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Sample records for tomography magnetic resonance

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  2. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked increases in clinical demand for these imaging modalities are straining healthcare expenditure and threatening health system sustainability. The number of CT and MRI scans requested in ...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalpe, I.O.

    1984-01-01

    A brief survey of the working principle of the NMR technique in diagnostical medicine is given. Its clinical usefulness for locating tumors, diagnosing various other diseases, such as some mental illnesses and multiple sclerosis, and its possibilities for studying biochemical processes in vivo are mentioned. The price of NMR image scanners and the problems of the strong magnetic field around the machines are mentioned

  4. Magnetic resonance tomography in confirmed multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Dickmann, E.; Beyer, H.K.; Gehlen, W.; Josef-Hospital, Bochum; Knappschafts-Krankenhaus Bochum

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on 21 cases of confirmed multiple sclerosis examined by both CT and magnetic resonance tomography. To safeguard the results, strict criteria were applied in accordance with the suggestions made by neurological work teams. Pathological lesons were seen in 20 patients; the MR image did not reveal anything abnormal in one case. On the average, 10.3 lesions were seen in the MR tomogram, whereas CT images showed on the average only 2.1 foci. The size and number of lesions in the MR tomogram were independent of the duration of the disease, the presented clinical symptoms, or the type of treatment at the time of examination. Evidently the sensitivity of MR tomography is very high in MS patients, but it has not yet been clarified to what extent this applies also to the specificity. Further research is mandatory. First experiences made by us show that lesions of a similar kind can also occur in diseases such as malignant lymphoma involving the brain, in vitamin B 12 deficiency syndrome, or encephalitis, and can become manifest in the MR tomogram. (orig.) [de

  5. Gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, L.; Imhof, H.; Stiglbauer, R.; Kramer, J.; Wimberger, D.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography was performed on 158 patients with different indications before and after the administration of contrast medium. The MR examination included various plain T 1 and T 2 weighted spin echo sequences as well as T 1 weighted examinations after intravenous application of gadolinium-DTPA ('Magnevist', Schering AG) in a dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The following conclusions were drawn: The sensitivity of MR in detecting brain tumors, acoustic neuromas and pituitary adenomas was improved considerably after the administration of 'Magnevist'. To diagnose the type of tumor, the criteria which apply to Gd-DPTA are similar to those used for iodine-containing contrast medium in CT. In about 2/3 rds of the cases, delineation of pathological tissues from surrounding edema and normal structures was better than in plain films. Hence, accurate, pretherapeutic staging of bronchial carcinomas and an exact definition of the expansion of the malignancies in the muscle-skeleton system were possible. In respect of tumors in the region of the base of the skull, we could omit T 2 -weighted sequences without noticeable loss of diagnostically relevant information; the examination time could thus be shortened by about 12 minutes. (orig.) [de

  6. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed.

  8. Contemporary imaging: Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, H.I.; Higgins, C.; Ring, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to discussing the most recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and the vast array of interventional procedures, this book explores the appropriate clinical applications of each of these important modalities

  9. Magnetic resonance tomography of the temporo-mandibular joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Burgener, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    79 patients aged 6 to 66 years (9 men and 70 women) with abnormalities of the TMJs were examined by magnetic resonance tomography (132 joints) and the results were compared with CT (16 joints) and resonance tomography showed forward luxation of the meniscus in 82 joints (62%). In 34 joints (26%) the meniscus spontaneously resumed normal position when the mouth was open, but in 48 joints (36%) the displacement was permanent. The accuracy of resonance tomography was equal to that of arthrography and superior to CT. It was particularly suitable for follow-up examination after surgery (23 cases) when invasive arthrography would be contraindicated or difficult. Because of the high resolution of the soft tissue components in the TMJ, resonance tomography should be able to diagnose inflammatory and degenerative changes in the meniscus and ligaments. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance tomography of the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tscholakoff, D.

    1987-01-01

    In this experimental study (canine heart) a variety of pathologic conditions of the myocardium were studied using ECG-triggered magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to examine the MR appearance and the T/sub 2/ relaxation times of occlusive and reperfused myocardial infarcts, of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and of cardiac transplants with and without acute cardiac allograft rejection. MR images were correlated with the results of histology and tissue water content. MRI identified normal myocardium with T/sub 2/ values of 38 (+-4.3) msec. Myocardial infarcts and acute allograft rejection had significant (p<0.05) longer T/sub 2/ values compared to normal myocardium. On the basis of T/sub 2/ relaxation times no further differentiation among different pathologic entities was possible. Therefore, it is necessary to include morphologic criteria such as myocardial wall thickness, cardiac chamber size and intracavitary blood flow signal in the interpretation of cardiac MR tomograms.

  11. Magnetic resonance tomography and ultrasound in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Czerny, C.; Trattnig, S.; Lack, W.; Machold, K.; Graninger, W.

    1996-01-01

    Technical innovations and software improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution sonography (US) have definitely influenced the diagnostic imaging of rheumatic diseases. For MRI, improvements in surface coils, dedicated low-field systems (0.2 T), and software improvements (shorter acquisition times and refinements of fat suppressing techniques) must be mentioned. For sonography, the main innovations concern the development of higher transducer frequencies (7-15 Mhz) and power Doppler imaging. Clinical evaluations have shown that MRI and US are most useful in cases of suspected rheumatic disease with negative plain film radiographs and for documenting the course of the disease, diagnosing of early rheumatoid arthritis, making a differential diagnosis in clinically unclear rheumatic diseases, investigating vascularization, and quantifying pannus formation. In order to improve diagnostic efficacy the role of MRI and US in the management of patients with rheumatic disease should be reconsidered. (orig.) [de

  12. Magnetic resonance tomography of renal allografts - Diagnostic possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, C.; Luening, M.

    1988-01-01

    It is the aim of the use of magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) to reduce the existing insufficiency in imaging diagnostics of complications after kidney transplantation. The topical status of examination technique is presented and the criteria of normal and pathological MRT findings are described in detail. (author)

  13. Selection of planes in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype aiming to obtain images in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was developed, by adjusting NMR spectrometer in the IFQSC Laboratory. The techniques for selecting planes were analysed by a set of computer codes, which were elaborated from Bloch equation solutions to simulate the spin system behaviour. Images were obtained using planes with thickness inferior to 1 cm. (M.C.K.)

  14. Use of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjoerstad, K.

    1992-01-01

    This is a neurologist's opinion on how computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have improved the doctor's diagnostic possibilities, changed patient/doctor relationship and increased the patients' expectations from diagnostic tests. How should the often conflicting interests of patients, society and doctors be handled? 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital, University of Berne, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology Inselspital, Berne (Switzerland); Endel, Gottfried [Main Association of Austrian Social Insurance Institutions, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas; Endel, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  17. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.A.; Kim, E.E.; Tresukosol, D.; Kudelka, A.P.; Edwards, C.L.; Kavanagh, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Technical competence in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Azevedo Filho, Clerio Francisco de; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Pinto, Ibraim Marciarelli Francisco; Lopes, Marly Maria Uellendahl; Schvartzman, Paulo Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography have evolved as very practical and useful techniques applied in clinical cardiology. Due to their rapid acceptance in the cardiology community and widespread use, training of both cardiologists and radiologists on this subspecialty has not been homogeneous so far. This in part explains significant differences observed in the diverse background found in today’s practicing physicians who execute these exams. In order to guide training facilities as well as both payers, contractors and general cardiologists ordering the exam, this document provides a minimum standard that should be accomplished by all physicians who pursue education in the field and for those who already practice in it. The clinical competences listed in this statement are by no means thorough but should be required by all those involved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography as the customary requirements for current and future practitioners. (author)

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography in Hallervorden-Spatz's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.; Bauer, M.; Seiderer, M.; Rath, M.

    1984-01-01

    Two patients (mother and son) with Hallervorden-Spatz's syndrome were examined both via CT and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), using different measuring modes. In the patient with progressing disease pathological findings were seen in the right and left putamen with CT and NMR. All examinations in the mother with a less progressive syndrome were without any result. Information obtained via NMR did not yield significantly more relevant data than computed tomography. (orig.) [de

  20. Magnetic resonance tomography in comprehensive examination of epileptic children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akberov, R.F.; Mikhajlov, I.M.; Chernova, G.G.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presets the results of examining 100 children suffering from various epilepsies by magnetic resonance tomography, which determined a morphological substrate of the disease in 26%. The findings were compared with the clinical picture and the results of routine study tools (skull X-ray, EEC). The diagnostic value of the techniques applied was defined. Jt is concluded that a set of diagnostic tools rather than individual techniques should be applied to reveal etiological and pathogenetic factors of the disease. 5 refs., 6 figs

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-12-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla. (orig.) [de

  3. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  4. Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) for lesions of the temporal lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Felix, R.; Meencke, H.J.; Freie Univ. Berlin; Freie Univ. Berlin

    1985-01-01

    A comparative study between magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) and CT was carried out in 16 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The MRT studies were performed on a 0.35 T Magnetom with T.1 modes in a coronal plane. MRT proved to the superior to CT. CT demonstrated a discrete temporal lobe lesion in three patients and MRT in four patients. In addition, unilateral atrophy of the temporal lobe was demonstrated by MRT in six cases; these could not be diagnosed by CT. The lack of artifacts near the skull base, the possibility of producing coronal sections and the excellent tissue differential of MRT provide the basis for improved diagnosis of lesions in the temporal lobes. (orig.) [de

  5. Correlative neuroanatomy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.

    1984-01-01

    Since the development of computed tomography (CT) more than a decade ago, still another form of imaging has become available that provides displays of normal and abnormal human structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is given complete coverage in this book. It describes both CT and MR anatomy that explains basic principles and the current status of imaging the brain and spine. The author uses three-dimensional concepts to provide the reader with a simple means to compare the main structures of the brain, skull and spine. Combining normal, gross neuroanatomic illustrations with CT and MR images of normal and abnormal conditions, the book provides diagnostic guidance. Drawings, photographs and radiologic images are used to help

  6. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Features of Renal Ewing Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekram, T.; Elsayes, K.M.; Cohan, R.H.; Francis, I.R.

    2008-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a rare malignant tumor that primarily involves long and flat bones but can develop in almost any bone or soft tissue. ES accounts for 2.3-3.5% of tumors in patients under the age of 19, and is rarely found in the adult population. Sarcomas, in general, account for less than 1% of tumors in adults. Several reports of renal ES have been described in the pediatric population, but only a few cases have been described in the adult population. To the best of our knowledge, fewer than 10 cases of renal Ewing sarcoma in adults have been described in the English literature. None of these cases described the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman, including CT and MRI characteristics

  7. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  8. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic resonance vs. computerized tomography, ultrasonic examinations and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, J.

    1985-01-01

    A symposium on magnetic resonance in nuclear medicine was held from 23rd to 27th January, 1985 in Munich and Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Discussed were suitable methods, the use of contrast media, the evaluation of results, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance in examining various body organs, and the latest apparatus. NMR achievements in medicine were compared to those by other diagnostic methods. (M.D.)

  10. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the normal equine carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser-Hotz, B.; Sartoretti-Schefer, S.; Weiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    A normal equine carpus was used for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The structures outlined were identified and described. The two techniques were compared. This anatomic description could be helpful as a basis for clinical exams

  11. Evaluation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors by multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Fabiano Elias; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Pelizon, Christina Helena de Toledo

    2005-01-01

    This article presents three cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical manifestations and pathological features, along with differential diagnoses, with special emphasis on multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. (author)

  12. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...

  13. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography and computed tomography of the brain for diagnosing Wilson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenbrock, D.; Straube, A.; Beyer, H.K.; Leopold, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The authors report on two woman patients with confirmed Wilson's desease (hepatolenticular degeneration) who had neurological deficits and showed typical changes evident from laboratory data. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance tomography revealed degenerative changes in the basal ganglia, especially of the lenticular nucleus, MR showing these defects more clearly than CT. There was a noticeable symmetrical enhancement of signals in the lenticular nucleus which was particularly evident on the image basing on the T 2 (spin-spin relaxation time constant) values. MR could be superior to CT with regard to showing up pathological changes in the basal ganglia. The future indication of MR could be the establishment of an exact correlation between clinical signs and symptoms on the one hand, and morphological findings on the other. Over and above this, it should be explored to what extent MR can already detect degenerative changes in the brain in primarily hepatic types of the disease even without prior neurological examination. (orig.) [de

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in vascular surgical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelzang, R.L.; Fisher, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is now universally accepted as an extremely useful tool in the investigation of disease throughout the body. CT has revolutionized the practice of medicine in virtually every specialty. In vascular surgery the routine use of CT in a variety of problems has changed the way diagnoses are made. It allows prompt recognition of conditions that were difficult if not impossible to diagnose using older techniques. Nowhere is this concept better epitomized than in the realm of vascular surgical emergencies. In these cases, life or limb threatening conditions such as hemorrhage, prosthetic graft infection, or vascular occlusion exist as the result of aneurysm, trauma, dissection, tumor, or previous arterial surgery. Prompt and appropriate diagnosis of the immediate problem and its cause is afforded by the use of contrast enhanced CT. This frequently obviates the need for angiography and eliminates less accurate tests such as plain films, barium studies, nuclear medicine scans, and/or ultrasound. In the past several years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body has become a practical reality. The technique offers promise in the imaging of many disease processes. In the neural axis it has become a preferred modality due to inherently higher contrast resolution and freedom from artifacts. Progress in body imaging has been slower due to problems with motion artifact but early results in cardiovascular imaging demonstrate that MRI offers theoretical advantages over CT that may make it the imaging test of choice in vascular disease. This paper identifies those vascular surgical emergencies in which CT and MRI are most useful and clarifies and illustrates the diagnostic features of the various conditions encountered

  16. Sensitivity analysis of magnetic field measurements for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Cihan; Scheffler, Klaus; Ehses, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical use of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) still requires significant sensitivity improvements. Here, the measurement of the current-induced magnetic field (DBz,c) is improved using systematic efficiency analyses and optimization of multi-echo spin echo...... (MESE) and steady-state free precession free induction decay (SSFP-FID) sequences. Theory and Methods: Considering T1, T2, and T 2 relaxation in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the MR magnitude images, the efficiency of MESE and SSFP-FID MREIT experiments, and its dependence on the sequence...

  17. Attenuation correction for flexible magnetic resonance coils in combined magnetic resonance/positron emission tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Mootaz; Bini, Jason; Calcagno, Claudia; Robson, Philip M; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A

    2014-02-01

    Attenuation correction for magnetic resonance (MR) coils is a new challenge that came about with the development of combined MR and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This task is difficult because such coils are not directly visible on either PET or MR acquisitions with current combined scanners and are therefore not easily localized in the field of view. This issue becomes more evident when trying to localize flexible MR coils (eg, cardiac or body matrix coil) that change position and shape from patient to patient and from one imaging session to another. In this study, we proposed a novel method to localize and correct for the attenuation and scatter of a flexible MR cardiac coil, using MR fiducial markers placed on the surface of the coil to allow for accurate registration of a template computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation map. To quantify the attenuation properties of the cardiac coil, a uniform cylindrical water phantom injected with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) was imaged on a sequential MR/PET system with and without the flexible cardiac coil. After establishing the need to correct for the attenuation of the coil, we tested the feasibility of several methods to register a precomputed attenuation map to correct for the attenuation. To accomplish this, MR and CT visible markers were placed on the surface of the cardiac flexible coil. Using only the markers as a driver for registration, the CT image was registered to the reference image through a combination of rigid and deformable registration. The accuracy of several methods was compared for the deformable registration, including B-spline, thin-plate spline, elastic body spline, and volume spline. Finally, we validated our novel approach both in phantom and patient studies. The findings from the phantom experiments indicated that the presence of the coil resulted in a 10% reduction in measured 18F-FDG activity when compared with the phantom-only scan. Local underestimation reached 22% in

  18. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  19. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of hepatic hemangioma compared with enhanced computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Tateyama, Akihiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Takumi, Koji; Shindo, Toshikazu; Kumagae, Yuichi; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To clarify features of hepatic hemangiomas on gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with enhanced computed tomography (CT).

  20. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease: pictorial essay focused on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPMUnifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The present study was aimed at describing key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain derived from pelvic inflammatory disease. Two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in patients with proven pelvic inflammatory disease leading to presentation of acute abdomen. Main findings included presence of intracavitary fluid collections, anomalous enhancement of the pelvic excavation and densification of adnexal fat planes. Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the leading causes of abdominal pain in women of childbearing age and it has been increasingly been diagnosed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging supplementing the role of ultrasonography. It is crucial that radiologists become familiar with the main sectional imaging findings in the diagnosis of this common cause of acute abdomen (author)

  1. Ectopic pregnancy: pictorial essay focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM-Unifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis; Cardia, Patricia Prando, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Centro Radiologico Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The objective of the present study is to describe key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain caused by ectopic pregnancy. For this purpose, two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed in female patients with acute abdominal pain caused by proven ectopic pregnancy in the period between January 2010 and December 2011. The imaging diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy is usually obtained by ultrasonography, however, with the increasing use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of patients with acute abdomen of gynecological origin it is necessary that the radiologist becomes familiar with the main findings observed at these diagnostic methods. (author)

  2. Ectopic pregnancy: pictorial essay focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to describe key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain caused by ectopic pregnancy. For this purpose, two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed in female patients with acute abdominal pain caused by proven ectopic pregnancy in the period between January 2010 and December 2011. The imaging diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy is usually obtained by ultrasonography, however, with the increasing use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of patients with acute abdomen of gynecological origin it is necessary that the radiologist becomes familiar with the main findings observed at these diagnostic methods. (author)

  3. Development of nuclear magnetic resonance tomography technology - TORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannus, A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of hardware and software necessary to implement the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques is described. The major subjects were the construction of an aquisition and control system which allowed the operation of a pulsed Fourier NMR spectrometer as a NMR Tomograph; further it was oriented the developing of a NMR spectrometer whose parameters could be easily reconfigured by the controlling system. As a result a sofisticated equipment which allows, more than the proposed, working with high resolution spectroscopic techniques and spectroscopy in solids, was obtained. Since the basic techniques employed in NMR and CT Tomographs are well known, a great emphasis was also given on the understanding of the image reconstruction techniques that constitutes today the frontier of research in this area. The results obtained with the system described here are considered good, comparable to the results from commercial units developed in cooperation with imaging groups located in universities abroad. (author) [pt

  4. The use of magnetic resonance tomography in gastrointestinal diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geitung, Jonn Terje

    2000-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising method for examination of the gastrointestinal tract. In this article we present the present status and potential of MRI. Material and method: The review is based on personal experience and selected published, international papers. Results: Magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) and MRI of the liver are well documented examinations which are widely performed. These examinations partly replace existing modalities such as CT and ERCP and represent additional possibilities for examining this anatomic area. MRI is not as yet accepted as the standard examination of the pancreas, but it is regarded as comparable to CT. The adrenals may be examined even more accurately with MRI than with CT. MRI examinations of the oesophagus and gastric ventricle seem promising, but it should be said that they are in an early and not well document phase. MRI of the small and large bowels is not common. With the exception of preoperative staging of rectal cancers, it is still experimental. MR angiography, functional MRI studies and perfusion studies are not yet common in abdominal diseases. We may, however, believe that they will become important diagnostic tools. Interpretation: MRI is rapidly increasing its share of gastrointestinal imaging examinations. This is mainly due to the increased speed of newer machines. The diagnostic quality has improved and will improve more. It is thus likely that MRI will, in a large amount of abdominal imaging, replace CT and to some extent other diagnostic modalities. It is, however, not possible to replace CT for emergencies and we will probably look forward to more and better imaging with more diagnostic modalities in the future

  5. The magnetic field gradients generation for magnetic resonance tomography; Generacja gradientow pola magnetyczbego dla tomografii MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, A.; Skorka, T.; Kwiecinski, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    To obtain three-dimensional images in the computerized tomography a gradient of magnetic field should be generated. In this paper the analytical as well as computerized calculations of magnetic coils for such purposes are presented. 4 refs, 8 figs.

  6. Transection of the pituitary stalk: evaluation of two cases by computerized tomography and magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, L.L.F. do; Mendonca, R.A.; Natal, M.R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present two cases of pituitary dwarfism where the study by high resolution computed tomography and by magnetic resonance imaging show transection of the pituitary stalk as the cause of the endocrine disturb. The importance of these methods on the investigation of disturbs of the hypothalamus-hypophyseal axis is stressed. (author)

  7. Correlation of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcome in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Namik; Ozcam, Giray; Kosar, Pinar; Ozcan, Ayse; Basar, Hulya; Kaymak, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas for humans and is still a silent killer in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this case series was to evaluate early radiological images as a predictor of subsequent neuropsychological sequelae, following carbon monoxide poisoning. After carbon monoxide exposure, early computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 52-year-old woman showed bilateral lesions in the globus pallidus. This patient was discharged and followed for 90 days. The patient recovered without any neurological sequela. In a 58-year-old woman exposed to carbon monoxide, computed tomography showed lesions in bilateral globus pallidus and periventricular white matter. Early magnetic resonance imaging revealed changes similar to that like in early tomography images. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital. On the 27th day of exposure, the patient developed disorientation and memory impairment. Late magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse hyperintensity in the cerebral white matter. White matter lesions which progress to demyelination and end up in neuropsychological sequelae cannot always be diagnosed by early computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in carbon monoxide poisoning. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of computer tomography and magnetic resonance tomography in the diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, S.; Elste, V.; Sartor, K.; Reith, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Muenchen Univ.

    1999-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Stroke symptoms are caused in 10 to 15% by intracerebral hemorrhage. From the clinical examination it is often impossible to differentiate intracerebralhemorrhage from cerebral ischemia. To exclude intracerebral hemorrhage as the cause of clinical symptoms a CT is usually performed. The aim of our study was a direct comparison of the sensitivity of Computed Tomography and MRI using different MR sequences for the detection of acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods: In 8 male Wistar rats intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by infusion of collagenase into the caudate nucleus. After 1 hour the brains were subsequently imaged with CT and MRI using T2- and T1-weighted Spin Echo sequences, diffusion-weighted sequences, T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences and FLAIR-sequences. Visibility of the intracerebral hemorrhage was examined using a scoring system for 1=not visible to 5=excellent visible. Finally, the intracerebral hemorrhage was verified by histological staining. Results: In all animals, intracerebral hemorrhage was visible in T2*-weighted gradient echo and diffusion weighted MR images 1 h after infusion of collagenase. T2- and PD-weighted SE images were positive in 7/8 rats. T1-weighted images revealed signal changes in 5/8 rats, and FLAIR sequence was positive in 8/8 rats. In CT intracerebral hemorrhage was only visible in 3/8 rats. When measuring the increase of Hounsfield units within the suspected hemisphere we saw a mean increase of 7% compared to the normal hemisphere in 3/8 rats. Conclusions: In this animal model, T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging proved to be the most sensitive imaging modality in the detection of acute intracerebral hemorrhage and is by far more sensitive than CT. (orig.) [de

  9. Spectrum of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Murakami, Koji; Kaji, Yasushi; Kita, Masato; Suzuki, Kayo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a variety of benign, malignant, and borderline malignant ovarian tumors. It is advantageous to become familiar with the wide variety of FDG-PET/CT findings of this entity. Benign ovarian tumors generally have faint uptake, whereas endometriomas, fibromas, and teratomas show mild to moderate uptake. Malignant ovarian tumors generally have intense uptake, whereas tumors with a small solid component often show minimal uptake.

  10. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging aspects of hemorrhagic strokes in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Zardo, Karen Maciel; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos; Campos, Lidice Araujo; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, veterinary medicine has made great technological advances, allowing, thus, aid in the diagnosis of many diseases that resulted in increased animals life expectancy. As a result of this new situation, there was an increase of older animals clinical care. Thus, illnesses considered unusual in the past, began to be better identified, as is the case of strokes. Recently, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have been used as aid tools in the diagnosis of many diseases, enabling the identification and evaluation of the central nervous tissue lesions. Information is provided regarding the size, shape and location of the lesion, and the magnitude of tissue compression and its side effects. This review aims to present the main aspects of hemorrhagic strokes in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in dogs. (author)

  11. Technical competence in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography; Competencia tecnica em ressonancia e tomografia cardiovascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Azevedo Filho, Clerio Francisco de; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Pinto, Ibraim Marciarelli Francisco; Lopes, Marly Maria Uellendahl; Schvartzman, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: jlaraf@fcm.unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP/GERT) SP (Brazil). Grupo de Estudo em Ressonancia e Tomografia Cardiovascular

    2009-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography have evolved as very practical and useful techniques applied in clinical cardiology. Due to their rapid acceptance in the cardiology community and widespread use, training of both cardiologists and radiologists on this subspecialty has not been homogeneous so far. This in part explains significant differences observed in the diverse background found in today’s practicing physicians who execute these exams. In order to guide training facilities as well as both payers, contractors and general cardiologists ordering the exam, this document provides a minimum standard that should be accomplished by all physicians who pursue education in the field and for those who already practice in it. The clinical competences listed in this statement are by no means thorough but should be required by all those involved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance and computed tomography as the customary requirements for current and future practitioners. (author)

  12. Kaposi sarcoma related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: hepatic findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Daniel Nobrega da; Viana, Publio Cesar Cavalcante; Maciel, Rosangela Pereira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Mello Santiago [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: dnobrega@gmail.com

    2008-03-15

    Kaposi sarcoma is a neoplasm associated with immunosuppressive conditions, and involving blood and lymphatic vessels. It is the most frequent intrahepatic neoplasm in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrate multiple small nodules, prominence and contrast-enhancement of periportal branches due to the presence of the neoplastic tissue. The authors report a case of a 47-year-old male patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome presenting disseminated Kaposi sarcoma. (author)

  13. Migrational disorders: a review of 13 cases. Computed tomography and Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado Junior, M.A.; Barbosa, V.A.; Puglio, N.; Bastos, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The authors reviewed 13 cases of migrational disorders using Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They found a large advantage of MRI in relation to CT, mainly, to study Schizencephaly, because MRI is more efficient way to demonstrate that the margins of the clefts are lined by cortical and make reliable differentiation with Porencephalic cysts. The relationship of the pathological anatomy to theories of pathogenesis is emphasized. No abnormal findings was detected in the process of Myelinization. (author)

  14. Evaluation of parapharyngeal space by computerized tomography and magnetic resonance. Part 1: anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Rapoport, Abrao

    1994-01-01

    The authors, through a comprehensive review of the literature, intend to establish an anatomical concept of the parapharyngeal space and its surroundings spaces in the supra-hyoid neck, based on its division by the fascial planes. The correlation between the anatomically defined parapharyngeal space and the findings of the sectional imaging procedures (computed tomography and magnetic resonance) is established, evidencing clear anatomic-radiologic correspondence. (author)

  15. Computed Tomography Perfusion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Histopathological Findings After Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation: An In Vivo Pig Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Graumann, Ole

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates how computed tomography perfusion scans and magnetic resonance imaging correlates with the histopathological alterations in renal tissue after cryoablation. A total of 15 pigs were subjected to laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation on both kidneys. After intervention...... of follow-up, but on microscopic examination, the urothelium was found to be intact in all cases. In conclusion, cryoablation effectively destroyed renal parenchyma, leaving the urothelium intact. Both computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging reflect the microscopic findings...

  16. Myocardial blood flow quantification for evaluation of coronary artery disease by positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Alfonso H; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2014-05-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications.

  17. Imaging in hematology. Part 2: Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhechev, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A dramatic increase of the role of imaging in diagnosis of blood diseases occurred with the development of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At present CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is routinely employed in diagnostic and staging evaluation. The bone marrow may be imaged by one of several methods, including scintigraphy, CT and MRI. Nuclear imaging at diagnosis can clarify findings of uncertain significance on conventional staging and may be very useful in the setting of large masses to follow responses to therapy nad to evaluate the residual tumor in a large mass that has responded to treatment. Recent developments such as helical CT, single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have continued to advance diagnosis and therapy

  18. Ultrasound appearance of radiation-induced hepatic injury. Correlation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garra, B.S.; Shawker, T.H.; Chang, R.; Kaplan, K.; White, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ultrasound findings in three cases of radiation-induced hepatic injury are described and compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Fatty infiltration of the liver was present in two of the cases in which concurrent chemotherapy was being administered. On ultrasound B-scans, the regions of radiation injury were hypoechoic relative to the remainder of the liver. This finding was more obvious in the patients with fatty livers. CT scans on the patients with fatty infiltrated livers showed higher attenuation in the irradiated region than in unexposed liver. In the patient where no fatty infiltration was present, the radiated section of liver had lower attenuation consistent with previous reports. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decreased signal in the exposed areas on T1 weighted images

  19. Occult primary tumors of the head and neck: accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, S. A.; Balm, A. J.; Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Hoefnagel, C. A.; Hilgers, F. J.; Tan, I. B.; Pameijer, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography (thallium SPECT) and computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) in the detection of occult primary tumors of the head and neck. Study of diagnostic tests. National Cancer Institute, Amsterdam,

  20. Elastofibroma dorsi: computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, A.; Bravo, F.; Garrido, J.; Ortega, R.

    2001-01-01

    The elastofibroma dorse is a benign, nonencapsulated pseudotumor consisting of a proliferation of fibrous tissue and elastic fibers accompanied by fatty tissue. It is usually locate in the scapular region and can be unilateral or bilateral. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings are characteristic and, in the proper clinical context, practically pathognomonic: a fat-containing subcapsular mass with an attenuation coefficient and signal intensity similar to those of the adjacent muscles. We report two new cases of elastofibroma dorsi that fulfilled all the clinical and radiologic criteria, enabling the preoperative diagnosis. (Author) 15 refs

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography - an additive method complementary to ultrasonographic diagnosis of fetal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloechle, M.; Bollmann, R.; Zienert, A.; Kalache, K.; Koerner, H.; Tennstedt, C.; Ivanow, S.

    1992-01-01

    A case of prenatal sonographic diagnosis of polycystic renal degeneration is reported in this paper. With oligophydramnion established, the extent of the malformation could not be reliable diagnosed by means of sonography. It was also not possible to determine safely whether both kidneys were affected by malformation or if one possibly intact kidney was superimposed by one with dysplasia. In addition, the urinary bladder could not be sonographically delineated with reliability. Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) was thus performed as an additional modality to complete the fetal diagnosis. The results thus obtained and the role of MRI in prenatal diagnosis and therapy are discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction of positron emission tomography data in PET/MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view (FoV). MR-AC methods can be divided into three main categories: segmentation-, atlas- and PET-based. This review aims to...

  3. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Myoepitheliloma in the Soft Palate: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu; Park, Mi Ja; Jang, Dong Sik

    2011-01-01

    We report the appearance of myoepithelioma arising from minor salivary glands in the soft palate observed on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT, the tumor was round with a smooth and partial lobulating contour, and slightly marginal contrast enhancement. On T1-weighted images, the mass had heterogeneous iso-signal intensity compared to the pharyngeal muscle. Additionally, the tumor had heterogeneously high T2 signal intensity with heterogeneously strong enhancement on the Gd-enhanced T1-weighted image. Radiologists should consider myoepithelioma in the radiological differential diagnosis of soft palate tumors.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares [Clinica Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Radiologia; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique [Associacao Brasileira de Odontologia de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Especializacao em Disfuncao Temporomandibular e Dor Orofacial

    2008-09-15

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint: beyond dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Machado, Karina Freitas Soares; Mascarenhas, Marcelo Henrique

    2008-01-01

    Several diseases should be considered in the differential diagnosis of disorders affecting the temporomandibular joints. Internal derangement is the main condition responsible for pain related to this joint. Clinical signs may, though, be quite non-specific, and many other conditions present with similar and not infrequently indistinguishable signs and symptoms. In the present study, the authors describe several non-dysfunctional conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints through computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing the importance of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of inflammatory, neoplastic and traumatic diseases of this region. Considering that clinical presentations are frequently non-specific, radiologists play a critical role in the differential diagnosis. (author)

  6. Comparative study of ultrasound imaging, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hisaaki; Hoshihara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Mitsunao; Suda, Yoshio; Takenaka, Eiichi; Sasa, Hidenori.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 18 patients who were operated at the National Defense Medical College Hospital and confirmed by pathological diagnosis. We compared ultrasound imaging, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patients. MRI was useful to diagnose enlargement of the uterine cavity and a small amount of ascites and to understand orientation of the pelvic organs. Ultrasound imaging is the most useful examination to diagnose gynecological diseases. But when it is difficult to diagnose by ultrasound imaging alone, we should employ either CT or MRI, or preferably both. (author)

  7. Ultrasonography, angiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance in nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarche, C.; Pelletier, G.; Attali, P.; Ladouch-Badre, A.; Fabre, M.; Roche, A.; Etienne, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and angiographic abnormalities of nodular regenerative hyperplasia have been described in very few cases. We report here the case of a 50-year-old man with round, well-limited hypoechogenic lesions involving the two lobes of the liver, and hypervascular, poorly delineated angiographic lesions. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance of the liver were normal. Histological examination of large liver specimens provided by intraoperative biopsy allowed the diagnosis of nodular regenerative hyperplasia. Such a pseudo-tumoral ultrasonographic and angiographic pattern must be recognized in order to avoid diagnostic and therapeutic mistakes, especially since percutaneous liver biopsy usually fails to diagnose this disease. (author)

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  9. Malignant tumors of the nasal cavity: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Paes Junior, Ademar Jose de Oliveira; Gonzalez, Fabio Mota; Cordeiro, Flamarion de Barros; Yamashiro, Ilka; Lenh, Carlos Neutzling; Rapoport, Abrao

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the characterization of deep tissue extension of malignant tumors of the nasal cavity. Twelve patients diagnosed with malignant tumors of the nasal cavity were retrospectively evaluated at the Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Head and Neck Surgery of the 'Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis', Sao Paulo, Brazil, between 1990 and 2000. All cases were confirmed by histopathologic examination. The results were: extension to the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses was identified in six patients, extension to contralateral nasal cavity, orbit and lamina cribosa in five patients, extension to nasal pharynx and masticator space in two patients, extension to cavernous sinus, anterior/middle cranial fossa, pterygomaxillary fossa, inferior/superior orbital fissure, frontal sinus, contralateral ethmoid sinus, contralateral lamina cribosa, hard palate and pterygopalatine fossa in one patient. Conclusion: It is important to precisely assess the local extension and spread of tumor by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in order to plan the approach to treatment, which will influence the prognosis. (author)

  10. Value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis of central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, I.; Sicinska, J.; Szymanska, E.; Rudnicka, L.; Furmanek, M.; Walecki, J.; Olszewska, M.; Rudnicka, L.; Walecki, J.

    2006-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by vascular abnormalities and fibrotic changes in skin and internal organs. The aim of the study was to investigate involvement of the central nervous system in systemic sclerosis and the value of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of central nervous system involvement in systemic sclerosis. 26 patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms in the course of systemic sclerosis were investigated for central nervous system abnormalities by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among these 26 symptomatic patients lesions in brain MRI and CT examinations were present in 54% and in 50% patients respectively. Most common findings (in 46% of all patients), were symptoms of cortical and subcortical atrophy, seen in both, MRI and CT. Single and multiple focal lesions, predominantly in the white matter, were detected by MRI significantly more frequently as compared to CT (62% and 15% patients respectively). These data indicate that brain involvement is common in patients with severe systemic sclerosis. MRI shows significantly higher than CT sensitivity in detection focal brain lesions in these patients. (author)

  11. A comparison of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of palmar process fractures in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneps, A.J.; Koblik, P.D.; Freeman, D.M.; Pool, R.R.; O'Brien, T.R.

    1995-01-01

    The relative sensitivity of radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting palmar process fractures of the distal phalanx in foals was determined and the imaging findings were compared with histomorphologic evaluations of the palmar processes. Compared to radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not improve the sensitivity for detection of palmar process fractures. Statistical agreement for palmar process fracture diagnosis was excellent among the three imaging modalities. Histomorphologic evaluations were more sensitive for diagnosis of palmar process fracture than any of the imaging modalities. Three-dimensional image reconstructions and volume measurements of distal phalanges and palmar process fracture fragments from computed tomography studies provided more complete anatomical information than radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed that the deep digital flexor tendon insertion on the distal phalanx is immediately axial to the site where palmar process fractures occur, and differentiated cartilage, bone, and soft tissue structures of the hoof

  12. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Temporomandibular Joint in Two Normal Camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Arencibia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance (MR image features of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and associated structures in two mature dromedary camels were obtained with a third-generation equipment CT and a superconducting magnet RM at 1.5 Tesla. Images were acquired in sagittal and transverse planes. Medical imaging processing with imaging software was applied to obtain postprocessing CT and MR images. Relevant anatomic structures were identified and labelled. The resulting images provided excellent anatomic detail of the TMJ and associated structures. Annotated CT and MR images from this study are intended as an anatomical reference useful in the interpretation for clinical CT and MR imaging studies of the TMJ of the dromedary camels.

  13. Magnetic resonance tomography for focal lesions in the liver using the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Roemer, T.; Felix, R.; Wolf, K.J.; Klinikum Charlottenburg, Berlin

    1986-01-01

    The use of the para-magnetic contrast medium gadolinium DTPA for magnetic resonance tomography of focal lesions in the liver was investigated in 31 patients. Two dosage schedules of the contrast medium (0.1 and 0.2 mmol/kg body weight) were used with field strengths of 0.35 and 0.5 Tesla. Using T 1 sequences, gadolinium DTPA showed increased signal intensity in the liver and in tumours, but this was significantly more marked in the tumour. On T 1 spin-echo sequences, previously iso-intense lesions became visible after administration of contrast. On the other hand, contrast-enhanced lesions were less well seen on inversion recovery sequences because of a reduction in the contrast between tumour and liver tissue. The contrast between tumour and liver tissue was not improved by gadolinium DTPA in comparison with precontrast inversion recovery sequences and T 2 spin-echo sequences. The perfusion of intra-hepatic tumours could be elucidated by magnetic resonance tomography after the administration of gadolinium DTPA. (orig.) [de

  14. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT): conductivity and current density imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the latest impedance imaging technique called Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) providing information on electrical conductivity and current density distributions inside an electrically conducting domain such as the human body. The motivation for this research is explained by discussing conductivity changes related with physiological and pathological events, electromagnetic source imaging and electromagnetic stimulations. We briefly summarize the related technique of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) that deals with cross-sectional image reconstructions of conductivity distributions from boundary measurements of current-voltage data. Noting that EIT suffers from the ill-posed nature of the corresponding inverse problem, we introduce MREIT as a new conductivity imaging modality providing images with better spatial resolution and accuracy. MREIT utilizes internal information on the induced magnetic field in addition to the boundary current-voltage measurements to produce three-dimensional images of conductivity and current density distributions. Mathematical theory, algorithms, and experimental methods of current MREIT research are described. With numerous potential applications in mind, future research directions in MREIT are proposed

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro de; Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; Santos, Alair Agusto Sarmet Moreira Damas dos; Nacif, Marcelo Souto, E-mail: diogocloliveira@hotmail.com, E-mail: diogocloliveira@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease and represents the main cause of sudden death in young patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods with high sensitivity and specificity, useful for the establishment of diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and for the screening of patients with subclinical phenotypes. The improvement of image analysis by CMR and CCT offers the potential to promote interventions aiming at stopping the natural course of the disease. This study aims to describe the role of RCM and CCT in the diagnosis and prognosis of HCM, and how these methods can be used in the management of these patients. (author)

  16. Bronchobiliary fistula after hemihepatectomy: cholangiopancreaticography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oettl, C.; Schima, W.; Metz-Schimmerl, S.; Fuegger, R.; Mayrhofer, T.; Herold, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    A bronchobiliary fistula (BBF), which is defined by an abnormal communication between the biliary system and the bronchial tree, is an uncommon complication after hemihepatectomy, trauma, hydatid disease, choledocholithiasis and other causes of biliary obstruction. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with colon cancer, who developed a BBF 2 months after right hemihepatectomy for liver metastases. The findings at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) included a stricture of the common bile duct and biliary leakage from the liver resection plane with biliary infiltration of the right lower lobe of the lung. The patient was treated successfully by endoscopic insertion of a biliary plastic stent which bridged the stricture and lead to closure of the fistula

  17. Basic setup for breast conductivity imaging using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Il; Oh, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae-Seong; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun

    2006-01-01

    We present a new medical imaging technique for breast imaging, breast MREIT, in which magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is utilized to get high-resolution conductivity and current density images of the breast. In this work, we introduce the basic imaging setup of the breast MREIT technique with an investigation of four different imaging configurations of current-injection electrode positions and pathways through computer simulation studies. Utilizing the preliminary findings of a best breast MREIT configuration, additional numerical simulation studies have been carried out to validate breast MREIT at different levels of SNR. Finally, we have performed an experimental validation with a breast phantom on a 3.0 T MREIT system. The presented results strongly suggest that breast MREIT with careful imaging setups could be a potential imaging technique for human breast which may lead to early detection of breast cancer via improved differentiation of cancerous tissues in high-resolution conductivity images

  18. Characteristics of Cranial Aneurysmal Bone Cyst on Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Ping Lin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign bone tumors that most commonly occur in people younger than 30 years. The cysts are most often found in the metaphyses of long bones and rarely affect the skull. We present a 54-year-old woman with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left occipital region that caused tenderness for 2 weeks. Computed tomography (CT revealed an expansile, osteolytic lesion with characteristic soap-bubble appearance and fluid-fluid levels. Magnetic resonance images showed a dark rim surrounding the lesion, as well as multilocular spaces with fluid-fluid levels. The tumor was soft, fragile, and pulsatile during surgery. The patient was treated with en bloc resection of the tumor with cranioplasty. Follow-up CT 5 months later showed no evidence of recurrence. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(3:255-259

  19. A role of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for cystic lung diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Jun; Shimotake, Takashi; Deguchi, Eiichi; Tokiwa, Kazuaki; Iwai, Naomi

    1995-01-01

    Fourteen children with cystic lung diseases were imaged using computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These patients studied included 7 patients with bronchogenic cyst of lung, 4 with pulmonary sequestration, 1 with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, 1 with lung abscess, and 1 with cystic bronchoectasis. MRI identified all lesions seen on the chest radiographs. It was particularly valuable delineating contents of bronchogenic cyst without the need for contrast material enhancement. However, MRI was not quite as sensitive as CT that detected very small abnormalities, because MRI had more artifacts than those of CT. In conclusion, we believe that both CT and MRI are needed for differential diagnosis of lung diseases in children. (author)

  20. A role of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for cystic lung diseases in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagihara, Jun; Shimotake, Takashi; Deguchi, Eiichi; Tokiwa, Kazuaki; Iwai, Naomi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    Fourteen children with cystic lung diseases were imaged using computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These patients studied included 7 patients with bronchogenic cyst of lung, 4 with pulmonary sequestration, 1 with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, 1 with lung abscess, and 1 with cystic bronchoectasis. MRI identified all lesions seen on the chest radiographs. It was particularly valuable delineating contents of bronchogenic cyst without the need for contrast material enhancement. However, MRI was not quite as sensitive as CT that detected very small abnormalities, because MRI had more artifacts than those of CT. In conclusion, we believe that both CT and MRI are needed for differential diagnosis of lung diseases in children. (author).

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Boldrini Assunção

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI and cardiac computed tomography (CCT are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complementarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction of positron emission tomography data in PET/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view (FoV). MR-AC methods can be divided into three main categories: segmentation-, atlas- and PET-based. This review aims to provide a comprehensive list of the state of the art MR-AC approaches as well as their pros and cons. The main sources of artifacts such as body-truncation, metallic implants and hardware correction will be presented. Finally, this review will discuss the current status of MR-AC approaches for clinical applications. PMID:26952727

  3. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for determining electric field distribution during electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranjc, Matej; Miklavcic, Damijan; Bajd, Franci; Serša, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon caused by externally applied electric field to cells that results in an increase of cell membrane permeability to various molecules. Accurate coverage of the tissue with a sufficiently large electric field presents one of the most important conditions for successful membrane permeabilization. Applications based on electroporation would greatly benefit with a method for monitoring the electric field, especially if it could be done in situ. As the membrane electroporation is a consequence of an induced transmembrane potential, which is directly proportional to the local electric field, we have been investigating current density imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography techniques to determine the electric field distribution during electroporation. In this paper, we present comparison of current density and electric field distribution in an agar phantom and in a liver tissue exposed to electroporation pulses. As expected, a region of increased electrical conductivity was observed in the liver tissue exposed to sufficiently high electric field but not in agar phantom.

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, Fernanda Boldrini; Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro de; Nacif, Marcelo Souto, E-mail: msnacif@gmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Medicina; Souza, Vitor Frauches [Complexo Hospitalar de Niteroi (CHN), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complimentarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies. (author)

  5. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Eduardo Lima da; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2015-05-15

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. (author)

  6. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Fabry Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Granqvist, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PATIENTS: Forty patients with Fabry disease (14 males, 26 females, age at inclusion: 10-66 years, median: 39 years) underwent a brain F-18-FDG-PET-scan at inclusion, and 31 patients were followed with FDG-PET biannually for up to seven years. All...... patients (except one) had a brain MRI-scan at inclusion, and 34 patients were followed with MRI biannually for up to nine years. IMAGE ANALYSIS: The FDG-PET-images were inspected visually and analysed using a quantitative 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection analysis (Neurostat). MRI images were...... also inspected visually and severity of white matter lesions (WMLs) was graded using a visual rating scale. RESULTS: In 28 patients brain-FDG-PET was normal; in 23 of these 28 patients brain MRI was normal--of the remaining five patients in this group, four patients had WMLs and one patient never had...

  7. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Angelo Del; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  8. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Angelo Del [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo e Universita di Milano, 20142 Milan (Italy); Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS H San Raffaele e Universita Vita e Salute, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Lucignani, Giovanni [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare c/o Ospedale L. Sacco, Via G.B. Grassi, 74, 20157 Milan (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) of intracranial tumours: Contrast versus T2-weighted tomograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Laniado, M.; Claussen, C.; Kazner, E.; Niendorf, H.P.; Felix, R.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was performed on 38 patients with intracranial tumours, before and after the administration of contrast, using a 0.35 T Magnetom. The MR examinations included various plain spin-echo sequences (SE 400/35, 800/35, 1600/35, 1600/70, 1600/105, 1600/120) as well as examinations after the iv-administration of gadolinium-DTPA (SE 800/35). On all occasions, the abnormalities were visible without contrast. Differentiation of tumour and its surroundings was possible in 19 out of 38 cases without contrast. Delineation of expansively growing tumours (eg. meningiomas) was possible in twelve out of 14 cases, but in only seven out of 24 cases with infiltrating tumours (eg. glioblastomas). On the other hand, clear differentiation between tumour and adjacent edema and normal brain, respectively, was possible in 35 out of 38 cases after Gadolinium-DTPA. (orig.) [de

  10. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the journal of nuclear cardiology in 2015. Part 1 of 2: Plaque imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, many original articles pertaining to cardiovascular imaging with impressive quality were published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. In a set of 2 articles, we provide an overview of these contributions to facilitate for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that occurred in the field over this year. In this first article, we focus on arterial plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. T cell homing to tumors detected by 3D-coordinated positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Ralf; Petersen, Mikkel; Petersen, Charlotte Christie

    2007-01-01

    of magnetic resonance imaging with the high sensitivity and spatial accuracy of positron emission tomography. We have used this technique, together with determination of tissue radioactivity, flow cytometry, and microscopy, to characterize and quantitate the specific accumulation of transferred CD8+ T cells...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as tools for the investigation of sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) teeth and eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Munk, Ole Lajord; Jensen, Trine Hammer

    2017-01-01

    Background: Scanning techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) are useful tools in veterinary and human medicine. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of these techniques in the study of the anatomy of wild marine mammals as part of a necropsy. MRI and CT scan...

  13. Is there an indication for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass grafts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, R.; van der Zaag-Loonen HJ, [No Value; Willems, T.P.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for bypass graft occlusion and stenosis detection compared with coronary angiography in post-coronary artery bypass graft patients. The indication for noninvasive

  14. Hepatocellular adenoma: findings at state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, computed tomography and pathologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shahid M.; Bos, Indra C. van den; Dwarkasing, Roy S.; Kuiper, Jan-Willem; Hollander, Jan den

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the most recent concepts and pertinent findings of hepatocellular adenomas, including clinical presentation, gross pathology and histology, pathogenesis and transformation into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and imaging findings at ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. (orig.)

  15. Retroperitoneal and pelvic plexiform neurofibromatosis: computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings - case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancado, Daniel Dutra; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle; Leijoto, Camila Cruz; Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo Souza

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a case of neurofibromatosis type I, characterized by multiple plexiform neurofibromas in the retroperitoneum and pelvis. Computed tomography showed markedly hypodense lesions involving mainly the psoas and the paravertebral regions, findings which could mimic other diseases such as abscesses and lymphadenopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging was useful to better evaluate the extension and internal structure of the neurofibromas. (author)

  16. Can carotid stenosis be operated without arteriography? Contribution of magnetic resonance and helical computerized tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffrau-Calvier, E.; Kersaint-Gilly, A. de; Desal, H.A.; Viarouge, M.P.; Havet, T.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to ascertain the role of the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and to compare it with the Doppler effect, the X-ray angiography and the new method of helical computerized tomography. Seventy one carotid bifurcations in 37 patients with suspected cerebral vascular events has been evaluated with the MRA and digitalized angiography, the reference method. The obtained data corroborate the good results proposed by other authors reporting in the literature and allow to propose this examination as a new means of investigating carotid bifurcations. Work with the helical computerized tomography appears to be promising too but there are few reported series. Therefore, there appears to be two interesting points: the reliability of distinguishing between very severe stenosis and occlusion, and the fine-tuned analysis of the plaque with detection of ulcerations. When a consistent approach is used to the evaluation of the carotid bifurcation, the Willis circle and the cerebral parenchyma, the MRA can complete the Doppler echo data and the preoperative arteriography can only be used in patients when the MRA and the Doppler echo results disagree. (authors)

  17. DETECTION OF MYOCARDIAL VIABILITY IN ISСHAEMIC DAMAGE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Ussov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of modern methods of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and emission tomography (singlephoton emission and positron emission computer tomography – SPECT and PET as toos for diagnosis and prognosis of myocardial ischaemic damage, in particular in coronary revascularization. The definition of term “myocardial viability” is discussed. It has been shown that the integrity of blood-tissue barrier between myocardium and microcirculatory vessels is the most sensitive marker of tissue viability and of functional integrity of myocardium. It’s evaluation by means of contrast-enhanced MRI of myocardium is the most available and most precise technique of diagnosis and prognosis both in patients with postinfarction myocardiosclerosis and in patients with coronary disease without myocardial infarction. It is proposed that in the nearest future the combination of MR-coronarography and contrast-enhanced MRI of myocardium will provide a possibility to obtain the full set of data necessary for planning of endovascular and surgical treatment of various forms of coronary heart disease. PET and SPECT techniques currently are of some essential interest for pathophysiologic research of coronary ishaemia in clinical and experimental studies as well as for qualitative visual studies of pharmacokinetics.

  18. A feasibility study of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for prostate cancer detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is an imaging technique that reconstructs the conductivity distribution inside the subject using magnetic flux density or current density measurements acquired by a magnetic resonance imaging system. Since the primary prostate cancer diagnostic method, prostate biopsy, has limited accuracy in cancer diagnosis and malignant tissues have shown significantly different electrical properties from normal or benign tissues, MREIT has potential application in prostate cancer detection. The feasibility of utilizing MREIT in detecting prostate cancer was evaluated via a series of well-designed computer simulations in the present study. MREIT techniques with three different electrode configurations (external, trans-rectal, and trans-urethral electrode arrays) and two different reconstruction algorithms (J-substitution algorithm and harmonic B z  algorithm) were successfully developed. The performance of different MREIT techniques were evaluated and compared based on the imaging accuracy of the reconstructed conductivity distribution in the prostate. Without the presence of noise, the external MREIT achieves a better imaging accuracy than the two endo-MREIT (trans-rectal and trans-urethral) techniques, while the trans-urethral MREIT achieves the best imaging accuracy in noisy environments. We also found that the J-substitution reconstruction algorithm consistently offered better imaging accuracy than the harmonic B z  algorithm. When Gaussian distributed random noise with a standard deviation of 0.25 nT was added, the relative errors (RE) between the reconstructed and target conductivity distributions inside the prostate were observed to be 14.18% and 17.35% by the trans-urethral MREIT with the J-substitution and harmonic B z  algorithms respectively. The lower REs of 9.64% and 11.17% were achieved respectively when the standard deviation of noise was reduced to 0.05 nT. The simulation results demonstrate the

  19. Novel Electro-Optical Coupling Technique for Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Positron Emission Tomography Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Olcott

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-compatible positron emission tomography (PET detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  20. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  1. Differential diagnosis and staging of urological tumors by magnetic resonance imaging compared with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Okada, Yusaku; Takeuchi, Hideo; Miyakawa, Mieko; Okada, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kazumasa

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 49 urological tumors (11 renal cell carcinomas, 3 renal pelvic cancers, 2 renal angiomyolipomas, 1 renal leiomyosarcoma, 1 large renal cvst, 4 adrenal tumors, 11 bladder cancers, 2 bone metastasis from bladder cancer, 10 prostatic cancers, 1 prostatic sarcoma, 1 urethral cancer, 1 penile cancer and 1 perivesical granuloma) since October 1985 to September 1986. MRI was performed using a Signa (G.E.) with a 1.5 T superconductive magnet and 3 images, including T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and proton density image, were obtained. In conclusion MRI is a noninvasive examination and gives more information than computed tomography despite its high cost. In renal cell carcinoma, the chemical shift in MRI and clear visualization of tumor thrombus enable accurate staging. Differential diagnosis from other renal mass lesions may be possible by the T2 weighted image. In adrenal disease, most of the adrenal masses can be differentiated, but in some cases it is impossible. In bladder cancer, wall invasion of tumor may be evaluated in T2 weighted image, and MRI is suitable for staging of locally advanced tumor. In prostatic cancer, visualization of periprostatic plexus and differentiation between internal and external gland may enable local staging and identification of low stage tumors. (author)

  2. Multidetector computerized tomography enema versus magnetic resonance enema in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscaldi, Ennio, E-mail: ennio.biscaldi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Galliera Hospital, via Mura delle Capuccine 14, 16128 Genoa (Italy); Ferrero, Simone, E-mail: simone.ferrero@unige.it [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Martino Hospital and National Institute for Cancer Research, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi, 1, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto, E-mail: ulrm@libero.it [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Martino Hospital and National Institute for Cancer Research, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi, 1, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Remorgida, Valentino, E-mail: vremorgida@yahoo.it [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Martino Hospital and National Institute for Cancer Research, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi, 1, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Venturini, Pier Luigi, E-mail: venturini@unige.it [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Martino Hospital and National Institute for Cancer Research, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi, 1, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Rollandi, Gian Andrea, E-mail: rollandi@galliera.it [Department of Radiology, Galliera Hospital, via Mura delle Capuccine 14, 16128 Genoa (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of multidetector computerized tomography enema (MDCT-e) and magnetic resonance enema (MRI-e) in determining the presence of sigmoid and rectal endometriotic nodules. Materials and methods: 260 women (32.6 ± 4.3 years) with symptoms suggestive of rectosigmoid endometriosis underwent MDCT-e and MRI-e prior to laparoscopy. After retrograde colonic distention and injection of intravenous contrast medium, patients were scanned on a 64-row MDCT scanner. MRI-e was performed on a 1.5 T magnet using an 8 channels phased array coil; intestinal distention was achieved by introducing in the rectum 250–300 ml of ultrasonographic gel diluted with saline solution. Radiological findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Results: 176 women had rectosigmoid endometriosis at surgery. There was no significant difference in the accuracy of MDCT-e (98.5%) and MRI-e (96.9%) in the diagnosis of sigmoid and rectal endometriosis (p = 0.248). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio of MDCT-e and MRI-e were respectively 98.3%, 98.8%, 99.4%, 96.5%, 81.59, 0.02 and 97.2%, 96.4%, 98.3%, 94.1%, 26.89, 0.03. Conclusions: Both MDCT-e and MRI-e are accurate in the diagnosis of rectal and sigmoid endometriosis.

  3. Multidetector computerized tomography enema versus magnetic resonance enema in the diagnosis of rectosigmoid endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscaldi, Ennio; Ferrero, Simone; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Remorgida, Valentino; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Rollandi, Gian Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of multidetector computerized tomography enema (MDCT-e) and magnetic resonance enema (MRI-e) in determining the presence of sigmoid and rectal endometriotic nodules. Materials and methods: 260 women (32.6 ± 4.3 years) with symptoms suggestive of rectosigmoid endometriosis underwent MDCT-e and MRI-e prior to laparoscopy. After retrograde colonic distention and injection of intravenous contrast medium, patients were scanned on a 64-row MDCT scanner. MRI-e was performed on a 1.5 T magnet using an 8 channels phased array coil; intestinal distention was achieved by introducing in the rectum 250–300 ml of ultrasonographic gel diluted with saline solution. Radiological findings were compared with surgical and histological results. Results: 176 women had rectosigmoid endometriosis at surgery. There was no significant difference in the accuracy of MDCT-e (98.5%) and MRI-e (96.9%) in the diagnosis of sigmoid and rectal endometriosis (p = 0.248). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio of MDCT-e and MRI-e were respectively 98.3%, 98.8%, 99.4%, 96.5%, 81.59, 0.02 and 97.2%, 96.4%, 98.3%, 94.1%, 26.89, 0.03. Conclusions: Both MDCT-e and MRI-e are accurate in the diagnosis of rectal and sigmoid endometriosis

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  5. White Paper of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance on Dual-Energy CT, Part 2: Radiation Dose and Iodine Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, W Dennis; Shuman, William P; Siegel, Marilyn J; Sahani, Dushyant V; Boll, Daniel T; Bolus, David N; De Cecco, Carlo N; Kaza, Ravi K; Morgan, Desiree E; Schoepf, U Joseph; Vrtiska, Terri J; Yeh, Benjamin M; Berland, Lincoln L

    This is the second of a series of 4 white papers that represent Expert Consensus Documents developed by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance through its task force on dual-energy computed tomography. This paper, part 2, addresses radiation dose and iodine sensitivity in dual-energy computed tomography.

  6. Static resistivity image of a cubic saline phantom in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Il; Oh, Suk Hoon; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyeong; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun; Baek, Woon Sik

    2003-05-01

    In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) we inject currents through electrodes placed on the surface of a subject and try to reconstruct cross-sectional resistivity (or conductivity) images using internal magnetic flux density as well as boundary voltage measurements. In this paper we present a static resistivity image of a cubic saline phantom (50 x 50 x 50 mm3) containing a cylindrical sausage object with an average resistivity value of 123.7 ohms cm. Our current MREIT system is based on an experimental 0.3 T MRI scanner and a current injection apparatus. We captured MR phase images of the phantom while injecting currents of 28 mA through two pairs of surface electrodes. We computed current density images from magnetic flux density images that are proportional to the MR phase images. From the current density images and boundary voltage data we reconstructed a cross-sectional resistivity image within a central region of 38.5 x 38.5 mm2 at the middle of the phantom using the J-substitution algorithm. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed image was 64 x 64 and the reconstructed average resistivity of the sausage was 117.7 ohms cm. Even though the error in the reconstructed average resistivity value was small, the relative L2-error of the reconstructed image was 25.5% due to the noise in measured MR phase images. We expect improvements in the accuracy by utilizing an MRI scanner with higher SNR and increasing the size of voxels scarifying the spatial resolution.

  7. Prospective, blinded trial of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography positron emission tomography in staging primary and recurrent cancer of the head and neck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the use of computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for the staging of head and neck cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January to July 2009, 15 consecutive head and neck cancer patients (11 men and four women; mean age 59 years; age range 19 to 81 years) underwent computed tomography - positron emission tomography and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for pre-therapeutic evaluation. All scans were staged, as per the American Joint Committee on Cancer tumour-node-metastasis classification, by two blinded consultant radiologists, in two sittings. Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathological examination of endoscopic biopsies, and in some cases whole surgical specimens. RESULTS: Tumour staging showed a 74 per cent concordance, node staging an 80 per cent concordance and metastasis staging a 100 per cent concordance, comparing the two imaging modalities. CONCLUSION: This study found radiological staging discordance between the two imaging modalities. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging is an emerging staging modality with superior visualisation of metastatic disease, which does not require exposure to ionising radiation.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  10. Simultaneous 68Ga DOTATATE Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Meningioma Target Contouring: Feasibility and Impact Upon Interobserver Variability Versus Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, J; Fersht, N; Sullivan, K; Kayani, I; Bomanji, J; Dickson, J; O'Meara, C; Short, S

    2017-07-01

    The increasing use of highly conformal radiation techniques to treat meningioma confers a greater need for accurate targeting. Several groups have shown that positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) information alters meningioma targets contoured by single observers, but whether this translates into improved accuracy has not been defined. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone of meningioma target contouring, simultaneous PET/MRI may be superior to PET/CT. We assessed whether 68 Ga DOTATATE PET imaging (from PET/CT and PET/MRI) reduced interobserver variability (IOV) in meningioma target volume contouring. Ten patients with meningioma underwent simultaneous 68 Ga DOTATATE PET/MRI followed by PET/CT. They were selected as it was anticipated that target volume definition in their cases would be particularly challenging. Three radiation oncologists contoured target volumes according to an agreed protocol: gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) on CT/MRI alone, CT/MRI+PET(CT) and CT/MRI+PET(MRI). GTV/CTV Kouwenhoven conformity levels (KCL), regions of contour variation and qualitative differences between PET(CT) and PET(MRI) were evaluated. There was substantial IOV in contouring. GTV mean KCL: CT/MRI 0.34, CT/MRI+PET(CT) 0.38, CT/MRI+PET(MRI) 0.39 (P = 0.06). CTV mean KCL: CT/MRI 0.31, CT/MRI+PET(CT) 0.35, CT/MRI+PET(MRI) 0.35 (P = 0.04 for all groups; P > 0.05 for individual pairs). One observer consistently contoured largest and one smallest. Observers rarely decreased volumes in relation to PET. Most IOV occurred in bone followed by dural tail, postoperative bed and venous sinuses. Tumour edges were qualitatively clearer on PET(MRI) versus PET(CT), but this did not affect contouring. IOV in contouring challenging meningioma cases was large and only slightly improved with the addition of 68 Ga DOTATATE PET. Simultaneous PET/MRI for meningioma contouring is feasible, but did not improve IOV versus PET

  11. Cardiac and pericardial tumors: A potential application of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathala, Ahmed; Abouzied, Mohei; AlSugair, Abdul-Aziz

    2017-07-26

    Cardiac and pericardial masses may be neoplastic, benign and malignant, non-neoplastic such as thrombus or simple pericardial cysts, or normal variants cardiac structure can also be a diagnostic challenge. Currently, there are several imaging modalities for diagnosis of cardiac masses; each technique has its inherent advantages and disadvantages. Echocardiography, is typically the initial test utilizes in such cases, Echocardiography is considered the test of choice for evaluation and detection of cardiac mass, it is widely available, portable, with no ionizing radiation and provides comprehensive evaluation of cardiac function and valves, however, echocardiography is not very helpful in many cases such as evaluation of extracardiac extension of mass, poor tissue characterization, and it is non diagnostic in some cases. Cross sectional imaging with cardiac computed tomography provides a three dimensional data set with excellent spatial resolution but utilizes ionizing radiation, intravenous iodinated contrast and relatively limited functional evaluation of the heart. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has excellent contrast resolution that allows superior soft tissue characterization. CMR offers comprehensive evaluation of morphology, function, tissue characterization. The great benefits of CMR make CMR a highly useful tool in the assessment of cardiac masses. (Fluorine 18) fluorodeoxygluocse (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has become a corner stone in several oncological application such as tumor staging, restaging, treatment efficiency, FDG is a very useful imaging modality in evaluation of cardiac masses. A recent advance in the imaging technology has been the development of integrated PET-MRI system that utilizes the advantages of PET and MRI in a single examination. FDG PET-MRI provides complementary information on evaluation of cardiac masses. The purpose of this review is to provide several clinical scenarios on the incremental value of PET

  12. Lhermitte-Duclos disease presenting with positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance fusion imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calabria Ferdinando

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lhermitte-Duclos disease or dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum is an extremely rare tumor. It is a slowly enlarging mass within the cerebellar cortex. The majority of cases are diagnosed in the third or fourth decade of life. Case presentation We report the case of a 37-year-old Caucasian woman who underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose for evaluation of a solitary lung node. No pathological uptake was detected in the solitary lung node but the positron emission tomography-computed tomography of her brain showed intense tracer uptake, suggestive of a malignant neoplasm, in a mass in her left cerebellar lobe. Our patient had experienced two years of occipital headache and movement disorder. Subsequently, magnetic resonance imaging was performed with contrast agent administration, showing a large subtentorial mass in her left cerebellar hemisphere, with compression and dislocation of the fourth ventricle. Metabolic data provided by positron emission tomography and morphological magnetic resonance imaging views were fused in post-processing, allowing a diagnosis of dysplastic gangliocytoma with increased glucose metabolism. Total resection of the tumor was performed and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Lhermitte-Duclos disease. Conclusions Our case indicates that increased uptake of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose may be misinterpreted as a neoplastic process in the evaluation of patients with Lhermitte-Duclos disease, but supports the usefulness of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in the exact pathophysiologic explanation of this disease and in making the correct diagnosis. However, an accurate physical examination and exact knowledge of clinical data is of the utmost importance.

  13. Utility of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ammar A Chaudhry; Maryam Gul; Elaine Gould; Mathew Teng; Kevin Baker; Robert Matthews

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) has established itself as one of the key clinical tools in evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. However, MRI still has several key limitations which require supplemental information from additional modalities to complete evaluation of various disorders. This has led to the development hybrid positron emission tomography(PET)-MRI which is rapidly evolving to address key clinical questions by using the morphological strengths of MRI and functional information of PET imaging. In this article, we aim to review physical principles and techniques of PET-MRI and discuss clinical utility of functional information obtained from PET imaging and structural information obtained from MRI imaging for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. More specifically, this review highlights the role of PET-MRI in musculoskeletal oncology including initial diagnosis and staging, treatment planning and posttreatment follow-up. Also we will review utility of PET-MRI in evaluating musculoskeletal infections(especially in the immunocompromised and diabetics) and inflammatory condition. Additionally, common pitfalls of PET-MRI will be addressed.

  14. [Usefulness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance in the preoperative diagnosis for hyperparathyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Rivero, V; Pantoja Hernández, C G; González Palomino, A; Trinidad Ruíz, G; Marcos García, M; Keituqwa Yáñez, T; Pardo Romero, G; Blasco Huelva, A

    2005-01-01

    Sonnography and Tc-99m sestamibi scintigraphy are the most requested preoperative imaging tests nowdays in the surgery of hyperparathyroidism. The aim of our article is to know if Computerized Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are useful as a location study and in which cases it would be more justified to ask these radiologic techniques. For that we report our results with 29 patients at all diagnosed as hyperparathyroidism (26 primary forms and 3 secondary ones) and operated by our E.N.T. Department later. On 20 of them a cervical CT was asked before the parathyroidectomy and on the rest 9, a MRI with sensitivities of 65% and 88.9% respectively. We think both complementary explorations must not be solicited by routine but they can represent a help in the cases in that sonnography and scintigraphy are not able to show the possible adenoma or hiperplasia, particularly in recurrent hyperparathyroidisms, reinterventions or suspect of parathyroid glands in an atypical location.

  15. Non-cardiac findings on coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc; Schnapauff, Dirk; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Both multislice computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are emerging as methods to detect coronary artery stenoses and assess cardiac function and morphology. Non-cardiac structures are also amenable to assessment by these non-invasive tests. We investigated the rate of significant and insignificant non-cardiac findings using CT and MRI. A total of 108 consecutive patients suspected of having coronary artery disease and without contraindications to CT and MRI were included in this study. Significant non-cardiac findings were defined as findings that required additional clinical or radiological follow-up. CT and MR images were read independently in a blinded fashion. CT yielded five significant non-cardiac findings in five patients (5%). These included a pulmonary embolism, large pleural effusions, sarcoid, a large hiatal hernia, and a pulmonary nodule (>1.0 cm). Two of these significant non-cardiac findings were also seen on MRI (pleural effusions and sarcoid, 2%). Insignificant non-cardiac findings were more frequent than significant findings on both CT (n = 11, 10%) and MRI (n = 7, 6%). Incidental non-cardiac findings on CT and MRI of the coronary arteries are common, which is why images should be analyzed by radiologists to ensure that important findings are not missed and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. (orig.)

  16. Non-cardiac findings on coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Schnapauff, Dirk; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Chariteplatz 1, P.O. Box 10098, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Both multislice computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are emerging as methods to detect coronary artery stenoses and assess cardiac function and morphology. Non-cardiac structures are also amenable to assessment by these non-invasive tests. We investigated the rate of significant and insignificant non-cardiac findings using CT and MRI. A total of 108 consecutive patients suspected of having coronary artery disease and without contraindications to CT and MRI were included in this study. Significant non-cardiac findings were defined as findings that required additional clinical or radiological follow-up. CT and MR images were read independently in a blinded fashion. CT yielded five significant non-cardiac findings in five patients (5%). These included a pulmonary embolism, large pleural effusions, sarcoid, a large hiatal hernia, and a pulmonary nodule (>1.0 cm). Two of these significant non-cardiac findings were also seen on MRI (pleural effusions and sarcoid, 2%). Insignificant non-cardiac findings were more frequent than significant findings on both CT (n = 11, 10%) and MRI (n = 7, 6%). Incidental non-cardiac findings on CT and MRI of the coronary arteries are common, which is why images should be analyzed by radiologists to ensure that important findings are not missed and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. (orig.)

  17. Radiographic Evaluation of Valvular Heart Disease With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempel, Jason K; Bolen, Michael A; Renapurkar, Rahul D; Azok, Joseph T; White, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a group of complex entities with varying etiologies and clinical presentations. There are a number of imaging tools available to supplement clinical evaluation of suspected valvular heart disease, with echocardiography being the most common and clinically established, and more recent emergence of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as additional supportive techniques. Yet even with these newer and more sophisticated modalities, chest radiography remains one of the earliest and most common diagnostic examinations performed during the triage of patients with suspected cardiac dysfunction. Recognizing the anatomic and pathologic features of cardiac radiography including the heart's adaptation to varying hemodynamic changes can provide clues to the radiologist regarding the underlying etiology. In this article, we will elucidate several principles relating to chamber modifications in response to pressure and volume overload as well as radiographic appearances associated with pulmonary fluid status and cardiac dysfunction. We will also present a pattern approach to optimize analysis of the chest radiograph for valvular heart disease, which will help guide the radiologist down a differential diagnostic pathway and create a more meaningful clinical report.

  18. Contribution of computerized tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance to the diagnosis of vascular dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallois, P; Pruvo, J P

    1987-06-18

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and computerized tomography (CT) have become indispensable to the exploration of patients with vascular dementia. NMR is remarkable for its innocuity, its anatomical accuracy, its sensitivity and the three-dimensional approach it offers. CT is less sensitive, but the examinations are shorter and less costly. These two techniques seem to be about equally effective in visualizing multiple infarcts, although NMR gives a better contrast. In dementia due to multiple infarcts, the bilateral cortical and subcortical lesions coexist with moderate cortical atrophy. The cerebral lacunae of lacunar dementia are better visualized by NMR; they are distributed on both sides, predominate in the frontal lobes and only produce slight cortical atrophy, less pronounced than ventricular dilatation. The main advantage of NMR is its high sensitivity in detecting early changes in the white matter, changes which are particularly perceptible in juxta- and peri-ventricular areas in arteriosclerous subcortical leucoencephalopathy. NMR, not very specific here, does not readily separate these lesions from those of other types of leucoencephalopathy. The finding of hypodense areas at CT or hypersignals at NMR (T2) around the ventricles may help in differentiating between vascular dementia, irrespective of its mechanism, and primary dementia.

  19. Automatic injectors in magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography: pilot study on hygienic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerke, B.; Fischbach, R.; Heindel, W.; Tombach, B.; Sonntag, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hygienic conditions using automatic injectors in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) during clinical routine. Materials and methods: The surfaces of medical devices (e.g., control console) and the palms of the technical and medical staff were microbiologically analyzed by taking imprints before and after hygienic education. In addition, the injector syringes for contrast medium (CM) and saline were checked for microbiological contamination following multiple (MRI: 14h; CT 8h) and single use. Furthermore, the potential of retrograde contamination from the patient along the tube was analyzed. Results: A bacterial contamination with typical dermal bacteria was documented for the surfaces of the medical devices, the palms of the technical and medical staff, and the injection syringes following multiple use (MRI: 10/10 CM syringes, 6/10 saline syringes; CT: 8/10 CM syringes, 5/10 saline syringes). Correct hand disinfection in combination with single use of syringes avoided bacterial colonization. Retrograde bacterial contamination from the patient was not observed. Conclusion: Regular hygienic teaching sessions for technical and medical staff in MRI and CT departments using automatic injectors should be mandatory. Furthermore, the multiple use of syringes should be avoided until investigations addressing the potential of bacterial contamination are performed. (orig.)

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis and Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manogaran, Praveena; Hanson, James V M; Olbert, Elisabeth D; Egger, Christine; Wicki, Carla; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Landau, Klara; Schippling, Sven

    2016-11-15

    Irreversible disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is largely attributed to neuronal and axonal degeneration, which, along with inflammation, is one of the major pathological hallmarks of these diseases. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging tool that has been used in MS, NMOSD, and other diseases to quantify damage to the retina, including the ganglion cells and their axons. The fact that these are the only unmyelinated axons within the central nervous system (CNS) renders the afferent visual pathway an ideal model for studying axonal and neuronal degeneration in neurodegenerative diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to obtain anatomical information about the CNS and to quantify evolving pathology in MS and NMOSD, both globally and in specific regions of the visual pathway including the optic nerve, optic radiations and visual cortex. Therefore, correlations between brain or optic nerve abnormalities on MRI, and retinal pathology using OCT, may shed light on how damage to one part of the CNS can affect others. In addition, these imaging techniques can help identify important differences between MS and NMOSD such as disease-specific damage to the visual pathway, trans-synaptic degeneration, or pathological changes independent of the underlying disease process. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of the visual pathway using OCT and MRI in patients with MS and NMOSD. Emphasis is placed on studies that employ both MRI and OCT to investigate damage to the visual system in these diseases.

  1. Methods for modeling and quantification in functional imaging by positron emissions tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This report presents experiences and researches in the field of in vivo medical imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In particular, advances in terms of reconstruction, quantification and modeling in PET are described. The validation of processing and analysis methods is supported by the creation of data by simulation of the imaging process in PET. The recent advances of combined PET/MRI clinical cameras, allowing simultaneous acquisition of molecular/metabolic PET information, and functional/structural MRI information opens the door to unique methodological innovations, exploiting spatial alignment and simultaneity of the PET and MRI signals. It will lead to an increase in accuracy and sensitivity in the measurement of biological phenomena. In this context, the developed projects address new methodological issues related to quantification, and to the respective contributions of MRI or PET information for a reciprocal improvement of the signals of the two modalities. They open perspectives for combined analysis of the two imaging techniques, allowing optimal use of synchronous, anatomical, molecular and functional information for brain imaging. These innovative concepts, as well as data correction and analysis methods, will be easily translated into other areas of investigation using combined PET/MRI. (author) [fr

  2. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of pathologic conditions of the middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroldi, R.; Farina, D.; Palvarini, L.; Marconi, A.; Gadola, E.; Menni, K.; Battaglia, G.

    2001-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an excellent technique for demonstrating even small abnormalities of the thin and complex bony structures of the middle ear. For this reason, it is the modality of choice in the study of conductive hearing loss (CHL). However, not every patient complaining of CHL requires a CT study. In fact, established indications encompass complex conditions, such as the complications of acute and chronic otomastoiditis, the postoperative ear in chronic otomastoiditis or in the localization of prosthetic devices, and the assessment of congenital or vascular anomalies. Particularly, the precise extent of bone erosion associated with cholesteatoma is correctly demonstrated by high resolution CT. Conversely, although fistulization through the tegmen tympani or the posterior wall of temporal bone is usually detectable by CT, the actual involvement of meninges and veins are better assessed by magnetic resonance (MR). MR is also indicated when complicated inflammatory lesions are suspected to extend into the inner ear or towards the sigmoid sinus or jugular vein. Neoplasms arising from or extending into the middle ear require the use of both techniques as their combined data provide essential information. Most important data for surgical planning concern the destruction of thin bony structures and the relationships of the lesion with the dura and surrounding vessels. DSA and interventional vascular techniques maintain an essential role in the presurgical work-up and embolization of paragangliomas extended into the middle ear

  3. Agreement between computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwankong, Niyada; Voorhout, George; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Meij, Björn P

    2006-12-15

    To assess the extent of agreement between computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Observational study. 35 dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Results of preoperative CT and MRI were compared with surgical findings with respect to degree and location of disk protrusion, position of the dural sac, amount of epidural fat, and swelling of spinal nerve roots. A lumbosacral step was seen on radiographic images from 22 of 32 (69%) dogs, on CT images from 23 of 35 (66%) dogs, and on MR images from 21 of 35 (60%) dogs. Most dogs had slight or moderate disk protrusion that was centrally located. There was substantial or near perfect agreement between CT and MRI findings in regard to degree of disk protrusion (kappa, 0.88), location of disk protrusion (0.63), position of the dural sac (0.89), amount of epidural fat (0.72), and swelling of spinal nerve roots (0.60). The degree of agreement between CT and surgical findings and between MRI and surgical findings was moderate in regard to degree and location of disk protrusion (kappa, 0.44 to 0.56) and swelling of spinal nerve roots (0.40 and 0.50). Results indicate that there is a high degree of agreement between CT and MRI findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis but that the degree of agreement between diagnostic imaging findings and surgical findings is lower.

  4. Research advances in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of cirrhotic portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Fuhua

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Portal hypertension is the most common complication of liver cirrhosis. Noninvasive radiological examinations have important values in evaluating liver parenchyma, collateral circulation, and esophagogastric variceal bleeding in liver cirrhosis. Computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can reflect the changes in liver morphology, the density and signals of liver parenchyma, and hemodynamics and have important values in disease diagnosis and prognostic evaluation. CT and functional MRI, such as perfusion-weighted imaging, MR elastography, and MR diffusion-weighted imaging, can provide quantitative information and can be applied in the diagnosis of hepatic fibrosis and early-stage liver cirrhosis in clinical practice. CT angiography and MR angiography, especially unenhanced MR angiography, can show the condition of the branches of portal vein, which helps to evaluate the risk of esophagogastric variceal bleeding and detect the markers for early warning. A combination of CT and MRI and evaluation of their potential in clinical application can give full play to the role of radiological examinations in the diagnosis, evaluation, and prognostic analysis of cirrhotic portal hypertension.

  5. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for measuring electrical conductivity during electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranjc, M; Miklavčič, D; Bajd, F; Serša, I

    2014-01-01

    The electroporation effect on tissue can be assessed by measurement of electrical properties of the tissue undergoing electroporation. The most prominent techniques for measuring electrical properties of electroporated tissues have been voltage–current measurement of applied pulses and electrical impedance tomography (EIT). However, the electrical conductivity of tissue assessed by means of voltage–current measurement was lacking in information on tissue heterogeneity, while EIT requires numerous additional electrodes and produces results with low spatial resolution and high noise. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) is similar to EIT, as it is also used for reconstruction of conductivity images, though voltage and current measurements are not limited to the boundaries in MREIT, hence it yields conductivity images with better spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of the MREIT technique for assessment of conductivity images of tissues undergoing electroporation. Two objects were investigated: agar phantoms and ex vivo liver tissue. As expected, no significant change of electrical conductivity was detected in agar phantoms exposed to pulses of all used amplitudes, while a considerable increase of conductivity was measured in liver tissue exposed to pulses of different amplitudes. (paper)

  6. Hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children - imaging findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yingyan; Qiao, Zhongwei; Gong, Ying; Yang, Haowei; Li, Guoping; Pa, Mier; Xia, Chunmei

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease that occurs mainly in children, and hepatic involvement is generally a poor prognostic factor. To describe CT and MRI findings of hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children, especially the abnormal bile duct manifestation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Thirteen children (seven boys, six girls; mean age 28.9 months) were diagnosed with disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis. They underwent CT (n = 5) or MRI (n = 4), or CT and MRI examinations (n = 4) to evaluate the liver involvement. Periportal abnormalities presented as band-like or nodular lesions on CT and MRI in all 13 children. The hepatic parenchymal lesions were found in the peripheral regions of the liver in seven children, including multiple nodules on MRI (n = 6), and cystic-like lesions on CT and MRI (n = 3). In 11 of the 13 children the dilatations of the bile ducts were observed on CT and MRI. Eight of the 13 children underwent MR cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated stenoses or segmental stenoses with slight dilatation of the central bile ducts, including the common hepatic duct and its first-order branches. The peripheral bile ducts in these children showed segmental dilatations and stenoses. Stenosis of the central bile ducts revealed by MR cholangiopancreatography was the most significant finding of liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. (orig.)

  7. Hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children - imaging findings of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yingyan; Qiao, Zhongwei; Gong, Ying; Yang, Haowei; Li, Guoping; Pa, Mier [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Xia, Chunmei [Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Physiology and Pathophysiology Department, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-15

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease that occurs mainly in children, and hepatic involvement is generally a poor prognostic factor. To describe CT and MRI findings of hepatic involvement of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children, especially the abnormal bile duct manifestation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Thirteen children (seven boys, six girls; mean age 28.9 months) were diagnosed with disseminated Langerhans cell histiocytosis. They underwent CT (n = 5) or MRI (n = 4), or CT and MRI examinations (n = 4) to evaluate the liver involvement. Periportal abnormalities presented as band-like or nodular lesions on CT and MRI in all 13 children. The hepatic parenchymal lesions were found in the peripheral regions of the liver in seven children, including multiple nodules on MRI (n = 6), and cystic-like lesions on CT and MRI (n = 3). In 11 of the 13 children the dilatations of the bile ducts were observed on CT and MRI. Eight of the 13 children underwent MR cholangiopancreatography, which demonstrated stenoses or segmental stenoses with slight dilatation of the central bile ducts, including the common hepatic duct and its first-order branches. The peripheral bile ducts in these children showed segmental dilatations and stenoses. Stenosis of the central bile ducts revealed by MR cholangiopancreatography was the most significant finding of liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis in children. (orig.)

  8. FDG-PET in the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric Lupus erythematosus and comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoppe, G.; Wildhagen, K.; Meyer, G.J.; Schober, O.

    1989-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement has been found in 30-75% of all cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Up to now, clinical diagnosis is difficult and there are no markers for disease activity. We have compared cranial computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) in two cases. FDG-PET is shown to be the most sensitive method demonstrating even reversible deficits and a better correlation with other neurological findings. MRI seems to be more sensitive than CT. A survey of the literature concerning imaging methods in neuropsychiatric SLE is given. The special problem of neuronal desactivation by antineuronal activity is discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Diagnostic evaluation of ischemic heart disease by X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Takasu, Junichiro; Sakakibara, Makoto; Imai, Hitoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Morooka, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki

    1987-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting and evaluating ischemic heart disease, conventional and enhanced CT were performed for 180 patients (150 with transmural infarction, 12 with subendocardial infarction, and 18 with angina pectoris). MRI examinations were performed for 38 patients (31 with transmural infarction, three with subendocardial infarction, and four with angina pectoris). With enhanced CT, two findings in the myocardium were direct evidence of myocardial infarction: 1) filling defects on the early scans, and 2) late enhancement of the myocardium on the delayed scans. The former were observed mainly at the sites of recent anterior myocardial infarction and the latter were seen in about half of the patients with recent and remote anterior myocardial infarctions. However, these findings were inadequately imaged in patients with inferoposterior infarction and subendocardial infarction. Among 137 patients with transmural infarction, enhanced CT revealed left ventricular aneurysms in 51 (37 %) and ventricular thrombi in 26 (19 %). ECG-gated MRI apparatus having a superconducting magnetic operating at 0.25 Tesla was used, and data for this study were collected using the single-slice spin echo technique. In eight of nine patients with acute myocardial infarction, gated MRI demonstrated the infarcted myocardium as regions of high signal intensity relative to that of the adjacent normal myocardium. Such a difference in MRI signal intensity was scarcely recognized in the chronic stage of myocardial infarction, but the indirect findings of infarction, such as regional wall thinning, wall motion disturbances, left ventricular aneurysms, and ventricular thrombi were easily detected using MRI. No characteristic finding was obtained by CT or MRI in patients with angina pectoris. (author)

  10. Multimodal imaging analysis of single-photon emission computed tomography and magnetic resonance tomography for improving diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, H.; Georgi, P.; Slomka, P.; Dannenberg, C.; Kahn, T.

    2000-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a degeneration of nigrostriated dopaminergic neurons, which can be imaged with 123 I-labeled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl) tropane ([ 123 I]β-CIT) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, the quality of the region of interest (ROI) technique used for quantitative analysis of SPECT data is compromised by limited anatomical information in the images. We investigated whether the diagnosis of PD can be improved by combining the use of SPECT images with morphological image data from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT). We examined 27 patients (8 men, 19 women; aged 55±13 years) with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.1±0.8) by high-resolution [ 123 I]β-CIT SPECT (185-200 MBq, Ceraspect camera). SPECT images were analyzed both by a unimodal technique (ROIs defined directly within the SPECT studies) and a multimodal technique (ROIs defined within individual MRI/CT studies and transferred to the corresponding interactively coregistered SPECT studies). [ 123 I]β-CIT binding ratios (cerebellum as reference), which were obtained for heads of caudate nuclei (CA), putamina (PU), and global striatal structures were compared with clinical parameters. Differences between contra- and ipsilateral (related to symptom dominance) striatal [ 123 I]β-CIT binding ratios proved to be larger in the multimodal ROI technique than in the unimodal approach (e.g., for PU: 1.2*** vs. 0.7**). Binding ratios obtained by the unimodal ROI technique were significantly correlated with those of the multimodal technique (e.g., for CA: y=0.97x+2.8; r=0.70; P com subscore (r=-0.49* vs. -0.32). These results show that the impact of [ 123 I]β-CIT SPECT for diagnosing PD is affected by the method used to analyze the SPECT images. The described multimodal approach, which is based on coregistration of SPECT and morphological imaging data, leads to improved determination of the degree of this dopaminergic disorder

  11. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Nagarajah, James; Buchbender, Christian; Hoffmann, Oliver; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Poeppel, Thorsten; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast for lesion detection and local tumor staging of patients with primary breast cancer in comparison to PET/computed tomography (CT) and MRI. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a PET/CT, and subsequently, a contrast-enhanced PET/MRI of the breast after written informed consent was obtained before each examination. Two radiologists independently evaluated the corresponding data sets (PET/CT, PET/MRI, and MRI) and were instructed to identify primary tumors lesions as well as multifocal/multicentric and bilateral disease. Furthermore, the occurrence of lymph node metastases was assessed, and the T-stage for each patient was determined. Histopathological verification of the local tumor extent and the axillary lymph node status was available for 30 of 49 and 48 of 49 patients, respectively. For the remaining patients, a consensus characterization was performed for the determination of the T-stage and nodal status, taking into account the results of clinical staging, PET/CT, and PET/MRI examinations. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Positron emission tomography/MRI and MRI correctly identified 47 (96%) of the 49 patients with primary breast cancer, whereas PET/CT enabled detection of 46 (94%) of 49 breast cancer patients and missed a synchronous carcinoma in the contralateral breast in 1 patient. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, no significant differences could be obtained between the 3 imaging procedures for the identification of primary breast cancer lesions (P > 0.05). Positron emission tomography/MRI and

  12. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  13. Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To compare and evaluate the diagnostic ability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). CBCT and MRI of 46 TMJs of 23 patients with TMJ disorders were evaluated. They were divided into 3 groups according to the position of the articular disc of the TMJ at closed mouth position and the reduction of the disc during open mouth position on MRI: no disc displacement group (NDD), disc displacement with reduction group (DDR), and disc displacement without reduction group (DDWR). With PACS viewing software, position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa, osseous change of mandibular condyle, shape of articular fossa, and mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of mandibular condyle were evaluated on CBCT and MRI. Each value was tested statistically. The position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa were concentric in the NDD, DDR, and DDWR of CBCT and NDD of MRI. However, condyle was positioned posteriorly in DDR and DDWR of MRI. Flattening, sclerosis and osteophyte of the mandibular condyle were much more apparent on DDR of CBCT than MRI. And the erosion of the condyle was much more apparent on DDWR of MRI than CBCT. Box and Sigmoid types of articular fossa were found most frequently in DDR of MRI. Flattened type was found most frequently in DDR of CBCT and deformed type was found most frequently in DDWR of CBCT. No significant difference in mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions were shown on CBCT and MRI. Since MRI and CBCT has unique diagnostic imaging ability, both modalities should be used together to supplement each other to evaluate TMJ.

  14. Effectiveness of revascularization surgery evaluated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masaaki; Ueda, Shin; Hondo, Hideki; Matsumoto, Keizo; Harada, Masafumi [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were used to evaluate chronic ischemic regions in 26 stroke patients before and 1, 3, and 6 months after revascularization surgery. The volume of interest for proton MRS was placed in an area including part of the frontal and temporal opercula, insular cortex, and basal ganglia. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls for proton MRS. Patients were divided into three groups according to the preoperative proton MRS. Group A (n=12) had significantly lower N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios on the operative side compared to those on the contralateral side, and also lower than those in normal subjects. In seven patients in Group A, postoperative serial proton MRS demonstrated no recovery of these ratios on the operative side. However, proton MRS of the other five patients indicated gradual improvement in these ratios on the operative side at 3 to 6 months after surgery, and SPECT indicated an increase in cerebral blood flow on the operative side in four of these five patients. In Group B (n=9), proton MRS and SPECT showed no laterality before revascularization and no remarkable change during the postoperative course. In Group C (n=5), NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr decreased on the contralateral side preoperatively. Two patients showed fluctuating values of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr during the postoperative period. Serial proton MRS and SPECT Studies may be useful for the evaluation of revascularization surgery on ischemic regions. The efficacy of revascularization surgery on the metabolism may appear gradually within 3-6 months. (author)

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of nasal cavity hemangiomas according to histological type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Park, Sun Won; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Yeo Ju; Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Tae Young [Dept. of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Hye [Dept. of Radiology, nha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To compare computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings between two histological types of nasal hemangiomas (cavernous hemangioma and capillary or lobular capillary hemangioma). CT (n = 20; six pre-contrast; 20 post-enhancement) and MRI (n = 7) images from 23 patients (16 men and seven women; mean age, 43 years; range, 13-73 years) with a pathologically diagnosed nasal cavity hemangioma (17 capillary and lobular capillary hemangiomas and six cavernous hemangiomas) were reviewed, focusing on lesion location, size, origin, contour, enhancement pattern, attenuation or signal intensity (SI), and bony changes. The 17 capillary and lobular hemangiomas averaged 13 mm (range, 4-37 mm) in size, and most (n = 13) were round. Fourteen capillary hemangiomas had marked or moderate early phase enhancement on CT, which dissipated during the delayed phase. Four capillary hemangiomas on MRI showed marked enhancement. Bony changes were usually not seen on CT or MRI (seen on five cases, 29.4%). Half of the lesions (2/4) had low SI on T1-weighted MRI images and heterogeneously high SI with signal voids on T2-weighted images. The six cavernous hemangiomas were larger than the capillary type (mean, 20.5 mm; range, 10-39 mm) and most had lobulating contours (n = 4), with characteristic enhancement patterns (three centripetal and three multifocal nodular), bony remodeling (n = 4, 66.7%), and mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement during the early and delayed phases. CT and MRI findings are different between the two histological types of nasal hemangiomas, particularly in the enhancement pattern and size, which can assist in preoperative diagnosis and planning of surgical tumor excision.

  16. Comparison of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and conventional X-ray of the equine digit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiter, M.

    1996-10-01

    An anatomical study of the equine digit with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was performed. In addition, the observed pathologic findings were compared with their diagnosticity in associated radiographs. Twenty isolated forelimbs were radiographed and compared with the according CT-images. From 19 isolated forelimbs and one hindlimb MR-images were taken using spinecho and overview gradient-echo sequences. The appearance of bone and soft tissue is described in various sectional positions. CT images allow excellent evaluation of bone tissue in cases in which the X-ray examination suffers from the superimposition of adjacent structures. Thus, in several cases of navicular disease additional findings were made using CT. An insertional desmopathy of the interosseus, a cartilagineous fetlock chip, a separation of the hoof wall and osteophytes of the distal phalanx were found with CT but not in the associated radiographs. MRI allows the specific diagnosis of joint-, ligament- and tendon diseases also in the hoof region. The possibility to evaluate the navicular region, the distal interphalangeal joint and the hoof matrix is of great diagnostic value. In one case of navicular d sease a defect of the flexor cortex with pannus formation could be diagnosed. In a case with chronical laminitis the separation of the epidermal lamellae and the growth of the scar horn were depicted. A tendinitis of the interosseus, fibrocartilage in the insertion of the deep digital flexor tendon, the interosseus and in the distal sesamoid ligaments are well documented. It is concluded that in some equine patients CT and MRI are indicated due to the substantial diagnostic information. (author)

  17. Quantification of Regional Myocardial Oxygenation by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Validation with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCommis, Kyle S.; Goldstein, Thomas A.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Herrero, Pilar; Misselwitz, Bernd; Gropler, Robert J.; Zheng, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Background A comprehensive evaluation of myocardial ischemia requires measures of both oxygen supply and demand. Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently the gold standard for such evaluations, but its use is limited due to its ionizing radiation, limited availability, and high cost. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method was developed for assessing myocardial oxygenation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and validate this technique compared to PET during pharmacologic stress in a canine model of coronary artery stenosis. Methods and Results Twenty-one beagles and small mongrel dogs without coronary artery stenosis (controls), or with moderate to severe acute coronary artery stenosis underwent MRI and PET imaging at rest and during dipyridamole vasodilation or dobutamine stress to induce a wide range of changes in cardiac perfusion and oxygenation. MRI first-pass perfusion imaging was performed to quantify myocardial blood flow (MBF) and volume (MBV). The MRI blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) technique was used to determine the myocardial oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) during pharmacologic hyperemia. Myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) was determined by Fick’s law. In the same dogs, 15O-water and 11C-acetate were used to measure MBF and MVO2, respectively, by PET. Regional assessments were performed for both MR and PET. MRI data correlated nicely with PET values for MBF (R2 = 0.79, P < 0.001), MVO2 (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.001), and OEF (R2 = 0.66, P < 0.01). Conclusions Cardiac MRI methods may provide an alternative to radionuclide imaging in settings of myocardial ischemia. Our newly developed quantitative MRI oxygenation imaging technique may be a valuable non-invasive tool to directly evaluate myocardial energetics and efficiency. PMID:19933371

  18. The accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the extent of endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshioka, Masuo; Kosuge, Hiroaki; Iizuka, Yoshihiro; Musha, Terunaga; Yamauchi, Itaru; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakamura, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the accuracy of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in evaluating the extent of the tumor in 36 patients with endometrial carcinoma. The CT and MRI findings were compared with the microscopic pathologic characteristics in all cases. Linear regression analysis for measurements of residual normal myometrium revealed significant positive correlations (p<0.001) between MRI (r=0.861) and CT (r=0.826) findings and pathologic evaluation. Thirty-six patients were divided into two groups according to our previous CT and MRI criteria: the superficial myometrial invasion group and advanced tumor group. In MRI findings, higher incidences of deep (≥1/2) myometrial invasion (p<0.001), vessel permeation (p<0.05) and cervical involvement (p<0.05) were observed in the advanced group. In CT findings, deep myometrial invasion (p<0.001) was observed in the advanced group. The incidence of extrauterine extension of the tumor did not differ significantly between CT and MRI findings. The accuracy figures for cervical involvement evaluated by CT and MRI were 83%, and 86%, respectively. In four of 6 patients, in whom an intact Junctional zone (j-zone) was detected by MRI, the tumor was localized in the endometrium. The remaining 2 patients had only superficial myometrial invasion histologically. In all 16 patients, in whom the j-zone was interrupted in MRI findings, myometrial invasion was confirmed pathologically. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the overall accuracy of MRI staging in patients with endometrial carcinoma is 61.1%, and CT, as well as MRI, is effective preoperatively in evaluating the extent of the tumor. (author)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography in stress fractures of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiyusufoglu, A.K.; Onat, L.; Karatoprak, O.; Enercan, M.; Hamzaoglu, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) in stress fractures of the lumbar spine. Materials and methods: Radiological and clinical data from 57 adolescents and young adults with a diagnosis of stress injury of the lumbar spine were retrospectively reviewed. All cases had undergone both 1.5 T MRI and 16-section CT examinations. All MRI and CT images were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated in separate sessions. The fracture morphology (complete/incomplete, localization) and vertebral levels were noted at both the CT and MRI examinations. Bone marrow/peri-osseous soft-tissue oedema was also determined at MRI. Results: In total, 73 complete and 32 incomplete stress fractures were detected with CT. Sixty-seven complete, 24 incomplete fractures and eight stress reactions were detected using MRI in the same study group. Marrow oedema was also seen in eight of the complete and 20 of the incomplete fractures. The specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of MRI in detecting fracture lines were 99.6, 86.7, and 97.2%, respectively. MRI was more accurate at the lower lumbar levels in comparison to upper lumbar levels. Conclusion: MRI has a similar diagnostic accuracy to CT in determining complete fractures with or without accompanying marrow oedema and incomplete fractures with accompanying marrow oedema, especially at the lower lumbar levels, which constitutes 94% of all fractures. At upper lumbar levels and in the incomplete fractures of the pars interarticularis with marked surrounding sclerosis, MRI has apparent limitations compared to CT imaging.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography in stress fractures of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganiyusufoglu, A.K., E-mail: kursady33@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Onat, L. [Department of Radiology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Karatoprak, O.; Enercan, M.; Hamzaoglu, A. [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with computed tomography (CT) in stress fractures of the lumbar spine. Materials and methods: Radiological and clinical data from 57 adolescents and young adults with a diagnosis of stress injury of the lumbar spine were retrospectively reviewed. All cases had undergone both 1.5 T MRI and 16-section CT examinations. All MRI and CT images were retrospectively reviewed and evaluated in separate sessions. The fracture morphology (complete/incomplete, localization) and vertebral levels were noted at both the CT and MRI examinations. Bone marrow/peri-osseous soft-tissue oedema was also determined at MRI. Results: In total, 73 complete and 32 incomplete stress fractures were detected with CT. Sixty-seven complete, 24 incomplete fractures and eight stress reactions were detected using MRI in the same study group. Marrow oedema was also seen in eight of the complete and 20 of the incomplete fractures. The specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of MRI in detecting fracture lines were 99.6, 86.7, and 97.2%, respectively. MRI was more accurate at the lower lumbar levels in comparison to upper lumbar levels. Conclusion: MRI has a similar diagnostic accuracy to CT in determining complete fractures with or without accompanying marrow oedema and incomplete fractures with accompanying marrow oedema, especially at the lower lumbar levels, which constitutes 94% of all fractures. At upper lumbar levels and in the incomplete fractures of the pars interarticularis with marked surrounding sclerosis, MRI has apparent limitations compared to CT imaging.

  1. Three-dimensional forward solver and its performance analysis for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) using recessed electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Il; Oh, Suk Hoon; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun; Lee, June-Yub; Baek, Woon Sik

    2003-01-01

    In magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), we try to reconstruct a cross-sectional resistivity (or conductivity) image of a subject. When we inject a current through surface electrodes, it generates a magnetic field. Using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, we can obtain the induced magnetic flux density from MR phase images of the subject. We use recessed electrodes to avoid undesirable artefacts near electrodes in measuring magnetic flux densities. An MREIT image reconstruction algorithm produces cross-sectional resistivity images utilizing the measured internal magnetic flux density in addition to boundary voltage data. In order to develop such an image reconstruction algorithm, we need a three-dimensional forward solver. Given injection currents as boundary conditions, the forward solver described in this paper computes voltage and current density distributions using the finite element method (FEM). Then, it calculates the magnetic flux density within the subject using the Biot-Savart law and FEM. The performance of the forward solver is analysed and found to be enough for use in MREIT for resistivity image reconstructions and also experimental designs and validations. The forward solver may find other applications where one needs to compute voltage, current density and magnetic flux density distributions all within a volume conductor

  2. Comparison of Positron Emission Tomography Quantification Using Magnetic Resonance- and Computed Tomography-Based Attenuation Correction in Physiological Tissues and Lesions: A Whole-Body Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Study in 66 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seith, Ferdinand; Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Bezrukov, Ilja; la Fougère, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) in fully integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) systems plays a key role for the quantification of tracer uptake. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the accuracy of standardized uptake value (SUV) quantification using MR-based AC in direct comparison with computed tomography (CT)-based AC of the same PET data set on a large patient population. Sixty-six patients (22 female; mean [SD], 61 [11] years) were examined by means of combined PET/CT and PET/MR (11C-choline, 18F-FDG, or 68Ga-DOTATATE) subsequently. Positron emission tomography images from PET/MR examinations were corrected with MR-derived AC based on tissue segmentation (PET(MR)). The same PET data were corrected using CT-based attenuation maps (μ-maps) derived from PET/CT after nonrigid registration of the CT to the MR-based μ-map (PET(MRCT)). Positron emission tomography SUVs were quantified placing regions of interest or volumes of interest in 6 different body regions as well as PET-avid lesions, respectively. The relative differences of quantitative PET values when using MR-based AC versus CT-based AC were varying depending on the organs and body regions assessed. In detail, the mean (SD) relative differences of PET SUVs were as follows: -7.8% (11.5%), blood pool; -3.6% (5.8%), spleen; -4.4% (5.6%)/-4.1% (6.2%), liver; -0.6% (5.0%), muscle; -1.3% (6.3%), fat; -40.0% (18.7%), bone; 1.6% (4.4%), liver lesions; -6.2% (6.8%), bone lesions; and -1.9% (6.2%), soft tissue lesions. In 10 liver lesions, distinct overestimations greater than 5% were found (up to 10%). In addition, overestimations were found in 2 bone lesions and 1 soft tissue lesion adjacent to the lung (up to 28.0%). Results obtained using different PET tracers show that MR-based AC is accurate in most tissue types, with SUV deviations generally of less than 10%. In bone, however, underestimations can be pronounced, potentially leading to inaccurate SUV quantifications. In

  3. The hypofunctioning thyroid nodule: Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, R.; Wagner-Manslau, C.

    1992-01-01

    The hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule is a scintigraphic diagnosis by definition. Its dignity is assessed by fine needle aspiration biopsy. Radiographic methods and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are no primary tools in diagnosis of the hypofunctioning thyroid nodule but may reveal additional information, especially in cases of retrosternal goiter and thyroid malignomas. (orig.) [de

  4. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: roles of magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, conventional radiography and computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, Bo; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). While conventional X-rays only visualize the late signs of preceding disease activity, there is evidence for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography being highly sensitiv...

  5. Diagnostic performance of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging fusion images of gynecological malignant tumors. Comparison with positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, Kazuya; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Inoue, Atsuo

    2010-01-01

    We compared the diagnostic accuracy of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion images for gynecological malignancies. A total of 31 patients with gynecological malignancies were enrolled. FDG-PET images were fused to CT, T1- and T2-weighted images (T1WI, T2WI). PET-MRI fusion was performed semiautomatically. We performed three types of evaluation to demonstrate the usefulness of PET/MRI fusion images in comparison with that of inline PET/CT as follows: depiction of the uterus and the ovarian lesions on CT or MRI mapping images (first evaluation); additional information for lesion localization with PET and mapping images (second evaluation); and the image quality of fusion on interpretation (third evaluation). For the first evaluation, the score for T2WI (4.68±0.65) was significantly higher than that for CT (3.54±1.02) or T1WI (3.71±0.97) (P<0.01). For the second evaluation, the scores for the localization of FDG accumulation showing that T2WI (2.74±0.57) provided significantly more additional information for the identification of anatomical sites of FDG accumulation than did CT (2.06±0.68) or T1WI (2.23±0.61) (P<0.01). For the third evaluation, the three-point rating scale for the patient group as a whole demonstrated that PET/T2WI (2.72±0.54) localized the lesion significantly more convincingly than PET/CT (2.23±0.50) or PET/T1WI (2.29±0.53) (P<0.01). PET/T2WI fusion images are superior for the detection and localization of gynecological malignancies. (author)

  6. Pericardial abscess occurring after tuberculous pericarditis: image morphology on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, G.S.; Sharma, S.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the image morphology on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pericardial abscess, an uncommon complication of tuberculous pericarditis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a 9-year period, 120 patients with clinical and imaging features of constrictive pericarditis were retrospectively reviewed. Of them, 13 patients (age range, 1-51 years; seven females, six males), who had a pericardial mass on echocardiography, and were subjected to CT (11 patients) and MRI (7 patients), were included as subjects of the present study. Five patients underwent both the investigations. The intra-lesional morphology, location, extent, mass effect on adjacent cardiac chambers, secondary effects on the atria and venae cavae, and pericardial thickness were studied. Histopathological confirmation of tubercular infection was available in nine patients. In the remaining four patients, the diagnosis was based on typical extra-cardiac manifestations of tuberculosis. RESULTS: A total of 15 abscesses were detected. CT showed a lesion with a hypodense core and an enhancing rim in all patients. On spin-echo T1-weighted MRI, 57% of the paients had a lesion with a hyperintense core, suggesting an exudative process. Seventy-one percent of patients showed a lesion with a hyperintense core on T2-weighted MRI, while one lesion was hypointense. Post-gadolinium MRI was performed in two patients and showed an enhancing rim in both, with enhancing septa in one. The predominant site of involvement was in the right atrioventricular (AV) groove (77%). Localized tamponade, suggested by the presence of mass effect on an adjacent cardiac chamber, was noted in nine (69%) cases, with proximal atrial dilatation in 78% of them. Four other patients (31%) had atrial dilatation without a localized mass effect. CONCLUSION: Pericardial abscess is an uncommon complication of constrictive pericarditis. Tuberculosis was responsible for abscess formation in all cases in this study. The

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of chronic subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoroki, Koji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Kanemaru, Reizo; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Okada, Akihiko; Fujimoto, Toshirou

    1987-04-01

    Twenty-two patients with chronic subdural hematomas (C.S.D.H.) and subdural effusion were evaluated by means of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Surgical treatments were given to seventeen of those patients. Three of them showed an isodense collection on CT; however, it was clearly demonstrated by MRI. In three patients, small C.S.D.H. which could not be detected by CT were identified by MRI. In patients with CT numbers of over thirty, all the operative cases were hematomas, where in those with CT numbers under twenty, all cases were those of effusion. Hematomas and effusion co-existed in the patients with CT numbers between twenty and thirty. A comparison of the CT numbers and the T/sub 1/ values revealed that there was a tendency for higher CT numbers and shorter T/sub 1/ values, to go together, as did lower CT numbers and longer T/sub 1/ values. However, in CT numbers between twenty and forty there was a large variation in the T/sub 1/ values. Most of the C.S.D.H. were demonstrated as a zone of shortened T/sub 1/ values (T/sub 1/ < 700 msec), while most of the cases of effusion were demonstrated as longer T/sub 1/ values (T/sub 1/ > 1000 msec). However, a few hematoma cases revealed longer T/sub 1/ values (T/sub 1/ > 1000 msec). In the SE image, all the hematoma cases (six lesions in five cases) were shown as signal regions higher than those of the cerebrospinal fluid (C.S.F.), while all the effusional cases (three lesions in two cases) were shown as iso-signal regions similar to those of C.S.F. The authors suggest that MRI may be the best method to identify the C.S.D.H. and to distinguish between hematoma and effusion when used in connection with the CT and MRI.

  8. Pericardial abscess occurring after tuberculous pericarditis: image morphology on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulati, G.S.; Sharma, S. E-mail: meetisv@vsnl.commeetisv@yahoo.com

    2004-06-01

    AIM: To study the image morphology on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pericardial abscess, an uncommon complication of tuberculous pericarditis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a 9-year period, 120 patients with clinical and imaging features of constrictive pericarditis were retrospectively reviewed. Of them, 13 patients (age range, 1-51 years; seven females, six males), who had a pericardial mass on echocardiography, and were subjected to CT (11 patients) and MRI (7 patients), were included as subjects of the present study. Five patients underwent both the investigations. The intra-lesional morphology, location, extent, mass effect on adjacent cardiac chambers, secondary effects on the atria and venae cavae, and pericardial thickness were studied. Histopathological confirmation of tubercular infection was available in nine patients. In the remaining four patients, the diagnosis was based on typical extra-cardiac manifestations of tuberculosis. RESULTS: A total of 15 abscesses were detected. CT showed a lesion with a hypodense core and an enhancing rim in all patients. On spin-echo T1-weighted MRI, 57% of the paients had a lesion with a hyperintense core, suggesting an exudative process. Seventy-one percent of patients showed a lesion with a hyperintense core on T2-weighted MRI, while one lesion was hypointense. Post-gadolinium MRI was performed in two patients and showed an enhancing rim in both, with enhancing septa in one. The predominant site of involvement was in the right atrioventricular (AV) groove (77%). Localized tamponade, suggested by the presence of mass effect on an adjacent cardiac chamber, was noted in nine (69%) cases, with proximal atrial dilatation in 78% of them. Four other patients (31%) had atrial dilatation without a localized mass effect. CONCLUSION: Pericardial abscess is an uncommon complication of constrictive pericarditis. Tuberculosis was responsible for abscess formation in all cases in this study. The

  9. Adapting the Computed Tomography Criteria of Hemorrhagic Transformation to Stroke Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Neeb

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main safety aspect in the use of stroke thrombolysis and in clinical trials of new pharmaceutical or interventional stroke therapies is the incidence of hemorrhagic transformation (HT after treatment. The computed tomography (CT-based classification of the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study (ECASS distinguishes four categories of HTs. An HT can range from a harmless spot of blood accumulation to a symptomatic space-occupying parenchymal bleeding associated with a massive deterioration of symptoms and clinical prognosis. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI HTs are often categorized using the ECASS criteria although this classification has not been validated in MRI. We developed MRI-specific criteria for the categorization of HT and sought to assess its diagnostic reliability in a retrospective study. Methods: Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients, who had received a 3-tesla MRI before and 12-36 h after thrombolysis, were screened retrospectively for an HT of any kind in post-treatment MRI. Intravenous tissue plasminogen activator was given to all patients within 4.5 h. HT categorization was based on a simultaneous read of 3 different MRI sequences (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion-weighted imaging and T2* gradient-recalled echo. Categorization of HT in MRI accounted for the various aspects of the imaging pattern as the shape of the bleeding area and signal intensity on each sequence. All data sets were independently categorized in a blinded fashion by 3 expert and 3 resident observers. Interobserver reliability of this classification was determined for all observers together and for each group separately by calculating Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W. Results: Of the 186 patients screened, 39 patients (21% had an HT in post-treatment MRI and were included for the categorization of HT by experts and residents. The overall agreement of HT categorization according to the modified classification was

  10. Head and Neck Veins of the Mouse. A Magnetic Resonance, Micro Computed Tomography and High Frequency Color Doppler Ultrasound Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Mancini

    Full Text Available To characterize the anatomy of the venous outflow of the mouse brain using different imaging techniques. Ten C57/black male mice (age range: 7-8 weeks were imaged with high-frequency Ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Angiography and ex-vivo Microcomputed tomography of the head and neck. Under general anesthesia, Ultrasound of neck veins was performed with a 20 MHz transducer; head and neck Magnetic Resonance Angiography data were collected on 9.4 T or 7 T scanners, and ex-vivo Microcomputed tomography angiography was obtained by filling the vessels with a radiopaque inert silicone rubber compound. All procedures were approved by the local ethical committee. The dorsal intracranial venous system is quite similar in mice and humans. Instead, the mouse Internal Jugular Veins are tiny vessels receiving the sigmoid sinuses and tributaries from cerebellum, occipital lobe and midbrain, while the majority of the cerebral blood, i.e. from the olfactory bulbs and fronto-parietal lobes, is apparently drained through skull base connections into the External Jugular Vein. Three main intra-extracranial anastomoses, absent in humans, are: 1 the petrosquamous sinus, draining into the posterior facial vein, 2 the veins of the olfactory bulb, draining into the superficial temporal vein through a foramen of the frontal bone 3 the cavernous sinus, draining in the External Jugular Vein through a foramen of the sphenoid bone. The anatomical structure of the mouse cranial venous outflow as depicted by Ultrasound, Microcomputed tomography and Magnetic Resonance Angiography is different from humans, with multiple connections between intra- and extra-cranial veins.

  11. Variabilities of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-, Computed Tomography-, and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography-Based Tumor and Lymph Node Delineations for Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Kishor; Saraiya, Siddharth; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Jan, Nuzhat; Schuster, Jessica; Schutzer, Matthew; Fahrner, Lester; Groves, Robert; Olsen, Kathryn M; Ford, John C; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    To investigate interobserver delineation variability for gross tumor volumes of primary lung tumors and associated pathologic lymph nodes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare the results with computed tomography (CT) alone- and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT-based delineations. Seven physicians delineated the tumor volumes of 10 patients for the following scenarios: (1) CT only, (2) PET-CT fusion images registered to CT ("clinical standard"), and (3) postcontrast T1-weighted MRI registered with diffusion-weighted MRI. To compute interobserver variability, the median surface was generated from all observers' contours and used as the reference surface. A physician labeled the interface types (tumor to lung, atelectasis (collapsed lung), hilum, mediastinum, or chest wall) on the median surface. Contoured volumes and bidirectional local distances between individual observers' contours and the reference contour were analyzed. Computed tomography- and MRI-based tumor volumes normalized relative to PET-CT-based volumes were 1.62 ± 0.76 (mean ± standard deviation) and 1.38 ± 0.44, respectively. Volume differences between the imaging modalities were not significant. Between observers, the mean normalized volumes per patient averaged over all patients varied significantly by a factor of 1.6 (MRI) and 2.0 (CT and PET-CT) (P=4.10 × 10 -5 to 3.82 × 10 -9 ). The tumor-atelectasis interface had a significantly higher variability than other interfaces for all modalities combined (P=.0006). The interfaces with the smallest uncertainties were tumor-lung (on CT) and tumor-mediastinum (on PET-CT and MRI). Although MRI-based contouring showed overall larger variability than PET-CT, contouring variability depended on the interface type and was not significantly different between modalities, despite the limited observer experience with MRI. Multimodality imaging and combining different imaging characteristics might be the best approach to define

  12. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in infants with microcephaly potentially related to congenital Zika virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto Filho, Aníbal Araujo Alves; Freitas, Simone Baltar de; Ciosaki, Márcio Morikoshi; Oliveira, Lourenço Nogueira e; Santos Júnior, Onildo Tavares dos, E-mail: anibalpeixotof@gmail.com [Rede Sarah de Hospitais de Reabilitação, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2018-03-15

    The recent association between the increase in the number of neonates with microcephaly in northeastern Brazil and the outbreak of infection with the Zika virus, which has been occurring in the Americas, has been declared a public health emergency of international concern. The evidence that implicates the virus as the cause of this public health emergency has been demonstrated ever more consistently. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging characteristics seen on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of infants admitted to a rehabilitation hospital with a diagnosis of microcephaly and a maternal history of rash during pregnancy. (author)

  13. Computed tomography synthesis from magnetic resonance images in the pelvis using multiple random forests and auto-context features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Morgenthaler Edmund, Jens; Zografos, Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatment planning that is only based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the electron density information usually obtained from computed tomography (CT) must be derived from the MRI by synthesizing a so-called pseudo CT (pCT). This is a non-trivial task since MRI intensities...... as measured by water-equivalent path lengths. We compare the performance of our method against two baseline pCT strategies, which either set all MRI voxels in the subject equal to the CT value of water, or in addition transfer the bone volume from the real CT. We show an improved performance compared to both...

  14. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in infants with microcephaly potentially related to congenital Zika virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto Filho, Aníbal Araujo Alves; Freitas, Simone Baltar de; Ciosaki, Márcio Morikoshi; Oliveira, Lourenço Nogueira e; Santos Júnior, Onildo Tavares dos

    2018-01-01

    The recent association between the increase in the number of neonates with microcephaly in northeastern Brazil and the outbreak of infection with the Zika virus, which has been occurring in the Americas, has been declared a public health emergency of international concern. The evidence that implicates the virus as the cause of this public health emergency has been demonstrated ever more consistently. This pictorial essay illustrates the imaging characteristics seen on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans of infants admitted to a rehabilitation hospital with a diagnosis of microcephaly and a maternal history of rash during pregnancy. (author)

  15. ATYPICAL PRESENTATION OF CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS IN A KOALA (PHASCOLARCTOS CINEREUS): A MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Nevado, Eva; Alonso-Alegre, Elisa González; Martínez, M Ángeles Jiménez; Rodríguez-Álvaro, Alfonso; de Merlo, Elena Martínez; García, Juncal García; Real, Isabel García

    2017-03-01

    Cryptococcosis is a worldwide and potentially fatal mycosis documented in wild and captive koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) caused by Cryptococcus neoformans . Though mainly a subclinical disease, when the nasal cavity is affected, epistaxis, mucopurulent nasal discharge, dyspnea, and facial distortion may occur. This report describes a case of cryptococcosis in a koala where unilateral exophthalmos was the only evident clinical sign and magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography findings are described. Both advanced imaging techniques should be considered as standard and complementary techniques for nasal cavity evaluation in koalas.

  16. Preoperative lymph-node staging of invasive urothelial bladder cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thor Knak; Holt, Per; Gerke, Oke

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The treatment and prognosis of bladder cancer are based on the depth of primary tumour invasion and the presence of metastases. A highly accurate preoperative tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) staging is critical to proper patient management and treatment. This study retrospectively...... investigated the value of ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative N staging of bladder cancer. Material and methods. From June 2006 to January 2008, 48 consecutive patients diagnosed with bladder......) for MRI and ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT, respectively. The differences in specificity and negative predictive values were not statistically significant. Conclusions. No significant statistical difference between ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT and MRI for preoperative N staging of urothelial bladder cancer was found in the study...

  17. First multimodal embolization particles visible on x-ray/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, Soenke H; Budjan, Johannes; Aviv, Hagit; Haneder, Stefan; Kraenzlin, Bettina; Michaely, Henrik; Margel, Shlomo; Diehl, Steffen; Semmler, Wolfhard; Gretz, Norbert; Schönberg, Stefan O; Sadick, Maliha

    2011-03-01

    Embolization therapy is gaining importance in the treatment of malignant lesions, and even more in benign lesions. Current embolization materials are not visible in imaging modalities. However, it is assumed that directly visible embolization material may provide several advantages over current embolization agents, ranging from particle shunt and reflux prevention to improved therapy control and follow-up assessment. X-ray- as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible embolization materials have been demonstrated in experiments. In this study, we present an embolization material with the property of being visible in more than one imaging modality, namely MRI and x-ray/computed tomography (CT). Characterization and testing of the substance in animal models was performed. To reduce the chance of adverse reactions and to facilitate clinical approval, materials have been applied that are similar to those that are approved and being used on a routine basis in diagnostic imaging. Therefore, x-ray-visible Iodine was combined with MRI-visible Iron (Fe3O4) in a macroparticle (diameter, 40-200 μm). Its core, consisting of a copolymerized monomer MAOETIB (2-methacryloyloxyethyl [2,3,5-triiodobenzoate]), was coated with ultra-small paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (150 nm). After in vitro testing, including signal to noise measurements in CT and MRI (n = 5), its ability to embolize tissue was tested in an established tumor embolization model in rabbits (n = 6). Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) (Integris, Philips), CT (Definition, Siemens Healthcare Section, Forchheim, Germany), and MRI (3 Tesla Magnetom Tim Trio MRI, Siemens Healthcare Section, Forchheim, Germany) were performed before, during, and after embolization. Imaging signal changes that could be attributed to embolization particles were assessed by visual inspection and rated on an ordinal scale by 3 radiologists, from 1 to 3. Histologic analysis of organs was performed. Particles provided a

  18. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  19. Pocket atlas of sectional anatomy: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Vol. 3. Spine, extremities, joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.B.; Reif, E. [Caritas Hospital, Dillingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the musculoskeletal system is an established and important component in the diagnosis of diseases of the joints, soft tissues, bones, and bone marrow. We are therefore pleased to collect together images of the joints and the spinal column in a separate volume on the musculoskeletal system. Demonstrating the growing importance of new developments in MRI in recent years, with ever-increasing resolution, many images were acquired with 3-tesla units. We are deeply grateful to the manufacturers, Siemens and Philips, for making this possible. We believe that colored atlases are the ideal medium to represent the highly detailed images achieved nowadays with improved resolution techniques. Volume 3 of the Pocket Atlas of Sectional Anatomay provides a color illustration facing each magnetic resonance image, as in the preceding volumes on the skull, thorax, and abdomen. To ensure the greatest possible precision in details, we still produce these illustrations ourselves. Each is accompanied by a sectional image and an orientation aid. Uniform color schemes ensure optimal clarity, as similar structures, such as arteries, veins, nerves, tendons, etc., are consistently represented in the same color. Individual muscle groups are represented uniformly, but differentiated from other muscle groups, so that classification is possible even when numerous groups of muscles are shown in the same image. Maximal lucidity prevails even in highly detailed representations. This is made possible by the high quality of the production and printing process that are characteristic of Thieme International. (orig.)

  20. Possibilities of magnet-resonance tomography usage while examining patients with reccurent genital prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banakhevych R.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex problem of establishing a diagnosis and choosing optimal treatment for patients with recurrent genital prolapse calls for improving preoperative clinical examination of these patients. Relapse necessitates better understanding of genital prolapse in each individual patient. The results of survey of 45 women with recurrent genital prolapse at the stage of preparation for re-surgery using magnetic resonance imaging are submitted. Follow-up period was 4 years. Dynamic study of the pelvic fundus was performed by a radiologist using MRI Philips Intera 1,5 Tesla with the possibility of 3D modeling, making up to 1mm thick slices in any plane, high differentiation of soft tissue (ligaments, muscles. The study showed that the classification of prolapse by stages is useful for standardization of diagnosis, but it is less useful for a differentiated approach to the choice of surgical strategy, since it ignores the nuances of surgical anatomy. The developed algorithm of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in patients with recurrent pelvic hernia significantly improves the quality of diagnosis. It takes into account the relationship between the segments and allows to evaluate the type of fascial and ligament complex defect, the details of planning future surgery. In 57,8% of patients prolapse of the vagina following pubo-coccygeal line indicates a true relapse. Reducing the distance while performing Valsalva samples from cervical pubo-coccygeal line 2-3 cm was seen as second-best result of the operation – 26,7%, questionable form of recurrence was observed in 15,6% of patients. The developed algorithm makes it possible to determine the extent of the procedure and to predict possible intraoperative complications and results of operations, to avoid changes of operation plan, to minimize the risk of recurrence and the need for re-surgery. In the postoperative period it allows to determine topographical relations between pelvic organs and quality of

  1. White Paper of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance on Dual-Energy CT, Part 1: Technology and Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Marilyn J; Kaza, Ravi K; Bolus, David N; Boll, Daniel T; Rofsky, Neil M; De Cecco, Carlo N; Foley, W Dennis; Morgan, Desiree E; Schoepf, U Joseph; Sahani, Dushyant V; Shuman, William P; Vrtiska, Terri J; Yeh, Benjamin M; Berland, Lincoln L

    This is the first of a series of 4 white papers that represent Expert Consensus Documents developed by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance through its task force on dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). This article, part 1, describes the fundamentals of the physical basis for DECT and the technology of DECT and proposes uniform nomenclature to account for differences in proprietary terms among manufacturers.

  2. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance in Lymphoma: Comparison With 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and With the Addition of Magnetic Resonance Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudo, Chiara; Raderer, Markus; Karanikas, Georgios; Weber, Michael; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Dolak, Werner; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Mayerhoefer, Marius E

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) (with and without diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) to F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT), with regard to the assessment of nodal and extranodal involvement, in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, without restriction to FDG-avid subytpes. Patients with histologically proven lymphoma were enrolled in this prospective, institutional review board-approved study. After a single F-FDG injection, patients consecutively underwent F-FDG PET[Fraction Slash]CT and F-FDG PET/MR on the same day for staging or restaging. Three sets of images were analyzed separately: F-FDG PET/CT, F-FDG PET/MR without DWI, and F-FDG PET/MR with DWI. Region-based agreement and examination-based sensitivity and specificity were calculated for F-FDG PET/CT, F-FDG PET/MR without DWI, and F-FDG PET/MR DWI. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) on F-FDG PET/CT and F-FDG PET/MR were compared and correlated with minimum and mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCmin, ADCmean). Thirty-four patients with a total of 40 examinations were included. Examination-based sensitivities for F-FDG PET/CT, F-FDG PET/MR, and F-FDG PET/MR DWI were 82.1%, 85.7%, and 100%, respectively; specificities were 100% for all 3 techniques; and accuracies were 87.5%, 90%, and 100%, respectively. F-FDG PET/CT was false negative in 5 of 40 examinations (all with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma), and F-FDG PET/MR (without DWI) was false negative in 4 of 40 examinations. Region-based percentages of agreement were 99% (κ, 0.95) between F-FDG PET/MR DWI and F-FDG PET/CT, 99.2% (κ, 0.96) between F-FDG PET/MR and F-FDG PET/CT, and 99.4% (κ, 0.97) between F-FDG PET/MR DWI and F-FDG PET/MR. There was a strong correlation between F-FDG PET/CT and F-FDG PET/MR for SUVmax (r = 0.83) and SUVmean (r = 0.81) but no significant correlation between ADCmin and SUVmax

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  4. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of primary intracranial histiocytic sarcoma in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, B.T.; Park, C.; Yoo, J.H.; Gu, S.H.; Jang, D.P.; Kim, Y.B.; Woo, E.J.; Kim, D.Y.; Cho, Z.H.; Park, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    A 10-year-old, neutered male, Maltese dog presented with a three week history of intention tremor, right hind limb rigidity, poor coordination, and occasional circling to the left. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, a mass was identified in the right occipital lobe and cerebellum. Three weeks after the initial MRI scan, we performed an sup(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) of the brain. The FDG-PET demonstrated areas of hypermetabolism in the right occipital lobe, cerebellum, pons, and medulla oblongata. When the standardized uptake value was calculated, the hypermetabolic lesion was higher than the gray matter values. The anatomical location of the hypermetabolic lesion was more precisely identified by the PET-MRI fusion images. The dog was definitively diagnosed as a primary histiocytic sarcoma of the brain. This is the first report of PET findings of an intracranial histiocytic sarcoma in a dog

  5. Congenital varitans and anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct: Imaging by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuerkvatan, Aysel; Yener, Ouzlem [Dept. of Radiology, Tuerkiye Yueksek Ihtisas Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Erden, Aysel [Dept. of Radiology, Ankara University School of Medicine, Antalya (Turkmenistan); Tuerkoglu, Mehmet Akif [Dept. of General Surgery, Antalya University School of Medicine, Antalya (Turkmenistan)

    2013-12-15

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography.

  6. Induced current magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography of brain tissues based on the J-substitution algorithm: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Zhu Shanan; He Bin

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated induced current magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (IC-MREIT) by means of computer simulations. The J-substitution algorithm was implemented to solve the IC-MREIT reconstruction problem. By providing physical insight into the charge accumulating on the interfaces, the convergence characteristics of the reconstruction algorithm were analyzed. The simulation results conducted on different objects were well correlated with the proposed theoretical analysis. The feasibility of IC-MREIT to reconstruct the conductivity distribution of head-brain tissues was also examined in computer simulations using a multi-compartment realistic head model. The present simulation results suggest that IC-MREIT may have the potential to become a useful conductivity imaging technique.

  7. Use of contrast media in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in horses: Techniques, adverse events and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, B B; Goodrich, L R; Barrett, M F; Grinstaff, M W; Kawcak, C E

    2017-07-01

    The use of contrast media in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasing in horses. These contrast-enhanced imaging techniques provide improved tissue delineation and evaluation, thereby expanding diagnostic capabilities. While generally considered safe, not all contrast media exhibit the same safety profiles. The safety of contrast media use and descriptions of adverse events occurring in horses are sparsely reported. This review summarises the reported evidence of contrast media use and adverse events that occur in horses, with added contribution from other veterinary species and studies in man for comparison. This comprehensive data set empowers equine clinicians to develop use and monitoring strategies when working with contrast media. Finally, it summarises the current state-of-the-art and highlights the potential applications of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI for assessment of diseased or injured equine tissues, as well as (patho)physiological processes. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  8. The Role of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in STEMI Patients with Normal Coronary Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beganu Elena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the diagnosis of myocardial infarction based on patient symptoms, electrocardiogram (ECG changes, and cardiac enzymes, is not a challenge for cardiologists. The correlation between coronary anatomy and the ECG territories that present ischemic changes can help the clinician to estimate which coronary artery presents lesions upon performing a coronary angiogram. In certain situations, the diagnosis of myocardial infarction can be difficult due to the lack of correlations between the clinical and paraclinical examinations and the coronary angiogram. In some cases, patients with chest pain and ST-segment elevation on the ECG tracing present with a normal coronary angiography. In other cases, patients without important changes on the ECG can present critical lesions or even occlusions upon angiographic examination. The aim of this article is to highlight the role of noninvasive coronary magnetic resonance and multi-slice computed tomography in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and normal coronary angiography.

  9. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F; Bluemm, R G; Beyer, H K

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  10. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  11. Potential clinical applications of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/magnetic resonance mammography in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yeugnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) scan is a cutting edge technology providing comprehensive structural information from MR imaging and functional features from PET in a single session. Recent research findings and clinical experience have shown that 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) whole-body PET/MR imaging has a diagnostic performance comparable with or superior to that of PET/CT in the field of oncology, including for breast cancer. In particular, FDG PET/MR mammography in the prone position with the breast hanging in a pendant manner can provide more comprehensive information about the metabolism, anatomy, and functional features of a breast lesion than a whole-body PET/MR scan. This article reports on current state-of-the-art PET/MR mammography in patients with breast cancer and the prospects for potential application in the future.

  12. J-substitution algorithm in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT): phantom experiments for static resistivity images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Hyun Soo; Lee, Byung Il; Oh, Suk Hoon; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung; Kwon, Ohin; Yoon, Jeong Rock; Seo, Jin Keun

    2002-06-01

    Recently, a new static resistivity image reconstruction algorithm is proposed utilizing internal current density data obtained by magnetic resonance current density imaging technique. This new imaging method is called magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT). The derivation and performance of J-substitution algorithm in MREIT have been reported as a new accurate and high-resolution static impedance imaging technique via computer simulation methods. In this paper, we present experimental procedures, denoising techniques, and image reconstructions using a 0.3-tesla (T) experimental MREIT system and saline phantoms. MREIT using J-substitution algorithm effectively utilizes the internal current density information resolving the problem inherent in a conventional EIT, that is, the low sensitivity of boundary measurements to any changes of internal tissue resistivity values. Resistivity images of saline phantoms show an accuracy of 6.8%-47.2% and spatial resolution of 64 x 64. Both of them can be significantly improved by using an MRI system with a better signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies.

  14. The assessment of chemotherapy and radiation therapy effect in malignant lymphomas with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrovolskiene, L.; Griniute, R.

    2003-01-01

    Aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic possibilities of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the assessment of treatment effect in malignant lymphomas. In the period of 1998 to 2002, 196 patients with histologically proven malignant lymphoma were examined in the Department of Tomography of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital. The data were processed with SPSS 10.1, including application of standardized t-test and classification of Fisher's statistics. In this group the density of lymphomatous masses prior and post treatment has no difference on CT images, thus the differentiation of active tissue and relapse is not possible. On MR images the difference of signal intensity of the active component (not treated) and fibrous remnant is significant. MRI is a radiological method which provides information about activity of lymphomatous tissue and is able to delineate the active component (recidive or partial remission) and inactive remnant (total remission) of the tumor mass and thus facilitating the diagnosis of possible relapse of malignant lymphomas for hematology, chemotherapy and radiotherapy specialists. (author)

  15. Experimental flow and perfusion measurement in an animal model with magnetic resonance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, S.O.; Bock, M.; Just, A.

    2001-01-01

    Aim. Validation of non-invasive methods for morphologic and functional imaging of the kidney under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions. Material and Methods. In chronically instrumented animals (foxhounds) comparative measurements of renal flow and perfusion were performed. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were compared to data obtained from implanted flow probes and total kidney weight post mortem. In the MR system, different degrees of renal artery stenosis could be induced by means of an implanted inflatable cuff. The degree of stenosis was verified with high-resolution 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D-CE-MRA) using an intravascular contrast agent. Results. The MR-data agreed well with the invasively obtained results. Artifacts resulting from the implanted flow probes and other devices could be kept to a minimum due to appropriate selection of the probe materials and measurement strategies. Stenoses could be reproduced reliably and quantified from the induced morphologic and functional changes. Conclusion. Morphologic and functional MR techniques are well suited for non-invasive in vivo assessment of renal blood flow physiology. (orig.) [de

  16. Magnetic resonance tomography-guided interventional procedure for diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schernthaner, M.; Helbich, T.H.; Fueger, B.J.; Memarsadeghi, M.; Stiglbauer, A.; Linhart, H.G.; Doan, A.; Pinker, K.; Brader, P.; Margreiter, M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly established in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in addition to transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). The use of T2-weighted imaging allows an exact delineation of the zonal anatomy of the prostate and its surrounding structures. Other MR imaging tools, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging or diffusion-weighted imaging allow an inference of the biochemical characteristics (multiparametric MRI). Prostate cancer, which could only be diagnosed using MR imaging or lesions suspected as being prostate cancer, which are localized in the anterior aspect of the prostate and were missed with repetitive TRUS biopsy, need to undergo MR guided biopsy. Recent studies have shown a good correlation between MR imaging and histopathology of specimens collected by MR-guided biopsy. Improved lesion targeting is therefore possible with MR-guided biopsy. So far data suggest that MR-guided biopsy of the prostate is a promising alternative diagnostic tool to TRUS-guided biopsy. (orig.) [de

  17. Computer simulation of a clinical magnet resonance tomography scanner for training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacklaender, T.; Mertens, H.; Cramer, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The idea for this project was born by the necessity to offer medical students an easy approach to the theoretical basics of magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to simulate the features and functions of such a scanner on a commercially available computer by means of a computer program. Materials and Methods: The simulation was programmed in pure Java under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for a commercially available computer with Windows, Macintosh or Linux operating system. The graphic user interface is oriented to a real scanner. In an external program parameter, images for the proton density and the relaxation times T1 and T2 are calculated on the basis of clinical examinations. From this, the image calculation is carried out in the simulation program pixel by pixel on the basis of a pulse sequence chosen and modified by the user. The images can be stored and printed. In addition, it is possible to display and modify k-space images. Results: Seven classes of pulse sequences are implemented and up to 14 relevant sequence parameters, such as repetition time and echo time, can be altered. Aliasing and motion artifacts can be simulated. As the image calculation only takes a few seconds, interactive working is possible. (orig.)

  18. [Computer simulation of a clinical magnet resonance tomography scanner for training purposes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackländer, T; Mertens, H; Cramer, B M

    2004-08-01

    The idea for this project was born by the necessity to offer medical students an easy approach to the theoretical basics of magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to simulate the features and functions of such a scanner on a commercially available computer by means of a computer program. The simulation was programmed in pure Java under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for a commercially available computer with Windows, Macintosh or Linux operating system. The graphic user interface is oriented to a real scanner. In an external program parameter, images for the proton density and the relaxation times T1 and T2 are calculated on the basis of clinical examinations. From this, the image calculation is carried out in the simulation program pixel by pixel on the basis of a pulse sequence chosen and modified by the user. The images can be stored and printed. In addition, it is possible to display and modify k-space images. Seven classes of pulse sequences are implemented and up to 14 relevant sequence parameters, such as repetition time and echo time, can be altered. Aliasing and motion artifacts can be simulated. As the image calculation only takes a few seconds, interactive working is possible. The simulation has been used in the university education for more than 1 year, successfully illustrating the dependence of the MR images on the measuring parameters. This should facititate the approach of students to the understanding MR imaging in the future.

  19. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  20. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bradley J; Klose, Alexander D; Le, Carl H; Longo, Valerie A; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36+/-0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed.

  1. Visibility of Different Intraorbital Foreign Bodies Using Plain Radiography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadrashid, Reza; Golamian, Masoud; Shahrzad, Maryam; Hajalioghli, Parisa; Shahmorady, Zahra; Fouladi, Daniel F; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Akhoundzadeh, Leila

    2017-05-01

    The study sought to compare the usefulness of 4 imaging modalities in visualizing various intraorbital foreign bodies (IOFBs) in different sizes. Six different materials including metal, wood, plastic, stone, glass. and graphite were cut in cylindrical shapes in 4 sizes (dimensions: 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mm) and placed intraorbitally in the extraocular space of fresh sheep's head. Four skilled radiologists rated the visibility of the objects individually using plain radiography, spiral computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in accordance with a previously described grading system. Excluding wood, all embedded foreign bodies were best visualized in CT and CBCT images with almost equal accuracies. Wood could only be detected using MRI, and then only when fragments were more than 2 mm in size. There were 3 false-positive MRI reports, suggesting air bubbles as wood IOFBs. Because of lower cost and using less radiation in comparison with conventional CT, CBCT can be used as the initial imaging technique in cases with suspected IOFBs. Optimal imaging technique for wood IOFBs is yet to be defined. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. F-18 fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayana, Shankaramurthy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Paramjeet; Prakash, Mahesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Femoral head avascular necrosis (FHAVN) is one of the increasingly common causes of musculoskeletal disability and poses a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been widely used in the diagnosis of FHAVN, positron emission tomography (PET) has recently been evaluated to assess vascularity of the femoral head. In this study, the authors compared F-18 fluoride PET/CT with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN. Patients and Methods: We prospectively studied 51 consecutive patients with a high clinical suspicion of FHAVN. All patients underwent MRI and F-18 fluoride PET/CT, the time interval between the two scans being 4–10 (mean 8) days. Two nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the MRI report read the PET/CT scans. Clinical assessment was also done. Final diagnoses were made by surgical pathology or clinical and radiologic follow-up. Results: A final diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) was made in 40 patients. MRI was 96.5% sensitive, 100% specific, and 98.03% accurate while PET/CT was 100% sensitive, specific, and accurate in diagnosing FHAVN. The agreement between the two imaging modalities for the diagnosis of AVN was 96.07%. Conclusion: F-18 fluoride PET/CT showed good agreement with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN and can be better than MRI in detecting early disease. PMID:26917886

  3. F-18 fluoride positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the femoral head: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayana, Shankaramurthy; Bhattacharya, Anish; Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Paramjeet; Prakash, Mahesh; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Femoral head avascular necrosis (FHAVN) is one of the increasingly common causes of musculoskeletal disability and poses a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Although radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been widely used in the diagnosis of FHAVN, positron emission tomography (PET) has recently been evaluated to assess vascularity of the femoral head. In this study, the authors compared F-18 fluoride PET/CT with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN. We prospectively studied 51 consecutive patients with a high clinical suspicion of FHAVN. All patients underwent MRI and F-18 fluoride PET/CT, the time interval between the two scans being 4–10 (mean 8) days. Two nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the MRI report read the PET/CT scans. Clinical assessment was also done. Final diagnoses were made by surgical pathology or clinical and radiologic follow-up. A final diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) was made in 40 patients. MRI was 96.5% sensitive, 100% specific, and 98.03% accurate while PET/CT was 100% sensitive, specific, and accurate in diagnosing FHAVN. The agreement between the two imaging modalities for the diagnosis of AVN was 96.07%. F-18 fluoride PET/CT showed good agreement with MRI in the initial diagnosis of FHAVN and can be better than MRI in detecting early disease

  4. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging contrast media injectors: technical feature review – what is really needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friebe M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Friebe Institute of Medical Engineering, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany Abstract: There has been little technical innovation over the last few years for contrast media (CM injectors that are used for diagnostic imaging (computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and hybrid imaging systems, such as positron emission tomography–CT or magnetic resonance–positron emission tomography examinations. The medical need of CM for the enhancement of diagnostic images has been around for a long time, but the application of the CM into the blood stream comes with potential medical complications for the patient and requires a lot of operator experience and training. Most power injector systems that are currently used can do significantly more than what is typically required; this complexity however, adds error potential and cost. This paper focuses on the main features that CM injector systems should have and highlights the technical developments that are useful to have but which add complexity and cost, increase setup time, and require intensive training for safe use. CM injection protocols are very different between CT and MRI, with CT requiring many more variances, has a need for multiphase protocols, and requires a higher timing accuracy. A CM injector used in the MRI suite, on the other-hand, could only need a relatively time insensitive injection with a standard injection flow rate and a volume that is dependent on the patients’ weight. This would make easy and lightweight systems possible, which are able to safely and accurately perform the injection task, while allowing full MRI compatibility with relatively low cost investment and consumable costs. Keywords: power injector, contrast media injection, injection protocols, MRI compatibility

  5. Magnetic resonance tomography and ultrasound in rheumatology; MRT und Sonographie in der Rheumatologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainberger, F. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Ludwig-Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Physikalische und Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Czerny, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Ludwig-Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Physikalische und Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Trattnig, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Ludwig-Boltzmann-Inst. fuer Physikalische und Radiologische Tumordiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Lack, W. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria); Machold, K. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Innere Medizin III, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Rheumatologie; Graninger, W. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Innere Medizin III, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Rheumatologie

    1996-08-01

    Technical innovations and software improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution sonography (US) have definitely influenced the diagnostic imaging of rheumatic diseases. For MRI, improvements in surface coils, dedicated low-field systems (0.2 T), and software improvements (shorter acquisition times and refinements of fat suppressing techniques) must be mentioned. For sonography, the main innovations concern the development of higher transducer frequencies (7-15 Mhz) and power Doppler imaging. Clinical evaluations have shown that MRI and US are most useful in cases of suspected rheumatic disease with negative plain film radiographs and for documenting the course of the disease, diagnosing of early rheumatoid arthritis, making a differential diagnosis in clinically unclear rheumatic diseases, investigating vascularization, and quantifying pannus formation. In order to improve diagnostic efficacy the role of MRI and US in the management of patients with rheumatic disease should be reconsidered. (orig.) [Deutsch] Technische Innovationen in Hard- und Software von Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und Sonographiegeraeten haben die bildgebende Diagnostik in der Rheumatologie massgeblich beeinflusst (Verbesserungen der Oberflaechenspulen mit hohen Gradientenfeldern, dedizierte Niederfeldgeraete, Softwareverbesserungen in Form von kuerzeren Aquisitionszeiten und Verfeinerungen in der Fettunterdrueckung, hoehere Transducerfrequenzen zwischen 7 und 15 Mhz, Powerdopplerverfahren). Fuer die klinische Anwendung bedeutet dies, dass MRT und Sonographie als bildgebende Zusatzverfahren nach der Anfertigung konventioneller Roentgenaufnahmen anzuwenden sind, wenn diese unauffaellige Resultate ergeben oder spezielle Fragen zur Schwere des Krankheitsprozesses bzw. von Folgeerscheinungen zu beantworten sind. Im besonderen betrifft dies den Nachweis der Frueharthritis, die Differentialdiagnose klinisch nicht klar einzuordnender Krankheitsbilder und die Bestimmung des

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of adrenocortical adenomas in childhood: correlation with computed tomography and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.A.; Weber, A.; Reznek, R.H.; Cotterill, A.M.; Ross, R.J.M.; Harris, R.J.; Armstrong, P.; Savage, M.O.

    1996-01-01

    There are few descriptions of the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of hyperfunctioning adrenocortical tumours, particularly those occurring in childhood. We studied five patients, two girls and three boys, aged 6-14.3 years, presenting with clinical syndromes of adrenocortical hyperfunction. The diagnoses were Cushing's syndrome (n = 2), virilisation (n = 2), and Conn's syndrome (n = 1). Biochemical features suggested an adrenal lesion in each case. MR and ultrasound were performed in all five cases, with CT in four. Each patient had a functional adrenal tumour secreting either cortisol, androgens or aldosterone alone, or a combination of cortisol, androgens and oestradiol. The histological diagnosis was adenoma in four cases and tumour of indeterminate nature in one case. MR clearly showed the tumours (diameter 1.0-7.5 cm), all the lesions being of high signal intensity relative to liver on T2-weighted sequences. CT revealed an adrenal mass in each of the four patients scanned, three of which enhanced after intravenous contrast medium injection. The multiplanar imaging of MR allowed better distinction from adjacent structures and also demonstrated an unenlarged contralateral adrenal gland. In the patient with a 1-cm Conn's adenoma the lesion was more easily seen on MR than CT. Ultrasound showed the four larger tumours but was unable to visualise the contralateral adrenal or the Conn's adenoma. In conclusion, the MR appearances of four adrenocortical adenomas and one indeterminate tumour in children are described. MR has been found to be at least equal to CT in the detection of these tumours, with some possible advantages. Both techniques are superior to ultrasound. (orig.). With 4 figs

  7. Computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography or positron emission tomography/computer tomography for detection of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with ovarian cancer: A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Ying; Gu Zhaoxiang; Tao Xiaofeng; Liu Shiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the diagnostic performances of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET or PET/CT) for detection of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with ovarian cancer. Methods: Relevant studies were identified with MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1990 to July 2010. We estimated the weighted summary sensitivities, specificities, OR (odds ratio), and summary receiver operating characteristic (sROC) curves of each imaging technique and conducted pair-wise comparisons using the two-sample Z-test. Meta-regression, subgroup analysis, and funnel plots were also performed to explain the between-study heterogeneity. Results: Eighteen eligible studies were included, with a total of 882 patients. PET or PET/CT was a more accurate modality (sensitivity, 73.2%; specificity, 96.7%; OR [odds ratio], 90.32). No significant difference was detected between CT (sensitivity, 42.6%; specificity, 95.0%; OR, 19.87) and MR imaging (sensitivity, 54.7%; specificity, 88.3%; OR, 12.38). Meta-regression analyses and subgroup analyses revealed no statistical difference. Funnel plots with marked asymmetry suggested a publication bias. Conclusion: FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT is more accurate than CT and MR imaging in the detection of lymph node metastasis in patients with ovarian cancer.

  8. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of solitary fibrous tumors in the pelvis: Correlation with histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weidong; Chen Jianyu; Cao Yun; Liu Qingyu; Luo Rongguang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to analyze the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of pelvic solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) and to improve the diagnostic efficacy for such tumors. Methods: Six cases of pelvic SFTs confirmed by histopathology were analyzed retrospectively. Of the 6 patients, 4 had undergone CT scanning, and 2 had undergone magnetic resonance imaging. All the patients had undergone unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations, and 2 had also undergone dynamic CT enhancement examination. Image characteristics such as shape, size, number, edge, attenuation or intensity for each lesion before and after contrast enhancement were analyzed and compared with the pathomorphology of the tumors. Results: All the 6 cases showed oval or rounded and well-defined masses. Unenhanced CT images showed heterogeneous masses with patchy, necrotic foci in 3 cases and homogeneous mass in 1 case. None of the tumors showed calcification. Contrast-enhanced CT images showed marked, heterogeneous enhancement in the first and second cases. Dynamic enhancement scan demonstrated mild homogeneous enhancement in the third case and mild prolonged, delayed enhancement and washout in the fourth case. T1-weighted MR images showed heterogeneous mild hypointense lesion with linear hyperintensity in 1 case, and homogeneous isointensity in the other. T2-weighted images showed heterogeneous mixed intensity in 1 case and mostly hyperintensive lesion with hypointense foci in another case. A case showed marked heterogeneous enhancement and another showed marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Conclusion: Radiological findings of pelvic SFTs are variable and nonspecific. However, a well-defined, ovoid or rounded mass with hypointense on MR T2-weighted images and variable enhancement on CT and MR images may suggest the diagnosis of SFTs. Pelvic SFTs should be included in the differential diagnosis of regional tumors.

  9. ANATOMICAL STUDY OF CRANIAL NERVE EMERGENCE AND SKULL FORAMINA IN THE HORSE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rita; Malalana, Fernando; McConnell, James Fraser; Maddox, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For accurate interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the equine brain, knowledge of the normal cross-sectional anatomy of the brain and associated structures (such as the cranial nerves) is essential. The purpose of this prospective cadaver study was to describe and compare MRI and computed tomography (CT) anatomy of cranial nerves' origins and associated skull foramina in a sample of five horses. All horses were presented for euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the head. Heads were collected posteuthanasia and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in the transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes. Thin-slice MR sequences were also acquired using transverse 3D-CISS sequences that allowed mutliplanar reformatting. Transverse thin-slice CT images were acquired and multiplanar reformatting was used to create comparative images. Magnetic resonance imaging consistently allowed visualization of cranial nerves II, V, VII, VIII, and XII in all horses. The cranial nerves III, IV, and VI were identifiable as a group despite difficulties in identification of individual nerves. The group of cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were identified in 4/5 horses although the region where they exited the skull was identified in all cases. The course of nerves II and V could be followed on several slices and the main divisions of cranial nerve V could be distinguished in all cases. In conclusion, CT allowed clear visualization of the skull foramina and occasionally the nerves themselves, facilitating identification of the nerves for comparison with MRI images. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  10. Positron emission tomography-guided magnetic resonance spectroscopy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh-Bahaei, Nasim; Sajjadi, S Ahmad; Manavaki, Roido; McLean, Mary; O'Brien, John T; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether the level of metabolites in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a representative marker of underlying pathological changes identified in positron emission tomographic (PET) images in Alzheimer disease (AD). We performed PET-guided MRS in cases of probable AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC). All participants were imaged by 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET followed by 3T MRS. PET images were assessed both visually and using standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs). MRS voxels were placed in regions with maximum abnormality on amyloid (Aβ+) and FDG (hypometabolic) areas on PET scans. Corresponding normal areas were selected in controls. The ratios of total N-acetyl (tNA) group, myoinositol (mI), choline, and glutamate + glutamine over creatine (Cr) were compared between these regions. Aβ + regions had significantly higher (p = 0.02) mI/Cr and lower tNA/Cr (p = 0.02), whereas in hypometabolic areas only tNA/Cr was reduced (p = 0.003). Multiple regression analysis adjusting for sex, age, and education showed mI/Cr was only associated with 11 C-PiB SUVR (p < 0.0001). tNA/Cr, however, was associated with both PiB (p = 0.0003) and 18 F-FDG SUVR (p = 0.006). The level of mI/Cr was not significantly different between MCI and AD (p = 0.28), but tNA/Cr showed significant decline from HC to MCI to AD (p = 0.001, p = 0.04). mI/Cr has significant temporal and spatial associations with Aβ and could potentially be considered as a disease state biomarker. tNA is an indicator of early neurodegenerative changes and might have a role as disease stage biomarker and also as a valuable surrogate marker for treatment response. Ann Neurol 2018;83:771-778. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  11. Multimodality imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in local prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Wassberg, Cecilia; Pucar, Darko; Schöder, Heiko; Goldman, Debra A; Mazaheri, Yousef; Reuter, Victor E; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T; Hricak, Hedvig

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the relationship using multimodality imaging between intermediary citrate/choline metabolism as seen on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) and glycolysis as observed on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. METHODS The study included 22 patients with local PCa who were referred for endorectal magnetic resonance imaging/1H-MRSI (April 2002 to July 2007) and 18F-FDG-PET/CT and then underwent prostatectomy as primary or salvage treatment. Whole-mount step-section pathology was used as the standard of reference. We assessed the relationships between PET parameters [standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVmean)] and MRSI parameters [choline + creatine/citrate (CC/Cmax and CC/Cmean) and total number of suspicious voxels] using spearman’s rank correlation, and the relationships of PET and 1H-MRSI index lesion parameters to surgical Gleason score. RESULTS Abnormal intermediary metabolism on 1H-MRSI was present in 21/22 patients, while abnormal glycolysis on 18F-FDG-PET/CT was detected in only 3/22 patients. Specifically, index tumor localization rates were 0.95 (95%CI: 0.77-1.00) for 1H-MRSI and 0.14 (95%CI: 0.03-0.35) for 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Spearman rank correlations indicated little relationship (ρ = -0.36-0.28) between 1H-MRSI parameters and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters. Both the total number of suspicious voxels (ρ = 0.55, P = 0.0099) and the SUVmax (ρ = 0.46, P = 0.0366) correlated weakly with the Gleason score. No significant relationship was found between the CC/Cmax, CC/Cmean or SUVmean and the Gleason score (P = 0.15-0.79). CONCLUSION The concentration of intermediary metabolites detected by 1H MRSI and glycolytic flux measured 18F-FDG PET show little correlation. Furthermore, only few tumors were FDG avid on PET, possibly because increased glycolysis represents a late and rather ominous event in the progression of PCa. PMID:28396727

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  13. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography of the sellar region in patients with endocrine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenkova, T.S.; Fedina, I.D.; Mel'nichenko, G.A.; Stenina, I.I.; Zubarev, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    The hypophysis was studied by MR tomography (MRT) in 148 patients with the most prevalent diseases of the hypothalamohypophyseal system and in 13 ones with primary hypothyrosis. The findings evidence a great variety of changes in the MRT picture in the examines. Qualitative and quantitative criteria for MRT diagnosis were suggested. The method was effectively used for a dynamic follow-up of the hypophyseal status in the course of pathogenetic therapy

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of unusual causes of ankle pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, S.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography and MRI are frequently utilized to evaluate ankle pain that remains unexplained by radiography. The most common causes of ankle pain are related to trauma and the imaging appearances of these entities are well established in the radiologic and orthopedic literature. A smaller percentage is comprised of non-traumatic disorders. Our goal is to emphasize the value of CT and MRI in recognition of these less common and unusual causes of ankle pain. Copyright (2006) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Noninvasive evaluation of global and regional left ventricular function using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniewska, Malwina; Schuetz, Georg M.; Willun, Steffen; Dewey, Marc; Schlattmann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of global and regional left ventricular (LV) function with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science were systematically reviewed. Evaluation included: ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and left ventricular mass (LVM). Differences between modalities were analysed using limits of agreement (LoA). Publication bias was measured by Egger's regression test. Heterogeneity was evaluated using Cochran's Q test and Higgins I"2 statistic. In the presence of heterogeneity the DerSimonian-Laird method was used for estimation of heterogeneity variance. Fifty-three studies including 1,814 patients were identified. The mean difference between CT and MRI was -0.56 % (LoA, -11.6-10.5 %) for EF, 2.62 ml (-34.1-39.3 ml) for EDV and 1.61 ml (-22.4-25.7 ml) for ESV, 3.21 ml (-21.8-28.3 ml) for SV and 0.13 g (-28.2-28.4 g) for LVM. CT detected wall motion abnormalities on a per-segment basis with 90 % sensitivity and 97 % specificity. CT is accurate for assessing global LV function parameters but the limits of agreement versus MRI are moderately wide, while wall motion deficits are detected with high accuracy. (orig.)

  17. Cancer and diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. Differentiation with computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging - Preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeistaemoe, Emma; Hjern, Fredrik; Abraham-Nordling, Mirna [Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Div. of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: mirna.abraham.nordling@ki.se; Blomqvist, Lennart [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Von Heijne, Anders [Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Div. of Radiology, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Both colon cancer and diverticular disease are common in the Western world. A challenge when patients present with clinical findings is that both diseases can present with symptoms that may mimic the other. Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be helpful to differentiate between diverticulitis and cancer of the sigmoid colon compared to the differentiation offered by evaluation of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a clinical situation. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were consecutively included. Fifteen patients were under work-up for a recently diagnosed sigmoid cancer and 15 patients had recently been treated in hospital due to first-time acute sigmoid diverticulitis. All patients underwent CT, T2- weighted MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI. Anonymized examinations were retrospectively presented in random order to one experienced radiologist. Results: With contrast-enhanced CT, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 66.7% (10/15) and 93.3% (14/15), respectively. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Conclusion: MRI provides information that may contribute to improve the differentiation between sigmoid cancer and diverticulitis that is offered by CT. These encouraging results need to be confirmed in a larger study.

  18. Dental magnetic resonance tomography (dental-MRT) as a method for imaging of the maxillo-mandibular bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, A.; Nasel, C.; Schick, S.; Dorffner, S.; Imhof, H.; Trattnig, S.; Bernhart, T.; Mailath, G.; Watzek, G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a new method for dental imaging using magnetic resonance tomography named Dental-MRT and to demonstrate its usefulness in diagnosing dentogen pathologies of the mandible and maxilla. Methods: Seven healthy volunteers, three patients with pulpitis, two patients with dentigerous cysts, two patients after tooth transplantation, and three patients with atrophic mandibles have been evaluated. Optimized axial T 1 - and T 2 -weighted gradient echo and spin echo sequences in 2D and 3D technique have been established to perform studies of the jaws. The acquired images were reconstructed with a standard dental software package on a workstation as panorama and cross-sectional views of the mandible or maxilla. Results: The entire maxillo-mandibular bone, teeth, dental pulp, and the content of the mandibular canal were well depicted. Patients with pulpitis demonstrate bone marrow edema in the periapical region. Dentigerous cysts and their relation to the surrounding structures are clearly shown. After contrast media administration marked enhancement of the dental pulp can be demonstrated. Conclusion: Dental-MRT promises to provide a new tool for visualization and detection of dental diseases. (orig.) [de

  19. Brain metastasis of small cell lung carcinoma. Comparison of Gd-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and enhanced computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Yutaka; Miyamoto, Tadaaki.

    1994-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) frequently metastasizes into the brain, resulting in serious influences upon prognosis. Delayed brain damage caused by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is also problematic. Gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to detect early brain metastasis from SCLC, and its usefulness was compared with contrast computerized tomography (CT). Among 25 SCLC patients, brain metastasis was detected in 11 by MRI and in 10 by CT, although six of them were completely asymptomatic. In the 11 patients, 6.3 and 2.4 lesions were respectively detected on average by MRI and CT. The ability of MRI to detect metastatic lesions of ≥15 mm diameter did not differ from that of CT, but became different as lesions became smaller (P<0.002), and MRI had a decided advantage over CT because as many as 30 lesions of ≤5 mm diameter were detected by MRI, whereas such lesions visualized on CT numbered only one (P<0.0001). MRI was incomparably superior to CT (P<0.0004) for subtentorial lesions since 18 lesions were detected on MRI, but only three, measuring ≥25 mm in diameter, were demonstrated on CT. Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI was determined to be extremely useful in the early diagnosis of SCLC brain metastasis. MRI was thought to reduce delayed brain damage caused by PCI if performed according to an adequate schedule. (author)

  20. Congenital inferior vena cava anomalies: a review of findings at multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Inferior vena cava anomalies are rare, occurring in up to 8.7% of the population, as left renal vein anomalies are considered. The inferior vena cava develops from the sixth to the eighth gestational weeks, originating from three paired embryonic veins, namely the subcardinal, supracardinal and postcardinal veins. This complex ontogenesis of the inferior vena cava, with multiple anastomoses between the pairs of embryonic veins, leads to a number of anatomic variations in the venous return from the abdomen and lower limbs. Some of such variations have significant clinical and surgical implications related to other cardiovascular anomalies and in some cases associated with venous thrombosis of lower limbs, particularly in young adults. The authors reviewed images of ten patients with inferior vena cava anomalies, three of them with deep venous thrombosis. The authors highlight the major findings of inferior vena cava anomalies at multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, correlating them the embryonic development and demonstrating the main alternative pathways for venous drainage. The knowledge on the inferior vena cava anomalies is critical in the assessment of abdominal images to avoid misdiagnosis and to indicate the possibility of associated anomalies, besides clinical and surgical implications.

  1. Radiolabeled, Antibody-Conjugated Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles for Tumor Vasculature Targeted Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yonghua; Shi, Sixiang; Ehlerding, Emily B; Graves, Stephen A; Goel, Shreya; Engle, Jonathan W; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie; Cai, Weibo

    2017-11-08

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles (Mn 3 O 4 NPs) have attracted a great deal of attention in the field of biomedical imaging because of their ability to create an enhanced imaging signal in MRI as novel potent T 1 contrast agents. In this study, we present tumor vasculature-targeted imaging in mice using Mn 3 O 4 NPs through conjugation to the anti-CD105 antibody TRC105 and radionuclide copper-64 ( 64 Cu, t 1/2 : 12.7 h). The Mn 3 O 4 conjugated NPs, 64 Cu-NOTA-Mn 3 O 4 @PEG-TRC105, exhibited sufficient stability in vitro and in vivo. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies evaluated the pharmacokinetics and demonstrated targeting of 64 Cu-NOTA-Mn 3 O 4 @PEG-TRC105 to 4T1 murine breast tumors in vivo, compared to 64 Cu-NOTA-Mn 3 O 4 @PEG. The specificity of 64 Cu-NOTA-Mn 3 O 4 @PEG-TRC105 for the vascular marker CD105 was confirmed through in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo experiments. Since Mn 3 O 4 conjugated NPs exhibited desirable properties for T 1 enhanced imaging and low toxicity, the tumor-specific Mn 3 O 4 conjugated NPs reported in this study may serve as promising multifunctional nanoplatforms for precise cancer imaging and diagnosis.

  2. Computed tomography compared to magnetic resonance imaging in occult or suspect hip fractures. A retrospective study in 44 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, David; Goethlin, Jan H. [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Moelndal (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) for evaluation of occult and suspect hip fractures has been proposed as a good second-line investigation. The diagnostic precision compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unclear. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI in a retrospective study on patients with suspect and occult hip fractures. Forty-four elderly consecutive patients with low-energy trauma to the hip were identified where negative or suspect CT was followed by MRI. Primary reporting and review by two observers as well as the diagnostic performance of the two modalities were compared. Surgical treatment and clinical course were used as outcomes. Compared to the primary reports, the CT reviewers found fewer normal and no suspect cases. MRI changed the primary diagnoses in 27 cases, and in 14 and 15 cases, respectively, at review. There was no disagreement on MRI diagnoses. In our patient population, MRI was deemed a more reliable modality for hip fracture diagnosis in comparison to CT. For clinical decision making, MRI seems to have a higher accuracy than CT. A negative CT finding cannot completely rule out a hip fracture in patients where clinical findings of hip fracture persevere. (orig.)

  3. Spontaneous rupture of intracranial dermoid tumor in a patient with vertigo. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asil, Kıyasettin; Gunduz, Yasemin; Ayhan, Laçin Tatli; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Yildiz, Can

    2013-01-01

    Congenital dermoid cysts are very rare, constituting less than 1% of intracranial tumors. Spontaneous rupture of dermoid tumor is a potentially serious complication that can lead to meningitis, seizures, cerebral ischemia and hydrocephalus. Occasionally, dermoid tumors are incidentally discovered on computed tomography (CT) of the brain or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following unrelated clinical complaints. They are also discovered during radiologic investigations of unexplained headaches, seizures, and rarely olfactory delusions. In this report we describe a patient complaining of vertigo caused by spontaneous rupture of dermoid cyst, preoperatively diagnosed by CT and MRI. Cranial CT revealed a dense fatty lesion adjacent to the posterolateral parasellar region on the left with multiple small, dense fat droplets scattered in the subarachnoid space corresponding to a dermoid cyst rupture. Cranial MRI sections revealed a lesion with mixed-signal-intensity and multiple hyperintense droplets scattered through the cerebellar surface on the left. No enhancement was found on axial T1-weighted MRI after intravenous Gadolinium administration. Diffusion weighted image (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient map studies exhibited explicit restricted diffusion. Many studies and literature case reports concerning the rupture of dermoid cyst have been reported. However, multimodal imaging of this rare pathology in the same patient is uncommon. Although dermoid cysts are pathognomonic in appearance on a CT examination, the MRI is also of value in helping to understand the effect of extension and pressure of the mass. DWI is also important for support of the diagnosis and patient follow-up

  4. Comparison of radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Wei; Feng Feng; Yang Hongzen; Jiang Ming; Dion, E.; Genant, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To compare magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, computed tomography (CT), and radiography in the detection of sacroiliitis accompanying ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Design and subjects. Nine volunteers and 24 patients were recruited. Radiography, CT, and MR imaging were completed within a 1-week period in 24 patients with AS. In precontrast MR examination, spin-echo T1, fast spin-echo T2, and gradient echo with rephasing T2* images were obtained without fat saturation using a 0.3-T imager for all volunteers and patients. Postcontrast MR examination was performed using the same precontrast SE T1 sequence for patients with AS. Results and conclusions. MR imaging directly showed the normal cartilage in all 16 sacroiliac joints of the 8 volunteers. In the 24 patients with AS, cartilage abnormalities were observed in 42 sacroiliac joints. More diagnoses of sacroiliitis were made using MR and CT imaging than using radiography (P<0.001). Therefore, low-field-strength MR can be useful in detecting early sacroiliitis in patients with AS. MR imaging was able to reveal early cartilage changes and bone marrow edema, which could not be found by either CT or radiography. (orig.)

  5. Correlation between conductivity and prognostic factors in invasive breast cancer using magnetic resonance electric properties tomography (MREPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Shin, Jaewook; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between conductivity and prognostic factors of invasive breast cancer using magnetic resonance electric properties tomography (MREPT). This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and verbal informed consent was obtained prior to breast MRI. This study included 65 women with surgically confirmed invasive breast cancers measuring 1 cm or larger on T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE). Phase-based MREPT and the coil combination technique were used to reconstruct conductivity. Simple and multiple linear regression analysis were used to find an independent factor associated with conductivity. In total tumours, tumours with HER-2 overexpression showed lower conductivity than those without, and HER-2 overexpression was independently associated with conductivity. In 37 tumours 2 cm or larger, tumours with high mitosis or PR positivity showed higher conductivity than those without, and high mitosis and PR positivity were independently associated with conductivity. In 28 tumours 1-2 cm in size, there were no differences in conductivity according to the prognostic factors. Conductivity values measured using MREPT are associated with the HER-2 overexpression status, and may provide information about mitosis and the PR status of invasive breast cancers 2 cm or larger. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Gomaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to computed tomography (CT and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases, followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases. While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity.

  7. Coronary artery calcification score by multislice computed tomography predicts the outcome of dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Caroline H.C.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Overbosch, Jelle; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Dijkman, Paul R.M. van; Zijlstra, Felix

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of less than 11 can reliably rule out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients suspected of having myocardial ischemia. In 114 of 136 consecutive patients clinically suspected of myocardial ischemia with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, dobutamine CMR was performed and the CAC score was determined. The CAC score was obtained by 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and was calculated according to the method of Agatston. The CAC score and the results of the dobutamine CMR were correlated and the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of the CAC score for dobutamine CMR were calculated. A total of 114 (87%) of the patients were eligible for this study. There was a significant correlation between the CAC score and dobutamine CMR (p<0.001). Patients with a CAC score of less than 11 showed no signs of inducible ischemia during dobutamine CMR. For a CAC score of less than 101, the NPV and the PPV of the CAC score for the outcome of dobutamine CMR were, respectively, 0.96 and 0.29. In patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia a MDCT CAC score of less than 11 reliably rules out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine CMR. (orig.)

  8. Coronary artery calcification score by multislice computed tomography predicts the outcome of dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Caroline H C; Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Overbosch, Jelle; van Dijkman, Paul R M; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of less than 11 can reliably rule out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients suspected of having myocardial ischemia. In 114 of 136 consecutive patients clinically suspected of myocardial ischemia with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, dobutamine CMR was performed and the CAC score was determined. The CAC score was obtained by 16-row multidetector compued tomography (MDCT) and was calculated according to the method of Agatston. The CAC score and the results of the dobutamine CMR were correlated and the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of the CAC score for dobutamine CMR were calculated. A total of 114 (87%) of the patients were eligible for this study. There was a significant correlation between the CAC score and dobutamine CMR (p<0.001). Patients with a CAC score of less than 11 showed no signs of inducible ischemia during dobutamine CMR. For a CAC score of less than 101, the NPV and the PPV of the CAC score for the outcome of dobutamine CMR were, respectively, 0.96 and 0.29. In patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia a MDCT CAC score of less than 11 reliably rules out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine CMR.

  9. Coronary artery calcification score by multislice computed tomography predicts the outcome of dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Caroline H.C.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Overbosch, Jelle; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Dirkjan [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Bronovo Hospital, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Dijkman, Paul R.M. van [Bronovo Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Zijlstra, Felix [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of less than 11 can reliably rule out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients suspected of having myocardial ischemia. In 114 of 136 consecutive patients clinically suspected of myocardial ischemia with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, dobutamine CMR was performed and the CAC score was determined. The CAC score was obtained by 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and was calculated according to the method of Agatston. The CAC score and the results of the dobutamine CMR were correlated and the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of the CAC score for dobutamine CMR were calculated. A total of 114 (87%) of the patients were eligible for this study. There was a significant correlation between the CAC score and dobutamine CMR (p<0.001). Patients with a CAC score of less than 11 showed no signs of inducible ischemia during dobutamine CMR. For a CAC score of less than 101, the NPV and the PPV of the CAC score for the outcome of dobutamine CMR were, respectively, 0.96 and 0.29. In patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia a MDCT CAC score of less than 11 reliably rules out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine CMR. (orig.)

  10. Congenital inferior vena cava anomalies: a review of findings at multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Catherine; Trad, Clovis Simao; Trad, Henrique Simao

    2013-01-01

    Inferior vena cava anomalies are rare, occurring in up to 8.7% of the population, as left renal vein anomalies are considered. The inferior vena cava develops from the sixth to the eighth gestational weeks, originating from three paired embryonic veins, namely the subcardinal, supracardinal and postcardinal veins. This complex ontogenesis of the inferior vena cava, with multiple anastomoses between the pairs of embryonic veins, leads to a number of anatomic variations in the venous return from the abdomen and lower limbs. Some of such variations have significant clinical and surgical implications related to other cardiovascular anomalies and in some cases associated with venous thrombosis of lower limbs, particularly in young adults. The authors reviewed images of ten patients with inferior vena cava anomalies, three of them with deep venous thrombosis. The authors highlight the major findings of inferior vena cava anomalies at multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, correlating them the embryonic development and demonstrating the main alternative pathways for venous drainage. The knowledge on the inferior vena cava anomalies is critical in the assessment of abdominal images to avoid misdiagnosis and to indicate the possibility of associated anomalies, besides clinical and surgical implications. (author)

  11. Congenital inferior vena cava anomalies: a review of findings at multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Catherine; Trad, Clovis Simao [Central de Diagnostico Ribeirao Preto (CEDIRP), SP (Brazil); Trad, Henrique Simao, E-mail: hstrad@terra.com.br [Central de Diagnostico Ribeirao Preto (CEDIRP), SP (Brazil); Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC-FMRPUSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Mendonca, Silvana Machado [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Inferior vena cava anomalies are rare, occurring in up to 8.7% of the population, as left renal vein anomalies are considered. The inferior vena cava develops from the sixth to the eighth gestational weeks, originating from three paired embryonic veins, namely the subcardinal, supracardinal and postcardinal veins. This complex ontogenesis of the inferior vena cava, with multiple anastomoses between the pairs of embryonic veins, leads to a number of anatomic variations in the venous return from the abdomen and lower limbs. Some of such variations have significant clinical and surgical implications related to other cardiovascular anomalies and in some cases associated with venous thrombosis of lower limbs, particularly in young adults. The authors reviewed images of ten patients with inferior vena cava anomalies, three of them with deep venous thrombosis. The authors highlight the major findings of inferior vena cava anomalies at multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, correlating them the embryonic development and demonstrating the main alternative pathways for venous drainage. The knowledge on the inferior vena cava anomalies is critical in the assessment of abdominal images to avoid misdiagnosis and to indicate the possibility of associated anomalies, besides clinical and surgical implications. (author)

  12. Cancer and diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. Differentiation with computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging - Preliminary experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeistaemoe, Emma; Hjern, Fredrik; Abraham-Nordling, Mirna; Blomqvist, Lennart; Von Heijne, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both colon cancer and diverticular disease are common in the Western world. A challenge when patients present with clinical findings is that both diseases can present with symptoms that may mimic the other. Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be helpful to differentiate between diverticulitis and cancer of the sigmoid colon compared to the differentiation offered by evaluation of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a clinical situation. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were consecutively included. Fifteen patients were under work-up for a recently diagnosed sigmoid cancer and 15 patients had recently been treated in hospital due to first-time acute sigmoid diverticulitis. All patients underwent CT, T2- weighted MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI. Anonymized examinations were retrospectively presented in random order to one experienced radiologist. Results: With contrast-enhanced CT, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 66.7% (10/15) and 93.3% (14/15), respectively. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Conclusion: MRI provides information that may contribute to improve the differentiation between sigmoid cancer and diverticulitis that is offered by CT. These encouraging results need to be confirmed in a larger study

  13. Comparison between high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the liver and computed tomography. A preliminary study on 39 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G.; Aerts, P.; Van Fraeyenhoven, L.; Baert, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty nine patients with one or more focal hepatic lesions were examined by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A variety of pulse sequences - spin echo (SE), gradient echo (GE) and inversion recovery (IR) - have been reported in the literature on MRI concerning the detection and characterization of liver tumors. Multiple studies have compared MRI at different field strenghts to CT. As controversy still exists concerning the optimal pulse sequence on MRI, CE-CT has been compared to T2 weighted SE sequence in this study. CT, as well as MRI, identified abnormalities in liver parenchyma in all patients. As far as detection of hepatic lesions is concerned, MRI and CE-CT were equal in 35 cases and MRI was superior in the other four cases. However, CT remains the examination of choice for detection of focal lesions, due to the short examination time, the low cost and the superiority in detection of extrahepatic pathology [fr

  14. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pontone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT, functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

  15. Noninvasive evaluation of global and regional left ventricular function using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaniewska, Malwina; Schuetz, Georg M.; Willun, Steffen; Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Schlattmann, Peter [Jena University Hospital, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Documentation, Jena (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of global and regional left ventricular (LV) function with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science were systematically reviewed. Evaluation included: ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV) and left ventricular mass (LVM). Differences between modalities were analysed using limits of agreement (LoA). Publication bias was measured by Egger's regression test. Heterogeneity was evaluated using Cochran's Q test and Higgins I{sup 2} statistic. In the presence of heterogeneity the DerSimonian-Laird method was used for estimation of heterogeneity variance. Fifty-three studies including 1,814 patients were identified. The mean difference between CT and MRI was -0.56 % (LoA, -11.6-10.5 %) for EF, 2.62 ml (-34.1-39.3 ml) for EDV and 1.61 ml (-22.4-25.7 ml) for ESV, 3.21 ml (-21.8-28.3 ml) for SV and 0.13 g (-28.2-28.4 g) for LVM. CT detected wall motion abnormalities on a per-segment basis with 90 % sensitivity and 97 % specificity. CT is accurate for assessing global LV function parameters but the limits of agreement versus MRI are moderately wide, while wall motion deficits are detected with high accuracy. (orig.)

  16. Pleomorphic adenoma: Choice of radiographic imaging modality - Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging? Illustration through a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common benign neoplasm of the major salivary glands arising primarily from the parotid gland. Computed tomography (CT is one of the primary imaging modalities used to assess the tumors of salivary glands. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may provide additional information over CT. Case Report: We report the case of a 60-year-old male with a slowly enlarging, well-defined, round, painless, non-fixated, rubber-like swelling over the left ramus region below the ear, measuring about 4 × 4.5 cm, covering the lower border of the mandible near the angle. A provisional diagnosis of PA was given and CT and MRI were used to study the lesion. Discussion: Through this case, which was suspected to have undergone malignant transformation because of indistinct margins and focal hypodense areas on CT but was later confirmed to be a benign salivary gland tumor on MRI, we illustrate the role of CT and MRI as diagnostic aids in PA and emphasize on what should be the choice of imaging modality for parotid tumors.

  17. Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data to Constrain a Positron Emission Tomography Kinetic Model: Theory and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob U. Fluckiger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data can constrain a compartmental model for analyzing dynamic positron emission tomography (PET data. We first develop the theory that enables the use of DCE-MRI data to separate whole tissue time activity curves (TACs available from dynamic PET data into individual TACs associated with the blood space, the extravascular-extracellular space (EES, and the extravascular-intracellular space (EIS. Then we simulate whole tissue TACs over a range of physiologically relevant kinetic parameter values and show that using appropriate DCE-MRI data can separate the PET TAC into the three components with accuracy that is noise dependent. The simulations show that accurate blood, EES, and EIS TACs can be obtained as evidenced by concordance correlation coefficients >0.9 between the true and estimated TACs. Additionally, provided that the estimated DCE-MRI parameters are within 10% of their true values, the errors in the PET kinetic parameters are within approximately 20% of their true values. The parameters returned by this approach may provide new information on the transport of a tracer in a variety of dynamic PET studies.

  18. Cine magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography in the evaluation of chest wall invasion of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokozaki, Michiya; Nawano, Shigeru; Nagai, Kanji; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Kodama, Tetsuro; Nishiwaki, Yutaka.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) in the evaluation of chest wall invasion, we compared the results of cine-MRI with those of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). Eleven patients were examined who had no pain and who were difficult to diagnose by routine examinations. MRI was performed with a Magnetom SP/4000, 1.5T unit (Siemens, Germany). For cine imaging, continuous turbo-FLUSH (ultra fast low angle shot) images were obtained at an orthogonal section to the chest wall during slow deep breathing. A CT scan was performed using a TCT 900S or Super Helix (Toshiba, Japan) at 1 cm intervals, with section thicknesses of 1 cm throughout the entire chest. US was performed with a model SSA-270A (Toshiba, Japan) with 7.5-MHz linear array scanners (PLF-705S; Toshiba, Japan). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 67%, 75% and 73% for cine MRI, 67%, 63% and 64% for CT, 33%, 75% and 64% for US, respectively. These results indicate that cine MRI is potentially useful for the diagnosis of chest wall invasion of lung cancer. (author)

  19. Efficacy of navigation in skull base surgery using composite computer graphics of magnetic resonance and computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nakamasa; Kurimoto, Masanori; Hirashima, Yutaka; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takashi; Tomita, Takahiro; Endo, Shunro

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a neurosurgical navigation system using three-dimensional composite computer graphics (CGs) of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images was evaluated in skull base surgery. Three-point transformation was used for integration of MR and CT images. MR and CT image data were obtained with three skin markers placed on the patient's scalp. Volume-rendering manipulations of the data produced three-dimensional CGs of the scalp, brain, and lesions from the MR images, and the scalp and skull from the CT. Composite CGs of the scalp, skull, brain, and lesion were created by registering the three markers on the three-dimensional rendered scalp images obtained from MR imaging and CT in the system. This system was used for 14 patients with skull base lesions. Three-point transformation using three-dimensional CGs was easily performed for multimodal registration. Simulation of surgical procedures on composite CGs aided in comprehension of the skull base anatomy and selection of the optimal approaches. Intraoperative navigation aided in determination of actual spatial position in the skull base and the optimal trajectory to the tumor during surgical procedures. (author)

  20. Dosimetry for computed tomography using Fricke gel dosimetry and magnetic resonance imaging; Dosimetria em tomografia computadorizada empregando dosimetro Fricke gel e a tecnica de imageamento por ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capeleti, Felipe Favaro; Campos, Leticia L., E-mail: felipe@gmpbrasil.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    In this work it was determined a new method for the determination of absorbed doses in Computed Tomography (CT) examinations using Fricke gel dosimetry developed at IPEN. Absorbed doses were determined by different methods of analysis, such as optical absorption spectrometry, ionization chambers and magnetic resonance imaging. Lower limit of sensitivity of the Fricke gel solution, the solution repeatability signal Fricke gel and CT equipment, detection sensitivity, among other tests were performed. Different equipment of computed tomography with multiple detectors were used. The Fricke gel solution showed better repeatability than ±5.5% using the technique of optical absorption spectrophotometry and computed tomography equipment showed repeatability better than ±0.2%. The Fricke gel solution features an easy and relatively quick preparation, but it is necessary to be careful not to contaminate and lose the solution. With the results, it was confirmed the application of this type of dosimetry for computed tomography equipment. (author)

  1. Pure ground glass nodular adenocarcinomas: Are preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging useful or necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyoun; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Hong Kwan; Choi, Joon Young; Um, Sang-Won; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2015-09-01

    The utility of (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a staging workup for lung adenocarcinoma manifesting as pure ground glass opacity (GGO) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of these 2 tests for preoperative staging of pure GGO nodular lung adenocarcinoma. The study included 164 patients (male:female, 73:91; mean age, 62 years) with pure GGO nodular lung adenocarcinoma who underwent PET/CT (in 136 patients) and/or brain MRI (in 109 patients) before surgery. Pathologic N staging and dedicated standard imaging or follow-up imaging findings for M staging were used as reference standards. The median follow-up time was 47.9 months. On PET/CT scan, abnormal FDG uptake of lymph nodes was found in 2 of 136 patients (1.5%); both were negative on final pathology. Abnormal FDG uptake of the liver was detected in 1 patient, which was also confirmed to be negative by dedicated abdominal CT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET/CT in detecting metastases were not applicable, 98% (95% confidence interval [CI], 94%-100%), 0% (95% CI, 0%-71%), 100% (95% CI, 97%-100%), and 98% (95% CI, 94%-100%), respectively. No brain metastasis was found in preoperative brain MRI of 109 patients. Of 109 patients, 1 (0.9%) developed brain metastasis 30 months after surgical resection. PET/CT and brain MRI is not necessary in the staging of pure GGO nodular lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by 18 F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by 18 F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUV max ) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p 2 = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p 2 = 0.37 and p 2 = 0.48, respectively). 18 F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUV max .

  3. Differentiation of myocardial ischemia and infarction assessed by dynamic computed tomography perfusion imaging and comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance and single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Yuki; Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Toon, Ehime (Japan); Uetani, Teruyoshi; Kono, Tamami; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology, Hypertension and Nephrology, Toon, Ehime (Japan); Soma, Tsutomu [FUJIFILM RI Pharma Co., Ltd., QMS Group, Quality Assurance Department, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murase, Kenya [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Osaka (Japan); Iwaki, Hirotaka [Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Center for Clinical Research Data and Biostatistics, Toon, Ehime (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of myocardial blood flow (MBF) by computed tomography from dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) for detecting myocardial ischemia and infarction assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Fifty-three patients who underwent stress dynamic CTP and either SPECT (n = 25) or CMR (n = 28) were retrospectively selected. Normal and abnormal perfused myocardium (ischemia/infarction) were assessed by SPECT/CMR using 16-segment model. Sensitivity and specificity of CT-MBF (mL/g/min) for detecting the ischemic/infarction and severe infarction were assessed. The abnormal perfused myocardium and severe infarction were seen in SPECT (n = 90 and n = 19 of 400 segments) and CMR (n = 223 and n = 36 of 448 segments). For detecting the abnormal perfused myocardium, sensitivity and specificity were 80 % (95 %CI, 71-90) and 86 % (95 %CI, 76-91) in SPECT (cut-off MBF, 1.23), and 82 % (95 %CI, 76-88) and 87 % (95 %CI, 80-92) in CMR (cut-off MBF, 1.25). For detecting severe infarction, sensitivity and specificity were 95 % (95 %CI, 52-100) and 72 % (95 %CI, 53-91) in SPECT (cut-off MBF, 0.92), and 78 % (95 %CI, 67-97) and 80 % (95 %CI, 58-86) in CMR (cut-off MBF, 0.98), respectively. Dynamic CTP has a potential to detect abnormal perfused myocardium and severe infarction assessed by SPECT/CMR using comparable cut-off MBF. (orig.)

  4. Systematic review: Use of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis, assessment of activity and abdominal complications of Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Panes , Julian; Bouzas , Rosa; García-Sánchez , Valle; Chaparro , María; Pérez-Gisbert , Javier; Martínez De Guereñu , Blanca; Mendoza , Juan Luis; Paredes , José María; Quiroga , Sergi; Ripollés , Tomás; Rimola , Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud: Cross-sectional imaging techniques, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are increasingly used for evaluation of Crohn?s disease (CD). Aim: To perform an assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of cross-sectional imaging techniques for diagnosis of CD, evaluation of disease extension and activity, and diagnosis of complications, and to provide recommendations for their optimal use. Methods: Relevant ...

  5. Soft-tissue perineurioma of the retroperitoneum in a 63-year-old man, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumoto Mayumi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Soft-tissue perineuriomas are rare benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors in the subcutis of the extremities and the trunks of young patients. To our knowledge, this the first presentation of the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of a soft-tissue perineurioma in the retroperitoneum with pathologic correlation. Case presentation A 63-year-old Japanese man was referred for assessment of high blood pressure. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-defined, gradually enhancing tumor without focal degeneration or hemorrhage adjacent to the pancreatic body. Tumor excision with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed, as a malignant tumor of pancreatic origin could not be ruled out. No recurrence has been noted in the 16 months since the operation. Pathologic examination of the tumor revealed a soft-tissue perineurioma of the retroperitoneum. Conclusion Although the definitive diagnosis of soft-tissue perineurioma requires biopsy and immunohistochemical reactivity evaluation, the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings described in this report suggest inclusion of this rare tumor in the differential diagnosis when such findings occur in the retroperitoneum.

  6. Magnetic resonance tomography - a possibility for noninvasive meniscus diagnosis. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, F.; Koenig, H.; Sell, S.

    1989-01-01

    Meniscus tears were experimentally produced by surgery in 5 pigs. They were identified via MR tomography with the selected routine sequence (SE: TR 1600, TE 22/80msec, SD 3 mm) independent of position, orientation and severity. The best imaging was obtained between the 2nd and 8th weeks after the operation in the sagittal plane. Subsequently the contrast and with it simultaneously the delineation between intact fibrous cartilage and rupture cleft decreased; this could be observed in sequences weighted according to proton density and T2 in different degrees of intensity. Parallel to this a trial to induce degeneration in the meniscus tissue resulted 8 weeks after the operation in central, signal-intensive zones in the menisci. No success was achieved in trying to improve imaging of the pathological changes by means of intraarticular injections of Gd-DTPA; this was tried out at various points of time. Besides enabling the imaging of lesions of the fibrous cartilage as a matter of principle, MR tomography can also give limited information on the age of a meniscus tear. (orig.) [de

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children: comparison with multidetector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, H Nursun; Gormez, Ayşegul; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Karakaya, Jale; Oguz, Berna; Unal, Sule; Cetin, Mualla; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Haliloglu, Mithat

    2017-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to detect pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children. To compare MRI and multidetector CT findings of pulmonary abnormalities in immunocompromised children. Seventeen neutropaenic children (6 girls; ages 2-18 years) were included. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed with a 64-detector CT scanner. Axial and coronal non-enhanced thoracic MRI was performed using a 1.5-T scanner within 24 h of the CT examination (true fast imaging with steady-state free precession, fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with motion correction, T2-weighted half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin echo [HASTE], fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo). Pulmonary abnormalities (nodules, consolidations, ground glass opacities, atelectasis, pleural effusion and lymph nodes) were evaluated and compared among MRI sequences and between MRI and CT. The relationship between MRI sequences and nodule sizes was examined by chi- square test. Of 256 CT lesions, 207 (81%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 76-85%) were detected at MRI. Of 202 CT-detected nodules, 157 (78%, 95% CI 71-83%) were seen at motion-corrected MRI. Of the 1-5-mm nodules, 69% were detected by motion-corrected T2-weighted MRI and 38% by HASTE MRI. Sensitivity of MRI (both axial fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with variable phase encoding directions (BLADE) images and HASTE sequences) to detect pulmonary abnormalities is promising.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children: comparison with multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, H.N.; Gormez, Aysegul; Oguz, Berna; Haliloglu, Mithat; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Karakaya, Jale; Unal, Sule; Cetin, Mualla

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to detect pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children. To compare MRI and multidetector CT findings of pulmonary abnormalities in immunocompromised children. Seventeen neutropaenic children (6 girls; ages 2-18 years) were included. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed with a 64-detector CT scanner. Axial and coronal non-enhanced thoracic MRI was performed using a 1.5-T scanner within 24 h of the CT examination (true fast imaging with steady-state free precession, fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with motion correction, T2-weighted half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin echo [HASTE], fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo). Pulmonary abnormalities (nodules, consolidations, ground glass opacities, atelectasis, pleural effusion and lymph nodes) were evaluated and compared among MRI sequences and between MRI and CT. The relationship between MRI sequences and nodule sizes was examined by chi- square test. Of 256 CT lesions, 207 (81%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 76-85%) were detected at MRI. Of 202 CT-detected nodules, 157 (78%, 95% CI 71-83%) were seen at motion-corrected MRI. Of the 1-5-mm nodules, 69% were detected by motion-corrected T2-weighted MRI and 38% by HASTE MRI. Sensitivity of MRI (both axial fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with variable phase encoding directions (BLADE) images and HASTE sequences) to detect pulmonary abnormalities is promising. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children: comparison with multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, H.N.; Gormez, Aysegul; Oguz, Berna; Haliloglu, Mithat [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Ceyhan, Mehmet [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease, Ankara (Turkey); Karakaya, Jale [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Ankara (Turkey); Unal, Sule; Cetin, Mualla [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-02-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to detect pulmonary infection in immunocompromised children. To compare MRI and multidetector CT findings of pulmonary abnormalities in immunocompromised children. Seventeen neutropaenic children (6 girls; ages 2-18 years) were included. Non-contrast-enhanced CT was performed with a 64-detector CT scanner. Axial and coronal non-enhanced thoracic MRI was performed using a 1.5-T scanner within 24 h of the CT examination (true fast imaging with steady-state free precession, fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with motion correction, T2-weighted half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin echo [HASTE], fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo). Pulmonary abnormalities (nodules, consolidations, ground glass opacities, atelectasis, pleural effusion and lymph nodes) were evaluated and compared among MRI sequences and between MRI and CT. The relationship between MRI sequences and nodule sizes was examined by chi- square test. Of 256 CT lesions, 207 (81%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 76-85%) were detected at MRI. Of 202 CT-detected nodules, 157 (78%, 95% CI 71-83%) were seen at motion-corrected MRI. Of the 1-5-mm nodules, 69% were detected by motion-corrected T2-weighted MRI and 38% by HASTE MRI. Sensitivity of MRI (both axial fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin echo with variable phase encoding directions (BLADE) images and HASTE sequences) to detect pulmonary abnormalities is promising. (orig.)

  11. Imaging human reward processing with positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Nina B L; Slifstein, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Xu, Xiaoyan; Ayoub, Rawad; Medina, Olga; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Krystal, John H; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2012-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging (fMRI) studies show activation in mesolimbic circuitry in tasks involving reward processing, like the Monetary Incentive Delay Task (MIDT). In voltammetry studies in animals, mesolimbic dopamine release is associated with reward salience. This study examined the relationship between fMRI activation and magnitude of dopamine release measured with Positron emission tomography study (PET) in the same subjects using MIDT in both modalities to test if fMRI activation is related to dopamine release. Eighteen healthy subjects were scanned with [¹¹C]raclopride PET at baseline and after MIDT. Binding potential (BP(ND)) was derived by equilibrium analysis in striatal subregions and percent change across conditions (∆BP(ND)) was measured. Blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD) signal changes with MIDT were measured during fMRI using voxelwise analysis and ROI analysis and correlated with ∆BP(ND). ∆BP(ND) was not significant in the ventral striatum (VST) but reached significance in the posterior caudate. The fMRI BOLD activation was highest in VST. No significant associations between ∆BP(ND) and change in fMRI BOLD were observed with VST using ROI analysis. Voxelwise analysis showed positive correlation between BOLD activation in anticipation of the highest reward and ∆BP(ND) in VST and precommissural putamen. Our study indicates that endogenous dopamine release in VST is of small magnitude and is related to BOLD signal change during performance of the MIDT in only a few voxels when rewarding and nonrewarding conditions are interspersed. The lack of correlation at the ROI level may be due to the small magnitude of release or to the particular dependence of BOLD on glutamatergic signaling.

  12. Localization of the surgical bed using supine magnetic resonance and computed tomography scan fusion for planification of breast interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, Marjory; Racine, Marie-Lynn; Trop, Isabelle; Hathout, Lara; Nguyen, David; Derashodian, Talar; David, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of supine breast magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for definition and localization of the surgical bed (SB) after breast conservative surgery. To assess the inter-observer variability of surgical bed delineation on computed tomography (CT) and supine MR. Materials and methods: Patients candidate for breast brachytherapy and no contra-indications for MR were eligible for this study. Patients were placed in supine position, with the ipsilateral arm above the head in an immobilization device. All patients underwent CT and MR in the same implant/treatment position. Four points were predefined for CT-MRI image fusion. The surgical cavity was drawn on CT then MRI, by three independent observers. Fusion and analysis of CT and MR images were performed using the ECLIPSE treatment planning software. Results: From September 2005 to November 2008, 70 patients were included in this prospective study. For each patient, we were able to acquire axial T1 and T2 images of good quality. Using the predefined fusion points, the median error following the fusion was 2.7 mm. For each observer, volumes obtained on MR were, respectively, 30%, 38% and 40% smaller than those derived from CT images. A highly significant inter-observer variability in the delineation of the SB on CT was demonstrated (p < 0.0001). On the contrary, all three observers agreed on the volume of the SB drawn on MR. Conclusion: Supine breast MRI yields a more precise definition of the SB with a smaller inter-observer variability than CT and may obviate the need for surgical clips. The volume of the SB is smaller with MRI. In our opinion, CT-MRI fusion should be used for SB delineation, in view of partial breast irradiation.

  13. Potentials of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography for preoperative local staging of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollven, Erik; Blomqvist, Lennart; Holm, Torbjorn; Glimelius, Bengt; Loerinc, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preoperative identification of locally advanced colon cancer is of importance in order to properly plan treatment. Purpose: To study high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus computed tomography (CT) for preoperative staging of colon cancer with surgery and histopathology as reference standard. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a total of 29 tumors were included. Patients were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using a phased array body coil. T2 turbo spin-echo high resolution sequences were obtained in a coronal, transverse, and perpendicular plane to the long axis of the colon at the site of the tumor. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using a protocol for metastasis staging. The examinations were independently evaluated by two gastrointestinal radiologists using criteria adapted to imaging for prediction of T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion. Based on the T-stage, tumors were divided in to locally advanced (T3cd-T4) and not locally advanced (T1-T3ab). Surgical and histopathological findings served as reference standard. Results: Using MRI, T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion were correctly predicted for each observer in 90% and 93%, 72% and 69%, and 82% and 78% of cases, respectively. With CT the corresponding results were 79% and 76%, 72% and 72%, 78% and 67%. For MRI inter-observer agreements (Kappa statistics) were 0.79, 0.10, and 0.76. For CT the corresponding results were 0.64, 0.66, and 0.22. Conclusion: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer, defined as tumor stage T3cd-T4, can be identified by both high resolution MRI and CT, even when CT is performed with a metastasis staging protocol. MRI may have an advantage, due to its high soft tissue discrimination, to identify certain prognostic factors such as T-stage and extramural venous invasion

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance, computed tomography and contrast enhanced ultrasound in radiological multimodality assessment of peribiliary liver metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Granata

    Full Text Available We compared diagnostic performance of Magnetic Resonance (MR, Computed Tomography (CT and Ultrasound (US with (CEUS and without contrast medium to identify peribiliary metastasis.We identified 35 subjects with histological proven peribiliary metastases who underwent CEUS, CT and MR study. Four radiologists evaluated the presence of peribiliary lesions, using a 4-point confidence scale. Echogenicity, density and T1-Weigthed (T1-W, T2-W and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI signal intensity as well as the enhancement pattern during contrast studies on CEUS, CT and MR so as hepatobiliary-phase on MRI was assessed.All lesions were detected by MR. CT detected 8 lesions, while US/CEUS detected one lesion. According to the site of the lesion, respect to the bile duct and hepatic parenchyma: 19 (54.3% were periductal, 15 (42.8% were intra-periductal and 1 (2.8% was periductal-intrahepatic. According to the confidence scale MRI had the best diagnostic performance to assess the lesion. CT obtained lower diagnostic performance. There was no significant difference in MR signal intensity and contrast enhancement among all metastases (p>0.05. There was no significant difference in CT density and contrast enhancement among all metastases (p>0.05.MRI is the method of choice for biliary tract tumors but it does not allow a correct differential diagnosis among different histological types of metastasis. The presence of biliary tree dilatation without hepatic lesions on CT and US/CEUS study may be an indirect sign of peribiliary metastases and for this reason the patient should be evaluated by MRI.

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weidong; Chen Yanfeng; Li Chuanxing; Zhang Liang; Xu Zhibin; Zhang Fujun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to analyze the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET) of the head and neck. Methods: Eight patients with pPNET of the head and neck confirmed by histopathological examination were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The average patient age was 8 years. The tumor location in the 8 patients was as follows: maxillofacial region (right, 2; left, 1), left maxillary sinus (1), right masticator space (1), left carotid space (1), right infratemporal fossa (1), and left parotid gland (1). All 5 patients who underwent CT demonstrated ill-defined soft masses and no calcification. Three patients with tumors in the maxillofacial region showed homogeneous small masses and a mild enhancement. The patient with left maxillary sinus tumor showed a heterogeneous mass with patchy, necrotic foci and mild heterogeneous enhancement. The patient with right masticator space tumor showed a heterogeneous mass, and marked heterogeneous enhancement. The T1-weighted images of the patients with right infratemporal fossa, left carotid space, and left parotid gland tumors were isointense. The T2-weighted images were heterogeneous and mildly hyperintense in 2 patients and hyperintense in 1 patient. Heterogeneous intermediate enhancement was demonstrated in 2 patients and mild ring enhancement in 1 patient. Conclusion: The imaging features of pPNET of the head and neck are non-specific. An ill-defined, aggressive mass and variable enhancement on CT and MR images may suggest the diagnosis of pPNET. Peripheral PNET should be included in the differential diagnosis of children and adolescents' regional tumors.

  16. Morphological analysis and differentiation of benign cystic neoplasms of the pancreas using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, Christian; Heine, G.; Stelter, L.; Steffen, I.G.; Rothe, J.H.; Walter, T.C.; Denecke, T. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie; Fischer, C. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum (Germany). Medizinische Klinik m. S. Hepatologie und Gastroenterologie; Bahra, M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum (Germany). Klinik fuer Allgemein, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate morphologic characteristics and establish a standardized diagnostic algorithm to differentiate benign cystic pancreatic tumors (CPTs) in non-pancreatitis patients using multidetector computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Patients with histopathologically proven CPTs who had undergone MRI and/or CT and subsequent tumor resection in our institution were retrospectively identified. Images were analyzed for morphology and enhancement patterns by three independent blinded observers. Preoperative image findings were correlated with histopathological results. Based on the evaluated morphologic parameters, a standardized diagnostic algorithm was designed to help characterize the lesions. Results: A total of 62 consecutive patients with 64 CPTs were identified from the surgical database (21 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms; 10 mucinous cystic neoplasms; 12 serous microcystic adenomas; 3 serous oligocystic adenomas; 6 solid pseudopapillary tumors; 12 neuroendocrine neoplasms). The overall averaged accuracy for the 3 observers was 89.9 % for CT and 93.1 % for MRI with increasing overall accuracy in relation to the experience of the observer (88.2 %, 91.5 %, and 93.8 %, respectively). Overall, the generalized kappa value was 0.69 (CT, 0.64; MRI, 0.76); p < 0.001. The accuracy of the standardized diagnostic algorithm was 91.1 %. Conclusion: It is possible to characterize benign CPTs with MRI and CT, while MRI appears to be superior to CT. Diagnostic accuracy depends on the observer's experience. The standardized algorithm can aid in the differential diagnosis but still needs to be tested in other patient populations. (orig.)

  17. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5 Tesla of mechanically induced osteoarthritis in rabbit knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torelli, S.R.; Rahal, R.S.; Volpi, R.S.; Yamashita, S.; Mamprim, M.J.; Crocci, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the present experimental study we assessed induced osteoarthritis data in rabbits, compared three diagnostic methods, i.e., radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlated the imaging findings with those obtained by macroscopic evaluation. Ten young female rabbits of the Norfolk breed were used. Seven rabbits had the right knee immobilized in extension for a period of 12 weeks (immobilized group), and three others did not have a limb immobilized and were maintained under the same conditions (control group). Alterations observed by XR, CT and MRI after the period of immobilization were osteophytes, osteochondral lesions, increase and decrease of joint space, all of them present both in the immobilized and non-immobilized contralateral limbs. However, a significantly higher score was obtained for the immobilized limbs (XT: P = 0.016, CT: P 0.031, MRI: P = 0.0156). All imaging methods were able to detect osteoarthritis changes after the 12 weeks of immobilization. Macroscopic evaluation identified increased thickening of joint capsule, proliferative and connective tissue in the femoropatellar joint, and irregularities of articular cartilage, especially in immobilized knees. The differences among XR, CT and MRI were not statistically significant for the immobilized knees. However, MRI using a 0.5 Tesla scanner was statistically different from CT and XR for the non-immobilized contralateral knees. We conclude that the three methods detected osteoarthritis lesions in rabbit knees, but MRI was less sensitive than XR and CT in detecting lesions compatible with initial osteoarthritis. Since none of the techniques revealed all the lesions, it is important to use all methods to establish an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  18. Accuracy of Cytology for Diagnosis of Lipomatous Tumors: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography Findings in 175 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einarsdottir, H.; Skoog, L.; Soederlund, V.; Bauer, H.C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of fine-needle aspiration cytology in the diagnostic work-up of lipomatous tumors of the extremities and trunk, and to identify specific radiological features that could aid in the preoperative evaluation. Material and Methods: 175 patients with subfascial lipomatous tumors who had undergone preoperative magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and fine-needle aspiration cytology were studied. The percentage of fat within the lesion was visually graded from the images as: none, 1-75%, 75-95%, or 95-100%. The histological and cytological diagnoses were compared and in discordant cases the radiological images were re-reviewed. Results: There was cytological and histological concordance in 96% of lipomas and in 85% of atypical lipomatous tumors (ALT) and liposarcomas. Most discordant cases exhibited 1-75% fat. Radiological review suggested that cytological sampling problems due to tumor heterogeneity were the main cause of diagnostic difficulties. The majority of tumors with less than 75% fat were liposarcomas, and in no liposarcoma was the fat content higher than 75%. Both ALT and lipoma were found in the 95-100% group. Conclusion: Cytology can be highly accurate in the diagnosis of lipomatous tumors, including ALT; however, critical comparison with the radiological findings increases diagnostic security. In tumors with fat content visually assessed as less than 75% of the tumor volume, liposarcoma is the most likely diagnosis and a cytological diagnosis of ALT or lipoma should be questioned. In lesions with 75-95% fat, liposarcoma is unlikely, but FNAC is still indicated for safety. In lesions with 95-100% fat, FNAC is only indicated if the differentiation between lipoma and ALT influences the treatment strategy

  19. Comparison between perfusion computed tomography and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Zhong Zheng, E-mail: jzz2397@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Wei, E-mail: sw740104@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Jin Long, E-mail: shij_ns@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shen, Dan Dan, E-mail: 1021121084@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Gu, Hong Mei, E-mail: guhongmei71@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: 56516400@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provide independent measurements of biomarkers related to tumor perfusion. The aim of this study was to compare the two techniques in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (14 males and 11 females; 51 ± 11 years old, ranging from 33 to 70 years) were includede in this prospective study. All patients underwent both PCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a 256-slice CT scanner and a 3-T MRI system. PCT yielded permeability surface-area product (PS) using deconvolution physiological models; meanwhile, DCE-MRI determined volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}) using the Tofts-Kermode compartment model. All cases were submitted to surgical intervention, and CD105-microvascular density (CD105-MVD) was measured in each glioblastoma specimen. Then, Spearman’s correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were obtained for PS, K{sup trans} and CD105-MVD. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Tumor PS and K{sup trans} values were correlated with CD105-MVD (r = 0.644, P < 0.001; r = 0.683, P < 0.001). In addition, PS was correlated with K{sup trans} in glioblastoma (r = 0.931, P < 0.001). Finally, Bland-Altman plots showed no significant differences between PS and K{sup trans} (P = 0.063). Conclusion: PCT and DCE-MRI measurements of glioblastoma perfusion biomarkers have similar results, suggesting that both techniques may have comparable utility. Therefore, PCT may serve as an alternative modality to DCE-MRI for the in vivo evaluation of glioblastoma microvasculature.

  20. Comparison of onboard low-field magnetic resonance imaging versus onboard computed tomography for anatomy visualization in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Camille E; Parikh, Parag J; Spencer, Christopher R; Green, Olga L; Hu, Yanle; Mutic, Sasa; Olsen, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Onboard magnetic resonance imaging (OB-MRI) for daily localization and adaptive radiotherapy has been under development by several groups. However, no clinical studies have evaluated whether OB-MRI improves visualization of the target and organs at risk (OARs) compared to standard onboard computed tomography (OB-CT). This study compared visualization of patient anatomy on images acquired on the MRI-(60)Co ViewRay system to those acquired with OB-CT. Fourteen patients enrolled on a protocol approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and undergoing image-guided radiotherapy for cancer in the thorax (n = 2), pelvis (n = 6), abdomen (n = 3) or head and neck (n = 3) were imaged with OB-MRI and OB-CT. For each of the 14 patients, the OB-MRI and OB-CT datasets were displayed side-by-side and independently reviewed by three radiation oncologists. Each physician was asked to evaluate which dataset offered better visualization of the target and OARs. A quantitative contouring study was performed on two abdominal patients to assess if OB-MRI could offer improved inter-observer segmentation agreement for adaptive planning. In total 221 OARs and 10 targets were compared for visualization on OB-MRI and OB-CT by each of the three physicians. The majority of physicians (two or more) evaluated visualization on MRI as better for 71% of structures, worse for 10% of structures, and equivalent for 14% of structures. 5% of structures were not visible on either. Physicians agreed unanimously for 74% and in majority for > 99% of structures. Targets were better visualized on MRI in 4/10 cases, and never on OB-CT. Low-field MR provides better anatomic visualization of many radiotherapy targets and most OARs as compared to OB-CT. Further studies with OB-MRI should be pursued.

  1. Potentials of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging versus computed tomography for preoperative local staging of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollven, Erik; Blomqvist, Lennart [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: erik.rollven@ki.se; Holm, Torbjorn [Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Surgery, Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna, Stockholm (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Loerinc, Esther [Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Dept. of Pathology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Solna, Sweden (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Preoperative identification of locally advanced colon cancer is of importance in order to properly plan treatment. Purpose: To study high resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) versus computed tomography (CT) for preoperative staging of colon cancer with surgery and histopathology as reference standard. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients with a total of 29 tumors were included. Patients were examined on a 1.5 T MR unit using a phased array body coil. T2 turbo spin-echo high resolution sequences were obtained in a coronal, transverse, and perpendicular plane to the long axis of the colon at the site of the tumor. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed using a protocol for metastasis staging. The examinations were independently evaluated by two gastrointestinal radiologists using criteria adapted to imaging for prediction of T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion. Based on the T-stage, tumors were divided in to locally advanced (T3cd-T4) and not locally advanced (T1-T3ab). Surgical and histopathological findings served as reference standard. Results: Using MRI, T-stage, N-stage, and extramural venous invasion were correctly predicted for each observer in 90% and 93%, 72% and 69%, and 82% and 78% of cases, respectively. With CT the corresponding results were 79% and 76%, 72% and 72%, 78% and 67%. For MRI inter-observer agreements (Kappa statistics) were 0.79, 0.10, and 0.76. For CT the corresponding results were 0.64, 0.66, and 0.22. Conclusion: Patients with locally advanced colon cancer, defined as tumor stage T3cd-T4, can be identified by both high resolution MRI and CT, even when CT is performed with a metastasis staging protocol. MRI may have an advantage, due to its high soft tissue discrimination, to identify certain prognostic factors such as T-stage and extramural venous invasion.

  2. Assessment of left atrial volume and function: a comparative study between echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and multi slice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, J Tobias; Lønborg, Jacob; Fuchs, Andreas; Andersen, Mads J; Vejlstrup, Niels; Kelbæk, Henning; Engstrøm, Thomas; Møller, Jacob E; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2012-06-01

    Measurement of left atrial (LA) maximal volume (LA(max)) using two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) provides prognostic information in several cardiac diseases. However, the relationship between LA(max) and LA function is poorly understood and TTE is less well suited for measuring dynamic LA volume changes. Conversely, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) appears more appropriate for such measures. We sought to determine the relationship between LA size assessed with TTE and LA size and function assessed with CMR and MSCT. Fifty-four patients were examined 3 months post myocardial infarction with echocardiography, CMR and MSCT. Left atrial volumes and LA reservoir function were assessed by TTE. LA time-volume curves were determined and LA reservoir function (cyclic change and fractional change), passive emptying function (reservoir volume) and pump function (left atrial ejection fraction-LAEF) were derived using CMR and MSCT. Left atrial fractional change and left atrial ejection fraction (LAEF) determined with CMR and MSCT were unrelated to LA(max) enlargement by echocardiography (P = NS). There was an overall good agreement between CMR and MSCT, with a small to moderate bias in LA(max) (4.9 ± 10.4 ml), CC (3.1 ± 9.1 ml) and reservoir volume (3.4 ± 9.1 ml). TTE underestimates LA(max) with up to 32% compared with CMR and MSCT (P fractional change and LAEF is not significantly related to LA(max) measured by TTE. TTE systematically underestimated LA volumes, whereas there are good agreements between MSCT and CMR for volumetric and functional properties.

  3. The Prognostic Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Viral Encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, U.K.; Kalita, J.; Srivastav, A.; Pradhan, P.K. (Depts. of Neurology and Nuclear Medicine, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India))

    2008-09-15

    Background: There is a paucity of studies evaluating the prognostic role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) changes in viral encephalitis. Purpose: To study MRI and SPECT changes in patients with viral encephalitis, and to correlate these changes with clinical findings and outcome. Material and Methods: During 1997-2006, 31 encephalitis patients (aged 2-60 years; nine females, 22 males) underwent both MRI and SPECT studies. Their demographic and clinical data and 6-month outcome were recorded. For the diagnosis of encephalitis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were carried out. Cranial MRI was done on a 1.5 T scanner, and 99mTc ethylene cysteine dimer (ECD) SPECT using a gamma camera. Outcome was defined at 6 months as complete, partial, or poor recovery. Results: 19 patients had Japanese encephalitis (JE), one had herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), and 11 had nonspecific encephalitis. Movement disorders were present in 21, parkinsonian features in 19, and dystonia in 16 patients. MRI was abnormal in 20 patients, and revealed thalamic involvement in 17, basal ganglia in eight, brainstem in 11, and cortical in two. SPECT revealed hypoperfusion in 22 patients, which was cortical in 11, thalamic in 10, basal ganglia in six, and midbrain in one. Cortical involvement was more frequently found by SPECT and brainstem involvement by MRI. Outcome of encephalitis did not differ in the different groups of encephalitis and MRI changes. Conclusion: MRI and SPECT show a spectrum of findings in encephalitis, but these do not correlate with 6-month outcome

  4. Transmission imaging for registration of ictal and interictal single-photon emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, O. [Epilepsy Unit, Neurology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FIN-02015 HUT (Finland); Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Laboratory Department, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Savolainen, S. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Laboratory Department, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Granstroem, M.-L.; Gaily, E. [Epilepsy Unit, Neurology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Poutanen, V.-P. [Department of Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Pohjonen, H. [Technology Development Centre, P.O. Box 69, 00101 Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-02-01

    A method developed for registration of ictal and interictal single-photon emission tomography (SPET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) is described. For SPET studies, technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) was injected intravenously while the patient was monitored on video-EEG to document the ictal or interictal state. Imaging was performed using a triple-head gamma camera equipped with a transmission imaging device using a gadolinium-153 source. The images (128 x 128 pixels, voxel size 3.7 x 3.7 x 3.6 mm{sup 3}) were reconstructed using an iterative algorithm and postfiltered with a Wiener filter. The gold-plated silver electrodes on the patient's scalp were utilized as markers for registration of the ictal and interictal SPET images, as these metallic markers were clearly seen on the transmission images. Fitting of the marker sets was based on a non-iterative least squares method. The interictal SPET image was subtracted from the ictal image after scaling. The T1-weighted MPRAGE MR images with voxel size of 1.0 x 1.0 x 1.0 mm{sup 3} were obtained with a 1.5-T scanner. For registration of MR and subtraction SPET images, the external marker set of the ictal SPET study was fitted to the surface of the head segmented from MR images. The SPET registration was tested with a phantom experiment. Registration of ictal and interictal SPET in five patient studies resulted in a 2-mm RMS residual of the marker sets. The estimated RMS error of registration in the final result combining locations of the electrodes, subtraction SPET and MR images was 3-5 mm. In conclusion, transmission imaging can be utilized for an accurate and easily implemented registration procedure for ictal and interictal SPET, MRI and EEG. (orig.)

  5. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Weidong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510060 (China); Chen Yanfeng [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510060 (China); Li Chuanxing; Zhang Liang; Xu Zhibin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510060 (China); Zhang Fujun, E-mail: drzhangfj@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510060 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We aimed to analyze the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET) of the head and neck. Methods: Eight patients with pPNET of the head and neck confirmed by histopathological examination were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The average patient age was 8 years. The tumor location in the 8 patients was as follows: maxillofacial region (right, 2; left, 1), left maxillary sinus (1), right masticator space (1), left carotid space (1), right infratemporal fossa (1), and left parotid gland (1). All 5 patients who underwent CT demonstrated ill-defined soft masses and no calcification. Three patients with tumors in the maxillofacial region showed homogeneous small masses and a mild enhancement. The patient with left maxillary sinus tumor showed a heterogeneous mass with patchy, necrotic foci and mild heterogeneous enhancement. The patient with right masticator space tumor showed a heterogeneous mass, and marked heterogeneous enhancement. The T1-weighted images of the patients with right infratemporal fossa, left carotid space, and left parotid gland tumors were isointense. The T2-weighted images were heterogeneous and mildly hyperintense in 2 patients and hyperintense in 1 patient. Heterogeneous intermediate enhancement was demonstrated in 2 patients and mild ring enhancement in 1 patient. Conclusion: The imaging features of pPNET of the head and neck are non-specific. An ill-defined, aggressive mass and variable enhancement on CT and MR images may suggest the diagnosis of pPNET. Peripheral PNET should be included in the differential diagnosis of children and adolescents' regional tumors.

  6. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  7. Role of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer; comparison with multidetector row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergul, N; Gundogan, C; Tozlu, M; Toprak, H; Kadıoglu, H; Aydin, M; Cermik, T F

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to analyze the contribution of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) imaging to the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer compared with multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). We retrospectively scanned the data of 52 patients who were referred for FDG PET/CT imaging for evaluation of pancreatic lesions greater than 10mm. The diagnostic performances of 4 imaging methods and the impact of PET/CT on the management of pancreatic cancer were defined. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in 33 of 52 patients (63%), 15 patients had benign diseases of pancreas (29%), and 4 patients were normal (8%). Sensitivity and NPV of EUS and PET/CT were equal (100%) and higher than MDCT and MRI. Specificity, PPV and NPV of PET/CT were significantly higher than MDCT. However, sensitivities of two imaging methods were not significantly different. There was no significant difference between PET/CT and MRI and EUS for these values. When the cut-off value of SUVmax was 3.2, the most effective sensitivity and specificity values were obtained. PET/CT contributed to the management of pancreatic cancer in 30% of patients. FDG PET/CT is a valuable imaging method for the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer, especially when applied along with EUS as first line diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Jae Seung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by {sup 18}F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p < 0.01, R{sup 2} = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p < 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.37 and p < 0.01, R{sup 2} = 0.48, respectively). {sup 18}F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUV{sub max}.

  9. [Comparative assessment of MR-semiotics of acutest intracerebral hematomas in low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsova, V I; Burenchev, D V; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Prokhorov, A V; Smirnov, A M; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    An objective of the study was to compare sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance (MR) tomography of acutest intracerebral hematomas (ICH) and to assess differences between symptoms in obtained images. A study was conducted using experimental ICH in rats (n=6). Hematomas were formed by two injections of autologic blood into the brain. MR-devices "Bio Spec 70/30" with magnetic field strength of 7 T and "Ellipse-150" with magnetic field strength of 0,15 T were used in the study. MR-tomography was carried out 3-5 h after the injections. Both MR-devices revealed the presence of pathological lesion in all animals. Extra highfield frequency MR-tomography showed the specific signs of ICH caused by the paramagnetic effect of deoxyhemoglobin in T2 and T2*-weighted images (WI) and low frequency MR-tomography - in T2*-WI only. The comparable sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency MR-devices in acutest ICH was established.

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  12. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quail, Michael A., E-mail: m.quail@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Nordmeyer, Johannes [Department of Congenital Heart Disease and Paediatric Cardiology, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schievano, Silvia [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Reinthaler, Markus; Mullen, Michael J. [The Heart Hospital, University College Hospital and Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, UCL, 16-18 Westmoreland Street, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.5 cm{sup 2}), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm{sup 2}, L.A 1.4 cm{sup 2}). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve

  13. Use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for TAVR assessment in patients with bioprosthetic aortic valves: Comparison with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quail, Michael A.; Nordmeyer, Johannes; Schievano, Silvia; Reinthaler, Markus; Mullen, Michael J.; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been successfully used to treat patients with failing aortic bioprostheses. Computed tomography (CT) is the usual method of pre-procedural imaging for TAVR in the native position; however, the optimal modality for valve-in-valve procedures has not been established. CT can assess intracardiac anatomy and is superior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in the assessment of coronary artery disease. However, CMR can provide superior haemodynamic information, does not carry the risk of ionising radiation, and may be performed without contrast in patients with renal insufficiency. In this study, we compared CT and CMR for the evaluation of TAVR in a small cohort of patients with existing aortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: 21 patients with aortic bioprostheses were prospectively evaluated by CT and CMR, as pre-assessment for TAVR; agreement between measurements of aortic geometries was assessed. Results: 16/21 patients had aortic bioprostheses constructed with a metal ring, and 5/21 patients had a metal strut construction. Patients with metal struts had significant metal-artefact on CMR, which compromised image quality in this region. There was good agreement between CT and CMR measurements of aortic geometry. The mean difference (d) in annulus area-derived diameter was 0.5 mm (95% limits of agreement [L.A] 4.2 mm). There was good agreement between modalities for the cross-sectional area of the sinuses of valsalva (d 0.5 cm 2 , L.A 1.4 cm 2 ), sinotubular junction (d 0.9 cm 2 , L.A 1.5 cm 2 ), and ascending aorta (d 0.6 cm 2 , L.A 1.4 cm 2 ). In patients without metal struts, the left coronary artery height d was 0.7 mm and L.A 2.8 mm. Conclusions: Our analysis shows that CMR and CT measurements of aortic geometry show good agreement, including measurement of annulus size and coronary artery location, and thus provide the necessary anatomical information for valve-in-valve TAVR planning. However

  14. Elastofibroma dorsi: computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in two cases; Elastofibroma dorsal: hallazgos en TC y RM. A proposito de dos casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, A.; Bravo, F.; Garrido, J.; Ortega, R. [Hospital Universitario Reina Sofia. Cordoba (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The elastofibroma dorse is a benign, nonencapsulated pseudotumor consisting of a proliferation of fibrous tissue and elastic fibers accompanied by fatty tissue. It is usually locate in the scapular region and can be unilateral or bilateral. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings are characteristic and, in the proper clinical context, practically pathognomonic: a fat-containing subcapsular mass with an attenuation coefficient and signal intensity similar to those of the adjacent muscles. We report two new cases of elastofibroma dorsi that fulfilled all the clinical and radiologic criteria, enabling the preoperative diagnosis. (Author) 15 refs.

  15. Measurement of left atrial volume by 2D and 3D non-contrast computed tomography compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredgart, Maise Høigaard; Carter-Storch, Rasmus; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the gold standard for assessment of left atrial (LA) volume. We assessed the feasibility of evaluating LA volume using 3D non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT). Furthermore, since manual tracing of LA volume is time consuming, we...... evaluated the accuracy of the LA area using 2D NCCT imaging for LA volume assessment. Methods: MRI and NCCT imaging were performed in 69 patients before and one year after aortic valve replacement. In 3D MRI and 3D NCCT, each slice was manually traced, excluding the pulmonary veins and atrial appendage...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  17. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  20. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  1. Comparison of Accuracy of Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with Accuracy of Non-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of Local Extension of Base of Tongue Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Rathod

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of base of tongue malignancy can be obtained through clinical examination and biopsy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT are used to detect its local extension, nodal spread and distant metastases. The main aim of study was to compare the accuracy of MRI and contrast enhanced CT in determining the local extent of base of tongue malignancy. Twenty five patients, biopsy proven cases of squamous cell carcinoma of base of tongue were taken. 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit with T2 weighted axial, coronal image; T1 weighted axial, coronal image; and STIR (Short tau inversion recovery axial and coronal images were used. 16 slice Computed Tomography unit with non-contrast and contrast enhanced images were used. Accuracy of CT to detect midline crossing: 50%; accuracy of MRI to detect midline crossing: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect anterior extension: 92%; accuracy of MRI to detect anterior extension: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect bone involvement: 20%; accuracy of MRI to detect bone involvement: 100%. MRI proved to be a better investigation than CT, in terms of evaluation of depth of invasion, presence of bony involvement, extension to opposite side, anterior half of tongue, tonsillar fossa, floor of mouth or oropharynx.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  6. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  8. Selection of multislice in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. Selecao de multiplos planos em tomografia por ressonancia magnetica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frare, Junior, P L

    1990-01-01

    The study and the implementation of three techniques for the selection of multislice, aiming the optimization of the NMR tomography is presented. The first technique uses the simultaneous excitation of multiple slices, being each plane encoded with a pre determined phase for a latter decodification of the information by the linear combination of n experiments. The second one makes use of the multislice simultaneous excitation, like the first one, but the slices are acquired in the presence of an oblique reading gradient, which provides us the multi slices signal without any further computer processing. The third technique uses frequency multiplexed excitation, that is, different slices are successively excited during the repetition time of an acquisition, making possible multislice acquisition at the same time of a single slice. The construction and the use of a phantom for the equipment characterization are discussed too. Many technical aspects necessary for an improvement of the tomography performance, like reception circuits and resonators, are discussed. A brief introduction to the gradient modulated adiabatic excitation (GMAX) technique and the first results ever obtained with it, using surface coils, is presented. (author).

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  11. Does the Primary Imaging Modality-Computed Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Influence Stroke Physicians' Certainty on Whether or Not to Give Thrombolysis to Randomized Acute Stroke Patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Anders; Rodgers, Helen

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Door-to-needle time of 20 minutes to stroke patients with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv-tPA) is feasible when computed tomography (CT) is used as first-line of brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment is more time-consuming but superior in detect......BACKGROUND: Door-to-needle time of 20 minutes to stroke patients with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv-tPA) is feasible when computed tomography (CT) is used as first-line of brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment is more time-consuming but superior...

  12. Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (CCR-AAA) with massive vertebral bone erosion: computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Sachiko; Okauchi, Kenzo; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2014-02-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with sudden onset of low back and right leg pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography demonstrated an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), along with a large mass lesion causing vertebral body erosion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested that the mass lesion consisted of a chronic hematoma. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) demonstrated increased uptake around the mass lesion, but not around the AAA. Surgical intervention was performed, and the subsequent histological diagnosis was chronic contained rupture of AAA. The mass lesion consisted of chronic hematoma and necrosis with inflammatory cell infiltration and hemosiderin deposition. This condition mimics some neoplastic diseases, but MRI and FDG-PET findings may help establish the correct diagnosis.

  13. Chronic contained rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (CCR-AAA) with massive vertebral bone erosion. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Sachiko; Okauchi, Kenzo; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with sudden onset of low back and right leg pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography demonstrated an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), along with a large mass lesion causing vertebral body erosion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested that the mass lesion consisted of a chronic hematoma. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) demonstrated increased uptake around the mass lesion, but not around the AAA. Surgical intervention was performed, and the subsequent histological diagnosis was chronic contained rupture of AAA. The mass lesion consisted of chronic hematoma and necrosis with inflammatory cell infiltration and hemosiderin deposition. This condition mimics some neoplastic diseases, but MRI and FDG-PET findings may help establish the correct diagnosis. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  18. Specific proof of various stages of Osler's disease of the brain via high field magnetic resonance tomography (1. 5 Tesla)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, F.; Bluemm, R.G.; Beyer, H.K.

    1988-08-01

    MR is a sensitive noninvasive examination method for diagnosing parenchymatous cryptic arteriovenous malformations and sequels of cerebral haemorrhage. In a patient with recurring nosebleed and brain stem syndrome eleven so-called cryptic arteriovenous malformations or their haemorrhage sequels were diagnosed via magnetic resonance tomography. Basing on these specific findings, nosebleeding, and a positive family anamnesis, the findings could be classified as belonging to manifestations of Osler's disease (hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia). This rare disease is characterised by a triad of signs: telangiectasias, recurring bleeding, and heredity. In this article the specific MR image is compared with the CT pattern and the results are discussed against the background of literature on Osler's disease which is also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  19. Quantification of Global Left Ventricular Function: Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. A Meta-analysis and Review of the Current Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vleuten, P.A. van der; Willems, T.P.; Goette, M.J.; Tio, R.A.; Greuter, M.J.; Zijlstra, F.; Oudkerk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac morbidity and mortality are closely related to cardiac volumes and global left ventricular (LV) function, expressed as left ventricular ejection fraction. Accurate assessment of these parameters is required for the prediction of prognosis in individual patients as well as in entire cohorts. The current standard of reference for left ventricular function is analysis by short-axis magnetic resonance imaging. In recent years, major extensive technological improvements have been achieved in computed tomography. The most marked development has been the introduction of the multidetector CT (MDCT), which has significantly improved temporal and spatial resolutions. In order to assess the current status of MDCT for analysis of LV function, the current available literature on this subject was reviewed. The data presented in this review indicate that the global left ventricular functional parameters measured by contemporary multi-detector row systems combined with adequate reconstruction algorithms and post-processing tools show a narrow diagnostic window and are interchangeable with those obtained by MRI

  20. Can Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Replace Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease? A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallin, L.; Danielsson, R.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Julin, P.; Frank, A.; Engman, E.L.; Svensson, L.; Kristoffersen Wiberg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: Twenty-four patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls were investigated with SPECT using 99m Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with gadobutrol. Three observers performed a visual interpretation of the SPECT and MR images using a four-point visual scale. Results: SPECT was superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological. All three observers showed statistically significant results in discriminating between the control group, AD, and MCI by SPECT, with a P value of 0.0006, 0.04, and 0.01 for each observer. The statistical results were not significant for MR (P values 0.8, 0.1, and 0.2, respectively). Conclusion: DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several patient- and method-related improvements should be made before this method can be recommended for clinical practice

  1. Can Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Replace Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease? A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallin, L.; Danielsson, R.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Julin, P.; Frank, A.; Engman, E.L.; Svensson, L.; Kristoffersen Wiberg, M. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Radiology

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material and Methods: Twenty-four patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls were investigated with SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with gadobutrol. Three observers performed a visual interpretation of the SPECT and MR images using a four-point visual scale. Results: SPECT was superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological. All three observers showed statistically significant results in discriminating between the control group, AD, and MCI by SPECT, with a P value of 0.0006, 0.04, and 0.01 for each observer. The statistical results were not significant for MR (P values 0.8, 0.1, and 0.2, respectively). Conclusion: DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Several patient- and method-related improvements should be made before this method can be recommended for clinical practice.

  2. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy.

  3. Seeking tools for image fusion between computed tomography, structural and functional magnetic resonance methods for applications in neurosurgery; Ferramentas para fusao de imagens dos metodos de tomografia computadorizada, ressonancia magnetica e ressonancia magnetica funcional para aplicacao pre-neurocirurgica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Liana Guerra Sanches da, E-mail: liana@einstein.br [Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo (SP) (Brazil); Amaro Junior, Edson [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Deptartamento de Diagnostico por Imagem; Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate tools for the fusion of images generated by tomography and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Magnetic resonance and functional magnetic resonance imaging were performed while a volunteer who had previously undergone cranial tomography performed motor and somatosensory tasks in a 3-Tesla scanner. Image data were analyzed with different programs, and the results were compared. Results: We constructed a flow chart of computational processes that allowed measurement of the spatial congruence between the methods. There was no single computational tool that contained the entire set of functions necessary to achieve the goal. Conclusion: The fusion of the images from the three methods proved to be feasible with the use of four free-access software programs (OsiriX, Register, MRIcro and FSL). Our results may serve as a basis for building software that will be useful as a virtual tool prior to neurosurgery. (author)

  4. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  5. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  12. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  13. Postoperative computed tomography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis treated by dorsal laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Martin; Ley, Charles J; Hansson, Kerstin; Sjöström, Lennart

    2017-03-20

    To describe postoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) treated by dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy. Prospective clinical case study of dogs diagnosed with and treated for DLSS. Surgical and clinical findings were described. Computed tomography and low field MRI findings pre- and postoperatively were described and graded. Clinical, CT and MRI examinations were performed four to 18 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 dogs were clinically improved and two dogs had unchanged clinical status postoperatively despite imaging signs of neural compression. Vacuum phenomenon, spondylosis, sclerosis of the seventh lumbar (L7) and first sacral (S1) vertebrae endplates and lumbosacral intervertebral joint osteoarthritis became more frequent in postoperative CT images. Postoperative MRI showed mild disc extrusions in five cases, and in all cases contrast enhancing non-discal tissue was present. All cases showed contrast enhancement of the L7 spinal nerves both pre- and postoperatively and seven had contrast enhancement of the lumbosacral intervertebral joints and paraspinal tissue postoperatively. Articular process fractures or fissures were noted in four dogs. The study indicates that imaging signs of neural compression are common after DLSS surgery, even in dogs that have clinical improvement. Contrast enhancement of spinal nerves and soft tissues around the region of disc herniation is common both pre- and postoperatively and thus are unreliable criteria for identifying complications of the DLSS surgery.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  19. Temporal and spatial characteristics of the area at risk investigated using computed tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Pals, Jesper; Hammer-Hansen, Sophia; Nielles-Vallespin, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can measure the myocardial area at risk (AAR), but the technique has received criticism for inadequate validation. CMR commonly depicts an AAR that is wider than the infarct, which in turn would require a lateral perfusion gradient within...... and fluorescent microparticle pathology were used to investigate the AAR in a canine model (n = 10) of ischaemia and reperfusion. AAR size by CMR correlated well with CT (R(2) = 0.80), microsphere blood flow (R(2) = 0.80), and pathology (R(2) = 0.74) with good limits of agreement [-0.79 ± 4.02% of the left.......05 ± 0.02 mL/g/min, lateral vs. core, P = 0.001). The transmural extent of MI was lower in the lateral portion of the AAR than the core (28.2 ± 10.2 vs. 17.4 ± 8.4% of the wall, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: T1-weighted CMR accurately quantifies size of the AAR with excellent agreement compared with three...

  20. Changes on magnetic resonance tomography in the knee joints of marathon runners: a 10-year longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampla, Wolfgang W.; Newrkla, Stephan P.; Hruby, Walter F.; Kroener, Andreas H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate long-term damage in the internal structures of the knee joints of recreational long-distance runners. Ten years after their participation in a baseline study concerning their knee joints, seven long-distance runners and one who had given up long-distance running were invited to participate in a repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation. The same evaluation criteria and the same technical equipment were used, and the results of the two investigations were compared. No adverse long-term consequences were observed in six of the seven active runners, regardless of pre-existing damage at the baseline investigation. In one case the arthrotic changes were progressive in nature. The person who had given up running presented with severe deterioration of the internal structures of the knee joint. Non-physiological maximal loads secondary to the marathon race do not cause any permanent damage in the internal structures of the knee joint in individuals without significant pre-existing damage. A disposition for premature arthrosis was not registered in the population investigated. A protective value of long distance running on the internal structures of the knee joint is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Histomorphologic study of the pituitary glands of Korean cadavers and correlation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ik; Chung, In Hyuk; Suh, Jung Ho

    1989-01-01

    Histomorphological analysis of the pituitary glands of 62 Korean Adult cadavers was performed, and its results were compared to the findings of high resolution CT scan in 6 cases and magnetic resonance imaging in 2 cases. The CT attenuation density of pituitary glands was also evaluated with coronal scans of 103 normal Korean adults who had no clinical evidence of pituitary abnormalities. The pituitary gland was classified into 4 types based on the contours of superior margin of the glands; slightly convex (type I and type II), slightly concave (type III) and deeply concave (type IV). Among them type III was the most common (44.4%). The size and shape of each lobe of gland were varied. The mean length and height of gland were 10.9 ± 1.4 mm and 4.6 ± 1.2 mm. Rathke's cleft cysts over 0.5 mm in diameter was found in 54.8%, but it rarely exceeded 3 mm in diameter. Rathke's cleft cysts were commonly located at the middle one third between anterior lobe and pars intermedia of pituitary gland. The CT attenuation density of pituitary gland varied depending on the anatomic location and was roughly corresponding to the compactness of cellularity. Focal low attenuation density areas could be consider to represent Rathke's cleft cysts. In one of two pituitary glands, the posterior lobe showed high signal intensity in T1-weighted MRI, which was not corresponding to the intrasellar fat pad or cellularity of gland

  2. Changes on magnetic resonance tomography in the knee joints of marathon runners: a 10-year longitudinal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krampla, Wolfgang W.; Newrkla, Stephan P.; Hruby, Walter F. [Danube Hospital, Radiology Department, Vienna (Austria); Kroener, Andreas H. [Danube Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate long-term damage in the internal structures of the knee joints of recreational long-distance runners. Ten years after their participation in a baseline study concerning their knee joints, seven long-distance runners and one who had given up long-distance running were invited to participate in a repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation. The same evaluation criteria and the same technical equipment were used, and the results of the two investigations were compared. No adverse long-term consequences were observed in six of the seven active runners, regardless of pre-existing damage at the baseline investigation. In one case the arthrotic changes were progressive in nature. The person who had given up running presented with severe deterioration of the internal structures of the knee joint. Non-physiological maximal loads secondary to the marathon race do not cause any permanent damage in the internal structures of the knee joint in individuals without significant pre-existing damage. A disposition for premature arthrosis was not registered in the population investigated. A protective value of long distance running on the internal structures of the knee joint is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Clinical features of congenital cystic disease of the mediastinum. Diagnostic usefulness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masashi; Ishii, Yoshiki; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Furuse, Makoto; Murayama, Fumio; Sohara, Yasunori

    2000-01-01

    We describe 18 cases of congenital mediastinal cysts, including 4 bronchogenic cysts, 5 pericardial cysts, and 9 thymic cysts. Fifteen of the 18 patients (62.5%) were asymptomatic, and the cysts were found incidentally on a chest radiograph conducted as a part of a physical screening. In 2 of the 4 cases of bronchogenic cysts, the cystic lesions were located in the posterior mediastinum and in the cephalad recess of the azgos vein (CRAzV). In 3 of the 5 cases of pericardial cysts, the lesions were located in the right cardio-phrenic region. In the remaining 2 cases, the cysts were located in the CRAzV and in the posterior mediastinum. Seventeen patients who had histologically proven mediastinal cysts were investigated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In all 3 cases of bronchogenic cysts, MR signals of the cysts were of higher intensity than those of muscle on T1-weighted images. Neither the pericardial cysts nor the thymic cysts showed high signal intensity on T1-weighted images. Macroscopically, the intracystic fluids in all of the bronchogenic cysts contained viscid mucus that probably caused high signal intensities on the T1-weighted images. MR imaging is not only useful in revealing the location of mediastinal cysts, but also in the differential diagnosis of congenital mediastinal cysts. (author)

  4. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  5. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  6. Simultaneous whole body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugmire, Brian S; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Lim, Ruth; Friedmann, Alison M; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Weinstein, Howard; Catalano, Onofrio A; Mahmood, Umar; Catana, Ciprian; Gee, Michael S

    2016-03-28

    To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients. This prospective, observational, single-center study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to: (1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis; (2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and (3) be scheduled for clinically indicated (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PET-MRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PET-MRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard. A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years (range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions (R = 0.93). PET-MRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-CT reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions (780.2 + 326.6) was significantly lower than

  7. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugmire, Brian S; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Lim, Ruth; Friedmann, Alison M; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Weinstein, Howard; Catalano, Onofrio A; Mahmood, Umar; Catana, Ciprian; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: This prospective, observational, single-center study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to: (1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis; (2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and (3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PET-MRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PET-MRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard. RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years (range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions (R = 0.93). PET-MRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-CT reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions (780.2 + 326.6) was

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  11. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography for Breast Target Volume Delineation in Prone and Supine Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, Elise M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Care Centre, Westmead Hospital, Westmead (Australia); Boxer, Miriam M. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Chan, Christine [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer A. [School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba (Australia); Koh, Eng-Siew [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Lim, Karen [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Papadatos, George [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether T2-weighted MRI improves seroma cavity (SC) and whole breast (WB) interobserver conformity for radiation therapy purposes, compared with the gold standard of CT, both in the prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eleven observers (2 radiologists and 9 radiation oncologists) delineated SC and WB clinical target volumes (CTVs) on T2-weighted MRI and CT supine and prone scans (4 scans per patient) for 33 patient datasets. Individual observer's volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume overlap index, center of mass shift, and Hausdorff distances. An average cavity visualization score was also determined. Results: Imaging modality did not affect interobserver variation for WB CTVs. Prone WB CTVs were larger in volume and more conformal than supine CTVs (on both MRI and CT). Seroma cavity volumes were larger on CT than on MRI. Seroma cavity volumes proved to be comparable in interobserver conformity in both modalities (volume overlap index of 0.57 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.54-0.60) for CT supine and 0.52 (95% CI 0.48-0.56) for MRI supine, 0.56 (95% CI 0.53-0.59) for CT prone and 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.59) for MRI prone); however, after registering modalities together the intermodality variation (Dice similarity coefficient of 0.41 (95% CI 0.36-0.46) for supine and 0.38 (0.34-0.42) for prone) was larger than the interobserver variability for SC, despite the location typically remaining constant. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging interobserver variation was comparable to CT for the WB CTV and SC delineation, in both prone and supine positions. Although the cavity visualization score and interobserver concordance was not significantly higher for MRI than for CT, the SCs were smaller on MRI, potentially owing to clearer SC definition, especially on T2-weighted MR images.

  12. Lean body mass correction of standardized uptake value in simultaneous whole-body positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochimsen, Thies H.; Schulz, Jessica; Busse, Harald; Werner, Peter; Schaudinn, Alexander; Zeisig, Vilia; Kurch, Lars; Seese, Anita; Barthel, Henryk; Sattler, Bernhard; Sabri, Osama

    2015-06-01

    This study explores the possibility of using simultaneous positron emission tomography—magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) to estimate the lean body mass (LBM) in order to obtain a standardized uptake value (SUV) which is less dependent on the patients' adiposity. This approach is compared to (1) the commonly-used method based on a predictive equation for LBM, and (2) to using an LBM derived from PET-CT data. It is hypothesized that an MRI-based correction of SUV provides a robust method due to the high soft-tissue contrast of MRI. A straightforward approach to calculate an MRI-derived LBM is presented. It is based on the fat and water images computed from the two-point Dixon MRI primarily used for attenuation correction in PET-MRI. From these images, a water fraction was obtained for each voxel. Averaging over the whole body yielded the weight-normalized LBM. Performance of the new approach in terms of reducing variations of 18F-Fludeoxyglucose SUVs in brain and liver across 19 subjects was compared with results using predictive methods and PET-CT data to estimate the LBM. The MRI-based method reduced the coefficient of variation of SUVs in the brain by 41  ± 10% which is comparable to the reduction by the PET-CT method (35  ± 10%). The reduction of the predictive LBM method was 29  ± 8%. In the liver, the reduction was less clear, presumably due to other sources of variation. In conclusion, employing the Dixon data in simultaneous PET-MRI for calculation of lean body mass provides a brain SUV which is less dependent on patient adiposity. The reduced dependency is comparable to that obtained by CT and predictive equations. Therefore, it is more comparable across patients. The technique does not impose an overhead in measurement time and is straightforward to implement.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  14. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr; Woo, Eung Je, E-mail: bmekim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ejwoo@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447 (Korea, Republic of); Kyung, Eun Jung [Department of Pharmacology, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Bum [Department of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh In [Department of Mathematics, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  15. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic-ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous (15)O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed...

  16. [Possibilities of a software-based hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of complicated diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadovskaya, V D; Zorkal'tsev, M A; Udodov, V D; Zamyshevskaya, M A; Kilina, O Yu; Kurazhov, A P; Popov, K M

    2015-01-01

    To give the results of a software-based hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (SPECT/MRI) in detecting osteomyelitis (OM) in patients with diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Seventy-six patients (35 men and 41 women) (mean age, 59.4 +/- 7.1 years) with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus and suspected OM were examined. The investigation enrolled patients with neuropathic (n = 25), ischemic (n = 13), and mixed (n = 38) DFS. All the patients underwent (99m)Tc-HMPAO/ (99m)Tc-technefit labeled leukocyte scintigraphy; magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 30 patients. The results were combined using RView 9.06 software (Colin Studholme). Labeled leukocyte SPECT to Diagnose OM yielded 255 true positive (TP), 38 true negative (TN), 12 false negative (FP), and 1 false negative (FN) results. The accuracy of the technique was 82.9%. The FP results were due to the low resolution of the technique and to the small sizes of the object under study. One FN result was detected in a patient with ischemic DFS because of reduced blood flow. MRI to identify OM in patients with DFS provided 20 TP, 16 TN, 4 FP, and 2 FN results. Its diagnostic accuracy was 85.7%. The relative low specificity of MRI was associated with the presence of FP results due to the complexity of differential diagnosis of bone marrow edema and inflammatory infiltration. Assessing 42 hybrid SPECT/MR-images revealed 21 TP, 17 TN, 3 FP, and I FN results. The diagnostic accuracy was equal to 95.9%. Thus, comparing MRI (90.9% sensitivity and 80.0% specificity), labeled leukocyte scintigraphy (96.2% sensitivity and 76.0% specificity), and hybrid SPECT/MRI (95.5% sensitivity and 85.0% specificity) showed the high diagnostic efficiency of the latter.

  17. The adult spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities syndrome: magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings in adults with spinal cord injuries having normal radiographs and computed tomography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimatis, Georgios B; Panagiotopoulos, Elias; Megas, Panagiotis; Matzaroglou, Charalambos; Gliatis, John; Tyllianakis, Minos; Lambiris, Elias

    2008-07-01

    Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORA) is thought to represent mostly a pediatric entity and its incidence in adults is rather underreported. Some authors have also proposed the term spinal cord injury without radiologic evidence of trauma, as more precisely describing the condition of adult SCIWORA in the setting of cervical spondylosis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate adult patients with cervical spine injuries and radiological-clinical examination discrepancy, and to discuss their characteristics and current management. During a 16-year period, 166 patients with a cervical spine injury were admitted in our institution (Level I trauma center). Upper cervical spine injuries (occiput to C2, 54 patients) were treated mainly by a Halo vest, whereas lower cervical spine injuries (C3-T1, 112 patients) were treated surgically either with an anterior, or posterior procedure, or both. Seven of these 166 patients (4.2%) had a radiologic-clinical mismatch, i.e., they presented with frank spinal cord injury with no signs of trauma, and were included in the study. Magnetic resonance imaging was available for 6 of 7 patients, showing intramedullary signal changes in 5 of 6 patients with varying degrees of compression from the disc and/or the ligamentum flavum, whereas the remaining patient had only traumatic herniation of the intervertebral disc and ligamentum flavum bulging. Follow-up period was 6.4 years on average (1-10 years). This retrospective chart review provides information on adult patients with cervical spinal cord injuries whose radiographs and computed tomography studies were normal. It furthers reinforces the pathologic background of SCIWORA in an adult population, when evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. Particularly for patients with cervical spondylosis, special attention should be paid with regard to vascular compromise by predisposing factors such as smoking or vascular disease, since they probably contribute in

  18. Prediction of the filter no-reflow phenomenon in patients with angina pectoris by using multimodality: Magnetic resonance imaging, optical coherence tomography, and serum biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Ehara, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Takao; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Shimada, Kenei

    2016-05-01

    Although the occurrence of no-reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcomes, the clinical relevance of preventing flow deterioration by using the filter-based distal protection devices (DPDs) is controversial. We investigated predictors of the filter no-reflow (FNR) phenomenon during PCI by using multimodality, such as hyperintense plaques (HIPs) in the coronary artery on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) non-contrast magnetic resonance, plaque composition by using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and serum biomarkers, in patients with angina pectoris. Fifty lesions from 50 patients with angina were examined. All patients underwent T1WI within 24 h before invasive coronary angiography was performed, and preinterventional OCT was performed on a native atherosclerotic culprit lesion. The signal intensity of coronary plaque to cardiac muscle ratio (PMR) was calculated on a standard console of the magnetic resonance system. Of the 50 lesions, 20 lesions showed FNR during PCI, while non-FNR was observed in 30 lesions. A cut-off value >1.85 of PMR had a sensitivity of 65%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 87%, and a negative predictive value of 80% for identifying lesions with FNR. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of HIPs with PMR >1.85 (p=0.008) was the only independent predictor of the FNR phenomenon during PCI. This study shows that the presence of HIPs with PMR >1.85 on T1WI was a novel independent predictor of the FNR phenomenon during PCI in angina patients. This result may help in identifying high-risk lesions for no-reflow to deploy filter-based DPDs. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using 99m Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (SE)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease

  20. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging

  2. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging versus bone scintigraphy for clinically suspected scaphoid fractures in patients with negative plain radiographs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, Wouter H.; Wang, Junfeng; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Kloen, Peter; Maas, Mario; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Doornberg, Job N.

    2015-01-01

    In clinically suspected scaphoid fractures, early diagnosis reduces the risk of non-union and minimises loss in productivity resulting from unnecessary cast immobilisation. Since initial radiographs do not exclude the possibility of a fracture, additional imaging is needed. Computed tomography (CT),

  3. Imaging in rheumatoid arthritis--status and recent advances for magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, computed tomography and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Morten; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Dohn, U.M.

    2008-01-01

    , and have several documented and potential applications in RA patients. This chapter will review key aspects of the current status and recent important advances in imaging in RA, briefly discussing X-ray and computed tomography, and particularly focusing on MRI and US. Suggestions for use in clinical trials...

  4. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its utilization in image formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.; Tannus, A.; Panepucci, H.

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects about Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (as Larmor Theorem, radio frequency pulse, relaxation of spins system) and its utilization in two dimensional image processing with the necessity of a tomography plane are studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  6. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  7. Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the follow-up of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legmann, P; Levesque, M; De, Broucker F; F,; Hay, J M; Maillard, J N

    1988-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and MRI in 8 patients operated for Budd-Chiari syndrome is reported. The results obtained, evaluated separately for each technique and then compared between each other and with the data of superior coelio-mesenteric angiography and inferior cavography, show that the MRI data is very clearly superior to the data obtained by ultrasonography and computed tomography. MRI allows simultaneous assessment of the hepatic parenchyma, evaluation of portal hypertension and the porto-caval anastomosis, which are all essential elements in the follow-up Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, in the light of the literature, the authors stress that ultrasonography associated with pulsed Doppler also ensures satisfactory vascular and parenchymal assessment of this disease in the majority of cases.

  8. Comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the follow-up of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legmann, P.; Levesque, M.; Broucker, F. de; Hay, J.M.; Maillard, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a comparative evaluation of ultrasonography, computed tomography and MRI in 8 patients operated for Budd-Chiari syndrome. The results obtained, evaluated separately for each technique and then compared between each other and with the data of superior coelio-mesenteric angiography and inferior cavography, showed that MRI data is very clearly superior to the data obtained by ultrasonography and computed tomography. MRI allows simultaneous assessment of the hepatic parenchyma, and evaluation of portal hypertension and the porto-caval anastomosis, which are all essential elements in the follow-up Budd-Chiari syndrome. However, in the light of the literature, the authors stress that ultrasonography associated with pulsed Doppler also ensures satisfactory vascular and parenchymal assessment of this disease in the majority of cases [fr

  9. POSSIBILITIES OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF MECHANICAL TRAUMA AND SUDDEN DEATH (A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Kokov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The review analyzes the possibility of multislice computed tomography (MSCT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI use in the forensic examination of corpses of adults. We present the critical analysis of literature on post-mortem imaging in terms of forensic thanatology. The review is based on basic Internet resources: Scientific Electronic Library (elibrary, Scopus, PubMed. The review includes articles that discuss both advantages and limitations of post-mortem MSCT and MRI imaging in forensic examination of the corpse.Through studying the available literature, the authors attempted to answer two questions: 1 which method was more suitable for the purposes of forensic examination of the corpse - MSCT or MRI; 2 whether the virtual autopsy replaced the traditional autopsy in the near future?Conclusion: comprehensive study of the corpse often requires both imaging methods; in cases of death under mechanical damage, MSCT exceeds the range of possibilities of MRI; today, virtual autopsy cannot completely replace traditional autopsy in forensic science, since there are no convincing evidence-based comparative studies, as well as the legal framework of the method. 

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O' Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H. [Victoria House Medical Imaging, Prahran, Victoria (Australia); Schneider, M.E. [Monash University, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  11. Non-invasive diagnostic workup of patients with suspected stable angina by combined computed tomography coronary angiography and magnetic resonance perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschbaum, S.W.; Nieman, K.; Springeling, T.

    2011-01-01

    The background of this study was to evaluate additional adenosine magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) imaging in the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected stable angina with computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) as first-line diagnostic modality. Two hundred and thirty symptomatic patients (male, 52%; age, 56 year) with suspected stable angina underwent CTCA. In patients with a stenosis of >50% as visually assessed, MRP was performed and the quantitative myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) was calculated. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) using invasive coronary flow measurements served as the standard of reference. CTCA showed non-significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in 151/230 (66%) patients and significant CAD in 79/230 patients (34%), of whom 50 subsequently underwent MRP and CFR. MRP showed reduced perfusion in 32 patients (64%), which was confirmed by CFR in 27 (84%). All 18 cases of normal MRP (36%) were confirmed by CFR. The positive likelihood ratio of MRP for the presence of functional significant disease in patients with a lesion on CTCA was 4.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.12-9.99). The negative likelihood ratio was 0.05 (95% CI 0.01-0.34). CTCA as first-line diagnostic modality excluded coronary artery disease in a high percentage of patients referred for diagnostic workup of suspected stable angina. MRP made a significant contribution to the detection of functional significant lesions in patients with a positive CTCA. (author)

  12. Cross-sectional anatomy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head of common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Farré, J M; Gonzalo-Orden, M; Barreiro-Vázquez, J D; Barreiro-Lois, A; André, M; Morell, M; Llarena-Reino, M; Monreal-Pawlowsky, T; Degollada, E

    2015-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to scan seven by-caught dolphin cadavers, belonging to two species: four common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) and three striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). CT and MRI were obtained with the animals in ventral recumbency. After the imaging procedures, six dolphins were frozen at -20°C and sliced in the same position they were examined. Not only CT and MRI scans, but also cross sections of the heads were obtained in three body planes: transverse (slices of 1 cm thickness) in three dolphins, sagittal (5 cm thickness) in two dolphins and dorsal (5 cm thickness) in two dolphins. Relevant anatomical structures were identified and labelled on each cross section, obtaining a comprehensive bi-dimensional topographical anatomy guide of the main features of the common and the striped dolphin head. Furthermore, the anatomical cross sections were compared with their corresponding CT and MRI images, allowing an imaging identification of most of the anatomical features. CT scans produced an excellent definition of the bony and air-filled structures, while MRI allowed us to successfully identify most of the soft tissue structures in the dolphin's head. This paper provides a detailed anatomical description of the head structures of common and striped dolphins and compares anatomical cross sections with CT and MRI scans, becoming a reference guide for the interpretation of imaging studies. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Mapping the extent of disease by multislice computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and sentinel node evaluation in stage I and II cervical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaram S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: (1 To map the extent of disease in women with stage I and II carcinoma cervix by multislice spiral computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sentinel nodes. (2 To assess accuracy of each modality individually and in conjunction with FIGO clinical staging. Design and Setting: Prospective, single-blind study. Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radiodiagnosis, and Pathology, UCMS and GTBH and Division of Radiological Imaging and Bioinformatics, INMAS, Delhi. Material and Method: The study was conducted on 25 women with cervical cancer FIGO stage I and II. Each woman underwent clinical staging, multislice spiral CT and MRI which was compared to the gold-standard histopathology/cytology. The overall accuracy of each modality and improvement of clinical staging by CT/MRI were noted. Sentinel nodes were evaluated by intracervical Patent Blue V dye injection. Statistical Analysis: Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated by 2Χ2 contingency tables. Results: The accuracy of staging by FIGO, CT and MRI was 68%, 52% and 80%, respectively. MRI and CT improved the overall accuracy of FIGO staging to 96% and 80%, respectively. Sentinel nodes were identified in 89% of patients with 91% accuracy. Conclusion: MRI emerges as the most valuable stand-alone modality improving accuracy of FIGO staging to 96%. Sentinel lymph-node evaluation appears promising in evaluating spread beyond cervix.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O'Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H.; Schneider, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  15. Supplementary methods in breast cancer screening: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance tomography of the breast; Mammasonographie und Magnetresonanz-Mammographie als ergaenzende Methoden im Mammographiescreening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, S. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie

    2001-04-01

    Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance (MR) tomography are helpful tools to evaluate unclear lesions found at screening mammography. Ultrasound is particularly useful to prove the presence of a cyst or to further examine unclear, asymmetrical densities. With MR mammography, carcinomas can be found even when X-ray mammography or ultrasonography are limited due to diffuse, benign, proliferative changes. Ultrasound guidance has greatly facilitated core needle biopsy for suspicious lesions. Additionally, approved devices for MR-guided biopsy are commercially available. As a primary screening tool, ultrasound or MR mammography may be used only in women who are positive for BRCA-1 or BRCA-2 mutations or who are otherwise at high risk for breast cancer. (orig.) [German] Sonographie und Magnetresonanz-Mammographie koennen zur Abklaerung unklarer Befunde eingesetzt werden, die im Rahmen des Mammographiescreenings auffallen. Die Mammosonographie eignet sich besonders zum Nachweis von Zysten und zur Abklaerung unklarer Dichte-Asymmetrien. Mit der Magnetresonanz-Mammographie koennen Karzinome auch dann nachgewiesen werden, wenn die Untersuchungsbedingungen fuer die Roentgenmammographie oder die Sonographie aufgrund einer Mastopathie unguenstig sind. Bei der differenzialdiagnostischen Abklaerung von Herdbefunden hat die Moeglichkeit der sonographischen Fuehrung einer Stanz- oder Vakuumbiopsie das Verfahren wesentlich vereinfacht. Fuer die MR-gesteuerte Biopsie sind inzwischen zugelassene Fuehrungshilfen kommerziell erhaeltlich. Als primaere Screeningmethode kommen sowohl die Sonographie als auch die Magnetresonanz-Mammographie nur fuer wenige Frauen in Frage, in der Regel bei nachgewiesenen BRCA-1- oder BRCA-2-Mutationen oder bei sonstiger Brustkrebsdisposition. (orig.)

  16. Efficacy of double arterial phase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with the sensitivity encoding technique versus dynamic multidetector-row helical computed tomography for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumano, Seishi; Okada, Masahiro; Murakami, Takamichi; Uemura, Masahiko; Haraikawa, Toyoaki; Hirata, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Kim, Tonsok

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of double arterial phase dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the sensitivity encoding technique (SENSE dynamic MRI) for detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison with double arterial phase dynamic multidetector-row helical computed tomography (dynamic MDCT). A total of 28 patients with 66 hypervascular HCCs underwent both double arterial SENSE dynamic MRI and dynamic MDCT. The diagnosis of HCC was based on surgical resection (n=7), biopsy (n=10), or a combination of CT during arterial portography (CTAP), CT during hepatic arteriography (CTA), and/or the 6-month follow-up CT (n=49). Based on alternative-free response receiving operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the diagnostic performance for detecting HCC was compared between double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI and double arterial phase dynamic MDCT. The mean sensitivity, positive predictive value, and mean A Z values for hypervascular HCCs were 72%, 80%, and 0.79, respectively, for SENSE dynamic MRI and 66%, 92%, and 0.78, respectively, for dynamic MDCT. The mean sensitivity for double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI was higher than that for double arterial phase dynamic MDCT, but the difference was not statistically significant. Double arterial phase SENSE dynamic MRI is as valuable as double arterial phase dynamic MDCT for detecting hypervascular HCCs. (author)

  17. Case study of supply induced demand: the case of provision of imaging scans (computed tomography and magnetic resonance) at Unimed-Manaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Edson de Oliveira; Andrade, Elizabeth Nogueira de, E-mail: dredsonandrade@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Gallo, Jose Hiran [Universidade do Porto (U.Porto) (Portugal)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: to present the experience of a health plan operator (Unimed-Manaus) in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, with the accreditation of imaging services and the demand induced by the supply of new services (Roemer's Law). Methods: this is a retrospective work studying a time series covering the period from January 1998 to June 2004, in which the computed tomography and the magnetic resonance imaging services were implemented as part of the services offered by that health plan operator. Statistical analysis consisted of a descriptive and an inferential part, with the latter using a mean parametric test (Student T-test and ANOVA) and the Pearson correlation test. A 5% alpha and a 95% confidence interval were adopted. Results: at Unimed-Manaus, the supply of new imaging services, by itself, was identified as capable of generating an increased service demand, thus characterizing the phenomenon described by Roemer. Conclusion: the results underscore the need to be aware of the fact that the supply of new health services could bring about their increased use without a real demand. (author)

  18. Case study of supply induced demand: the case of provision of imaging scans (computed tomography and magnetic resonance) at Unimed-Manaus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Edson de Oliveira; Andrade, Elizabeth Nogueira de; Gallo, Jose Hiran

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to present the experience of a health plan operator (Unimed-Manaus) in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, with the accreditation of imaging services and the demand induced by the supply of new services (Roemer's Law). Methods: this is a retrospective work studying a time series covering the period from January 1998 to June 2004, in which the computed tomography and the magnetic resonance imaging services were implemented as part of the services offered by that health plan operator. Statistical analysis consisted of a descriptive and an inferential part, with the latter using a mean parametric test (Student T-test and ANOVA) and the Pearson correlation test. A 5% alpha and a 95% confidence interval were adopted. Results: at Unimed-Manaus, the supply of new imaging services, by itself, was identified as capable of generating an increased service demand, thus characterizing the phenomenon described by Roemer. Conclusion: the results underscore the need to be aware of the fact that the supply of new health services could bring about their increased use without a real demand. (author)

  19. Assessment of left ventricular myocardial function using 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuschmid, Martin; Rothfuss, Julia K.; Fenchel, Michael; Stauder, Norbert; Kuettner, Axel; Miller, Stephan; Claussen, Claus D.; Kopp, Andreas F.; Schroeder, Stephen; Burgstahler, Christof; Franow, Andreas; Kuzo, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    To assess functional parameters using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and echocardiography and to compare the results with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). End-diastolic-volume (EDV), end-systolic-volume (ESV), stroke-volume (SV), ejection-fraction (EF), and myocardial mass (MM) were calculated based on CT data sets from 52 patients. Echocardiography was performed in 24 of the 52 patients. The results from MDCT and echocardiography were compared with MRI. A strong correlation between MDCT and MRI (r=0.66-0.90) was found for all parameters. Echocardiography revealed a low or moderate correlation (0.05-0.59). Compared to MRI the average differences with MDCT were for EDV 15.1 ml, ESV 10.6 ml, SV 4.5 ml, EF 1.8%, and MM 8.2 g, for EDV determined by echocardiography 36.2 ml, ESV 6.8 ml, and EF 13.9%. Bland-Altman analysis revealed acceptable limits of agreement between MRI and MDCT. MDCT enables reliable quantification of left ventricular function. Echocardiography was found to have only a moderate agreement of functional parameters with MRI. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of right ventricular function with multidetector computed tomography: comparison with magnetic resonance imaging and analysis of inter- and intraobserver variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Mira; Teige, Florian; Schnapauff, Dirk; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite, Medical School, Berlin, PO Box 10098 (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    This study was performed to prospectively compare multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with 16 simultaneous sections and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of global right ventricular function in 50 patients. MDCT using a semiautomatic analysis tool showed good correlation with MRI for end-diastolic volume (EDV, r=0.83, p<0.001), end-systolic volume (ESV, r=0.86, p<0.001) and stroke volume (SV, r=0.74, p<0.001), but only a moderate correlation for the ejection fraction (EF, r=0.67, p<0.001). Bland Altman analysis revealed a slight, but insignificant overestimation of EDV (4.0 ml, p= 0.08) and ESV (2.4 ml, p=0.07), and underestimation of EF (0.1%, p=0.92) with MDCT compared with MRI. All limits of agreement between both modalities (EF: {+-}15.7%, EDV: {+-}31.0 ml, ESV: {+-}18.0 ml) were in a moderate but acceptable range. Interobserver variability of MDCT was not significantly different from that of MRI. For MDCT software, the post-processing time was significantly longer (19.6{+-}5.8 min) than for MRI (11.8{+-}2.6 min, p<0.001). Accurate assessment of right ventricular volumes by 16-detector CT is feasible but still rather time-consuming. (orig.)

  1. Detection of hemodynamic impairment using magnetic resonance angiography in patients with internal carotid artery stenoocclusive disease. Comparison with quantitative brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Ryonoshin; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to acetazolamideis a key parameter in determining the severity of hemodynamic impairment in patients with major cerebral artery occlusive disease. The aim of the present study is to validate the accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for detecting hemodynamic impairment by correlating detectability of the middle cerebral artery obtained by MRA with CVR measured by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusive disease. Ninety-four patients with chronic ICA occlusion underwent single slab three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA and SPECT. SPECT-CVR was calculated by measured cerebral blood flow before and after acetazolamide challenge. CVR was significantly lower in patients without detection of any portion (M1, M2 or M3) of the MCA than in those with detection of all portions. When SPECT-CVR lower than the mean- 2 standard deviation (SD) obtained in normal subjects was defined as reduced and the SPECT-CVR was assumed as the true determinant of hemodynamic impairment, MRA provided 92% sensitivity and 73% specificity, with 96% negative predictive value for detecting patients with reduced CVR. The present MRA method is effective for the identification of patients with hemodynamic impairment. (author)

  2. Case study of supply induced demand: the case of provision of imaging scans (computed tomography and magnetic resonance) at Unimed-Manaus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Edson de Oliveira; Andrade, Elizabeth Nogueira de; Gallo, José Hiran

    2011-01-01

    To present the experience of a health plan operator (Unimed-Manaus) in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, with the accreditation of imaging services and the demand induced by the supply of new services (Roemer's Law). This is a retrospective work studying a time series covering the period from January 1998 to June 2004, in which the computed tomography and the magnetic resonance imaging services were implemented as part of the services offered by that health plan operator. Statistical analysis consisted of a descriptive and an inferential part, with the latter using a mean parametric test (Student T-test and ANOVA) and the Pearson correlation test. A 5% alpha and a 95% confidence interval were adopted. At Unimed-Manaus, the supply of new imaging services, by itself, was identified as capable of generating an increased service demand, thus characterizing the phenomenon described by Roemer. The results underscore the need to be aware of the fact that the supply of new health services could bring about their increased use without a real demand.

  3. Clinical significance of cerebrospinal fluid tap test and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography findings of tight high convexity in patients with possible idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Masatsune; Furuse, Motomasa; Nishida, Namiko; Oowaki, Hisayuki; Matsumoto, Atsuhito; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a treatable syndrome with a classical triad of symptoms. The Japanese iNPH guidelines indicate that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test and tight high-convexity on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are important for the diagnosis. The relationships between the effectiveness of CSF shunt surgery in possible iNPH patients, the tap test result, and the MR imaging/computed tomography (CT) findings of tight high-convexity were evaluated in 88 possible iNPH patients (mean age 75 years) with one or more of the classical triad of symptoms, and mild to moderate ventricular dilation. All patients underwent the tap test in the outpatient clinic, and patients and caregivers assessed the clinical changes during one week. The tap test was positive in 47 patients and negative in 41 patients. Surgery was performed in 19 patients with positive tap test, and was effective in 17 patients. Although the findings were inconsistent in some patients, the result of the tap test was found to be highly correlated with the MR imaging/CT finding of tight high-convexity (p<0.0001), confirming that both these diagnostic tests are promising predictors of shunt effectiveness. (author)

  4. The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestan, C.; Czerny, C.; Gstoettner, W.; Franz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The role of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of preoperative and postoperative complications caused by acquired cholesteatomas will be described in this paper. The pre- and postoperative imaging of the temporal bone was performed with HRCT and MRI. HRCT and MRI were performed in the axial and coronal plane. MRI was done with T2 weighted and T1 weighted sequences both before and after the intravenous application of contrast material. All imaging findings were confirmed clinically or surgically. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by HRCT included bony erosions of the ossicles, scutum, facial canal in the middle ear, tympanic walls including the tegmen tympani, and of the labyrinth. The preoperative cholesteatoma-caused complications depicted by MRI included signs indicative for labyrinthitis, and brain abscess. Postoperative HRCT depicted bony erosions caused by recurrent cholesteatoma, bony defects of the facial nerve and of the labyrinth, and a defect of the tegmen tympani with a soft tissue mass in the middle ear. Postoperative MRI delineated neuritis of the facial nerve, labyrinthitis, and a meningo-encephalocele protruding into the middle ear. HRCT and MRI are excellent imaging tools to depict either bony or soft tissue complications or both if caused by acquired cholesteatomas. According to our findings and to the literature HRCT and MRI are complementary imaging methods to depict pre- or postoperative complications of acquired cholesteatomas if these are suspected by clinical examination. (orig.) [de

  5. Multifunctional BaYbF5: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo tri-modal upconversion optical, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yi, Zhigao; Xue, Zhenluan; Zeng, Songjun; Liu, Hongrong

    2017-06-01

    Development of high-quality upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with combination of the merits of multiple molecular imaging techniques, such as, upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, could significantly improve the accuracy of biological diagnosis. In this work, multifunctional BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er (50:2mol%) UCNPs were synthesized via a solvothermal method using oleic acid (OA) as surface ligands (denoted as OA-UCNPs). The OA-UCNPs were further treated by diluted HCl to form ligand-free UCNPs (LF-UCNPs) for later bioimaging applications. The cytotoxicity assay in HeLa cells shows low cell toxicity of these LF-UCNPs. Owing to the efficient UCL of BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er, the LF-UCNPs were successfully used as luminescent bioprobe in UCL bioimaging. And, X-ray CT imaging reveals that BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er UCNPs can act as potential contrast agents for detection of the liver and spleen in the live mice owing to the high-Z elements (e.g., Ba, Yb, and Gd) in host matrix. Moreover, with the addition of Gd, the as-designed UCNPs exhibit additional positive contrast enhancement in T 1 -weighted MR imaging. These findings demonstrate that BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er UCNPs are potential candidates for tri-modal imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Effective Parameters on Quality of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-computed Tomography Image Fusion in Head and Neck Tumors for Application in Treatment Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Shirvani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In radiation therapy, computed tomography (CT simulation is used for treatment planning to define the location of tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-CT image fusion leads to more efficient tumor contouring. This work tried to identify the practical issues for the combination of CT and MRI images in real clinical cases. The effect of various factors is evaluated on image fusion quality. Materials and Methods: In this study, the data of thirty patients with brain tumors were used for image fusion. The effect of several parameters on possibility and quality of image fusion was evaluated. These parameters include angles of the patient's head on the bed, slices thickness, slice gap, and height of the patient's head. Results: According to the results, the first dominating factor on quality of image fusion was the difference slice gap between CT and MRI images (cor = 0.86, P 4 cm and image fusion quality was <25%. Conclusion: The most important problem in image fusion is that MRI images are taken without regard to their use in treatment planning. In general, parameters related to the patient position during MRI imaging should be chosen to be consistent with CT images of the patient in terms of location and angle.

  7. On the value of geometry-based models for left ventricular volumetry in magnetic resonance imaging and electron beam tomography: a Bland-Altman analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Gert; Reiter, Ursula; Rienmueller, Rainer; Gagarina, Nina; Ryabikin, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Methodological comparison of ellipsoid model-based approaches and Simpson method to evaluate left ventricular volumetric parameters by magnetic resonance (MR) and electron beam tomography (EBT) and analysis of the origin of possible discrepancies. Methods and material: 100 subjects (87 patients, 13 healthy volunteers) were studied in MR in various cardiac views and EBT long axis view to determine left ventricular volumes and masses by applying (rotational) ellipsoid and Simpson model. Observer variation and method agreement was quantified by means of variance component and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Simpson approach showed smaller observer variability than all ellipsoid approaches. All geometry-based models gave smaller left ventricular volumes than Simpson approach, the bias in mass determination was minimal. Whereas high correlation coefficients (typically 0.85-0.95) for left ventricular volume and mass measurements indicated satisfying correspondence between methods, large 95% limits of agreement made a transfer of results for single subjects between Simpson and ellipsoid approaches difficult and between different geometry-based models almost impossible. Because 95% limits of agreement and observer variability of geometry-based approaches were of equal order, the latter could be identified as main limiting factor of methodological agreement. Conclusion: MR Simpson approach is superior to all ellipsoid model-based approaches, because observer variability is smaller

  8. If the skull fits: magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for combined analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Marissa C.; Roman, Brian B.; Henkelman, R. Mark; Millen, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain and skull develop concurrently in a coordinated manner, consistently producing a brain and skull that fit tightly together. It is common that abnormalities in one are associated with related abnormalities in the other. However, this is not always the case. A complete characterization of the relationship between brain and skull phenotypes is necessary to understand the mechanisms that cause them to be coordinated or divergent and to provide perspective on the potential diagnostic or prognostic significance of brain and skull phenotypes. We demonstrate the combined use of magnetic resonance imaging and microcomputed tomography for analysis of brain and skull phenotypes in the mouse. Co-registration of brain and skull images allows comparison of the relationship between phenotypes in the brain and those in the skull. We observe a close fit between the brain and skull of two genetic mouse models that both show abnormal brain and skull phenotypes. Application of these three-dimensional image analyses in a broader range of mouse mutants will provide a map of the relationships between brain and skull phenotypes generally and allow characterization of patterns of similarities and differences. PMID:22947655

  9. Sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum: a tertiary center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladimir M; Wani, Sachin B; Fowler, Kathryn; Menias, Christine; Varma, Rakesh; Narra, Vamsi; Hovis, Christine; Murad, Faris M; Mullady, Daniel K; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa S; Early, Dayna S; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R

    2013-04-01

    There are limited data comparing imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. We aimed to: (1) evaluate the sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for pancreas divisum; and (2) assess interobserver agreement (IOA) among expert radiologists for detecting pancreas divisum on MDCT and MRCP. For this retrospective cohort study, we identified 45 consecutive patients with pancreaticobiliary symptoms and pancreas divisum established by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography who underwent EUS and cross-sectional imaging. The control group was composed of patients without pancreas divisum who underwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and cross-sectional imaging. The sensitivity of EUS for pancreas divisum was 86.7%, significantly higher than the sensitivity reported in the medical records for MDCT (15.5%) or MRCP (60%) (P pancreas divisum; IOA was moderate (κ = 0.43). Endoscopic ultrasound is a sensitive test for diagnosing pancreas divisum and is superior to MDCT and MRCP. Review of MDCT studies by expert radiologists substantially raises its sensitivity for pancreas divisum.

  10. SENSITIVITY OF ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND, MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTER TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE CHOLANGIOPANCREATOGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF PANCREAS DIVISUM: A TERTIARY CENTER EXPERIENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Wani, Sachin B.; Fowler, Kathryn; Menias, Christine; Varma, Rakesh; Narra, Vamsi; Hovis, Christine; Murad, Faris; Mullady, Daniel; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa S.; Early, Dayna S.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Azar, Riad R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There are limited data comparing imaging modalities in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum. We aimed to: 1. Evaluate the sensitivity of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) for pancreas divisum. 2. Assess interobserver agreement (IOA) among expert radiologists for detecting pancreas divisum on MDCT and MRCP. METHODS For this retrospective cohort study, we identified 45 consecutive patients with pancreaticobiliary symptoms and pancreas divisum established by endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) who underwent EUS and cross-sectional imaging. The control group was composed of patients without pancreas divisum who underwent ERP and cross-sectional imaging. RESULTS The sensitivity of EUS for pancreas divisum was 86.7%, significantly higher than sensitivity reported in the medical records for MDCT (15.5%) or MRCP (60%) [ppancreas divisum; IOA was moderate (қ=0.43). CONCLUSIONS EUS is a sensitive test for diagnosing pancreas divisum and is superior to MDCT and MRCP. Review of MDCT studies by expert radiologists substantially raises its sensitivity for pancreas divisum. PMID:23211370

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  12. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  14. FDG-PET in the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric Lupus erythematosus and comparison with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Einsatz der FDG-PET bei der Diagnostik des zentralnervoesen Lupus erythematodes und Vergleich mit CT und MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoppe, G [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Klinik mit Klinischer Neurophysiologie; Wildhagen, K [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Immunologie und Transfusionsmedizin; Meyer, G J [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Biophysik; Schober, O [Muenster Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1989-10-01

    Central nervous system involvement has been found in 30-75% of all cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Up to now, clinical diagnosis is difficult and there are no markers for disease activity. We have compared cranial computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) in two cases. FDG-PET is shown to be the most sensitive method demonstrating even reversible deficits and a better correlation with other neurological findings. MRI seems to be more sensitive than CT. A survey of the literature concerning imaging methods in neuropsychiatric SLE is given. The special problem of neuronal desactivation by antineuronal activity is discussed. (orig.).

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  16. Comparison and usefulness of cardiac magnetic resonance versus computed tomography in infants six months of age or younger with aortic arch anomalies without deep sedation or anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Mark A; Pawlowski, Thomas W; Harris, Matthew A; Whitehead, Kevin K; Keller, Marc S; Wilson, Justine; Tipton, Deanna; Harris, Christine

    2011-07-01

    The present project investigated whether cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) of aortic arch anomalies can be performed successfully in infants <6 months of age without the use of cardiac anesthesia or deep sedation. We performed a retrospective review of infants ≤6 months old from 2005 to 2009 who underwent either CMR or computed tomography angiography to investigate aortic arch abnormalities. The CMR procedure used a "feed and swaddle" protocol without deep sedation or cardiac anesthesia. Of the 52 infants referred for CMR, 24 underwent the feed and swaddle protocol (aged 2.6 ± 1.4 months). One patient awoke during the study, and examination of the remaining 23 yielded a definitive diagnosis (success rate 96%). The scanning time was 6.2 ± 3.1 minutes, with the large airways evaluation accounting for 1/2 the time. Single-shot axial steady-state free precession, in which the definitive diagnosis was made, accounted for 0.59 ± 0.3 minutes. Fifteen infants were diagnosed with a vascular ring. Of the 8 infants who underwent surgery, the diagnostic accuracy was 100%. During the same period, 19 patients, who had undergone computed tomography angiography (aged 1.67 ± 1.20 months), were referred for aortic arch evaluation. Of these 19 patients, 6 (32%) underwent sedation or anesthesia. The imaging time was 0.08 ± 0.06 minutes, significantly different from the CMR times (p <0.01). However, the overall room times (31.3 ± 22.3 and 35.8 ± 3.86 minutes, respectively) were not different between the CMR and angiographic groups. The radiation dose was 1.41 ± 1.03 mSv. In conclusion, CMR evaluation of aortic arch anomalies in children <6 months old can be successfully completed quickly using a feed and swaddle approach with high diagnostic accuracy. This protocol avoids the risks of sedation, as well as the radiation associated with computed tomography angiography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  18. Contrast media and the brain - the basis of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging enhancement: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage, M.R.; Wilson, A.J.; Scroop, R.

    2000-01-01

    The blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and extracellular fluid of the parenchyma form the fluid compartments of the brain with three interfaces between, namely the blood-brain interface (BBB), the CSF-brain interface, and the blood-CSF interface. When either water-soluble iodinated contrast media (CM) or water-soluble paramagnetic CM are injected intravenously, they are rapidly brought into contact with both the BBB and the blood-CSF interface. It is the behaviour of the water-soluble CM at these two interfaces that determines the normal and abnormal enhancement patterns demonstrated by either CT or MRI. Unlike lipophilic solutes, current iodinated and MRI contrast media all have high affinities for plasma water, low affinities for plasma proteins and, in particular, extremely low partition coefficients. Therefore they do not penetrate the normal BBB. On the other hand, radiopharmaceuticals used in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to demonstrate regional cerebral blood flow are highly lipophilic and readily cross the intact BBB completely during the first pass through the cerebral vasculature. It is the inability of the current iodinated and MRI contrast media to cross the normal intact BBB that is the basis of their use in CT and MRI studies of the brain. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  19. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sihan Xue,1 Yao Wang,1 Mengxing Wang,2 Lu Zhang,1 Xiaoxia Du,2 Hongchen Gu,1 Chunfu Zhang1,31School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3State Key Laboratory of Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography (CT/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs. Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2 markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/C/fluorescence trimodal imaging.Keywords: multifunctional probe, SPIONs, mesoporous silica

  20. Cerebral fat embolism: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, A.; Barrena, R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Tejada, A.

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of 26-year-old man who presented clinical evidence of fat embolism following a traffic accident. Although computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed no abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed several scattered points of high intensity on T2-weighted and proton density (PD) images, with complete resolution of the lesions on follow-up scan. MRI is considered more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting these lesions, and may be useful for their diagnosis, correlating well with the clinical course. (Author) 10 refs

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  2. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  3. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.; Phillips, S.; Enzmann, D.

    1990-01-01

    MELAS syndrome is a distinct clinical entity belonging to a group of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies characterized by the tetrad of myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings are reviewed in a patient with MELAS. Serial CT studies demonstrated multiple 'migrating' infarcts in various stages of evolution involving primarily the posterior temporal and occipital regions. MR was more sensitive than CT in demonstrating the number and extent of cortical lesions in this disease entity. (orig.)

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  7. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  10. Urothelial carcinoma in a pyelocaliceal diverticulum discovered by magnetic resonance urography[

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akatsuka, Jun; Suzuki, Yasutomo; Hamasaki, Tsutomu; Kimura, Go; Kondo, Yukihiro, E-mail: s00-001@nms.ac.jp [Departments of Urology, Nippon Medical School, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Neither computed tomography (CT) nor intravenous pyelography (IVP) alone can diagnose tumors of renal pelvic diverticula, but magnetic resonance urography (MRU) can obtain accurate preoperative information. (author)

  11. Ventilation distribution in rats: Part 2 – A comparison of electrical impedance tomography and hyperpolarised helium magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunster Kimble R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperpolarised helium MRI (He3 MRI is a new technique that enables imaging of the air distribution within the lungs. This allows accurate determination of the ventilation distribution in vivo. The technique has the disadvantages of requiring an expensive helium isotope, complex apparatus and moving the patient to a compatible MRI scanner. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT a non-invasive bedside technique that allows constant monitoring of lung impedance, which is dependent on changes in air space capacity in the lung. We have used He3MRI measurements of ventilation distribution as the gold standard for assessment of EIT. Methods Seven rats were ventilated in supine, prone, left and right lateral position with 70% helium/30% oxygen for EIT measurements and pure helium for He3 MRI. The same ventilator and settings were used for both measurements. Image dimensions, geometric centre and global in homogeneity index were calculated. Results EIT images were smaller and of lower resolution and contained less anatomical detail than those from He3 MRI. However, both methods could measure positional induced changes in lung ventilation, as assessed by the geometric centre. The global in homogeneity index were comparable between the techniques. Conclusion EIT is a suitable technique for monitoring ventilation distribution and inhomgeneity as assessed by comparison with He3 MRI.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of tunnel diameters prior to revision ACL reconstruction: a comparison to computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Bjoern Holger; Gulkin, Daniel; Guelke, Joachim; Gebhard, Florian [University of Ulm, Center of Surgery, Department for Orthopedic Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Ulm (Germany); Merz, Cornelia; Huth, Jochen; Mauch, Frieder [Sportklinik Stuttgart GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Revision ACL reconstruction is becoming more frequent because of a 10% rate of re-ruptures and insufficiencies. Currently, computed tomography (CT) represents the gold standard in detecting and measuring the tunnels of the initial ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to compare measurement results of CT and thin-sliced MRI sequences, which were modified to a high soft tissue-bone contrast. Prior to an ACL revision surgery, 16 consecutive patients had an MRI in addition to the standard CT scan. A dedicated 0.25-T Esaote G-Scan (Esaote Biomedica, Cologne, Germany) with a Turbo 3D T1 sequence was used for MRI. Tunnel diameters were measured at 11 defined points of interest. For the statistical evaluation, the Mann-Whitney U test for connected samples was used. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was additionally calculated. All measured diameters showed significant to highly significant correlations between both diagnostic tools (r = 0.7-0.98). In addition, there was no significant difference (p > 0.5) between the two techniques. Almost all diameters showed nearly perfect intraobserver reliability (ICC 0.8-0.97). Interobserver reliability showed an ICC of 0.91/0.92 for only one diameter in MRI and CT. Prior to ACL revision surgery, bone tunnel measurements can be done using a 3D T1-MRI sequence in low-field MRI. MRI measurements show the same accuracy as CT scans. Preoperative radiation exposure in mainly young patients could be reduced. Also the costs of an additional CT scan could be saved. (orig.)

  13. Early Cardiac Involvement Affects Left Ventricular Longitudinal Function in Females Carrying α-Galactosidase A Mutation: Role of Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Letizia; Imbriaco, Massimo; Nappi, Carmela; Nicolai, Emanuele; Giugliano, Giuseppe; Ponsiglione, Andrea; Diomiaiuti, Tommaso Claudio; Riccio, Eleonora; Duro, Giovanni; Pisani, Antonio; Trimarco, Bruno; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    Hybrid 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may differentiate mature fibrosis or scar from fibrosis associated to active inflammation in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease, even in nonhypertrophic stage. This study was designed to compare the results of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance cardiac imaging with those of speckle-tracking echocardiography in heterozygous Anderson-Fabry disease females. Twenty-four heterozygous females carrying α-galactosidase A mutation and without left ventricular hypertrophy underwent cardiac positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance using 18 F-FDG for glucose uptake and 2-dimensional strain echocardiography. 18 F-FDG myocardial uptake was quantified by measuring the coefficient of variation (COV) of the standardized uptake value using a 17-segment model. Focal 18 F-FDG uptake with COV >0.17 was detected in 13 patients, including 2 patients with late gadolinium enhancement at magnetic resonance. COV was 0.30±0.14 in patients with focal 18 F-FDG uptake and 0.12±0.03 in those without ( P 0.17 compared with those with COV ≤0.17 (-18.5±2.7% versus -22.2±1.8%; P =0.024). For predicting COV >0.17, a global longitudinal strain >-19.8% had 77% sensitivity and 91% specificity and a value >2 dysfunctional segments 92% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In females carrying α-galactosidase A mutation, focal 18 F-FDG uptake represents an early sign of disease-related myocardial damage and is associated with impaired left ventricular longitudinal function. These findings support the hypothesis that inflammation plays an important role in glycosphingolipids storage disorders. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The value of intraoperative ultrasound (IUS) examination for the visualization of metastatic cerebral lesions, compared with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacikowska, M.; Szczerbicki, M.; Grzesiakowska, U.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is: 1. to assess the value of intraoperative ultrasonographic examination (IUSG) in confirming intraoperatively the presence of metastatic tumours detected preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance tomography (MRI), 2. to evaluate an accordance of the numbers, localization and dimensions of metastatic tumours recognized preoperatively (CT and MRI) with those shown by intraoperative USG, 3. to comparatively assess the images of metastatic tumours found in preoperative CT and MRI examinations and in intraoperative USG examinations. Sixteen patients were operated upon for metastatic intracranial tumours from various primary foci. All patients had diagnostic brain examinations before the operation: MRI and CT in 7 cases, only MRI in 3 cases, only CT in 6 cases. Intraoperative USG examination was done in all cases. Retrospective analysis included: 1. comparative assessment of the images of metastatic tumours in intraoperative USG versus preoperative MRI and CT findings, 2. analysis of the number, localization and dimensions of metastatic tumours detected preoperatively and in intraoperative USG examination. The comparison of the greatest dimensions of metastatic lesions measured in CT and MRI findings, and in intraoperative USG based on Student t test showed no statistically significant differences between the examinations performed, p=0.2449. No statistically significant difference were found either between the numbers of metastatic lesions detected by these methods, p=0.71830. In the analysis of the images of metastatic lesions in preoperative examinations, the non--homogenous foci with margin enhancement after administration of gadolinium or contrast medium, with inner area not enhanced (necrosis?) were found in 8 cases (10 foci lesions), and in USG in 6 cases (9 focal lesions). In one case (one lesion) USG showed that the tumour was hypo echogenic as a whole, without areola around it. Intraoperative USG examination

  15. Assessment of atherosclerotic plaque activity in patients with sleep apnea using hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundel, Vaishnavi; Trivieri, Maria Giovanna; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Robson, Phillip M; Mani, Venkatesh; Kizer, Jorge R; Kaplan, Robert; Fayad, Zahi; Shah, Neomi

    2018-03-05

    Evidence suggests that the inflammatory state of an atherosclerotic plaque is important in predicting future risk of plaque rupture. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of measuring plaque inflammation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) utilizing advanced vascular imaging - hybrid positron-emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer-before and after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Patients with newly diagnosed moderate to severe OSA underwent baseline PET/MRI for assessment of vascular inflammation of the carotid arteries and thoracic aorta prior to initiation of CPAP. Those adherent to CPAP returned for repeat imaging after 3-6 months of CPAP use. Atherosclerotic plaque activity, as measured by arterial wall FDG uptake, was calculated using target-to-background ratios (TBR) before and after CPAP. Five patients were recruited as part of a focused project. Mean age was 52 years (80% male), and mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 33. Three patients were objectively adherent with CPAP. In the pre-CPAP phase, all patients had focal FDG uptake in the carotid arteries and aorta. After CPAP, there was an average reduction in TBR of 5.5% (TBR mean ) and 6.2% (TBR max ) in carotid and aortic plaque inflammation, similar in magnitude to the reduction observed with statin therapy alone in non-OSA patients (previously reported by others). We demonstrate the feasibility of using hybrid PET/MRI to assess atherosclerotic plaque inflammation in patients with OSA before and after CPAP. Use of the vascular PET/MRI platform in patients with OSA may provide better insight into the role of OSA and its treatment in reducing atherosclerotic inflammation.

  16. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, Abbas A.; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Christensen, Thomas E.; Ghotbi, Adam A.; Mathiasen, Anders B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent rest and adenosine stress imaging by 1.5-Tesla MR Scanner and a mCT/PET 64-slice Scanner. CMRI were analyzed based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution without specifying an explicit compartment model using our own software. PET images were analyzed using standard clinical software. CMRI and PET data was compared with Spearman's rho and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: CMRI results were strongly and significantly correlated with PET results for the absolute global myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.805, p = 0.001) and for global myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) (r = 0.886, p < 0.001). At vessel territorial level, CMRI results were also significantly correlated with absolute PET myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.737, p < 0.001) and MPR (r = 0.818, p < 0.001). Each vessel territory had similar strong correlation for absolute myocardial perfusion differences (right coronary artery (RCA): r = 0.787, p = 0.001; left anterior descending artery (LAD): r = 0.796, p = 0.001; left circumflex artery (LCX): r = 0.880, p < 0.001) and for MPR (RCA: r = 0.895, p < 0.001; LAD: r = 0.886, p < 0.001; LCX: r = 0.886, p < 0.001). Conclusion: On a global and vessel territorial basis, CMRI-measured absolute myocardial perfusion differences and MPR were strongly and significantly correlated with the Rb-82 PET findings

  17. Comparison of [11C]choline Positron Emission Tomography With T2- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Delineating Malignant Intraprostatic Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe H.; Lim Joon, Daryl; Davis, Ian D.; Lee, Sze Ting; Hiew, Chee-Yan; Esler, Stephen; Gong, Sylvia J.; Wada, Morikatsu; Clouston, David; O'Sullivan, Richard; Goh, Yin P.; Bolton, Damien; Scott, Andrew M.; Khoo, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of [ 11 C]choline positron emission tomography (CHOL-PET) with that of the combination of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (T2W/DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for delineating malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPLs) for guiding focal therapies and to investigate factors predicting the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Methods and Materials: This study included 21 patients who underwent CHOL-PET and T2W/DW MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. Two observers manually delineated IPL contours for each scan, and automatic IPL contours were generated on CHOL-PET based on varying proportions of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). IPLs identified on prostatectomy specimens defined reference standard contours. The imaging-based contours were compared with the reference standard contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and sensitivity and specificity values. Factors that could potentially predict the DSC of the best contouring method were analyzed using linear models. Results: The best automatic contouring method, 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV 60 ) , had similar correlations (DSC: 0.59) with the manual PET contours (DSC: 0.52, P=.127) and significantly better correlations than the manual MRI contours (DSC: 0.37, P<.001). The sensitivity and specificity values were 72% and 71% for SUV 60 ; 53% and 86% for PET manual contouring; and 28% and 92% for MRI manual contouring. The tumor volume and transition zone pattern could independently predict the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Conclusions: CHOL-PET is superior to the combination of T2W/DW MRI for delineating IPLs. The accuracy of CHOL-PET is insufficient for gland-sparing focal therapies but may be accurate enough for focal boost therapies. The transition zone pattern is a new classification that may predict how well CHOL-PET delineates IPLs

  18. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, Abbas A., E-mail: abbas.ali.qayyum@regionh.dk [Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory 2014, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hasbak, Philip, E-mail: philip.hasbak@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W., E-mail: henrik.larsson@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Functional Imaging Unit, Diagnostic Department, Glostrup Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Ndr. Ringvej 57, 2600 Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.emil.christensen@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Ghotbi, Adam A., E-mail: adam.ali.ghotbi@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mathiasen, Anders B., E-mail: anders.b.mathiasen@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory 2014, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent rest and adenosine stress imaging by 1.5-Tesla MR Scanner and a mCT/PET 64-slice Scanner. CMRI were analyzed based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution without specifying an explicit compartment model using our own software. PET images were analyzed using standard clinical software. CMRI and PET data was compared with Spearman's rho and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: CMRI results were strongly and significantly correlated with PET results for the absolute global myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.805, p = 0.001) and for global myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) (r = 0.886, p < 0.001). At vessel territorial level, CMRI results were also significantly correlated with absolute PET myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.737, p < 0.001) and MPR (r = 0.818, p < 0.001). Each vessel territory had similar strong correlation for absolute myocardial perfusion differences (right coronary artery (RCA): r = 0.787, p = 0.001; left anterior descending artery (LAD): r = 0.796, p = 0.001; left circumflex artery (LCX): r = 0.880, p < 0.001) and for MPR (RCA: r = 0.895, p < 0.001; LAD: r = 0.886, p < 0.001; LCX: r = 0.886, p < 0.001). Conclusion: On a global and vessel territorial basis, CMRI-measured absolute myocardial perfusion differences and MPR were strongly and significantly correlated with the Rb-82 PET findings.

  19. Impact of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction on myocardial late iodine enhancement in computed tomography and comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yuki; Kido, Teruhito; Kurata, Akira; Fukuyama, Naoki; Yokoi, Takahiro; Kido, Tomoyuki; Uetani, Teruyoshi; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Tokuyasu, Shinichi; Yamashita, Natsumi; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the image quality and diagnostic performance of late iodine enhancement computed tomography (LIE-CT) with knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) for the detection of myocardial infarction (MI) in comparison with late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI). The study investigated 35 patients who underwent a comprehensive cardiac CT protocol and LGE-MRI for the assessment of coronary artery disease. The CT protocol consisted of stress dynamic myocardial CT perfusion, coronary CT angiography (CTA) and LIE-CT using 256-slice CT. LIE-CT scans were acquired 5 min after CTA without additional contrast medium and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), a hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR), and IMR. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were assessed. Sensitivity and specificity of LIE-CT for detecting MI were assessed according to the 16-segment model. Image quality scores, and diagnostic performance were compared among LIE-CT with FBP, HIR and IMR. Among the 35 patients, 139 of 560 segments showed MI in LGE-MRI. On LIE-CT with FBP, HIR, and IMR, the median SNRs were 2.1, 2.9, and 6.1; and the median CNRs were 1.7, 2.2, and 4.7, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 56 and 93% for FBP, 62 and 91% for HIR, and 80 and 91% for IMR. LIE-CT with IMR showed the highest image quality and sensitivity (p quality and diagnostic performance of LIE-CT for detecting MI in comparison with FBP and HIR.

  20. Perfusion impairments in infantile autism on technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer brain single-photon emission tomography: comparison with findings on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Y H; Lee, J D; Yoon, P H; Kim, D I [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H B; Shin, Y J [Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The neuro-anatomical substrate of autism has been the subject of detailed investigation. Because previous studies have not demonstrated consistent and specific neuro-imaging findings in autism and most such studies have been performed in adults and school-aged children, we performed a retrospective review in young children in search of common functional and anatomical abnormalities with brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) and correlative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The patient population was composed of 23 children aged 28-92 months (mean: 54 months) who met the diagnostic criteria of autism as defined in the DSM-IV and CARS. Brain SPET was performed after intravenous injection of 185-370 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD using a brain-dedicated annular crystal gamma camera. MRI was performed in all patients, including T1, T2 axial and T1 sagittal sequences. SPET data were assessed visually. Twenty patients had abnormal SPET scans revealing focal areas of decreased perfusion. Decreased perfusion of the cerebellar hemisphere (20/23), thalami (19/23), basal ganglia (5/23) and posterior parietal (10/23) and temporal (7/23) areas were noted on brain SPET. By contrast all patients had normal MRI findings without evidence of abnormalities of the cerebellar vermis, cerebellar hemisphere, thalami, basal ganglia or parietotemporal cortex. In conclusion, extensive perfusion impairments involving the cerebellum, thalami and parietal cortex were found in this study. SPET may be more sensitive in reflecting the pathophysiology of autism than MRI. However, further studies are necessary to determine the significance of thalamic and parietal perfusion impairment in autism. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 33 refs.

  1. Perfusion impairments in infantile autism on technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer brain single-photon emission tomography: comparison with findings on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Y.H.; Lee, J.D.; Yoon, P.H.; Kim, D.I.; Lee, H.B.; Shin, Y.J.

    1999-01-01

    The neuro-anatomical substrate of autism has been the subject of detailed investigation. Because previous studies have not demonstrated consistent and specific neuro-imaging findings in autism and most such studies have been performed in adults and school-aged children, we performed a retrospective review in young children in search of common functional and anatomical abnormalities with brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET) using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) and correlative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The patient population was composed of 23 children aged 28-92 months (mean: 54 months) who met the diagnostic criteria of autism as defined in the DSM-IV and CARS. Brain SPET was performed after intravenous injection of 185-370 MBq of 99m Tc-ECD using a brain-dedicated annular crystal gamma camera. MRI was performed in all patients, including T1, T2 axial and T1 sagittal sequences. SPET data were assessed visually. Twenty patients had abnormal SPET scans revealing focal areas of decreased perfusion. Decreased perfusion of the cerebellar hemisphere (20/23), thalami (19/23), basal ganglia (5/23) and posterior parietal (10/23) and temporal (7/23) areas were noted on brain SPET. By contrast all patients had normal MRI findings without evidence of abnormalities of the cerebellar vermis, cerebellar hemisphere, thalami, basal ganglia or parietotemporal cortex. In conclusion, extensive perfusion impairments involving the cerebellum, thalami and parietal cortex were found in this study. SPET may be more sensitive in reflecting the pathophysiology of autism than MRI. However, further studies are necessary to determine the significance of thalamic and parietal perfusion impairment in autism. (orig.)

  2. Initial experience of using an iron-containing fiducial marker for radiotherapy of prostate cancer: Advantages in the visualization of markers in Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Iida, Takayoshi; Komeda, Hisao; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Seike, Kensaku; Kato, Daiki; Yokoyama, Takamasa; Hirose, Shigeki; Kawaguchi, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    Visualization of markers is critical for imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the size of the marker varies according to the imaging technique. While a large-sized marker is more useful for visualization in MRI, it results in artifacts on CT and causes substantial pain on administration. In contrast, a small-sized marker reduces the artifacts on CT but hampers MRI detection. Herein, we report a new ironcontaining marker and compare its utility with that of non-iron-containing markers. Five patients underwent CT/MRI fusion-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and the markers were placed by urologists. A Gold Anchor™ (GA; diameter, 0.28 mm; length, 10 mm) was placed using a 22G needle on the right side of the prostate. A VISICOIL™ (VIS; diameter, 0.35 mm; length, 10 mm) was placed using a 19G needle on the left side. MRI was performed using T2*-weighted imaging. Three observers evaluated and scored the visual qualities of the acquired images. The mean score of visualization was almost identical between the GA and VIS in radiography and cone-beam CT (Novalis Tx). The artifacts in planning CT were slightly larger using the GA than using the VIS. The visualization of the marker on MRI using the GA was superior to that using the VIS. In conclusion, the visualization quality of radiography, conebeam CT, and planning CT was roughly equal between the GA and VIS. However, the GA was more strongly visualized than was the VIS on MRI due to iron containing.

  3. Assessment of global and regional left ventricular function using 64-slice multislice computed tomography and 2D echocardiography: A comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annuar, Bin Rapaee; Liew, Chee Khoon; Chin, Sze Piaw; Ong, Tiong Kiam; Seyfarth, M. Tobias; Chan, Wei Ling; Fong, Yean Yip; Ang, Choon Kiat; Lin, Naing; Liew, Houng Bang; Sim, Kui Hian

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the assessment of global and regional left ventricular (LV) function using 64-slice multislice computed tomography (MSCT), 2D echocardiography (2DE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients (mean age, 56.5 ± 9.7 years) referred for evaluation of coronary artery using 64-slice MSCT also underwent 2DE and CMR within 48 h. The global left ventricular function which include left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVdV) and left ventricular end systolic volume (LVsV) were determine using the three modalities. Regional wall motion (RWM) was assessed visually in all three modalities. The CMR served as the gold standard for the comparison between 64-slice MSCT with CMR and 2DE with CMR. Statistical analysis included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman plots and κ-statistics. Results: The 64-slice MSCT agreed well with CMR for assessment of LVEF (r = 0.92; p < 0.0001), LVdV (r = 0.98; p < 0.0001) and LVsV (r = 0.98; p < 0.0001). In comparison with 64-slice MSCT, 2DE showed moderate correlation with CMR for the assessment of LVEF (r = 0.84; p < 0.0001), LVdV (r = 0.83; p < 0.0001) and LVsV (r = 0.80; p < 0.0001). However in RWM analysis, 2DE showed better accuracy than 64-slice MSCT (94.3% versus 82.4%) and closer agreement (κ = 0.89 versus 0.63) with CMR. Conclusion: 64-Slice MSCT correlates strongly with CMR in global LV function however in regional LV function 2DE showed better agreement with CMR than 64-slice MSCT

  4. Assessment of global and regional left ventricular function using 64-slice multislice computed tomography and 2D echocardiography: A comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annuar, Bin Rapaee [Faculty of Medicine, University Malaysia Sarawak (Malaysia); Department of Cardiology, Sarawak General Hospital (Malaysia)], E-mail: rannuar@fmhs.unimas.my; Liew, Chee Khoon; Chin, Sze Piaw; Ong, Tiong Kiam [Department of Cardiology, Sarawak General Hospital (Malaysia); Seyfarth, M. Tobias [Sieman Medical Solution (Germany); Chan, Wei Ling; Fong, Yean Yip; Ang, Choon Kiat [Department of Cardiology, Sarawak General Hospital (Malaysia); Lin, Naing [Universiti Sains Malaysia (Malaysia); Liew, Houng Bang; Sim, Kui Hian [Department of Cardiology, Sarawak General Hospital (Malaysia)

    2008-01-15

    Objectives: To compare the assessment of global and regional left ventricular (LV) function using 64-slice multislice computed tomography (MSCT), 2D echocardiography (2DE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: Thirty-two consecutive patients (mean age, 56.5 {+-} 9.7 years) referred for evaluation of coronary artery using 64-slice MSCT also underwent 2DE and CMR within 48 h. The global left ventricular function which include left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVdV) and left ventricular end systolic volume (LVsV) were determine using the three modalities. Regional wall motion (RWM) was assessed visually in all three modalities. The CMR served as the gold standard for the comparison between 64-slice MSCT with CMR and 2DE with CMR. Statistical analysis included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman plots and {kappa}-statistics. Results: The 64-slice MSCT agreed well with CMR for assessment of LVEF (r = 0.92; p < 0.0001), LVdV (r = 0.98; p < 0.0001) and LVsV (r = 0.98; p < 0.0001). In comparison with 64-slice MSCT, 2DE showed moderate correlation with CMR for the assessment of LVEF (r = 0.84; p < 0.0001), LVdV (r = 0.83; p < 0.0001) and LVsV (r = 0.80; p < 0.0001). However in RWM analysis, 2DE showed better accuracy than 64-slice MSCT (94.3% versus 82.4%) and closer agreement ({kappa} = 0.89 versus 0.63) with CMR. Conclusion: 64-Slice MSCT correlates strongly with CMR in global LV function however in regional LV function 2DE showed better agreement with CMR than 64-slice MSCT.

  5. Assessment of global and regional left ventricular function using 64-slice multislice computed tomography and 2D echocardiography: a comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuar, Bin Rapaee; Liew, Chee Khoon; Chin, Sze Piaw; Ong, Tiong Kiam; Seyfarth, M Tobias; Chan, Wei Ling; Fong, Yean Yip; Ang, Choon Kiat; Lin, Naing; Liew, Houng Bang; Sim, Kui Hian

    2008-01-01

    To compare the assessment of global and regional left ventricular (LV) function using 64-slice multislice computed tomography (MSCT), 2D echocardiography (2DE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Thirty-two consecutive patients (mean age, 56.5+/-9.7 years) referred for evaluation of coronary artery using 64-slice MSCT also underwent 2DE and CMR within 48h. The global left ventricular function which include left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVdV) and left ventricular end systolic volume (LVsV) were determine using the three modalities. Regional wall motion (RWM) was assessed visually in all three modalities. The CMR served as the gold standard for the comparison between 64-slice MSCT with CMR and 2DE with CMR. Statistical analysis included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman plots and kappa-statistics. The 64-slice MSCT agreed well with CMR for assessment of LVEF (r=0.92; p<0.0001), LVdV (r=0.98; p<0.0001) and LVsV (r=0.98; p<0.0001). In comparison with 64-slice MSCT, 2DE showed moderate correlation with CMR for the assessment of LVEF (r=0.84; p<0.0001), LVdV (r=0.83; p<0.0001) and LVsV (r=0.80; p<0.0001). However in RWM analysis, 2DE showed better accuracy than 64-slice MSCT (94.3% versus 82.4%) and closer agreement (kappa=0.89 versus 0.63) with CMR. 64-Slice MSCT correlates strongly with CMR in global LV function however in regional LV function 2DE showed better agreement with CMR than 64-slice MSCT.

  6. Comparison of Combined X-Ray Radiography and Magnetic Resonance (XMR) Imaging-Versus Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for the Evaluation of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acher, Peter; Rhode, Kawal; Morris, Stephen; Gaya, Andrew; Miquel, Marc; Popert, Rick; Tham, Ivan; Nichol, Janette; McLeish, Kate; Deehan, Charles; Dasgupta, Prokar; Beaney, Ronald; Keevil, Stephen F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for the dosimetric analysis of permanent prostate brachytherapy implants using a combination of stereoscopic X-ray radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (XMR) in an XMR facility, and to compare the clinical results between XMR- and computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Patients who had received nonstranded iodine-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy implants underwent XMR and CT imaging 4 weeks later. Four observers outlined the prostate gland on both sets of images. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were derived, and agreement was compared among the observers and between the modalities. Results: A total of 30 patients were evaluated. Inherent XMR registration based on prior calibration and optical tracking required a further automatic seed registration step that revealed a median root mean square registration error of 4.2 mm (range, 1.6-11.4). The observers agreed significantly more closely on prostate base and apex positions as well as outlining contours on the MR images than on those from CT. Coefficients of variation were significantly higher for observed prostate volumes, D90, and V100 parameters on CT-based dosimetry as opposed to XMR. The XMR-based dosimetry showed little agreement with that from CT for all observers, with D90 95% limits of agreement ranges of 65, 118, 79, and 73 Gy for Observers 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusions: The study results showed that XMR-based dosimetry offers an alternative to other imaging modalities and registration methods with the advantages of MR-based prostate delineation and confident three-dimensional reconstruction of the implant. The XMR-derived dose-volume histograms differ from the CT-derived values and demonstrate less interobserver variability

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of mild head injury - is it appropriate to classify patients with glasgow coma scale score of 13 to 15 as 'mild injury'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Y.; Saeki, N.; Yamaura, A.; Okimura, Y.; Tanaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study is to examine the relation between Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score and findings on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of patients with mild head injury presenting GCS Scores between 13 and 15. Methods. Data were collected from all consecutive patients with mild head injury who were referred to our hospital between July 1 and October 31, 1999. All patients were recommended to undergo CT and MR imaging examinations. Patients younger than 14 years of age were excluded. Results. Ninety patients were recruited into this study. CT scans were obtained in 88 patients and MR imaging were obtained in 65 patients. Of those 90 patients, 2 patients scored 13 points, 5 scored 14 points and 83 (92.2 %) 15 points. Patients with GCS score of 13 points demonstrated parenchymal lesions an both CT and MR imaging. Those with 14 points revealed absence of parenchymal abnormality an CT, but presence of parenchymal lesions an MR imaging. Patients in advanced age (chi square test, p < 0.0001), and those with amnesia (p = 0005, not significant), although scoring 15 points, revealed a tendency to abnormal intracranial lesions on CT scans. Conclusion. It is doubtful whether patients with GCS score 13 should be included in the mild head injury category, due to obvious brain damage on CT scans. MR imaging should be performed on patients with GCS score 14, since the parenchymal lesions are not clearly demonstrated an CT scans. Even if patients scored GCS 15, patients which amnesia or of advanced age should undergo CT scans at minimum, and MR imaging when available. (author)

  8. Diagnostic Value of Multislice Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Retroperitoneal Spread of Testicular Cancer: A Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.; Jurik, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most frequent malignant disorder in men aged 15-35 years. Generally, diagnosing and follow-up include computer tomography (CT) examinations to detect possible retroperitoneal spread (abdomen and pelvis), resulting in at least eight CT examinations. This patient group is thereby exposed to a non-neglectable radiation dose, increasing the risk of future radiation-induced secondary cancer. This is especially problematic in potentially surgically cured patients with stage 1 testicular cancer. Thus, it can be beneficial to substitute CT with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), provided there is valid evidence that the diagnostic value of MRI is at least comparable to current multislice CT (MSCT). The purpose of this study was to analyze whether there is evidence to recommend a substitution of MSCT with MRI in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal spread of testicular cancer. A literature search on the diagnostic accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity of MSCT and MRI in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal spread of testicular cancer was performed in the following databases: PubMed, EmBase, and ISI Web of Science. The search was limited to include the period from 2000 to September 2008, and to human and English-language publications. Forty-four publications were obtained for formal review (27 from PubMed, 15 from EmBase, two from ISI Web of Science). None of the publications reviewed encompassed diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of MSCT, and they lacked systematic comparison of MSCT and MRI. Only one study included sensitivity and specificity of MRI compared to single-slice CT. Both methods had a sensitivity and a specificity of approximately 70%. The literature review did not reveal valid data regarding diagnostic accuracy of MRI compared with MSCT for diagnosing retroperitoneal spread of testicular cancer. A prospective blinded comparative study is needed to provide valid evidence

  9. Behaviors of cost functions in image registration between 201Tl brain tumor single-photon emission computed tomography and magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, Tsutomu; Takaki, Akihiro; Teraoka, Satomi; Ishikawa, Yasushi; Murase, Kenya; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    We studied the behaviors of cost functions in the registration of thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) brain tumor single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images, as the similarity index of image positioning. A marker for image registration [technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) point source] was attached at three sites on the heads of 13 patients with brain tumor, from whom 42 sets of 99m Tc- 201 Tl SPECT (the dual-isotope acquisition) and MR images were obtained. The 201 Tl SPECT and MR images were manually registered according to the markers. From the positions where the two images were registered, the position of the 201 Tl SPECT was moved to examine the behaviors of the three cost functions, i.e., ratio image uniformity (RIU), mutual information (MI), and normalized MI (NMI). The cost functions MI and NMI reached the maximum at positions adjacent to those where the SPECT and MR images were manually registered. As for the accuracy of image registration in terms of the cost functions MI and NMI, on average, the images were accurately registered within 3 deg of rotation around the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, and within 1.5 mm (within 2 pixels), 3 mm (within 3 pixels), and 4 mm (within 1 slice) of translation to the X-, Y-, and Z-axes, respectively. In terms of rotation around the Z-axis, the cost function RIU reached the minimum at positions where the manual registration of the two images was substantially inadequate. The MI and NMI were suitable cost functions in the registration of 201 Tl SPECT and MR images. The behavior of the RIU, in contrast, was unstable, being unsuitable as an index of image registration. (author)

  10. Correlation of X-Ray Computed Tomography with Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for Pre-Clinical Measurement of Adipose and Lean Tissues in Living Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N. Metzinger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR. Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  11. Pancreatic gross tumor volume contouring on computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Results of an international contouring conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A; Heerkens, Hanne D; Paulson, Eric S; Meijer, Gert J; Kotte, Alexis N; Knechtges, Paul; Parikh, Parag J; Bassetti, Michael F; Lee, Percy; Aitken, Katharine L; Palta, Manisha; Myrehaug, Sten; Koay, Eugene J; Portelance, Lorraine; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Erickson, Beth A

    Accurate identification of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma is challenging. We sought to understand differences in GTV delineation using pancreatic computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twelve attending radiation oncologists were convened for an international contouring symposium. All participants had a clinical and research interest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CT and MRI scans from 3 pancreatic cases were used for contouring. CT and MRI GTVs were analyzed and compared. Interobserver variability was compared using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdorff distances, and Jaccard indices. Mann-Whitney tests were used to check for significant differences. Consensus contours on CT and MRI scans and constructed count maps were used to visualize the agreement. Agreement regarding the optimal method to determine GTV definition using MRI was reached. Six contour sets (3 from CT and 3 from MRI) were obtained and compared for each observer, totaling 72 contour sets. The mean volume of contours on CT was significantly larger at 57.48 mL compared with a mean of 45.76 mL on MRI, P = .011. The standard deviation obtained from the CT contours was significantly larger than the standard deviation from the MRI contours (P = .027). The mean DSC was 0.73 for the CT and 0.72 for the MRI (P = .889). The conformity index measurement was similar for CT and MRI (P = .58). Count maps were created to highlight differences in the contours from CT and MRI. Using MRI as a primary image set to define a pancreatic adenocarcinoma GTV resulted in smaller contours compared with CT. No differences in DSC or the conformity index were seen between MRI and CT. A stepwise method is recommended as an approach to contour a pancreatic GTV using MRI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of computer tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography in the stenosis detection of autologuous hemodialysis access: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the diagnostic performances of computer tomography angiography (CTA and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA for detection and assessment of stenosis in patients with autologuous hemodialysis access. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library database from January 1984 to May 2013 for studies comparing CTA or MRA with DSA or surgery for autologuous hemodialysis access. Eligible studies were in English language, aimed to detect more than 50% stenosis or occlusion of autologuous vascular access in hemodialysis patients with CTA and MRA technology and provided sufficient data about diagnosis performance. Methodological quality was assessed by the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies (QUADAS instrument. Sensitivities (SEN, specificities (SPE, positive likelihood ratio (PLR, negative likelihood values (NLR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR and areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC were pooled statistically. Potential threshold effect, heterogeneity and publication bias was evaluated. The clinical utility of CTA and MRA in detection of stenosis was also investigated. RESULT: Sixteen eligible studies were included, with a total of 500 patients. Both CTA and MRA were accurate modality (sensitivity, 96.2% and 95.4%, respectively; specificity, 97.1 and 96.1%, respectively; DOR [diagnostic odds ratio], 393.69 and 211.47, respectively for hemodialysis vascular access. No significant difference was detected between the diagnostic performance of CTA (AUC, 0.988 and MRA (AUC, 0.982. Meta-regression analyses and subgroup analyses revealed no statistical difference. The Deek's funnel plots suggested a publication bias. CONCLUSION: Diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA for detecting stenosis of hemodialysis vascular access had no statistical difference. Both techniques may function as an alternative or an important complement to conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA and may be

  13. Diagnostic Value of Multislice Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Retroperitoneal Spread of Testicular Cancer: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus (Denmark)); Jurik, A.G. (Dept. of Radiology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2009-11-15

    Testicular cancer is the most frequent malignant disorder in men aged 15-35 years. Generally, diagnosing and follow-up include computer tomography (CT) examinations to detect possible retroperitoneal spread (abdomen and pelvis), resulting in at least eight CT examinations. This patient group is thereby exposed to a non-neglectable radiation dose, increasing the risk of future radiation-induced secondary cancer. This is especially problematic in potentially surgically cured patients with stage 1 testicular cancer. Thus, it can be beneficial to substitute CT with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), provided there is valid evidence that the diagnostic value of MRI is at least comparable to current multislice CT (MSCT). The purpose of this study was to analyze whether there is evidence to recommend a substitution of MSCT with MRI in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal spread of testicular cancer. A literature search on the diagnostic accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity of MSCT and MRI in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal spread of testicular cancer was performed in the following databases: PubMed, EmBase, and ISI Web of Science. The search was limited to include the period from 2000 to September 2008, and to human and English-language publications. Forty-four publications were obtained for formal review (27 from PubMed, 15 from EmBase, two from ISI Web of Science). None of the publications reviewed encompassed diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of MSCT, and they lacked systematic comparison of MSCT and MRI. Only one study included sensitivity and specificity of MRI compared to single-slice CT. Both methods had a sensitivity and a specificity of approximately 70%. The literature review did not reveal valid data regarding diagnostic accuracy of MRI compared with MSCT for diagnosing retroperitoneal spread of testicular cancer. A prospective blinded comparative study is needed to provide valid evidence

  14. Three-dimensional echocardiography in various types of heart disease: a comparison study of magnetic resonance imaging and 64-slice computed tomography in a real-world population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squeri, Angelo; Censi, Stefano; Reverberi, Claudio; Gaibazzi, Nicola; Baldelli, Marco; Binno, Simone Maurizio; Properzi, Enrico; Bosi, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Accurate quantification of left ventricular (LV) volumes [end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV)] and ejection fraction (EF) is of critical importance. The development of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) has shown better correlation than two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. The aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of RT3DE and 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of LV volumes and function using MRI as the reference standard in a real-world population with various types of heart disease with different chamber geometry. The study population consisted of 66 patients referred for cardiac MRI for various pathologies. All patients underwent cardiac MRI, and RT3DE and 64 slices CT were then performed on a subsequent day. The study population was then divided into 5 clinical groups depending on the underlying heart disease. RT3DE volumes correlated well with MRI values (R 2 values: 0.90 for EDV and 0.94 for ESV). RT3DE measurements of EF correlated well with MRI values (R 2  = 0.86). RT3DE measurements resulted in slightly underestimated values of both EDV and ESV, as reflected by biases of -9.18 and -4.50 mL, respectively. Comparison of RT3DE and MRI in various types of cardiomyopathies showed no statistical difference between different LV geometrical patterns. These results confirm that RT3DE has good accuracy in everyday clinical practice and can be of clinical utility in all types of cardiomyopathy independently of LV geometric pattern, LV diameter or wall thickness, taking into account a slight underestimation of LV volumes and EF compared to MRI.

  15. Clinical significance of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography for the diagnosis of cystic tumor of the pancreas compared with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mera, Kiyomi; Tajiri, Hisao; Muto, Manabu

    1999-01-01

    Cystic tumor of the pancreas has been investigated by a variety of imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is being widely used as a non-invasive diagnostic modality for investigation of the biliary tree and pancreatic duct system. The purpose of this study was to compare MRCP images with those of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and computed tomography (CT) in order to clarify the diagnostic efficacy of MRCP for cystic tumor of the pancreas. We retrospectively studied 15 patients with cystic tumor of the pancreas that had been surgically resected and histopathologically confirmed. There were five cases of intraductal papillary adenocarcinoma, five of intraductal papillary adenoma, two of serous cyst adenoma, two of retention cyst associated with invasive ductal adenocarcinoma and one of solid cystic tumor. In all cases MRCP correctly identified the main pancreatic duct (MPD) and showed the entire cystic tumor and the communication between the tumor and the MPD. On the other hand, the detection rate by ERCP of the cystic tumor and the communication between the cystic tumor and the MPD was only 60%. Although the detection rates by CT for the septum and solid components inside the cystic tumor were 100 and 90.0%, respectively, those of MRCP for each were 58.3 and 20.0%. MRCP is capable of providing diagnostic information superior to ERCP for the diagnosis of cystic tumor of the pancreas. Although MRCP may provide complementary information about the whole lesion of interest, the characteristic internal features of cystic tumor of the pancreas should be carefully diagnosed in combination with CT. (author)

  16. Value of (18F)-FDG positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing primary and recurrent ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik-Huch, R.A.; Doerffler, W.; Marincek, B.; Schulthess, G.K.; Steinert, H.C.; Koechli, O.R.; Haller, U.; Seifert, B.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare prospectively the accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography (PET), CT and MRI in diagnosing primary and recurrent ovarian cancer. Nineteen patients (age range 23-76 years) were recruited with suspicious ovarian lesions at presentation (n = 8) or follow-up for recurrence (n = 11). All patients were scheduled for laparotomy and histological confirmation. Whole-body PET with FDG, contrast-enhanced spiral CT of the abdomen, including the pelvis, and MRI of the entire abdomen were performed. Each imaging study was evaluated separately. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathological diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for lesion characterization in patients with suspicious ovarian lesions (n = 7) were, respectively: 100, 67 and 86 % for PET; 100, 67 and 86 % for CT; and 100, 100 and 100 % for MRI. For the diagnosis of recurrent disease (n = 10), PET had a sensitivity of 100 %, specificity of 50 % and accuracy of 90 %. The PET technique was the only technique which correctly identified a single transverse colon metastasis. Results for CT were 40, 50 and 43 %, and for MRI 86, 100 and 89 %, respectively. No statistically significant difference was seen. Neither FDG PET nor CT nor MRI can replace surgery in the detection of microscopic peritoneal disease. No statistically significant difference was observed for the investigated imaging modalities with regard to lesion characterization or detection of recurrent disease; thus, the methods are permissible alternatives. The PET technique, however, has the drawback of less accurate spatial assignment of small lesions compared with CT and MRI. (orig.)

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  18. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  19. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  3. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  4. Multimodal elucidation of choline metabolism in a murine glioma model using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 11C-choline positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wehrl, H.F.; Schwab, J.; Hasenbach, K.; Reischl, G.; Tabatabai, G.; Quintanilla-Martinez, L.; Jiru, F.; Chughtai, K; Kiss, A.; Cay, F.; Bukala, D.; Heeren, R.M.A.; Pichler, B.J.; Sauter, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolites, transporters, and enzymes involved in choline metabolism are regarded as biomarkers for disease progression in a variety of cancers, but their in vivo detection is not ideal. Both magnetic resonance spectroscopy [MRS using chemical shift imaging (CSI) total choline (tCho)] and

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  19. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography in eclampsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlig, U.

    1995-01-01

    Eclampsia is a rare but severe complication during the course of a pregnancy. The CT-findings at the brain are well known. Reports on MRT-findings are limited, however, especially in German literature. We describe the MRT picture of the cerebral changes caused by eclampsia and discuss the advantages of MRT in comparison with CT. The use of contrast agents with MRT shows breakdown of blood-brain barrier but does not provide any information of therapeutical consequences and should be avoided during pregnancy. An early and targeted use of MRT in any case of unclear or suspicious neurological symptoms during pregnancy is recommended. MRT supports differential diagnosis regarding non pregnancy-related cerebral disease and can be helpful for therapy planning in cases of preeclampsia. Additionally, MRT offers the possibility to control the effect of therapy with regard to brain damage. (orig.) [de

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  4. The increased use of computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography as the sole imaging modalities prior to infrainguinal bypass has had no effect on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Bing; Damle, Rachelle N; Flahive, Julie; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Stone, David H; Patel, Virendra I; Schanzer, Andres; Baril, Donald T

    2015-08-01

    Angiography remains the gold standard imaging modality before infrainguinal bypass. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have emerged as noninvasive alternatives for preoperative imaging. We sought to examine contemporary trends in the utilization of CTA and MRA as isolated imaging modalities before infrainguinal bypass and to compare outcomes following infrainguinal bypass in patients who underwent CTA or MRA versus those who underwent conventional arteriography. Patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass within the Vascular Study Group of New England were identified (2003-2012). Patients were stratified by preoperative imaging modality: CTA/MRA alone or conventional angiography. Trends in utilization of these modalities were examined and demographics of these groups were compared. Primary end points included primary patency, secondary patency, and major adverse limb events (MALE) at 1 year as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to evaluate the effect of imaging modality on primary patency, secondary patency, and MALE after adjusting for confounders. In 3123 infrainguinal bypasses, CTA/MRA alone was used in 462 cases (15%) and angiography was used in 2661 cases (85%). Use of CTA/MRA alone increased over time, with 52 (11%) bypasses performed between 2003 and 2005, 189 (41%) bypasses performed between 2006 and 2009, and 221 (48%) bypasses performed between 2010 and 2012 (P < 0.001). Patients with CTA/MRA alone, compared with patients with angiography, more frequently underwent bypass for claudication (33% vs. 26%, P = 0.001) or acute limb ischemia (13% vs. 5%, P < 0.0001), more frequently had prosthetic conduits (39% vs. 30%, P = 0.001), and less frequently had tibial/pedal targets (32% vs. 40%, P = 0.002). After adjusting for these and other confounders, multivariable analysis demonstrated that the use of CTA/MRA alone was not associated with a significant

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung [Dept. of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Sang Min

    2014-01-01

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT

  7. The assessment of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Seon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Lyou, Chae Yeon; Cho, Nariya; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key

    2011-01-01

    Background: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer is a widely accepted treatment. For assessment of the tumor response after chemotherapy, both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) are promising methods. Purpose: To retrospectively compare MRI and PET in the assessment of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for primary breast cancer with the pathologic response as the reference standard. Material and Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2008, 32 women with breast cancer underwent concurrent MRI and PET before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For response assessment, we calculated the changes in the maximum diameters of the tumor (ΔDmax) on MRI, and the changes in the standard uptake values (ΔSUV) on PET. The correlation between the ΔDmax and ΔSUV was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The correspondence rates between each imaging modality and pathologic assessment were calculated. For prediction of the pathologic complete response (pCR), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were analyzed using the McNemar test. Results: The pathologic assessment of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy identified eight complete responses (25.0%), 10 partial responses (31.2%), and 14 non-responses (43.8%). The change in size on MRI was moderately correlated with the change in SUV on PET (r = 0.574, p = 0.001). The correspondence rate of response assessment was 75.0% (24/32) between MRI and pathologic response and 53.1% (17/32) between PET and pathologic response. For the pCR, specificity (95.8% vs. 62.5%) and PPV (83.3% vs. 47.1%) were statistically higher on MRI than PET (p < 0.05), while sensitivity (100.0% vs. 62.5%) and NPV (100.0% vs. 88.5%) on PET tended to be higher than MRI. Conclusion: Before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, the ΔDmax of MRI correlated moderately with the

  8. Voxelwise comparison of perfusion parameters estimated using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) computed tomography and DCE-magnetic resonance imaging in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallehauge; Jesper; Nielsen, Thomas; Haack, Soeren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging has gained interest as an imaging modality for assessment of tumor characteristics and response to cancer treatment. However, for DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue contrast enhancement may vary depending on imaging sequence and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to compare DCE-MRI to DCE-computed tomography (DCE-CT) as the gold standard. Material and methods: Thirteen patients with advanced cervical cancer were scanned once prior to chemo-radiation and during chemo-radiation with DCE-CT and -MRI in immediate succession. A total of 22 paired DCE-CT and -MRI scans were acquired for comparison. Kinetic modeling using the extended Tofts model was applied to both image series. Furthermore the similarity of the spatial distribution was evaluated using a G analysis. The correlation between the two imaging techniques was evaluated using Pe arson's correlation and the parameter means were compared using a Student's t-test (p trans (r = 0.9), flux rate constant k ep (r = 0.77), extracellular volume fraction v e (r = 0.58) and blood plasma volume fraction v p (r = 0.83). All quantitative parameters were found to be significantly different as estimated by DCE-CT and -MRI. The G analysis in normalized maps revealed that 45 % of the voxels failed to find a voxel with the corresponding value allowing for an uncertainty of 3 mm in position and 3 % in value (G 3,3 ). By reducing the criteria, the G-failure rates were: G 3,5 (37 % failure), G 3,10 (26% failure) and at G 3,15 (19 % failure). Conclusion: Good to excellent correlations but significant bias was found between DCE-CT and -MRI. Both the Pearson's correlation and the G analysis proved that the spatial information was similar when analyzing the two sets of DCE data using the extended Tofts model. Improvement of input function sampling is needed to improve kinetic quantification using DCE-MRI

  9. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Sun, Jidi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Richardson, Haylea [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Arm, Jameen [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Best, Leah [Department of Radiology, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, New South Wales (Australia); Chandra, Shekhar S. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Fripp, Jurgen [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Menk, Frederick W. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  10. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Jason A.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Fripp, Jurgen; Menk, Frederick W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  11. Comparative Study of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Detection of Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Untreated Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Hoon Ryu, Y.; Yun, M.J.; Suh, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The presence and extent of osteolytic bone lesions in untreated patients with multiple myeloma are important factors in the staging of the disease, and the extent of bone lesions in multiple myeloma cases significantly influences decisions regarding therapy. Recently, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to detect bone marrow involvement in patients with multiple myeloma. Purpose: To compare the efficacy of FDG-PET and MRI for the detection of bone marrow infiltration into the spine in untreated patients with multiple myeloma. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients with multiple myeloma underwent both FDG-PET and spine MRI. The examined spinal regions by MRI included 21 thoracic and lumbar spines, one lumbar spine, and 12 cervical spines. The following imaging sequences were performed: T1-weighted spin-echo MRI with and without fat suppression, and T2-weighted spin-echo MRI in the sagittal plane. In the patients with bone marrow abnormalities, an additional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo MR image and a fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo MR image were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of the criteria defined by Durie and Salmon: stage I (n=9), stage II (n=3), and stage III (n=10). The number and location of lesions detected in both FGD-PET and MRI were recorded, and the lesions were compared using the McNemar test. Bone marrow biopsy results, the patient's clinical examinations, and other imaging findings (MRI, FDG-PET, etc.) were used as references. Results: In stages I and II (37 lesions in 12 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 78% (29 of 37 lesions) and 86% (32 of 37 lesions), respectively. However, the difference between the abilities of FDG-PET and MRI to detect lesions was not statistically significant (P=0.317). In stage III (101 lesions in 10 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 80% (81 of 101 lesions) and 92

  12. Comparative Study of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Detection of Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Untreated Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, J.; Yoon, C.S.; Hoon Ryu, Y.; Yun, M.J.; Suh, J.S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Research Inst. of Radiological Science, and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (KR))

    2008-05-15

    Background: The presence and extent of osteolytic bone lesions in untreated patients with multiple myeloma are important factors in the staging of the disease, and the extent of bone lesions in multiple myeloma cases significantly influences decisions regarding therapy. Recently, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to detect bone marrow involvement in patients with multiple myeloma. Purpose: To compare the efficacy of FDG-PET and MRI for the detection of bone marrow infiltration into the spine in untreated patients with multiple myeloma. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients with multiple myeloma underwent both FDG-PET and spine MRI. The examined spinal regions by MRI included 21 thoracic and lumbar spines, one lumbar spine, and 12 cervical spines. The following imaging sequences were performed: T1-weighted spin-echo MRI with and without fat suppression, and T2-weighted spin-echo MRI in the sagittal plane. In the patients with bone marrow abnormalities, an additional contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo MR image and a fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo MR image were obtained. Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of the criteria defined by Durie and Salmon: stage I (n=9), stage II (n=3), and stage III (n=10). The number and location of lesions detected in both FGD-PET and MRI were recorded, and the lesions were compared using the McNemar test. Bone marrow biopsy results, the patient's clinical examinations, and other imaging findings (MRI, FDG-PET, etc.) were used as references. Results: In stages I and II (37 lesions in 12 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 78% (29 of 37 lesions) and 86% (32 of 37 lesions), respectively. However, the difference between the abilities of FDG-PET and MRI to detect lesions was not statistically significant (P=0.317). In stage III (101 lesions in 10 patients), FDG-PET and MRI detected lesions in 80% (81 of 101 lesions) and

  13. Utility of 3D Reconstruction of 2D Liver Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Images as a Surgical Planning Tool for Residents in Liver Resection Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Caitlin T; MacDonald, Andrew; Ungi, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Jalink, Diederick; Zevin, Boris; Fichtinger, Gabor; Nanji, Sulaiman

    A fundamental aspect of surgical planning in liver resections is the identification of key vessel tributaries to preserve healthy liver tissue while fully resecting the tumor(s). Current surgical planning relies primarily on the surgeon's ability to mentally reconstruct 2D computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) images into 3D and plan resection margins. This creates significant cognitive load, especially for trainees, as it relies on image interpretation, anatomical and surgical knowledge, experience, and spatial sense. The purpose of this study is to determine if 3D reconstruction of preoperative CT/MR images will assist resident-level trainees in making appropriate operative plans for liver resection surgery. Ten preoperative patient CT/MR images were selected. Images were case-matched, 5 to 2D planning and 5 to 3D planning. Images from the 3D group were segmented to create interactive digital models that the resident can manipulate to view the tumor(s) in relation to landmark hepatic structures. Residents were asked to evaluate the images and devise a surgical resection plan for each image. The resident alternated between 2D and 3D planning, in a randomly generated order. The primary outcome was the accuracy of resident's plan compared to expert opinion. Time to devise each surgical plan was the secondary outcome. Residents completed a prestudy and poststudy questionnaire regarding their experience with liver surgery and the 3D planning software. Senior level surgical residents from the Queen's University General Surgery residency program were recruited to participate. A total of 14 residents participated in the study. The median correct response rate was 2 of 5 (40%; range: 0-4) for the 2D group, and 3 of 5 (60%; range: 1-5) for the 3D group (p surgery planning increases accuracy of resident surgical planning and decreases amount of time required. 3D reconstruction would be a useful model for improving trainee understanding of liver anatomy and surgical

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  15. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  16. Marchiafava-Bignami disease: computed tomography and magnetic resonance evidence of the reversibility of the lesions; Enfermedad de Marchiafava-Bignami: reversibilidad de las lesiones radiologicas en TC y Rm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, V.; Belda, J.; Mola, S. [Hospital Vega Baja. Orihuela (Spain); Gilabert, A. [Hospital de La Arrixaca. Murcia (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    We present a case of Marchiafava-Bignami disease with a favorable outcome in a 53-year-old man with a history of chronic alcoholism. the diagnosis was made in the early stages of the disease on the basis of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) and rapid therapeutic measures were initiated, leading to the improvement of the patient. The CT and MR images revealed the early stages of the typical demyelination of the corpus callosum and the subsequent reversibility of the lesions. (Author) 10 refs.

  17. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Haesung; Yoon, Dahye; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Joon; Koo, Ja Seung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters. Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years) with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1) were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US), 2) were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) 3) underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and 4) had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER), maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters. In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites showed

  18. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesung Yoon

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters.Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1 were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US, 2 were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB 3 underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT, and 4 had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER, maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters.In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites

  19. {sup 18}F-Choline Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Detection of Early Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer Initially Treated by Radiation Therapy: Comparison With Systematic 3-Dimensional Transperineal Mapping Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoun, Salim, E-mail: Salim.kanoun@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon (France); LE2I UMR6306, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Arts et Métiers, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon (France); MRI Unit, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Dijon (France); Walker, Paul [LE2I UMR6306, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Arts et Métiers, Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon (France); MRI Unit, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Dijon (France); Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Depardon, Edouard [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon (France); Barbier, Vincent [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Dijon (France); Humbert, Olivier [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, Dijon (France); Moulin, Morgan [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Dijon (France); and others

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FCH-PET/CT), multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), and a combination of both techniques for the detection of local recurrence of prostate cancer initially treated by radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective, single-institution study of 32 patients with suspected prostate cancer recurrence who underwent both FCH-PET/CT and 3T mpMRI within 3 months of one another for the detection of recurrence. All included patients had to be cleared for metastatic recurrence. The reference procedure was systematic 3-dimensional (3D)-transperineal prostate biopsy for the final assessment of local recurrence. Both imaging modalities were analyzed by 2 experienced readers blinded to clinical data. The analysis was made per-patient and per-segment using a 4-segment model. Results: The median prostate-specific antigen value at the time of imaging was 2.92 ng/mL. The mean prostate-specific antigen doubling time was 14 months. Of the 32 patients, 31 had a positive 3D-transperineal mapping biopsy for a local relapse. On a patient-based analysis, the detection rate was 71% (22 of 31) for mpMRI and 74% (23 of 31) for FCH-PET/CT. On a segment-based analysis, the sensitivity and specificity were, respectively, 32% and 87% for mpMRI, 34% and 87% for FCH-PET/CT, and 43% and 83% for the combined analysis of both techniques. Accuracy was 64%, 65%, and 66%, respectively. The interobserver agreement was κ = 0.92 for FCH-PET/CT and κ = 0.74 for mpMRI. Conclusions: Both mpMRI and FCH-PET/CT show limited sensitivity but good specificity for the detection of local cancer recurrence after radiation therapy, when compared with 3D-transperineal mapping biopsy. Prostate biopsy still seems to be mandatory to diagnose local relapse and select patients who could benefit from local salvage therapy.

  20. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. RESULTS The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. CONCLUSIONS All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the

  1. How does MRI work? An introduction into physics and functionality of magnetic resonance imaging. 6. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Marincek, Borut

    2009-01-01

    The book provides the basic physics and describes the functionality of magnetic resonance tomography in a very illustrative way. The following topics are covered: Spins and the magnetic resonance phenomenon, image contrast, three-dimensional structure, signal-to-noise ratio, description of a magnetic resonance tomography, basic pulse sequences, fast pulse sequences, methods for fat suppression, parallel imaging, cardiovascular imaging, MR contrast media, MR image artifacts, high-field MRI, imaging beyond morphology and structure, safety and risks [de

  2. Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of axillary lymph node metastases in early breast cancer: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K L; Meng, Y; Harnan, S; Ward, S E; Fitzgerald, P; Papaioannou, D; Wyld, L; Ingram, C; Wilkinson, I D; Lorenz, E

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women. Evaluation of axillary lymph node metastases is important for breast cancer staging and treatment planning. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and effect on patient outcomes of positron emission tomography (PET), with or without computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of axillary lymph node metastases in patients with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer. A systematic review of literature and an economic evaluation were carried out. Key databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE and nine others) plus research registers and conference proceedings were searched for relevant studies up to April 2009. A decision-analytical model was developed to determine cost-effectiveness in the UK. One reviewer assessed titles and abstracts of studies identified by the search strategy, obtained the full text of relevant papers and screened them against inclusion criteria. Data from included studies were extracted by one reviewer using a standardised data extraction form and checked by a second reviewer. Discrepancies were resolved by discussion. Quality of included studies was assessed using the quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS) checklist, applied by one reviewer and checked by a second. Forty-five citations relating to 35 studies were included in the clinical effectiveness review: 26 studies of PET and nine studies of MRI. Two studies were included in the cost-effectiveness review: one of PET and one of MRI. Of the seven studies evaluating PET/CT (n = 862), the mean sensitivity was 56% [95% confidence interval (CI) 44% to 67%] and mean specificity 96% (95% CI 90% to 99%). Of the 19 studies evaluating PET only (n = 1729), the mean sensitivity was 66% (95% CI 50% to 79%) and mean specificity 93% (95% CI 89% to 96%). PET performed less well for small metastases; the mean sensitivity was 11% (95% CI 5% to 22%) for micrometastases (≤ 2 mm

  3. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  5. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  6. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  7. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  8. The effect of highly potent, static magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) on the red-green vision of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancken, G.C.W.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of red-green differentiation before and after MRT exposure to a static magnetic field of a potency of 0.5 Tesla was examined in a total of 32 volunteers and contrastet to that of 128 further test persons before and after CT, linear accelerator irradiation and ultrasonography as well as to findings revealed in a control group. The greatest number of significant colour misjudgements was seen in the MRT group, where 57% of patients had deteriorated colour vision. Volunteers treated at CT units or linear accelerators also showed deviations from the normal red-green vision in 48.5% and 38.7% of cases. In the ultrasound and control groups, no more than 25% and 13.3% of the values measured using the anomaloscope suggested changes from normal. Exposure to a 0.5 Tesla magnetic field led to slight shifts in colour vision for a great number of patients. These appear to be brought about by light-sensitive photoreceptors in the retinal cone cells that respond to magnetic field influences. Theories about the underlying mechanisms are explained and discussed. The results obtained in the ultrasound and control groups have, however, also made evident that some individuals are prone to changes in colour vision without having been exposed to any measurable physical influences. These appear to be chiefly attributable to factors like stress. It would be most interesting to know to which extent study results such as these are distorted by personal perceptions and mental factors. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Physics of Magnetic Resonance. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hee Kwon [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a property of nuclei in a magnetic field where they are able to absorb applied radiofrequency (RF) energy and subsequently release it at a specific frequency, goes back many decades to the early 1900s. Physicist Isidor I. Rabi, fascinated by the work of Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach which demonstrated that particles have intrinsic quantum properties, delved into the magnetic properties of nuclei, and in 1938 Rabi discovered the phenomenon of NMR. Several years later, in 1946, Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell refined the methods and successfully measured the NMR signal from liquids and solids. For their discoveries, Rabi received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1944 and Bloch and Purcell in 1952. While Rabi, Bloch, Purcell and other physicists working in this field had laid the foundations, a major discovery that transformed the NMR phenomenon for imaging was not made until 1973, when Paul Lauterbur developed a method for spatially encoding the NMR signal by utilizing linear magnetic field gradients. About the same time, Peter Mansfield had also discovered a means of determining the spatial structure of solids by introducing a linear gradient across the object. The idea of applying magnetic field gradients to induce spatially varying resonance frequencies to resolve the spatial distribution of magnetization was a major milestone and the beginning of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For their work, Lauterbur and Mansfield were awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2003. Since its discovery, MRI has quickly become one of the most important medical imaging devices available to physicians today. Unlike other imaging modalities, such as X ray and computed tomography, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation. MRI also offers superior soft tissue contrast that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Furthermore, in MRI, the desired level of image contrast among different tissues can often be precisely controlled

  10. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  11. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the radiation treatment planning of localized prostate cancer using intra-prostatic fiducial markers for computed tomography co-registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, C.C.; Damyanovich, A.; Haycocks, T.; Haider, M.; Bayley, A.; Catton, C.N.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility, and potential implications, of using intra-prostatic fiducial markers, rather than bony landmarks, for the co-registration of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in the radiation treatment planning of localized prostate cancer. Methods: All men treated with conformal therapy for localized prostate cancer underwent routine pre-treatment insertion of prostatic fiducial markers to assist with gross target volume (GTV) delineation and to identify prostate positioning during therapy. Six of these men were selected for investigation. Phantom MRI measurements were obtained to quantify image distortion, to determine the most suitable gold alloy marker composition, and to identify the spin-echo sequences that optimized both marker identification and the contrast between the prostate and the surrounding tissues. The GTV for each patient was contoured independently by three radiation oncologists on axial planning CT slices, and on axial MRI slices fused to the CT slices by matching the implanted fiducial markers. From each set of contours the scan common volume (SCV), and the scan encompassing volume (SEV), were obtained. The ratio SEV/SCV for a given scan is a measure of inter-observer variation in contouring. For each of the 18 patient-observer combinations the observer common volume (OCV) and the observer encompassing volume (OEV) was obtained. The ratio OEV/OCV for a given patient-observer combination is a measure of the inter-modality variation in contouring. The distance from the treatment planning isocenter to the prostate contours was measured and the discrepancy between the CT- and the MR-defined contour recorded. The discrepancies between the CT- and MR-defined contours of the posterior prostate were recorded in the sagittal plane at 1-cm intervals above and below the isocenter. Results: Phantom measurements demonstrated trivial image distortion within the required field of view, and an 18K Au/Cu alloy to

  13. Production possibility of 51Mn via natV(3He,x)51Mn nuclear process for combined positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szelecsenyi, F.; Kovacs, Z.; Suzuki, K.; Mukai, K.; Japan Steel Works, Yokohama

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. It is very difficult to quantify the uptake kinetics and bio-distribution of magneto pharmaceuticals in humans using MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). The well-know PET (Positron Emission Tomography) technique, however, could give a solution to this problem in the case of those MRI contrast agents that are based on manganese as paramagnetic contrast enhancer. Luckily manganese has a proper radioisotope, namely the 51 Mn (T 1/2 = 46.2 min, β + = 97%), which can be easily employed (in the form of 51 Mn-labelled contrast agents) for PET studies. Recently, for the production of this radioisotope proton and deuteron induced nuclear reactions were suggested using natural and enriched Cr targets, respectively. In this work we studied the nat V( 3 He,x) 51 Mn nuclear processes in detail from their respective threshold energies up to 40 MeV. For natural vanadium, the 51 V( 3 He,3n) 51 Mn reaction (natural isotopic composition of 51 V: 99.75%) forms the majority of the required radioisotope. The cross-sections were measured by the conventional stacked-foil method. Two stacks containing 10 and 8 pieces of thin natural V foils were irradiated in external collimated 3 He beams of the AVF-930 isochronous cyclotron of NIRS. Thin copper and titanium foils served as energy degraders. The activations lasted for 1 h with a beam current of 100 nA. The activity of the irradiated samples was measured without chemical separation by using the usual gamma-ray spectroscopy. Since the 51 Mn has a very weak gamma-line at 749 keV (Iγ=0.265%) its activity was measured via decay curve analysis of the annihilation peaks. We also measured the excitation functions of those reactions which form the major radio-contaminants i.e. 52m Mn (T 1/2 =21.1 min, Eγ=1434.068 keV(Iγ=98.3%)) and 52 Mn (T 1/2 = 5.591 d, Eγ=744.223 keV (Iγ=90%), Eγ=935.538 keV (Iγ=94.5%)). The excitation function curve of the nat V( 3 He,x) 51 Mn nuclear process shows one maximum of

  14. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Ozmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Akata, Deniz; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-12-01

    Liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the gold standard in liver metastasis detection and treatment response assessment. The most sensitive magnetic resonance sequences are diffusion-weighted images and hepatobiliary phase images after Gd-EOB-DTPA. Peripheral ring enhancement, diffusion restriction, and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images are hallmarks of liver metastases. In patients with normal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT findings and high clinical suspicion of metastasis, MRI should be performed for diagnosis of unseen metastasis. In melanoma, colon cancer, and neuroendocrine tumor metastases, MRI allows confident diagnosis of treatment-related changes in liver and enables differential diagnosis from primary liver tumors. Focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules in patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, hypersteatosis, and focal fat can mimic metastasis. In cancer patients with fatty liver, MRI should be preferred to CT. Although the first-line imaging for metastases is CT, MRI can be used as a problem-solving method. MRI may be used as the first-line method in patients who would undergo curative surgery or metastatectomy. Current limitation of MRI is low sensitivity for metastasis smaller than 3mm. MRI fingerprinting, glucoCEST MRI, and PET-MRI may allow simpler and more sensitive diagnosis of liver metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comprehensive Oncologic Imaging in Infants and Preschool Children With Substantially Reduced Radiation Exposure Using Combined Simultaneous ¹⁸F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Direct Comparison to ¹⁸F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Gücke, Brigitte; Bezrukov, Ilja; Seitz, Guido; Ebinger, Martin; Reimold, Matthias; Pfannenberg, Christina A; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schwenzer, Nina F; Schäfer, Jürgen F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical applicability and technical feasibility of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) in young children focusing on lesion detection, PET quantification, and potential savings in radiation exposure. Twenty examinations (10 PET/CT and 10 PET/MRI examinations) were performed prospectively in 9 patients with solid tumors (3 female, 6 male; mean age, 4.8 [1-6] years). Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and FDG PET/MRI were performed sequentially after a single tracer injection. Lesion detection and analysis were performed independently in PET/CT and PET/MRI. Potential changes in diagnostic or therapeutic patient management were recorded. Positron emission tomography quantification in PET/MRI was evaluated by comparing standardized uptake values resulting from MRI-based and CT-based attenuation correction. Effective radiation doses of PET and CT were estimated. Twenty-one PET-positive lesions were found congruently in PET/CT and PET/MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled significantly better detection of morphologic PET correlates compared with CT. Eight suspicious PET-negative lesions were identified by MRI, of which one was missed in CT. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for correct lesion classification were not significantly different (90%, 47%, and 62% in PET/CT; 100%, 68%, and 79% in PET/MRI, respectively). In 4 patients, the use of PET/MRI resulted in a potential change in diagnostic management compared with PET/CT, as local and whole-body staging could be performed within 1 single examination. In 1 patient, PET/MRI initiated a change in therapeutic management. Positron emission tomography quantification using MRI-based attenuation correction was accurate compared with CT-based attenuation correction. Higher standardized uptake value deviations of about 18% were observed in the lungs due to misclassification in MRI

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  5. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of parotid tumors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akihiko; Yamashita, Toshio; Inoue, Toshiya; Kumazawa, Tadami; Kato, Tsutomu; Sawada, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1987-01-01

    We compared the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with that of X-ray computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors. We performed in 13 patients with parotid tumors and 10 of them were operated. The MRI equipment had a magnetic fild of 0.15 Tesla. We used the spine echo acquisition technique and a repetition time of 600, 1000 and 2000 milli-seconds, and echo time of 40 and 80 milli-seconds. We found that the T 1 weighted image well visualized the duct of the parotid gland, the T 2 weighted image provided fine pictures of the parotid tumor. The facial nerve of normal parotid glands could not be visualized by MRI. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  8. The introduction of clinical magnetic resonance imaging in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorby, W.; Baddeley, H.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a new, but expensive, modality that is being introduced into clinical use in Australia. While it promises increased safety and accuracy in many situations, its precise role when compared with computed tomography and other modalities is not fully established. Therefore, a Government financed evaluation of costs and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging units in five teaching hospitals is to be conducted over two years (1986-1988). Experience with the introduction of computed tomography to Australia and other nations has revealed difficulties in the evaluation by conventional methods of a diagnostic technology that is improving rapidly; it is to be hoped that a systematic evaluation of the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging will be more achievable and useful

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging- physical principles and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavri, Omprakash J.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in equipment and knowledge related to radiology are occurring at an astonishingly rapid rate. On November 8, 1895, William Conrad Roentgen discovered x-rays. In 1972, Godfrey Hounsfield and George Ambrose introduced computec tomography at a meeting of the British Institute of Radiology. In the same year, Paul Lauterbur published the idea of spatially resolving nuclear magnetic resonance samples, naming it zeugmatography. In 1977, Waldo Hinshaw and co-workers published a magnetic resonance image of a human hand and wrist, and by 1981 several centres were obtaining clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images. In a very short time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained acceptance as a clinically useful imaging tool. (author)

  10. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  11. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  12. Dysgenesis of the corpus callosum and associated malformaaation{sup :} computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings; Disgenesia do corpo caloso e mas-formacoes associadas: achados de tomografia computadorizada e ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem (CBR), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Sousa; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares Barbosa; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos [Goias Univ., Goiania (Brazil). Hospital de Clinicas. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem e Anatomia Patologica]. E-mail: cabeca2@terra.com.br

    2003-10-01

    Callosal dysgenesis is a malformation of the corpus callosum with origins in the embryogenesis of the telencephalon. We reviewed the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of 11 patients with callosal dysgenesis and one patient with normal corpus callosum associated with a lipoma. The patients were divided into three distinct groups: total agenesis (three patients), partial agenesis (six patients) and hypoplasia (two patients). Associated abnormalities were observed in nine patients, including Chiari II malformation (one patient), schizencephaly (one patient), interhemispheric cyst (two patients), Dandy-Walker cyst (one patient), nodular heterotopy (one patient) and lipoma of the corpus callosum (four patients). This paper presents a review that may contribute to the diagnosis of these disorders. (author)

  13. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, M.; Putzier, M.; Pumberger, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Diekhoff, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. (orig.)

  14. Complementary information from magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography in the assessment of the response to an antiangiogenic treatment in a rat brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valable, Samuel; Petit, Edwige; Roussel, Simon; Marteau, Lena; Toutain, Jerome; Divoux, Didier; Sobrio, Franck; Delamare, Jerome; Barre, Louisa; Bernaudin, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: No direct proof has been brought to light in a link between hypoxic changes in glioma models and the effects of antiangiogenic treatments. Here, we assessed the sensitivity of the detection of hypoxia through the use of 18 F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography ([ 18 F]-FMISO PET) in response to the evolution of the tumor and its vasculature. Methods: Orthotopic glioma tumors were induced in rats after implantation of C6 or 9L cells. Sunitinib was administered from day (D) 17 to D24. At D17 and D24, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging was performed to characterize tumor growth and vasculature. Hypoxia was assessed by [ 18 F]-FMISO PET. Results: We showed that brain hypoxic volumes are related to glioma volume and its vasculature and that an antiangiogenic treatment, leading to an increase in cerebral blood volume and a decrease in vessel permeability, is accompanied by a decrease in the degree of hypoxia. Conclusions: We propose that [ 18 F]-FMISO PET and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging are pertinent complementary tools in the evaluation of the effects of an antiangiogenic treatment in glioma.

  15. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomogra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian S Pugmire; Alexander R Guimaraes; Ruth Lim; Alison M Friedmann; Mary Huang; David Ebb; Howard Weinstein; Onofrio A Catalano; Umar Mahmood; Ciprian Catana; Michael S Gee

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose(18F-FDG)positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging(PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients.METHODS: This prospective, observational, singlecenter study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to:(1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis;(2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and(3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG PETCT examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PETMRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PETMRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient(ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard.RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years(range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions(R = 0.93). PETMRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-computed tomography(CT) reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions(780.2 + 326.6) was significantly

  16. Gadolinium Ethoxybenzyl Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetic Acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Feng; Liu, Jun; Ouyang, Han

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until July 4, 2014, using combinations of the following terms: gadoxetic acid disodium, Gd-EOB-DTPA, multidetector CT, contrast-enhanced computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Inclusion criteria were as follows: confirmed diagnosis of primary HCC by histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen; comparative study of MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA and MDCT for diagnosis of HCC; and studies that provided quantitative outcome data. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of the 2 methods were compared, and diagnostic accuracy was assessed with alternative-free response receiver-operating characteristic analysis.Nine studies were included in the meta-analysis, and a total of 1439 lesions were examined. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for 1.5T MRI were 0.95 and 0.96, respectively, for 3.0T MRI were 0.91 and 0.96, respectively, and for MDCT were 0.74 and 0.93, respectively. The pooled diagnostic odds ratio for 1.5T and 3.0T MRI was 242.96, respectively, and that of MDCT was 33.47. To summarize, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI (1.5T and 3.0T) has better diagnostic accuracy for HCC than MDCT.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tamaki, Susumu; Kurata, Kyosuke; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx, the eustachian tube and the middle ear was performed in nine patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. MRI revealed the extent of the tumor more clearly than CT (computed tomography) when the tumor was situated in the parapharyngeal space. But when the tumor extended superficially in the nasopharyngeal mucosa, its margin could not be identified clearly by either MRI or CT because of hypervascularity and long T1 and T2 of the nasopharyngeal mucosa. Seven of the nine patients had unilateral otitis media with effusion. Their eustachian tube ventilation function was evaluated by an inflation-deflation technique. Failure of active equalization of negative pressure applied to the middle ear was found to be a characteristic disorder of their eustachian tube ventilation function. This dysfunction seemed to be correlated with the lateral dislocation of the eustachian tube cartilage caused by the tumor. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  19. Urothelial carcinoma in a pyelocaliceal diverticulum discovered by magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Akatsuka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neither computed tomography (CT nor intravenous pyelography (IVP alone can diagnose tumors of renal pelvic diverticula, but magnetic resonance urography (MRU can obtain accurate preoperative information.

  20. The application of magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular joint pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmedov, E.T.; Qahramanov, E.T.

    2007-01-01

    The diseases and damages of temporomandibular joint have compleceted diagnostic unlike other bone-joint pathologies. In 2005 for the first time in history it was implemented the magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics of patients with with temporomandibular joints pathology. The current researches are in place till today. Being the golden standart the application of magnetic resonance tomography has a great role in differential diagnostics of the chronic arthritis, sclerosanse, deformanse arthrosis and arthrosis with internal derancement. This method guaranteed the correct valuation of the bone, disc and muscle structures of the joint and therefore brought full clearance into the problem

  1. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  2. Prospective study comparing three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in potential living renal donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Aftab A; Chugtai, Aamir; Haslam, Philip; Talbot, David; Rix, David A; Soomro, Naeem A

    2005-11-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in potential living renal donors. Thirty-one donors underwent multislice spiral CTA and gadolinium-enhanced MRA. In addition to axial images, multiplanar reconstruction and maximum intensity projections were used to display the renal vascular anatomy. Twenty-four donors had a left laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN), whereas seven had right open donor nephrectomy (ODN); LDN was only considered if the renal vascular anatomy was favourable on the left. CTA and MRA images were analysed by two radiologists independently. The radiological and surgical findings were correlated after the surgery. CTA showed 33 arteries and 32 veins (100% sensitivity) whereas MRA showed 32 arteries and 31 veins (97% sensitivity). CTA detected all five accessory renal arteries whereas MRA only detected one. CTA also identified all three accessory renal veins whereas MRA identified two. CTA had a sensitivity of 97% and 47% for left lumbar and left gonadal veins, whereas MRA had a sensitivity of 74% and 46%, respectively. Multislice spiral CTA with three-dimensional reconstruction was more accurate than MRA for both renal arterial and venous anatomy.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  5. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  6. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  9. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  11. Intraoperative Magnetic-Resonance Tomography and Neuronavigation During Resection of Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type II in Adult Epilepsy Surgery Offers Better Seizure Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Karl; Kasper, Burkhard S; Heynold, Elisabeth; Coras, Roland; Sommer, Björn; Rampp, Stefan; Hamer, Hajo M; Blümcke, Ingmar; Buchfelder, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one important cause of drug-resistant epilepsy potentially curable by epilepsy surgery. We investigated the options of using neuronavigation and intraoperative magnetic-resonance tomographical imaging (MRI) to avoid residual epileptogenic tissue during resection of patients with FCD II to improve seizure outcome. Altogether, 24 patients with FCD II diagnosed by MRI (16 female, 8 male; mean age 34 ± 10 years) suffered from drug-resistant electroclinical and focal epilepsy