitivity X-ray area detector called an imaging plate. The 190 A layer line from the thin filaments increased in intensity with increase in tonic tension up to 6x10 4 kg m -2 . Above this value, the layer-line intensity remained almost constant and comparable to that for a contracting skeletal muscle, indicating that the same structural changes of the thin filaments occur in both muscles. (orig.)

  5. Is Forced Swimming Immobility a Good Endpoint for Modeling Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia? - Study of Sub-Anesthetic Ketamine Repeated Administration Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GILDA NEVES

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Immobility time in the forced swimming has been described as analogous to emotional blunting or apathy and has been used for characterizing schizophrenia animal models. Several clinical studies support the use of NMDA receptor antagonists to model schizophrenia in rodents. Some works describe the effects of ketamine on immobility behavior but there is variability in the experimental design used leading to controversial results. In this study, we evaluated the effects of repeated administration of ketamine sub-anesthetic doses in forced swimming, locomotion in response to novelty and novel object recognition, aiming a broader evaluation of the usefulness of this experimental approach for modeling schizophrenia in mice. Ketamine (30 mg/kg/day i.p. for 14 days induced a not persistent decrease in immobility time, detected 24h but not 72h after treatment. This same administration protocol induced a deficit in novel object recognition. No change was observed in mice locomotion. Our results confirm that repeated administration of sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine is useful in modeling schizophrenia-related behavioral changes in mice. However, the immobility time during forced swimming does not seem to be a good endpoint to evaluate the modeling of negative symptoms in NMDAR antagonist animal models of schizophrenia.

  6. Is Forced Swimming Immobility a Good Endpoint for Modeling Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia? - Study of Sub-Anesthetic Ketamine Repeated Administration Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Gilda; Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila B; Pranke, Mariana A; Betti, Andresa H; Rates, Stela M K

    2017-01-01

    Immobility time in the forced swimming has been described as analogous to emotional blunting or apathy and has been used for characterizing schizophrenia animal models. Several clinical studies support the use of NMDA receptor antagonists to model schizophrenia in rodents. Some works describe the effects of ketamine on immobility behavior but there is variability in the experimental design used leading to controversial results. In this study, we evaluated the effects of repeated administration of ketamine sub-anesthetic doses in forced swimming, locomotion in response to novelty and novel object recognition, aiming a broader evaluation of the usefulness of this experimental approach for modeling schizophrenia in mice. Ketamine (30 mg/kg/day i.p. for 14 days) induced a not persistent decrease in immobility time, detected 24h but not 72h after treatment. This same administration protocol induced a deficit in novel object recognition. No change was observed in mice locomotion. Our results confirm that repeated administration of sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine is useful in modeling schizophrenia-related behavioral changes in mice. However, the immobility time during forced swimming does not seem to be a good endpoint to evaluate the modeling of negative symptoms in NMDAR antagonist animal models of schizophrenia.

  7. Tonic cervical influences on eye nystagmus following hemilabyrinthectomy: immediate and plastic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, V E; Petrosini, L

    1984-12-17

    In intact guinea pigs a passive horizontal rotation of the body about the fixed head induces compensatory ocular movements (cervico-ocular reflex). When the static neck deviation is maintained, a significant ocular displacement is observed. In acutely hemilabyrinthectomized animals, static body deviation towards the lesion side tonically alters eye nystagmus. It affects slow phase eye velocity and quick phase amplitude and frequency causing the eye to reach a less eccentric orbital position. Apart from such immediate influences, a plastic effect on eye nystagmus abatement is induced. In the animals restrained with no body-on-head deviation, abatement of nystagmus is delayed with respect to the animals restrained with 35 degrees body deviation towards the lesion side. Thus the head position signal is not only a contributing factor for the correction of postural deficits but also influences the time course of the ocular balancing process following unilateral vestibular damage.

  8. Incidence of tonic spasms as the initial presentation of pediatric multiple sclerosis in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjak, Neli; Osredkar, Damjan; Meglič, Nuška Pečarič; Benedik, Mirjana Perković

    2017-07-01

    Tonic spasms (TS) are involuntary movement patterns that can present in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). They have been first described decades ago, but are frequently missed and misdiagnosed, particularly in the pediatric MS patients and if appearing ahead of hallmark neurological signs and symptoms of MS. Slovenia is a country with the population of about 2 million people. In the years from 1992 to 2016, we have treated 57 sequential pediatric patients with MS at our hospital, which is the only tertiary medical institution for treating children with MS in the country. We present the only two MS patients, a 17-year-old girl and a 14-year-old boy, whose first manifestation of MS were TS. This allowed us to estimate the incidence of TS in pediatric MS patients in Slovenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Guaraná's Journey from Regional Tonic to Aphrodisiac and Global Energy Drink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Guaraná (Paullinia cupana H.B.K., Sapindaceae is a rainforest vine that was domesticated in the Amazon for its caffeine-rich fruits. Guaraná has long been used as a tonic and to treat various disorders in Brazil and abroad and became a national soda in Brazil about a century ago. In the last two decades or so, guaraná has emerged as a key ingredient in various ‘sports’ and energy drinks as well as concoctions that allegedly boost one's libido. For some time, guaraná's high caffeine content was thought to be a detriment because of health concerns about excessive intake of caffeine-rich drinks. But it is precisely this quality, and the fact that it has a mysterious name and comes from an exotic land, that has propelled guaraná into a global beverage.

  10. Responses to tonic heat pain in the ongoing EEG under conditions of controlled attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, Janet; Meyer-Brandis, Gesa; Kunz, Miriam; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    To confirm the existence of an ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern that is truly suggestive of pain, tonic heat pain was induced by small heat pulses at 1 °C above the pain threshold and compared to slightly less intense tonic non-painful heat pulses at 1 °C below the pain threshold. Twenty healthy subjects rated the sensation intensity during thermal stimulation. Possible confounding effects of attention were thoroughly controlled for by testing in four conditions: (1) focus of attention directed ipsilateral or (2) contralateral to the side of the stimulation, (3) control without a side preference, and (4) no control of attention at all. EEG was recorded via eight leads according to the 10/20 convention. Absolute power was computed for the frequency bands delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha1 (8-11 Hz), alpha2 (11-14 Hz), beta1 (14-25 Hz), and beta2 (25-35 Hz). Ratings were clearly distinct between the heat and pain conditions and suggestive for heat and pain sensations. Manipulation of attention proved to be successful by producing effects on the ratings and on the EEG activity (with lower ratings and lower EEG activity (theta, beta1, 2) over central areas for side-focused attention). During pain stimulation, lower central alpha1 and alpha2 activity and higher right-parietal and right-occipital delta power were observed compared to heat stimulation. This EEG pattern was not influenced by the manipulation of attention. Since the two types of stimuli (pain, heat) were subjectively felt differently although stimulation intensities were nearby, we conclude that this EEG pattern is clearly suggestive of pain.

  11. The GABAA Antagonist DPP-4-PIOL Selectively Antagonises Tonic over Phasic GABAergic Currents in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent...

  12. Blockade of T-type calcium channels prevents tonic-clonic seizures in a maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkaki, Sophie; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Lerat, Benoit; Françon, Dominique; Forichon, Luc; Chemin, Jean; Valjent, Emmanuel; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Lory, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    T-type (Cav3) calcium channels play important roles in neuronal excitability, both in normal and pathological activities of the brain. In particular, they contribute to hyper-excitability disorders such as epilepsy. Here we have characterized the anticonvulsant properties of TTA-A2, a selective T-type channel blocker, in mouse. Using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) as a model of tonic-clonic generalized seizures, we report that mice treated with TTA-A2 (0.3 mg/kg and higher doses) were significantly protected against tonic seizures. Although no major change in Local Field Potential (LFP) pattern was observed during the MES seizure, analysis of the late post-ictal period revealed a significant increase in the delta frequency power in animals treated with TTA-A2. Similar results were obtained for Cav3.1-/- mice, which were less prone to develop tonic seizures in the MES test, but not for Cav3.2-/- mice. Analysis of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and c-Fos expression revealed a rapid and elevated neuronal activation in the hippocampus following MES clonic seizures, which was unchanged in TTA-A2 treated animals. Overall, our data indicate that TTA-A2 is a potent anticonvulsant and that the Cav3.1 isoform plays a prominent role in mediating TTA-A2 tonic seizure protection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Evidence for a role of NTS2 receptors in the modulation of tonic pain sensitivity

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    Martinez Jean

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central neurotensin (NT administration results in a naloxone-insensitive antinociceptive response in animal models of acute and persistent pain. Both NTS1 and NTS2 receptors were shown to be required for different aspects of NT-induced analgesia. We recently demonstrated that NTS2 receptors were extensively associated with ascending nociceptive pathways, both at the level of the dorsal root ganglia and of the spinal dorsal horn. Then, we found that spinally administered NTS2-selective agonists induced dose-dependent antinociceptive responses in the acute tail-flick test. In the present study, we therefore investigated whether activation of spinal NTS2 receptors suppressed the persistent inflammatory pain symptoms observed after intraplantar injection of formalin. Results We first demonstrated that spinally administered NT and NT69L agonists, which bind to both NTS1 and NTS2 receptors, significantly reduced pain-evoked responses during the inflammatory phase of the formalin test. Accordingly, pretreatment with the NTS2-selective analogs JMV-431 and levocabastine was effective in inhibiting the aversive behaviors induced by formalin. With resolution at the single-cell level, we also found that activation of spinal NTS2 receptors reduced formalin-induced c-fos expression in dorsal horn neurons. However, our results also suggest that NTS2-selective agonists and NTS1/NTS2 mixed compounds differently modulated the early (21–39 min and late (40–60 min tonic phase 2 and recruited endogenous pain inhibitory mechanisms integrated at different levels of the central nervous system. Indeed, while non-selective drugs suppressed pain-related behaviors activity in both part of phase 2, intrathecal injection of NTS2-selective agonists was only efficient in reducing pain during the late phase 2. Furthermore, assessment of the stereotypic pain behaviors of lifting, shaking, licking and biting to formalin also revealed that unlike non

  14. Differences between Dorsal and Ventral Striatum in the Sensitivity of Tonically Active Neurons to Rewarding Events

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    Kevin Marche

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the striatum, cholinergic interneurons, electrophysiologically identified as tonically active neurons (TANs, represent a relatively homogeneous group in terms of their functional properties. They display typical pause in tonic firing in response to rewarding events which are of crucial importance for reinforcement learning. These responses are uniformly distributed throughout the dorsal striatum (i.e., motor and associative striatum, but it is unknown, at least in monkeys, whether differences in the modulation of TAN activity exist in the ventral striatum (i.e., limbic striatum, a region specialized for processing of motivational information. To address this issue, we examined the activity of dorsal and ventral TANs in two monkeys trained on a Pavlovian conditioning task in which a visual stimulus preceded the delivery of liquid reward by a fixed time interval. We found that the proportion of TANs responding to the stimulus predictive of reward did not vary significantly across regions (58%–80%, whereas the fraction of TANs responding to reward was higher in the limbic striatum (100% compared to the motor (65% and associative striatum (52%. By examining TAN modulation at the level of both the population and the individual neurons, we showed that the duration of pause responses to the stimulus and reward was longer in the ventral than in the dorsal striatal regions. Also, the magnitude of the pause was greater in ventral than dorsal striatum for the stimulus predictive of reward but not for the reward itself. We found similar region-specific differences in pause response duration to the stimulus when the timing of reward was less predictable (fixed replaced by variable time interval. Regional variations in the duration and magnitude of the pause response were transferred from the stimulus to reward when reward was delivered in the absence of any predictive stimulus. It therefore appears that ventral TANs exhibit stronger responses to

  15. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Lindera obtusiloba Extracts on the Immobility Behavior of Rats in the Forced Swim Test

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    Dong Wook Lim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lindera obtusiloba extracts are commonly used as an alternative medicine due to its numerous health benefits in Korea. However, the antidepressant-like effects of L. obtusiloba extracts have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to determine whether L. obtusiloba extracts exhibited antidepressant-like activity in rats subjected to forced swim test (FST-induced depression. Acute treatment of rats with L. obtusiloba extracts (200 mg/kg, p.o. significantly reduced immobility time and increased swimming time without any significant change in climbing. Rats treated with L. obtusiloba extracts also exhibited a decrease in the limbic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis response to the FST, as indicated by attenuation of the corticosterone response and decreased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the hippocampus CA3 region. In addition, L. obtusiloba extracts, at concentrations that were not affected by cell viability, significantly decreased luciferase activity in response to cortisol in a concentration-dependent manner by the glucocorticoid binding assay in HeLa cells. Our findings suggested that the antidepressant-like effects of L. obtusiloba extracts were likely mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential of L. obtusiloba extracts as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of depression.

  16. Bilateral vocal fold immobility: a 13 year review of etiologies, management and the utility of the Empey index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Maria K; Anderson, Jennifer

    2015-06-26

    Bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI) is a rare diagnosis causing dyspnea, dysphonia and dysphagia. Management depends on respiratory performance, airway patency, vocal ability, and quality-of-life priorities. The authors review the presentation, management and outcome in patients diagnosed with BVFI. The utility and efficacy of the Empey index (EI) and the Expiratory Disproportion Index (EDI) are evaluated as an objective monitoring tools for BVFI patients. A 13-year retrospective review was performed of BVFI patients at St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, a tertiary referral centre for laryngology. Forty-eight patients were included; 46 presented with airway obstruction symptoms. Tracheotomy was required for airway management in 40% of patients throughout the course of their treatment, which was reduced to 19% at the end of the study period. Twenty-one patients underwent endoscopic arytenoidectomy/cordotomy. Non-operative management included continuous positive airway pressure devices. Pulmonary function testing was carried out in 29 patients. Only a portion of the BVFI patients met the defined upper airway obstruction criteria (45% EI and 52% EDI). Seven patients had complete pre- and post-operative PFTs for comparison and all seven had ratios that significantly improved post-operatively which correlated clinically. The EI and EDI have limited use in evaluating patients with who have variable upper airway obstruction, but may be helpful in monitoring within subject airway function changes.

  17. Aging is associated with diminished muscle re-growth and myogenic precursor cell expansion in the early recovery phase after immobility-induced atrophy in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, Charlotte Arneboe; Frandsen, Ulrik; Mackey, Abigail L

    2013-01-01

    Recovery of skeletal muscle mass from immobilisation-induced atrophy is faster in young than older individuals, yet the cellular mechanisms remain unknown. We examined the cellular and molecular regulation of muscle recovery in young and old human subjects subsequent to 2 weeks of immobility...... expression analysis of key growth and transcription factors associated with local skeletal muscle milieu were performed after 2 weeks immobility (Imm) and following 3 days (+3d) and 4 weeks (+4wks) of re-training. OM demonstrated no detectable gains in MFA (VL muscle) and no increases in number of Pax7......-induced muscle atrophy. Re-training consisted of 4 weeks of supervised resistive exercise in 9 older (OM: 67.3yrs, range 61-74) and 11 young (YM: 24.4yrs, range 21-30) males. Measures of myofiber area (MFA), Pax7-positive satellite cells (SC) associated with type I and type II muscle fibres, as well as gene...

  18. Immobility time during the forced swimming test predicts sensitivity to amitriptyline, whereas traveled distance in the circular corridor indicates resistance to treatment in female Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Serrano, Ana G; Zaldívar-Rae, Jaime; Salgado, Humberto; Pineda, Juan C

    2015-03-25

    Among the main issues in the pharmacological treatment of depression are the wide variation in response to antidepressants among individual patients and the lack of indexes that allow prediction of which drug will be effective in a particular case. We evaluated whether differential sensitivity to amitriptyline is related to dichotomous categorization of individuals on the basis of their behavioral responses to two common paradigms used to evaluate the potential of tricyclic drugs as antidepressants. Hence, we categorized a cohort of 38 female rats on the basis of their immobility time in the conditioning phase of the forced swimming test [FST; high immobility (HI) vs. low immobility (LI) rats] and their locomotor behavior in the circular corridor test [high locomotor response (HR) vs. low locomotor response (LR) rats]. We subjected the rodents to the FST while under the influence of vehicle (n=20) or amitriptyline (15 mg/kg; n=18). We found no statistical evidence of dependence between categorizations of rats on the basis of their behavior in the FST and circular corridor test. Rats categorized as HI/LI and HR/LR significantly differed in their sensitivity/resistance to amitriptyline, as evidenced by changes (or lack thereof) in their immobility time, climbing time, and swimming time during the FST. These results confirm that different behavioral styles among rats are linked to differential sensitivity/resistance to antidepressants. However, we specifically found that categorizing rats as HI/LI better reflected sensitivity to amitriptyline, whereas categorizing them as HR/LR better revealed resistance to the drug. These differential responses should be considered in experimental approaches. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stimulation of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2 receptor attenuates the MK-801-induced increase in the immobility time in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Karasawa, Jun-Ichi; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2016-02-01

    Negative symptoms of schizophrenia are poorly managed using the currently available antipsychotics. Previous studies indicate that agonists of the metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptors may provide a novel approach for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the effects of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists or mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulators have not yet been clearly elucidated in animal models of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, we reported that the forced swimming test in rats treated with subchronic MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, may be regarded as a useful test to evaluate the activities of drugs against the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We evaluated the effects of LY379268, an mGlu2/3 receptor agonist, and BINA, an mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulator, on the hyperlocomotion induced by acute administration of MK-801 (0.15mg/kg, sc) and on the increase in the immobility time in the forced swimming test induced by subchronic treatment with MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, sc, twice a day for 7 days) in rats. Both LY379268 (3mg/kg, sc) and BINA (100mg/kg, ip) attenuated the increase in the immobility time induced by subchronic treatment with MK-801 at the same doses at which they attenuated the MK-801-induced increase in locomotor activity, but had no effect on the immobility time in saline-treated rats. The present results suggest that stimulation of the mGlu2 receptor attenuates the increase in the immobility time in the forced swimming test elicited by subchronic administration of MK-801, and may be potentially useful for treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in mouse brain induce loss of righting reflex, but not immobility, in response to noxious stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Sohtaro; Irifune, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Nobuhito; Takarada, Tohru; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Endo, Chie; Takata, Takashi; Dohi, Toshihiro; Sato, Tomoaki; Kawahara, Michio

    2007-06-01

    The general anesthetic state comprises behavioral and perceptual components, including amnesia, unconsciousness, and immobility. gamma-Aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) inhibitory neurotransmission is an important target for anesthetic action at the in vitro cellular level. In vivo, however, the functional relevance of enhancing GABAergic neurotransmission in mediating essential components of the general anesthetic state is unknown. Gabaculine is a GABA-transaminase inhibitor that inhibits degradation of released GABA, and consequently increases endogenous GABA in the central nervous system. Here, we examined, behaviorally, the ability of increased GABA levels to produce components of the general anesthetic state. All drugs were administered systemically in adult male ddY mice. To assess the general anesthetic components, two end-points were used. One was loss of righting reflex (LORR; as a measure of unconsciousness); the other was loss of movement in response to tail-clamp stimulation (as a measure of immobility). Gabaculine induced LORR in a dose-dependent fashion with a 50% effective dose of 100 (75-134; 95% confidence limits) mg/kg. The behavioral and microdialysis studies revealed that the endogenous GABA-induced LORR occurred in a brain concentration-dependent manner. However, even larger doses of gabaculine (285-400 mg/kg) produced no loss of tail-clamp response. In contrast, all the tested volatile anesthetics concentration-dependently abolished both righting and tail-clamp response, supporting the evidence that volatile anesthetics act on a variety of molecular targets. These findings indicate that LORR is associated with enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission, but that immobility in response to noxious stimulation is not, suggesting that LORR and immobility are mediated through different neuronal pathways and/or regions in the central nervous system.

  1. Quantifying and Characterizing Tonic Thermal Pain Across Subjects From EEG Data Using Random Forest Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Vishal; Case, Michelle; Shirinpour, Sina; He, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Effective pain assessment and management strategies are needed to better manage pain. In addition to self-report, an objective pain assessment system can provide a more complete picture of the neurophysiological basis for pain. In this study, a robust and accurate machine learning approach is developed to quantify tonic thermal pain across healthy subjects into a maximum of ten distinct classes. A random forest model was trained to predict pain scores using time-frequency wavelet representations of independent components obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) data, and the relative importance of each frequency band to pain quantification is assessed. The mean classification accuracy for predicting pain on an independent test subject for a range of 1-10 is 89.45%, highest among existing state of the art quantification algorithms for EEG. The gamma band is the most important to both intersubject and intrasubject classification accuracy. The robustness and generalizability of the classifier are demonstrated. Our results demonstrate the potential of this tool to be used clinically to help us to improve chronic pain treatment and establish spectral biomarkers for future pain-related studies using EEG.

  2. Critical tonicity determination of sperm using fluorescent staining and flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noiles, E.E.; Ruffing, N.A.; Kleinhans, F.W.; Mark, L.A.; Watson, P.F.; Critser, J.K. (Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (USA)); Horstman, L. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). School of Veterinary Medicine); Mazur, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The use of cryopreserved, rather than fresh, mammalian semen for artificial insemination confers several important medical and/or economic advantages. However, current methods for cryopreservation of both human and bovine spermatozoa result in approximately only a 50% survival rate with thawing, obviously reducing the fertilizing capacity of the semen. A primary consideration during the cooling process is to avoid intracellular ice crystal formation with its lethal consequences to the cell. Current techniques achieve this by controlling the cooling rate. Computation of the time necessary for this dehydration, and hence, the cooling rate, is dependent upon knowledge of the water permeability coefficient (L{sub {rho}}) and its activation energy. The fluorophore, 6-carboxyfluoroscein diacetate (CFDA), which is nonfluorescent, readily crosses the intact plasma membrane. Intracellular esterases hydrolyze CFDA to 6-carboxyfluoroscein, a fluorescent, membrane-impermeable fluorophore. Consequently, spermatozoa with intact plasma membranes fluoresce bright green (Garner et. al., 1986), but those with disrupted membranes do not. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use loss of CFDA fluorescence to determine the osmolality at which 50% of the spermatozoa will swell and lyse (critical tonicity, CT). These data will then be used to determine the L{sub {rho}} and its activation energy for sperm, thus increasing the knowledge available in cellular cryopreservation. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Tonically Active α5GABAA Receptors Reduce Motoneuron Excitability and Decrease the Monosynaptic Reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Canto-Bustos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons, the final common path of the Central Nervous System (CNS, are under a complex control of its excitability in order to precisely translate the interneuronal pattern of activity into skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation. To fulfill this relevant function, motoneurons are provided with a vast repertoire of receptors and channels, including the extrasynaptic GABAA receptors which have been poorly investigated. Here, we confirmed that extrasynaptic α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors localize with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT positive cells, suggesting that these receptors are expressed in turtle motoneurons as previously reported in rodents. In these cells, α5GABAA receptors are activated by ambient GABA, producing a tonic shunt that reduces motoneurons’ membrane resistance and affects their action potential firing properties. In addition, α5GABAA receptors shunted the synaptic excitatory inputs depressing the monosynaptic reflex (MSR induced by activation of primary afferents. Therefore, our results suggest that α5GABAA receptors may play a relevant physiological role in motor control.

  4. Tonic and phasic changes in anteromedial globus pallidus activity in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelashvili, Michal; Smeets, Anouk Y J M; Bronfeld, Maya; Zeef, Dagmar H; Leentjens, Albert F G; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Vivianne; Janssen, Marcus L F; Temel, Yasin; Ackermans, Linda; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a hyperkinetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by tics. Assess the neuronal changes in the associative/limbic GP associated with Tourette syndrome. Neurophysiological recordings were performed from the anterior (associative/limbic) GPe and GPi of 8 awake patients during DBS electrode implantation surgeries. The baseline firing rate of the neurons was low in a state-dependent manner in both segments of the GP. Tic-dependent transient rate changes were found in the activity of individual neurons of both segments around the time of the tic. Neither oscillatory activity of individual neurons nor correlations in their interactions were observed. The results demonstrate the involvement of the associative/limbic pathway in the underlying pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome and point to tonic and phasic modulations of basal ganglia output as a key mechanisms underlying the abnormal state of the disorder and the expression of individual tics, respectively. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Immediate effects of the toe spreader on the tonic toe flexion reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saca, L R; Catlin, P A; Segal, R L

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether the use of a toe spreader to inhibit the tonic toe flexion reflex (TTFR) immediately alters temporal-distance gait characteristics, plantar surface contact, or muscle activity in the limb exhibiting the TTFR of subjects with hemiparesis secondary to supraspinal lesion. Eighteen adults with hemiparesis secondary to supraspinal lesions served as subjects for the standing portion of the study. Sixteen of the subjects participated in the gait portion of the study. The study was a randomized, within-subject, between-conditions comparison consisting of standing and gait phases, with four conditions for each phase (shoe off, toe spreader off/on, shoe on, toe spreader off/on). Measures performed were ink footprint gait analysis and integrated electromyography from the limb exhibiting the TTFR. Presence of the TTFR was reduced significantly with the use of the toe spreader. Velocity and cadence were increased significantly by use of the toe spreader. The toe spreader may be a useful treatment option for improving gait. The clinical significance of these findings, however, will depend on the functional context of toe-spreader use.

  6. Tonic Pupil and Corneal Anesthesia after Vitrectomy and Encircling Band for Retinal Detachment in an Ex-Premature Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Valldeperas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy presented with a total retinal detachment in his right eye. He had a bilateral 360° argon laser treatment for an active retinopathy of prematurity performed after his birth. He underwent an uneventful pars plana vitrectomy, encircling band, 810-nm diode endolaser and heavy silicone oil (Densiron® endotamponade. A tonic pupil and abolition of corneal sensitivity, with a large epithelial defect, were observed during the postoperative period. We discuss the possible etiopathogenic mechanisms of the long and short ciliary nerves damage, and the role that retinopathy of prematurity and retinal detachment laser treatment and the encircling band placement might have played in the development of the tonic pupil and the corneal anesthesia.

  7. The effects of physical therapy on exaggerated muscle tonicity, balance and quality of life on hemiparetic patients due to stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoseinabadi, M.R.; Taheri, H.R.; Keavanloo, F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of physical therapy on balance, exaggerated muscle tonicity and quality of life on patients with hemiparesis. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2011 among male hemiparetic patients secondary to stroke, at a physiotherapy centre in Neyshabur, Iran. Twenty-four patients were randomly assigned to two equal groups representing the cases and the controls. The cases were assigned to do the practical protocol for 4 weeks. To collect the data, Berg Balance Scaling, Modified Ashworth Scale, Barthel Activities of Daily Living Index and demographic questionnaires were used. Paired and un-paired t-tests were used to analyse data. All analyses were done on SPSS 16. Results: The two groups were similar before intervention. Post-test analysis showed that the average balance and quality of life significantly improved (p<0.001) among the cases, and the quadriceps muscle tonicity decreased (p<0.001). Among the controls, there was no significant change between pre-test and post-test readings. Conclusions: Physical therapy can enhance balance and quality of life of hemiparetic patients and reduces their exaggerated muscle tonicity. (author)

  8. Context-dependent modulation of alphabetagamma and alphabetadelta GABA A receptors by penicillin: implications for phasic and tonic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Botzolakis, Emmanuel J; Macdonald, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Penicillin, an open-channel blocker of GABA(A) receptors, was recently reported to inhibit phasic, but not tonic, currents in hippocampal neurons. To distinguish between isoform-specific and context-dependent modulation as possible explanations for this selectivity, the effects of penicillin were evaluated on recombinant GABA(A) receptors expressed in HEK293T cells. When co-applied with saturating GABA, penicillin decreased peak amplitude, induced rebound, and prolonged deactivation of currents evoked from both synaptic and extrasynaptic receptor isoforms. However, penicillin had isoform-specific effects on the extent of desensitization, reflecting its ability to differentially modulate peak (non-equilibrium) and residual (near-equilibrium) currents. This suggested that the context of activation could determine the apparent sensitivity of a given receptor isoform to penicillin. To test this hypothesis, we explored the ability of penicillin to modulate synaptic and extrasynaptic isoform currents that were activated under more physiologically relevant conditions. Interestingly, while currents evoked from synaptic isoforms under phasic conditions (transient activation by a saturating concentration of GABA) were substantially inhibited by penicillin, currents evoked from extrasynaptic isoforms under tonic conditions (prolonged application by a sub-saturating concentration of GABA) were minimally affected. We therefore concluded that the reported inability of penicillin to modulate tonic currents could not simply be attributed to insensitivity of extrasynaptic receptors, but rather, reflected an inability to modulate these receptors in their native context of activation.

  9. Salvia miltiorrhiza Induces Tonic Contraction of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter in Rats via Activation of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Chung Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to 40% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD suffer from proton pump inhibitor refractory GERD but clinically the medications to strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES to avoid irritating reflux are few in number. This study aimed to examine whether Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM extracts induce tonic contraction of rat LES ex vivo and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. To investigate the mechanism underlying the SM extract-induced contractile effects, rats were pretreated with atropine (a muscarinic receptor antagonist, tetrodotoxin (a sodium channel blocker, nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker, and Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA, followed by administration of cumulative dosages of SM extracts. SM extracts induced dose-related tonic contraction of the LES, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, atropine, or nifedipine. However, the SM extract-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution with EGTA. Next, SM extracts significantly induce extracellular Ca2+ entry into primary LES cells in addition to intracellular Ca2+ release and in a dose-response manner. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the SM extracts consistently induced significant extracellular Ca2+ influx into primary LES cells in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, SM extracts could induce tonic contraction of LES mainly through the extracellular Ca2+ influx pathway.

  10. Differential involvement of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors in human interferon-alpha-induced immobility in the mouse forced swimming test.

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    Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Shang, Jing; Zhang, Luyong

    2010-01-01

    Although Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha, CAS 9008-11-1) is a powerful drug in treating several viral infections and certain tumors, a considerable amount of neuropsychiatric side-effects such as depression and anxiety are an unavoidable consequence. Combination with the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (CAS 56296-78-7) significantly improved the situation. However, the potential 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor-signals involved in the antidepressant effects are still unclear. The effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor signals were analyzed by using the mouse forced swimming test (FST), a predictive test of antidepressant-like action. The present results indicated that (1) fluoxetine (administrated intragastrically, 30 mg/kg; not subactive dose: 15 mg/kg) significantly reduced IFN-alpha-induced increase of the immobility time in the forced swimming test; (2) 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands alone or in combination had no effects on IFN-alpha-induced increase of the immobility time in the FST; (3) surprisingly, WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, 634908-75-1) and 8-OH-DPAT(5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, CAS 78950-78-4) markedly enhanced the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine at the subactive dose (15 mg/kg, i. g.) on the IFN-alpha-treated mice in the FST. Further investigations showed that fluoxetine combined with WAY 100635 and 8-OH-DPAT failed to produce antidepressant effects in the FST. (4) Co-application of CGS 12066A (5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, CAS 109028-09-3) or GR 127935 (5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist, CAS 148642-42-6) with fluoxetine had no synergistic effects on the IFN-alpha-induced increase of immobility time in FST. (5) Interestingly, co-administration of GR 127935, WAY 100635 and fluoxetine significantly reduced the IFN-alpha-induced increase in immobility time of FST, being more effective than co-administration of WAY 100635 and fluoxetine. All results suggest that (1) compared to

  11. The fentanyl concentration required for immobility under propofol anesthesia is reduced by pre-treatment with flurbiprofen axetil.

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    Kodaka, Mitsuharu; Tsukakoshi, Mikiko; Miyao, Hideki; Tsuzaki, Koichi; Ichikawa, Junko; Komori, Makiko

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the plasma fentanyl concentration required to produce immobility in 50% of patients in response to skin incision (Cp50incision) compared with placebo under target-controlled infusion (TCI) propofol anesthesia. Sixty-two unpremedicated patients scheduled to undergo gynecologic laparoscopy were randomly assigned to receive placebo (control group) or flurbiprofen axetil 1 mg·kg(-1) (flurbiprofen group) preoperatively. General anesthesia was induced with fentanyl and propofol, and intubation was performed after succinylcholine 1 mg·kg(-1). Propofol was administered via a target-controlled infusion (TCI) system (Diprifusor™) set at an effect-site concentration of 5 μg·mL(-1). Fentanyl was given by a TCI system using the STANPUMP software (Schafer model). The concentration for the first patient was set at 3 ng·mL(-1) and modified in each group according to the up-down method. Skin incision was performed after more than ten minutes equilibration time. Serum fentanyl concentration, bispectral index (BIS), and hemodynamic parameters were measured two minutes before and after skin incision. The Cp50incision of fentanyl was derived from the mean of the crossovers (i.e., the serum fentanyl concentrations of successive participants who responded and those who did not or vice versa). Ten and 11 independent crossover pairs were collected in the control and flurbiprofen groups, respectively, representing 42 of 62 enrolled patients. The mean (SD) fentanyl Cp50incision was less in the flurbiprofen group [0.84 (0.63) ng·mL(-1)] than in the control group [1.65 (1.15) ng·mL(-1)]; P = 0.007; however, there were no differences in BIS, blood pressure, or heart rate, between groups. Preoperative flurbiprofen axetil decreased the Cp50incision of fentanyl by 49% during propofol anesthesia without changing the BIS or hemodynamic variables.

  12. Strain differences in paroxetine-induced reduction of immobility time in the forced swimming test in mice: role of serotonin.

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    Guzzetti, Sara; Calcagno, Eleonora; Canetta, Alessandro; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Fracasso, Claudia; Caccia, Silvio; Cervo, Luigi; Invernizzi, Roberto W

    2008-10-10

    We studied the antidepressant-like effect of paroxetine in strains of mice carrying different isoforms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT). The effect of paroxetine alone and in combination with pharmacological treatments enhancing or lowering 5-HT synthesis or melatonin was assessed in the forced swimming test in mice carrying allelic variants of TPH-2 (1473C in C57BL/6 and 1473G in DBA/2 and BALB/c). Changes in brain 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) accumulation and melatonin levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Paroxetine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) reduced immobility time in C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice but had no such effect in DBA/2J, DBA/2N and BALB/c mice, even at 10 mg/kg. Enhancing 5-HT synthesis with tryptophan reinstated the antidepressant-like effect of paroxetine in DBA/2J, DBA/2N and BALB/c mice whereas inhibition of 5-HT synthesis prevented the effect of paroxetine in C57BL/6N mice. The response to paroxetine was not associated with changes in locomotor activity, brain melatonin or brain levels of the drug measured at the end of the behavioral test. These results support the importance of 5-HT synthesis in the response to SSRIs and suggest that melatonin does not contribute to the ability of tryptophan to rescue the antidepressant-like effect of paroxetine.

  13. Improved Pain Relief With Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation for Two Weeks in Patients Using Tonic Stimulation: Results From a Small Clinical Study.

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    Courtney, Peter; Espinet, Anthony; Mitchell, Bruce; Russo, Marc; Muir, Andrew; Verrills, Paul; Davis, Kristina

    2015-07-01

    Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivers a tonic waveform with consistent stream of pulses; burst delivers groups of pulses separated by short pulse-free periods. The current study compared the short-term safety and efficacy of burst with tonic stimulation in subjects already receiving SCS. At 4 IRB-approved sites, 22 subjects previously implanted with an SCS device for intractable, chronic pain gave informed consent and received burst stimulation for 14 days. Subjects reported average daily Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for overall, trunk, and limb pain using tonic stimulation and after 7 and 14 days of burst stimulation. Thoughts about pain were assessed using the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Areas of paresthesia were assessed during tonic and burst stimulation using body maps. Assessment of patient satisfaction and preferred stimulation occurred after 14 days of burst. Average daily overall VAS reduced 46% from a mean of 53.5 (±20.2) mm during tonic SCS to 28.5 (±18.1) mm during burst (p pain relief was the most common reason cited for preference. A majority of subjects reported improved pain relief using burst compared with tonic stimulation. Most subjects experienced less paresthesia during burst and preferred burst citing better pain relief. © 2015 The Authors. Neuromodulation: Technology at the Neural Interface published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. Painful tonic spasm in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders: Prevalence, clinical implications and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Zhang, Qin; Lian, Zhiyun; Chen, Hongxi; Shi, Ziyan; Feng, Huiru; Miao, Xiaohui; Du, Qin; Zhou, Hongyu

    2017-10-01

    Painful tonic spasm (PTS) is a common symptom in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). This study aimed to obtain further insights into the prevalence, characteristics, and treatment of PTS in patients with NMOSD, and to systematically investigate and compare the clinical features and prognosis of NMOSD with and without PTS. We reviewed the medical records and prospectively interviewed patients with NMOSD who attended the West China Hospital of Sichuan University in Chengdu, China between September 2014 and December 2016. In total, 52 of the 230 patients with NMOSD experienced PTS (22.61%). Patients with NMOSD and PTS were characterized by a higher age at onset (P = 0.017), higher annual relapse rate (ARR) (P = 0.003), higher ARR of myelitis (P = 0.011), and a tendency to experience pruritus (P = 0.025). Sodium channel blocking antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine) had higher efficacy than gabapentin in the treatment of PTS (P = 0.001). Although the progression index was higher in patients with PTS, this difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.05). Our study suggested that immunosuppressors for the prevention of relapse should be administered without delay in patients with NMOSD and PTS. Owing to the side effects of carbamazepine, we recommend oxcarbazepine as the first-line of treatment for PTS in patients with NMOSD. Whether PTS is a marker of disease severity in NMOSD remains to be determined, requiring a long-term prospective observational study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tonic tensor tympani syndrome in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients: A multi-clinic prevalence study

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    Myriam Westcott

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tonic tensor tympani syndrome (TTTS is an involuntary, anxiety-based condition where the reflex threshold for tensor tympani muscle activity is reduced, causing a frequent spasm. This can trigger aural symptoms from tympanic membrane tension, middle ear ventilation alterations and trigeminal nerve irritability. TTTS is considered to cause the distinctive symptoms of acoustic shock (AS, which can develop after exposure to an unexpected loud sound perceived as highly threatening. Hyperacusis is a dominant AS symptom. Aural pain/blockage without underlying pathology has been noted in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients, without wide acknowledgment. This multiclinic study investigated the prevalence of TTTS symptoms and AS in tinnitus and hyperacusis patients. This study included consecutive patients with tinnitus and/or hyperacusis seen in multiple clinics. Data collected: Symptoms consistent with TTTS (pain/numbness/burning in and around the ear; aural "blockage"; mild vertigo/nausea; "muffled" hearing; tympanic flutter; headache; onset or exacerbation from exposure to loud/intolerable sounds; tinnitus/hyperacusis severity. All patients were medically cleared of underlying pathology, which could cause these symptoms. 60.0% of the total sample (345 patients, 40.6% of tinnitus only patients, 81.1% of hyperacusis patients had ≥1 symptoms (P < 0.001. 68% of severe tinnitus patients, 91.3% of severe hyperacusis patients had ≥1 symptoms (P < 0.001. 19.7% (68/345 of patients in the total sample had AS. 83.8% of AS patients had hyperacusis, 41.2% of non-AS patients had hyperacusis (P < 0.001. The high prevalence of TTTS symptoms suggests they readily develop in tinnitus patients, more particularly with hyperacusis. Along with AS, they should be routinely investigated in history-taking.

  16. Exocytosis of ATP From Astrocytes Modulates Phasic and Tonic Inhibition in the Neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasooli-Nejad, Seyed; Andrew, Jemma; Haydon, Philip G.; Pankratov, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Communication between neuronal and glial cells is important for many brain functions. Astrocytes can modulate synaptic strength via Ca2+-stimulated release of various gliotransmitters, including glutamate and ATP. A physiological role of ATP release from astrocytes was suggested by its contribution to glial Ca2+-waves and purinergic modulation of neuronal activity and sleep homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying release of gliotransmitters remain uncertain, and exocytosis is the most intriguing and debated pathway. We investigated release of ATP from acutely dissociated cortical astrocytes using “sniff-cell” approach and demonstrated that release is vesicular in nature and can be triggered by elevation of intracellular Ca2+ via metabotropic and ionotropic receptors or direct UV-uncaging. The exocytosis of ATP from neocortical astrocytes occurred in the millisecond time scale contrasting with much slower nonvesicular release of gliotransmitters via Best1 and TREK-1 channels, reported recently in hippocampus. Furthermore, we discovered that elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ in cortical astrocytes triggered the release of ATP that directly activated quantal purinergic currents in the pyramidal neurons. The glia-driven burst of purinergic currents in neurons was followed by significant attenuation of both synaptic and tonic inhibition. The Ca2+-entry through the neuronal P2X purinoreceptors led to phosphorylation-dependent down-regulation of GABAA receptors. The negative purinergic modulation of postsynaptic GABA receptors was accompanied by small presynaptic enhancement of GABA release. Glia-driven purinergic modulation of inhibitory transmission was not observed in neurons when astrocytes expressed dn-SNARE to impair exocytosis. The astrocyte-driven purinergic currents and glia-driven modulation of GABA receptors were significantly reduced in the P2X4 KO mice. Our data provide a key evidence to support the physiological importance of exocytosis of ATP from astrocytes

  17. Exocytosis of ATP from astrocytes modulates phasic and tonic inhibition in the neocortex.

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    Ulyana Lalo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication between neuronal and glial cells is important for many brain functions. Astrocytes can modulate synaptic strength via Ca(2+-stimulated release of various gliotransmitters, including glutamate and ATP. A physiological role of ATP release from astrocytes was suggested by its contribution to glial Ca(2+-waves and purinergic modulation of neuronal activity and sleep homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying release of gliotransmitters remain uncertain, and exocytosis is the most intriguing and debated pathway. We investigated release of ATP from acutely dissociated cortical astrocytes using "sniff-cell" approach and demonstrated that release is vesicular in nature and can be triggered by elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ via metabotropic and ionotropic receptors or direct UV-uncaging. The exocytosis of ATP from neocortical astrocytes occurred in the millisecond time scale contrasting with much slower nonvesicular release of gliotransmitters via Best1 and TREK-1 channels, reported recently in hippocampus. Furthermore, we discovered that elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+ in cortical astrocytes triggered the release of ATP that directly activated quantal purinergic currents in the pyramidal neurons. The glia-driven burst of purinergic currents in neurons was followed by significant attenuation of both synaptic and tonic inhibition. The Ca(2+-entry through the neuronal P2X purinoreceptors led to phosphorylation-dependent down-regulation of GABAA receptors. The negative purinergic modulation of postsynaptic GABA receptors was accompanied by small presynaptic enhancement of GABA release. Glia-driven purinergic modulation of inhibitory transmission was not observed in neurons when astrocytes expressed dn-SNARE to impair exocytosis. The astrocyte-driven purinergic currents and glia-driven modulation of GABA receptors were significantly reduced in the P2X4 KO mice. Our data provide a key evidence to support the physiological importance of exocytosis of

  18. Ectopic Expression of α6 and δ GABAA Receptor Subunits in Hilar Somatostatin Neurons Increases Tonic Inhibition and Alters Network Activity in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaoping; Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S.; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The role of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons remains unclear and may vary among subgroups. Somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus show negligible expression of nonsynaptic GABAAR subunits and very low tonic inhibition. To determine the effects of ectopic expression of tonic GABAAR subtypes in these neurons, Cre-dependent viral vectors were used to express GFP-tagged GABAAR subunits (α6 and δ) selectively in hilar SOM neurons in SOM-Cre mice. In single-transfected animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong expression of either the α6 or δ subunit; in cotransfected animals, both subunits were consistently expressed in the same neurons. Electrophysiology revealed a robust increase of tonic current, with progressively larger increases following transfection of δ, α6, and α6/δ subunits, respectively, indicating formation of functional receptors in all conditions and likely coassembly of the subunits in the same receptor following cotransfection. An in vitro model of repetitive bursting was used to determine the effects of increased tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons on circuit activity in the dentate gyrus. Upon cotransfection, the frequency of GABAAR-mediated bursting in granule cells was reduced, consistent with a reduction in synchronous firing among hilar SOM interneurons. Moreover, in vivo studies of Fos expression demonstrated reduced activation of α6/δ-cotransfected neurons following acute seizure induction by pentylenetetrazole. The findings demonstrate that increasing tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons can alter dentate gyrus circuit activity during strong stimulation and suggest that tonic inhibition of interneurons could play a role in regulating excessive synchrony within the network. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In contrast to many hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin (SOM) neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus have very low levels of nonsynaptic GABAARs and exhibit

  19. Effect of Withania somnifera on forced swimming test induced immobility in mice and its interaction with various drugs.

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    Shah, P C; Trivedi, N A; Bhatt, J D; Hemavathi, K G

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant action of Withania somnifera (WS) as well as its interaction with the conventional antidepressant drugs and to delineate the possible mechanism of its antidepressant action using forced swimming model in mice. Effect of different doses of WS, fluoxetine and imipramine were studied on forced swimming test induced mean immobility time (MIT). Moreover effect of WS 100 mg/kg, i.p. was observed at different time intervals. Effect produced by combination of sub therapeutic doses of WS with imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were also observed. Effect of WS (100 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as combination of WS (37.5 mg/kg, i.p.) with either imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were observed in mice pretreated with reserpine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and clonidine (0.15 mg/kg, i.p.). Effects of prazosin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) pre-treatment were also observed on WS induced decrease in MIT. WS produced dose dependent decrease in MIT. Maximum effect in MIT was observed after 30 min of treatment with WS 100 mg/kg, i.p. Combination of WS (37.5 mg/kg, i.p.) with imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) also produced significant decrease in the MIT. Clonidine and reserpine induced increase in MIT, was significantly reversed by treatment with WS (100 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as combination of WS (37.5 mg/kg, i.p.) with either imipramine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluoxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-treatment with prazosin but not haloperidol, significantly antagonized the WS (100 mg/kg, i.p.) induced decrease in MIT. It is concluded that, WS produced significant decrease in MIT in mice which could be mediated partly through a adrenoceptor as well as alteration in the level of central biogenic amines.

  20. Tonic-clonic activity at subarachnoid hemorrhage onset: impact on complications and outcome.

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    Gian Marco De Marchis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tonic-clonic activity (TCA at onset complicates 3% to 21% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. The impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, including seizures, remains unclear. One study associated onset TCA with poor clinical outcome at 6 weeks after SAH, but to our knowledge no other studies have confirmed this relationship. This study aims to assess the impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. METHODS: Analysis of a prospective study cohort of 1479 SAH patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between 1996 and 2012. TCA within 6 hours of hemorrhage onset was identified based on accounts of emergency care providers or family witnesses. RESULTS: TCA at onset was described in 170 patients (11%. Patients with onset TCA were younger (P = 0.002, presented more often with poor clinical grade (55% vs. 26%, P<0.001 and had larger amounts of cisternal, intraventricular, and intracerebral blood than those without onset TCA (all, P<0.001. After adjusting for known confounders, onset TCA was significantly associated with in-hospital seizures (OR 3.80, 95%-CI: 2.43-5.96, P<0.001, in-hospital pneumonia (OR 1.56, 95%-CI: 1.06-2.31, p = 0.02, and delayed cerebral ischemia (OR 1.77, 95%-CI: 1.21-2.58, P = 0.003. At 3 months, however, onset TCA was not associated with poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy after adjusting for age, admission clinical grade, and cisternal blood volume. CONCLUSIONS: Onset TCA is not a rare event as it complicates 11% of cases of SAH. New and clinically relevant findings are the association of onset TCA with in-hospital seizures, pneumonia and delayed cerebral ischemia. Despite the increased risk of in-hospital complications, onset TCA is not associated with disability, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months.

  1. Selegiline prevents long-term changes in dopamine efflux and stress immobility during the second and third weeks of abstinence following opiate withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasing, K; Ghosh, S

    1998-08-01

    Selegiline is an irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B with trophic and neuroprotective effects. Because of evidence for decreased dopaminergic function during the withdrawal syndromes associated with opiates and other medications with potential for abuse, we investigated effects of treatment with selegiline on in vitro measures of dopamine efflux following opiate withdrawal. Treatment with 2.0 mg/kg/day of selegiline did not modify the severity of opiate withdrawal, as assessed by weight loss over the first 3 days of abstinence. Opiate withdrawal increased immobility in response to a forced warm water swim test performed during the second and third weeks of abstinence following the onset of withdrawal. Brain slices obtained from the nucleus accumbens of opiate-withdrawn animals immediately following swim stress testing displayed diminished efflux of tritiated dopamine after two in vitro exposures to cocaine or amphetamine. Cocaine increases neurotransmitter efflux through blockade of dopamine reuptake, while amphetamine augments efflux by stimulating release of dopamine from intracellular storage vesicles. Although slices from opiate withdrawal subjects showed decreases in efflux after in vitro treatment with these agents, no differences were observed after exposure to 4-aminopyridine, which increases neurotransmitter release by prolonging action potential duration. These findings indicate mechanisms of action that are specific for catecholamine neurotransmitter systems are important for demonstrating long-term changes in dopaminergic function following opiate withdrawal. Selegiline prevented decreases in the efflux of tritiated dopamine in slices obtained from opiate-withdrawn subjects. In addition, selegiline decreased withdrawal-induced immobility during warm water swim testing. In conclusion, treatment with selegiline can prevent long-term changes in stress-induced immobility and deficits in presynaptic dopaminergic function that occur following the

  2. Subregion-specific modulation of excitatory input and dopaminergic output in the striatum by tonically activated glycine and GABAA receptors

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    Louise eAdermark

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow of cortical information through the basal ganglia is a complex spatiotemporal pattern of increased and decreased firing. The striatum is the biggest input nucleus to the basal ganglia and the aim of this study was to assess the role of inhibitory GABAA and glycine receptors in regulating synaptic activity in the dorsolateral (DLS and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, nAc. Local field potential recordings from coronal brain slices of juvenile and adult Wistar rats showed that GABAA receptors and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors are tonically activated and inhibit excitatory input to the DLS and to the nAc. Strychnine-induced disinhibition of glutamatergic transmission was insensitive to the muscarinic receptor inhibitor scopolamine (10 µM, inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine (10 µM and blocked by GABAA receptor inhibitors, suggesting that tonically activated glycine receptors depress excitatory input to the striatum through modulation of cholinergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. As an end-product example of striatal GABAergic output in vivo we measured dopamine release in the DLS and nAc by microdialysis in the awake and freely moving rat. Reversed dialysis of bicuculline (50 μM in perfusate only increased extrasynaptic dopamine levels in the nAc, while strychnine administered locally (200 μM in perfusate decreased dopamine output by 60% in both the DLS and nAc. Our data suggest that GABAA and glycine receptors are tonically activated and modulate striatal transmission in a partially sub-region specific manner.

  3. Tonic noradrenergic activity modulates explorative behavior and attentional set shifting: Evidence from pupillometry and gaze pattern analysis.

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    Pajkossy, Péter; Szőllősi, Ágnes; Demeter, Gyula; Racsmány, Mihály

    2017-12-01

    A constant task for every living organism is to decide whether to exploit rewards associated with current behavior or to explore the environment for more rewarding options. Current empirical evidence indicates that exploitation is related to phasic whereas exploration is related to tonic firing mode of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. In humans, this exploration-exploitation trade-off is subserved by the ability to flexibly switch attention between task-related and task-irrelevant information. Here, we investigated whether this function, called attentional set shifting, is related to exploration and tonic noradrenergic discharge. We measured pretrial baseline pupil dilation, proved to be strongly correlated with the activity of the locus coeruleus, while human participants took part in well-known tasks of attentional set shifting. Study 1 used the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, whereas in Study 2, the Intra/Extradimensional Set Shifting Task was used. Both tasks require participants to choose between different compound stimuli based on feedback provided for their previous decisions. During the task, stimulus-reward contingencies change periodically, thus participants are repeatedly required to reassess which stimulus features are relevant (i.e., they shift their attentional set). Our results showed that baseline pupil diameter steadily decreased when the stimulus-reward contingencies were stable, whereas they suddenly increased when these contingencies changed. Analysis of looking patterns also confirmed the presence of exploratory behavior during attentional set shifting. Thus, our results suggest that tonic firing mode of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus is implicated in attentional set shifting, as it regulates the amount of exploration. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Rethinking Modal Gender in the Context of the Universe of Tn-Types: Definitions and Mathematical Models for Tonicity and Phonicity

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    Marcus Alessi Bittencourt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An indisputable cornerstone of the Western music tradition, the dialectic opposition between the major and minor grammatical modal genders has always been present in the imagination of musicians and music theorists for centuries. Such dialectics of opposition is especially important in the context of nineteenth-century harmonic dualism, with its ideas of tonicity and phonicity. These concepts serve as the main foundation for the way harmonic dualism conceives the major and minor worlds: two worlds with equivalent rights and properties, but with opposed polarities. This paper presents a redefinition of the terms tonicity and phonicity, translating those concepts to the context of post-tonal music theory. The terminologies of generatrix, tonicity, root, phonicity, vertex, and azimuth are explained in this paper, followed by propositions of mathematical models for those concepts, which spring from Richard Parncutt’s root-salience model for pitch-class sets. In order to demonstrate the possibilities of using modal gender as a criterion for the study and classification of the universe of Tn-types, we will present a taxonomy of the 351 transpositional set types, which comprises the categories of tonic (major, phonic (minor and neutral (genderless. In addition, there will be a small discussion on the effect of set symmetries and set asymmetries on the tonic/phonic properties of a Tn-type.

  5. Muscarinic Long-Term Enhancement of Tonic and Phasic GABAA Inhibition in Rat CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

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    Domínguez, Soledad; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Buño, Washington

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates network operation in the hippocampus by controlling excitation and inhibition in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons (PCs), the latter through gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs). Although, the enhancing effects of ACh on GABAARs have been reported (Dominguez et al., 2014, 2015), its role in regulating tonic GABAA inhibition has not been explored in depth. Therefore, we aimed at determining the effects of the activation of ACh receptors on responses mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAARs. Here, we show that under blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors ACh, acting through muscarinic type 1 receptors, paired with post-synaptic depolarization induced a long-term enhancement of tonic GABAA currents (tGABAA) and puff-evoked GABAA currents (pGABAA). ACh combined with depolarization also potentiated IPSCs (i.e., phasic inhibition) in the same PCs, without signs of interactions of synaptic responses with pGABAA and tGABAA, suggesting the contribution of two different GABAA receptor pools. The long-term enhancement of GABAA currents and IPSCs reduced the excitability of PCs, possibly regulating plasticity and learning in behaving animals. PMID:27833531

  6. Isolation stress and chronic mild stress induced immobility in the defensive burying behavior and a transient increased ethanol intake in Wistar rats.

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    Vázquez-León, Priscila; Martínez-Mota, Lucía; Quevedo-Corona, Lucía; Miranda-Páez, Abraham

    2017-09-01

    Stress can be experienced with or without adverse effects, of which anxiety and depression are two of the most important due to the frequent comorbidity with alcohol abuse in humans. Historically, stress has been considered a cause of drug use, particularly alcohol abuse due to its anxiolytic effects. In the present work we exposed male Wistar rats to two different stress conditions: single housing (social isolation, SI), and chronic mild stress (CMS). We compared both stressed groups to group-housed rats and rats without CMS (GH) to allow the determination of a clear behavioral response profile related to their respective endocrine stress response and alcohol intake pattern. We found that SI and CMS, to a greater extent, induced short-lasting increased sucrose consumption, a transient increase in serum corticosterone level, high latency/immobility, and low burying behavior in the defensive burying behavior (DBB) test, and a transient increase in alcohol intake. Thus, the main conclusion was that stress caused by both SI and CMS induced immobility in the DBB test and, subsequently, induced a transient increased voluntary ethanol intake in Wistar rats with a free-choice home-cage drinking paradigm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of co-treatment with mirtazapine and low doses of risperidone on immobility time in the forced swimming test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóż, Zofia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of mirtazapine (MIR) and risperidone (an atypical antipsychotic drug), given separately or jointly, on immobility time in the forced swimming test in male C57BL/6J mice. Fluoxetine (FLU) was used as a reference drug. MIR (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) and FLU (5 and 10 mg/kg), or risperidone in low doses (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg) given alone did not change the immobility time of mice in the forced swimming test. Joint administration of MIR (5 and 10 mg/kg) or FLU (10 mg/kg) and risperidone (0.1 mg/kg) produced antidepressant-like activity in the forced swimming test. WAY100636 (a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist) inhibited, while yohimbine (an α(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of MIR and risperidone. Active behavior in that test did not reflect an increase in general activity, since combined administration of antidepressants and risperidone failed to enhance the locomotor activity of mice. The obtained results indicate that risperidone applied in a low dose enhances the antidepressant-like activity of MIR and that, among other mechanisms, 5-HT(1A)-, and α(2)-adrenergic receptors may play a role in this effect.

  8. Phosphodiesterase-1b (Pde1b) knockout mice are resistant to forced swim and tail suspension induced immobility and show upregulation of Pde10a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufgard, Jillian R; Williams, Michael T; Skelton, Matthew R; Grubisha, Olivera; Ferreira, Filipa M; Sanger, Helen; Wright, Mary E; Reed-Kessler, Tracy M; Rasmussen, Kurt; Duman, Ronald S; Vorhees, Charles V

    2017-06-01

    Major depressive disorder is a leading cause of suicide and disability. Despite this, current antidepressants provide insufficient efficacy in more than 60% of patients. Most current antidepressants are presynaptic reuptake inhibitors; postsynaptic signal regulation has not received as much attention as potential treatment targets. We examined the effects of disruption of the postsynaptic cyclic nucleotide hydrolyzing enzyme, phosphodiesterase (PDE) 1b, on depressive-like behavior and the effects on PDE1B protein in wild-type (WT) mice following stress. Littermate knockout (KO) and WT mice were tested in locomotor activity, tail suspension (TST), and forced swim tests (FST). FST was also used to compare the effects of two antidepressants, fluoxetine and bupropion, in KO versus WT mice. Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression changes were also determined. WT mice underwent acute or chronic stress and markers of stress and PDE1B expression were examined. Pde1b KO mice exhibited decreased TST and FST immobility. When treated with antidepressants, both WT and KO mice showed decreased FST immobility and the effect was additive in KO mice. Mice lacking Pde1b had increased striatal Pde10a mRNA expression. In WT mice, acute and chronic stress upregulated PDE1B expression while PDE10A expression was downregulated after chronic but not acute stress. PDE1B is a potential therapeutic target for depression treatment because of the antidepressant-like phenotype seen in Pde1b KO mice.

  9. ESTIMATION OF MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY IN THE DETERMINATION OF Fe CONTENT IN POWDERED TONIC FOOD DRINK USING GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of uncertainty measurement in the determination of Fe content in powdered tonic food drink using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was carried out. The specification of measurand, source of uncertainty, standard uncertainty, combined uncertainty and expanded uncertainty from this measurement were evaluated and accounted. The measurement result showed that the Fe content in powdered tonic food drink sample was 569.32 µg/5g, with the expanded uncertainty measurement ± 178.20 µg/5g (coverage factor, k = 2, at confidende level 95%. The calibration curve gave the major contribution to the uncertainty of the final results.   Keywords: uncertainty, powdered tonic food drink, iron (Fe, graphite furnace AAS

  10. Involvement of 5-HT(2) serotonergic receptors of the nucleus raphe magnus and nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis/paragigantocellularis complex neural networks in the antinociceptive phenomenon that follows the post-ictal immobility syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ferreira, Célio Marcos Dos Reis; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-09-01

    The post-ictal immobility syndrome is followed by a significant increase in the nociceptive thresholds in animals and men. In this interesting post-ictal behavioral response, endogenous opioid peptides-mediated mechanisms, as well as cholinergic-mediated antinociceptive processes, have been suggested. However, considering that many serotonergic descending pathways have been implicated in antinociceptive reactions, the aim of the present work is to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(2)-serotonergic receptor subfamily in the post-ictal antinociception. The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in seven or eight Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by statistically significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 120 min of the post-ictal period. Male Wistar rats were submitted to stereotaxic surgery for introduction of a guide-cannula in the rhombencephalon, aiming either the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) or the gigantocellularis complex. In independent groups of animals, these nuclei were neurochemically lesioned with a unilateral microinjection of ibotenic acid (1.0 microg/0.2 microL). The neuronal damage of either the NRM or nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis/paragigantocellularis complex decreased the post-ictal analgesia. Also, in other independent groups, central administration of ritanserin (5.0 microg/0.2 microL) or physiological saline into each of the reticular formation nuclei studied caused a statistically significant decrease in the TFL of seizing animals, as compared to controls, in all post-ictal periods studied. These results indicate that serotonin input-connected neurons of the pontine and medullarly reticular nuclei may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia.

  11. Reduced tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus contributes to chronic stress-induced impairments in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vallent; MacKenzie, Georgina; Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that stress impacts the underlying processes of learning and memory. The effects of stress on memory are thought to involve, at least in part, effects on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to stress. Chronic stress induces hippocampal alterations, including but not limited to dendritic atrophy and decreased neurogenesis, which are thought to contribute to chronic stress-induced hippocampal dysfunction and deficits in learning and memory. Changes in synaptic transmission, including changes in GABAergic inhibition, have been documented following chronic stress. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated shifts in EGABA in CA1 pyramidal neurons following chronic stress, compromising GABAergic transmission and increasing excitability of these neurons. Interestingly, here we demonstrate that these alterations are unique to CA1 pyramidal neurons, since we do not observe shifts in EGABA following chronic stress in dentate gyrus granule cells. Following chronic stress, there is a decrease in the expression of the GABAA receptor (GABAA R) δ subunit and tonic GABAergic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells, whereas there is an increase in the phasic component of GABAergic inhibition, evident by an increase in the peak amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). Given the numerous changes observed in the hippocampus following stress, it is difficult to pinpoint the pertinent contributing pathophysiological factors. Here we directly assess the impact of a reduction in tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells on learning and memory using a mouse model with a decrease in GABAA R δ subunit expression specifically in dentate gyrus granule cells (Gabrd/Pomc mice). Reduced GABAA R δ subunit expression and function in dentate gyrus granule cells is sufficient to induce deficits in learning and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that the reduction in GABAA R δ subunit-mediated tonic inhibition

  12. Reduced tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus contributes to chronic stress-induced impairments in learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that stress impacts the underlying processes of learning and memory. The effects of stress on memory are thought to involve, at least in part, effects on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to stress. Chronic stress induces hippocampal alterations, including but not limited to dendritic atrophy and decreased neurogenesis, which are thought to contribute to chronic stress-induced hippocampal dysfunction and deficits in learning and memory. Changes in synaptic transmission, including changes in GABAergic inhibition, have been documented following chronic stress. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated shifts in EGABA in CA1 pyramidal neurons following chronic stress, compromising GABAergic transmission and increasing excitability of these neurons. Interestingly, here we demonstrate that these alterations are unique to CA1 pyramidal neurons, since we do not observe shifts in EGABA following chronic stress in dentate gyrus granule cells. Following chronic stress, there is a decrease in the expression of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) δ subunit and tonic GABAergic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells; whereas, there is an increase in the phasic component of GABAergic inhibition, evident by an increase in the peak amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). Given the numerous changes observed in the hippocampus following stress, it is difficult to pinpoint the pertinent contributing pathophysiological factors. Here we directly assess the impact of a reduction in tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells on learning and memory using a mouse model with a decrease in GABAAR δ subunit expression specifically in dentate gyrus granule cells (Gabrd/Pomc mice). Reduced GABAAR δ subunit expression and function in dentate gyrus granule cells is sufficient to induce deficits in learning and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that the reduction in GABAAR δ subunit-mediated tonic inhibition in

  13. Genetic Determinism of Fearfulness, General Activity and Feeding Behavior in Chickens and Its Relationship with Digestive Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Chantry-Darmon, Céline; Boscher, Marie-Yvonne; Sellier, Nadine; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Bertin, Aline

    2017-01-01

    The genetic relationships between behavior and digestive efficiency were studied in 860 chickens from a cross between two lines divergently selected on digestive efficiency. At 2 weeks of age each chick was video-recorded in the home pen to characterize general activity and feeding behavior. Tonic immobility and open-field tests were also carried out individually to evaluate emotional reactivity (i.e. the propensity to express fear responses). Digestive efficiency was measured at 3 weeks. Genetic parameters of behavior traits were estimated. Birds were genotyped on 3379 SNP markers to detect QTLs. Heritabilities of behavioral traits were low, apart from tonic immobility (0.17-0.18) and maximum meal length (0.14). The genetic correlations indicated that the most efficient birds fed more frequently and were less fearful. We detected 14 QTL (9 for feeding behavior, 3 for tonic immobility, 2 for frequency of lying). Nine of them co-localized with QTL for efficiency, anatomy of the digestive tract, feed intake or microbiota composition. Four genes involved in fear reactions were identified in the QTL for tonic immobility on GGA1.

  14. Enhanced astroglial GABA uptake attenuates tonic GABAA inhibition of the presympathetic hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sudip; Jo, Ji Yoon; Lee, Sang Ung; Lee, Young Jae; Lee, So Yeong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, Jung Un; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Park, Jin Bong

    2015-08-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) generates persistent tonic inhibitory currents (Itonic) and conventional inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) via activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We investigated the pathophysiological significance of astroglial GABA uptake in the regulation of Itonic in the PVN neurons projecting to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (PVN-RVLM). The Itonic of PVN-RVLM neurons were significantly reduced in heart failure (HF) compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats. Reduced Itonic sensitivity to THIP argued for the decreased function of GABAAR δ subunits in HF, whereas similar Itonic sensitivity to benzodiazepines argued against the difference of γ2 subunit-containing GABAARs in SHAM and HF rats. HF Itonic attenuation was reversed by a nonselective GABA transporter (GAT) blocker (nipecotic acid, NPA) and a GAT-3 selective blocker, but not by a GAT-1 blocker, suggesting that astroglial GABA clearance increased in HF. Similar and minimal Itonic responses to bestrophin-1 blockade in SHAM and HF neurons further argued against a role for astroglial GABA release in HF Itonic attenuation. Finally, the NPA-induced inhibition of spontaneous firing was greater in HF than in SHAM PVN-RVLM neurons, whereas diazepam induced less inhibition of spontaneous firing in HF than in SHAM neurons. Overall, our results showed that combined with reduced GABAARs function, the enhanced astroglial GABA uptake-induced attenuation of Itonic in HF PVN-RVLM neurons explains the deficit in tonic GABAergic inhibition and increased sympathetic outflow from the PVN during heart failure. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Effect of tonic pain on motor acquisition and retention while learning to reach in a force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Mélanie; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Bouffard, Jason; Gagné, Martin; Bouyer, Laurent J; Mercier, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Most patients receiving intensive rehabilitation to improve their upper limb function experience pain. Despite this, the impact of pain on the ability to learn a specific motor task is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of experimental tonic pain interferes with the acquisition and retention stages of motor learning associated with training in a reaching task. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were randomized to either a Control or Pain Group (receiving topical capsaicin cream on the upper arm during training on Day 1). On two consecutive days, subjects made ballistic movements towards two targets (NEAR/FAR) using a robotized exoskeleton. On Day 1, the task was performed without (baseline) and with a force field (adaptation). The adaptation task was repeated on Day 2. Task performance was assessed using index distance from the target at the end of the reaching movement. Motor planning was assessed using initial angle of deviation of index trajectory from a straight line to the target. Results show that tonic pain did not affect baseline reaching. Both groups improved task performance across time (pControl group for the FAR target (p = 0.030) during both acquisition and retention. Moreover, a Group x Time interaction (p = 0.028) was observed on initial angle of deviation, suggesting that subjects with Pain made larger adjustments in the feedforward component of the movement over time. Interestingly, behaviour of the Pain group was very stable from the end of Day 1 (with pain) to the beginning of Day 2 (pain-free), indicating that the differences observed could not solely be explained by the impact of pain on immediate performance. This suggests that if people learn to move differently in the presence of pain, they might maintain this altered strategy over time.

  16. Effect of tonic pain on motor acquisition and retention while learning to reach in a force field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Lamothe

    Full Text Available Most patients receiving intensive rehabilitation to improve their upper limb function experience pain. Despite this, the impact of pain on the ability to learn a specific motor task is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of experimental tonic pain interferes with the acquisition and retention stages of motor learning associated with training in a reaching task. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were randomized to either a Control or Pain Group (receiving topical capsaicin cream on the upper arm during training on Day 1. On two consecutive days, subjects made ballistic movements towards two targets (NEAR/FAR using a robotized exoskeleton. On Day 1, the task was performed without (baseline and with a force field (adaptation. The adaptation task was repeated on Day 2. Task performance was assessed using index distance from the target at the end of the reaching movement. Motor planning was assessed using initial angle of deviation of index trajectory from a straight line to the target. Results show that tonic pain did not affect baseline reaching. Both groups improved task performance across time (p<0.001, but the Pain group showed a larger final error (under-compensation than the Control group for the FAR target (p = 0.030 during both acquisition and retention. Moreover, a Group x Time interaction (p = 0.028 was observed on initial angle of deviation, suggesting that subjects with Pain made larger adjustments in the feedforward component of the movement over time. Interestingly, behaviour of the Pain group was very stable from the end of Day 1 (with pain to the beginning of Day 2 (pain-free, indicating that the differences observed could not solely be explained by the impact of pain on immediate performance. This suggests that if people learn to move differently in the presence of pain, they might maintain this altered strategy over time.

  17. YouTube as a potential learning tool to help distinguish tonic-clonic seizures from nonepileptic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Louwai; Adcock, Jane E; Sen, Arjune

    2014-08-01

    Medical students are increasingly turning to the website YouTube as a learning resource. This study set out to determine whether the videos on YouTube accurately depict the type of seizures that a medical student may search for. Two consultant epileptologists independently assessed the top YouTube videos returned following searches for eight terms relating to different categories of seizures. The videos were rated for their technical quality, concordance of diagnosis with an epileptologist-assigned diagnosis, and efficacy as a learning tool for medical education. Of the 200 videos assessed, 106 (63%) met the inclusion criteria for further analysis. Technical quality was generally good and only interfered with the diagnostic process in 8.5% of the videos. Of the included videos, 40.6-46.2% were judged to depict the purported diagnosis with moderate agreement between raters (75% agreement, κ=0.50). Of the videos returned after searching "tonic-clonic seizure", 28.6-35.7% were judged to show nonepileptic seizures with almost perfect interrater agreement (92.9% agreement, κ=0.84). Of the videos returned following the search "pseudoseizure", 77.8-88.9% of videos were judged to show nonepileptic seizures with substantial agreement (88.9% agreement, κ=0.61). Across all search terms, 19.8-33% of videos were judged as potentially useful as a learning resource, with fair agreement between raters (75.5% agreement, κ=0.38). These findings suggest that the majority of videos on YouTube claiming to show specific seizure subtypes are inaccurate, and YouTube should not be recommended as a learning tool for students. However, a small group of videos provides excellent demonstrations of tonic-clonic and nonepileptic seizures, which could be used by an expert teacher to demonstrate the difference between epileptic and nonepileptic seizures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Body as First Space of Communication: The Tonic-Emotional Dialogue in the Beginning of Psychic Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Martins

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early stages of ontogenesis, when thesupport for development relies upon the relational function of the mother–baby dyad, the child will organise the foundation of the Self. This process involves a physiological and emotional symbiosis, in a relation with predominance of a tonic-emotional dialogue. The presence or absence of the other, the dynamics of nearness/farness, the postural and gestural dynamics, the containment activities, rhythmic synchronicities and thermal contact, are essential supports to primary organization of the psyche. When these processes are inadequate, they can cause problems of individuation and affirmation of identity, linked to absences or deficiencies in the primary relationship between mother and baby. This perspective leads us to equate the importance of corporeality in the early processes of communication when they are mediated primarily by tonic-emotional processes of communication, imbued with affections, desires and emotions. These processes are essential to the organization of the internal processes that make up this pre-linguistic phase, based on the organization of body schema, ensuring a sense of identity and the possibility of individuation and differentiation from the maternal object. When there are disruptions in this evolutionary dynamics, psychomotor therapy is a privileged resource, providing a safe and container space in which through spontaneous and symbolic play, children learn to transform the feelings, acts and affections in thoughts, projects and words. A desired relationship, allows to experience new forms of expression and conflict resolution, improving emotional and behavioural regulation, and promoting mentoring capacity and executive functions (such as attention, working memory, planning and inhibition of impulses.

  19. Exercise training lowers the enhanced tonically active glutamatergic input to the rostral ventrolateral medulla in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yan-Ping; Wang, Yang-Kai; Deng, Yu; Zhang, Ru-Wen; Tan, Xing; Yuan, Wen-Jun; Deng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that low-intensity exercise training (ExT) is beneficial to cardiovascular dysfunction in hypertension. The tonically active glutamatergic input to the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a key region for control of blood pressure and sympathetic tone, has been demonstrated to be increased in hypertensive rats. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ExT on the increased glutamatergic input to the RVLM in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Normotensive rats Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and SHR were treadmill trained or remained sedentary (Sed) for 12 weeks and classed into four groups (WKY-Sed, WKY-ExT, SHR-Sed, and SHR-ExT). The release of glutamate in the RVLM and its contribution to cardiovascular activity were determined in WKY and SHR after treatment of ExT. Blood pressure and sympathetic tone were significantly reduced in SHR after treatment with ExT. Bilateral microinjection of the glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (2.7 nmol in 100 nL) into the RVLM significantly decreased resting blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in SHR-Sed but not in WKY groups (WKY-Sed and WKY-ExT). However, the degree of reduction in these cardiovascular parameters evoked by KYN was significantly blunted in SHR-ExT compared with SHR-Sed group. The concentration of glutamate and the protein expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 in the RVLM were significantly increased in SHR-Sed compared with WKY-Sed, whereas they were reduced after treatment with ExT. Our findings suggest that ExT attenuates the enhancement in the tonically acting glutamatergic input to the RVLM of hypertensive rats, thereby reducing the sympathetic hyperactivity and blood pressure. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Glycine and GABAA receptors mediate tonic and phasic inhibitory processes that contribute to prepulse inhibition in the goldfish startle network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C.P. Curtin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Prepulse inhibition (PPI is understood as an inhibitory process that attenuates sensory flow during early stages (20-1000ms of information processing. Here, we applied in vivo electrophysiology and pharmacology to determine if prepulse inhibition (PPI is mediated by glycine receptors (GlyRs and/or GABAA receptors (GABAARs in the goldfish auditory startle circuit. Specifically, we used selective antagonists to dissect the contributions of target receptors on sound-evoked postsynaptic potentials (PSPs recorded in the neurons that initiate startle, the Mauthner-cells (M-cell. We found that strychnine, a GlyR antagonist, disrupted a fast-activated (5 ms and rapidly (< 50ms decaying (feed-forward inhibitory process that disrupts PPI at 20 ms prepulse/pulse inter-stimulus intervals (ISI. Additionally we observed increases of the evoked postsynaptic potential (PSP peak amplitude (+87.43 ± 21.53%; N=9 and duration (+204 ± 48.91%, N=9. In contrast, treatment with bicuculline, a GABAAR antagonist, caused a general reduction in PPI across all tested ISIs (20-500 ms, essentially eliminating PPI at ISIs from 20-100 ms. Bicuculline also increased PSP peak amplitude (+133.8 ± 10.3%, N=5 and PSP duration (+284.95 ± 65.64%, N=5. Treatment with either antagonist also tonically increased post-synaptic excitability in the M-cells, reflected by an increase in the magnitude of antidromically-evoked action potentials (APs by 15.07 ± 3.21%, N=7 and 16.23 ± 7.08%, N=5 for strychnine and bicuculline, respectively. These results suggest that GABAARs and GlyRs are functionally segregated to short- and longer-lasting sound-evoked (phasic inhibitory processes that contribute to PPI, with the mediation of tonic inhibition by both receptor systems being critical for gain control within the M-cell startle circuit.

  1. The Aqueous Crude Extracts of Montanoa frutescens and Montanoa grandiflora Reduce Immobility Faster Than Fluoxetine Through GABAA Receptors in Rats Forced to Swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Cueto-Escobedo, Jonathan; Flores-Aguilar, Luis Ángel; Rosas-Sánchez, Gilberto Uriel; Rovirosa-Hernández, María de Jesús; García-Orduña, Francisco; Carro-Juárez, Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Montanoa frutescens and Montanoa grandiflora have been indistinctly used for centuries in traditional Mexican medicine for reproductive impairments, anxiety, and mood disorders. Preclinical studies support their aphrodisiac and anxiolytic properties, but their effects on mood are still unexplored. The effects of 25 and 50 mg/kg of M frutescens and M grandiflora extracts were evaluated on days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 of treatment, and compared with fluoxetine (1 mg/kg) and Remotiv (7.14 mg/kg) in Wistar rats. The participation of GABA A receptor in the effects produced by the treatments was explored. Montanoa extracts reduced immobility since day 1 of treatment, while fluoxetine and Remotiv required 14 days. The GABA A antagonism blocked the effects of Montanoa extracts, but not of fluoxetine or Remotiv. Montanoa extracts prevented quickly the stress-induced behaviors in the swimming test through action at the GABA A receptor, exerting a protective effect different to the typical antidepressants drugs.

  2. Serotonin transporter binding in the hypothalamus correlates negatively with tonic heat pain ratings in healthy subjects: A [11C]DASB PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence that the serotonergic system plays an important role in the transmission and regulation of pain. Here we used positron emission tomography (PET) with the serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer [11C]DASB to study the relationship between SERT binding in the brain and....... The negative correlation between SERT binding in the hypothalamus and insula with tonic pain ratings suggests a possible serotonergic control of the role of these areas in the modulation or in the affective appreciation of pain.......) tonic noxious heat stimulus. PET data were analyzed using both volume-of-interest (VOI) and voxel-based approaches. VOI analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between tonic pain ratings and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = −0.59; p = 0.008), a finding confirmed by the parametric...... analysis. The parametric analysis also revealed a negative correlation between tonic pain ratings and SERT binding in the right anterior insula. Measures of regional SERT binding did not correlate with pain threshold or with responses to short phasic suprathreshold phasic heat stimuli. Finally, the VOI...

  3. Hypotonicity-induced reduction of aquaporin-2 transcription in mpkCCD cells is independent of the tonicity responsive element, vasopressin, and cAMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortenoeven, M.L.A.; van den Brand, M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Deen, P.M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is characterized by excessive water uptake and hyponatremia. The extent of hyponatremia, however, is less than anticipated, which is ascribed to a defense mechanism, the vasopressin-escape, and is suggested to involve a tonicity-determined

  4. Effect of local versus remote tonic heat pain during training on acquisition and retention of a finger-tapping sequence task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilodeau, M.C.; Roosink, M.; Mercier, C.

    2016-01-01

    Although pain is present in a large proportion of patients receiving rehabilitation, its impact on motor learning is still unclear, especially in the case of neuropathic pain that is not tightly linked to specific movements. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of local and remote tonic

  5. Effects of co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone on immobility time and plasma corticosterone concentration in rats subjected to the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogóz, Zofia; Skuza, Grazyna; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2008-01-01

    Major depression is frequently associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitors have been shown to exert antidepressant action. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone on immobility time and plasma corticosterone concentration in male Wistar rats subjected to the forced swim test. Metyrapone alone (50 mg/kg, but not 25 mg/kg) reduced the immobility time of rats in the forced swim test; moreover, both doses tested (25 and 50 mg/kg), dose-dependently decreased the stress-induced plasma corticosterone concentration. Joint administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine (10 mg/kg) and metyrapone (25 mg/kg - a dose inactive per se) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test in rats. WAY 100636 (a 5-HT(1A) antagonist), but not prazosin (an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist), used in doses ineffective in the forced swim test, inhibited the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone (25 mg/kg). Combined treatment of fluoxetine or tianeptine and metyrapone inhibited stress-induced corticosterone secretion to a similar extent as metyrapone alone. The obtained results indicate that metyrapone potentiates the antidepressant-like activity of fluoxetine or tianeptine and that, among other mechanisms, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play some role in this effect. Moreover, metyrapone exerts a beneficial effect on the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These findings suggest that the co-administration of metyrapone and an antidepressant drug may be useful for the treatment of drug-resistant depression and/or depression associated with a high cortisol level.

  6. Decreased surface expression of the δ subunit of the GABAA receptor contributes to reduced tonic inhibition in dentate granule cells in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianhui; Peng, Zechun; Tong, Xiaoping; Lindemeyer, A Kerstin; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Houser, Carolyn R

    2017-11-01

    While numerous changes in the GABA system have been identified in models of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), alterations in subunits of the GABA A receptors (GABA A Rs) that mediate tonic inhibition are particularly intriguing. Considering the key role of tonic inhibition in controlling neuronal excitability, reduced tonic inhibition could contribute to FXS-associated disorders such as hyperactivity, hypersensitivity, and increased seizure susceptibility. The current study has focused on the expression and function of the δ subunit of the GABA A R, a major subunit involved in tonic inhibition, in granule cells of the dentate gyrus in the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model of FXS. Electrophysiological studies of dentate granule cells revealed a marked, nearly four-fold, decrease in tonic inhibition in the Fmr1 KO mice, as well as reduced effects of two δ subunit-preferring pharmacological agents, THIP and DS2, supporting the suggestion that δ subunit-containing GABA A Rs are compromised in the Fmr1 KO mice. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a small but statistically significant decrease in δ subunit labeling in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus in Fmr1 KO mice compared to wildtype (WT) littermates. The discrepancy between the large deficits in GABA-mediated tonic inhibition in granule cells in the Fmr1 KO mice and only modest reductions in immunolabeling of the δ subunit led to studies of surface expression of the δ subunit. Cross-linking experiments followed by Western blot analysis demonstrated a small, non-significant decrease in total δ subunit protein in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice, but a four-fold decrease in surface expression of the δ subunit in these mice. No significant changes were observed in total or surface expression of the α4 subunit protein, a major partner of the δ subunit in the forebrain. Postembedding immunogold labeling for the δ subunit demonstrated a large, three-fold, decrease in the number of symmetric synapses with

  7. Enhanced anti-immobility effects of Sanggenon G isolated from the root bark of Morus alba combined with the α2-antagonist yohimbine in the rat forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong Wook; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Changho; Kim, In-Ho; Han, Daeseok

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether Sanggenon G, an active compound isolated from the root bark of Morus alba, exhibited enhanced anti-immobility activity with the addition of the α2-antagonist yohimbine in rats subjected to forced swim test (FST)-induced depression. Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) treatment in rats reduced the immobility time, and pretreatment with yohimbine significantly enhanced the antidepressant-like behavior of fluoxetine at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg. Similarly, Sanggenon G significantly decreased the immobility time, reducing immobility by a maximum of 43.9 % when treated at a dose of 20 mg/kg. Furthermore, pretreatment with yohimbine significantly enhanced the antidepressant-like behavior of Sanggenon G at 5 and 10 mg/kg. Our findings suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of Sanggenon G could be facilitated by concomitant use of the α2-antagonist. Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential of Sanggenon G as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of depression.

  8. Hypotonicity-induced reduction of aquaporin-2 transcription in mpkCCD cells is independent of the tonicity responsive element, vasopressin, and cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenoeven, Marleen L A; van den Brand, Michiel; Wetzels, Jack F M; Deen, Peter M T

    2011-04-15

    The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is characterized by excessive water uptake and hyponatremia. The extent of hyponatremia, however, is less than anticipated, which is ascribed to a defense mechanism, the vasopressin-escape, and is suggested to involve a tonicity-determined down-regulation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). The underlying mechanism, however, is poorly understood. To study this, we used the mouse cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cell line. MpkCCD cells, transfected with an AQP2-promoter luciferase construct showed a reduced and increased AQP2 abundance and transcription following culture in hypotonic and hypertonic medium, respectively. This depended on tonicity rather than osmolality and occurred independently of the vasopressin analog dDAVP, cAMP levels, or protein kinase A activity. Although prostaglandins and nitric oxide reduced AQP2 abundance, inhibition of their synthesis did not influence tonicity-induced AQP2 transcription. Also, cells in which the cAMP or tonicity-responsive element (CRE/TonE) in the AQP2-promoter were mutated showed a similar response to hypotonicity. Instead, the tonicity-responsive elements were pin-pointed to nucleotides -283 to -252 and -157 to -126 bp. In conclusion, our data indicate that hypotonicity reduces AQP2 abundance and transcription, which occurs independently of vasopressin, cAMP, and the known TonE and CRE in the AQP2-promoter. Increased prostaglandin and nitric oxide, as found in vivo, may contribute to reduced AQP2 in vasopressin-escape, but do not mediate the effect of hypotonicity on AQP2 transcription. Our data suggest that two novel segments (-283 to -252 and -157 to -126 bp) in the AQP2-promoter mediate the hypotonicity-induced AQP2 down-regulation during vasopressin-escape.

  9. Study of GABAergic extra-synaptic tonic inhibition in single neurons and neural populations by traversing neural scales: application to propofol-induced anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutt, Axel; Buhry, Laure

    2014-12-01

    Anaesthetic agents are known to affect extra-synaptic GABAergic receptors, which induce tonic inhibitory currents. Since these receptors are very sensitive to small concentrations of agents, they are supposed to play an important role in the underlying neural mechanism of general anaesthesia. Moreover anaesthetic agents modulate the encephalographic activity (EEG) of subjects and hence show an effect on neural populations. To understand better the tonic inhibition effect in single neurons on neural populations and hence how it affects the EEG, the work considers single neurons and neural populations in a steady-state and studies numerically and analytically the modulation of their firing rate and nonlinear gain with respect to different levels of tonic inhibition. We consider populations of both type-I (Leaky Integrate-and-Fire model) and type-II (Morris-Lecar model) neurons. To bridge the single neuron description to the population description analytically, a recently proposed statistical approach is employed which allows to derive new analytical expressions for the population firing rate for type-I neurons. In addition, the work shows the derivation of a novel transfer function for type-I neurons as considered in neural mass models and studies briefly the interaction of synaptic and extra-synaptic inhibition. We reveal a strong subtractive and divisive effect of tonic inhibition in type-I neurons, i.e. a shift of the firing rate to higher excitation levels accompanied by a change of the nonlinear gain. Tonic inhibition shortens the excitation window of type-II neurons and their populations while maintaining the nonlinear gain. The gained results are interpreted in the context of recent experimental findings under propofol-induced anaesthesia.

  10. The adjustment of γ-aminobutyric acidA tonic subunits in Huntington's disease: from transcription to translation to synaptic levels into the neostriatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Rosas-Arellano

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, plays a key role in all stages of life, also is considered the main inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABA activates two kind of membrane receptors known as GABAA and GABAB, the first one is responsible to render tonic inhibition by pentameric receptors containing α4−6, β3, δ, or ρ1−3 subunits, they are located at perisynaptic and/or in extrasynaptic regions. The biophysical properties of GABAA tonic inhibition have been related with cellular protection against excitotoxic injury and cell death in presence of excessive excitation. On this basis, GABAA tonic inhibition has been proposed as a potential target for therapeutic intervention of Huntington's disease. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a genetic mutation of the huntingtin protein. For experimental studies of Huntington's disease mouse models have been developed, such as R6/1, R6/2, HdhQ92, HdhQ150, as well as YAC128. In all of them, some key experimental reports are focused on neostriatum. The neostriatum is considered as the most important connection between cerebral cortex and basal ganglia structures, its cytology display two pathways called direct and indirect constituted by medium sized spiny neurons expressing dopamine D1 and D2 receptors respectively, they display strong expression of many types of GABAA receptors, including tonic subunits. The studies about of GABAA tonic subunits and Huntington's disease into the neostriatum are rising in recent years, suggesting interesting changes in their expression and localization which can be used as a strategy to delay the cellular damage caused by the imbalance between excitation and inhibition, a hallmark of Huntington's disease.

  11. Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition partially mimics the ethanol-induced increase of the Golgi cell-dependent component of the tonic GABAergic current in rat cerebellar granule cells.

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    Marvin R Diaz

    Full Text Available Cerebellar granule cells (CGNs are one of many neurons that express phasic and tonic GABAergic conductances. Although it is well established that Golgi cells (GoCs mediate phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs, their role in mediating tonic currents in CGNs (CGN-I(tonic is controversial. Earlier studies suggested that GoCs mediate a component of CGN-I(tonic that is present only in preparations from immature rodents. However, more recent studies have detected a GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic in preparations of mature rodents. In addition, acute exposure to ethanol was shown to potentiate the GoC component of CGN-I(tonic and to induce a parallel increase in spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency at CGNs. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these effects of ethanol on GABAergic transmission in CGNs are mediated by inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase. We used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology techniques in cerebellar slices of male rats (postnatal day 23-30. Under these conditions, we reliably detected a GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic that could be blocked with tetrodotoxin. Further analysis revealed a positive correlation between basal sIPSC frequency and the magnitude of the GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic. Inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase with a submaximal concentration of ouabain partially mimicked the ethanol-induced potentiation of both phasic and tonic GABAergic currents in CGNs. Modeling studies suggest that selective inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase in GoCs can, in part, explain these effects of ethanol. These findings establish a novel mechanism of action of ethanol on GABAergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  12. Role of Peripheral Alpha2 Adrenergic Receptors in Tonic Pain During Different Stages of Estrous Cycle in Rats

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    AR Abyazi Shelmani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Estrogen and progesterone are supposed to modify pain sensitivity. However, the actual role of each of these steroid hormones in this respect is not well known. Plasma concentrations of these hormones show variation during estrous cycle. The role of alpha2 receptors in tonic pain has been pointed out. The aim of the present study was to investigate the agonist and antagonist effect of alpha2 adrenergic receptors on tonic pain sensitivity during all stages of estrous cycle in female rats. Methods: Xylasine as alpha2 agonist and yohimbin as alpha2 antagonist were used via intraperitoneal route (IP. Adult rats weighing 180-200 grams were used. Animals were maintained on 12h reverse light/dark cycle for 7 days prior to the experiment. Water and food was available ad libitum. Formalin test was performed by subcutaneous injection of 50 l formalin (2.5% solution into the hind paw. Formalin test was performed in all stages of estrous cycle for 60 minutes. Animals were divided into four groups; 1- control group (intact animal, 2- Sham group (animals received 0.2 ml normal saline by IP route, 3- Agonist groups (animals received 0.2 ml xylasine 1, 3 mg/kg body weight by IP route and 4- Antagonist group (animals received 0.2 ml yohimbine 1, 3 mg/kg body weight by IP route. Data were statistically analyzed using 2 way ANOVA test followed by Tukey's test as post-hoc test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Results showed that xylasine significantly (p<0.05 decreases pain sensitivity in all stages of estrous cycle. Analgesic effect of xylasine was maximum in estrus stage of estrous cycle and minimum in metestrus stage of estrous cycle. Yohimbine significantly (p<0.05 increases pain sensitivity in all stages of estrous cycle. Hyperalgesic effect of yohimbine was maximum in metestrus stage of estrous cycle and minimum in estrus stage of estrous cycle. Conclusion: These results indicate that alpha2 adrenergic system and endogenous

  13. Tonic 5nM DA stabilizes neuronal output by enabling bidirectional activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current via PKA and calcineurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C; Rodgers, Edmund W; Baro, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Volume transmission results in phasic and tonic modulatory signals. The actions of tonic dopamine (DA) at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) are largely undefined. Here we show that tonic 5nM DA acts at D1Rs to stabilize neuronal output over minutes by enabling activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current (I h). In the presence but not absence of 5nM DA, I h maximal conductance (G max) was adjusted according to changes in slow wave activity in order to maintain spike timing. Our study on the lateral pyloric neuron (LP), which undergoes rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential with depolarized plateaus, demonstrated that incremental, bi-directional changes in plateau duration produced corresponding alterations in LP I hG max when preparations were superfused with saline containing 5nM DA. However, when preparations were superfused with saline alone there was no linear correlation between LP I hGmax and duty cycle. Thus, tonic nM DA modulated the capacity for activity to modulate LP I h G max; this exemplifies metamodulation (modulation of modulation). Pretreatment with the Ca2+-chelator, BAPTA, or the specific PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented all changes in LP I h in 5nM DA. Calcineurin inhibitors blocked activity-dependent changes enabled by DA and revealed a PKA-mediated, activity-independent enhancement of LP I hG max. These data suggested that tonic 5nM DA produced two simultaneous, PKA-dependent effects: a direct increase in LP I h G max and a priming event that permitted calcineurin regulation of LP I h. The latter produced graded reductions in LP I hG max with increasing duty cycles. We also demonstrated that this metamodulation preserved the timing of LP's first spike when network output was perturbed with bath-applied 4AP. In sum, 5nM DA permits slow wave activity to provide feedback that maintains spike timing, suggesting that one function of low-level, tonic modulation is to stabilize specific features of a dynamic output.

  14. Tonic 5nM DA stabilizes neuronal output by enabling bidirectional activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current via PKA and calcineurin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf-Dieter C Krenz

    Full Text Available Volume transmission results in phasic and tonic modulatory signals. The actions of tonic dopamine (DA at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs are largely undefined. Here we show that tonic 5nM DA acts at D1Rs to stabilize neuronal output over minutes by enabling activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current (I h. In the presence but not absence of 5nM DA, I h maximal conductance (G max was adjusted according to changes in slow wave activity in order to maintain spike timing. Our study on the lateral pyloric neuron (LP, which undergoes rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential with depolarized plateaus, demonstrated that incremental, bi-directional changes in plateau duration produced corresponding alterations in LP I hG max when preparations were superfused with saline containing 5nM DA. However, when preparations were superfused with saline alone there was no linear correlation between LP I hGmax and duty cycle. Thus, tonic nM DA modulated the capacity for activity to modulate LP I h G max; this exemplifies metamodulation (modulation of modulation. Pretreatment with the Ca2+-chelator, BAPTA, or the specific PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented all changes in LP I h in 5nM DA. Calcineurin inhibitors blocked activity-dependent changes enabled by DA and revealed a PKA-mediated, activity-independent enhancement of LP I hG max. These data suggested that tonic 5nM DA produced two simultaneous, PKA-dependent effects: a direct increase in LP I h G max and a priming event that permitted calcineurin regulation of LP I h. The latter produced graded reductions in LP I hG max with increasing duty cycles. We also demonstrated that this metamodulation preserved the timing of LP's first spike when network output was perturbed with bath-applied 4AP. In sum, 5nM DA permits slow wave activity to provide feedback that maintains spike timing, suggesting that one function of low-level, tonic modulation is to stabilize specific features of a dynamic output.

  15. Food components and the Immune System: from tonic agents to allergens

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    Ana Maria Caetano Faria

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosa is the major site of contact with antigens, and it lodges the largest lymphoid tissue in the body. In physiological conditions, microbiota and dietary antigens are the natural sources of stimulation for the gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT and for the immune system as a whole. Germ free models have provided some insights on the immunological role of gut antigens. However, most of the GALT is not located in the large intestine, where gut microbiota is prominent. It is concentrated in the small intestine where protein absorption takes place. In this review, we will address the involvement of food components in the development and the function of the immune system. Studies in mice have already shown that dietary proteins are critical elements for the developmental shift of the immature neonatal immune profile into a fully developed immune system. The immunological effects of other food components (such as vitamins and lipids will also be addressed. Most of the cells in the GALT are activated and local proinflammatory mediators are abundant. Regulatory elements are known to provide a delicate yet robust balance that keeps the gut homeostasis at check. Usually antigenic contact in the gut induces two major immune responses, oral tolerance and production of secretory IgA. However, under pathological conditions mucosal homeostasis is disturbed resulting in inflammatory reactions such as food hypersensitivity. Food allergy development depends on many factors such as genetic predisposition, biochemical features of allergens and a growing array of environmental elements. Neuroimmune interactions are also implicated in food allergy and they are examples of the high complexity of the phenomenon. Recent findings on the gut circuits triggered by food components will be reviewed to show that, far beyond their role as nutrients, they are critical players in the operation of immune system in health and disease.

  16. Isobolographic analysis of the opioid-opioid interactions in a tonic and a phasic mouse model of induced nociceptive pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Zanetta, Pilar; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Prieto-Rayo, Juan Carlos; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2014-07-15

    Opioids have been used for the management of pain and coadministration of two opioids may induce synergism. In a model of tonic pain, the acetic acid writhing test and in a phasic model, the hot plate, the antinociceptive interaction between fentanyl, methadone, morphine, and tramadol was evaluated. The potency of opioids in the writhing test compared to the hot plate assay was from 2.5 (fentanyl) to 15.5 (morphine) times, respectively. The ED50 was used in a fixed ratio for each of the six pairs of opioid combinations, which, resulted in a synergistic antinociception except for methadone/tramadol and fentanyl/tramadol which were additive, in the hot plate. The opioid antagonists naltrexone, naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, suggests that the synergism of morphine combinations are due to the activation of MOR subtypes with partially contribution of DOR and KOR, however fentanyl and methadone combinations are partially due to the activation of MOR and DOR subtypes and KOR lack of participation. The antinociceptive effects of tramadol combinations, are partially due to the activation of MOR, DOR and KOR opioid subtypes. These results suggets that effectiveness and magnitude of the interactions between opioids are dependent on pain stimulus intensity.

  17. A decentralized control scheme for an effective coordination of phasic and tonic control in a snake-like robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takahide; Kano, Takeshi; Ishiguro, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Autonomous decentralized control has attracted considerable attention because it enables us to understand the adaptive and versatile locomotion of animals and facilitates the construction of truly intelligent artificial agents. Thus far, we have developed a snake-like robot (HAUBOT I) that is driven by a decentralized control scheme based on a discrepancy function, which incorporates phasic control. In this paper, we investigate a decentralized control scheme in which phasic and tonic control are well coordinated, as an extension of our previous study. To verify the validity of the proposed control scheme, we apply it to a snake-like robot (HAUBOT II) that can adjust both the phase relationship between its body segments and the stiffness at each joint. The results indicate that the proposed control scheme enables the robot to exhibit remarkable real-time adaptability over various frictional and inclined terrains. These findings can potentially enable us to gain a deeper insight into the autonomous decentralized control mechanism underlying the adaptive and resilient locomotion of animals.

  18. Spasticity Measurement Based on Tonic Stretch Reflex Threshold in Children with Cerebral Palsy Using the PediAnklebot

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    Marco Germanotta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, objective measures are becoming prominent in spasticity assessment, to overcome limitations of clinical scales. Among others, Tonic Stretch Reflex Threshold (TSRT showed promising results. Previous studies demonstrated the validity and reliability of TSRT in spasticity assessment at elbow and ankle joints in adults. Purposes of the present study were to assess: (i the feasibility of measuring TSRT to evaluate spasticity at the ankle joint in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP, and (ii the correlation between objective measures and clinical scores. A mechatronic device, the pediAnklebot, was used to impose 50 passive stretches to the ankle of 10 children with CP and 3 healthy children, to elicit muscles response at 5 different velocities. Surface electromyography, angles, and angular velocities were recorded to compute dynamic stretch reflex threshold; TSRT was computed with a linear regression through angles and angular velocities. TSRTs for the most affected side of children with CP resulted into the biomechanical range (95.7 ± 12.9° and 86.7 ± 17.4° for Medial and Lateral Gastrocnemius, and 75.9 ± 12.5° for Tibialis Anterior. In three patients, the stretch reflex was not elicited in the less affected side. TSRTs were outside the biomechanical range in healthy children. However, no correlation was found between clinical scores and TSRT values. Here, we demonstrated the capability of TSRT to discriminate between spastic and non-spastic muscles, while no significant outcomes were found for the dorsiflexor muscle.

  19. The Cortisol Paradox of Trauma-Related Disorders: Lower Phasic Responses but Higher Tonic Levels of Cortisol Are Associated with Sexual Abuse in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Schalinski, Inga; Elbert, Thomas; Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    ObjectivesInconsistent findings exist for the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with stress related disorders. Recent studies point towards early life stress as a potential modulator.MethodsWe investigated the impact of childhood sexual abuse on phasic (saliva cortisol reactivity) and tonic (hair cortisol) regulation. Furthermore, we assessed predictors on cortisol accumulation in hair. Women (N = 43) with stress-related disorders underwent a standardized a...

  20. Roles of taurine-mediated tonic GABAA receptor activation in the radial migration of neurons in the fetal mouse cerebral cortex

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    Tomonori eFurukawa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA depolarizes embryonic cerebrocortical neurons and continuous activation of the GABAA receptor (GABAAR contributes to their tonic depolarization. Although multiple reports have demonstrated a role of GABAAR activation in neocortical development, including in migration, most of these studies have used pharmacological blockers. Herein, we performed in utero electroporation in GABA synthesis-lacking homozygous GAD67-GFP knock-in mice (GAD67GFP/GFP to label neurons born in the ventricular zone. Three days after electroporation, there were no differences in the distribution of labeled cells between the genotypes. The dose-response properties of cells labeled to detect GABA were equivalent among genotypes. However, continuous blockade of GABAAR with the GABAAR antagonist SR95531 accelerated radial migration. This effect of GABAAR blockade in GAD67GFP/GFP mice suggested a role for alternative endogenous GABAAR agonists. Thus, we tested the role of taurine, which is derived from maternal blood but is abundant in the fetal brain. The taurine-evoked currents in labeled cells were mediated by GABAAR. Taurine uptake was blocked by a taurine transporter inhibitor, 2-(guanidinoethanesulfonic acid (GES, and taurine release was blocked by a volume-sensitive anion channel blocker, 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl oxobutyric acid (DCPIB, as examined through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. GES increased the extracellular taurine concentration and induced an inward shift of the holding current, which was reversed by SR95531. In a taurine-deficient mouse model, the GABAAR-mediated tonic currents were greatly reduced, and radial migration was accelerated. As the tonic currents were equivalent among the genotypes of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, taurine, rather than GABA, might play a major role as an endogenous agonist of embryonic tonic GABAAR conductance, regulating the radial migration of neurons in the

  1. Context-Dependent Modulation of αβγ and αβγ GABAA Receptors by Penicillin: Implications for Phasic and Tonic Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Botzolakis, Emmanuel J.; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Penicillin, an open-channel blocker of GABAA receptors, was recently reported to inhibit phasic, but not tonic, currents in hippocampal neurons. To distinguish between isoform-specific and context-dependent modulation as possible explanations for this selectivity, the effects of penicillin were evaluated on recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in HEK293T cells. When co-applied with saturating GABA, penicillin decreased peak amplitude, induced rebound, and prolonged deactivation of currents e...

  2. Maternal separation increases later immobility during forced swim in guinea pig pups: evidence for sensitization of a depressive-like state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Schreibeis, Amanda D; Schiml, Patricia A; Deak, Terrence

    2017-01-01

    Early-life stress is thought to increase later vulnerability for developing depressive illness by sensitizing underlying stress-responsive systems. Guinea pig pups separated from their mother and isolated in a novel cage for 3 hr exhibit a sensitized depressive-like behavioral response when separated again the following day as well as weeks later. The behavioral response and its sensitization appear to be mediated by inflammatory factors. To determine if this sensitization is specific to the separation response or if it reflects a broader underlying depressive-like state, guinea pig pups that had either been separated for 3 hr or remained with their mothers were observed in the forced swim test the following 3 days. Earlier separation was found to increase the duration of immobility, a measure sensitive to antidepressant treatment. These results support the use of the guinea pig as a model for examining mechanisms of inflammatory-mediated sensitization of depression following stress in early life. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Noradrenergic neurotransmission within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulates the retention of immobility in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Michelly M; Gomes, Felipe V; Crestani, Carlos C; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2013-06-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is a limbic structure that has a direct influence on the autonomic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral responses to stress. It was recently reported that reversible inactivation of synaptic transmission within this structure causes antidepressant-like effects, indicating that activation of the BNST during stressful situations would facilitate the development of behavioral changes related to the neurobiology of depression. Moreover, noradrenergic neurotransmission is abundant in the BNST and has an important role in the regulation of emotional processes related to the stress response. Thus, this study aimed to test the hypothesis that activation of adrenoceptors within the BNST facilitates the development of behavioral consequences of stress. To investigate this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were stressed (forced swimming, 15 min) and 24 h later received intra-BNST injections of vehicle, WB4101, RX821002, CGP20712, or ICI118,551, which are selective α(1), α(2), β(1), and β(2) adrenoceptor antagonists, respectively, 10 min before a 5-min forced swimming test. It was observed that administration of WB4101 (10 and 15 nmol), CGP20712 (5 and 10 nmol), or ICI118,551 (5 nmol) into the BNST reduced the immobility time of rats subjected to forced swimming test, indicating an antidepressant-like effect. These findings suggest that activation of α(1), β(1), and β(2) adrenoceptors in the BNST could be involved in the development of the behavioral consequences of stress. © 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  4. Antidepressant-like effects of the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the root bark of Morus alba on the immobility behavior of rats in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong Wook; Kim, Yun Tai; Park, Ji-Hae; Baek, Nam-In; Han, Daeseok

    2014-06-12

    In this study, the antidepressant-like effects of Morus alba fractions in rats were investigated in the forced swim test (FST). Male Wistar rats (9-week-old) were administered orally the M. alba ethyl acetate (EtOAc 30 and 100 mg/kg) and M. alba n-butanol fractions (n-BuOH 30 and 100 mg/kg) every day for 7 consecutive days. On day 7, 1 h after the final administration of the fractions, the rats were exposed to the FST. M. alba EtOAc fraction at the dose of 100 mg/kg induced a decrease in immobility behavior (p alba EtOAc fraction at the dose of 100 mg/kg decreased the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to the stress, as indicated by an attenuated corticosterone response and decreased c-fos immunoreactivity in the hippocampal and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) region. These findings demonstrated that M. alba EtOAc fraction have beneficial effects on depressive behaviors and restore both altered c-fos expression and HPA activity.

  5. The GLP-1 Receptor Agonist Exendin-4 and Diazepam Differentially Regulate GABAA Receptor-Mediated Tonic Currents in Rat Hippocampal CA3 Pyramidal Neurons.

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    Sergiy V Korol

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is a metabolic hormone that is secreted in a glucose-dependent manner and enhances insulin secretion. GLP-1 receptors are also found in the brain where their signalling affects neuronal activity. We have previously shown that the GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and exendin-4 enhanced GABA-activated synaptic and tonic currents in rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. The hippocampus is the centre for memory and learning and is important for cognition. Here we examined if exendin-4 similarly enhanced the GABA-activated currents in the presence of the benzodiazepine diazepam. In whole-cell recordings in rat brain slices, diazepam (1 μM, an allosteric positive modulator of GABAA receptors, alone enhanced the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC amplitude and frequency by a factor of 1.3 and 1.6, respectively, and doubled the tonic GABAA current normally recorded in the CA3 pyramidal cells. Importantly, in the presence of exendin-4 (10 nM plus diazepam (1 μM, only the tonic but not the sIPSC currents transiently increased as compared to currents recorded in the presence of diazepam alone. The results suggest that exendin-4 potentiates a subpopulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in the CA3 pyramidal neurons.

  6. Context-Dependent Modulation of αβγ and αβγ GABAA Receptors by Penicillin: Implications for Phasic and Tonic Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Botzolakis, Emmanuel J.; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Penicillin, an open-channel blocker of GABAA receptors, was recently reported to inhibit phasic, but not tonic, currents in hippocampal neurons. To distinguish between isoform-specific and context-dependent modulation as possible explanations for this selectivity, the effects of penicillin were evaluated on recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in HEK293T cells. When co-applied with saturating GABA, penicillin decreased peak amplitude, induced rebound, and prolonged deactivation of currents evoked from both synaptic and extrasynaptic receptor isoforms. However, penicillin had isoform-specific effects on the extent of desensitization, reflecting its ability to differentially modulate peak (non-equilibrium) and residual (near-equilibrium) currents. This suggested that the context of activation could determine the apparent sensitivity of a given receptor isoform to penicillin. To test this hypothesis, we explored the ability of penicillin to modulate synaptic and extrasynaptic isoforms that were activated under more physiologically relevant conditions. Interestingly, while currents evoked from synaptic isoforms under phasic conditions (transient activation by a saturating concentration of GABA) were substantially inhibited by penicillin, currents evoked from extrasynaptic isoforms under tonic conditions (prolonged application by a sub-saturating concentration of GABA) were minimally affected. We therefore concluded that the reported inability of penicillin to modulate tonic currents could not simply be attributed to insensitivity of extrasynaptic receptors, but rather, reflected an inability to modulate these receptors in their native context of activation. PMID:18775733

  7. Primate Cerebellar Granule Cells Exhibit a Tonic GABAAR Conductance that is not Affected by Alcohol: A Possible Cellular Substrate of the Low Level of Response Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eMohr

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In many rodent brain regions, alcohol increases vesicular release of GABA, resulting in an increase in the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and the magnitude of tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR currents. A neglected issue in translating the rodent literature to humans is the possibility that phylogenetic differences alter the actions of alcohol. To address this issue we made voltage-clamp recordings from granule cells (GCs in cerebellar slices from the non-human primate, Macaca fascicularis. We found that similar to Sprague Dawley rats (SDRs, non-human primate (NHP GCs exhibit a tonic conductance generated by 6 subunit containing GABAARs, as evidenced by its blockade by the broad spectrum GABAAR antagonist, GABAzine (10M, inhibition by 6 selective antagonist, furosemide (100M, and enhancement by THDOC (10-20nM and THIP (500nM. In contrast to SDR GCs, in most NHP GCs (~60%, application of EtOH (25-105mM did not increase sIPSC frequency or the tonic GABAAR current. In a minority of cells (~40%, EtOH did increase sIPSC frequency and the tonic current. The relative lack of response to EtOH was associated with reduced expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, which we recently reported mediates EtOH-induced enhancement of vesicular GABA release in rats. The EtOH-induced increase in tonic GABAAR current was significantly smaller in NHPs than in SDRs, presumably due to less GABA release, because there were no obvious differences in the density of GABAARs or GABA transporters between SDR and NHP GCs. Thus, EtOH does not directly modulate 6 subunit GABAARs in NHPs. Instead, EtOH enhanced GABAergic transmission is mediated by enhanced GABA release. Further, SDR GC responses to alcohol are only representative of a subpopulation of NHP GCs. This suggests that the impact of EtOH on NHP cerebellar physiology will be reduced compared to SDRs, and will likely have different computational and behavioral

  8. A dietary supplement improves facial photoaging and skin sebum, hydration and tonicity modulating serum fibronectin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Laurino, Carmen; Palmieri, Beniamino; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2015-03-01

    Excessive exposure to the sun can cause severe photoaging as early as the second decade of life resulting in a loss of physiological elastic fiber functions. We designed a first study to assess differences in facial skin pH, sebum, elasticity, hydration and tonicity and serum levels of fibronectin, elastin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. In a second study we tested the hypothesis that a dietary supplement would improve facial photoaging, also promoting changes in the above mentioned skin and serum parameters. In the first study we enrolled 30 women [age: 47.5 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)] affected by moderate facial photoaging (4 cm ≤ Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)Skin Tester was used to analyze differences in facial skin parameters between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. Skin Tester was also used to assess the effect of VISCODERM Pearls on facial skin parameters and compared with placebo 2 weeks after the end of treatment. Serum levels of fibronectin, elastin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the first cohort of patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls and, at baseline and 2 weeks after the end of treatment, in the second cohort of patients who underwent treatment with VISCODERM Pearls and placebo. VAS photoaging score was higher in patients affected by photoaging, if compared with healthy controls (p hydration and tonicity were decreased in patients affected by photoaging, if compared with healthy controls (all p hydration and tonicity were increased in the active treatment group vs. placebo (p skin hydration, tonicity and elasticity and increased skin pH and sebum. Treatment with the dietary supplement VISCODERM Pearls significantly improved VAS photoaging score and skin hydration, sebum and tonicity 2 weeks

  9. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In reviewing work at Harwell over the past 25 years on nuclear reactions it is stated that a balance has to be struck in both experiment and theory between work on cross-sections of direct practical relevance to reactors and on those relevant to an overall understanding of reaction processes. The compound nucleus and direct process reactions are described. Having listed the contributions from AERE, Harwell to developments in nuclear reaction research in the period, work on the optical model, neutron capture theory, reactions at doorway states with fine structure, and sum-rules for spectroscopic factors are considered in more detail. (UK)

  10. Peripheral chemoreceptors tune inspiratory drive via tonic expiratory neuron hubs in the medullary ventral respiratory column network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, L S; Nuding, S C; Ott, M M; Dean, J B; Bolser, D C; O'Connor, R; Morris, K F; Lindsey, B G

    2015-01-01

    Models of brain stem ventral respiratory column (VRC) circuits typically emphasize populations of neurons, each active during a particular phase of the respiratory cycle. We have proposed that "tonic" pericolumnar expiratory (t-E) neurons tune breathing during baroreceptor-evoked reductions and central chemoreceptor-evoked enhancements of inspiratory (I) drive. The aims of this study were to further characterize the coordinated activity of t-E neurons and test the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreceptors also modulate drive via inhibition of t-E neurons and disinhibition of their inspiratory neuron targets. Spike trains of 828 VRC neurons were acquired by multielectrode arrays along with phrenic nerve signals from 22 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated adult cats. Forty-eight of 191 t-E neurons fired synchronously with another t-E neuron as indicated by cross-correlogram central peaks; 32 of the 39 synchronous pairs were elements of groups with mutual pairwise correlations. Gravitational clustering identified fluctuations in t-E neuron synchrony. A network model supported the prediction that inhibitory populations with spike synchrony reduce target neuron firing probabilities, resulting in offset or central correlogram troughs. In five animals, stimulation of carotid chemoreceptors evoked changes in the firing rates of 179 of 240 neurons. Thirty-two neuron pairs had correlogram troughs consistent with convergent and divergent t-E inhibition of I cells and disinhibitory enhancement of drive. Four of 10 t-E neurons that responded to sequential stimulation of peripheral and central chemoreceptors triggered 25 cross-correlograms with offset features. The results support the hypothesis that multiple afferent systems dynamically tune inspiratory drive in part via coordinated t-E neurons. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Tonic aortic depressor nerve stimulation does not impede baroreflex dynamic characteristics concomitantly mediated by the stimulated nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Turner, Michael J; Shimizu, Shuji; Kamiya, Atsunori; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2018-03-01

    Although electrical activation of the carotid sinus baroreflex (baroreflex activation therapy) is being explored as a device therapy for resistant hypertension, possible effects on baroreflex dynamic characteristics of interaction between electrical stimulation and pressure inputs are not fully elucidated. To examine whether the electrical stimulation of the baroreceptor afferent nerve impedes normal short-term arterial pressure (AP) regulation mediated by the stimulated nerve, we electrically stimulated the right aortic depressor nerve (ADN) while estimating the baroreflex dynamic characteristics by imposing pressure inputs to the isolated baroreceptor region of the right ADN in nine anesthetized rats. A Gaussian white noise signal with a mean of 120 mmHg and standard deviation of 20 mmHg was used for the pressure perturbation. A tonic ADN stimulation (2 or 5 Hz, 10 V, 0.1-ms pulse width) decreased mean sympathetic nerve activity (367.0 ± 70.9 vs. 247.3 ± 47.2 arbitrary units, P ADN stimulation did not affect the slope of dynamic gain in the neural arc transfer function from pressure perturbation to sympathetic nerve activity (16.9 ± 1.0 vs. 14.7 ± 1.6 dB/decade, not significant). These results indicate that electrical stimulation of the baroreceptor afferent nerve does not significantly impede the dynamic characteristics of the arterial baroreflex concomitantly mediated by the stimulated nerve. Short-term AP regulation by the arterial baroreflex may be preserved during the baroreflex activation therapy.

  12. Perceived social isolation is associated with altered functional connectivity in neural networks associated with tonic alertness and executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, Elliot A; Cacioppo, John T; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Cappa, Stefano F; Dodich, Alessandra; Falini, Andrea; Canessa, Nicola

    2017-01-15

    Perceived social isolation (PSI), colloquially known as loneliness, is associated with selectively altered attentional, cognitive, and affective processes in humans, but the neural mechanisms underlying these adjustments remain largely unexplored. Behavioral, eye tracking, and neuroimaging research has identified associations between PSI and implicit hypervigilance for social threats. Additionally, selective executive dysfunction has been evidenced by reduced prepotent response inhibition in social Stroop and dichotic listening tasks. Given that PSI is associated with pre-attentional processes, PSI may also be related to altered resting-state functional connectivity (FC) in the brain. Therefore, we conducted the first resting-state fMRI FC study of PSI in healthy young adults. Five-minute resting-state scans were obtained from 55 participants (31 females). Analyses revealed robust associations between PSI and increased brain-wide FC in areas encompassing the right central operculum and right supramarginal gyrus, and these associations were not explained by depressive symptomatology, objective isolation, or demographics. Further analyses revealed that PSI was associated with increased FC between several nodes of the cingulo-opercular network, a network known to underlie the maintenance of tonic alertness. These regions encompassed the bilateral insula/frontoparietal opercula and ACC/pre-SMA. In contrast, FC between the cingulo-opercular network and right middle/superior frontal gyrus was reduced, a finding associated with diminished executive function in prior literature. We suggest that, in PSI, increased within-network cingulo-opercular FC may be associated with hypervigilance to social threat, whereas reduced right middle/superior frontal gyrus FC to the cingulo-opercular network may be associated with diminished impulse control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Respiratory-haemodynamic reactions in patients with lung cancer complicated by atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnosel'skij, N.V.; Krut'ko, E.N.; Pilipenko, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    The article contains published research materials confirming paradoxical respiratory-haemodynamic reactions in patients with lung atelectasis. The physiopathology mechanisms of these reactions were estimated by means of non-invasive arterial pressure, blood saturation and pulse values. The outcomes obtained are indicative of two pathophysiologic compensation mechanisms in patients with lung atelectasis. After pressing carotid artery branch - increased tonicity of the arteries in this lung area decreases blood flow resulting in ventilation/blood flow rate balancing that corresponds to Euler-Liljestrand mechanism. Resection of atelectized lung area leads to increased thoraco-pulmonary pressure, which has been reduced through atelectasis, that aids in higher lung tissue compliance.

  14. The effect of chronic fluoxetine on social isolation-induced changes on sucrose consumption, immobility behavior, and on serotonin and dopamine function in hippocampus and ventral striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Juan C; Fornaguera, Jaime

    2009-03-02

    This study examined the effect of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, on isolation-induced changes on sucrose consumption and preference, spontaneous open-field activity, forced swimming behavior, and on tissue levels of 5-HT and dopamine (DA) in hippocampus and ventral striatum (VS). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in social isolation or group housing from postnatal day 28. Thirty-two days later, half of the isolated animals were orally treated with fluoxetine (10mg/kg/day) during the following 34 days. At the end of this period, behavior was assessed and afterward ex-vivo tissue samples were obtained. It was found that fluoxetine restored isolation-increased sucrose consumption and immobility behavior, without affecting locomotor activity, which appeared slightly increased in isolated groups both treated and untreated. In the hippocampus, isolation rearing depleted 5-HT contents and increased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels, as well as 5-HT and DA turnover. These neurochemical alterations were reversed by fluoxetine. In VS, treated and untreated isolated rats showed higher 5-HT levels than grouped congeners. Although fluoxetine did not affect 5-HT and DA contents in this region, it slightly reversed the alterations in the 5-HT and DA turnover observed in isolated rats. Overall, social isolation impaired incentive and escape motivated behaviors. At the neurochemical level, isolation rearing affected 5-HT rather than DA activity, and this differential effect was more noticeable in hippocampus than in VS. The chronic treatment with fluoxetine during the last month of rearing somewhat prevented these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. Our data suggest that isolation rearing is an appropriate procedure to model some developmental-related alterations underlying depression disorders.

  15. Effects of periadolescent fluoxetine and paroxetine on elevated plus-maze, acoustic startle, and swimming immobility in rats while on and off-drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorhees, Charles V; Morford, LaRonda R; Graham, Devon L; Skelton, Matthew R; Williams, Michael T

    2011-10-05

    Whether selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) exposure during adolescent brain development causes lasting effects remains unresolved. Assess the effects of fluoxetine and paroxetine 60 days after adolescent exposure compared with when on-drug. Male Sprague-Dawley littermates (41 litters) were gavaged on postnatal days 33-53 with fluoxetine (3 or 10 mg/kg/day), paroxetine (3, 10 or, 17 mg/kg/day), or water; half were tested while on-drug (21 litters) and half after 60 days off-drug (20 litters). The highest dose of the drugs reduced body weight gain during treatment that rebounded 1 week post-treatment. On-drug, no significant group differences were found on elevated plus maze time-in-open, zone entries, or latency to first open entry; however, the high dose of paroxetine significantly reduced head-dips (N=20/group). No significant effects were found on-drug for acoustic startle response/prepulse inhibition (ASR/PPI) although a trend (pfluoxetine and paroxetine (N=20-21/group). No differences on immobility time were seen in the Porsolt forced swim test or in plasma corticosterone at the end of forced swim (N-19-21/group). Off-drug, no effects were seen in the elevated plus maze (N=16/group), ASR/PPI (N=20/group), forced swim (N=19-20/group), or plasma corticosterone (N=19/group). At the doses tested, fluoxetine and paroxetine induced minor effects with drug on-board but no residual, long-term adverse effects in rats 60 days after drug discontinuation. The data provide no evidence that fluoxetine or paroxetine have long-term adverse effects on the behaviors measured here after adolescent to young adult exposure.

  16. Clinical doses of citalopram or reboxetine differentially modulate passive and active behaviors of female Wistar rats with high or low immobility time in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Serrano, Ana Gisela; Vila-Luna, María Leonor; Álvarez-Cervera, Fernando José; Heredia-López, Francisco José; Góngora-Alfaro, José Luis; Pineda, Juan Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The sensitivity of immobility time (IT) to antidepressant-drugs differs in rats expressing high or low motor activity during the forced swimming test (FST). However, whether this heterogeneity is expressed after the administration of the most selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs, respectively) is unknown. We compared the influence of either the SSRI citalopram or the SNRI reboxetine with the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on two subgroups of female Wistar rats expressing high IT (HI; at or above the mean value) or low IT (LI; below the mean) during the initial 5 min of the first session of the FST. None of the tested drugs increased motor activity in the open field test. When vehicle was applied to either HI or LI rats, IT increased in the second session of the FST. This increment concurred with a simultaneous climbing time (CT) decrement. When amitriptyline (15 mg/kg) was tested the CT increased for both HI and LI rats. This increment was accompanied by an IT decrement in HI and LI rats. Reboxetine (0.16 or 1 mg/kg) precluded IT and CT changes in both HI and LI rats and produced a swimming time reduction. Citalopram (0.4, 1, and 3 mg/kg) essentially mimicked the influence of reboxetine on the IT and CT in LI rats, as well as in HI rats, but in the latter case only at 3 mg/kg. Yet, at the dose of 10 mg/kg citalopram lacked this effect in both subgroups. No differences were detected when the IT of LI rats was evaluated with citalopram (3 mg/kg) during estrus or diestrus stage. These results show that clinical doses of citalopram produced an antidepressant-like effect selectively in LI rats, while amitriptyline or reboxetine produced this effect in both LI and HI animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of ionotropic GABA, glutamate and glycine receptors in the tonic and reflex control of cardiac vagal outflow in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodchild Ann K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac vagal preganglionic neurons (CVPN are responsible for the tonic, reflex and respiratory modulation of heart rate (HR. Although CVPN receive GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs, likely involved in respiratory and reflex modulation of HR respectively, little else is known regarding the functions controlled by ionotropic inputs. Activation of g-protein coupled receptors (GPCR alters these inputs, but the functional consequence is largely unknown. The present study aimed to delineate how ionotropic GABAergic, glycinergic and glutamatergic inputs contribute to the tonic and reflex control of HR and in particular determine which receptor subtypes were involved. Furthermore, we wished to establish how activation of the 5-HT1A GPCR affects tonic and reflex control of HR and what ionotropic interactions this might involve. Results Microinjection of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin into CVPN decreased HR but did not affect baroreflex bradycardia. The glycine antagonist strychnine did not alter HR or baroreflex bradycardia. Combined microinjection of the NMDA antagonist, MK801, and AMPA antagonist, CNQX, into CVPN evoked a small bradycardia and abolished baroreflex bradycardia. MK801 attenuated whereas CNQX abolished baroreceptor bradycardia. Control intravenous injections of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT evoked a small bradycardia and potentiated baroreflex bradycardia. These effects were still observed following microinjection of picrotoxin but not strychnine into CVPN. Conclusions We conclude that activation of GABAA receptors set the level of HR whereas AMPA to a greater extent than NMDA receptors elicit baroreflex changes in HR. Furthermore, activation of 5-HT1A receptors evokes bradycardia and enhances baroreflex changes in HR due to interactions with glycinergic neurons involving strychnine receptors. This study provides reference for future studies investigating how diseases alter neurochemical inputs to CVPN.

  18. First-aid management of tonic-clonic seizures among healthcare personnel: A survey by the Apulian section of the Italian League Against Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Tommaso; Lalla, Alessandra; Carapelle, Elena; Di Claudio, Maria Teresa; Avolio, Carlo; d'Orsi, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the knowledge of healthcare workers about first-aid measures to be performed during and after a tonic-clonic seizure. One hundred and fifty-four healthcare workers (86 physicians) working at 8 tertiary hospitals in the Apulia region, Italy, responded to a questionnaire comprising of 28 questions based on available Italian and international recommendations about what to do during a tonic-clonic seizure. One hundred and fifty-four healthcare workers completed and returned surveys with a response rate of 96.25%. There were 55 nurses (35.7%), 86 physicians (55.8%), and 13 healthcare workers with different roles (Electroencephalograph technicians, psychologists, social workers). Among physicians, there were 7 cardiologists, 3 surgeons, 12 infectious-disease specialists, 11 internal medicine specialists, 2 psychiatrists, 2 gynecologists, 27 specialists working in the emergency department, and 22 physicians with different specializations. Nearly 90% of the respondents identified head protection as important first aid, while 100% responded to not keep the legs elevated. To avoid tongue bite, both physicians and other healthcare workers would put something in the mouth (54.0%), like a Guedel cannula (71.0%) fingers (29.5%). Grabbing arms and legs, trying to stop the seizure, would be potentially performed by 11.6% of our sample. Physicians would administer a benzodiazepine during the seizure (65.7%) and during the postictal phase (29.2%), even if the patient is known to have epilepsy (23.7%), and in this case, 11.3% of respondents would administer the usual antiepileptic medications. More than half of respondents would call the emergency telephone number, because of necessary hospitalization in case of tonic-clonic seizure, even if it is experienced by a patient known to have epilepsy. Our survey suggests the need for epilepsy educational programs on first-aid management of seizures among healthcare workers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optogenetic stimulation of VTA dopamine neurons reveals that tonic but not phasic patterns of dopamine transmission reduce ethanol self-administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline E Bass

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that acute ethanol exposure stimulates ventral tegmental area (VTA dopamine cell activity and that VTA-dependent dopamine release in terminal fields within the nucleus accumbens plays an integral role in the regulation of ethanol drinking behaviors. Unfortunately, due to technical limitations, the specific temporal dynamics linking VTA dopamine cell activation and ethanol self-administration are not known. In fact, establishing a causal link between specific patterns of dopamine transmission and ethanol drinking behaviors has proven elusive. Here, we sought to address these gaps in our knowledge using a newly developed viral-mediated gene delivery strategy to selectively express Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 on dopamine cells in the VTA of wild-type rats. We then used this approach to precisely control VTA dopamine transmission during voluntary ethanol drinking sessions. The results confirmed that ChR2 was selectively expressed on VTA dopamine cells and delivery of blue light pulses to the VTA induced dopamine release in accumbal terminal fields with very high temporal and spatial precision. Brief high frequency VTA stimulation induced phasic patterns of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Lower frequency stimulation, applied for longer periods mimicked tonic increases in accumbal dopamine. Notably, using this optogenetic approach in rats engaged in an intermittent ethanol drinking procedure, we found that tonic, but not phasic, stimulation of VTA dopamine cells selectively attenuated ethanol drinking behaviors. Collectively, these data demonstrate the effectiveness of a novel viral targeting strategy that can be used to restrict opsin expression to dopamine cells in standard outbred animals and provide the first causal evidence demonstrating that tonic activation of VTA dopamine neurons selectively decreases ethanol self-administration behaviors.

  20. Combined Diazepam and MK-801 Therapy Provides Synergistic Protection from Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine-induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures and Lethality in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Ali, Mahil S.; Velíšková, Jana; Stanton, Patric K.; Heck, Diane E.; Velíšek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic rodenticide, tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TMDT), is a persistent and highly lethal GABA-gated Cl− channel blocker. TMDT is clandestinely produced, remains popular in mainland China, and causes numerous unintentional and deliberate poisonings worldwide. TMDT is odorless, tasteless, and easy to manufacture, features that make it a potential weapon of terrorism. There is no effective treatment. We previously characterized the effects of TMDT in C57BL/6 mice and surveyed efficacies of GABAergic and glutamatergic anticonvulsant treatments. At 0.4 mg/kg i.p., TMDT produced neurotoxic symptomatology consisting of twitches, clonic and tonic-clonic seizures, often progressing to status epilepticus and death. If administered immediately after the occurrence of the first clonic seizure, the benzodiazepine diazepam (DZP) effectively prevented all subsequent seizure symptoms, whereas the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) primarily prevented tonic-clonic seizures. The latter agent, however, appeared to be more effective at preventing delayed death. The present study further explored these phenomena, and characterized the therapeutic actions of DZP and MK-801 as combinations. Joint treatment with both DZP and MK-801 displayed synergistic protection against tonic-clonic seizures and 24 hour lethality as determined by isobolographic analysis. Clonic seizures, however, remained poorly controlled. A modification of the treatment regimen, where DZP was followed 10 min later by MK-801, yielded a reduction in both types of seizures and improved overall outcome. Simultaneous monitoring of subjects via EEG and videography confirmed effectiveness of this sequential regimen. We conclude that TMDT blockage at GABAA receptors involves early activation of NMDA receptors, which contribute to persistent ictogenic activity. Our data predict that a sequential combination treatment with DZP followed by MK-801 will be superior to either individual therapy with, or

  1. Conduction block and tonic pupils in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease caused by a myelin protein zero p.Ile112Thr mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2011-03-01

    We report a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) due to the p.Ile112Thr mutation in myelin protein zero (MPZ) who presented with a patchy neuropathy with conduction block and tonic pupils. Conduction block is unusual in inherited neuropathies, while pupil abnormalities are recognised to occur in CMT especially due to MPZ mutations. This case highlights that patchy demyelinating neuropathy with conduction block may occur in p.Ile112Thr MPZ mutations. Involvement of the pupils, as in this case, may be a pointer towards a genetic rather than inflammatory cause of neuropathy.

  2. Variable Action Potential Backpropagation during Tonic Firing and Low-Threshold Spike Bursts in Thalamocortical But Not Thalamic Reticular Nucleus Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, William M; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Errington, Adam C

    2017-05-24

    Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are indispensable in dendritic signaling. Conflicting Ca 2+ -imaging data and an absence of dendritic recording data means that the extent of backpropagation in thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons remains unknown. Because TRN neurons signal electrically through dendrodendritic gap junctions and possibly via chemical dendritic GABAergic synapses, as well as classical axonal GABA release, this lack of knowledge is problematic. To address this issue, we made two-photon targeted patch-clamp recordings from rat TC and TRN neuron dendrites to measure bAPs directly. These recordings reveal that "tonic"' and low-threshold-spike (LTS) "burst" APs in both cell types are always recorded first at the soma before backpropagating into the dendrites while undergoing substantial distance-dependent dendritic amplitude attenuation. In TC neurons, bAP attenuation strength varies according to firing mode. During LTS bursts, somatic AP half-width increases progressively with increasing spike number, allowing late-burst spikes to propagate more efficiently into the dendritic tree compared with spikes occurring at burst onset. Tonic spikes have similar somatic half-widths to late burst spikes and undergo similar dendritic attenuation. In contrast, in TRN neurons, AP properties are unchanged between LTS bursts and tonic firing and, as a result, distance-dependent dendritic attenuation remains consistent across different firing modes. Therefore, unlike LTS-associated global electrical and calcium signals, the spatial influence of bAP signaling in TC and TRN neurons is more restricted, with potentially important behavioral-state-dependent consequences for synaptic integration and plasticity in thalamic neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In most neurons, action potentials (APs) initiate in the axosomatic region and propagate into the dendritic tree to provide a retrograde signal that conveys information about the level of

  3. Reactions of animals and people under conditions of brief weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayev-Smik, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown that under brief weightlessness sensory reactions arise in a number of people, mainly those under these conditions for the first time, in the form of spatial and visual illusions, motor excitation, in which tonic and motor components can be distinguished, and vestibular-vegetative disturbances (nausea, vomiting, etc.). In repeated flights with creation of weightlessness, a decrease in the extent of expression and, then, disappearance of these reactions occurred in a significant majority of those studied. Experiments in weightlessness with the vision cut off and with the absence of vestibular functions in the subjects confirm the hypothesis that spatial conceptions of people in weightlessness depend on predominance of gravireceptor or visual afferent signals under these conditions.

  4. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.

    1979-01-01

    Quasielastic reaction studies, because of their capability to microscopically probe nuclear structure, are still of considerable interest in heavy-ion reactions. The recent progress in understanding various aspects of the reaction mechanism make this aim appear closer. The relation between microscopic and macroscopic behavior, as suggested, for example, by the single proton transfer data to individual final states or averaged excitation energy intervals, needs to be explored. It seems particularly useful to extend measurements to higher incident energies, to explore and understand nuclear structure aspects up to the limit of the energy range where they are important

  5. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular Modeling Group, Organic Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology,. Hyderabad ... thus obtained are helpful to model the regioselectivity ... compromise to model Diels–Alder reactions involving ...... acceptance.

  6. Electrophysiological evidence of increased glycine receptor-mediated phasic and tonic inhibition by blockade of glycine transporters in spinal superficial dorsal horn neurons of adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misa Oyama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand the synaptic and/or extrasynaptic mechanisms underlying pain relief by blockade of glycine transporter subtypes GlyT1 and GlyT2, whole-cell recordings were made from dorsal horn neurons in spinal slices from adult mice, and the effects of NFPS and ALX-1393, selective GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors, respectively, on phasic evoked or miniature glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs or mIPSCs were examined. NFPS and ALX-1393 prolonged the decay phase of eIPSCs without affecting their amplitude. In the presence of tetrodotoxin to record mIPSCs, NFPS and ALX-1393 induced a tonic inward current that was reversed by strychnine. Although NFPS had no statistically significant influences on mIPSCs, ALX-1393 significantly increased their frequency. We then further explored the role of GlyTs in the maintenance of glycinergic IPSCs. To facilitate vesicular release of glycine, repetitive high-frequency stimulation (HFS was applied at 10 Hz for 3 min during continuous recordings of eIPSCs at 0.1 Hz. Prominent suppression of eIPSCs was evident after HFS in the presence of ALX-1393, but not NFPS. Thus, it appears that phasic and tonic inhibition may contribute to the analgesic effects of GlyT inhibitors. However, reduced glycinergic inhibition due to impaired vesicular refilling could hamper the analgesic efficacy of GlyT2 inhibitors.

  7. The Cortisol Paradox of Trauma-Related Disorders: Lower Phasic Responses but Higher Tonic Levels of Cortisol Are Associated with Sexual Abuse in Childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Schalinski

    Full Text Available Inconsistent findings exist for the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis in patients with stress related disorders. Recent studies point towards early life stress as a potential modulator.We investigated the impact of childhood sexual abuse on phasic (saliva cortisol reactivity and tonic (hair cortisol regulation. Furthermore, we assessed predictors on cortisol accumulation in hair. Women (N = 43 with stress-related disorders underwent a standardized assessment of idiographic adverse and traumatic experiences and psychopathology, while measuring salivary cortisol and, heart rate and blood pressure.Comparing women with and without childhood sexual abuse revealed lower rates of responders and distinct levels of salivary cortisol to the interview in conjunction with a lower heart rate for the abused group. Childhood adversities, traumatic experiences, and depression contributed to higher hair cortisol levels.Our finding of lower response rate and distinct salivary cortisol pattern in individuals with childhood sexual abuse compared to individuals without early sexual abuse supports the role of environmental programming for the HPA axis. Both, childhood adversities and traumatic stress emerge as crucial factors for long-term cortisol secretion. Lower or suppressed phasic cortisol responses to trauma-related stimuli may therefore be associated with higher tonic values. Thus, early exposure to adversities may result in a biological distinct phenotype in adult patients with stress-related disorders.

  8. The Cortisol Paradox of Trauma-Related Disorders: Lower Phasic Responses but Higher Tonic Levels of Cortisol Are Associated with Sexual Abuse in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalinski, Inga; Elbert, Thomas; Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Inconsistent findings exist for the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with stress related disorders. Recent studies point towards early life stress as a potential modulator. We investigated the impact of childhood sexual abuse on phasic (saliva cortisol reactivity) and tonic (hair cortisol) regulation. Furthermore, we assessed predictors on cortisol accumulation in hair. Women (N = 43) with stress-related disorders underwent a standardized assessment of idiographic adverse and traumatic experiences and psychopathology, while measuring salivary cortisol and, heart rate and blood pressure. Comparing women with and without childhood sexual abuse revealed lower rates of responders and distinct levels of salivary cortisol to the interview in conjunction with a lower heart rate for the abused group. Childhood adversities, traumatic experiences, and depression contributed to higher hair cortisol levels. Our finding of lower response rate and distinct salivary cortisol pattern in individuals with childhood sexual abuse compared to individuals without early sexual abuse supports the role of environmental programming for the HPA axis. Both, childhood adversities and traumatic stress emerge as crucial factors for long-term cortisol secretion. Lower or suppressed phasic cortisol responses to trauma-related stimuli may therefore be associated with higher tonic values. Thus, early exposure to adversities may result in a biological distinct phenotype in adult patients with stress-related disorders.

  9. Properties of tonic episodes of masseter muscle activity during waking hours and sleep in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mude, Acing Habibie; Kawakami, Shigehisa; Kato, Seiya; Minagi, Shogo

    2018-04-01

    To provide a scientific data related to the tonic activity of masseter muscle in subjects with and without history of orofacial pain during their normal daily life. Thirty-three subjects were divided into two groups, a pain history group (PHG) and a non-pain history group (non-PHG), based on their responses to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders questionnaire. After excluding four subjects with incomplete recordings, full-day masseter muscle surface EMGs of 29 subjects (10 men, 19 women; mean age 24.1 years) were analyzed. Tonic episode (TE) was defined as continuous EMG activity with a duration at least 2s with intensities above twice the baseline noise level. TEs were classified into 6 strength categories (40% of the maximum voluntary clenching (MVC)). The mean duration of activity observed in the non-PHG+2 SD was adopted as a cutoff for identifying sustained TE. During waking hours, the incidence of sustained TEs was significantly higher in the PHG than in the non-PHG (porofacial pain and the intensity range of 7.5-25% MVC would be an important range for future clenching studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. In situ hybridization on the change of m1 receptor mRNA in different brain areas of aged rats and the effect of Yin tonic Zhimu studied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yaer; Xia Zongqin; Yi Ningyu

    1996-01-01

    The change of gene expression of m1 receptors in different brain areas of aged rats and the effects of water extract of the Yin tonic Zhimu and its active principle ZMS was studied. In situ hybridization using 35 S-labelled m1 and m2 probes and analysis of the autoradiographs using a computerized image-analyzer was selected. The grain density of m1 mRNA in striatum was significantly lowered in old rats as compared with young rats (decreased by 12.26 +- 3.60, P<0.01). Long-term oral administration of ZMS, the active principle of Yin tonic Zhimu but not the water extraction of Zhimu, elevated the m1 mRNA in striatum of aged rats (increased by 15.71 +- 3.27, P<0.01). Neither significant change of the grain density of m1 mRNA in old rats nor significant effect of Zhimu or ZMS was observed in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The m1 mRNA level in striatum is decreased in aged rats and ZMS is able to elevate it

  11. Direct Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austern, N. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1963-01-15

    In order to give a unified presentation of one point of view, these lectures are devoted only to a detailed development of the standard theories of direct reactions, starting from basic principles. Discussion is given of the present status of the theories, of the techniques used for practical calculation, and of possible future developments. The direct interaction (DI) aspects of a reaction are those which involve only a few of the many degrees of freedom of a nucleus. In fact the minimum number of degrees of freedom which must be involved in a reaction are those required to describe the initial and final channels, and DI studies typically consider these degrees of freedom and no others. Because of this simplicity DI theories may be worked out in painstaking detail. DI processes concern only part of the wave function for a problem. The other part involves complicated excitations of many degrees of freedom, and gives the compound nucleus (CN) effects. While it is extremely interesting to learn how to separate DI and CN effects in an orderly manner, if they are both present in a reaction, no suitable method has yet been found. Instead, current work stresses the kinds of reactions and the kinds of final states in which DI effects dominate and in which CN effects may almost be forgotten. The DI cross-sections which are studied are often extremely large, comparable to elastic scattering cross-sections. (author)

  12. Reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Anh

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the Reaction Mechanisms laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The research topics are: the valence bond methods, the radical chemistry, the modelling of the transition states by applying geometric constraints, the long range interactions (ion - molecule) in gaseous phase, the reaction sites in gaseous phase and the mass spectroscopy applications. The points of convergence between the investigations of the mass spectroscopy and the theoretical chemistry teams, as well as the purposes guiding the research programs, are discussed. The published papers, the conferences, the congress communications and the thesis, are also reported [fr

  13. Allergic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that don't bother most people (such as venom from bee stings and certain foods, medicines, and pollens) can ... person. If the allergic reaction is from a bee sting, scrape the ... more venom. If the person has emergency allergy medicine on ...

  14. Understanding the cognitive impact of the contraceptive estrogen Ethinyl Estradiol: tonic and cyclic administration impairs memory, and performance correlates with basal forebrain cholinergic system integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennenga, Sarah E; Gerson, Julia E; Koebele, Stephanie V; Kingston, Melissa L; Tsang, Candy W S; Engler-Chiurazzi, Elizabeth B; Baxter, Leslie C; Bimonte-Nelson, Heather A

    2015-04-01

    Ethinyl Estradiol (EE), a synthetic, orally bio-available estrogen, is the most commonly prescribed form of estrogen in oral contraceptives, and is found in at least 30 different contraceptive formulations currently prescribed to women as well as hormone therapies prescribed to menopausal women. Thus, EE is prescribed clinically to women at ages ranging from puberty to reproductive senescence. Here, in two separate studies, the cognitive effects of cyclic or tonic EE administration following ovariectomy (Ovx) were evaluated in young female rats. Study I assessed the cognitive effects of low and high doses of EE, delivered tonically via a subcutaneous osmotic pump. Study II evaluated the cognitive effects of low, medium, and high doses of EE administered via a daily subcutaneous injection, modeling the daily rise and fall of serum EE levels with oral regimens. Study II also investigated the impact of low, medium and high doses of EE on the basal forebrain cholinergic system. The low and medium doses utilized here correspond to the range of doses currently used in clinical formulations, and the high dose corresponds to doses prescribed to a generation of women between 1960 and 1970, when oral contraceptives first became available. We evaluate cognition using a battery of maze tasks tapping several domains of spatial learning and memory as well as basal forebrain cholinergic integrity using immunohistochemistry and unbiased stereology to estimate the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-producing cells in the medial septum and vertical/diagonal bands. At the highest dose, EE treatment impaired multiple domains of spatial memory relative to vehicle treatment, regardless of administration method. When given cyclically at the low and medium doses, EE did not impact working memory, but transiently impaired reference memory during the learning phase of testing. Of the doses and regimens tested here, only EE at the highest dose impaired several domains of memory

  15. Adrenergic receptors and gastric secretion in dogs. Is a "tonic balance" relationship between vagal and beta 2-adrenergic activity a possibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Hovendal, C; Bech, K

    1984-01-01

    The relative influence of adrenergic receptors on gastric acid secretion in the dog stomach with different vagal activity or "tone" is almost unknown. beta-adrenoceptors seem to be most important for the direct effect of adrenergic stimulation on acid secretion. In this study the effects...... acid secretion was not influenced significantly by beta-blockade. Similar dose-response curves were found for non-vagotomized dogs with high beta 2-adrenergic tone and dogs with low vagal tone (vagotomy) after pentagastrin and histamine stimulated acid secretion. This study indicates...... that a counterbalance between beta 2-adrenergic and cholinergic vagal tone exists. A "tonic balance theory" is suggested and is probably involved in the resulting acid secretion after vagotomy....

  16. Considerações sobre o reflexo tônico cervical de Magnus: De Kleijn Considerations about the Magnus: De Kleijn tonic neck reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Bearzoti

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available O reflexo tônico cervical de Magnus - De Kleijn é analisado levando-se em conta as psicologias do desenvolvimento de Gesell, Spitz e Piaget. É considerada sua natureza filogenética, realçado o significado favorável de seu desaparecimento em torno do terceiro mês de vida e enfatizada sua participação no desenvolvimento da criança.The Magnus - De Kleijn's tonic neck reflex is analyzed concerning to the developmental psychologies of Gesell, Spitz and Piaget. It is considered its phylogenetic nature, it is taken into account its favorable disappearing about three months old and, it is made a great account of its participation in baby development.

  17. Antioxidant capacities and total phenolic contents of 20 polyherbal remedies used as tonics by folk healers in Phatthalung and Songkhla provinces, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthasri, Wipawee; Puangkeaw, Nuntitporn; Kunworarath, Nongluk; Jaisamut, Patcharawalai; Limsuwan, Surasak; Maneenoon, Katesarin; Choochana, Piyapong; Chusri, Sasitorn

    2018-02-21

    Uses of polyherbal formulations have played a major role in traditional medicine. The present study is focused on the formulations used in traditional Thai folkloric medicine as tonics or bracers. Twenty documented polyherbal mixtures, used as nourishing tonics by the folk healers in Phatthalung and Songkhla provinces in southern Thailand, are targeted. Despite traditional health claims, there is no scientific evidence to support the utilization of polyherbal formulations. The phenolic and flavonoid contents of the polyherbal formulations and a series of antioxidant tests were applied to measure their capability as preventive or chain-breaking antioxidants. In addition, the cytotoxic activity of effective formulations was assayed in Vero cells. Ninety-eight plant species belonging to 45 families were used to prepare the tested formulation. The preliminary results revealed that water extracts of THP-R016 and THP-R019 contain a high level of total phenolic and flavonoid contents and exhibit remarkable antioxidant activities, as tested by DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assays. The extract of THP-R019 also showed the strongest metal chelating activities, whereas THP-R016 extract possessed notable superoxide anion and peroxyl radical scavenging abilities. The data provide evidence that the water extracts of folkloric polyherbal formulations, particularly THP-R016, are a potential source of natural antioxidants, which will be valuable in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. The free radical scavenging of THP-R016 may be due to the contribution of phenolic and flavonoid contents. Useful characteristics for the consumer, such as the phytochemical profiles of active ingredients, cellular based antioxidant properties and beneficial effects in vivo, are under further investigation.

  18. Commercial herbal medicines used as African traditional medicines: Ngoma Herbal Tonic Immune Booster interferes with a rapid urine drug screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothibe, M E; Osuch, E; Kahler-Venter, C P

    2017-08-25

    The prevalent use of African traditional medicine by the general public has been reported. With commercialisation and marketing, some of the herbal medicines (HMs) used are readily available over the counter, most of them promoted as immune boosters. These commercial HMs have not been taken through clinical trials and other tests that would validate their composition and safety, and other properties such as their effect on laboratory diagnostic tests. To investigate the cross-reactivity of selected HMs with commonly tested drugs of abuse (DoA) using a qualitative rapid urinalysis assay. The six HMs selected were bought from local pharmacies. A rapid urinalysis screening test was performed with the Instant View Multi-Drug of Abuse Test kit from Labstix Diagnostics. Drug-free urine (DFU) was pooled from samples donated by healthy volunteers. Urine samples that had tested positive for DoA were obtained from a pharmacology laboratory. Aliquots of the urine samples were spiked with the HMs in neat and diluted form, and tested at various time intervals. The results for the DFU samples spiked with the HMs remained negative. There were no significant changes in pH or specific gravity of the samples. The results of samples that had tested positive for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were not altered by five of the HMs when spiked at 40% v/v. The HM Ngoma Herbal Tonic Immune Booster caused false-negative results for the THC test. An important finding is that the herbal mixture Ngoma Herbal Tonic Immune Booster caused false-negative results for the cannabinoid screening test. It adds to the list of substances that may be potential adulterants of urine for screening tests.

  19. The forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response involves histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Yalini; Droste, Susanne K; Arthur, J Simon C; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-05-01

    The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. Previously, we have shown that the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response after a forced swim experience is associated with chromatin modifications and transcriptional induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons. Given that both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 signalling pathway are involved in neuroplasticity processes underlying learning and memory, we investigated in rats and mice whether these signalling pathways regulate chromatin modifications and transcriptional events participating in the acquisition of the immobility response. We found that: (i) forced swimming evoked a transient increase in the number of phospho-acetylated histone H3-positive [P(Ser10)-Ac(Lys14)-H3(+)] neurons specifically in the middle and superficial aspects of the dentate gyrus granule cell layer; (ii) antagonism of NMDA receptors and inhibition of ERK1/2 signalling blocked forced swimming-induced histone H3 phospho-acetylation and the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response; (iii) double knockout (DKO) of the histone H3 kinase mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK) 1/2 in mice completely abolished the forced swimming-induced increases in histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate granule neurons and the behavioural immobility response; (iv) blocking mineralocorticoid receptors, known not to be involved in behavioural immobility in the forced swim test, did not affect forced swimming-evoked histone H3 phospho-acetylation in dentate neurons; and (v) the pharmacological manipulations and gene deletions did not affect behaviour in the initial forced swim test. We conclude that the forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response requires histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in distinct dentate granule neurons through recruitment of the NMDA/ERK/MSK 1/2 pathway.

  20. Personality affects defensive behaviour of Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Oniscidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Hadrián Tuf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated individual behavioural patterns of isopods expressed as tonic immobility following some intrusive treatments. Common rough woodlice, Porcellio scaber, were kept individually in plastic boxes and tested for tonic immobility repeatedly. Reactivity, sensitivity (number of stimuli needed to respond, and endurance of tonic immobility (TI according three types of treatments (touch, squeeze, drop were evaluated. Touch was the weakest treatment and it was necessary to repeat it a number of times to obtain a response; while squeeze and drop induced TI more frequently. Nevertheless, duration of the response persisted for a longer time with the touch treatment. Within each set of the three treatment, the strongest response was the third one, regardless of treatment type. Duration of reaction was affected by the size of the woodlouse, the smallest individuals feigning death for the shortest time. Despite body size, we found a significant individual pattern of endurance of TI among tested woodlice, which was stable across treatments as well as across time (5 repetitions during a 3 week period. Porcellio scaber is one of the first species of terrestrial isopods with documented personality traits.

  1. Quasielastic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the experimental and theoretical situation regarding transfer reactions and inelastic scattering. In the first category there is little (very little) precision data for heavy projectiles and consequently almost no experience with quantitative theoretical analysis. For the inelastic scattering the rather extensive data strongly supports the coupled channels models with collective formfactors. At the most back angles, at intensities about 10 -5 of Rutherford scattering, a second, compound-like mechanism becomes dominant. The description of the interplay of these two opposite mechanisms provides a new challenge for our understanding

  2. Nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corner, J.; Richardson, K.; Fenton, N.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear reactions' marks a new development in the study of television as an agency of public policy debate. During the Eighties, nuclear energy became a major international issue. The disasters at Three-mile Island and Chernobyl created a global anxiety about its risks and a new sensitivity to it among politicians and journalists. This book is a case-study into documentary depictions of nuclear energy in television and video programmes and into the interpretations and responses of viewers drawn from many different occupational groupings. How are the complex and specialist arguments about benefit, risk and proof conveyed through the different conventions of commentary, interview and film sequence? What symbolic associations does the visual language of television bring to portrayals of the issue? And how do viewers make sense of various and conflicting accounts, connecting what they see and hear on the screen with their pre-existing knowledge, experience and 'civic' expectations. The authors examine some of the contrasting forms and themes which have been used by programme makers to explain and persuade, and then give a sustained analysis of the nature and sources of viewers' own accounts. 'Nuclear Reactions' inquires into the public meanings surrounding energy and the environment, spelling out in its conclusion some of the implications for future media treatments of this issue. It is also a key contribution to the international literature on 'television knowledge' and the processes of active viewing. (author)

  3. Spallation reactions; Reactions de spallation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugon, J.

    1996-12-31

    Spallation reactions dominate the interactions of hadrons with nuclei in the GeV range (from {approx} 0.1 to {approx} 10 GeV). They correspond to a sometimes important ejection of light particles leaving most of the time a residue of mass commensurate with the target mass. The main features of the experimental data are briefly reviewed. The most successful theoretical model, namely the intranuclear cascade + evaporation model, is presented. Its physical content, results and possible improvements are critically discussed. Alternative approaches are shortly reviewed. (author). 84 refs.

  4. Chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, Brian.

    1991-01-01

    Chain Reaction is a work of recent American political history. It seeks to explain how and why America came to depend so heavily on its experts after World War II, how those experts translated that authority into political clout, and why that authority and political discretion declined in the 1970s. The author's research into the internal memoranda of the Atomic Energy Commission substantiates his argument in historical detail. It was not the ravages of American anti-intellectualism, as so many scholars have argued, that brought the experts back down to earth. Rather, their decline can be traced to the very roots of their success after World War II. The need to over-state anticipated results in order to garner public support, incessant professional and bureaucratic specialization, and the sheer proliferation of expertise pushed arcane and insulated debates between experts into public forums at the same time that a broad cross section of political participants found it easier to gain access to their own expertise. These tendencies ultimately undermined the political influence of all experts. (author)

  5. [Laboratory diagnostics in transient loss of consciousness : Serum lactate compared to serum creatine kinase as diagnostic indicator for generalized tonic-clonic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafotakis, M; Heckelmann, J; Zechbauer, S; Litmathe, J; Brokmann, J; Willmes, K; Surges, R; Matz, O

    2018-03-21

    Laboratory parameters can help in the differential diagnostics of acute episodes of transient loss of consciousness. Especially serum lactate and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels may provide valuable hints to distinguish generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) from syncope. Serum lactate levels at admission and CK levels 10-48 h after the episodes that led to admission were compared between patients with GTCS (n = 30) and those with syncope (n = 15). In addition, sensitivity and specificity of lactate and CK as diagnostic markers for syncope and GTCS were determined. The serum lactate and serum CK levels were significantly increased in patients with GTCS as compared to syncope patients (serum lactate: p lactate as an indicator for GTCS was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-1.0). For CK the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis produced an AUC of only 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63-0.9). The determination of the lactate value as point-of-care diagnostics appears to be highly relevant in the rapid clarification of unclear episodes with transient loss of consciousness. The CK level at follow-up is also suitable for distinguishing GTCS from syncope but is inferior to the serum lactate value.

  6. Repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow in the left superior temporal gyrus reveal tonic hyperactivity in patients with auditory verbal hallucinations: A possible trait marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eHoman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The left superior temporal gyrus (STG has been suggested to play a key role in auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Eleven medicated subjects with schizophrenia and medication-resistant auditory verbal hallucinations and 19 healthy controls underwent perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling. Three additional repeated measurements were conducted in the patients. Patients underwent a treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS between the first 2 measurements. The main outcome measure was the pooled cerebral blood flow (CBF, which consisted of the regional CBF measurement in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG and the global CBF measurement in the whole brain.Results: Regional CBF in the left STG in patients was significantly higher compared to controls (p < 0.0001 and to the global CBF in patients (p < 0.004 at baseline. Regional CBF in the left STG remained significantly increased compared to the global CBF in patients across time (p < 0.0007, and it remained increased in patients after TMS compared to the baseline CBF in controls (p < 0.0001. After TMS, PANSS (p = 0.003 and PSYRATS (p = 0.01 scores decreased significantly in patients.Conclusions: This study demonstrated tonically increased regional CBF in the left STG in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations despite a decrease in symptoms after TMS. These findings were consistent with what has previously been termed a trait marker of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  7. Generalized epilepsy syndromes and callosal thickness: Differential effects between patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and those with generalized tonic-clonic seizures alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulou, Stavroula; Kurth, Florian; Luders, Eileen; Savic, Ivanka

    2017-01-01

    The definition of two well-studied genetic generalized epilepsy syndromes (GGE) - juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures alone (GTCS) - suggests the absence of structural cerebral abnormalities. Nevertheless, there are various reports of such abnormalities (especially in JME), where effects mainly occur within thalamus and mesial prefrontal regions. This raises the question of whether JME is particularly linked to midline structure abnormalities, which may also involve the corpus callosum. We studied callosal morphology in a well-matched sample of 22 JME patients, 15 GTCS patients, and 42 controls (CTL) for all of whom we obtained T1-weighted data on a 3T MRI scanner. More specifically, we measured callosal thickness at 100 equidistant points across the callosal surface, and subsequently compared the three groups (JME, GTCS, and CTL) against each other. Significant differences between JME patients and controls were observed within the callosal genu, anterior midbody, and isthmus, with thinner regions in JME patients. There were no significant differences between GTCS patients and controls, and also not between JME patients and GTCS patients. The present outcomes point to callosal abnormalities in JME patients suggesting an impairment of interhemisperic communication between prefrontal, motor, parietal and temporal cortices. These findings further support the notion that structural aberrations are present and differentiated across GGE syndromes, with significant callosal deviations from normality in JME. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of local versus remote tonic heat pain during training on acquisition and retention of a finger-tapping sequence task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Marie-Claude; Roosink, Meyke; Mercier, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Although pain is present in a large proportion of patients receiving rehabilitation, its impact on motor learning is still unclear, especially in the case of neuropathic pain that is not tightly linked to specific movements. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of local and remote tonic cutaneous heat pain applied during training on motor learning of a finger-tapping sequence task. Forty-five healthy participants, randomized to the control, local pain or remote pain groups, were trained to perform an explicit finger motor sequence of five items as fast as possible. During the 10 training blocks (30 s each), local pain and remote pain groups received a heat pain stimulus on the wrist or leg, respectively. Performance was tested in the absence of pain in all groups before (baseline), immediately after (post-immediate), 60 min after (post-60 min) and 24 h after training (post-24 h) to assess both acquisition and next-day retention. Speed increased over time from baseline to post-24 h (p pain during training. No changes were observed on error rates, which were very low even at baseline. These results with experimental heat pain suggest that the ability to relearn finger sequence should not be affected by concomitant neuropathic pain in neurorehabilitation. However, these results need to be validated in the context of chronic pain, by including pain as a co-variable in motor rehabilitation trials.

  9. Role of pp60(c-src) and p(44/42) MAPK in ANG II-induced contraction of rat tonic gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Rajinder N; Fan, Ya-Ping; Rattan, Satish

    2002-08-01

    We examined the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (p(44/42) MAPK) in ANG II-induced contraction of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscles. Studies were performed in the isolated smooth muscles and cells (SMC). ANG II-induced changes in the levels of phosphorylation of different signal transduction and effector proteins were determined before and after selective inhibitors. ANG II-induced contraction of the rat LES and IAS SMC was inhibited by genistein, PD-98059 [a specific inhibitor of MAPK kinases (MEK 1/2)], herbimycin A (a pp60(c-src) inhibitor), and antibodies to pp60(c-src) and p(120) ras GTPase-activating protein (p(120) rasGAP). ANG II-induced contraction of the tonic smooth muscles was accompanied by an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of p(120) rasGAP. These were attenuated by genistein but not by PD-98059. ANG II-induced increase in phosphorylations of p(44/42) MAPKs and caldesmon was attenuated by both genistein and PD-98059. We conclude that pp60(c-src) and p(44/42) MAPKs play an important role in ANG II-induced contraction of LES and IAS smooth muscles.

  10. Surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle relieves chronic tension-type headache caused by tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle in patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    Proprioceptively innervated intramuscular connective tissues in Müller's muscle function as exterior mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the levator and occipitofrontalis muscles. In aponeurotic blepharoptosis, since the levator aponeurosis is disinserted from the tarsus, stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle is increased even on primary gaze to induce phasic and tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. It was hypothesised that in certain patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, the presence of tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle due to the sensitised mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle, can cause chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) associated with occipitofrontalis tenderness. To verify this hypothesis, this study evaluated (1) what differentiates patients with CTTH from patients without CTTH, (2) how pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres as a method for desensitising the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle affects electromyographic activity of the frontalis muscle, and (3) how surgical aponeurotic reinsertion to desensitise the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle electromyographically or subjectively affects activities of the occipitofrontalis muscle or CTTH. It was found that patients had sustained CTTH when light eyelid closure did not markedly reduce eyebrow elevation. However, pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres or surgery to desensitise the mechanoreceptor electromyographically reduced the tonic contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle on primary gaze and subjectively relieved aponeurotic blepharoptosis-associated CTTH. Over-stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle on primary gaze may induce CTTH due to tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. Therefore, surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle appears to relieve CTTH.

  11. Highly sensitive chemiluminescent point mutation detection by circular strand-displacement amplification reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chao; Ge, Yujie; Gu, Hongxi; Ma, Cuiping

    2011-08-15

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is attracting extensive attentions owing to its direct connections with human diseases including cancers. Here, we have developed a highly sensitive chemiluminescence biosensor based on circular strand-displacement amplification and the separation by magnetic beads reducing the background signal for point mutation detection at room temperature. This method took advantage of both the T4 DNA ligase recognizing single-base mismatch with high selectivity and the strand-displacement reaction of polymerase to perform signal amplification. The detection limit of this method was 1.3 × 10(-16)M, which showed better sensitivity than that of most of those reported detection methods of SNP. Additionally, the magnetic beads as carrier of immobility was not only to reduce the background signal, but also may have potential apply in high through-put screening of SNP detection in human genome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Ou Sik; Park, Youn Yeol

    1996-12-01

    This book is about chemical kinetics and reaction mechanism. It consists of eleven chapters, which deal with reaction and reaction speed on reaction mechanism, simple reaction by rate expression, reversible reaction and simultaneous reaction, successive reaction, complicated reaction mechanism, assumption for reaction mechanism, transition state theory, successive reaction and oscillating reaction, reaction by solution, research method high except kinetics on reaction mechanism, high reaction of kinetics like pulsed radiolysis.

  13. Imobilidade: uma ação essencial dos anestésicos inalatórios Inmovilidad: una acción esencial de los anestésicos inhalatorios Immobility: essential inhalational anesthetics action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Teixeira Domingues Duarte

    2005-02-01

    -HT2A, y canales de sodio voltaje-dependientes. CONCLUSIONES: La inmovilidad producida por los anestésicos inhalatorios es mediada, principalmente, a través de una acción sobre la médula espinal. Ese efecto ocurre por la acción anestésica sobre la excitabilidad de las neuronas motoras espinales, pero también sobre neuronas e interneuronas nociceptivas del cuerno posterior de la médula. La acción sobre receptores específicos ejerce efecto sobre la transmisión sináptica de esas neuronas.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Immobility is an essential component of general anesthesia and should be looked for and maintained throughout anesthesia. Anesthetic potency, called Minimum Alveolar Concentration (MAC, results from the inhibition of movement response to noxious stimulation. However, although spinal cord is recognized as the primary mediator of surgical immobility, cellular and subcelular mechanisms of action of inhaled anesthetics to produce immobility are not yet totally known. Considering major research advances on mechanisms of action of inhaled anesthetics and resulting wide variety of information, this review aimed at critically evaluating clinical and experimental studies performed to identify sites of action and mechanisms of inhaled anesthetics to promote immobility in response to noxious stimulations. CONTENTS: Complex mechanisms of action of inhaled anesthetics on central nervous system may be divided into three levels: macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular. Macroscopically, behavioral studies have shown spinal cord to be the primary anesthetic site of action to promote immobility in response to noxious stimulations. At cellular level, excitability of motor neurons, nociceptive neurons and synaptic transmission are involved in the anesthetic action. At molecular level, several receptors are affected by inhaled anesthetics, but only a few may directly mediate anesthetic action, among them: glycine, glutamate AMPA and 5-HT2A receptors, in addition to

  14. Análise do significado do tempo de imobilidade em modelos experimentais de natação Analysis of the meaning of the immobility time in swimming experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Morini Calil

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi testar a hipótese de que a interpretação do tempo de imobilidade (desamparo aprendido ou adaptação pode variar conforme o modelo utilizado (teste da natação forçada ou estresse por natação. Foram analisados o tempo de imobilidade (TI e a mobilização de glicogênio de ratos submetidos à natação em dois protocolos: estresse por natação (EN e teste da natação forçada (TNF. Também comparamos os efeitos da desipramina e diazepam. Os experimentos foram filmados para análise do TI. Os ratos, após a sessão de natação, foram sacrificados e amostras do fígado e músculos foram preparadas para quantificação do glicogênio. O TI foi menor no EN comparado ao TNF (p=0,001. As concentrações de glicogênio hepático dos grupos foram diferentes entre si (controle>EN>TNF; pThe aim of this work was to evaluate if the meaning of immobility (helplessness or adaptation depends on the experimental model (forced swimming test or swimming stress. Immobility time (IT and glycogen mobilization of rats submitted to swimming session were analyzed in two protocols: swimming stress (SS and forced swimming test (FST. We also compared the effects of desipramine and diazepam. The experiments were recorded to evaluate the IT. The rats, after swimming session, were sacrificed and hepatic and muscles samples were prepared to the quantification of glycogen. IT was lower in SS than in FST (p=0.001. Hepatic glycogen concentration were different one from another (control>FST>SS;p<0.05. The glycogen concentrations at gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were lower at SS compared to FST and control (p<0.05. The IT was recorded and measured from another group treated with desipramine and diazepam. Desipramine decreased the IT in the FST but not in the SS. Diazepam increased the IT in the SS but not in the FST. We conclude that SS and FST induced different physiological and behavioral responses and represent different situations for the

  15. Tonic spasms are a common clinical manifestation in patients with neuromyelitis optica Espasmos tônicos são manifestações clínicas frequentes em pacientes com neuromielite óptica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Abaroa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Tonic spasms have been most commonly associated with multiple sclerosis. To date, few reports of series of patients with neuromyelitis optica and tonic spasms have been published. Methods: We analyzed the characteristics and frequency of tonic spasms in 19 subjects with neuromyelitis optica. Data was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire for tonic spasms, by both retrospectively reviewing medical records and performing clinical assessment. Results: All patients except one developed this symptom. The main triggering factors were sudden movements and emotional factors. Spasms were commonly associated to sensory disturbances and worsened during the acute phases of the disease. Carbamazepine was most commonly used to treat the symptom and patients showed good response to the drug. Conclusions: Tonic spasms are a common clinical manifestation in patients with neuromyelitis optica.Espasmos tônicos têm sido mais frequentemente associados com esclerose múltipla. Foram publicados até agora poucos relatos de série de pacientes com neuromielite óptica e espasmos tônicos. Métodos: Foram analisadas as características e a frequência de espasmos tônicos em 19 indivíduos com neuromielite óptica. Os dados foram coletados por meio de um questionário semiestruturado para espasmos tônicos, mediante a avaliação retrospectiva dos prontuários e a análise dos dados clínicos Resultados: Todos os pacientes com neuromielite óptica exceto um apresentaram espasmos tônicos. Os principais fatores desencadeantes foram movimentos bruscos e fatores emocionais. Espasmos foram frequentemente associados a perturbações sensoriais e se agravaram durante a fase aguda da doença. A carbamazepina foi utilizada frequentemente para tratar os sintomas, com boa resposta. Conclusões: Os espasmos tônicos são manifestações clínicas frequentes em pacientes com neuromielite óptica.

  16. Genetic polymorphism of cytochrome P450 4F2, vitamin E level and histological response in adults and children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease who participated in PIVENS and TONIC clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaminie Athinarayanan

    Full Text Available Vitamin E improved liver histology in children and adults with NAFLD who participated in TONIC and PIVENS clinical trials, but with significant inter-individual variability in its efficacy. Cytochrome P450 4F2 (CYP4F2 is the major enzyme metabolizing Vit E, with two common genetic variants (V433M, rs2108622 and W12G, rs3093105 found to alter its activity. We investigated the relationship between CYP4F2 genotypes, α-tocopherol levels and histological improvement in these two trials. V433M and W12G variants were genotyped in TONIC (n = 155 and PIVENS (n = 213 DNA samples. The relationships between CYP4F2 genotypes, plasma α-tocopherol levels at baseline and weeks 48 (w48 and 96 (w96 and histological end points (overall improvement in liver histology and resolution of NASH were investigated. As a result, the V433M genotype was significantly associated with baseline plasma α-tocopherol in the TONIC trial (p = 0.004, but not in PIVENS. Among those receiving Vit E treatment, CYP4F2 V433M genotype was associated with significantly decreased plasma α-tocopherol levels at w48 (p = 0.003 for PIVENS and p = 0.026 for TONIC but not at w96. The w96 α-tocopherol level was significantly associated with resolution of NASH (p = 0.006 and overall histology improvement (p = 0.021in the PIVENS, but not in the TONIC trial. There was no significant association between CYP4F2 genotypes and histological end points in either trial. Our study suggested the a moderate role of CYP4F2 polymorphisms in affecting the pharmacokinetics of Vit E as a therapeutic agent. In addition, there may be age-dependent relationship between CYP4F2 genetic variability and Vit E pharmacokinetics in NAFLD.

  17. Influence of caffeine on the protective activity of gabapentin and topiramate in a mouse model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargiełło-Baszak, Małgorzata; Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Andres-Mach, Marta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine may interact with classical antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), reducing their anticonvulsant effects in basic seizure models. The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether intraperitoneal caffeine (acute or chronic for 15 days) could attenuate the anticonvulsant effect of some newer AEDs: gabapentin (GBP) and topiramate (TPM) against electroconvulsions in mice. Maximal electroshock (MES)-induced mouse seizure model was used for the estimation of the anticonvulsant activity of TPM whilst the protective activity of GBP was evaluated in the threshold test for maximal (tonic) convulsions. Adverse effects were evaluated by measurement of long-term memory (the step-through passive avoidance task) and motor coordination (chimney test). Plasma AED concentrations were also measured to determinate any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed effects. Caffeine (both acute and chronic at 23.1 and 46.2mg/kg) significantly reduced the protective effects of TPM against MES. As regards GBP, caffeine (acutely at 46.2mg/kg and chronically at 23.1 or 46.2mg/kg) significantly diminished the GBP-induced increases in the electroconvulsive threshold. In addition, caffeine did not affect the free plasma concentrations of TPM or GBP. Acute and chronic caffeine (23.1 and 46.2mg/kg) enhanced the impairment of motor coordination in mice pretreated with GBP whilst an opposite effect was observed in TPM injected mice and pretreated with chronic caffeine at 46.2mg/kg. The results indicate that newer AEDs, GBP or TPM behave in the exactly same way as classical antiepileptics in mice challenged with caffeine. This hazardous effect of caffeine is not subject to tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical utility of serum lactate levels for differential diagnosis of generalized tonic-clonic seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ebru Apaydın; Ünal, Ali; Ünal, Aslıhan; Erdoğan, Çağla

    2017-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), and syncope constitutes a major challenge. Misdiagnosis rates up to 20 to 30% are reported in the literature. To assess the clinical utility of serum lactate levels for differentiation of GTCS, PNES, and syncope based on gender differences. Data from 270 patients were evaluated retrospectively. Only patients ≥18 years old with the final diagnosis of GTCS, PNES, or syncope in their chart were recruited. Serum lactate levels were measured in the first 2h of the index event. Serum lactate levels in patients with GTCS (n=157) were significantly higher than in the patients with PNES (n=25) (plactate levels in patients with GTCS were significantly higher in the male subgroup (p=0.004). In male patients the ROC analysis yielded a serum lactate value of 2.43mmol/l with a sensitivity of 0.85 and a specificity of 0.88 as the optimal cut-off value to distinguish GTCS from other events. The ROC analysis for the AUC yielded a high estimate of 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.91-0.98). When a cut-off value of 2.43mmol/l was chosen for the females, which was an optimal value for male patients, the specificity was 0.85, however, the sensitivity was 0.64. We propose that serum lactate level when measured in the first 2h after the index event has a high clinical utility in the differential diagnosis of GTCS, PNES, and syncope. With concomitant clinical signs and physical examination findings besides neuroimaging and EEG, elevated levels of lactate should be taken into account when evaluating a patient with impaired consciousness. On the other hand, the suggested cut-off value 2.43mmol/l might not have a discriminative effect between GTCS, PNES, and syncope in female patients. This finding should be verified in a prospectively designed study with a larger patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interaction of reelin and stress on immobility in the forced swim test but not dopamine-mediated locomotor hyperactivity or prepulse inhibition disruption: Relevance to psychotic and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaras, Michael J; Vivian, Billie; Wilson, Carey; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2017-07-13

    Psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia, as well as some mood disorders, such as bipolar disorder, have been suggested to share common biological risk factors. One such factor is reelin, a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein that regulates neuronal migration during development as well as numerous activity-dependent processes in the adult brain. The current study sought to evaluate whether a history of stress exposure interacts with endogenous reelin levels to modify behavioural endophenotypes of relevance to psychotic and mood disorders. Heterozygous Reeler Mice (HRM) and wildtype (WT) controls were treated with 50mg/L of corticosterone (CORT) in their drinking water from 6 to 9weeks of age, before undergoing behavioural testing in adulthood. We assessed methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity, prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle, short-term spatial memory in the Y-maze, and depression-like behaviour in the Forced-Swim Test (FST). HRM genotype or CORT treatment did not affect methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity, a model of psychosis-like behaviour. At baseline, HRM showed decreased PPI at the commonly used 100msec interstimulus interval (ISI), but not at the 30msec ISI or following challenge with apomorphine. A history of CORT exposure potentiated immobility in the FST amongst HRM, but not WT mice. In the Y-maze, chronic CORT treatment decreased novel arm preference amongst HRM, reflecting reduced short-term spatial memory. These data confirm a significant role of endogenous reelin levels on stress-related behaviour, supporting a possible role in both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. However, an interaction of reelin deficiency with dopaminergic regulation of psychosis-like behaviour remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a validated clinical case definition of generalized tonic-clonic seizures for use by community-based health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Krishnan; Jain, Satish; Paul, Eldho; Srivastava, Achal; Sahariah, Sirazul A; Kapoor, Suresh K

    2005-05-01

    To develop and test a clinical case definition for identification of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) by community-based health care providers. To identify symptoms that can help identify GTCSs, patients with history of a jerky movements or rigidity in any part of the body ever in life were recruited from three sites: the community, secondary care hospital, and tertiary care hospital. These patients were administered a 14-item structured interview schedule focusing on the circumstances surrounding the seizure. Subsequently, a neurologist examined each patient and, based on available investigations, classified them as GTCS or non-GTCS cases. A logistic regression analysis was performed to select symptoms that were to be used for case definition of GTCSs. Validity parameters for the case definition at different cutoff points were calculated in another set of subjects. In total, 339 patients were enrolled in the first phase of the study. The tertiary care hospital contributed the maximal number of GTCS cases, whereas cases of non-GTCS were mainly from the community. At the end of phase I, the questionnaire was shortened from 14 to eight questions based on statistical association and clinical judgment. After phase II, which was conducted among 170 subjects, three variables were found to be significantly related to the presence of GTCSs by logistic regression: absence of stress (13.1; 4.1-41.3), presence of frothing (13.7; 4.0-47.3), and occurrence in sleep (8.3; 2.0-34.9). As a case definition using only three variables did not provide sufficient specificity, three more variables were added based on univariate analysis of the data (incontinence during the episode and unconsciousness) and review of literature (injury during episode). A case definition consisting of giving one point to an affirmative answer for each of the six questions was tested. At a cutoff point of four, sensitivity was 56.9 (47.4-66.0) and specificity, 96.3 (86.2-99.4). Among the 197 GTCS

  1. Treatment and Managing Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of reactions. Learn more here. Milk Egg Peanut Tree Nuts Soy Wheat Fish Shellfish Sesame Other Food ... a severe reaction. Consider wearing an emergency medical identification (e.g., bracelet, other jewelry). What to Read ...

  2. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-cheng [Irvine, CA; Sui, Guodong [Los Angeles, CA; Elizarov, Arkadij [Valley Village, CA; Kolb, Hartmuth C [Playa del Rey, CA; Huang, Jiang [San Jose, CA; Heath, James R [South Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Michael E [Los Angeles, CA; Quake, Stephen R [Stanford, CA; Tseng, Hsian-rong [Los Angeles, CA; Wyatt, Paul [Tipperary, IE; Daridon, Antoine [Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  3. Preequilibrium Nuclear Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1988-01-01

    After a survey on existing experimental data on precompound reactions and a description of preequilibrium reactions, theoretical models and quantum mechanical theories of preequilibrium emission are presented. The 25 papers of this meeting are analyzed separately

  4. Managing Your Emotional Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Managing Your Emotional Reactions KidsHealth / For Teens / Managing Your Emotional Reactions ... Think about what you might do next time. Emotions 101 The skills we use to manage our ...

  5. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    array (CLARA), extensive investigations of nuclear structure and reaction dynamics have been carried out. In the present paper aspects of these studies will be presented, focussing more closely on the reaction mechanism, in particular on the ...

  6. Chemical transport reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schäfer, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Transport Reactions focuses on the processes and reactions involved in the transport of solid or liquid substances to form vapor phase reaction products. The publication first offers information on experimental and theoretical principles and the transport of solid substances and its special applications. Discussions focus on calculation of the transport effect of heterogeneous equilibria for a gas motion between equilibrium spaces; transport effect and the thermodynamic quantities of the transport reaction; separation and purification of substances by means of material transport; and

  7. Thermonuclear reaction rates. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Fowler, W.A.; Caughlan, G.R.; Zimmerman, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar thermonuclear reaction rates are revised and updated, adding a number of new important reaction rates. Several reactions with large negative Q-values are included, and examples of them are discussed. The importance of the decay rates for Mg-26(p,n) exp 26 Al and Al-26(n,p) exp 26 Mg for stellar studies is emphasized. 19 references

  8. Maillard Reaction: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia d'Almeida Francisquini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is an important subject of study in food science and technology and different areas of knowledge are involved such as chemistry, food engineering, nutrition and food technology. The objective of this paper is to present the basic concepts of the Maillard reaction, such as the reaction stages, the main compounds producced and some technological consequences for dairy products.

  9. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  10. Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H 2 , an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs

  11. Analysis of myofibrillar proteins and transcripts in adult skeletal muscles of the American lobster Homarus americanus: variable expression of myosins, actin and troponins in fast, slow-twitch and slow-tonic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Scott; Mykles, Donald L

    2003-10-01

    Skeletal muscles are diverse in their contractile properties, with many of these differences being directly related to the assemblages of myofibrillar isoforms characteristic of different fibers. Crustacean muscles are similar to other muscles in this respect, although the majority of information about differences in muscle organization comes from vertebrate species. In the present study, we examined the correlation between myofibrillar protein isoforms and the patterns of myofibrillar gene expression in fast, slow-phasic (S(1)) and slow-tonic (S(2)) fibers of the American lobster Homarus americanus. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were used to identify isoform assemblages of myosin heavy chain (MHC), P75, troponin T (TnT) and troponin I (TnI). RT-PCR was used to monitor expression of fast and slow (S(1)) MHC, P75 and actin in different fiber types, and the MHC and actin levels were quantified by real-time PCR. Fast and slow fibers from the claw closers predominantly expressed fast and S(1) MHC, respectively, but also lower levels of the alternate MHC. By contrast, fast fibers from the deep abdominal muscle expressed fast MHC exclusively. In addition, slow muscles expressed significantly higher levels of actin than fast fibers. A distal bundle of fibers in the cutter claw closer muscle was found to be composed of a mixture of S(1) and S(2) fibers, many of which possessed a mixture of S(1) and S(2) MHC isoforms. This pattern supports the idea that S(1) and S(2) fibers represent extremes in a continuum of slow muscle phenotype. Overall, these patterns demonstrate that crustacean skeletal muscles cannot be strictly categorized into discrete fiber types, but a muscle's properties probably represent a point on a continuum of fiber types. This trend may result from differences in innervation pattern, as each muscle is controlled by a unique combination of phasic, tonic or both phasic and tonic motor nerves. In this respect, future studies examining how muscle phenotype

  12. Noncanonical Reactions of Flavoenzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sobrado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a “molecular scaffold” in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  13. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  14. Knock-out reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Forest, T. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    It is pointed out that the primary motivation for performing high energy single nucleon knock-out reactions is based on the concept of quasi-elastic scattering. The validity of and corrections to the partial wave impulse approximation and kinematical invariance of knock-out reactions and tests of the reaction mechanism are treated. The effect of distortions on the momentum distribution in the effective momentum approximation for given parameters are plotted. 12 references

  15. Reaction kinetics of polybutylene terephthalate polycondensation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darda, P. J.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.; Souren, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the forward polycondensation reaction of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PBT - prepolymer with an initial degree of polymerization of 5.5 was used as starting material. The PBT prepolymer was prepared from dimethyl

  16. Thermonuclear reaction listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    The following 10 elements, including T, are well known as nuclear fusion fuels: p, D, T, 3 He, 4 He, 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, 10 B, 11 B, ( 12 C, 13 C), where 12 C and 13 C are considered only in the calculation of Q value. Accordingly the number of the thermonuclear reactions is 55, and 78, if including carbon elements. The reactions have some branches. For the branches having two and three reaction products, the reaction products, Q value and threshold energy are calculated by using a computer. We have investigated those of the branches having more than three products from the papers of Ajzenberg-Selove and so on. And also, by the same papers, we check whether the above mentioned branch has been observed or not. The results are as follows: (I) the number of reactions which have Q 0 branches only with γ ray production, and Q 0 and neutron production is 36(17), and (IV) that of reactions whose branch with Q > 0 does not produce neutrons is 9(3). The value in the parentheses shows the number of the case of the carbon elements. For 55 thermonuclear reactions induced by lighter nuclides than 11 B, the reaction products, the values of Q and threshold energy, and the papers with reaction cross section data are presented in the tables. (author)

  17. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M Allen [Berkeley, CA; Beeman, Barton V [San Mateo, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Hadley, Dean R [Manteca, CA; Landre, Phoebe [Livermore, CA; Lehew, Stacy L [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter A [Pleasanton, CA

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  18. Tattoo reaction: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneer Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea. In this series we present three cases of tattoo reaction.

  19. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  20. Precompound Reactions: Basic Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenmueller, H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the non-zero nuclear equilibration time, the compound-nucleus scattering model fails when the incident energy exceeds 10 or 20 MeV, and precompound reactions become important. Basic ideas used in the quantum-statistical approaches to these reactions are described

  1. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  2. Fluorogenic organocatalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raeisolsadati Oskouei, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, we introduce fluorescence spectroscopy as a new tool to gain insight into the interactions between the substrates and catalyst during organocatalytic reactions. The ultimate goal is to resolve the kinetics of the binding and reaction steps and obtain detailed understanding of the

  3. Applications of Reaction Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  4. Chemical burn or reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemicals that touch skin can lead to a reaction on the skin, throughout the body, or both. ... leave the person alone and watch carefully for reactions affecting the entire body. Note: If a chemical gets into the eyes, the eyes should be ...

  5. Degradations and Rearrangement Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianbo

    This section deals with recent reports concerning degradation and rearrangement reactions of free sugars as well as some glycosides. The transformations are classified in chemical and enzymatic ways. In addition, the Maillard reaction will be discussed as an example of degradation and rearrangement transformation and its application in current research in the fields of chemistry and biology.

  6. Heavy ion transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1977-06-01

    To complement discussions on the role of γ rays in heavy ion induced reactions, the author discusses the role played by particle detection. Transfer reactions are part of this subject and are among those in which one infers the properties of the residual nucleus in a reaction by observing the emerging light nucleus. Inelastic scattering ought not be excluded from this subject, although no particles are transferred, because of the role it plays in multistep reactions and in fixing O.M. parameters describing the entrance channel of the reaction. Heavy ion transfer reaction studies have been under study for some years and yet this research is still in its infancy. The experimental techniques are difficult and the demands on theory rigorous. One of the main products of heavy ion research has been the thrust to re-examine the assumptions of reaction theory and now include many effects neglected for light ion analysis. This research has spurred the addition of multistep processes to simple direct processes and coupled channel calculations. (J.R.)

  7. Enhancing chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  8. The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Daniel J; Spong, Mark W

    2007-01-01

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, t

  9. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  10. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  11. Nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuca, S.; Antalik, R.; Kristiak, J.

    1988-01-01

    The collection contains full texts of 37 contributions; all fall within the INIS Subject Scope. The topics treated include some unsolved problems of nuclear reactions and relevant problems of nuclear structure at low and intermediate energies. (Z.S.)

  12. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  13. Statistical nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the statistical model of nuclear reactions is presented. The main relations are described, together with the ingredients necessary to perform practical calculations. In addition, a substantial overview of the width fluctuation correction factor is given. (author)

  14. Photon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of medium energy nuclear reactions induced by real photons are reviewed. Special emphasis is put on high accuracy experiments that will become possible with the next generation of electron accelerators. (orig.)

  15. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Names Blood transfusion reaction Images Surface proteins causing rejection References Choate JD, Maitta RW, Tormey CA, Wu ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 177. Hall JE. Blood types; transfusion; tissue and organ transplantation. In: Hall JE, ...

  16. Sequential charged particle reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Jun-ichi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    The effective cross sections for producing the sequential reaction products in F82H, pure vanadium and LiF with respect to the 14.9-MeV neutron were obtained and compared with the estimation ones. Since the sequential reactions depend on the secondary charged particles behavior, the effective cross sections are corresponding to the target nuclei and the material composition. The effective cross sections were also estimated by using the EAF-libraries and compared with the experimental ones. There were large discrepancies between estimated and experimental values. Additionally, we showed the contribution of the sequential reaction on the induced activity and dose rate in the boundary region with water. From the present study, it has been clarified that the sequential reactions are of great importance to evaluate the dose rates around the surface of cooling pipe and the activated corrosion products. (author)

  17. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... preferences, recipients should not respond to the applicant actually hired on the basis of their (the recipients') racial preferences. My account decomposes the meritocratic ideal into four separate norms, one of which applies to recipients rather than to selectors. Finally, it defends the view that reaction...... qualifications based on antimeritocratic reactions, while not unproblematic, are not entirely irrelevant from the point of view of merit. Notably, selectors need not discount them when no one - including the targets of the objectionable preferences - is unfairly disadvantaged. Because not all problematic...

  18. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CADRs).1 ... patient's management is thought to be responsible for the reaction. Some clinical ... In SJS/TEN hypotension, diarrhoea, hypothermia and confusion suggest ... and a pain management team, centred around a good core of experienced ...

  19. Reaction Qualifications Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper

    2009-01-01

      When, in a competitive sphere, people are selected on the basis of qualifications only, their chances of acquiring positions of advantage may seem to depend entirely upon their abilities, not discriminatory bias. However, if reaction qualifications - i.e. characteristics which contribute...... to a person's effectiveness by causing a favourable reaction in customers, co-workers etc. (for short: recipients) - are involved, this assumption is false. Building on work by Wertheimer, Mason, and Miller, this paper proposes an account of the reaction qualifications that count, from the point of view...... of merit. Specifically, it preserves symmetry between negative evaluations of antimeritocratic bases of selection and negative evaluations of qualifications rooted in comparable antimeritocratic reactions. So if employers should not select among applicants on the basis of their (the employers') racial...

  20. Firefighter Nozzle Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chin, Selena K.; Sunderland, Peter B.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    Nozzle reaction and hose tension are analyzed using conservation of fluid momentum and assuming steady, inviscid flow and a flexible hose in frictionless contact with the ground. An expression that is independent of the bend angle is derived for the hose tension. If this tension is exceeded owing...... to anchor forces, the hose becomes straight. The nozzle reaction is found to equal the jet momentum flow rate, and it does not change when an elbow connects the hose to the nozzle. A forward force must be exerted by a firefighter or another anchor that matches the forward force that the jet would exert...... on a perpendicular wall. Three reaction expressions are derived, allowing it to be determined in terms of hose diameter, jet diameter, flow rate, and static pressure upstream of the nozzle. The nozzle reaction predictions used by the fire service are 56% to 90% of those obtained here for typical firefighting hand...

  1. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  2. Spallation reactions: calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Current methods for calculating spallation reactions over various energy ranges are described and evaluated. Recent semiempirical fits to existing data will probably yield the most accurate predictions for these reactions in general. However, if the products in question have binding energies appreciably different from their isotropic neighbors and if the cross section is approximately 30 mb or larger, then the intranuclear-cascade-evaporation approach is probably better suited. (6 tables, 12 figures, 34 references) (U.S.)

  3. Global Controllability of Chemical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Drexler, Dániel András; Tóth, János

    2015-01-01

    Controllability of chemical reactions is an important problem in chemical engineering science. In control theory, analysis of the controllability of linear systems is well-founded, however the dynamics of chemical reactions is usually nonlinear. Global controllability properties of chemical reactions are analyzed here based on the Lie-algebra of the vector fields associated to elementary reactions. A chemical reaction is controllable almost everywhere if all the reaction rate coefficients can...

  4. Introduction to chemical reaction engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeong Geol

    1990-10-01

    This deals with chemical reaction engineering with thirteen chapters. The contents of this book are introduction on reaction engineering, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics and chemical reaction, abnormal reactor, non-isothermal reactor, nonideal reactor, catalysis in nonuniform system, diffusion and reaction in porosity catalyst, design catalyst heterogeneous reactor in solid bed, a high molecule polymerization, bio reaction engineering, reaction engineering in material process, control multi-variable reactor process using digital computer.

  5. Chemical kinetics of gas reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kondrat'Ev, V N

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Kinetics of Gas Reactions explores the advances in gas kinetics and thermal, photochemical, electrical discharge, and radiation chemical reactions. This book is composed of 10 chapters, and begins with the presentation of general kinetic rules for simple and complex chemical reactions. The next chapters deal with the experimental methods for evaluating chemical reaction mechanisms and some theories of elementary chemical processes. These topics are followed by discussions on certain class of chemical reactions, including unimolecular, bimolecular, and termolecular reactions. The rema

  6. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Sigeki; Sato, Keiji; Sugiura, Hideshi; Iwata, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  7. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  8. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina Gil, D. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  9. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    OpenAIRE

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either ...

  10. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Modeling of Reaction Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to model the reaction calorimeter in order to calculate the heat of absorption which is the most important parameter in this work. Reaction calorimeter is an apparatus which is used in measuring the heat of absorption of CO2 as well as the total pressure in vapor phase based on vapor-liquid equilibrium state. Mixture of monoethanolamine (MEA) and water was used as a solvent to absorb the CO2.Project was divided in to three parts in order to make the programming...

  12. Introduction to nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This introduction to nuclear reaction phenomena is aimed primarily but not exclusively at readers at the undergraduate student level. An overview of the subject is presented in the first two chapters entitled - Some background information and Introduction to nuclear reactions. The third chapter reviews scattering theory with emphasis on the underlying physical ideas and also provides schematic entrees to the more advanced topics. The physical models which have been developed to account for the various aspects of nuclear phenomena are described in more detail in chapter 4. References and exercises are appended to each chapter. (U.K.)

  13. Knockout reactions: experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina Gil, D.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of radioactive beams has given rise to intense activity in the field of direct reactions. The removal of one(two)-nucleon (referred to as nucleon knockout in this text) from a fast exotic projectile has been extensively investigated. This lecture provides a general overview of the experimental results achieved using this technique. The sensitivity of the method to different experimental aspects is illustrated with a few examples. Special attention is given to the application of nucleon-knockout reactions as a general purpose spectroscopic tool. (author)

  14. (MIRC) reaction w

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudesh Kumari

    eco-friendly solvents, high yields and easy work-up procedure. Keywords. Ethylene glycol; 4-hydroxycoumarin; ... ability and also compatibility with most organic and inorganic compounds. Because of these properties it is ..... phenyl amino)-2H-chromen-2-one (8a) was isolated from the reaction mixture to confirm the ...

  15. Explaining competitive reaction effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    Changes in promotional expenditure decisions for a brand, as in other marketing decisions, should be based on the expected impact on purchase and consumption behavior as well as on the likely reactions by competitors. Purchase behavior may be predicted from estimated demand functions. Competitive

  16. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ulcers. Affected individuals may complain of a burning sensation and mouth sensitivity to cold, hot, and spicy foods. Lichenoid ... melon, and pineapple, are all associated with this syndrome. You should inform your ... reaction in the mouth, though some are more common than others. If ...

  17. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  18. Reaction schemes of immunoanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaage, M.; Barbet, J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors apply a general theory for multiple equilibria to the reaction schemes of immunoanalysis, competition and sandwich. This approach allows the manufacturer to optimize the system and provide the user with interpolation functions for the standard curve and its first derivative as well, thus giving access to variance [fr

  19. Allergic reactions in anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Menné, T

    2005-01-01

    a significant number of patients at unnecessary risk. Some patients may be labelled with a wrong allergy, leading to unnecessary warnings against harmless substances, and some patients may be put at risk of subsequent re-exposure to the real allergen. Patients with suspected allergic reactions during...

  20. Reaction product imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  1. Diagnostic thresholds for quantitative REM sleep phasic burst duration, phasic and tonic muscle activity, and REM atonia index in REM sleep behavior disorder with and without comorbid obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Duwell, Ethan J; Timm, Paul C; Sandness, David J; Boeve, Bradley F; Silber, Michael H

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to determine whether phasic burst duration and conventional REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) methods could accurately diagnose REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients with comorbid OSA. We visually analyzed RSWA phasic burst durations, phasic, "any," and tonic muscle activity by 3-s mini-epochs, phasic activity by 30-s (AASM rules) epochs, and conducted automated REM atonia index (RAI) analysis. Group RSWA metrics were analyzed and regression models fit, with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determining the best diagnostic cutoff thresholds for RBD. Both split-night and full-night polysomnographic studies were analyzed. N/A. Parkinson disease (PD)-RBD (n = 20) and matched controls with (n = 20) and without (n = 20) OSA. N/A. All mean RSWA phasic burst durations and muscle activities were higher in PD-RBD patients than controls (P sleep without atonia diagnostic thresholds applicable in Parkinson disease-REM sleep behavior disorder (PD-RBD) patient populations with comorbid OSA that may be useful toward distinguishing PD-RBD in typical outpatient populations. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  3. Kinetics of Bio-Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    his chapter predicts the specific rates of reaction by means of a mathematical expression, the kinetics of the reaction. This expression can be derived through a mechanistic interpretation of an enzymatically catalyzed reaction, but it is essentially of empirical nature for cell reactions. The mo...

  4. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T J

    1987-02-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis.

  5. Photooxidative reactions of psoralens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapenko, A.Ya.; Sukhorukov, V.L.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism and biological significance of photooxidative reactions of psoralens are reviewed. Skin-photosensitizing activities of bifunctional and monofunctional psoralens are compared. Antioxidants tocopherols and butilated hydroxytoluene inhibit photochemical reactions of psoralens responsible for induction of erythema. The same antioxidants do not inhibit PUVA-therapy of psriasis. Though psoralens can generate singlet oxygen under UVA-irradiation (315 - 400 nm), nevertheless singlet oxygen does not play significant role in 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) sensitized photooxidation of tocopherol or dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). SH-compounds enhance the rate of 8-MOP sensitized photooxidation of DOPA by a factor of four, simultaneously the rate of oxidation of SH-groups is enhanced many fold in the presence of DOPA. Under UVA-irradiation in organic solvents psoralens are photooxidized. Dimeric photooxidized psoralens are easily destructed in water medium, their destruction induce oxidation of unsaturated lipids and DOPA. (author)

  6. Solar nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharov, G

    1978-04-01

    The current state of neutrino solar astrophysics is outlined, showing the contradictions between the experimental results of solar neutrino detection and the standard solar models constructed on the basis of the star structure and development theory, which give values for high-energy neutrino fluxes considerably exceeding the upper experimental limit. A number of hypotheses interpreting the experimental results are summarized. The hypotheses are critically assessed and experiments are recommended for refining or verifying experimental data. Also dealt with are nuclear reactions in the Sun, as is the attempt to interpret the anomalous by high /sup 3/He fluxes from the Sun and the relatively small amounts of solar neutrinos and gamma quanta. The importance is emphasized of the simultaneous and complex measurement of the fluxes of neutrons, gamma radiation, and isotopes of hydrogen, helium, and boron from the Sun as indicators of nuclear reactions in the Sun.

  7. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  8. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, T J

    1987-01-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  9. Hadron reaction mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, P.D.B.; Martin, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of hadron scattering at high energies are reviewed in such a way as to combine the ideas of the parton model and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) with Regge theory and phenomenology. After a brief introduction to QCD and the basic features of hadron scattering data, scaling and the dimensional counting rules, the parton structure of hadrons, and the parton model for large momentum transfer processes, including scaling violations are discussed. Hadronic jets and the use of parton ideas in soft scattering processes are examined, attention being paid to Regge theory and its applications in exclusive and inclusive reactions, the relationship to parton exchange being stressed. The mechanisms of hadron production which build up cross sections, and hence the underlying Regge singularities, and the possible overlap of Regge and scaling regions are discussed. It is concluded that the key to understanding hadron reaction mechanisms seems to lie in the marriage of Regge theory with QCD. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is revised the nuclear reactions which present an interest in astrophysics regarding the explanation of some problems such as the relative quantity of the elements, the structure and evolution of the stars. The principal object of the study is the determination of the experimental possibilities in the field of astrophysics, of an accelerator Van de Graaff's 700 KeV type. Two hundred nuclear reactions approximately, were found, and nothing or very little has been done in the intervals of energy which are of interest. Since the bombardment energies and the involved sections are low in some cases, there are real possibilities, for the largest number of stars to obtain important statistical data with the above mentioned accelerator, taking some necessary precautions. (author)

  11. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  12. Polyneutron Chain Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John C. Fisher

    2000-01-01

    Although helium atoms do not form molecules, a sufficiently large number will bind into a stable liquid droplet. A comparable situation is expected for neutrons, with a sufficiently large number binding into a stable droplet of neutron matter. Such polyneutron droplets can be viewed as isotopes of an element with nuclear charge Z=0, tentatively denoted neutrium, symbol Nt. Because of the relatively weak binding of neutrons compared with that of a mix of neutrons and protons, the minimum number of neutrons required for stability of a droplet is fairly large. Early estimates of ∼60 may be reduced to a dozen or so by the BCS pairing interaction. The Nt entries with N≥12 are new to the table of isotopes. Because all of them are beta-unstable, none is expected to persist as a free particle. Yet, some may occasionally be produced by means to be described below, and it is of interest to examine their decay chains and their interactions with charged nuclei to ascertain how their presence might be revealed. Although these reactions are interesting, they cannot be taken seriously without identifying a source for the initial Nt isotope that begins the chain. Here, we consider possible interactions between 16 O and A Nt. Although there is no strong interaction between them, we can expect a very weak residual attraction that can form a loosely bound 16 O A Nt nuclear molecule. This is not a compound nucleus in the usual sense because, considered as fluids, the 16 O and A Nt droplets are immiscible. For a droplet with fewer than about 60 neutrons, beta decay of A Nt is prevented by the buildup of Coulomb energy associated with transforming A Nt into A H in close proximity to 16 O. Thus, it is possible that 16 O A Nt molecules can persist indefinitely and that a few of them may be present in ordinary water as supermassive oxygen nuclei. Because the binding of these molecules is weak, the A Nt component can tunnel to an adjacent nucleus, and if the adjacent nucleus is 18 O, a

  13. Procedures for Decomposing a Redox Reaction into Half-Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishtik, Ilie; Berka, Ladislav H.

    2005-01-01

    A simple algorithm for a complete enumeration of the possible ways a redox reaction (RR) might be uniquely decomposed into half-reactions (HRs) using the response reactions (RERs) formalism is presented. A complete enumeration of the possible ways a RR may be decomposed into HRs is equivalent to a complete enumeration of stoichiometrically…

  14. Insect bite reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some

  15. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  16. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2014-03-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and

  17. Comparing chemical reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardelli, Luca; Tribastone, Mirco; Tschaikowski, Max

    2017-01-01

    We study chemical reaction networks (CRNs) as a kernel model of concurrency provided with semantics based on ordinary differential equations. We investigate the problem of comparing two CRNs, i.e., to decide whether the solutions of a source and of a target CRN can be matched for an appropriate...... choice of initial conditions. Using a categorical framework, we extend and unify model-comparison approaches based on dynamical (semantic) and structural (syntactic) properties of CRNs. Then, we provide an algorithm to compare CRNs, running linearly in time with respect to the cardinality of all possible...... comparisons. Finally, using a prototype implementation, CAGE, we apply our results to biological models from the literature....

  18. Gravitational radiation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro

    2006-01-01

    We give a short personally-biased review on the recent progress in our understanding of gravitational radiation reaction acting on a point particle orbiting a black hole. The main motivation of this study is to obtain sufficiently precise gravitational waveforms from inspiraling binary compact starts with a large mass ratio. For this purpose, various new concepts and techniques have been developed to compute the orbital evolution taking into account the gravitational self-force. Combining these ideas with a few supplementary new ideas, we try to outline a path to our goal here. (author)

  19. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  20. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  1. Nuclear reactions. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Modern, self-contained introduction to the subject matter. Emphasizes the interplay between theory and experiment. Course-tested tutorial style, contains many derivations. Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown - mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos - to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no end in sight for either theoretical or experimental developments as shown e.g. by the recent need to introduce more sophisticated three-body interactions to account for an improved picture of nuclear structure and reactions. Yet, it turns out that the internal structure of the nucleons has comparatively little influence on the behavior of the nucleons in nuclei, and nuclear physics - especially nuclear structure and reactions - is thus a field of science in its own right, without much recourse to subnuclear degrees of freedom. This book collects essential material that was presented in the form of lectures notes in nuclear physics courses for graduate students at the University of Cologne. It follows the course's approach, conveying the subject matter by combining experimental facts and experimental

  2. Polymer reaction engineering, an integrated approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Meyer, T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2005-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Polymer Materials A Short History of Polymer Reaction Engineering The Position of Polymer Reaction Engineering Toward Integrated Polymer Reaction Engineering The Disciplines in Polymer Reaction Engineering The Future: Product-inspired Polymer Reaction

  3. Substitution reactions of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, T.

    1997-01-01

    Substitution reactions of a series of technetium complexes are considered in comparison with corresponding reactions of rhenium. Rhenium and technetium complexes are rather inert in substitution reactions, the latter are characterized by greater rate constants when they proceed according to dissociative mechanism. In rare cases when k Tc /k Re id little it is assumed that the reaction proceeds according to the associative mechanism. (author)

  4. The nuclear reaction matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenciglowa, E.M.; Kung, C.L.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Osnes, E.; and Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1976-01-01

    Different definitions of the reaction matrix G appropriate to the calculation of nuclear structure are reviewed and discussed. Qualitative physical arguments are presented in support of a two-step calculation of the G-matrix for finite nuclei. In the first step the high-energy excitations are included using orthogonalized plane-wave intermediate states, and in the second step the low-energy excitations are added in, using harmonic oscillator intermediate states. Accurate calculations of G-matrix elements for nuclear structure calculations in the Aapprox. =18 region are performed following this procedure and treating the Pauli exclusion operator Q 2 /sub p/ by the method of Tsai and Kuo. The treatment of Q 2 /sub p/, the effect of the intermediate-state spectrum and the energy dependence of the reaction matrix are investigated in detail. The present matrix elements are compared with various matrix elements given in the literature. In particular, close agreement is obtained with the matrix elements calculated by Kuo and Brown using approximate methods

  5. The redox-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijie; Seidel, Daniel

    2014-06-06

    A complement to the classic three-component Mannich reaction, the redox-Mannich reaction, utilizes the same starting materials but incorporates an isomerization step that enables the facile preparation of ring-substituted β-amino ketones. Reactions occur under relatively mild conditions and are facilitated by benzoic acid.

  6. Reaction Decoder Tool (RDT): extracting features from chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Torrance, Gilliean; Baldacci, Lorenzo; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Fenninger, Franz; Gopal, Nimish; Choudhary, Saket; May, John W; Holliday, Gemma L; Steinbeck, Christoph; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-07-01

    Extracting chemical features like Atom-Atom Mapping (AAM), Bond Changes (BCs) and Reaction Centres from biochemical reactions helps us understand the chemical composition of enzymatic reactions. Reaction Decoder is a robust command line tool, which performs this task with high accuracy. It supports standard chemical input/output exchange formats i.e. RXN/SMILES, computes AAM, highlights BCs and creates images of the mapped reaction. This aids in the analysis of metabolic pathways and the ability to perform comparative studies of chemical reactions based on these features. This software is implemented in Java, supported on Windows, Linux and Mac OSX, and freely available at https://github.com/asad/ReactionDecoder : asad@ebi.ac.uk or s9asad@gmail.com. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Adverse reactions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy - case description of a generalised seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobelska Kinga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a safe treatment, provided fulfilling certain rules of patient qualifications to treatment, as well as supervision over the course of therapy by qualified medical staff. Side effects reported in the literature are rare, and are usually mild and transient. Professional medical staff allows minimising the adverse events occurrence. The scale of complications is unknown, especially in Polish hyperbaric center. Careful analysis could be used to develop prevention procedures for patients of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric Oxygen Centre and Wound Treatment in Bydgoszcz during 28 months performed hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in case of 423 patients. During this period, adverse events occurred occasionally. 17 cases have been reported. Authors described study case 77 year-old patient who was admitted due to non-healing wound-left lower abdomen (state after radiotherapy. During the fourth session, on decompression phase patient have had a generalized seizure (tonic-clonic. The decompression was stopped, the oxygen supply was disconnected but only after the drug administration seizures terminated. The most likely causative agent of the adverse reactions of the patient treated with HBOT was the oxygen toxic effect on the brain tissue. However, analyzing the circumstances of the seizure termination: phase of decompression at the pressure 2ATA and lack of oxygen disconnection response, it cannot be excluded other causes of this complication.

  8. Nuclear reactions an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen. Schieck, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Nuclei and nuclear reactions offer a unique setting for investigating three (and in some cases even all four) of the fundamental forces in nature. Nuclei have been shown – mainly by performing scattering experiments with electrons, muons, and neutrinos – to be extended objects with complex internal structures: constituent quarks; gluons, whose exchange binds the quarks together; sea-quarks, the ubiquitous virtual quark-antiquark pairs and, last but not least, clouds of virtual mesons, surrounding an inner nuclear region, their exchange being the source of the nucleon-nucleon interaction.   The interplay between the (mostly attractive) hadronic nucleon-nucleon interaction and the repulsive Coulomb force is responsible for the existence of nuclei; their degree of stability, expressed in the details and limits of the chart of nuclides; their rich structure and the variety of their interactions. Despite the impressive successes of the classical nuclear models and of ab-initio approaches, there is clearly no ...

  9. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-01-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10 19 W/cm 2 . In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62 Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10 19 Wcm -2

  10. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, M.; Rayet, M.

    1990-01-01

    At all times and at all astrophysical scales, nuclear reactions have played and continue to play a key role. This concerns the energetics as well as the production of nuclides (nucleosynthesis). After a brief review of the observed composition of various objects in the universe, and especially of the solar system, the basic ingredients that are required in order to build up models for the chemical evolution of galaxies are sketched. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the stellar yields through an overview of the important burning episodes and nucleosynthetic processes that can develop in non-exploding or exploding stars. Emphasis is put on the remaining astrophysical and nuclear physics uncertainties that hamper a clear understanding of the observed characteristics, and especially compositions, of a large variety of astrophysical objects

  11. Ion-Molecule Reaction Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jennifer; Wester, Roland

    2017-05-05

    We review the recent advances in the investigation of the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. During the past decade, the combination of single-collision experiments in crossed ion and neutral beams with the velocity map ion imaging detection technique has enabled a wealth of studies on ion-molecule reactions. These methods, in combination with chemical dynamics simulations, have uncovered new and unexpected reaction mechanisms, such as the roundabout mechanism and the subtle influence of the leaving group in anion-molecule nucleophilic substitution reactions. For this important class of reactions, as well as for many fundamental cation-molecule reactions, the information obtained with crossed-beam imaging is discussed. The first steps toward understanding micro-solvation of ion-molecule reaction dynamics are presented. We conclude with the presentation of several interesting directions for future research.

  12. Reaction mechanisms of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Hay, R W

    2000-01-01

    This text provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanisms, suitable for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate study and/or research. The topic has important research applications in the metallurgical industry and is of interest in the science of biochemistry, biology, organic, inorganic and bioinorganic chemistry. In addition to coverage of substitution reactions in four-, five- and six-coordinate complexes, the book contains further chapters devoted to isomerization and racemization reactions, to the general field of redox reactions, and to the reactions of coordinated ligands. It is relevant in other fields such as organic, bioinorganic and biological chemistry, providing a bridge to organic reaction mechanisms. The book also contains a chapter on the kinetic background to the subject with many illustrative examples which should prove useful to those beginning research. Provides a general background as a course module in the area of inorganic reaction mechanis...

  13. Morus alba L. nature's functional tonic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butt, M.S.; Nazir, A.; Tauseef Sultan, M.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, importance of natural products is being revitalized to alleviate various health discrepancies. The link between health and diet is well documented and the consumers' trend reflects conscience towards their dietary habits. Probing these links has led to the emergence of functional,

  14. Khamiras, a natural cardiac tonic: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Sayeed; Rehman, Shabana; Ahmad, Aftab M.; Siddiqui, Khalid M.; Shaukat, Seemin; Khan, Masood Shah; Kamal, Y. T.; Jahangir, Tamanna

    2010-01-01

    The Unani system of Medicine (Unanipathy), which originated in Greece, is based on the principles proposed by Galen, a Greek practitioner. Since then, many Arab and Persian scholars have contributed to the system. Among them Ibn-e-Sina, an Arab philosopher and Physicist who wrote ′Kitab-al-shifa′ are worth mentioning. This system has an extensive and inspiring record in India. It was introduced in India around the tenth century A.D with the spread of Islamic civilization. At present, Unanipat...

  15. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  16. Nuclear reactions as structure probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Bernard; Cugnon, Joseph; Roussel-Chomaz, Patricia; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Oliveira Santos, Francois de; Bauge, Eric; Poves, Alfredo; Keeley, Nicholas; Simenel, Cedric; Avez, Benoit; Lacroix, Denis; Baye, Daniel; Cortina-Gil, Dolores; Pons, Alexandre

    2007-09-01

    This publication gathers courses which aim at giving a view on new experiments which are performed by using radioactive beams, notably low intensity beams, in different accelerators, and allow the structure of very exotic nuclei to be characterized. Experimental as well as theoretical aspects are thus addressed. The contributions propose: a brief history of nuclear reactions and of instruments used to study them from the discovery of nucleus to the DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation); an overview of nuclear reactions; experimental techniques; the theory of collisions at low energy; resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions; to probe nuclear structure with nucleons; shell model and spectroscopic factors; analysis of transfer reactions and determination of spectroscopic factors; microscopic approaches of nuclear dynamics; theoretical aspects of dissociation reactions; experimental aspects of knockout reactions; research in oenology with the chemical characterisation of defective ageing of dry white wines

  17. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Melike Dönertaş

    Full Text Available The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG. Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  18. The Glaser–Hay reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Mie Højer; Jensen, Jonas; Tortzen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative Glaser–Hay coupling of two terminal alkynes to furnish a butadiyne is a key reaction for acetylenic scaffolding. Although the reaction is performed under rather simple conditions [CuCl/TMEDA/O2 (air)], the mechanism is still under debate. Herein we present detailed studies...... on the scope of this reaction by using both 13C NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopic methods. The former method was used to study the kinetics of the coupling of aryl-substituted alkynes as the aryl carbon resonances of the reactants and products have similar NOEs and relaxation times. The reaction was found...... to be zero-order with respect to the terminal alkyne reactant under standard preparative conditions. Moreover, as the reaction proceeded, a clear change to slower reaction kinetics was observed, but it was still apparently zero-order. The onset of this change was found to depend on the catalyst loading...

  19. The Paterno-Buchi reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Yding; Schalk, Oliver; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.

    2012-01-01

    The Paternò-Büchi (PB) reaction between an excited carbonyl compound and an alkene has been widely studied, but so far little is known about the excited-state dynamics of the reaction. In this investigation, we used a compound in which a formyl and a vinyl group are attached to a [2.......2]paracyclophane in order to obtain a model system in pre-reactive conformation for the PB reaction. We studied the excited-state dynamics of the isolated molecule in a molecular beam using femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The results show that inter-system crossing...... within two picoseconds competes efficiently with the reaction in the singlet manifold. Thus, the PB reaction in this model system takes place in the triplet state on a time scale of nanoseconds. This result stresses the importance of triplet states in the excited-state pathway of the PB reaction...

  20. Limits for Stochastic Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele

    Reaction systems have been introduced in the 70s to model biochemical systems. Nowadays their range of applications has increased and they are fruitfully used in dierent elds. The concept is simple: some chemical species react, the set of chemical reactions form a graph and a rate function...... is associated with each reaction. Such functions describe the speed of the dierent reactions, or their propensities. Two modelling regimes are then available: the evolution of the dierent species concentrations can be deterministically modelled through a system of ODE, while the counts of the dierent species...... at a certain time are stochastically modelled by means of a continuous-time Markov chain. Our work concerns primarily stochastic reaction systems, and their asymptotic properties. In Paper I, we consider a reaction system with intermediate species, i.e. species that are produced and fast degraded along a path...

  1. Complex reactions of excitable tissue on radio-, photo- and thermostimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, E.; Bischof, R.; Seidenbusch, W.; Willich, N.

    2003-01-01

    Photo-, radio and thermotherapies are an essential part of modern treatment. A summary of some selected earlier and resent data about motor reactions of non- and vascular preparations is given [1-4, incl. methods]. Radiostimulation: X-irradiation (50-150 kV: 1-50 Gy, 10-30 Gy/min) induced in frog and rat aorta (helical strips) as well as guinea pig (GP) (and rat) detrusor, t. coli, frog lung and neuro-muscle prep. of hirudo med. reversible contractions. Photostimulation: After UV-irradiation (450 W Xenon lamp) frog aorta and hirudo (max. 267-308 nm) and frog lung (max. 294-335 nm) also reacted with reversible contr., but rat aorta and GP t. coli (max. 294-335 nm) with a photorelaxation. Laser (He-Ne 632.8 nm, 10 mW) induced photocontractions in detrusor and hirudo. Thermostimulation: After hypothermia (37 to 25/5 deg C) a relaxation of frog and rat aorta appeared: X-ray contr. of frog aorta and GP detrusor was potentiated, but of rat aorta - abolished; hyperthermic (37 to 42/45 deg C) tonic contr. of rat rct. were observed. Differences in the radio-, photo- and thermosensitizing / -inhibitory effects by drugs and ions are observed. The influence of non-ionizing radiation (infrared laser 9.5-11.5 μm and 50 μm-1 mm) as well as of micro- (cm) and ultrashort (m) waves (MHz, GHz) on excitable tissue in context of combined effects with ionizing radiation and signal transduction will be studied. Lit.: Furchgott et al [a] J Gen Physiol 44, 499, 1961; [b] Nature 218, 682, 1968. [2] Michailov et al, Strahlenther [a] 167, 5, 311-318, 1991 and 165, 860-5, 1989 and 159, 448-451, 1983; [b] Proc. ICRR Dublin, 234, 1999 and Wuerzburg 400, 1995. [3] Neu et al [a] in: IORT, Vg 'Blaue Eule' 27-39, 1993; [b] Gyn Rdsch 33/S1, 206-7, 1993. [4] Welscher et al [a] Front Rad Ther Oncol 31, Karger 22-35, 1997; [b] Proc ICRR Wuerzburg 434, 1995 and Toronto 265, 1991; [c] Physiol Res 48, S138, 1999; [d] Eur J. Physiol 430/S, 604, 1995?

  2. Metal-free bioconjugation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, Sander S; van Delft, Floris L

    2013-01-01

    The recent strategy to apply chemical reactions to address fundamental biological questions has led to the emergence of entirely new conjugation reactions that are fast and irreversible, yet so mild and selective that they can be performed even in living cells or organisms. These so-called bioorthogonal reactions open novel avenues, not only in chemical biology research, but also in many other life sciences applications, including the modulation of biopharmaceuticals by site-specific modification approaches.

  3. Multistep processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The theories of nuclear reactions are reviewed with particular attention to the recent work on multistep processes. The evidence for compound nucleus and direct interaction reactions is described together with the results of comparisons between theories and experimental data. These theories have now proved inadequate, and there is evidence for multistep processes that take place after the initial direct stage but long before the attainment of the statistical equilibrium characteristic of compound nucleus processes. The theories of these reactions are described and it is shown how they can account for the experimental data and thus give a comprehensive understanding of nuclear reactions. (author)

  4. Progress in microscopic direct reaction modeling of nucleon induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Lechaftois, F.; Peru, S.; Pillet, N.; Robin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    A microscopic nuclear reaction model is applied to neutron elastic and direct inelastic scatterings, and pre-equilibrium reaction. The JLM folding model is used with nuclear structure information calculated within the quasi-particle random phase approximation implemented with the Gogny D1S interaction. The folding model for direct inelastic scattering is extended to include rearrangement corrections stemming from both isoscalar and isovector density variations occurring during a transition. The quality of the predicted (n,n), (n,n{sup '}), (n,xn) and (n,n{sup '}γ) cross sections, as well as the generality of the present microscopic approach, shows that it is a powerful tool that can help improving nuclear reactions data quality. Short- and long-term perspectives are drawn to extend the present approach to more systems, to include missing reactions mechanisms, and to consistently treat both structure and reaction problems. (orig.)

  5. Reaction mechanisms in zeolite catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozanska, X.; Santen, van R.A.; Auerbach, S.C.; Carrado, K.A.; Dutta, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    A review; described are the most basic mechanistic reaction steps that are induced by zeolite catalysts. Details on the zeolitic properties that are relevant to mol. reactivity are also provided. The theor. methods and models at hand to allow the investigation of these reaction steps and that have

  6. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  7. Sodium concrete reaction - Structural considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferskakis, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the sodium concrete reaction phenomenon, with emphasis on structural considerations, is presented. Available test results for limestone, basalt, and magnetite concrete with various test article configurations are reviewed. Generally, tests indicate reaction is self limiting before all sodium is used. Uncertainties, however, concerning the mechanism for penetration of sodium into concrete have resulted in different theories about a reaction model. Structural behavior may be significant in the progression of the reaction due to thermal-structuralchemical interactions involving tensile cracking, compressive crushing, or general deterioration of concrete and the exposure of fresh concrete surfaces to react with sodium. Structural behavior of test articles and potential factors that could enhance the progression of the reaction are discussed

  8. STUDIES ON ENDOTHELIAL REACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Nathan Chandler

    1923-01-01

    operative. On the other hand, there may be an increase in the phagocytic activity of the endothelium of the sinusoids which might take up more bacteria under these changed conditions. Several investigators have claimed, recently, that there is an increased activity of the liver endothelium following splenectomy, their experiments being directed chiefly toward determining the fate of the erythrocytes. Pearce (1918) in reporting the effects of experimental splenectomy in dogs, states that there are definite compensatory changes in the lymph nodes, in the form of an increased proliferation of endothelial phagocytes, and that the stellate cells of the liver sinusoids often show a similar compensatory increase in number. In both cases the cells are, apparently, formed in situ rather than transported to the organs. He says: ‘Such findings suggest the development of a compensatory function on the part of the lymph-nodes and possibly the liver,’ and suggests that, in times of stress ‘the stellate cells of the liver thus assume, in part at least, the function of destroying red blood-corpuscles by phagocytosis.’ Incidentally, he presents an excellent discussion of the history and subject of splenectomy. Motohashi (1922) reports a great increase in the hemophagic power of the hepatic endothelium and an increase in the number of endothelial elements, after some 45 days following splenectomy in rabbits. Nishikawa and Takagi (1922) have observed similar phenomena with white rats, the Kupffer cells taking up erythrocytes in large numbers in splenectomized animals, whereas controls never show similar propensities on the part of these cells. It may be that different substances cause different reactions on the part of the hepatic endothelium. Contributory Experiment.—A side experiment was performed with five rabbits, two splenectomized and three controls, into which uniform doses of pneumococci were injected intravenously. They all died of septicemia after a few days. The results

  9. Dechlorinating reaction of organic chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahata, Taneaki; Kihara, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Ohuchi, Misao

    1996-06-01

    Dechlorination has been examined by the reaction between iron, aluminum powder or CaO and organic chlorides such as C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Progress of the reaction was analyzed with mass spectrometer. The reaction between iron and organic chloride was rapidly occurred at the temperature between 350 and 440degC in an atmosphere of argon. Above 380degC, more than 99.5% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, approximately 60% of C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} was decomposed by the reaction with aluminium powder within approximately 100 minutes. At 440degC, reaction between C{sub 2}HCl{sub 3} and CaO powder were occurred rapidly in an atmosphere of argon to form CaCl{sub 2} and free carbon. Also in an atmosphere of air, nearly the same result was obtained. In this reaction, CaCl{sub 2}, CO and CO{sub 2} were formed. CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was also decomposed by the reaction with iron at the temperature between 380 and 440degC. In the reaction, FeCl{sub 2}, carbon and hydrogen were formed. CH{sub 3}{sup +} and CH{sub 4} were observed during the dechlorinating reaction of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}. Variation in particle size of iron powder such as 100, 150 and 250 mesh did not affect the reaction rate. (author)

  10. Fusion chain reaction - a chain reaction with charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, A.; Shvarts, D.

    1975-01-01

    When a DT-plasma is compressed to very high density, the particles resulting from nuclear reactions give their energy mostly to D and T ions, by nuclear collisions, rather than to electrons as usual. Fusion can thus proceed as a chain reaction, without the need of thermonuclear temperatures. In this paper, we derive relations for the suprathermal ion population created by a fusion reaction. Numerical integration of these equations shows that a chain reaction can proceed in a cold infinite DT-plasma at densities above 8.4x10 27 ions.cm -3 . Seeding the plasma with a small amount of 6 Li reduces the critical density to 7.2x10 27 ions.cm -3 (140000times the normal solid density). (author)

  11. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  12. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel.

  13. Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference brings together all significant issues of practical importance for interested readers in one single volume. While covering homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the text is unique in focusing on such important aspects as using different reaction media, microwave techniques or catalyst recycling. It also provides a comprehensive treatment of modern-day coupling reactions and emphasizes those topics that show potential for future development, such as continuous flow systems, water as a reaction medium, and catalyst immobilization, among others. With i

  14. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  15. Basic reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarises some of the basic reactions resulting from exposure to high energy radiation. In the initial stages energy is absorbed, but not necessarily at random, giving radical and ion species which may then react to promote the final chemical change. However, it is possible to intervene at intermediate stages to modify or reduce the radiation effect. Under certain conditions enhanced reactions are also possible. Several expressions are given to calculate radiation yield in terms of energy absorbed. Some analogies between radiation-induced reactions in polymers, and those studied in radiobiology are outlined. (author)

  16. Chemical potential and reaction electronic flux in symmetry controlled reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt-Geisse, Stefan; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2016-07-15

    In symmetry controlled reactions, orbital degeneracies among orbitals of different symmetries can occur along a reaction coordinate. In such case Koopmans' theorem and the finite difference approximation provide a chemical potential profile with nondifferentiable points. This results in an ill-defined reaction electronic flux (REF) profile, since it is defined as the derivative of the chemical potential with respect to the reaction coordinate. To overcome this deficiency, we propose a new way for the calculation of the chemical potential based on a many orbital approach, suitable for reactions in which symmetry is preserved. This new approach gives rise to a new descriptor: symmetry adapted chemical potential (SA-CP), which is the chemical potential corresponding to a given irreducible representation of a symmetry group. A corresponding symmetry adapted reaction electronic flux (SA-REF) is also obtained. Using this approach smooth chemical potential profiles and well defined REFs are achieved. An application of SA-CP and SA-REF is presented by studying the Cs enol-keto tautomerization of thioformic acid. Two SA-REFs are obtained, JA'(ξ) and JA'' (ξ). It is found that the tautomerization proceeds via an in-plane delocalized 3-center 4-electron O-H-S hypervalent bond which is predicted to exist only in the transition state (TS) region. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  18. Method for conducting exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-01-05

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  19. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  20. Drug Reactions in Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Derviş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Both immunologic and nonimmunologic drug reactions can be seen in oral mucosa. Since considerable number of these reactions heals spontaneously without being noticed by the patients, exact frequency of the lesions is unknown. Most common lesions are xerostomia, taste disorders, mucosal ulcerations and edema. In this article, oral lesions resulting from drug intake similar to those from oral lesions of local and systemic diseases, and diagnostic problems caused by these similarities, have been reviewed.

  1. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Fischer

    Full Text Available Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  2. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  3. 'Sum rules' for preequilibrium reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.

    1981-03-01

    Evidence that suggests a correct relationship between the optical transmission matrix, P, and the several correlation widths, gamma sub(n), found in nsmission matrix, P, and the several correlation widths, n, found in multistep compound (preequilibrium) nuclear reactions, is presented. A second sum rule is also derived within the shell model approach to nuclear reactions. Indications of the potential usefulness of the sum rules in preequilibrium studies are given. (Author) [pt

  4. Medium effects in direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakoc, M; Bertulani, C

    2013-01-01

    We discuss medium corrections of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross sections and their influence on direct reactions at intermediate energies ≳50 MeV/nucleon. The results obtained with free NN cross sections are compared with those obtained with a geometrical treatment of Pauli-blocking and Dirac-Bruecker methods. We show that medium corrections may lead to sizable modifications for collisions at intermediate energies and that they are more pronounced in reactions involving weakly bound nuclei.

  5. The influence of a probiotic supplementation on memory in quail suggests a role of gut microbiota on cognitive abilities in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parois, Severine; Calandreau, Ludovic; Kraimi, Narjis; Gabriel, Irène; Leterrier, Christine

    2017-07-28

    The gut microbiota is involved in host behaviour and memory in mammals. Consequently, it may also influence emotional behaviour and memory in birds. Quail from two genetic lines with different fearfulness (LTI: long tonic immobility, n=37; STI: short tonic immobility, n=32) were either or not supplemented with a probiotic (Pediococcus acidilactici) from hatching. Emotional reactivity was measured in a tonic immobility test (d6 and 7 of age) and two open-field tests (d13-15; d22-24). Memory was measured in a test rewarded with mealworms, where quail had to remember the cups previously visited (d34-36). Quail endured a 5-days stress period from days 17 to 21 to help revealing the potentially beneficial effect of the probiotic. As expected, STI quail were less fearful compared to the LTI quail (p0.05), except in the tonic immobility test where supplemented STI quail had lower immobility duration (p=0.0001). Regarding the memory test, the two lines had similar performances. Quail fed with probiotics made fewer errors (p=0.040). There was no significant correlation between traits of emotional reactivity and of memory. In conclusion, the supplementation with Pediococcus acidilactici as a probiotic, affected a specific trait of emotional reactivity in STI quail, and improved memory in both lines, whichstrengthens the idea that the influence of gut microbiota on the host behaviour and memory seen in mammals is shared by birds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  7. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  8. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  9. Reaction time for trimolecular reactions in compartment-based reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Chen, Minghan; Erban, Radek; Cao, Yang

    2018-05-01

    Trimolecular reaction models are investigated in the compartment-based (lattice-based) framework for stochastic reaction-diffusion modeling. The formulae for the first collision time and the mean reaction time are derived for the case where three molecules are present in the solution under periodic boundary conditions. For the case of reflecting boundary conditions, similar formulae are obtained using a computer-assisted approach. The accuracy of these formulae is further verified through comparison with numerical results. The presented derivation is based on the first passage time analysis of Montroll [J. Math. Phys. 10, 753 (1969)]. Montroll's results for two-dimensional lattice-based random walks are adapted and applied to compartment-based models of trimolecular reactions, which are studied in one-dimensional or pseudo one-dimensional domains.

  10. Exchange Reactions. Proceedings of the Symposium on Exchange Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions are of great interest to chemists. The study of exchange reactions in particular helps to shed light on the dynamics of chemical change, providing an insight into the structures and the reactivities of the chemical species involved. The main theme of this meeting was the subject of oxidation-reduction reactions in which the net result is the transfer of one or more electrons between the different oxidation states of the same element. Other studies reported included the transfer of protons, atoms, complex ligands or organic radicals between molecules. Heterogeneous exchange, which is of importance in many cases of catalytic action, was also considered. For a long time isotopic tracers have formed the most convenient means of studying exchange reactions and today a considerable amount of work continues to be done with their aid. Consequently, several papers presented at this Symposium reported on work carried out by purely radiochemical tracer methods. In recognition, however, of the important role which nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance play in this field, in particular in the study of fast reactions, a number of reports on investigations in which these techniques had been used was included in the programme. By kind invitation of the United States Government the Symposium on Exchange Reactions was held from 31 May to 4 June at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, Long Island, N.Y., USA. It was attended by 46 participants from nine countries and one inter-governmental organization. The publication of these Proceedings makes the contents of the papers and the discussion available to a wider audience

  11. A comprehensive survey of nuclear reactions; Panorama des reactions nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cugnon, J. [Liege Univ., IFPA, AGO Dept. (Belgium)

    2007-07-01

    The various mechanisms of nuclear reactions are surveyed and classified in different regimes, based on the notions of coherent mechanisms and hard versus soft processes. The emphasis is put on the concepts at the basis of the understanding of these regimes and on the elements of nuclear structure which are involved in these different regimes, as well as the on the possibility of extracting this information. Due to lack of space and for pedagogical reasons, the discussion is limited to nucleon-induced and light-ion-induced reactions. However, a few remarks are given concerning some specific probes, such as weakly bound projectiles or neutron-rich nuclei. (author)

  12. SOLVENTLESS MIGRATORY-INSERTION REACTIONS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The product formed by reaction of an alkyl or aryl cyclopentadienyl metal carbonyl .... (as also observed from the NMR tube experiments) that the solventless reaction between ... As can be seen from Figure 3, the reaction rate in the melt.

  13. Desired Mobility or Satisfied Immobility? Migratory Aspirations among Knowledge Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Among the aspects discussed within the globalisation process, the international mobility of professional workers assumes considerable relevance. This paper focuses on migratory aspirations among knowledge workers within the context of economic globalisation and market restructuring in Romania. Due to a lack of literature dealing with these issues,…

  14. Biomarkers of adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel F; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2018-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions can be caused by a wide range of therapeutics. Adverse drug reactions affect many bodily organ systems and vary widely in severity. Milder adverse drug reactions often resolve quickly following withdrawal of the casual drug or sometimes after dose reduction. Some adverse drug reactions are severe and lead to significant organ/tissue injury which can be fatal. Adverse drug reactions also represent a financial burden to both healthcare providers and the pharmaceutical industry. Thus, a number of stakeholders would benefit from development of new, robust biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis, and prognostication of adverse drug reactions. There has been significant recent progress in identifying predictive genomic biomarkers with the potential to be used in clinical settings to reduce the burden of adverse drug reactions. These have included biomarkers that can be used to alter drug dose (for example, Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) and azathioprine dose) and drug choice. The latter have in particular included human leukocyte antigen (HLA) biomarkers which identify susceptibility to immune-mediated injuries to major organs such as skin, liver, and bone marrow from a variety of drugs. This review covers both the current state of the art with regard to genomic adverse drug reaction biomarkers. We also review circulating biomarkers that have the potential to be used for both diagnosis and prognosis, and have the added advantage of providing mechanistic information. In the future, we will not be relying on single biomarkers (genomic/non-genomic), but on multiple biomarker panels, integrated through the application of different omics technologies, which will provide information on predisposition, early diagnosis, prognosis, and mechanisms. Impact statement • Genetic and circulating biomarkers present significant opportunities to personalize patient therapy to minimize the risk of adverse drug reactions. ADRs are a significant heath issue

  15. Spallation reactions - physics and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelic, A.; Ricciardi, M.; Schmidt, K-H.

    2009-01-01

    Spallation reactions have become an ideal tool for studying the equation of state and thermal instabilities of nuclear matter. In astrophysics, the interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar medium have to be understood in detail for deducing their original composition and their production mechanisms. Renewed interest in spallation reactions with protons around 1 GeV came up recently with the developments of spallation neutron sources. The project of an accelerator-driven system (ADS) as a technological solution for incinerating the radioactive waste even intensified the efforts for better understanding the physics involved in the spallation process. Experiments on spallation reactions were performed for determining the production cross sections and properties of particles, fragments and heavy residues. Traditional experiments on heavy residues, performed in direct kinematics, were limited to the direct observation of long-lived radioactive nuclides and did not provide detailed information on the kinematics of the reaction. Therefore, an innovative experimental method has been developed, based on inverse kinematics, which allowed to identify all reaction residues in-flight, using the high resolution magnetic spectrometer FRS of GSL Darmstadt. It also gives direct access to the reaction kinematics. An experimental campaign has been carried out in a Europe-wide collaboration, investigating the spallation of several nuclei ranging from 56 Fe to 238 U Complementary experiments were performed with a full-acceptance detection system, yielding total fission cross sections. Recently, another detection system using the large acceptance ALADIN dipole and the LAND neutron detector was introduced to measure light particles in coincidence with the heavy residues. Another intense activity was dedicated to developing codes, which cover nuclear reactions occurring in an ADS. The first phase of the reaction is successfully described by a sequence of quasi-free nucleon

  16. Modeling of fluctuating reaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipshtat, A.; Biham, O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Various dynamical systems are organized as reaction networks, where the population size of one component affects the populations of all its neighbors. Such networks can be found in interstellar surface chemistry, cell biology, thin film growth and other systems. I cases where the populations of reactive species are large, the network can be modeled by rate equations which provide all reaction rates within mean field approximation. However, in small systems that are partitioned into sub-micron size, these populations strongly fluctuate. Under these conditions rate equations fail and the master equation is needed for modeling these reactions. However, the number of equations in the master equation grows exponentially with the number of reactive species, severely limiting its feasibility for complex networks. Here we present a method which dramatically reduces the number of equations, thus enabling the incorporation of the master equation in complex reaction networks. The method is examplified in the context of reaction network on dust grains. Its applicability for genetic networks will be discussed. 1. Efficient simulations of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar clouds. Azi Lipshtat and Ofer Biham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004), 170601. 2. Modeling of negative autoregulated genetic networks in single cells. Azi Lipshtat, Hagai B. Perets, Nathalie Q. Balaban and Ofer Biham, Gene: evolutionary genomics (2004), In press

  17. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  18. Dynamic effects in fragmentation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Esbensen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Fragmentation reactions offer a useful tool to study the spectroscopy of halo nuclei, but the large extent of the halo wave function makes the reaction theory more difficult. The simple reaction models based on the eikonal approximation for the nuclear interaction or first-order perturbation theory for the Coulomb interaction have systematic errors that they investigate here, comparing to the predictions of complete dynamical calculations. They find that stripping probabilities are underpredicted by the eikonal model, leading to extracted spectroscopy strengths that are two large. In contrast, the Coulomb excitation is overpredicted by the simple theory. They attribute this to a screening effect, as is well known in the Barkas effect on stopping powers. The errors decrease with beam energy as E(sub beam)(sup -1), and are not significant at beam energies above 50 MeV/u. At lower beam energies, the effects should be taken into account when extracting quantitative spectroscopic strengths

  19. Fragmentation processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legrain, R.

    1984-08-01

    Projectile and nuclear fragmentation are defined and processes referred to are recalled. The two different aspects of fragmentation are considered but the emphasis is also put on heavy ion induced reactions. The preliminary results of an experiment performed at GANIL to study peripheral heavy ions induced reactions at intermediate energy are presented. The results of this experiment will illustrate the characteristics of projectile fragmentation and this will also give the opportunity to study projectile fragmentation in the transition region. Then nuclear fragmentation is considered which is associated with more central collisions in the case of heavy ion induced reactions. This aspect of fragmentation is also ilustrated with two heavy ion experiments in which fragments emitted at large angle have been observed

  20. Effects of reaction channels in subbarrier fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasso, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this lecture we consider some aspects of fusion reactions between heavy ions at bombarding energies which are below or close to that of the Coulomb barrier. This problem has been traditionally confronted with simple barrier penetration calculations. So we start with a very brief review of what we can call the ''conventional'' procedure. (orig.)

  1. Effective dynamics along given reaction coordinates, and reaction rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-22

    In molecular dynamics and related fields one considers dynamical descriptions of complex systems in full (atomic) detail. In order to reduce the overwhelming complexity of realistic systems (high dimension, large timescale spread, limited computational resources) the projection of the full dynamics onto some reaction coordinates is examined in order to extract statistical information like free energies or reaction rates. In this context, the effective dynamics that is induced by the full dynamics on the reaction coordinate space has attracted considerable attention in the literature. In this article, we contribute to this discussion: we first show that if we start with an ergodic diffusion process whose invariant measure is unique then these properties are inherited by the effective dynamics. Then, we give equations for the effective dynamics, discuss whether the dominant timescales and reaction rates inferred from the effective dynamics are accurate approximations of such quantities for the full dynamics, and compare our findings to results from approaches like Mori-Zwanzig, averaging, or homogenization. Finally, by discussing the algorithmic realization of the effective dynamics, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic techniques like the "equation-free" approach and the "heterogeneous multiscale method" can be seen as special cases of our approach.

  2. Estimation of the reaction efficiency in polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalam, N.

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is largely used in molecular biology for increasing the copy number of a specific DNA fragment. The succession of 20 replication cycles makes it possible to multiply the quantity of the fragment of interest by a factor of 1 million. The PCR technique has

  3. Reaction rate of propene pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Su, Kehe; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Qingfeng; Cheng, Laifei; Zhang, Litong

    2011-10-01

    The reaction rate of propene pyrolysis was investigated based on the elementary reactions proposed in Qu et al., J Comput Chem 2009, 31, 1421. The overall reaction rate was developed with the steady-state approximation and the rate constants of the elementary reactions were determined with the variational transition state theory. For the elementary reaction having transition state, the vibrational frequencies of the selected points along the minimum energy path were calculated with density functional theory at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level and the energies were improved with the accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2). For the elementary reaction without transition state, the frequencies were calculated with CASSCF/6-311G(d,p) and the energies were refined with the multireference configuration interaction method MRCISD/6-311G(d,p). The rate constants were evaluated within 200-2000 K and the fitted three-parameter expressions were obtained. The results are consistent with those in the literatures in most cases. For the overall rate, it was found that the logarithm of the rate and the reciprocal temperature have excellent linear relationship above 400 K, predicting that the rate follows a typical first-order law at high temperatures of 800-2000 K, which is also consistent with the experiments. The apparent activation energy in 800-2000 K is 317.3 kJ/mol from the potential energy surface of zero Kelvin. This value is comparable with the energy barriers, 365.4 and 403.7 kJ/mol, of the rate control steps. However, the apparent activation energy, 215.7 kJ/mol, developed with the Gibbs free energy surface at 1200 K is consistent with the most recent experimental result 201.9 ± 0.6 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clozapine-associated extrapyramidal reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E S; Marken, P A; Ruehter, V L

    2000-05-01

    To report a case of extrapyramidal reaction associated with a dosage increase of clozapine. A 44-year-old white man with a 20-year history of chronic paranoid schizophrenia was admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility. His prior medications restarted on admission were clozapine 650 mg at bedtime, haloperidol 10 mg at bedtime, clonazepam 2 mg/d, and aspirin 325 mg/d. Two days after admission (hospital day 3), clozapine and clonazepam were discontinued, and he was prescribed haloperidol 5 mg every morning and 10 mg every evening. Stabilization occurred over the following 24 days, with progressively lower dosages of haloperidol and increasing dosages of clozapine. Haloperidol was discontinued on day 24. On day 47, the patient was agitated and making bizarre statements; thus, the morning dose of clozapine was increased by 50 mg (total 450 mg/d). On day 48 at 2200, a dystonic reaction was diagnosed; he received intramuscular diphenhydramine 50 mg, which caused the reaction to subside. At the time of the adverse reaction, he was prescribed clozapine 450 mg/d, vitamin E 400 IU three times daily, aspirin 325 mg/d, and acetaminophen, milk of magnesia, and Maalox as needed. Although the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) is significantly lower with clozapine than with conventional agents, elevated clozapine blood concentrations have been reported to cause EPS; other reports have cited severe dystonias and dyskinesias on abrupt clozapine withdrawal. Considering the medications prescribed at the time and the discontinuation of haloperidol 24 days before the event, clozapine was the most likely cause of the extrapyramidal reaction. Regardless of anticipated safety associated with novel antipsychotics such as clozapine, reports of dystonic reactions must be taken into account and patients monitored appropriately.

  5. Redox reactions in food fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Egon Bech

    2018-01-01

    involves oxidative steps in the early part of the pathways whereas a multitude of different reactions are used as compensating reductions. Much of the diversity seen between food fermentations arise from the different routes and the different electron acceptors used by microorganisms to counterbalance...... and this contributes to the diversity in flavor, color, texture, and shelf life. The review concludes that these reactions are still only incompletely understood and that they represent an interesting area for fundamental research and also represent a fertile field for product development through a more conscious use...... of the redox properties of strains used to compose food cultures....

  6. Learning to Predict Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles respectively are not high-throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, or lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry dataset consisting of 1630 full multi-step reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval, problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of non-productive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  7. Vision 2020. Reaction Engineering Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klipstein, David H. [Reaction Design, San Diego, CA (United States); Robinson, Sharon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Reaction Engineering Roadmap is a part of an industry- wide effort to create a blueprint of the research and technology milestones that are necessary to achieve longterm industry goals. This report documents the results of a workshop focused on the research needs, technology barriers, and priorities of the chemical industry as they relate to reaction engineering viewed first by industrial use (basic chemicals; specialty chemicals; pharmaceuticals; and polymers) and then by technology segment (reactor system selection, design, and scale-up; chemical mechanism development and property estimation; dealing with catalysis; and new, nonstandard reactor types).

  8. Learning to predict chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayala, Matthew A; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Chen, Jonathan H; Baldi, Pierre

    2011-09-26

    Being able to predict the course of arbitrary chemical reactions is essential to the theory and applications of organic chemistry. Approaches to the reaction prediction problems can be organized around three poles corresponding to: (1) physical laws; (2) rule-based expert systems; and (3) inductive machine learning. Previous approaches at these poles, respectively, are not high throughput, are not generalizable or scalable, and lack sufficient data and structure to be implemented. We propose a new approach to reaction prediction utilizing elements from each pole. Using a physically inspired conceptualization, we describe single mechanistic reactions as interactions between coarse approximations of molecular orbitals (MOs) and use topological and physicochemical attributes as descriptors. Using an existing rule-based system (Reaction Explorer), we derive a restricted chemistry data set consisting of 1630 full multistep reactions with 2358 distinct starting materials and intermediates, associated with 2989 productive mechanistic steps and 6.14 million unproductive mechanistic steps. And from machine learning, we pose identifying productive mechanistic steps as a statistical ranking, information retrieval problem: given a set of reactants and a description of conditions, learn a ranking model over potential filled-to-unfilled MO interactions such that the top-ranked mechanistic steps yield the major products. The machine learning implementation follows a two-stage approach, in which we first train atom level reactivity filters to prune 94.00% of nonproductive reactions with a 0.01% error rate. Then, we train an ensemble of ranking models on pairs of interacting MOs to learn a relative productivity function over mechanistic steps in a given system. Without the use of explicit transformation patterns, the ensemble perfectly ranks the productive mechanism at the top 89.05% of the time, rising to 99.86% of the time when the top four are considered. Furthermore, the system

  9. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  10. Theory of inclusive pionic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Salcedo, L.L.; Strottman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A theory is developed for all the inclusive pion nuclear reactions, quasielastic, single charge exchange, double charge exchange and absorption, around the resonance region. The theory is based on the isobar hole model and makes an expansion in the number of particle-hole excitations. Up to 3p3h for pion absorption and 2p2h for quasielastic or charge exchange, where good convergence is found, are considered. The results obtained with this theory agree remarkably well with experiment for the different reactions and different nuclei in a wide region of energies around resonance

  11. Adverse reactions associated with acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, E A; Bateman, D N

    2009-02-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most common agents deliberately ingested in self-poisoning episodes and a leading cause of acute liver failure in the western world. Acetylcysteine is widely acknowledged as the antidote of choice for paracetamol poisoning, but its use is not without risk. Adverse reactions, often leading to treatment delay, are frequently associated with both intravenous and oral acetylcysteine and are a common source of concern among treating physicians. A systematic literature review investigating the incidence, clinical features, and mechanisms of adverse effects associated with acetylcysteine. A variety of adverse reactions to acetylcysteine have been described ranging from nausea to death, most of the latter due to incorrect dosing. The pattern of reactions differs with oral and intravenous dosing, but reported frequency is at least as high with oral as intravenous. The reactions to the intravenous preparation result in similar clinical features to true anaphylaxis, including rash, pruritus, angioedema, bronchospasm, and rarely hypotension, but are caused by nonimmunological mechanisms. The precise nature of this reaction remains unclear. Histamine now seems to be an important mediator of the response, and there is evidence of variability in patient susceptibility, with females, and those with a history of asthma or atopy are particularly susceptible. Quantity of paracetamol ingestion, measured through serum paracetamol concentration, is also important as higher paracetamol concentrations protect patients against anaphylactoid effects. Most anaphylactoid reactions occur at the start of acetylcysteine treatment when concentrations are highest. Acetylcysteine also affects clotting factor activity, and this affects the interpretation of minor disturbances in the International Normalized Ratio in the context of paracetamol overdose. This review discusses the incidence, clinical features, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, and

  12. Photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant feature of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies is the excitation of the δ resonance and one can therefore use such reactions to study the dynamics of δ propagation in a nucleus. Following an introductory section the author comments on photoabsorption on a single nucleon in Section II. A review of the δ-n Greens function and of the photonuclear amplitude is given in Section III. Results for photoabsorption on 4 He are shown in Section IV and compared with the data. Coherent π 0 photoproduction is discussed in Section V and calculations for 12 C are compared to recent measurements. (Auth.)

  13. Hot wire radicals and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure radical (and stable gas) densities at the substrate of a tungsten hot wire (HW) reactor. We report measurements of the silane reaction probability on the HW and the probability of Si and H release from the HW. We describe a model for the atomic H release, based on the H 2 dissociation model. We note major variations in silicon-release, with dependence on prior silane exposure. Measured radical densities versus silane pressure yield silicon-silane and H-silane reaction rate coefficients, and the dominant radical fluxes to the substrate

  14. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    12 janv. 2012 ... Key words: Métastase, rate, colon, carcinome. Received: 28/12/2011 - Accepted: 09/01/2012 - Published: ... tomodensitométriques au moment du diagnostic du cancer primitif ou lors du suivi radiologique régulier des patients atteints de cancers. Le recours à la TEP-FDG couplée au scanner serait d'un ...

  15. Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2011-01-01

      My concern is to understand augmentation as an emergent modality - among many others in ‘the expanding digital field' (Søndergaard M. , Transformative Creativity in the Expanded Digital Field, 2009)' - attributed to the production of contemporary art and the ‘archive of knowledge' in the (art) ...

  16. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porz, F.

    1982-10-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 1500 0 C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE) [de

  17. Microscopic description of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbatov, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The genealogical series method has been extended to the continuous spectrum of the many-body systems. New nonlinear integral equations have been formulated to perform the microscopical description of the nuclear reactions with arbitrary number of particles. The way to solve them numerically is demonstrated

  18. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  19. Palladium-Catalysed Coupling Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Johannes G.; Beller, M; Blaser, HU

    2012-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed coupling reactions have gained importance as a tool for the production of pharmaceutical intermediates and to a lesser extent also for the production of agrochemicals, flavours and fragrances, and monomers for polymers. In this review only these cases are discussed where it seems

  20. Reactions to threatening health messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoor, Gill A; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kalagi, Janice; de Groot, Lianne; Grootjans, Karlijne; Huschens, Alexander; Köhninger, Constanze; Kölgen, Lizan; Pelssers, Isabelle; Schütt, Toby; Thomas, Sophia; Ruiter, Robert A C; Kok, Gerjo

    2012-11-21

    Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93). Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72). Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  1. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramstein B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  2. Reactions of ethanol on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Liu, Feng; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption and reactions of ethanol on Ru(0001) were studied with temperatureprogrammed desorption (TPD) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Ethanol was found to adsorb intact onto Ru(0001) below 100 K. Heating to 250 K resulted in formation of ethoxy groups, which undergo

  3. Runaway Reaction: Solving for X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Solveig A.

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the runaway reaction as it was displayed by Barry, a 14-year-old eighth-grade boy with learning disabilities. It identifies some of the common characteristics of this response and proposes school intervention methods. Functional behavioral assessments and strength-based assessments are encouraged, along with using strategy…

  4. Exchange effects in direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMere, M.; Kanellopoulos, E.J.; Suenkel, W.; Tang, Y.C.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of antisymmetrization in direct reactions is examined by studying the properties of the coupling-normalization kernel function occurring in a resonating-group formulation. From this study, one obtains useful information concerning the general behavior of direct-reactiion processes and some justification for the use of three-body models in phenomenological analyses

  5. Scattering theory and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1988-01-01

    In this course, scattering theory and chemical reactions are presented including scattering of one particle by a potential, n-particle systems, colinear triatomic molecules and the study of reactive scattering for 3-dimensional triatomic systems. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Recyclization reactions leading to benzimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamedov, Vakhid A; Murtazina, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    The published data on the recyclization reactions that afford benzimidazoles are generalized and systematized. Both classical and new methods of benzimidazole synthesis are considered. Attention is focused on the publications over the recent 10-15 years; of the earlier publications, only those unknown to the wide circle of chemists are analyzed.

  7. Recyclization reactions leading to benzimidazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Vakhid A.; Murtazina, Anna M.

    2011-05-01

    The published data on the recyclization reactions that afford benzimidazoles are generalized and systematized. Both classical and new methods of benzimidazole synthesis are considered. Attention is focused on the publications over the recent 10-15 years; of the earlier publications, only those unknown to the wide circle of chemists are analyzed.

  8. Reactants encapsulation and Maillard Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Fogliano, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades many efforts have been addressed to the control of Maillard Reaction products in different foods with the aim to promote the formation of compounds having the desired color and flavor and to reduce the concentration of several potential toxic molecules. Encapsulation, already

  9. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  10. Reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Seiichiro; Nakamura, Kazumoto; Hoshino, Takashi; Hikita, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde was investigated in a fast flow reactor equipped with a time-of-flight type mass spectrometer under reduced pressure. Main reaction products were carbon monoxide, ethylene, ethane, methane, and propanal. Consideration of the distributions of the reaction products under various reaction conditions showed that hydrogen atoms attacked the C=C double bond, especially its inner carbon side under reduced pressure. Resulting hot radicals caused subsequent reactions. The relative value of the apparent bimolecular rate constant of the reaction against that of trans-2-butene with hydrogen atoms was 1.6+-0.2, which supported the above-mentioned initial reaction. (auth.)

  11. Optimizing Chemical Reactions with Deep Reinforcement Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Li, Xiaocheng; Zare, Richard N

    2017-12-27

    Deep reinforcement learning was employed to optimize chemical reactions. Our model iteratively records the results of a chemical reaction and chooses new experimental conditions to improve the reaction outcome. This model outperformed a state-of-the-art blackbox optimization algorithm by using 71% fewer steps on both simulations and real reactions. Furthermore, we introduced an efficient exploration strategy by drawing the reaction conditions from certain probability distributions, which resulted in an improvement on regret from 0.062 to 0.039 compared with a deterministic policy. Combining the efficient exploration policy with accelerated microdroplet reactions, optimal reaction conditions were determined in 30 min for the four reactions considered, and a better understanding of the factors that control microdroplet reactions was reached. Moreover, our model showed a better performance after training on reactions with similar or even dissimilar underlying mechanisms, which demonstrates its learning ability.

  12. Department of Nuclear Reaction - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: This year 1999 can be considered as very successful. Not only that we have published 33 papers in journals listed by the Philadelphia Institute of Science but because our hard work allowed us to obtain new and exciting results. A group of theoretical papers concerned with application of correlation among random matrices elements developed for statistical aspects of nuclear coupling into continuum to study of the collective effects in brain activity and stock market dynamics. These papers arose quite an interest and got several citations. Studies of the nonpartonic components in the nucleon structure function led to better understanding of the higher-twist effects. It was shown that inclusion of the terms of the order of 1/Q 4 improves fits to the experimental data. A review paper summarizing results on the role of the leading baryon in high energy reactions appeared in Progress on Nuclear and Particle Physics. Studies on multistep transfer reactions of light heavy ions in collaboration with the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Ukrainian Academy of Sciences in Kiev have explained angular distributions of many reactions using the coupled channel theory. We have shown that it is possible to determine energy dependence of the optical model potential for such unstable nuclei like 8 Be. Further studies of mechanism of near threshold light meson production in collaboration with Juelich and Jagiellonian University were performed. Within COSY 10 and COSY 11 collaborations new data on the isospin symmetry breaking in pionic reactions and strange meson accompanied by hyperons emission were obtained. Together with colleagues from the Flerov Nuclear Reaction Laboratory we have started experiments with radioactive beams. Using magnetic separator COMBAS velocity distributions of isotopes with 2 ≤Z≤11 in reactions induced by 16 O on 9 Be were obtained. At the high resolution radioactive beam channel ACCULINA reactions induced by 6 He and 8 He nuclei were studied

  13. Multiresponse modelling of the caramelisation reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Quintas, Mafalda; Guimarães, Carla; Baylina, João; Brandão, Teresa R. S.; Silva, Cristina L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiresponse modelling is a powerful tool for studying complex kinetics of reactions occurring in food products. This modelling technique uses information of reactants and products involved, allowing insightful kinetic parameters estimation and helping in clarifying reaction mechanisms. One example of a complex reaction that occurs in food processing is the caramelisation reaction. Caramelisation is the common name for a group of reactions observed when carbohydrates are exposed to high temp...

  14. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  15. Vanadocene reactions with hydroxy acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latyaeva, V.N.; Lineva, A.N.; Zimina, S.V.; Ehllert, O.G.; Arsen'eva, T.I.

    1984-01-01

    To prepare a series of vanadium cyclopentadienylcarboxylates soluble in water, the vanadocene reactions with lactic, γ-oxybutyric-, salicylic,- gallic-, orotic-, and acetylsalicylic acids have been studied. To determine the influence of cyclopentadienyl groups, bound with a vanadium atom, on the physiological activity of the complexes formed, vanadium halides are made to react with lactic acid. Only the vanadocene reaction with orotic acid was conducted in an aqueous medium, other interactions were realized in the diethyl ether, toluene, T, H, P medium. The interaction of vanadocene and vanadium halides with lactic-, salicylic-, acetylsalicylic- and gallic acids was found to lead to the formation of water-soluble vanadium complexes of Cp 2 , VOCOR or CpV (OCOR) 2 type. The data on the produced compounds yield, their IR spectra, decomposition temperatures, solubility, effective magnetic moments are presented

  16. Allergic reactions in red tattoos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton Carlsen, K; Køcks, M; Sepehri, M

    2016-01-01

    to be feasible for chemical analysis of red pigments in allergic reactions. Raman spectroscopy has a major potential for fingerprint screening of problematic tattoo pigments in situ in skin, ex vivo in skin biopsies and in tattoo ink stock products, thus, to eliminate unsafe ink products from markets.......AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as a screening technique for chemical characterisation of tattoo pigments in pathologic reacting tattoos and tattoo ink stock products to depict unsafe pigments and metabolites of pigments. MATERIALS/METHODS: Twelve...... dermatome shave biopsies from allergic reactions in red tattoos were analysed with Raman spectroscopy (A 785-nm 300 mW diode laser). These were referenced to samples of 10 different standard tattoo ink stock products, three of these identified as the culprit inks used by the tattooist and thus by history...

  17. Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Takuya; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2011-10-07

    The dehydrogenative cycloaddition of dieneynes, which possess a diene in the form of a styrene moiety and a dienophile in the form of an alkyne moiety, produces naphthalene derivatives when heated. It was found that a key requirement of this process is the presence of a silyl group attached to the alkyne moiety, which forces a dehydrogenation reaction to occur. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Caging in high energy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ache, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of caging high energy reactions is considered. It is noted that there is no easy and unambiguous way, short of a complete and very tedious product and mechanistic analysis, which is feasible only for very few systems, to determine the contribution made by caging. It is emphasized that some products resulting from the hot reaction with a certain substrate may be formed via caging while others are not. In research on the mechanism of caging the results of Roots work on the reactions of hot 18 F with the CF 3 CH 3 system seem to provide evidence for caging, with 18 F being the caged moiety, thus proceeding via a radical--radical recombination mechanism. Their work with H 2 S additive also seems to indicate that scavenging via hydrogen abstraction from H 2 S to form does not interfere with the radical--radical recombination consistent with Bunkers molecular approach to explain the cage effects. In other research a series of observations resulting from stereochemical and combined stereochemical density variation techniques seem to favor a caged-complex. It is clear that a more conclusive answer can only be reached by more systematic studies, utilizing the whole range of nuclear reactions such as (n,2n), (n,γ) and E.C. processes in mechanistically well defined systems to elucidate the effect of variations in the recoil energies, by carrying out studies in different solvents or host substances to assess the effect of the physical parameters, such as molecule size and intermolecular interactions on the escape probability or caging efficiencies

  19. Reactions to threatening health messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ten Hoor Gill A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence that threatening health messages in the form of distressing imagery in anti-smoking and anti-alcohol campaigns cause defensive reactions. Methods We simulated both Brown et al. experiments, asking participants to estimate the reactions of the original study subjects to the threatening health information (n = 93. Afterwards, we presented the actual original study outcomes. One week later, we assessed whether this knowledge of the actual study outcomes helped participants to more successfully estimate the effectiveness of the threatening health information (n = 72. Results Results showed that participants were initially convinced of the effectiveness of threatening health messages and were unable to anticipate the defensive reactions that in fact occurred. Furthermore, these estimates did not improve after participants had been explained the dynamics of threatening communication as well as what the effects of the threatening communication had been in reality. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the effectiveness of threatening health messages is intuitively appealing. What is more, providing empirical evidence against the use of threatening health messages has very little effect on this intuitive appeal.

  20. Reactions to threatening health messages

    OpenAIRE

    ten Hoor, Gill A; Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Kalagi, Janice; de Groot, Lianne; Grootjans, Karlijne; Huschens, Alexander; K?hninger, Constanze; K?lgen, Lizan; Pelssers, Isabelle; Sch?tt, Toby; Thomas, Sophia; Ruiter, Robert AC; Kok, Gerjo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Threatening health messages that focus on severity are popular, but frequently have no effect or even a counterproductive effect on behavior change. This paradox (i.e. wide application despite low effectiveness) may be partly explained by the intuitive appeal of threatening communication: it may be hard to predict the defensive reactions occurring in response to fear appeals. We examine this hypothesis by using two studies by Brown and colleagues, which provide evidence th...

  1. Statistical theory of breakup reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Descouvemont, Pierre; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with loosely bound exotic nuclei (CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCC s ), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels. (author)

  2. Nuclear reaction studies: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaler, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    A principal focus of recent research has been the three-body problem. A great deal of effort has been devoted to the creation of a computer program to calculate physical observables in the three body problem below 1 GeV. Successful results have been obtained for the triton. Additional work concerns scattering of K + mesons from nuclei, antinucleon physics, relativistic nuclear physics and inclusive reactions

  3. Free radical reactions of daunorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houee-Levin, C.

    1991-01-01

    Daunorubicin is an antitumor antibiotic activated in vivo by reduction. Its mechanism of action involves DNA and topoisomerase attack, but side effects are cytotoxicity related to free radical formation. Therefore the mechanism of the one-electron reduction of the drug and the reactions of the daunorubicin transients towards compounds of biological interest have been studied by the methods of radiolysis, in order to provide possible explanations of the drug mechanism of action. Their relative importance in cellular conditions is discussed [fr

  4. Statistical theory of breakup reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A., E-mail: carlos.bertulani@tamuc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX (United States); Descouvemont, Pierre, E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels (Belgium); Hussein, Mahir S., E-mail: hussein@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Estudos Avancados

    2014-07-01

    We propose an alternative for Coupled-Channels calculations with loosely bound exotic nuclei (CDCC), based on the the Random Matrix Model of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions. The coupled channels equations are divided into two sets. The first set, described by the CDCC, and the other set treated with RMT. The resulting theory is a Statistical CDCC (CDCC{sub s}), able in principle to take into account many pseudo channels. (author)

  5. Tuberculin reaction and BCG scar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter

    2015-01-01

    rate ratio (MRR) comparing children with a BCG scar with those without was 0.42 (95% CI = 0.19; 0.93). There was a similar tendency for TST positivity: MRR = 0.47 (95% CI = 0.14; 1.54). For LBW children who had both a positive TST reaction and a scar, the MRR was 0.22 (95% CI = 0.05; 0.87). For NBW...

  6. Sequential series for nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumo, Ko

    1975-01-01

    A new time-dependent treatment of nuclear reactions is given, in which the wave function of compound nucleus is expanded by a sequential series of the reaction processes. The wave functions of the sequential series form another complete set of compound nucleus at the limit Δt→0. It is pointed out that the wave function is characterized by the quantities: the number of degrees of freedom of motion n, the period of the motion (Poincare cycle) tsub(n), the delay time t sub(nμ) and the relaxation time tausub(n) to the equilibrium of compound nucleus, instead of the usual quantum number lambda, the energy eigenvalue Esub(lambda) and the total width GAMMAsub(lambda) of resonance levels, respectively. The transition matrix elements and the yields of nuclear reactions also become the functions of time given by the Fourier transform of the usual ones. The Poincare cycles of compound nuclei are compared with the observed correlations among resonance levels, which are about 10 -17 --10 -16 sec for medium and heavy nuclei and about 10 -20 sec for the intermediate resonances. (auth.)

  7. Anaphylactic reactions presenting with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmazgul, Emrullah; Kutlu, Ali; Dogru, Salim; Ozalper, Veysel; Cetindagli, Ibrahim; Sezer, Ogun; Salmanoglu, Musa; Kilic, Erol; Karabacak, Ercan; Ozturk, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Although a few case reports about hypertensive anaphylaxis (HA) are available in the present literature, there is no study about the prevalence of HA. In this study, we review our cases with anaphylaxis presenting with hypertension and ascertain its prevalence. The documents of the patients who had anaphylactic reactions after the procedures performed for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic diseases in GATA Haydarpasa Clinic of Allergy and Immunology between January 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Within the study period, 324 patients had undergone 4332 procedures in which 62 of them had developed anaphylaxis. During the procedures, the rate of anaphylaxis was found to be 1.43 %. The rate of HA among the anaphylaxis patients was 12.9 % (8 of 62 patients). During treatments, 2 patients received adrenaline injections without any adverse reaction. HA may be seen at a considerable rate during an anaphylactic reaction. Anaphylaxis and hypertension can be recovered by adrenaline injection when required. According to the best of our knowledge, this study is the first original study about the prevalence of HA in English-language medical literature.

  8. Department of Nuclear Reaction - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzanowski, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Our research in 2001 can be characterized by a wide range of various subjects e.g. search for new physics in Au + Au collisions at the energy in the centre of mass per nucleon pair √ s NN = 200 GeV through hunting dibaryon formation in p + p → K + + D (dibaryon) reaction to the application of the random matrix theory taken from nuclear reaction studies in the analysis of fluctuations of the stock exchange time and space correlations. Heavy ion reactions have been studied in a broad range of energies. At low energy of the 12 C ions (E CM = 25.57 MeV), delivered by the Warsaw U200P cyclotron, the reactions induced on 11 B target were studied. Coupling effects between various reaction channels were found. At the energies corresponding to the liquid-to-gas phase transition, the onset of the flow phenomena was found in the multifragmentation of the 197 Au nuclei induced by a sequence of projectiles p, 4 He, 12 C of the energies from 1-3 GeV per nucleon. Finally, evidence of the melting of the baryonic structure of the colliding nuclei was found at the highest available energies of 200 GeV per nucleon pair, in the collision of gold nuclei studied at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider within the BRAHMS and PHOBOS collaboration. We entered a new collaboration HIRES with the aim to discover S = -1 dibaryonic state by studying the reaction p+p → K + +D. So far many attempts to prove experimentally the existence of a dibaryonic state failed. We hope to use the unique properties of the Big Karl spectrometer to prove the existence of a sharp peak in the energy spectra of kaons. To do so, we have to reduce strongly the background of pions. A diffusely reflective threshold Cherenkov detector made from silica aerogel was designed. Preliminary tests indicate that pionic signals can be reduced by a factor of 58. Extensive studies of the mechanism of generating collective levels and the energy gap by means of diagonalizing matrices with random elements ended up with

  9. Insights on the host stress, fear and growth responses to the deoxynivalenol feed contaminant in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Khaled; Awad, Wageha A; Sid-Ahmed, Omer E; Böhm, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins pose an important danger to human and animal health. Poultry feeds are frequently contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin. It is thus of great importance to evaluate the effects of DON on the welfare related parameters in poultry industry. In the present study, the effects of contamination of broiler diet with 10 mg DON/kg feed on plasma corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio as indicators of stress, tonic immobility duration as an index for fear response and growth performance of broiler chickens were studied. In addition, the effect of a microbial feed additive either alone or in combination with DON contamination on these different aspects was also evaluated. The results showed that DON feeding significantly affected the welfare related parameters of broiler chickens. The feeding of DON contaminated diet resulted in an elevation of plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and increased the fear levels as indicated by longer duration of tonic immobility reaction. Furthermore, DON reduced the body weight and body weight gain during the starter phase definitely at the second and third week. However, during grower phase, feeding of DON decreased the body weight at the fourth week and reduced the body gain at the fifth week. Addition of the microbial feed additive, a commercial antidote for DON mycotoxin, was able to overcome DON effects on stress index (H/L ratio), fearfulness and growth parameters of broilers. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that the DON feeding increased the underlying fearfulness and physiological stress responses of broilers and resulted in a reduction in the welfare status as indicated by higher plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and higher fearfulness. Additionally, feeding the microbial feed additive was effective in reducing the adverse effects of DON on the bird's welfare and can improve the performance of broiler chickens.

  10. Insights on the host stress, fear and growth responses to the deoxynivalenol feed contaminant in broiler chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Ghareeb

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins pose an important danger to human and animal health. Poultry feeds are frequently contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON mycotoxin. It is thus of great importance to evaluate the effects of DON on the welfare related parameters in poultry industry. In the present study, the effects of contamination of broiler diet with 10 mg DON/kg feed on plasma corticosterone and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L ratio as indicators of stress, tonic immobility duration as an index for fear response and growth performance of broiler chickens were studied. In addition, the effect of a microbial feed additive either alone or in combination with DON contamination on these different aspects was also evaluated. The results showed that DON feeding significantly affected the welfare related parameters of broiler chickens. The feeding of DON contaminated diet resulted in an elevation of plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and increased the fear levels as indicated by longer duration of tonic immobility reaction. Furthermore, DON reduced the body weight and body weight gain during the starter phase definitely at the second and third week. However, during grower phase, feeding of DON decreased the body weight at the fourth week and reduced the body gain at the fifth week. Addition of the microbial feed additive, a commercial antidote for DON mycotoxin, was able to overcome DON effects on stress index (H/L ratio, fearfulness and growth parameters of broilers. In conclusion, we showed for the first time that the DON feeding increased the underlying fearfulness and physiological stress responses of broilers and resulted in a reduction in the welfare status as indicated by higher plasma corticosterone, higher H/L ratio and higher fearfulness. Additionally, feeding the microbial feed additive was effective in reducing the adverse effects of DON on the bird's welfare and can improve the performance of broiler chickens.

  11. Radiation reactions and care of the patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochhead, J.N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Many of the radiation reactions which may occur in patients following radiotherapy and the care of these reactions are described. These include the systemic reaction, reactions of the blood and skin, reactions occurring after treatment of the breast and chest wall, reactions after irradiation of the mouth and throat, intrathoracic tumours, the abdominal alimentary tract and pelvis, bone, the CNS and the eye. Patient care during the treatment of children and also during treatment using small sealed sources is also described. (U.K.)

  12. Metal-catalyzed asymmetric aldol reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Luiz C.; Lucca Junior, Emilio C. de; Ferreira, Marco A. B.; Polo, Ellen C., E-mail: ldias@iqm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-12-15

    The aldol reaction is one of the most powerful and versatile methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Traditionally, this reaction was developed in a stoichiometric version; however, great efforts in the development of chiral catalysts for aldol reactions were performed in recent years. Thus, in this review article, the development of metal-mediated chiral catalysts in Mukaiyama-type aldol reaction, reductive aldol reaction and direct aldol reaction are discussed. Moreover, the application of these catalysts in the total synthesis of complex molecules is discussed. (author)

  13. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  14. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  15. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  16. Department of Nuclear Reactions: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusek, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: During last year the physicists of the Department of Nuclear Reactions were involved in many experiments and projects: -Low energy nuclear reactions: For the first time a heavy ion beam from the Warsaw Cyclotron C-200 was used to investigate elastic and inelastic scattering of 12 C ions from 12 C target. The experiment is a part of a long range programme devoted to study the energy dependence of the nucleus-nucleus interactions. -Multifragmentation of relativistic heavy ions: Multifragmentation reactions induced by 12 C on different heavy targets and at different energies were studied in experiments performed at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung by the ALADIN Collaboration. These asymmetric systems were investigated in order to study the interplay between preequilibrium and equilibrium phenomena in the nuclear liquid - gas phase transition. -The structure of nucleons: A novel, two-structure description of the Roper resonance was proposed on the basis of the α-p scattering data reanalysed by means of a T-matrix formalism. -Atomic physics: Emission of the X-rays by fast heavy ions (S, Ti, Fe) as they traverse the matter (thin carbon or other light element foil) was investigated in a series of experiments performed at University of Erlangen. It was demonstrated, that the characteristic K α X-rays emitted by a heavy ion can serve as a tool for Z-value control of the ion. -Material research: Semiconductor heterostructures were investigated by means of Rutherford Back Scattering and Channeling methods using the 2 MeV α particles from the Van de Graaff accelerator ''Lech'' at the Department. The following reports present the results and major successes which were achieved in 1999. (author)

  17. Neutral currents in semileptonic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschos, E.A.

    1975-05-01

    The evidence for weak neutral currents is analyzed in semileptonic reactions with special emphasis on their Lorentz and internal symmetry structure. It is found that present observations are consistent with the expectations of gauge theories, but other possibilities can not be ruled out. Of particular interest in this respect is the presence of a large isoscalar component. The excitation of the Δ-resonance by neutral currents is analyzed, and pion-nucleon mass distributions are presented. Charge asymmetries sensitive to isoscalar-isovector interferences are discussed. (U.S.)

  18. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  19. Apparent tunneling in chemical reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Billing, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A necessary condition for tunneling in a chemical reaction is that the probability of crossing a barrier is non-zero, when the energy of the reactants is below the potential energy of the barrier. Due to the non-classical nature (i.e, momentum uncertainty) of vibrational states this is, however......, not a sufficient condition in order to establish genuine tunneling as a result of quantum dynamics. This proposition is illustrated for a two-dimensional model potential describing dissociative sticking of N-2 on Ru(s). It is suggested that the remarkable heavy atom tunneling, found in this system, is related...

  20. Reaction rates for neutrino processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalitin, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some integrals involved in neutrino processes are evaluated by transformation to a special system of reference - usually to the center of mass system (CM). Rather simple analytic expressions are obtained for reaction rates and, though less simple, for moments. An interesting result thus obtained is for an isotropic interaction (in CM) of a neutrino with a monoenergetic isotropic gas of extreme relativistic electrons: it is found that the probability of the scattered neutrino to have energy in a certain range is independent of this energy. (Auth.)