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Sample records for tomography image fusion

  1. Diagnostic performance of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging fusion images of gynecological malignant tumors. Comparison with positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajo, Kazuya; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Inoue, Atsuo

    2010-01-01

    We compared the diagnostic accuracy of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion images for gynecological malignancies. A total of 31 patients with gynecological malignancies were enrolled. FDG-PET images were fused to CT, T1- and T2-weighted images (T1WI, T2WI). PET-MRI fusion was performed semiautomatically. We performed three types of evaluation to demonstrate the usefulness of PET/MRI fusion images in comparison with that of inline PET/CT as follows: depiction of the uterus and the ovarian lesions on CT or MRI mapping images (first evaluation); additional information for lesion localization with PET and mapping images (second evaluation); and the image quality of fusion on interpretation (third evaluation). For the first evaluation, the score for T2WI (4.68±0.65) was significantly higher than that for CT (3.54±1.02) or T1WI (3.71±0.97) (P<0.01). For the second evaluation, the scores for the localization of FDG accumulation showing that T2WI (2.74±0.57) provided significantly more additional information for the identification of anatomical sites of FDG accumulation than did CT (2.06±0.68) or T1WI (2.23±0.61) (P<0.01). For the third evaluation, the three-point rating scale for the patient group as a whole demonstrated that PET/T2WI (2.72±0.54) localized the lesion significantly more convincingly than PET/CT (2.23±0.50) or PET/T1WI (2.29±0.53) (P<0.01). PET/T2WI fusion images are superior for the detection and localization of gynecological malignancies. (author)

  2. Offline fusion of co-registered intravascular ultrasound and frequency domain optical coherence tomography images for the analysis of human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räber, Lorenz; Heo, Jung Ho; Radu, Maria D

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of an offline fusion of matched optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)/virtual histology (IVUS-VH) images.......To demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of an offline fusion of matched optical coherence tomography (OCT) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)/virtual histology (IVUS-VH) images....

  3. Value of image fusion using single photon emission computed tomography with integrated low dose computed tomography in comparison with a retrospective voxel-based method in neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amthauer, H.; Denecke, T.; Ruf, J.; Gutberlet, M.; Felix, R.; Lemke, A.J.; Rohlfing, T.; Boehmig, M.; Ploeckinger, U.

    2005-01-01

    The objective was the evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with integrated low dose computed tomography (CT) in comparison with a retrospective fusion of SPECT and high-resolution CT and a side-by-side analysis for lesion localisation in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Twenty-seven patients were examined by multidetector CT. Additionally, as part of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), an integrated SPECT-CT was performed. SPECT and CT data were fused using software with a registration algorithm based on normalised mutual information. The reliability of the topographic assignment of lesions in SPECT-CT, retrospective fusion and side-by-side analysis was evaluated by two blinded readers. Two patients were not enrolled in the final analysis because of misregistrations in the retrospective fusion. Eighty-seven foci were included in the analysis. For the anatomical assignment of foci, SPECT-CT and retrospective fusion revealed overall accuracies of 91 and 94% (side-by-side analysis 86%). The correct identification of foci as lymph node manifestations (n=25) was more accurate by retrospective fusion (88%) than from SPECT-CT images (76%) or by side-by-side analysis (60%). Both modalities of image fusion appear to be well suited for the localisation of SRS foci and are superior to side-by-side analysis of non-fused images especially concerning lymph node manifestations. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of Effective Parameters on Quality of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-computed Tomography Image Fusion in Head and Neck Tumors for Application in Treatment Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Shirvani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In radiation therapy, computed tomography (CT simulation is used for treatment planning to define the location of tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-CT image fusion leads to more efficient tumor contouring. This work tried to identify the practical issues for the combination of CT and MRI images in real clinical cases. The effect of various factors is evaluated on image fusion quality. Materials and Methods: In this study, the data of thirty patients with brain tumors were used for image fusion. The effect of several parameters on possibility and quality of image fusion was evaluated. These parameters include angles of the patient's head on the bed, slices thickness, slice gap, and height of the patient's head. Results: According to the results, the first dominating factor on quality of image fusion was the difference slice gap between CT and MRI images (cor = 0.86, P 4 cm and image fusion quality was <25%. Conclusion: The most important problem in image fusion is that MRI images are taken without regard to their use in treatment planning. In general, parameters related to the patient position during MRI imaging should be chosen to be consistent with CT images of the patient in terms of location and angle.

  5. Electrical characterization of bolus material as phantom for use in electrical impedance and computed tomography fusion imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvind Kaur Grewal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantoms are widely used in medical imaging to predict image quality prior to clinical imaging. This paper discusses the possible use of bolus material, as a conductivity phantom, for validation and interpretation of electrical impedance tomography (EIT images. Bolus is commonly used in radiation therapy to mimic tissue. When irradiated, it has radiological characteristics similar to tissue. With increased research interest in CT/EIT fusion imaging there is a need to find a material which has both the absorption coefficient and electrical conductivity similar to biological tissues. In the present study the electrical properties, specifically resistivity, of various commercially available bolus materials were characterized by comparing their frequency response with that of in-vivo connective adipose tissue. It was determined that the resistivity of Gelatin Bolus is similar to in-vivo tissue in the frequency range 10 kHz to 1MHz and therefore has potential to be used in EIT/CT fusion imaging studies.

  6. Single photon emission computed tomography/spiral computed tomography fusion imaging for the diagnosis of bone metastasis in patients with known cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhen; Li, Lin; Li, Fanglan; Zhao, Lixia

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/spiral computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging for the diagnosis of bone metastasis in patients with known cancer and to compare the diagnostic efficacy of SPECT/CT fusion imaging with that of SPECT alone and with SPECT + CT. One hundred forty-one bone lesions of 125 cancer patients (with nonspecific bone findings on bone scintigraphy) were investigated in the study. SPECT, CT, and SPECT/CT fusion images were acquired simultaneously. All images were interpreted independently by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. In cases of discrepancy, consensus was obtained by a joint reading. The final diagnosis was based on biopsy proof and radiologic follow-up over at least 1 year. The final diagnosis revealed 63 malignant bone lesions and 78 benign lesions. The diagnostic sensitivity of SPECT, SPECT + CT, and SPECT/CT fusion imaging for malignant lesions was 82.5%, 93.7%, and 98.4%, respectively. Specificity was 66.7%, 80.8%, and 93.6%, respectively. Accuracy was 73.8%, 86.5%, and 95.7%, respectively. The specificity and accuracy of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis malignant bone lesions were significantly higher than those of SPECT alone and of SPECT + CT (P 2 = 9.855, P = 0.002). The numbers of equivocal lesions were 37, 18, and 5 for SPECT, SPECT + CT, and SPECT/CT fusion imaging, respectively, and 29.7% (11/37), 27.8% (5/18), and 20.0% (1/5) of lesions were confirmed to be malignant by radiologic follow-up over at least 1 year. SPECT/spiral CT is particularly valuable for the diagnosis of bone metastasis in patients with known cancer by providing precise anatomic localization and detailed morphologic characteristics. (orig.)

  7. Automatic image fusion of real-time ultrasound with computed tomography images: a prospective comparison between two auto-registration methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Dong Ik; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Ah Yeong; Kang, Tae Wook; Oh, Young-Taek; Jeong, Ja-Yeon; Chang, Jung-Woo; Ryu, Jiwon; Lee, Kyong Joon; Kim, Jaeil; Bang, Won-Chul; Shin, Dong Kuk; Choi, Sung Jin; Koh, Dalkwon; Seo, Bong Koo; Kim, Kyunga

    2017-11-01

    Background A major drawback of conventional manual image fusion is that the process may be complex, especially for less-experienced operators. Recently, two automatic image fusion techniques called Positioning and Sweeping auto-registration have been developed. Purpose To compare the accuracy and required time for image fusion of real-time ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) images between Positioning and Sweeping auto-registration. Material and Methods Eighteen consecutive patients referred for planning US for radiofrequency ablation or biopsy for focal hepatic lesions were enrolled. Image fusion using both auto-registration methods was performed for each patient. Registration error, time required for image fusion, and number of point locks used were compared using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results Image fusion was successful in all patients. Positioning auto-registration was significantly faster than Sweeping auto-registration for both initial (median, 11 s [range, 3-16 s] vs. 32 s [range, 21-38 s]; P auto-registration was significantly higher for initial image fusion (median, 38.8 mm [range, 16.0-84.6 mm] vs. 18.2 mm [6.7-73.4 mm]; P = 0.029), but not for complete image fusion (median, 4.75 mm [range, 1.7-9.9 mm] vs. 5.8 mm [range, 2.0-13.0 mm]; P = 0.338]. Number of point locks required to refine the initially fused images was significantly higher with Positioning auto-registration (median, 2 [range, 2-3] vs. 1 [range, 1-2]; P = 0.012]. Conclusion Positioning auto-registration offers faster image fusion between real-time US and pre-procedural CT images than Sweeping auto-registration. The final registration error is similar between the two methods.

  8. Three-Dimensional Image Fusion of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography for Computer-Assisted Planning of Maxillectomy of Recurrent Maxillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Defect Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Chuan-Bin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Peng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe new technology assisted by 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for computer planning of a maxillectomy of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma and defect reconstruction. Treatment of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma usually includes tumor resection and free flap reconstruction. FDG-PET/CT provided images of regions of abnormal glucose uptake and thus showed metabolic tumor volume to guide tumor resection. CECT data were used to create 3D reconstructed images of vessels to show the vascular diameters and locations, so that the most suitable vein and artery could be selected during anastomosis of the free flap. The data from preoperative maxillofacial CECT scans and FDG-PET/CT imaging were imported into the navigation system (iPlan 3.0; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany). Three-dimensional image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was accomplished using Brainlab software according to the position of the 2 skulls simulated in the CECT image and PET/CT image, respectively. After verification of the image fusion accuracy, the 3D reconstruction images of the metabolic tumor, vessels, and other critical structures could be visualized within the same coordinate system. These sagittal, coronal, axial, and 3D reconstruction images were used to determine the virtual osteotomy sites and reconstruction plan, which was provided to the surgeon and used for surgical navigation. The average shift of the 3D image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was less than 1 mm. This technique, by clearly showing the metabolic tumor volume and the most suitable vessels for anastomosis, facilitated resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. We used 3D image fusion of FDG-PET/CT and CECT to successfully accomplish resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma

  9. Doppler tomography in fusion plasmas and astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Geiger, B.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler tomography is a well-known method in astrophysics to image the accretion flow, often in the shape of thin discs, in compact binary stars. As accretion discs rotate, all emitted line radiation is Doppler-shifted. In fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy measurements in magnetically confined plasma......, the Dα-photons are likewise Doppler-shifted ultimately due to gyration of the fast ions. In either case, spectra of Doppler-shifted line emission are sensitive to the velocity distribution of the emitters. Astrophysical Doppler tomography has lead to images of accretion discs of binaries revealing bright...... and limits, analogies and differences in astrophysical and fusion plasma Doppler tomography and what can be learned by comparison of these applications....

  10. Remote sensing image fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Alparone, Luciano; Baronti, Stefano; Garzelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis of more than ten years of experience, Remote Sensing Image Fusion covers methods specifically designed for remote sensing imagery. The authors supply a comprehensive classification system and rigorous mathematical description of advanced and state-of-the-art methods for pansharpening of multispectral images, fusion of hyperspectral and panchromatic images, and fusion of data from heterogeneous sensors such as optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and integration of thermal and visible/near-infrared images. They also explore new trends of signal/image processing, such as

  11. Investigations of image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong

    1999-12-01

    The objective of image fusion is to combine information from multiple images of the same scene. The result of image fusion is a single image which is more suitable for the purpose of human visual perception or further image processing tasks. In this thesis, a region-based fusion algorithm using the wavelet transform is proposed. The identification of important features in each image, such as edges and regions of interest, are used to guide the fusion process. The idea of multiscale grouping is also introduced and a generic image fusion framework based on multiscale decomposition is studied. The framework includes all of the existing multiscale-decomposition- based fusion approaches we found in the literature which did not assume a statistical model for the source images. Comparisons indicate that our framework includes some new approaches which outperform the existing approaches for the cases we consider. Registration must precede our fusion algorithms. So we proposed a hybrid scheme which uses both feature-based and intensity-based methods. The idea of robust estimation of optical flow from time- varying images is employed with a coarse-to-fine multi- resolution approach and feature-based registration to overcome some of the limitations of the intensity-based schemes. Experiments show that this approach is robust and efficient. Assessing image fusion performance in a real application is a complicated issue. In this dissertation, a mixture probability density function model is used in conjunction with the Expectation- Maximization algorithm to model histograms of edge intensity. Some new techniques are proposed for estimating the quality of a noisy image of a natural scene. Such quality measures can be used to guide the fusion. Finally, we study fusion of images obtained from several copies of a new type of camera developed for video surveillance. Our techniques increase the capability and reliability of the surveillance system and provide an easy way to obtain 3-D

  12. Tomography of laser fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceglio, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental programs exist in a number of laboratories throughout the world to test the feasibility of using powerful laser systems to drive the implosion of hydrogen isotope fuel to thermonuclear burn conditions. In a typical experiment multiple laser beams are focused onto a glass microshell (typically 50 μm to 200 μm diameter) filled with an equimolar D-T gas mixture. X-ray and particle emissions from the target provide important information about the hydrodynamic implosion of the glass shell and the associated compression and heating of the D-T fuel. Standard diagnostics for imaging such emissions are the grazing incidence reflection (GIR) x-ray microscope and the pinhole camera. Recently, a particular coded imaging technique, Zone Plate Coded Imaging (ZPCI), has been successfully used for x-ray and particle microscopy of laser fusion plasmas. ZPCI is highly attractive for investigating laser produced plasmas because it possesses a tomographic capability not shared by either the GIR or pinhole imaging techniques. This presentation provides a brief discussion of the tomographic potential of ZPCI. In addition, the first tomographic x-ray images (tomographic resolution approximately 74 μm) of a laser produced plasma are presented

  13. Ultrasound-guided image fusion with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical utility for imaging and interventional diagnostics of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clevert, D.A.; Helck, A.; Paprottka, P.M.; Trumm, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Zengel, P.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal ultrasound is often the first-line imaging modality for assessing focal liver lesions. Due to various new ultrasound techniques, such as image fusion, global positioning system (GPS) tracking and needle tracking guided biopsy, abdominal ultrasound now has great potential regarding detection, characterization and treatment of focal liver lesions. Furthermore, these new techniques will help to improve the clinical management of patients before and during interventional procedures. This article presents the principle and clinical impact of recently developed techniques in the field of ultrasound, e.g. image fusion, GPS tracking and needle tracking guided biopsy and discusses the results based on a feasibility study on 20 patients with focal hepatic lesions. (orig.) [de

  14. Lhermitte-Duclos disease presenting with positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance fusion imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calabria Ferdinando

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lhermitte-Duclos disease or dysplastic gangliocytoma of the cerebellum is an extremely rare tumor. It is a slowly enlarging mass within the cerebellar cortex. The majority of cases are diagnosed in the third or fourth decade of life. Case presentation We report the case of a 37-year-old Caucasian woman who underwent positron emission tomography-computed tomography with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose for evaluation of a solitary lung node. No pathological uptake was detected in the solitary lung node but the positron emission tomography-computed tomography of her brain showed intense tracer uptake, suggestive of a malignant neoplasm, in a mass in her left cerebellar lobe. Our patient had experienced two years of occipital headache and movement disorder. Subsequently, magnetic resonance imaging was performed with contrast agent administration, showing a large subtentorial mass in her left cerebellar hemisphere, with compression and dislocation of the fourth ventricle. Metabolic data provided by positron emission tomography and morphological magnetic resonance imaging views were fused in post-processing, allowing a diagnosis of dysplastic gangliocytoma with increased glucose metabolism. Total resection of the tumor was performed and histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of Lhermitte-Duclos disease. Conclusions Our case indicates that increased uptake of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose may be misinterpreted as a neoplastic process in the evaluation of patients with Lhermitte-Duclos disease, but supports the usefulness of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in the exact pathophysiologic explanation of this disease and in making the correct diagnosis. However, an accurate physical examination and exact knowledge of clinical data is of the utmost importance.

  15. Clinicopathological and prognostic relevance of uptake level using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging (18F-FDG PET/CT) in primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Shigeto; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Asakawa, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Using integrated 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT), the clinical significance of 18 F-FDG uptake was evaluated in patients with primary breast cancer. Clinicopathological correlation with the level of maximum standardized uptake values (SUV) 60 min obtained from preoperative 18 F-FDG PET/CT were examined in 152 patients with primary breast cancer. The prognostic impact of the level of SUV was explored using simulated prognosis derived from computed program Adjuvant! in 136 (89%) patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). High SUV level was significantly correlated with tumor invasive size (≤2 cm) (P 18 F-FDG would be predictive of poor prognosis in patients with primary breast cancer, and aggressive features of cancer cells in patients with early breast cancer. 18 F-FDG PET/CT could be a useful tool to pretherapeutically predict biological characteristics and baseline risk of breast cancer. (author)

  16. Experimental Study on Bioluminescence Tomography with Multimodality Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Lv

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To verify the influence of a priori information on the nonuniqueness problem of bioluminescence tomography (BLT, the multimodality imaging fusion based BLT experiment is performed by multiview noncontact detection mode, which incorporates the anatomical information obtained by the microCT scanner and the background optical properties based on diffuse reflectance measurements. In the reconstruction procedure, the utilization of adaptive finite element methods (FEMs and a priori permissible source region refines the reconstructed results and improves numerical robustness and efficiency. The comparison between the absence and employment of a priori information shows that multimodality imaging fusion is essential to quantitative BLT reconstruction.

  17. Seeking tools for image fusion between computed tomography, structural and functional magnetic resonance methods for applications in neurosurgery; Ferramentas para fusao de imagens dos metodos de tomografia computadorizada, ressonancia magnetica e ressonancia magnetica funcional para aplicacao pre-neurocirurgica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Liana Guerra Sanches da, E-mail: liana@einstein.br [Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo (SP) (Brazil); Amaro Junior, Edson [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Deptartamento de Diagnostico por Imagem; Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate tools for the fusion of images generated by tomography and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Magnetic resonance and functional magnetic resonance imaging were performed while a volunteer who had previously undergone cranial tomography performed motor and somatosensory tasks in a 3-Tesla scanner. Image data were analyzed with different programs, and the results were compared. Results: We constructed a flow chart of computational processes that allowed measurement of the spatial congruence between the methods. There was no single computational tool that contained the entire set of functions necessary to achieve the goal. Conclusion: The fusion of the images from the three methods proved to be feasible with the use of four free-access software programs (OsiriX, Register, MRIcro and FSL). Our results may serve as a basis for building software that will be useful as a virtual tool prior to neurosurgery. (author)

  18. [Image fusion in medical radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, C

    1996-07-20

    Image fusion supports the correlation between images of two or more studies of the same organ. First, the effect of differing geometries during image acquisitions, such as a head tilt, is compensated for. As a consequence, congruent images can easily be obtained. Instead of merely putting them side by side in a static manner and burdening the radiologist with the whole correlation task, image fusion supports him with interactive visualization techniques. This is especially worthwhile for small lesions as they can be more precisely located. Image fusion is feasible today. Easy and robust techniques are readily available, and furthermore DICOM, a rapidly evolving data exchange standard, diminishes the once severe compatibility problems for image data originating from systems of different manufacturers. However, the current solutions for image fusion are not yet established enough for a high throughput of fusion studies. Thus, for the time being image fusion is most appropriately confined to clinical research studies.

  19. Multispectral analytical image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbings, T.C.

    2000-04-01

    With new and advanced analytical imaging methods emerging, the limits of physical analysis capabilities and furthermore of data acquisition quantities are constantly pushed, claiming high demands to the field of scientific data processing and visualisation. Physical analysis methods like Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) or Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and others are capable of delivering high-resolution multispectral two-dimensional and three-dimensional image data; usually this multispectral data is available in form of n separate image files with each showing one element or other singular aspect of the sample. There is high need for digital image processing methods enabling the analytical scientist, confronted with such amounts of data routinely, to get rapid insight into the composition of the sample examined, to filter the relevant data and to integrate the information of numerous separate multispectral images to get the complete picture. Sophisticated image processing methods like classification and fusion provide possible solution approaches to this challenge. Classification is a treatment by multivariate statistical means in order to extract analytical information. Image fusion on the other hand denotes a process where images obtained from various sensors or at different moments of time are combined together to provide a more complete picture of a scene or object under investigation. Both techniques are important for the task of information extraction and integration and often one technique depends on the other. Therefore overall aim of this thesis is to evaluate the possibilities of both techniques regarding the task of analytical image processing and to find solutions for the integration and condensation of multispectral analytical image data in order to facilitate the interpretation of the enormous amounts of data routinely acquired by modern physical analysis instruments. (author)

  20. Fusion Imaging for Procedural Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Brandon M; Eleid, Mackram F; Thaden, Jeremy J

    2018-05-01

    The field of percutaneous structural heart interventions has grown tremendously in recent years. This growth has fueled the development of new imaging protocols and technologies in parallel to help facilitate these minimally-invasive procedures. Fusion imaging is an exciting new technology that combines the strength of 2 imaging modalities and has the potential to improve procedural planning and the safety of many commonly performed transcatheter procedures. In this review we discuss the basic concepts of fusion imaging along with the relative strengths and weaknesses of static vs dynamic fusion imaging modalities. This review will focus primarily on echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion imaging and its application in commonly performed transcatheter structural heart procedures. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, M.; Putzier, M.; Pumberger, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Diekhoff, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. (orig.)

  2. Image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detection of various anatomic structures - Effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jijo, E-mail: jijopaul1980@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Department of Biophysics, Goethe University, Max von Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Maentele, Werner [Department of Biophysics, Goethe University, Max von Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detecting various anatomic structures based on the effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality. Material and methods: Forty patients underwent a CT neck with dual energy mode (DECT under a Somatom Definition flash Dual Source CT scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany)). Tube voltage: 80-kV and Sn140-kV; tube current: 110 and 290 mA s; collimation-2 x 32 x 0.6 mm. Raw data were reconstructed using a soft convolution kernel (D30f). Fused images were calculated using a spectrum of weighting factors (0.0, 0.3, 0.6 0.8 and 1.0) generating different ratios between the 80- and Sn140-kV images (e.g. factor 0.6 corresponds to 60% of their information from the 80-kV image, and 40% from the Sn140-kV image). CT values and SNRs measured in the ascending aorta, thyroid gland, fat, muscle, CSF, spinal cord, bone marrow and brain. In addition, CNR values calculated for aorta, thyroid, muscle and brain. Subjective image quality evaluated using a 5-point grading scale. Results compared using paired t-tests and nonparametric-paired Wilcoxon-Wilcox-test. Results: Statistically significant increases in mean CT values noted in anatomic structures when increasing weighting factors used (all P {<=} 0.001). For example, mean CT values derived from the contrast enhanced aorta were 149.2 {+-} 12.8 Hounsfield Units (HU), 204.8 {+-} 14.4 HU, 267.5 {+-} 18.6 HU, 311.9 {+-} 22.3 HU, 347.3 {+-} 24.7 HU, when the weighting factors 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 were used. The highest SNR and CNR values were found in materials when the weighting factor 0.6 used. The difference CNR between the weighting factors 0.6 and 0.3 was statistically significant in the contrast enhanced aorta and thyroid gland (P = 0.012 and P = 0.016, respectively). Visual image assessment for image quality showed the highest score for the data reconstructed using the

  3. Image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detection of various anatomic structures - Effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Bauer, Ralf W.; Maentele, Werner; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detecting various anatomic structures based on the effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality. Material and methods: Forty patients underwent a CT neck with dual energy mode (DECT under a Somatom Definition flash Dual Source CT scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany)). Tube voltage: 80-kV and Sn140-kV; tube current: 110 and 290 mA s; collimation-2 x 32 x 0.6 mm. Raw data were reconstructed using a soft convolution kernel (D30f). Fused images were calculated using a spectrum of weighting factors (0.0, 0.3, 0.6 0.8 and 1.0) generating different ratios between the 80- and Sn140-kV images (e.g. factor 0.6 corresponds to 60% of their information from the 80-kV image, and 40% from the Sn140-kV image). CT values and SNRs measured in the ascending aorta, thyroid gland, fat, muscle, CSF, spinal cord, bone marrow and brain. In addition, CNR values calculated for aorta, thyroid, muscle and brain. Subjective image quality evaluated using a 5-point grading scale. Results compared using paired t-tests and nonparametric-paired Wilcoxon-Wilcox-test. Results: Statistically significant increases in mean CT values noted in anatomic structures when increasing weighting factors used (all P ≤ 0.001). For example, mean CT values derived from the contrast enhanced aorta were 149.2 ± 12.8 Hounsfield Units (HU), 204.8 ± 14.4 HU, 267.5 ± 18.6 HU, 311.9 ± 22.3 HU, 347.3 ± 24.7 HU, when the weighting factors 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 were used. The highest SNR and CNR values were found in materials when the weighting factor 0.6 used. The difference CNR between the weighting factors 0.6 and 0.3 was statistically significant in the contrast enhanced aorta and thyroid gland (P = 0.012 and P = 0.016, respectively). Visual image assessment for image quality showed the highest score for the data reconstructed using the weighting factor 0

  4. Three-dimensional reconstructed computed tomography-magnetic resonance fusion image-based preoperative planning for surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele repair. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamba, Yohei; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Yamasaki, Mami

    2011-01-01

    Surgical procedures for spinal lipoma or tethered spinal cord after myelomeningocele (MMC) repair are often difficult and complicated, because the anatomical structures can be deformed in complex and unpredictable ways. Imaging helps the surgeon understand the patient's spinal anatomy. Whereas two-dimensional images provide only limited information for surgical planning, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT)-magnetic resonance (MR) fusion images produce clearer representations of the spinal regions. Here we describe simple and quick methods for obtaining 3D reconstructed CT-MR fusion images for preoperative planning of surgical procedures using the iPlan cranial (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) neuronavigation software. 3D CT images of the vertebral bone were combined with heavily T 2 -weighted MR images of the spinal cord, lipoma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space, and nerve root through a process of fusion, segmentation, and reconstruction of the 3D images. We also used our procedure called 'Image Overlay' to directly project the 3D reconstructed image onto the body surface using an light emitting diode (LED) projector. The final reconstructed 3D images took 10-30 minutes to obtain, and provided the surgeon with a representation of the individual pathological structures, so enabled the design of effective surgical plans, even in patients with bony deformity such as scoliosis. None of the 19 patients treated based on our 3D reconstruction method has had neurological complications, except for CSF leakage. This 3D reconstructed imaging method, combined with Image Overlay, improves the visual understanding of complicated surgical situations, and should improve surgical efficiency and outcome. (author)

  5. Alternate method for to realize image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R.

    2005-01-01

    At the present time the image departments have the necessity of carrying out image fusion obtained of diverse apparatuses. Conventionally its fuse resonance or tomography images by X-rays with functional images as the gammagrams and PET images. The fusion technology is for sale with the modern image equipment and not all the cabinets of nuclear medicine have access to it. By this reason we analyze, study and we find a solution so that all the cabinets of nuclear medicine can benefit of the image fusion. The first indispensable requirement is to have a personal computer with capacity to put up image digitizer cards. It is also possible, if one has a gamma camera that can export images in JPG, GIF, TIFF or BMP formats, to do without of the digitizer card and to record the images in a disk to be able to use them in the personal computer. It is required of one of the following commercially available graph design programs: Corel Draw, Photo Shop, FreeHand, Illustrator or Macromedia Flash that are those that we evaluate and that its allow to make the images fusion. Anyone of them works well and a short training is required to be able to manage them. It is necessary a photographic digital camera with a resolution of at least 3.0 mega pixel. The procedure consists on taking photographic images of the radiological studies that the patient already has, selecting those demonstrative images of the pathology in study and that its can also be concordant with the images that we have created in the gammagraphic studies, whether for planar or tomographic. We transfer the images to the personal computer and we read them with the graph design program. To continuation also reads the gammagraphic images. We use those digital tools to make transparent the images, to clip them, to adjust the sizes and to create the fused images. The process is manual and it is requires of ability and experience to choose the images, the cuts, those sizes and the transparency grade. (Author)

  6. Liver function assessment using 99mTc-GSA single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging in hilar bile duct cancer: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Hata, Yasuhiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Kouno, Michihiko; Miyagawa, Kazuyuki; Tokorodani, Ryotaro; Saisaka, Yuichi; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Morita, Sojiro

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of Tc-99m-diethylenetriamine-penta-acetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging for posthepatectomy remnant liver function assessment in hilar bile duct cancer patients. Thirty hilar bile duct cancer patients who underwent major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection were retrospectively analyzed. Indocyanine green plasma clearance rate (KICG) value and estimated KICG by (99m)Tc-GSA scintigraphy (KGSA) and volumetric and functional rates of future remnant liver by (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging were used to evaluate preoperative whole liver function and posthepatectomy remnant liver function, respectively. Remnant (rem) KICG (= KICG × volumetric rate) and remKGSA (= KGSA × functional rate) were used to predict future remnant liver function; major hepatectomy was considered unsafe for values liver were significantly higher than volumetric rates (median: 0.54 vs 0.46; P liver failure and mortality did not occur in the patients for whom hepatectomy was considered unsafe based on remKICG. remKGSA showed a stronger correlation with postoperative prothrombin time activity than remKICG. (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging enables accurate assessment of future remnant liver function and suitability for hepatectomy in hilar bile duct cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of technology for medical image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takashi; Amano, Daizou

    2012-01-01

    With entry into a field of medical diagnosis in mind, we have developed positron emission tomography (PET) ''MIP-100'' system, of which spatial resolution is far higher than the conventional one, using semiconductor detectors for preclinical imaging for small animals. In response to the recently increasing market demand to fuse functional images by PET and anatomical ones by CT or MRI, we have been developing software to implement image fusion function that enhances marketability of the PET Camera. This paper describes the method of fusing with high accuracy the PET images and anatomical ones by CT system. It also explains that a computer simulation proved the image overlay accuracy to be ±0.3 mm as a result of the development, and that effectiveness of the developed software is confirmed in case of experiment to obtain measured data. Achieving such high accuracy as ±0.3 mm by the software allows us to present fusion images with high resolution (<0.6 mm) without degrading the spatial resolution (<0.5 mm) of the PET system using semiconductor detectors. (author)

  8. MR tomography in the assessment of functional stability of posterolateral lumbar fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H.K.; Chafetz, N.; Steiger, P.; Stoller, D.; California Univ., San Francisco

    1987-01-01

    MR tomography was used to assess functional lumbar stability in 30 patients with posterolateral fusions. The vertebral bodies of 9 of the 12 patients with unstable lumbar fusions presented with areas of decreased signal intensity on T 1 - and intermediately weighted images, which increased on T 2 -weighting. The vertebrae of 15 of the 18 patients with stable fusions demonstrated zones of increased signal intensity on T 1 - and intermediately weighted images, which were less intense or invisible on T 2 -weighting. Surgical correlation was available in 11 of the 30 patients studied. Hyperemia and inflammation appear to be responsible for the abnormal signal intensities in the patients with stable fusions, whereas an increase in adipose marrow due to decreased biomechanical stress is thought to account for the atypical signal intensities in the vertebral bodies of the patients with stable fusions. MR tomography seems to be a potential method for evaluating functional lumbar fusion stability. MR tomography may be particularly helpful in those patients with multiple back surgeries and possible instability, recurrent disc herniation, or post-operative fibrosis. MR is recommended in the patient, who appears clinically unstable, whose radiographs and CT, however, do not demonstrate fusion failure. (orig.) [de

  9. Tissue identification with micro-magnetic resonance imaging in a caprine spinal fusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffen, M.; Krijnen, M.; Hoogendoorn, R.; Strijkers, G.; Everts, V.; Wuisman, P.; Smit, T.

    2008-01-01

    Nonunion is a major complication of spinal interbody fusion. Currently X-ray and computed tomography (CT) are used for evaluating the spinal fusion process. However, both imaging modalities have limitations in judgment of the early stages of this fusion process, as they only visualize mineralized

  10. Multimodality Image Fusion and Planning and Dose Delivery for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, Cheng B.; Chen Hungcheng; Beatty, Ron E.; Wagner, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) relies on the quality of fused images to yield accurate and reproducible patient setup prior to dose delivery. The registration of 2 image datasets can be characterized as hardware-based or software-based image fusion. Hardware-based image fusion is performed by hybrid scanners that combine 2 distinct medical imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) into a single device. In hybrid scanners, the patient maintains the same position during both studies making the fusion of image data sets simple. However, it cannot perform temporal image registration where image datasets are acquired at different times. On the other hand, software-based image fusion technique can merge image datasets taken at different times or with different medical imaging modalities. Software-based image fusion can be performed either manually, using landmarks, or automatically. In the automatic image fusion method, the best fit is evaluated using mutual information coefficient. Manual image fusion is typically performed at dose planning and for patient setup prior to dose delivery for IGRT. The fusion of orthogonal live radiographic images taken prior to dose delivery to digitally reconstructed radiographs will be presented. Although manual image fusion has been routinely used, the use of fiducial markers has shortened the fusion time. Automated image fusion should be possible for IGRT because the image datasets are derived basically from the same imaging modality, resulting in further shortening the fusion time. The advantages and limitations of both hardware-based and software-based image fusion methodologies are discussed

  11. Ultrasound-guided image fusion with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical utility for imaging and interventional diagnostics of hepatic lesions; Ultraschallgestuetzte Bildfusion mittels CT und MRT. Klinische Bedeutung fuer die bildgebende und interventionelle Diagnostik von Leberlaesionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clevert, D.A.; Helck, A.; Paprottka, P.M.; Trumm, C.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Zengel, P. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Abdominal ultrasound is often the first-line imaging modality for assessing focal liver lesions. Due to various new ultrasound techniques, such as image fusion, global positioning system (GPS) tracking and needle tracking guided biopsy, abdominal ultrasound now has great potential regarding detection, characterization and treatment of focal liver lesions. Furthermore, these new techniques will help to improve the clinical management of patients before and during interventional procedures. This article presents the principle and clinical impact of recently developed techniques in the field of ultrasound, e.g. image fusion, GPS tracking and needle tracking guided biopsy and discusses the results based on a feasibility study on 20 patients with focal hepatic lesions. (orig.) [German] Bei der Bildfusion von Ultraschall mit anderen schnittbildgebenden Verfahren (CT, MRT) handelt es sich um ein relativ neuartiges Verfahren, welches unter Studienbedingungen jedoch bereits erfolgreich eingesetzt wurde. In der folgenden Machbarkeitsstudie soll der Nutzen weiterfuehrender Anwendungen der sonographischen Bildfusion, dem so genannten Global-Positioning-System- (GPS-) und Needle-Tracking, untersucht werden. Dabei handelt es sich um Instrumente, die insbesondere die Diagnostik und das Staging (GPS-Tracking) bzw. die bioptische Abklaerung (Needle-Tracking) von Patienten mit fokalen Leberlaesionen erleichtern. In diesem Artikel werden das Prinzip und die Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten dieser neuen Techniken anhand konkreter Beispiele in einem Kollektiv von 20 Patienten mit fokalen Leberlaesionen vorgestellt und erlaeutert. (orig.)

  12. Combined Sparsifying Transforms for Compressive Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO, L.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new compressive image fusion method based on combined sparsifying transforms. First, the framework of compressive image fusion is introduced briefly. Then, combined sparsifying transforms are presented to enhance the sparsity of images. Finally, a reconstruction algorithm based on the nonlinear conjugate gradient is presented to get the fused image. The simulations demonstrate that by using the combined sparsifying transforms better results can be achieved in terms of both the subjective visual effect and the objective evaluation indexes than using only a single sparsifying transform for compressive image fusion.

  13. Gabor fusion master slave optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cernat, Ramona; Bradu, Adrian; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the Gabor filtering protocol to a Master/Slave (MS) swept source optical coherence tomography (SS)-OCT system at 1300 nm. The MS-OCT system delivers information from selected depths, a property that allows operation similar to that of a time domain OCT system......, where dynamic focusing is possible. The Gabor filtering processing following collection of multiple data from different focus positions is different from that utilized by a conventional swept source OCT system using a Fast Fourier transform (FFT) to produce an A-scan. Instead of selecting the bright...

  14. Emission tomography for adrenal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.; Shapiro, B.; Hawkins, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography (SPET) of the adrenals was compared to convential gamma camera images. Depths of 19 adrenals were assessed by both the lateral skin-upper kidney pole method and by SPET. Eleven patients with adrenal disorders were also studied. An advantage of using SPET was that the analogue transverse section image showed improvement over the conventional posterior view because the liver activity was well separated from the adrenal. Furthermore, non-adrenal tissue background was virtually eliminated and adrenal depth determination facilitated. (U.K.)

  15. Image fusion tool: Validation by phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, A.; Geworski, L.; Richter, M.; Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L.; Muehler, M.; Ditt, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Validation of a new image fusion tool with regard to handling, application in a clinical environment and fusion precision under different acquisition and registration settings. Methods: The image fusion tool investigated allows fusion of imaging modalities such as PET, CT, MRI. In order to investigate fusion precision, PET and MRI measurements were performed using a cylinder and a body contour-shaped phantom. The cylinder phantom (diameter and length 20 cm each) contained spheres (10 to 40 mm in diameter) which represented 'cold' or 'hot' lesions in PET measurements. The body contour-shaped phantom was equipped with a heart model containing two 'cold' lesions. Measurements were done with and without four external markers placed on the phantoms. The markers were made of plexiglass (2 cm diameter and 1 cm thickness) and contained a Ga-Ge-68 core for PET and Vitamin E for MRI measurements. Comparison of fusion results with and without markers was done visually and by computer assistance. This algorithm was applied to the different fusion parameters and phantoms. Results: Image fusion of PET and MRI data without external markers yielded a measured error of 0 resulting in a shift at the matrix border of 1.5 mm. Conclusion: The image fusion tool investigated allows a precise fusion of PET and MRI data with a translation error acceptable for clinical use. The error is further minimized by using external markers, especially in the case of missing anatomical orientation. Using PET the registration error depends almost only on the low resolution of the data

  16. Image fusion for enhanced forest structural assessment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, JW

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the potential benefits of fusing active and passive medium resolution satellite-borne sensor data for forest structural assessment. Image fusion was applied as a means of retaining disparate data features relevant to modeling...

  17. Fusion of Images from Dissimilar Sensor Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chow, Khin

    2004-01-01

    Different sensors exploit different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum; therefore a multi-sensor image fusion system can take full advantage of the complementary capabilities of individual sensors in the suit...

  18. Quantitative image fusion in infrared radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romm, Iliya; Cukurel, Beni

    2018-05-01

    Towards high-accuracy infrared radiance estimates, measurement practices and processing techniques aimed to achieve quantitative image fusion using a set of multi-exposure images of a static scene are reviewed. The conventional non-uniformity correction technique is extended, as the original is incompatible with quantitative fusion. Recognizing the inherent limitations of even the extended non-uniformity correction, an alternative measurement methodology, which relies on estimates of the detector bias using self-calibration, is developed. Combining data from multi-exposure images, two novel image fusion techniques that ultimately provide high tonal fidelity of a photoquantity are considered: ‘subtract-then-fuse’, which conducts image subtraction in the camera output domain and partially negates the bias frame contribution common to both the dark and scene frames; and ‘fuse-then-subtract’, which reconstructs the bias frame explicitly and conducts image fusion independently for the dark and the scene frames, followed by subtraction in the photoquantity domain. The performances of the different techniques are evaluated for various synthetic and experimental data, identifying the factors contributing to potential degradation of the image quality. The findings reflect the superiority of the ‘fuse-then-subtract’ approach, conducting image fusion via per-pixel nonlinear weighted least squares optimization.

  19. Computed tomography and three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, L.D.; Ritman, E.L.; Robb, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Presented here is a brief introduction to two-, three-, and four-dimensional computed tomography. More detailed descriptions of the mathematics of reconstruction and of CT scanner operation are presented elsewhere. The complementary tomographic imaging methods of single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT) positron-emission tomography (PET), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, ulltrasound sector scanning, and ulltrasound computer-assisted tomography [UCAT] are only named here. Each imaging modality ''probes'' the body with a different energy form, yielding unique and useful information about tomographic sections through the body

  20. Alternate method for to realize image fusion; Metodo alterno para realizar fusion de imagenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L; Hernandez, F; Fernandez, R [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica. Centro Medico de Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    At the present time the image departments have the necessity of carrying out image fusion obtained of diverse apparatuses. Conventionally its fuse resonance or tomography images by X-rays with functional images as the gammagrams and PET images. The fusion technology is for sale with the modern image equipment and not all the cabinets of nuclear medicine have access to it. By this reason we analyze, study and we find a solution so that all the cabinets of nuclear medicine can benefit of the image fusion. The first indispensable requirement is to have a personal computer with capacity to put up image digitizer cards. It is also possible, if one has a gamma camera that can export images in JPG, GIF, TIFF or BMP formats, to do without of the digitizer card and to record the images in a disk to be able to use them in the personal computer. It is required of one of the following commercially available graph design programs: Corel Draw, Photo Shop, FreeHand, Illustrator or Macromedia Flash that are those that we evaluate and that its allow to make the images fusion. Anyone of them works well and a short training is required to be able to manage them. It is necessary a photographic digital camera with a resolution of at least 3.0 mega pixel. The procedure consists on taking photographic images of the radiological studies that the patient already has, selecting those demonstrative images of the pathology in study and that its can also be concordant with the images that we have created in the gammagraphic studies, whether for planar or tomographic. We transfer the images to the personal computer and we read them with the graph design program. To continuation also reads the gammagraphic images. We use those digital tools to make transparent the images, to clip them, to adjust the sizes and to create the fused images. The process is manual and it is requires of ability and experience to choose the images, the cuts, those sizes and the transparency grade. (Author)

  1. An enhanced approach for biomedical image restoration using image fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Ghada Sabah; Abbas, Fatma Ismail; Abood, Ziad M.; Kadhim, Kadhim K.; Karam, Nada S.

    2018-05-01

    Biomedical image is generally noisy and little blur due to the physical mechanisms of the acquisition process, so one of the common degradations in biomedical image is their noise and poor contrast. The idea of biomedical image enhancement is to improve the quality of the image for early diagnosis. In this paper we are using Wavelet Transformation to remove the Gaussian noise from biomedical images: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) image and Radiography (Radio) image, in different color spaces (RGB, HSV, YCbCr), and we perform the fusion of the denoised images resulting from the above denoising techniques using add image method. Then some quantive performance metrics such as signal -to -noise ratio (SNR), peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), and Mean Square Error (MSE), etc. are computed. Since this statistical measurement helps in the assessment of fidelity and image quality. The results showed that our approach can be applied of Image types of color spaces for biomedical images.

  2. Imaging granulomatous lesions with optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2012-01-01

    To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors.......To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors....

  3. Image fusion techniques in permanent seed implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Polo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty years major software and hardware developments in brachytherapy treatment planning, intraoperative navigation and dose delivery have been made. Image-guided brachytherapy has emerged as the ultimate conformal radiation therapy, allowing precise dose deposition on small volumes under direct image visualization. In thisprocess imaging plays a central role and novel imaging techniques are being developed (PET, MRI-MRS and power Doppler US imaging are among them, creating a new paradigm (dose-guided brachytherapy, where imaging is used to map the exact coordinates of the tumour cells, and to guide applicator insertion to the correct position. Each of these modalities has limitations providing all of the physical and geometric information required for the brachytherapy workflow.Therefore, image fusion can be used as a solution in order to take full advantage of the information from each modality in treatment planning, intraoperative navigation, dose delivery, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation.Image fusion, understood as the visualization of any morphological volume (i.e. US, CT, MRI together with an additional second morpholo gical volume (i.e. CT, MRI or functional dataset (functional MRI, SPECT, PET, is a well known method for treatment planning, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation. The term image fusion is used when multiple patient image datasets are registered and overlaid or merged to provide additional information. Fused images may be created from multiple images from the same imaging modality taken at different moments (multi-temporalapproach, or by combining information from multiple modalities. Quality means that the fused images should provide additional information to the brachythe rapy process (diagnosis and staging, treatment planning, intraoperative imaging, treatment delivery and follow-up that cannot be obtained in other ways. In this review I will focus on the role of

  4. 3D Image Fusion to Localise Intercostal Arteries During TEVAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Koutouzi

    Full Text Available Purpose: Preservation of intercostal arteries during thoracic aortic procedures reduces the risk of post-operative paraparesis. The origins of the intercostal arteries are visible on pre-operative computed tomography angiography (CTA, but rarely on intra-operative angiography. The purpose of this report is to suggest an image fusion technique for intra-operative localisation of the intercostal arteries during thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR. Technique: The ostia of the intercostal arteries are identified and manually marked with rings on the pre-operative CTA. The optimal distal landing site in the descending aorta is determined and marked, allowing enough length for an adequate seal and attachment without covering more intercostal arteries than necessary. After 3D/3D fusion of the pre-operative CTA with an intra-operative cone-beam CT (CBCT, the markings are overlaid on the live fluoroscopy screen for guidance. The accuracy of the overlay is confirmed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA and the overlay is adjusted when needed. Stent graft deployment is guided by the markings. The initial experience of this technique in seven patients is presented. Results: 3D image fusion was feasible in all cases. Follow-up CTA after 1 month revealed that all intercostal arteries planned for preservation, were patent. None of the patients developed signs of spinal cord ischaemia. Conclusion: 3D image fusion can be used to localise the intercostal arteries during TEVAR. This may preserve some intercostal arteries and reduce the risk of post-operative spinal cord ischaemia. Keywords: TEVAR, Intercostal artery, Spinal cord ischaemia, 3D image fusion, Image guidance, Cone-beam CT

  5. Risk factors for intervertebral instability assessed by temporal evaluation of the radiographs and reconstructed computed tomography images after L5-S1 single-level transforaminal interbody fusion: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiomi; Shinozaki, Yoshio; Takahashi, Yohei; Takaishi, Hironari; Ogawa, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Intervertebral instability risks following L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and causes of bony bridge formation on computed tomography (CT) remain largely unknown. We evaluated the temporal changes on plain radiographs and reconstructed CT images from 178 patients who had undergone single-level L5-S1 TLIF between February 2011 and February 2015. We statistically analyzed temporal changes the L5-S1 angle on radiographs and intervertebral stability (IVS) at the last observation. Bony bridge formation between the L5-S1 vertebral bodies and the titanium cage subsidence were analyzed by using reconstructed CT. Preoperative L5-S1 angle in the non-IVS group was significantly greater than that in the IVS group. The cage subsidence was classified as follows: type A, both upper and lower endplates; type B, either endplate; or type C, no subsidence. Types B and C decreased over time, whereas type A increased after surgery. The bony bridges between vertebral bodies were found in 87.2% of patients, and 94.5% of all bony bridges were found only in the cage, not on the contralateral side. Our findings suggested that high preoperative L5-S1 angle increased the risk of intervertebral instability after TLIF. The L5-S1 angle decreased over time with increasing type A subsidence, and almost all bony bridges were found only in the cage. These results suggest that the vertebral bodies were stabilized because of cage subsidence, and final bony bridges were created. Methods to improve bony bridge creation are needed to obtain reliable L5-S1 intervertebral bone union. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  7. Spinal fusion-hardware construct: Basic concepts and imaging review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of spinal images fixed with metallic hardware forms an increasing bulk of daily practice in a busy imaging department. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the instrumentation and operative options used in spinal fixation and fusion procedures, especially in his or her institute. This is critical in evaluating the position of implants and potential complications associated with the operative approaches and spinal fixation devices used. Thus, the radiologist can play an important role in patient care and outcome. This review outlines the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used imaging methods and reports on the best yield for each modality and how to overcome the problematic issues associated with the presence of metallic hardware during imaging. Baseline radiographs are essential as they are the baseline point for evaluation of future studies should patients develop symptoms suggesting possible complications. They may justify further imaging workup with computed tomography, magnetic resonance and/or nuclear medicine studies as the evaluation of a patient with a spinal implant involves a multi-modality approach. This review describes imaging features of potential complications associated with spinal fusion surgery as well as the instrumentation used. This basic knowledge aims to help radiologists approach everyday practice in clinical imaging. PMID:22761979

  8. Three dimensional image alignment, registration and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treves, S.T.; Mitchell, K.D.; Habboush, I.H.

    1998-01-01

    Combined assessment of three dimensional anatomical and functional images (SPECT, PET, MRI, CT) is useful to determine the nature and extent of lesions in many parts of the body. Physicians principally rely on their spatial sense of mentally re-orient and overlap images obtained with different imaging modalities. Objective methods that enable easy and intuitive image registration can help the physician arrive at more optimal diagnoses and better treatment decisions. This review describes a simple, intuitive and robust image registration approach developed in our laboratory. It differs from most other registration techniques in that it allows the user to incorporate all of the available information within the images in the registration process. This method takes full advantage of the ability of knowledgeable operators to achieve image registration and fusion using an intuitive interactive visual approach. It can register images accurately and quickly without the use of elaborate mathematical modeling or optimization techniques. The method provides the operator with tools to manipulate images in three dimensions, including visual feedback techniques to assess the accuracy of registration (grids, overlays, masks, and fusion of images in different colors). Its application is not limited to brain imaging and can be applied to images from any region in the body. The overall effect is a registration algorithm that is easy to implement and can achieve accuracy on the order of one pixel

  9. Pulmonary function-morphologic relationships assessed by SPECT-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) fusion images provide objective and comprehensive assessment of pulmonary function and morphology relationships at cross-sectional lungs. This article reviewed the noteworthy findings of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung disorders, which have been revealed on SPECT-CT fusion images in 8 years of experience. The fusion images confirmed the fundamental pathophysiologic appearance of lung low CT attenuation caused by airway obstruction-induced hypoxic vasoconstriction and that caused by direct pulmonary arterial obstruction as in acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The fusion images showed better correlation of lung perfusion distribution with lung CT attenuation changes at lung mosaic CT attenuation (MCA) compared with regional ventilation in the wide-spectral lung disorders, indicating that lung heterogeneous perfusion distribution may be a dominant mechanism of MCA on CT. SPECT-CT angiography fusion images revealed occasional dissociation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots in acute PTE, indicating the importance of assessment of actual effect of intravascular colts on peripheral lung perfusion. Perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images revealed the characteristic and preferential location of pulmonary infarction in acute PTE. The fusion images showed occasional unexpected perfusion defects in normal lung areas on CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and interstitial lung diseases, indicating the ability of perfusion SPECT superior to CT for detection of mild lesions in these disorders. The fusion images showed frequent ''steal phenomenon''-induced perfusion defects extending to the surrounding normal lung of arteriovenous fistulas and those at normal lungs on CT in hepatopulmonary syndrome. Comprehensive assessment of lung function-CT morphology on fusion images will lead to more profound understanding of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung

  10. Spectrally Consistent Satellite Image Fusion with Improved Image Priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Aanæs, Henrik; Jensen, Thomas B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Here an improvement to our previous framework for satellite image fusion is presented. A framework purely based on the sensor physics and on prior assumptions on the fused image. The contributions of this paper are two fold. Firstly, a method for ensuring 100% spectrally consistency is proposed......, even when more sophisticated image priors are applied. Secondly, a better image prior is introduced, via data-dependent image smoothing....

  11. T2*-weighted image/T2-weighted image fusion in postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yoshio, Kotaro

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion is considered to be the best method for postimplant dosimetry of permanent prostate brachytherapy; however, it is inconvenient and costly. In T2 * -weighted image (T2 * -WI), seeds can be easily detected without the use of an intravenous contrast material. We present a novel method for postimplant dosimetry using T2 * -WI/T2-weighted image (T2-WI) fusion. We compared the outcomes of T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based and CT/T2-WI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry. Between April 2008 and July 2009, 50 consecutive prostate cancer patients underwent brachytherapy. All the patients were treated with 144 Gy of brachytherapy alone. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (prostate D90, prostate V100, prostate V150, urethral D10, and rectal D2cc) were prospectively compared between T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based and CT/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry. All the DVH parameters estimated by T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry strongly correlated to those estimated by CT/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry (0.77≤ R ≤0.91). No significant difference was observed in these parameters between the two methods, except for prostate V150 (p=0.04). These results show that T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry is comparable or superior to MRI-based dosimetry as previously reported, because no intravenous contrast material is required. For some patients, rather large differences were observed in the value between the 2 methods. We thought these large differences were a result of seed miscounts in T2 * -WI and shifts in fusion. Improving the image quality of T2 * -WI and the image acquisition speed of T2 * -WI and T2-WI may decrease seed miscounts and fusion shifts. Therefore, in the future, T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion may be more useful for postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  12. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Karhunen, Kimmo; Seppä nen, Aku; Lehikoinen, Anssi; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2010-01-01

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured

  13. Image quality in coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Gerke, Oke; Thygesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) technology is rapidly evolving and software solution developed to optimize image quality and/or lower radiation dose. Purpose To investigate the influence of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) at different radiation doses in coronary CT...

  14. Live Imaging of Mouse Secondary Palate Fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kim, S.; Procházka, Jan; Bush, J.O.

    jaro, č. 125 (2017), č. článku e56041. ISSN 1940-087X Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Developmental Biology * Issue 125 * live imaging * secondary palate * tissue fusion * cleft * craniofacial Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Developmental biology Impact factor: 1.232, year: 2016

  15. Model-based satellite image fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Sveinsson, J. R.; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed for pixel-level satellite image fusion derived directly from a model of the imaging sensor. By design, the proposed method is spectrally consistent. It is argued that the proposed method needs regularization, as is the case for any method for this problem. A framework for pixel...... neighborhood regularization is presented. This framework enables the formulation of the regularization in a way that corresponds well with our prior assumptions of the image data. The proposed method is validated and compared with other approaches on several data sets. Lastly, the intensity......-hue-saturation method is revisited in order to gain additional insight of what implications the spectral consistency has for an image fusion method....

  16. Biometric image enhancement using decision rule based image fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagayee, G. Mary Amirtha; Arumugam, S.

    2010-02-01

    Introducing biometrics into information systems may result in considerable benefits. Most of the researchers confirmed that the finger print is widely used than the iris or face and more over it is the primary choice for most privacy concerned applications. For finger prints applications, choosing proper sensor is at risk. The proposed work deals about, how the image quality can be improved by introducing image fusion technique at sensor levels. The results of the images after introducing the decision rule based image fusion technique are evaluated and analyzed with its entropy levels and root mean square error.

  17. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  18. Improving Accuracy for Image Fusion in Abdominal Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Ewertsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Image fusion involving real-time ultrasound (US is a technique where previously recorded computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance images (MRI are reformatted in a projection to fit the real-time US images after an initial co-registration. The co-registration aligns the images by means of common planes or points. We evaluated the accuracy of the alignment when varying parameters as patient position, respiratory phase and distance from the co-registration points/planes. We performed a total of 80 co-registrations and obtained the highest accuracy when the respiratory phase for the co-registration procedure was the same as when the CT or MRI was obtained. Furthermore, choosing co-registration points/planes close to the area of interest also improved the accuracy. With all settings optimized a mean error of 3.2 mm was obtained. We conclude that image fusion involving real-time US is an accurate method for abdominal examinations and that the accuracy is influenced by various adjustable factors that should be kept in mind.

  19. Enabling image fusion for a CT guided needle placement robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifabadi, Reza; Xu, Sheng; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Velusamy, Gnanasekar; Puhazhendi, Kaliyappan; Wood, Bradford J.

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: This study presents development and integration of hardware and software that enables ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) fusion for a FDA-approved CT-guided needle placement robot. Having real-time US image registered to a priori-taken intraoperative CT image provides more anatomic information during needle insertion, in order to target hard-to-see lesions or avoid critical structures invisible to CT, track target motion, and to better monitor ablation treatment zone in relation to the tumor location. Method: A passive encoded mechanical arm is developed for the robot in order to hold and track an abdominal US transducer. This 4 degrees of freedom (DOF) arm is designed to attach to the robot end-effector. The arm is locked by default and is released by a press of button. The arm is designed such that the needle is always in plane with US image. The articulated arm is calibrated to improve its accuracy. Custom designed software (OncoNav, NIH) was developed to fuse real-time US image to a priori-taken CT. Results: The accuracy of the end effector before and after passive arm calibration was 7.07mm +/- 4.14mm and 1.74mm +/-1.60mm, respectively. The accuracy of the US image to the arm calibration was 5mm. The feasibility of US-CT fusion using the proposed hardware and software was demonstrated in an abdominal commercial phantom. Conclusions: Calibration significantly improved the accuracy of the arm in US image tracking. Fusion of US to CT using the proposed hardware and software was feasible.

  20. Development of a novel fusion imaging technique in the diagnosis of hepatobiliary-pancreatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Koichi; Ochiai, Jun; Miyajima, Takashi; Kassai, Kyoichi; Itani, Kenji; Yagi, Nobuaki; Naito, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Multi-row detector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) play an important role in the imaging diagnosis of hepatobiliary-pancreatic lesions. Here we investigated whether unifying the MDCT and MRCP images onto the same screen using fusion imaging could overcome the limitations of each technique, while still maintaining their benefits. Moreover, because reports of fusion imaging using MDCT and MRCP are rare, we assessed the benefits and limitations of this method for its potential application in a clinical setting. The patient group included 9 men and 11 women. Among the 20 patients, the final diagnoses were as follows: 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, 5 biliary system carcinomas, 1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 5 non-neoplastic lesions. After transmitting the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine data of the MDCT and MRCP images to a workstation, we performed a 3-D organisation of both sets of images using volume rendering for the image fusion. Fusion imaging enabled clear identification of the spatial relationship between a hepatobiliary-pancreatic lesion and the solid viscera and/or vessels. Further, this method facilitated the determination of the relationship between the anatomical position of the lesion and its surroundings more easily than either MDCT or MRCP alone. Fusion imaging is an easy technique to perform and may be a useful tool for planning treatment strategies and for examining pathological changes in hepatobiliary-pancreatic lesions. Additionally, the ease of obtaining the 3-D images suggests the possibility of using these images to plan intervention strategies.

  1. Utility of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging (18F-FDG PET/CT) in combination with ultrasonography for axillary staging in primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Shigeto; Ishida, Jiro; Abe, Yoshiyuki; Mochizuki, Hidetaka; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Asakawa, Hideki; Omata, Jiro; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Nobuo; Kondo, Tadaharu; Hama, Yukihiro; Tamura, Katsumi

    2008-01-01

    Accurate evaluation of axillary lymph node (ALN) involvement is mandatory before treatment of primary breast cancer. The aim of this study is to compare preoperative diagnostic accuracy between positron emission tomography/computed tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) and axillary ultrasonography (AUS) for detecting ALN metastasis in patients having operable breast cancer, and to assess the clinical management of axillary 18 F-FDG PET/CT for therapeutic indication of sentinel node biopsy (SNB) and preoperative systemic chemotherapy (PSC). One hundred eighty-three patients with primary operable breast cancer were recruited. All patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT and AUS followed by SNB and/or ALN dissection (ALND). Using 18 F-FDG PET/CT, we studied both a visual assessment of 18 F-FDG uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV) for axillary staging. In a visual assessment of 18 F-FDG PET/CT, the diagnostic accuracy of ALN metastasis was 83% with 58% in sensitivity and 95% in specificity, and when cut-off point of SUV was set at 1.8, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 36, 100, and 79%, respectively. On the other hand, the diagnostic accuracy of AUS was 85% with 54% in sensitivity and 99% in specificity. By the combination of 18 F-FDG PET/CT and AUS to the axilla, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 64, 94, and 85%, respectively. If either 18 F-FDG PET uptake or AUS was positive in allixa, the probability of axillary metastasis was high; 50% (6 of 12) in 18 F-FDG PET uptake only, 80% (4 of 5) in AUS positive only, and 100% (28 of 28) in dual positive. By the combination of AUS and 18 F-FDG PET/CT, candidates of SNB were more appropriately selected. The axillary 18 F-FDG uptake was correlated with the maximum size and nuclear grade of metastatic foci (p = 0.006 and p = 0.03). The diagnostic accuracy of 18 F-FDG PET/CT was shown to be nearly equal to ultrasound, and considering their limited sensitivities, the high radiation

  2. Utility of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging (18F-FDG PET/CT in combination with ultrasonography for axillary staging in primary breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura Katsumi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation of axillary lymph node (ALN involvement is mandatory before treatment of primary breast cancer. The aim of this study is to compare preoperative diagnostic accuracy between positron emission tomography/computed tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET/CT and axillary ultrasonography (AUS for detecting ALN metastasis in patients having operable breast cancer, and to assess the clinical management of axillary 18F-FDG PET/CT for therapeutic indication of sentinel node biopsy (SNB and preoperative systemic chemotherapy (PSC. Methods One hundred eighty-three patients with primary operable breast cancer were recruited. All patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT and AUS followed by SNB and/or ALN dissection (ALND. Using 18F-FDG PET/CT, we studied both a visual assessment of 18F-FDG uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV for axillary staging. Results In a visual assessment of 18F-FDG PET/CT, the diagnostic accuracy of ALN metastasis was 83% with 58% in sensitivity and 95% in specificity, and when cut-off point of SUV was set at 1.8, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 36, 100, and 79%, respectively. On the other hand, the diagnostic accuracy of AUS was 85% with 54% in sensitivity and 99% in specificity. By the combination of 18F-FDG PET/CT and AUS to the axilla, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 64, 94, and 85%, respectively. If either 18F-FDG PET uptake or AUS was positive in allixa, the probability of axillary metastasis was high; 50% (6 of 12 in 18F-FDG PET uptake only, 80% (4 of 5 in AUS positive only, and 100% (28 of 28 in dual positive. By the combination of AUS and 18F-FDG PET/CT, candidates of SNB were more appropriately selected. The axillary 18F-FDG uptake was correlated with the maximum size and nuclear grade of metastatic foci (p = 0.006 and p = 0.03. Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT was shown to be nearly equal to ultrasound, and considering their

  3. Color image guided depth image super resolution using fusion filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Liang, Bin; He, Ying; Yang, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Depth cameras are currently playing an important role in many areas. However, most of them can only obtain lowresolution (LR) depth images. Color cameras can easily provide high-resolution (HR) color images. Using color image as a guide image is an efficient way to get a HR depth image. In this paper, we propose a depth image super resolution (SR) algorithm, which uses a HR color image as a guide image and a LR depth image as input. We use the fusion filter of guided filter and edge based joint bilateral filter to get HR depth image. Our experimental results on Middlebury 2005 datasets show that our method can provide better quality in HR depth images both numerically and visually.

  4. Assessment of fusion operators for medical imaging: application to MR images fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barra, V.; Boire, J.Y.

    2000-01-01

    We propose in the article to assess the results provided by several fusion operators in the case of T 1 - and T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance images fusion of the brain. This assessment deals with an expert visual inspection of the results and with a numerical analysis of some comparison measures found in the literature. The aim of this assessment is to find the 'best' operator according to the clinical study. This method is here applied to the quantification of brain tissue volumes on a brain phantom, and allows to select a fusion operator in any clinical study where several information is available. (authors)

  5. Contemporary imaging: Magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, H.I.; Higgins, C.; Ring, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to discussing the most recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and the vast array of interventional procedures, this book explores the appropriate clinical applications of each of these important modalities

  6. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  7. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  8. Image characterization metrics for muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weidong; Lehovich, Andre; Anashkin, Edward; Bai, Chuanyong; Kindem, Joel; Sossong, Michael; Steiger, Matt

    2014-05-01

    Muon tomography uses naturally occurring cosmic rays to detect nuclear threats in containers. Currently there are no systematic image characterization metrics for muon tomography. We propose a set of image characterization methods to quantify the imaging performance of muon tomography. These methods include tests of spatial resolution, uniformity, contrast, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and vertical smearing. Simulated phantom data and analysis methods were developed to evaluate metric applicability. Spatial resolution was determined as the FWHM of the point spread functions in X, Y and Z axis for 2.5cm tungsten cubes. Uniformity was measured by drawing a volume of interest (VOI) within a large water phantom and defined as the standard deviation of voxel values divided by the mean voxel value. Contrast was defined as the peak signals of a set of tungsten cubes divided by the mean voxel value of the water background. SNR was defined as the peak signals of cubes divided by the standard deviation (noise) of the water background. Vertical smearing, i.e. vertical thickness blurring along the zenith axis for a set of 2 cm thick tungsten plates, was defined as the FWHM of vertical spread function for the plate. These image metrics provided a useful tool to quantify the basic imaging properties for muon tomography.

  9. Functional and morphological imaging of thyroid associated eye disease. Data evaluation by means of image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, H.

    2002-08-01

    Aim: to recognize the structures that show an uptake of a 99mTc-labeled octreotide tracer within the orbit and head in patients with thyroid associated eye disease relying on image fusion. Methods: A series of 18 patients presenting the signs and symptoms of thyroid associated eye disease were studied. Functional imaging was done with 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC, a newly in-house developed tracer. Both whole body as well as single photon emission tomographies (SPECT) of the head were obtained in each patient. Parallel to nuclear medicine imaging, morphological imaging was done using either computed tomography or magnetic resonance. Results: By means of image fusion farther more information on the functional status of the patients was obtained. All areas showing an uptake could be anatomically identified, revealing a series of organs that had not yet been consideren in this disease. The organs presenting tracer uptake showed characteristic forms as described below: - eye glass sign: lacrimal gland and lacrimal ducts - scissors sign: eye muscles, rectus sup. and inf. - arch on CT: muscle displacement - Omega sign: tonsils and salivary glands - W- sign: tonsils and salivary glands Conclusions: By means of image fusion it was possible to recognize that a series of organs of the neck and head express somatostatin receptors. We interpret these results as a sign of inflammation of the lacrimal glands, the lacrimal ducts, the cervical lymphatics, the anterior portions of the extra ocular eye muscles and muscles of the posterior cervical region. Somatostatin uptake in these sturctures reflects the prescence of specific receptors which reflect the immuno regulating function of the peptide. (author)

  10. Cellular imaging electron tomography and related techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book highlights important techniques for cellular imaging and covers the basics and applications of electron tomography and related techniques. In addition, it considers practical aspects and broadens the technological focus by incorporating techniques that are only now becoming accessible (e.g. block face imaging).  The first part of the book describes the electron microscopy 3D technique available to scientists around the world, allowing them to characterize organelles, cells and tissues. The major emphasis is on new technologies like scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, though the book also reviews some of the more proven technologies like electron tomography. In turn, the second part is dedicated to the reconstruction of data sets, signal improvement and interpretation.

  11. Five and eight image tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, P.R.; Dillon, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    This method can be implemented with standard equipment and only requires images with the usual total count and time. The time for image reconstruction is negligible since 6 slices are reconstructed in 40 seconds. While the resolution in the slices is relatively poor, it is sufficient for the location of emitting structures shown in the standard views

  12. Color Multifocus Image Fusion Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savić

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a recently proposed grayscale multifocus image fusion method based on the first level of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD has been extended to color images. In addition, this paper deals with low contrast multifocus image fusion. The major advantages of the proposed methods are simplicity, absence of artifacts and control of contrast, while this isn’t the case with other pyramidal multifocus fusion methods. The efficiency of the proposed method is tested subjectively and with a vector gradient based objective measure, that is proposed in this paper for multifocus color image fusion. Subjective analysis performed on a multifocus image dataset has shown its superiority to the existing EMD and DWT based methods. The objective measures of grayscale and color image fusion show significantly better scores for this method than for the classic complex EMD fusion method.

  13. Anato-metabolic fusion of PET, CT and MRI images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przetak, C.; Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Slomka, P.; Proeschild, A.; Leonhardi, J.

    2000-01-01

    The fusion of cross-sectional images - especially in oncology - appears to be a very helpful tool to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic accuracy. Though many advantages exist, image fusion is applied routinely only in a few hospitals. To introduce image fusion as a common procedure, technical and logistical conditions have to be fulfilled which are related to long term archiving of digital data, data transfer and improvement of the available software in terms of usefulness and documentation. The accuracy of coregistration and the quality of image fusion has to be validated by further controlled studies. (orig.) [de

  14. Fusion of SPECT/TC images: Usefulness and benefits in degenerative spinal cord pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Monica; Ucros, Gonzalo; Bermudez, Sonia; Morillo, Anibal; Rodriguez, Andres

    2005-01-01

    The objectives are to compare CT and SPECT bone scintigraphy evaluated independently with SPECT-CT fusion images in patients with known degenerative spinal pathology. To demonstrate the clinical usefulness of CT and SPECT fusion images. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients with suspected degenerative spinal disease were evaluated with thin-slice, non-angled helical CT and bone scintigrams with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), both with multiplanar reconstructions within a 24-hour period After independent evaluation by a nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist, multimodality image fusion software was used to merge the CT and SPECT studies and a final consensus interpretation of the combined images was obtained. Results: Thirty-two SPECT bone scintigraphy images, helical CT studies and SPECT-CT fusion images were obtained for 31 patients with degenerative spinal disease. The results of the bone scintigraphy and CT scans were in agreement in 17 pairs of studies (53.12%). In these studies image fusion did not provide additional information on the location or extension of the lesions. In 11 of the study pairs (34.2%), the information obtained was not in agreement between scintigraphy and CT studies: CT images demonstrated several abnormalities, whereas the SPECT images showed only one dominant lesion, or the SPECT images did not provide enough information for anatomical localization. In these cases image fusion helped establish the precise localization of the most clinically significant lesion, which matched the lesion with the greatest uptake. In 4 studies (12.5%) the CT and SPECT images were not in agreement: CT and SPECT images showed different information (normal scintigraphy, abnormal CT), thus leading to inconclusive fusion images. Conclusion: The use of CT-SPECT fusion images in degenerative spinal disease allows for the integration of anatomic detail with physiologic and functional information. CT-SPECT fusion improves the

  15. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Cun; Xie, Qiang; Lv, Wei-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a phenotypically heterogeneous, chronic, destructive inflammatory disease of the synovial joints. A number of imaging tools are currently available for evaluation of inflammatory conditions. By targeting the upgraded glucose uptake of infiltrating granulocytes and tissue macrophages, positron emission tomography/computed tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG PET/CT) is available to delineate inflammation with high sensitivity. Recently, several studies have indicated that FDG uptake in affected joints reflects the disease activity of RA. In addition, usage of FDG PET for the sensitive detection and monitoring of the response to treatment has been reported. Combined FDG PET/CT enables the detailed assessment of disease in large joints throughout the whole body. These unique capabilities of FDG PET/CT imaging are also able to detect RA-complicated diseases. Therefore, PET/CT has become an excellent ancillary tool to assess disease activity and prognosis in RA. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. An FPGA-based heterogeneous image fusion system design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Le; Lin, Yu-chi; Chen, Yan-hua; Zhao, Mei-rong

    2011-08-01

    Taking the advantages of FPGA's low cost and compact structure, an FPGA-based heterogeneous image fusion platform is established in this study. Altera's Cyclone IV series FPGA is adopted as the core processor of the platform, and the visible light CCD camera and infrared thermal imager are used as the image-capturing device in order to obtain dualchannel heterogeneous video images. Tailor-made image fusion algorithms such as gray-scale weighted averaging, maximum selection and minimum selection methods are analyzed and compared. VHDL language and the synchronous design method are utilized to perform a reliable RTL-level description. Altera's Quartus II 9.0 software is applied to simulate and implement the algorithm modules. The contrast experiments of various fusion algorithms show that, preferably image quality of the heterogeneous image fusion can be obtained on top of the proposed system. The applied range of the different fusion algorithms is also discussed.

  17. Joint Multi-Focus Fusion and Bayer ImageRestoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Guo; Bin Yang; Chao Yang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a joint multifocus image fusion and Bayer pattern image restoration algorithm for raw images of single-sensor colorimaging devices is proposed. Different from traditional fusion schemes, the raw Bayer pattern images are fused before colorrestoration. Therefore, the Bayer image restoration operation is only performed one time. Thus, the proposed algorithm is moreefficient than traditional fusion schemes. In detail, a clarity measurement of Bayer pattern image is defined for raw Bayer patternimages, and the fusion operator is performed on superpixels which provide powerful grouping cues of local image feature. Theraw images are merged with refined weight map to get the fused Bayer pattern image, which is restored by the demosaicingalgorithm to get the full resolution color image. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can obtain betterfused results with more natural appearance and fewer artifacts than the traditional algorithms.

  18. INTEGRATED FUSION METHOD FOR MULTIPLE TEMPORAL-SPATIAL-SPECTRAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Data fusion techniques have been widely researched and applied in remote sensing field. In this paper, an integrated fusion method for remotely sensed images is presented. Differently from the existed methods, the proposed method has the performance to integrate the complementary information in multiple temporal-spatial-spectral images. In order to represent and process the images in one unified framework, two general image observation models are firstly presented, and then the maximum a posteriori (MAP framework is used to set up the fusion model. The gradient descent method is employed to solve the fused image. The efficacy of the proposed method is validated using simulated images.

  19. Small scale imaging using ultrasonic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, Z.; Abdul Rahim, R.; Megat Ali, M.S.A.; Baharuddin, M.Y.; Jahidin, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound technology progressed through the 1960 from simple A-mode and B-mode scans to today M-mode and Doppler two dimensional (2-D) and even three dimensional (3-D) systems. Modern ultrasound imaging has its roots in sonar technology after it was first described by Lord John Rayleigh over 100 years ago on the interaction of acoustic waves with media. Tomography technique was developed as a diagnostic tool in the medical area since the early of 1970s. This research initially focused on how to retrieve a cross sectional images from living and non-living things. After a decade, the application of tomography systems span into the industrial area. However, the long exposure time of medical radiation-based method cannot tolerate the dynamic changes in industrial process two phase liquid/ gas flow system. An alternative system such as a process tomography systems, can give information on the nature of the flow regime characteristic. The overall aim of this paper is to investigate the use of a small scale ultrasonic tomography method based on ultrasonic transmission mode tomography for online monitoring of liquid/ gas flow in pipe/ vessel system through ultrasonic transceivers application. This non-invasive technique applied sixteen transceivers as the sensing elements to cover the pipe/ vessel cross section. The paper also details the transceivers selection criteria, hardware setup, the electronic measurement circuit and also the image reconstruction algorithm applied. The system was found capable of visualizing the internal characteristics and provides the concentration profile for the corresponding liquid and gas phases. (author)

  20. Image fusion via nonlocal sparse K-SVD dictionary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Fangyi; Bai, Bendu; Shen, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Image fusion aims to merge two or more images captured via various sensors of the same scene to construct a more informative image by integrating their details. Generally, such integration is achieved through the manipulation of the representations of the images concerned. Sparse representation plays an important role in the effective description of images, offering a great potential in a variety of image processing tasks, including image fusion. Supported by sparse representation, in this paper, an approach for image fusion by the use of a novel dictionary learning scheme is proposed. The nonlocal self-similarity property of the images is exploited, not only at the stage of learning the underlying description dictionary but during the process of image fusion. In particular, the property of nonlocal self-similarity is combined with the traditional sparse dictionary. This results in an improved learned dictionary, hereafter referred to as the nonlocal sparse K-SVD dictionary (where K-SVD stands for the K times singular value decomposition that is commonly used in the literature), and abbreviated to NL_SK_SVD. The performance of the NL_SK_SVD dictionary is applied for image fusion using simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit. The proposed approach is evaluated with different types of images, and compared with a number of alternative image fusion techniques. The resultant superior fused images using the present approach demonstrates the efficacy of the NL_SK_SVD dictionary in sparse image representation.

  1. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, Roland; Beer, Ambros J.; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or α v β 3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging α v β 3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. (orig.)

  2. Positron emission tomography imaging--technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Karp, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Positron imaging instrumentation has improved rapidly in the last few years. Scanners currently under development are beginning to approach fundamental limits set by positron range and noncolinearity effects. This report reviews the latest developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation, emphasizing the development of coding schemes that reduce the complexity and cost of high-resolution scanners. The relative benefits of using time-of-flight (TOF) information is discussed as well. 68 references

  3. A framework of region-based dynamic image fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhong-hua; QIN Zheng; LIU Yu

    2007-01-01

    A new framework of region-based dynamic image fusion is proposed. First, the technique of target detection is applied to dynamic images (image sequences) to segment images into different targets and background regions. Then different fusion rules are employed in different regions so that the target information is preserved as much as possible. In addition, steerable non-separable wavelet frame transform is used in the process of multi-resolution analysis, so the system achieves favorable characters of orientation and invariant shift. Compared with other image fusion methods, experimental results showed that the proposed method has better capabilities of target recognition and preserves clear background information.

  4. Multi-sensor image fusion and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Rick S

    2005-01-01

    Taking another lesson from nature, the latest advances in image processing technology seek to combine image data from several diverse types of sensors in order to obtain a more accurate view of the scene: very much the same as we rely on our five senses. Multi-Sensor Image Fusion and Its Applications is the first text dedicated to the theory and practice of the registration and fusion of image data, covering such approaches as statistical methods, color-related techniques, model-based methods, and visual information display strategies.After a review of state-of-the-art image fusion techniques,

  5. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, P.; Vandergraft, J.; Blohm, M.; Porter, D.

    1993-08-01

    A geophysical data fusion methodology is under development to combine data from complementary geophysical sensors and incorporate geophysical understanding to obtain three dimensional images of the subsurface. The research reported here is the first phase of a three phase project. The project focuses on the characterization of thin clay lenses (aquitards) in a highly stratified sand and clay coastal geology to depths of up to 300 feet. The sensor suite used in this work includes time-domain electromagnetic induction (TDEM) and near surface seismic techniques. During this first phase of the project, enhancements to the acquisition and processing of TDEM data were studied, by use of simulated data, to assess improvements for the detection of thin clay layers. Secondly, studies were made of the use of compressional wave and shear wave seismic reflection data by using state-of-the-art high frequency vibrator technology. Finally, a newly developed processing technique, called ''data fusion,'' was implemented to process the geophysical data, and to incorporate a mathematical model of the subsurface strata. Examples are given of the results when applied to real seismic data collected at Hanford, WA, and for simulated data based on the geology of the Savannah River Site

  6. Fast single image dehazing based on image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haibo; Yang, Jie; Wu, Zhengping; Zhang, Qingnian

    2015-01-01

    Images captured in foggy weather conditions often fade the colors and reduce the contrast of the observed objects. An efficient image fusion method is proposed to remove haze from a single input image. First, the initial medium transmission is estimated based on the dark channel prior. Second, the method adopts an assumption that the degradation level affected by haze of each region is the same, which is similar to the Retinex theory, and uses a simple Gaussian filter to get the coarse medium transmission. Then, pixel-level fusion is achieved between the initial medium transmission and coarse medium transmission. The proposed method can recover a high-quality haze-free image based on the physical model, and the complexity of the proposed method is only a linear function of the number of input image pixels. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can allow a very fast implementation and achieve better restoration for visibility and color fidelity compared to some state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Sparse Image Reconstruction in Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    In recent years, increased focus on the potentially harmful effects of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, such as radiation-induced cancer, has motivated research on new low-dose imaging techniques. Sparse image reconstruction methods, as studied for instance in the field of compressed sensing...... applications. This thesis takes a systematic approach toward establishing quantitative understanding of conditions for sparse reconstruction to work well in CT. A general framework for analyzing sparse reconstruction methods in CT is introduced and two sets of computational tools are proposed: 1...... contributions to a general set of computational characterization tools. Thus, the thesis contributions help advance sparse reconstruction methods toward routine use in...

  8. Localization of the surgical bed using supine magnetic resonance and computed tomography scan fusion for planification of breast interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolicoeur, Marjory; Racine, Marie-Lynn; Trop, Isabelle; Hathout, Lara; Nguyen, David; Derashodian, Talar; David, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of supine breast magnetic resonance imaging (MR) for definition and localization of the surgical bed (SB) after breast conservative surgery. To assess the inter-observer variability of surgical bed delineation on computed tomography (CT) and supine MR. Materials and methods: Patients candidate for breast brachytherapy and no contra-indications for MR were eligible for this study. Patients were placed in supine position, with the ipsilateral arm above the head in an immobilization device. All patients underwent CT and MR in the same implant/treatment position. Four points were predefined for CT-MRI image fusion. The surgical cavity was drawn on CT then MRI, by three independent observers. Fusion and analysis of CT and MR images were performed using the ECLIPSE treatment planning software. Results: From September 2005 to November 2008, 70 patients were included in this prospective study. For each patient, we were able to acquire axial T1 and T2 images of good quality. Using the predefined fusion points, the median error following the fusion was 2.7 mm. For each observer, volumes obtained on MR were, respectively, 30%, 38% and 40% smaller than those derived from CT images. A highly significant inter-observer variability in the delineation of the SB on CT was demonstrated (p < 0.0001). On the contrary, all three observers agreed on the volume of the SB drawn on MR. Conclusion: Supine breast MRI yields a more precise definition of the SB with a smaller inter-observer variability than CT and may obviate the need for surgical clips. The volume of the SB is smaller with MRI. In our opinion, CT-MRI fusion should be used for SB delineation, in view of partial breast irradiation.

  9. Remote sensing image fusion in the context of Digital Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, C

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the number of operational Earth observation satellites gives remote sensing image fusion a new boost. As a powerful tool to integrate images from different sensors it enables multi-scale, multi-temporal and multi-source information extraction. Image fusion aims at providing results that cannot be obtained from a single data source alone. Instead it enables feature and information mining of higher reliability and availability. The process required to prepare remote sensing images for image fusion comprises most of the necessary steps to feed the database of Digital Earth. The virtual representation of the planet uses data and information that is referenced and corrected to suit interpretation and decision-making. The same pre-requisite is valid for image fusion, the outcome of which can directly flow into a geographical information system. The assessment and description of the quality of the results remains critical. Depending on the application and information to be extracted from multi-source images different approaches are necessary. This paper describes the process of image fusion based on a fusion and classification experiment, explains the necessary quality measures involved and shows with this example which criteria have to be considered if the results of image fusion are going to be used in Digital Earth

  10. Speeding up image reconstruction in computed tomography

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique for imaging cross-sections of an object using X-ray measurements taken from different angles. In last decades a significant progress has happened there: today advanced algorithms allow fast image reconstruction and obtaining high-quality images even with missing or dirty data, modern detectors provide high resolution without increasing radiation dose, and high-performance multi-core computing devices are there to help us solving such tasks even faster. I will start with CT basics, then briefly present existing classes of reconstruction algorithms and their differences. After that I will proceed to employing distinctive architectural features of modern multi-core devices (CPUs and GPUs) and popular program interfaces (OpenMP, MPI, CUDA, OpenCL) for developing effective parallel realizations of image reconstruction algorithms. Decreasing full reconstruction time from long hours up to minutes or even seconds has a revolutionary impact in diagnostic medicine and industria...

  11. SPECT/CT image fusion with 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC in the oncological diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, F.

    2006-07-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours displaying somatostatin receptors have been successfully visualized with somatostatin receptor imaging. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the value of anatomical-functional image fusion. Image fusion means the combined transmission and emission tomography (computed tomography (CT)) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ) and was analyzed in comparison with SPECT and CT alone. Fifty-three patients (30 men and 23 women; mean age 55,9 years; range: 20-82 years) with suspected or known endocrine tumours were studied. The patients were referred to image fusion because of staging of newly diagnosed tumours (14) or biochemically/clinically suspected neuroendocrine tumour (20) or follow-up studies after therapy (19). The patients were studied with SPECT at 2 and 4 hours after injection of 400 MBq of 99mTc-EDDA-HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide using a dual-detector scintillation camera. The CT was performed on one of the following two days. For both investigations the patients were fixed in an individualized vacuum mattress to guarantee exactly the same position. SPECT and SPECT/CT showed an equivalent scan result in 35 patients (66 %), discrepancies were found in 18 cases (34 %). After image fusion the scan result was true-positive in 27 patients ( 50.9 %) and true-negative in 25 patients (47.2 %). One patient with multiple small liver metastases escaped SPECT as well as image fusion and was so false-negative. The frequency of equivocal and probable lesion characterization was reduced by 11.6% (12 to 0) with PET/CT in comparison with PET or CT alone. The frequency of definite lesion characterization was increased by 11.6% (91 to 103). SPECT/CT affected the clinical management in 21 patients (40 %). The results of this study indicate that SPECT/CT is a valuable tool for the assessment of neuroendocrine tumours. SPECT/CT is better than SPECT or CT alone and it allows a more precise staging and determination of prognosis and

  12. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  13. Advances in fusion of PET, SPET, CT und MRT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzyk, U.

    2003-01-01

    Image fusion as part of the correlative analysis for medical images has gained ever more interest and the fact that combined systems for PET and CT are commercially available demonstrates the importance for medical diagnostics, therapy and research oriented applications. In this work the basics of image registration, its different strategies and the mathematical and physical background are described. A successful image registration is an essential prerequisite for the next steps, namely correlative medical image analysis. Means to verify image registration and the different modes for integrated display are presented and its usefulness is discussed. Possible limitations in applying image fusion in order to avoid misinterpretation will be pointed out. (orig.) [de

  14. Global Seismic Imaging Based on Adjoint Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Smith, J. A.; Zhu, H.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Our aim is to perform adjoint tomography at the scale of globe to image the entire planet. We have started elastic inversions with a global data set of 253 CMT earthquakes with moment magnitudes in the range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7 and used GSN stations as well as some local networks such as USArray, European stations, etc. Using an iterative pre-conditioned conjugate gradient scheme, we initially set the aim to obtain a global crustal and mantle model with confined transverse isotropy in the upper mantle. Global adjoint tomography has so far remained a challenge mainly due to computational limitations. Recent improvements in our 3D solvers (e.g., a GPU version) and access to high-performance computational centers (e.g., ORNL's Cray XK7 "Titan" system) now enable us to perform iterations with higher-resolution (T > 9 s) and longer-duration (200 min) simulations to accommodate high-frequency body waves and major-arc surface waves, respectively, which help improve data coverage. The remaining challenge is the heavy I/O traffic caused by the numerous files generated during the forward/adjoint simulations and the pre- and post-processing stages of our workflow. We improve the global adjoint tomography workflow by adopting the ADIOS file format for our seismic data as well as models, kernels, etc., to improve efficiency on high-performance clusters. Our ultimate aim is to use data from all available networks and earthquakes within the magnitude range of our interest (5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7) which requires a solid framework to manage big data in our global adjoint tomography workflow. We discuss the current status and future of global adjoint tomography based on our initial results as well as practical issues such as handling big data in inversions and on high-performance computing systems.

  15. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  16. Fusion of multispectral and panchromatic images using multirate filter banks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hong; Jing Zhongliang; Li Jianxun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an image fusion method based on the filter banks is proposed for merging a high-resolution panchromatic image and a low-resolution multispectral image. Firstly, the filter banks are designed to merge different signals with minimum distortion by using cosine modulation. Then, the filter banks-based image fusion is adopted to obtain a high-resolution multispectral image that combines the spectral characteristic of low-resolution data with the spatial resolution of the panchromatic image. Finally, two different experiments and corresponding performance analysis are presented. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach outperforms the HIS transform, discrete wavelet transform and discrete wavelet frame.

  17. Neutron imaging for inertial confinement fusion and molecular optic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, O.

    2010-01-01

    Scientific domains that require imaging of micrometric/nano-metric objects are dramatically increasing (Plasma Physics, Astrophysics, Biotechnology, Earth Sciences...). Difficulties encountered in imaging smaller and smaller objects make this research area more and more challenging and in constant evolution. The two scientific domains, through which this study has been led, are the neutron imaging in the context of the inertial confinement fusion and the fluorescence molecular imaging. Work presented in this thesis has two main objectives. The first one is to describe the instrumentation characteristics that require such imagery and, relatively to the scientific domains considered, identify parameters likely to optimize the imaging system accuracy. The second one is to present the developed data analysis and reconstruction methods able to provide spatial resolution adapted to the size of the observed object. Similarities of numerical algorithms used in these two scientific domains, which goals are quiet different, show how micrometric/nano-metric object imaging is a research area at the border of a large number of scientific disciplines. (author)

  18. Fusion of colour and monochromatic images with edge emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade M. Pavlović

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to fuse true colour images with monochromatic non-visible range images that seeks to encode important structural information from monochromatic images efficiently but also preserve the natural appearance of the available true chromacity information. We utilise the β colour opponency channel of the lαβ colour as the domain to fuse information from the monochromatic input into the colour input by the way of robust grayscale fusion. This is followed by an effective gradient structure visualisation step that enhances the visibility of monochromatic information in the final colour fused image. Images fused using this method preserve their natural appearance and chromacity better than conventional methods while at the same time clearly encode structural information from the monochormatic input. This is demonstrated on a number of well-known true colour fusion examples and confirmed by the results of subjective trials on the data from several colour fusion scenarios. Introduction The goal of image fusion can be broadly defined as: the representation of visual information contained in a number of input images into a single fused image without distortion or loss of information. In practice, however, a representation of all available information from multiple inputs in a single image is almost impossible and fusion is generally a data reduction task.  One of the sensors usually provides a true colour image that by definition has all of its data dimensions already populated by the spatial and chromatic information. Fusing such images with information from monochromatic inputs in a conventional manner can severely affect natural appearance of the fused image. This is a difficult problem and partly the reason why colour fusion received only a fraction of the attention than better behaved grayscale fusion even long after colour sensors became widespread. Fusion method Humans tend to see colours as contrasts between opponent

  19. A new hyperspectral image compression paradigm based on fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Raúl; Melián, José; López, Sebastián.; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The on-board compression of remote sensed hyperspectral images is an important task nowadays. One of the main difficulties is that the compression of these images must be performed in the satellite which carries the hyperspectral sensor. Hence, this process must be performed by space qualified hardware, having area, power and speed limitations. Moreover, it is important to achieve high compression ratios without compromising the quality of the decompress image. In this manuscript we proposed a new methodology for compressing hyperspectral images based on hyperspectral image fusion concepts. The proposed compression process has two independent steps. The first one is to spatially degrade the remote sensed hyperspectral image to obtain a low resolution hyperspectral image. The second step is to spectrally degrade the remote sensed hyperspectral image to obtain a high resolution multispectral image. These two degraded images are then send to the earth surface, where they must be fused using a fusion algorithm for hyperspectral and multispectral image, in order to recover the remote sensed hyperspectral image. The main advantage of the proposed methodology for compressing remote sensed hyperspectral images is that the compression process, which must be performed on-board, becomes very simple, being the fusion process used to reconstruct image the more complex one. An extra advantage is that the compression ratio can be fixed in advanced. Many simulations have been performed using different fusion algorithms and different methodologies for degrading the hyperspectral image. The results obtained in the simulations performed corroborate the benefits of the proposed methodology.

  20. The optimal algorithm for Multi-source RS image fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Huang, Shui-Guang; Li, Zeng-Shun; Shen, Hao; Li, Jun-Shuai; Wang, Peng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the issue which the fusion rules cannot be self-adaptively adjusted by using available fusion methods according to the subsequent processing requirements of Remote Sensing (RS) image, this paper puts forward GSDA (genetic-iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm) by integrating the merit of genetic arithmetic together with the advantage of iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm for multi-source RS image fusion. The proposed algorithm considers the wavelet transform of the translation invariance as the model operator, also regards the contrast pyramid conversion as the observed operator. The algorithm then designs the objective function by taking use of the weighted sum of evaluation indices, and optimizes the objective function by employing GSDA so as to get a higher resolution of RS image. As discussed above, the bullet points of the text are summarized as follows.•The contribution proposes the iterative self-organizing data analysis algorithm for multi-source RS image fusion.•This article presents GSDA algorithm for the self-adaptively adjustment of the fusion rules.•This text comes up with the model operator and the observed operator as the fusion scheme of RS image based on GSDA. The proposed algorithm opens up a novel algorithmic pathway for multi-source RS image fusion by means of GSDA.

  1. Multifocus Image Fusion in Q-Shift DTCWT Domain Using Various Fusion Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhong Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifocus image fusion is a process that integrates partially focused image sequence into a fused image which is focused everywhere, with multiple methods proposed in the past decades. The Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DTCWT is one of the most precise ones eliminating two main defects caused by the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT. Q-shift DTCWT was proposed afterwards to simplify the construction of filters in DTCWT, producing better fusion effects. A different image fusion strategy based on Q-shift DTCWT is presented in this work. According to the strategy, firstly, each image is decomposed into low and high frequency coefficients, which are, respectively, fused by using different rules, and then various fusion rules are innovatively combined in Q-shift DTCWT, such as the Neighborhood Variant Maximum Selectivity (NVMS and the Sum Modified Laplacian (SML. Finally, the fused coefficients could be well extracted from the source images and reconstructed to produce one fully focused image. This strategy is verified visually and quantitatively with several existing fusion methods based on a plenty of experiments and yields good results both on standard images and on microscopic images. Hence, we can draw the conclusion that the rule of NVMS is better than others after Q-shift DTCWT.

  2. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  3. Research on fusion algorithm of polarization image in tetrolet domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dexiang; Yuan, BaoHong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-12-01

    Tetrolets are Haar-type wavelets whose supports are tetrominoes which are shapes made by connecting four equal-sized squares. A fusion method for polarization images based on tetrolet transform is proposed. Firstly, the magnitude of polarization image and angle of polarization image can be decomposed into low-frequency coefficients and high-frequency coefficients with multi-scales and multi-directions using tetrolet transform. For the low-frequency coefficients, the average fusion method is used. According to edge distribution differences in high frequency sub-band images, for the directional high-frequency coefficients are used to select the better coefficients by region spectrum entropy algorithm for fusion. At last the fused image can be obtained by utilizing inverse transform for fused tetrolet coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect image features more effectively and the fused image has better subjective visual effect

  4. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karhunen, Kimmo; Seppaenen, Aku; Lehikoinen, Anssi; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2010-01-01

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete.

  5. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Karhunen, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  7. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures

  8. Medium resolution image fusion, does it enhance forest structure assessment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, JW

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This research explored the potential benefits of fusing optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) medium resolution satellite-borne sensor data for forest structural assessment. Image fusion was applied as a means of retaining disparate data...

  9. Added Value of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound on Biopsies of Focal Hepatic Lesions Invisible on Fusion Imaging Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5-1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making.

  10. Radar image and data fusion for natural hazards characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Jixian; Zhang, Yonghong

    2010-01-01

    Fusion of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images through interferometric, polarimetric and tomographic processing provides an all - weather imaging capability to characterise and monitor various natural hazards. This article outlines interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) processing and products and their utility for natural hazards characterisation, provides an overview of the techniques and applications related to fusion of SAR/InSAR images with optical and other images and highlights the emerging SAR fusion technologies. In addition to providing precise land - surface digital elevation maps, SAR - derived imaging products can map millimetre - scale elevation changes driven by volcanic, seismic and hydrogeologic processes, by landslides and wildfires and other natural hazards. With products derived from the fusion of SAR and other images, scientists can monitor the progress of flooding, estimate water storage changes in wetlands for improved hydrological modelling predictions and assessments of future flood impacts and map vegetation structure on a global scale and monitor its changes due to such processes as fire, volcanic eruption and deforestation. With the availability of SAR images in near real - time from multiple satellites in the near future, the fusion of SAR images with other images and data is playing an increasingly important role in understanding and forecasting natural hazards.

  11. Neutron penumbral imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Ress, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Using a new technique, penumbral coded-aperture imaging, the first neutron images of laser-driven, inertial-confinement fusion targets were obtained. With these images the deuterium-tritium burn region within a compressed target can be measured directly. 4 references, 11 figures

  12. Patient Dose From Megavoltage Computed Tomography Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Langen, Katja M.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Cox, Andrea; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) can be used daily for imaging with a helical tomotherapy unit for patient alignment before treatment delivery. The purpose of this investigation was to show that the MVCT dose can be computed in phantoms, and further, that the dose can be reported for actual patients from MVCT on a helical tomotherapy unit. Methods and Materials: An MVCT beam model was commissioned and verified through a series of absorbed dose measurements in phantoms. This model was then used to retrospectively calculate the imaging doses to the patients. The MVCT dose was computed for five clinical cases: prostate, breast, head/neck, lung, and craniospinal axis. Results: Validation measurements in phantoms verified that the computed dose can be reported to within 5% of the measured dose delivered at the helical tomotherapy unit. The imaging dose scaled inversely with changes to the CT pitch. Relative to a normal pitch of 2.0, the organ dose can be scaled by 0.67 and 2.0 for scans done with a pitch of 3.0 and 1.0, respectively. Typical doses were in the range of 1.0-2.0 cGy, if imaged with a normal pitch. The maximal organ dose calculated was 3.6 cGy in the neck region of the craniospinal patient, if imaged with a pitch of 1.0. Conclusion: Calculation of the MVCT dose has shown that the typical imaging dose is approximately 1.5 cGy per image. The uniform MVCT dose delivered using helical tomotherapy is greatest when the anatomic thickness is the smallest and the pitch is set to the lowest value

  13. [A preliminary research on multi-source medical image fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yuanyuan; Li, Bin; Tian, Lianfang; Mao, Zongyuan

    2009-04-01

    Multi-modal medical image fusion has important value in clinical diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, the multi-resolution analysis of Daubechies 9/7 Biorthogonal Wavelet Transform is introduced for anatomical and functional image fusion, then a new fusion algorithm with the combination of local standard deviation and energy as texture measurement is presented. At last, a set of quantitative evaluation criteria is given. Experiments show that both anatomical and metabolism information can be obtained effectively, and both the edge and texture features can be reserved successfully. The presented algorithm is more effective than the traditional algorithms.

  14. Recurrent ovarian endodermal sinus tumor: demonstration by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.A.; Kim, E.E.; Tresukosol, D.; Kudelka, A.P.; Edwards, C.L.; Kavanagh, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor of the ovary that was identified and/or clearly depicted by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography. The potential roles of various imaging modalities in the detection of recurrent endodermal sinus tumor are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Image enhancement using thermal-visible fusion for human detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaihidee, Ezrinda Mohd; Hawari Ghazali, Kamarul; Zuki Saleh, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    An increased interest in detecting human beings in video surveillance system has emerged in recent years. Multisensory image fusion deserves more research attention due to the capability to improve the visual interpretability of an image. This study proposed fusion techniques for human detection based on multiscale transform using grayscale visual light and infrared images. The samples for this study were taken from online dataset. Both images captured by the two sensors were decomposed into high and low frequency coefficients using Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT). Hence, the appropriate fusion rule was used to merge the coefficients and finally, the final fused image was obtained by using inverse SWT. From the qualitative and quantitative results, the proposed method is more superior than the two other methods in terms of enhancement of the target region and preservation of details information of the image.

  16. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, Serguei; Nair, Bindu; Kellam, James; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging.

  17. Ultrasound and PET-CT image fusion for prostate brachytherapy image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.

    2015-01-01

    , indicating the system’s ability to visualize low contrast objects 5.4 cm into a patient. PET-CT system’s performance evaluation also produced satisfactory results in accordance with set tolerances as recommended by IAEA Human Health Series 1. Computed tomography laser alignment test ensured that all CT gantry lasers were properly aligned with the patient bed. Image display width test ensured that volume of patient or organ being measured and displayed was equivalent to that selected on the CT scanner console, to a deviation of ± 1 mm. Results from CT image uniformity test showed that mean CT numbers in peripheral regions of interest deviated from the central mean to within recommended tolerance level of ± 5 HU, indicating a good level of uniformity. Computed tomographic dose indices for head and body phantoms were estimated as 44.30 mGy and 20.08 mGy, comparative to console displayed doses of 42.40 mGy and 19.49 mGy respectively. Registration accuracy for PET-CT images was to have displacements of less than 1 mm in x, y and z directions. Image quality of PET-CT images was performed to produce images simulating those obtained in a total body imaging study involving both hot and cold lesions. Percentage contrast estimates of 49.3% and 52.6% were obtained for hot spheres of diameters 1.3 cm and 2.2 cm respectively, while contrast estimates of 74.8% and 75.6% were obtained for cold spheres of diameters 2.8 cm and 3.7 cm respectively. The PET-CT system resolution was estimated as 0.5 ± 0.01 cm, indicating the system’s ability to image tumours of the size of about 5 mm. Satisfactory results from the performance evaluation of ultrasound and PET-CT systems, paved way for them to be used in acquiring prostatic images for the study. Developed MATLAB image enhancement algorithm enhanced the quality of prostatic images before fusion. The algorithm was developed by mapping the intensity values in raw images to new values in a modified image using imadjust function. Contrast

  18. Hybrid Image Fusion for Sharpness Enhancement of Multi-Spectral Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awumah, Anna; Mahanti, Prasun; Robinson, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Image fusion enhances the sharpness of a multi-spectral (MS) image by incorporating spatial details from a higher-resolution panchromatic (Pan) image [1,2]. Known applications of image fusion for planetary images are rare, although image fusion is well-known for its applications to Earth-based remote sensing. In a recent work [3], six different image fusion algorithms were implemented and their performances were verified with images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Camera. The image fusion procedure obtained a high-resolution multi-spectral (HRMS) product from the LRO Narrow Angle Camera (used as Pan) and LRO Wide Angle Camera (used as MS) images. The results showed that the Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS) algorithm results in a high-spatial quality product while the Wavelet-based image fusion algorithm best preserves spectral quality among all the algorithms. In this work we show the results of a hybrid IHS-Wavelet image fusion algorithm when applied to LROC MS images. The hybrid method provides the best HRMS product - both in terms of spatial resolution and preservation of spectral details. Results from hybrid image fusion can enable new science and increase the science return from existing LROC images.[1] Pohl, Cle, and John L. Van Genderen. "Review article multisensor image fusion in remote sensing: concepts, methods and applications." International journal of remote sensing 19.5 (1998): 823-854.[2] Zhang, Yun. "Understanding image fusion." Photogramm. Eng. Remote Sens 70.6 (2004): 657-661.[3] Mahanti, Prasun et al. "Enhancement of spatial resolution of the LROC Wide Angle Camera images." Archives, XXIII ISPRS Congress Archives (2016).

  19. Fusion of Geophysical Images in the Study of Archaeological Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitrou, A. A.; Petrou, M.; Tsokas, G. N.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents results from different fusion techniques between geophysical images from different modalities in order to combine them into one image with higher information content than the two original images independently. The resultant image will be useful for the detection and mapping of buried archaeological relics. The examined archaeological area is situated in Kampana site (NE Greece) near the ancient theater of Maronia city. Archaeological excavations revealed an ancient theater, an aristocratic house and the temple of the ancient Greek God Dionysus. Numerous ceramic objects found in the broader area indicated the probability of the existence of buried urban structure. In order to accurately locate and map the latter, geophysical measurements performed with the use of the magnetic method (vertical gradient of the magnetic field) and of the electrical method (apparent resistivity). We performed a semi-stochastic pixel based registration method between the geophysical images in order to fine register them by correcting their local spatial offsets produced by the use of hand held devices. After this procedure we applied to the registered images three different fusion approaches. Image fusion is a relatively new technique that not only allows integration of different information sources, but also takes advantage of the spatial and spectral resolution as well as the orientation characteristics of each image. We have used three different fusion techniques, fusion with mean values, with wavelets by enhancing selected frequency bands and curvelets giving emphasis at specific bands and angles (according the expecting orientation of the relics). In all three cases the fused images gave significantly better results than each of the original geophysical images separately. The comparison of the results of the three different approaches showed that the fusion with the use of curvelets, giving emphasis at the features' orientation, seems to give the best fused image

  20. APPLICATION OF SENSOR FUSION TO IMPROVE UAV IMAGE CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jabari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Image classification is one of the most important tasks of remote sensing projects including the ones that are based on using UAV images. Improving the quality of UAV images directly affects the classification results and can save a huge amount of time and effort in this area. In this study, we show that sensor fusion can improve image quality which results in increasing the accuracy of image classification. Here, we tested two sensor fusion configurations by using a Panchromatic (Pan camera along with either a colour camera or a four-band multi-spectral (MS camera. We use the Pan camera to benefit from its higher sensitivity and the colour or MS camera to benefit from its spectral properties. The resulting images are then compared to the ones acquired by a high resolution single Bayer-pattern colour camera (here referred to as HRC. We assessed the quality of the output images by performing image classification tests. The outputs prove that the proposed sensor fusion configurations can achieve higher accuracies compared to the images of the single Bayer-pattern colour camera. Therefore, incorporating a Pan camera on-board in the UAV missions and performing image fusion can help achieving higher quality images and accordingly higher accuracy classification results.

  1. Application of Sensor Fusion to Improve Uav Image Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabari, S.; Fathollahi, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-08-01

    Image classification is one of the most important tasks of remote sensing projects including the ones that are based on using UAV images. Improving the quality of UAV images directly affects the classification results and can save a huge amount of time and effort in this area. In this study, we show that sensor fusion can improve image quality which results in increasing the accuracy of image classification. Here, we tested two sensor fusion configurations by using a Panchromatic (Pan) camera along with either a colour camera or a four-band multi-spectral (MS) camera. We use the Pan camera to benefit from its higher sensitivity and the colour or MS camera to benefit from its spectral properties. The resulting images are then compared to the ones acquired by a high resolution single Bayer-pattern colour camera (here referred to as HRC). We assessed the quality of the output images by performing image classification tests. The outputs prove that the proposed sensor fusion configurations can achieve higher accuracies compared to the images of the single Bayer-pattern colour camera. Therefore, incorporating a Pan camera on-board in the UAV missions and performing image fusion can help achieving higher quality images and accordingly higher accuracy classification results.

  2. A bio-electromechanical imaging technique with combined electrical impedance and ultrasound tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, G; Watzenig, D; Soleimani, M

    2008-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) seeks to image the electrical conductivity of an object using electrical impedance measurement data at its periphery. Ultrasound reflection tomography (URT) is an imaging modality that is able to generate images of mechanical properties of the object in terms of acoustic impedance changes. Both URT and EIT have the potential to be used in various medical applications. In this paper we focus on breast tumour detection. Both URT and EIT belong to soft field tomography and suffer from the small amounts of available data and the inherently ill-posed nature of the inverse problems. These facts result in limited achievable reconstruction accuracy and resolution. A dual bio-electromechanical tomography system using ultrasound and electrical tomography is proposed in this paper to improve the detection of the small-size tumour. Data fusion techniques are implemented to combine the EIT/URT data. Based on simulations, we demonstrate the improvement of detection of small size anomalies and improved depth detection compared to single modality soft field tomography

  3. 78 FR 42954 - Scientific Information Request on Imaging Tests for the Staging of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ...), positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT fusion), or positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI fusion)) from medical device manufacturers... considered confidential; marketing materials; pharmacoeconomic, pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic studies...

  4. Three-dimensional Image Fusion Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacher, Vania; Petit, Arthur; Derbel, Haytham; Novelli, Luigi; Vitellius, Manuel; Ridouani, Fourat; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Duvoux, Christophe; Salloum, Chady; Chiaradia, Mélanie; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2017-11-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of image fusion guidance with pre-procedural portal phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. All consecutive cirrhotic patients presenting at our interventional unit for TIPS creation from January 2015 to January 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Procedures were performed under general anesthesia in an interventional suite equipped with flat panel detector, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and image fusion technique. All TIPSs were placed under image fusion guidance. After hepatic vein catheterization, an unenhanced CBCT acquisition was performed and co-registered with the pre-procedural portal phase CT images. A virtual path between hepatic vein and portal branch was made using the virtual needle path trajectory software. Subsequently, the 3D virtual path was overlaid on 2D fluoroscopy for guidance during portal branch cannulation. Safety, feasibility, effectiveness and per-procedural data were evaluated. Sixteen patients (12 males; median age 56 years) were included. Procedures were technically feasible in 15 of the 16 patients (94%). One procedure was aborted due to hepatic vein catheterization failure related to severe liver distortion. No periprocedural complications occurred within 48 h of the procedure. The median dose-area product was 91 Gy cm 2 , fluoroscopy time 15 min, procedure time 40 min and contrast media consumption 65 mL. Clinical benefit of the TIPS placement was observed in nine patients (56%). This study suggests that 3D image fusion guidance for TIPS is feasible, safe and effective. By identifying virtual needle path, CBCT enables real-time multiplanar guidance and may facilitate TIPS placement.

  5. Image reconstruction. Application to transverse axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubry, Florent.

    1977-09-01

    A method of computerized tridimensional image reconstruction from their projection, especially in the computerized transverse axial tomography is suggested. First, the different techniques actually developped and presented in the literature are analyzed. Then, the equipment used is briefly described. The reconstruction algorithm developped is presented. This algorithm is based on the convolution method, well adapted to the real conditions of exploitation. It is an extension of SHEPP and LOGAN's algorithm. A correction of the self absorption and of the detector's response is proposed. Finally, the first results obtained which are satisfactory are given. The simplicity of the method which does not need a too long computation time makes possible the implementation of the algorithm on a mini-computer [fr

  6. New imaging algorithm in diffusion tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, Michael V.; Lucas, Thomas R.; Frank, Robert M.

    1997-08-01

    A novel imaging algorithm for diffusion/optical tomography is presented for the case of the time dependent diffusion equation. Numerical tests are conducted for ranges of parameters realistic for applications to an early breast cancer diagnosis using ultrafast laser pulses. This is a perturbation-like method which works for both homogeneous a heterogeneous background media. Its main innovation lies in a new approach for a novel linearized problem (LP). Such an LP is derived and reduced to a boundary value problem for a coupled system of elliptic partial differential equations. As is well known, the solution of such a system amounts to the factorization of well conditioned, sparse matrices with few non-zero entries clustered along the diagonal, which can be done very rapidly. Thus, the main advantages of this technique are that it is fast and accurate. The authors call this approach the elliptic systems method (ESM). The ESM can be extended for other data collection schemes.

  7. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik; Mahmud, Rozi

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affect the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan

  8. Optical coherence tomography in anterior segment imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev-Landoy, Maya; Day, Alexander C.; Cordeiro, M. Francesca; Migdal, Clive

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT), designed primarily to image the posterior segment, to visualize the anterior chamber angle (ACA) in patients with different angle configurations. Methods In a prospective observational study, the anterior segments of 26 eyes of 26 patients were imaged using the Zeiss Stratus OCT, model 3000. Imaging of the anterior segment was achieved by adjusting the focusing control on the Stratus OCT. A total of 16 patients had abnormal angle configurations including narrow or closed angles and plateau irides, and 10 had normal angle configurations as determined by prior full ophthalmic examination, including slit-lamp biomicroscopy and gonioscopy. Results In all cases, OCT provided high-resolution information regarding iris configuration. The ACA itself was clearly visualized in patients with narrow or closed angles, but not in patients with open angles. Conclusions Stratus OCT offers a non-contact, convenient and rapid method of assessing the configuration of the anterior chamber. Despite its limitations, it may be of help during the routine clinical assessment and treatment of patients with glaucoma, particularly when gonioscopy is not possible or difficult to interpret. PMID:17355288

  9. Brain dopaminergic systems : imaging with positron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, J C [University of Caen/INSERM U, Caen (France). CYCERON; Comar, D [E.E.C. Concerted Action on P.E.T. Investigations of Cellular Regeneration and Degeneration, Orsay (France) CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot; Farde, L [Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden); Martinot, J L; Mazoyer, B [CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot Paris-

    1991-01-01

    Imaging of the dopaminergic system in the human brain with the in vivo use of Positron Emission Tomography emerged in the late 1980s as a tool of major importance in clinical neurosciences and pharmacology. The last few years have witnessed rapid development of new radiotracers specific to receptors, reuptake sites and enzymes of the dopamine system; the application of these radiotracers has led to major break-troughs in the pathophysiology and therapy of movement disorders and schizophrenic-like psychoses. This book is the first to collect, in a single volume, state-of-the-art contributions to the various aspects of this research. Its contents address methodological issues related to the design, labelling, quantitative imaging and compartmental modeli-sation of radioligands of the post-synaptic, pre-synaptic and enzyme sites of the dopamine system and to their use in clinical research in the fields of Parkinson's disease as well as other movement disorders, psychoses and neuroleptic receptor occupancy. The chapters were written by leading European scientists in the field of PET, gathered together in Caen (France, November 1990) under the aegis of the EEC Concerted Action on PET Investigations of Cellular Regeneration and Degeneration. This book provides a current and comprehensive overview on PET studies of the brain dopamine system which should aid and interest neurologists , psychiatrists, pharmacologists and medical imaging scientists. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs.

  10. Computed tomography with selectable image resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibianca, F.A.; Dallapiazza, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    A computed tomography system x-ray detector has a central group of half-width detector elements and groups of full-width elements on each side of the central group. To obtain x-ray attenuation data for whole body layers, the half-width elements are switched effectively into paralleled pairs so all elements act like full-width elements and an image of normal resolution is obtained. For narrower head layers, the elements in the central group are used as half-width elements so resolution which is twice as great as normal is obtained. The central group is also used in the half-width mode and the outside groups are used in the full-width mode to obtain a high resolution image of a body zone within a full body layer. In one embodiment data signals from the detector are switched by electronic multiplexing and in another embodiment a processor chooses the signals for the various kinds of images that are to be reconstructed. (author)

  11. PET-CT imaging fusion in the assessment of head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Denise Takehana dos; Chojniak, Rubens; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira; Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmao Paraiso

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors have established a methodological approach to evaluate head and neck squamous cell carcinoma aiming at identifying and distinguishing high metabolic activity inside the lesion, combining in a single examination, functional, metabolic and morphological data simultaneously acquired by means of different non-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) device. Materials and Methods: The study population included 17 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma submitted to a non-dedicated 18 F-FDG-PET imaging at Department of Diagnostic Imaging of Hospital do Cancer, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. CT and 18 F-FDG-PET images were simultaneously acquired in a non-dedicated device. The original data were transferred to an independent workstation by means of the Entegra 2 NT software to generate PET-CT imaging fusion. Results: The findings were defined as positive in the presence of a well defined focal area of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake in regions not related with the normal biodistribution of the tracer. Conclusion: The fusion of simultaneously acquired images in a single examination ( 18 F-FDGPET and CT) has allowed the topographic-metabolic mapping of the lesion as well as the localization of high metabolic activity areas inside the tumor, indicating recidivation or metastasis and widening the array of alternatives for radiotherapy or surgical planning. (author)

  12. Distributed MIMO-ISAR Sub-image Fusion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Wenkun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The fast fluctuation associated with maneuvering a target’s radar cross-section often affects the imaging performance stability of traditional monostatic Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR. To address this problem, in this study, we propose an imaging method based on the fusion of sub-images of frequencydiversity-distributed multiple Input-Multiple Output-Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (MIMO-ISAR. First, we establish the analytic expression of a two-dimensional ISAR sub-image acquired by different channels of distributed MIMO-ISAR. Then, we derive the distance and azimuth distortion factors of the image acquired by the different channels. By compensating for the distortion of the ISAR image, we ultimately realize distributed MIMO-ISAR fusion imaging. Simulations verify the validity of this imaging method using distributed MIMO-ISAR.

  13. FUSION SEGMENTATION METHOD BASED ON FUZZY THEORY FOR COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The image segmentation method based on two-dimensional histogram segments the image according to the thresholds of the intensity of the target pixel and the average intensity of its neighborhood. This method is essentially a hard-decision method. Due to the uncertainties when labeling the pixels around the threshold, the hard-decision method can easily get the wrong segmentation result. Therefore, a fusion segmentation method based on fuzzy theory is proposed in this paper. We use membership function to model the uncertainties on each color channel of the color image. Then, we segment the color image according to the fuzzy reasoning. The experiment results show that our proposed method can get better segmentation results both on the natural scene images and optical remote sensing images compared with the traditional thresholding method. The fusion method in this paper can provide new ideas for the information extraction of optical remote sensing images and polarization SAR images.

  14. Bayesian tomography and integrated data analysis in fusion diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Dong, Y. B.; Deng, Wei; Shi, Z. B.; Fu, B. Z.; Gao, J. M.; Wang, T. B.; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yi; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, a Bayesian tomography method using non-stationary Gaussian process for a prior has been introduced. The Bayesian formalism allows quantities which bear uncertainty to be expressed in the probabilistic form so that the uncertainty of a final solution can be fully resolved from the confidence interval of a posterior probability. Moreover, a consistency check of that solution can be performed by checking whether the misfits between predicted and measured data are reasonably within an assumed data error. In particular, the accuracy of reconstructions is significantly improved by using the non-stationary Gaussian process that can adapt to the varying smoothness of emission distribution. The implementation of this method to a soft X-ray diagnostics on HL-2A has been used to explore relevant physics in equilibrium and MHD instability modes. This project is carried out within a large size inference framework, aiming at an integrated analysis of heterogeneous diagnostics.

  15. Principles of medical imaging with emphasis on tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouris, K [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College, London Medical School, Mortimer Street, London W1N 8AA (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Medical imaging with ionizing and non-ionizing radiations belongs to the class of problems known as indirect sensing. This article is concerned with imaging methods known as image reconstruction from projections or computerized tomography. A brief comparative study of the theory is presented. Depending on the nature and modes of propagation of the employed radiation, methods are discussed either under transmission tomography (with gamma rays and X rays) or emission tomography (with gamma rays and positrons). Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) is described as resonant absorption and re-emission of radiofrequency energy. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig.

  16. Image processing tensor transform and discrete tomography with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryan, Artyom M

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on mathematical methods in computer tomography, Image Processing: Tensor Transform and Discrete Tomography with MATLAB(R) introduces novel approaches to help in solving the problem of image reconstruction on the Cartesian lattice. Specifically, it discusses methods of image processing along parallel rays to more quickly and accurately reconstruct images from a finite number of projections, thereby avoiding overradiation of the body during a computed tomography (CT) scan. The book presents several new ideas, concepts, and methods, many of which have not been published elsewhere. New co

  17. Imaging fusion (SPECT/CT) in degenerative disease of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, P.; Ucros, G.; Bermudez, S.; Ocampo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine the utility of Fusion Imaging SPECT/CT in degenerative pathology of the spine and to establish the impact of the use of fusion imaging in spinal pain due to degenerative changes of the spine. Materials and methods: 44 Patients (M=21, F=23) average age of 63 years and with degenerative pathology of spine were sent to Diagnosis Imaging department in FSFB. Bone scintigraphy (SPECT), CT of spine (cervical: 30%, Lumbar 70%) and fusion imaging were performed in all of them. Bone scintigraphy was carried out in a gamma camera Siemens Diacam double head attached to ESOFT computer. The images were acquired in matrix 128 x 128, 20 seg/imag, 64 images. CT of spine was performed same day or two days after in Helycoidal Siemens somatom emotion CT. The fusion was done in a Dicom workstation in sagital, axial and coronal reconstruction. The findings were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians and 2 radiologists of the staff of FSFB in an independent way. Results: Bone scan (SPECT) and CT of 44 patients were evaluated. CT showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 27 (61.3%) patients, uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 7 (15.9%), bulging disc in 9(20.4%), spinal nucleus lesion in 7(15.9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%), spinal foraminal stenosis in 7 (15.9%), spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis in 4 (9%). Bone scan showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 29 (65.9%), uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 4 (9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%) and normal 3 (6.8%). The imaging fusion showed coincidence findings (main lesion in CT with high uptake in scintigraphy) in 34 patients (77.2%) and no coincidence in 10 (22.8%). In 15 (34.09%) patients the fusion provided additional information. The analysis of the findings of CT and SPECT showed similar results in most of the cases and the fusion didn't provide additional information but it allowed to confirm the findings but when the findings didn't match where the CT showed several findings and SPECT only one area with high uptake

  18. A hybrid image fusion system for endovascular interventions of peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalys, Florent; Favre, Ketty; Villena, Alexandre; Durrmann, Vincent; Colleaux, Mathieu; Lucas, Antoine; Kaladji, Adrien

    2018-03-16

    Interventional endovascular treatment has become the first line of management in the treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD). However, contrast and radiation exposure continue to limit the feasibility of these procedures. This paper presents a novel hybrid image fusion system for endovascular intervention of PAD. We present two different roadmapping methods from intra- and pre-interventional imaging that can be used either simultaneously or independently, constituting the navigation system. The navigation system is decomposed into several steps that can be entirely integrated within the procedure workflow without modifying it to benefit from the roadmapping. First, a 2D panorama of the entire peripheral artery system is automatically created based on a sequence of stepping fluoroscopic images acquired during the intra-interventional diagnosis phase. During the interventional phase, the live image can be synchronized on the panorama to form the basis of the image fusion system. Two types of augmented information are then integrated. First, an angiography panorama is proposed to avoid contrast media re-injection. Information exploiting the pre-interventional computed tomography angiography (CTA) is also brought to the surgeon by means of semiautomatic 3D/2D registration on the 2D panorama. Each step of the workflow was independently validated. Experiments for both the 2D panorama creation and the synchronization processes showed very accurate results (errors of 1.24 and [Formula: see text] mm, respectively), similarly to the registration on the 3D CTA (errors of [Formula: see text] mm), with minimal user interaction and very low computation time. First results of an on-going clinical study highlighted its major clinical added value on intraoperative parameters. No image fusion system has been proposed yet for endovascular procedures of PAD in lower extremities. More globally, such a navigation system, combining image fusion from different 2D and 3D image

  19. X-ray imaging in the laser-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Imaging devices which are used or planned for x-ray imaging in the laser-fusion program are discussed. Resolution criteria are explained, and a suggestion is made for using the modulation transfer function as a uniform definition of resolution for these devices

  20. Kimura's disease: imaging patterns on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinathan, Anil; Tan, T.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To define the role of computed tomography (CT) in identifying and classifying the imaging patterns of diagnostic value in Kimura's disease of the head and neck. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken comprising 13 patients with histopathological evidence of Kimura's disease. The patients' clinical and pathological records were reviewed against a detailed analysis of their CT images performed from the base of the skull to the arch of the aorta. Results: Both well-defined, nodular masses, as well as ill-defined plaque-like infiltrative masses were seen in the subcutaneous tissue of the head and neck region. All patients had lesions adjacent to the major salivary glands. The parotid gland was affected in 10 of the 13 cases and the submandibular gland was affected in the rest. Contrast enhancement was variable. More than half of the cases had associated lymphadenopathy. Some of them showed atrophy of the skin and subcutaneous fat overlying the subcutaneous masses. Blood eosinophilia was a consistent feature in all the cases. Conclusion: The patterns of distribution, morphology, and enhancement of the lesions in Kimura's disease that can be demonstrated at CT, enables a confident, non-invasive diagnosis of this condition, in an appropriate clinical context.

  1. High Speed impedance tomography for cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrani, J.N.; Jin, C.; Schaik, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) calculates the internal conductivity distribution within a body using electrical contact measurements. Previous investigation has shown that optimizing electrode placement can give better information about the stroke volume and better separation between the ventricles and atria than with the electrodes attached in the transverse plane. In our investigation we are developing fast three dimensional imaging of the heart (two planes of 16 electrodes) including internal electrodes in esophagus. The reconstruction speed in EIT is one of the main limitations for real time imaging when using a detailed three dimensional finite element mesh. For that reason we investigated new iterative algorithms for solving large scale LJ regularization. In this research we compare these algorithms on noise reliability and speed for 2D cardiac models. The four methods were as follows: (I) an interior point method for solving Ll-regularized least squares problems (Ll-LS); (2) total variation using a Lagrangian multiplier (TV AL3); (3) a two step iterative shrinkage/thresholding method (TWIST) for solving the Lo-regularized least squares problem; (4) The Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). In our investigation, using 1600 elements, we found all four algorithms provided an improvement over the best conventional EIT reconstruction method, Total Variation, in three important areas: robustness to noise, increased computational speed of at least 40 x and a visually apparent improvement in spatial resolution. Out of the four algorithms we found TWIST was the fastest with at least a 1 00 x speed increase. (author)

  2. Three-dimensional imaging of lumbar spinal fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafetz, N.; Hunter, J.C.; Cann, C.E.; Morris, J.M.; Ax, L.; Catterling, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    Using a Cemax 1000 three-dimensional (3D) imaging computer/workstation, the author evaluated 15 patients with lumbar spinal fusions (four with pseudarthrosis). Both axial images with sagittal and coronal reformations and 3D images were obtained. The diagnoses (spinal stenosis and psuedarthrosis) were changed in four patients, confirmed in six patients, and unchanged in five patients with the addition of the 3D images. The ''cut-away'' 3D images proved particularly helpful for evaluation of central and lateral spinal stenosis, whereas the ''external'' 3D images were most useful for evaluation of the integrity of the fusion. Additionally, orthopedic surgeons found 3D images superior for both surgical planning and explaining pathology to patients

  3. Visible and NIR image fusion using weight-map-guided Laplacian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish V Vanmali

    fusion perspective, instead of the conventional haze imaging model. The proposed ... Image dehazing; Laplacian–Gaussian pyramid; multi-resolution fusion; visible–NIR image fusion; weight map. 1. .... Tan's [8] work is based on two assumptions: first, images ... responding colour image, since NIR can penetrate through.

  4. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  5. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjonen, H

    1998-12-31

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI 90 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  6. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohjonen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI

  7. Image fusion in open-architecture quality-oriented nuclear medicine and radiology departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohjonen, H

    1997-12-31

    Imaging examinations of patients belong to the most widely used diagnostic procedures in hospitals. Multimodal digital imaging is becoming increasingly common in many fields of diagnosis and therapy planning. Patients are frequently examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound imaging (US) in addition to single photon (SPET) or positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of the study was to provide means for improving the quality of the whole imaging and viewing chain in nuclear medicine and radiology. The specific aims were: (1) to construct and test a model for a quality assurance system in radiology based on ISO standards, (2) to plan a Dicom based image network for fusion purposes using ATM and Ethernet technologies, (3) to test different segmentation methods in quantitative SPET, (4) to study and implement a registration and visualisation method for multimodal imaging, (5) to apply the developed method in selected clinical brain and abdominal images, and (6) to investigate the accuracy of the registration procedure for brain SPET and MRI 90 refs. The thesis includes also six previous publications by author

  8. External marker-based fusion of functional and morphological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremp, S.; Schaefer, A.; Alexander, C.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    The fusion of image data resulting from methods oriented toward morphology like CT, MRI with functional information coming from nuclear medicine (SPECT, PET) is frequently applied to allow for a better association between functional findings and anatomical structures. A new software was developed to provide image fusion using PET, SPECT, MRI and CT data within a short processing periode for brain as well as whole body examinations in particular thorax and abdomen. The software utilizes external markers (brain) or anatomical landmarks (thorax) for correlation. The fusion requires a periode of approx. 15 min. The examples shown emphasize the high gain in diagnostic information by fusing image data of anatomical and functional methods. (orig.) [de

  9. Image fusion and denoising using fractional-order gradient information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mei, Jin-Jin; Dong, Yiqiu; Huang, Ting-Zhu

    Image fusion and denoising are significant in image processing because of the availability of multi-sensor and the presence of the noise. The first-order and second-order gradient information have been effectively applied to deal with fusing the noiseless source images. In this paper, due to the adv...... show that the proposed method outperforms the conventional total variation in methods for simultaneously fusing and denoising....

  10. Fuzzy modeling of electrical impedance tomography images of the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Harki; Ortega, Neli Regina Siqueira; Galizia, Mauricio Stanzione; Borges, Joao Batista; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Aiming to improve the anatomical resolution of electrical impedance tomography images, we developed a fuzzy model based on electrical impedance tomography's high temporal resolution and on the functional pulmonary signals of perfusion and ventilation. Introduction: Electrical impedance tomography images carry information about both ventilation and perfusion. However, these images are difficult to interpret because of insufficient anatomical resolution, such that it becomes almost impossible to distinguish the heart from the lungs. Methods: Electrical impedance tomography data from an experimental animal model were collected during normal ventilation and apnoea while an injection of hypertonic saline was administered. The fuzzy model was elaborated in three parts: a modeling of the heart, the pulmonary ventilation map and the pulmonary perfusion map. Image segmentation was performed using a threshold method, and a ventilation/perfusion map was generated. Results: Electrical impedance tomography images treated by the fuzzy model were compared with the hypertonic saline injection method and computed tomography scan images, presenting good results. The average accuracy index was 0.80 when comparing the fuzzy modeled lung maps and the computed tomography scan lung mask. The average ROC curve area comparing a saline injection image and a fuzzy modeled pulmonary perfusion image was 0.77. Discussion: The innovative aspects of our work are the use of temporal information for the delineation of the heart structure and the use of two pulmonary functions for lung structure delineation. However, robustness of the method should be tested for the imaging of abnormal lung conditions. Conclusions: These results showed the adequacy of the fuzzy approach in treating the anatomical resolution uncertainties in electrical impedance tomography images. (author)

  11. Assessment of Spatiotemporal Fusion Algorithms for Planet and Worldview Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Chiman; Zhu, Xiaolin; Gao, Feng; Chou, Bryan; Perez, Daniel; Li, Jiang; Shen, Yuzhong; Koperski, Krzysztof; Marchisio, Giovanni

    2018-03-31

    Although Worldview-2 (WV) images (non-pansharpened) have 2-m resolution, the re-visit times for the same areas may be seven days or more. In contrast, Planet images are collected using small satellites that can cover the whole Earth almost daily. However, the resolution of Planet images is 3.125 m. It would be ideal to fuse these two satellites images to generate high spatial resolution (2 m) and high temporal resolution (1 or 2 days) images for applications such as damage assessment, border monitoring, etc. that require quick decisions. In this paper, we evaluate three approaches to fusing Worldview (WV) and Planet images. These approaches are known as Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM), Flexible Spatiotemporal Data Fusion (FSDAF), and Hybrid Color Mapping (HCM), which have been applied to the fusion of MODIS and Landsat images in recent years. Experimental results using actual Planet and Worldview images demonstrated that the three aforementioned approaches have comparable performance and can all generate high quality prediction images.

  12. Fusion of imaging and nonimaging data for surveillance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Elisa; Gagnon, Langis; Duquet, Jean Remi; Macieszczak, Maciej; Valin, Pierre

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes a phased incremental integration approach for application of image analysis and data fusion technologies to provide automated intelligent target tracking and identification for airborne surveillance on board an Aurora Maritime Patrol Aircraft. The sensor suite of the Aurora consists of a radar, an identification friend or foe (IFF) system, an electronic support measures (ESM) system, a spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SSAR), a forward looking infra-red (FLIR) sensor and a link-11 tactical datalink system. Lockheed Martin Canada (LMCan) is developing a testbed, which will be used to analyze and evaluate approaches for combining the data provided by the existing sensors, which were initially not designed to feed a fusion system. Three concurrent research proof-of-concept activities provide techniques, algorithms and methodology into three sequential phases of integration of this testbed. These activities are: (1) analysis of the fusion architecture (track/contact/hybrid) most appropriate for the type of data available, (2) extraction and fusion of simple features from the imaging data into the fusion system performing automatic target identification, and (3) development of a unique software architecture which will permit integration and independent evolution, enhancement and optimization of various decision aid capabilities, such as multi-sensor data fusion (MSDF), situation and threat assessment (STA) and resource management (RM).

  13. CT-MR image data fusion for computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz; Donat, Markus Alexander; Mehrain, Sheida; Friedrich, Klaus; Krestan, Christian; Matula, Christian; Imhof, Herwig; Czerny, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors and to present, especially, CT and MR image fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer assisted navigated neurosurgery of temporal bone tumors. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with temporal bone tumors underwent MDCT and MRI. MDCT was performed in high-resolution bone window level setting in axial plane. The reconstructed MDCT slice thickness was 0.8 mm. MRI was performed in axial and coronal plane with T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences, un-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences, and coronal T1-weighted SE sequences with fat suppression and with 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequences in axial plane. The 3D T1-weighted GE sequence had a slice thickness of 1 mm. Image data sets of CT and 3D T1-weighted GE sequences were merged utilizing a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images. MDCT and MR images were separately used to depict and characterize lesions. The fusion images were utilized for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Results: Tumorous lesions of bone and soft tissue were well delineated and characterized by CT and MR images. The images played a crucial role in the differentiation of benign and malignant pathologies, which consisted of 13 benign and 2 malignant tumors. The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in preoperative planning and improved surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation system was 1.25 mm. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential in the preoperative work up of temporal bone tumors. CT-MR image data fusion presents an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure and is a

  14. Spatial resolution enhancement of satellite image data using fusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestiana, H.; Sukristiyanti

    2018-02-01

    Object identification using remote sensing data has a problem when the spatial resolution is not in accordance with the object. The fusion approach is one of methods to solve the problem, to improve the object recognition and to increase the objects information by combining data from multiple sensors. The application of fusion image can be used to estimate the environmental component that is needed to monitor in multiple views, such as evapotranspiration estimation, 3D ground-based characterisation, smart city application, urban environments, terrestrial mapping, and water vegetation. Based on fusion application method, the visible object in land area has been easily recognized using the method. The variety of object information in land area has increased the variation of environmental component estimation. The difficulties in recognizing the invisible object like Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD), especially in tropical area, might be decreased by the fusion method. The less variation of the object in the sea surface temperature is a challenge to be solved.

  15. Feature-Fusion Guidelines for Image-Based Multi-Modal Biometric Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dane Brown

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The feature level, unlike the match score level, lacks multi-modal fusion guidelines. This work demonstrates a new approach for improved image-based biometric feature-fusion. The approach extracts and combines the face, fingerprint and palmprint at the feature level for improved human identification accuracy. Feature-fusion guidelines, proposed in our recent work, are extended by adding a new face segmentation method and the support vector machine classifier. The new face segmentation method improves the face identification equal error rate (EER by 10%. The support vector machine classifier combined with the new feature selection approach, proposed in our recent work, outperforms other classifiers when using a single training sample. Feature-fusion guidelines take the form of strengths and weaknesses as observed in the applied feature processing modules during preliminary experiments. The guidelines are used to implement an effective biometric fusion system at the feature level, using a novel feature-fusion methodology, reducing the EER of two groups of three datasets namely: SDUMLA face, SDUMLA fingerprint and IITD palmprint; MUCT Face, MCYT Fingerprint and CASIA Palmprint.

  16. Taxonomy of multi-focal nematode image stacks by a CNN based image fusion approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Wang, Xueping; Zhang, Hongzhong

    2018-03-01

    In the biomedical field, digital multi-focal images are very important for documentation and communication of specimen data, because the morphological information for a transparent specimen can be captured in form of a stack of high-quality images. Given biomedical image stacks containing multi-focal images, how to efficiently extract effective features from all layers to classify the image stacks is still an open question. We present to use a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) image fusion based multilinear approach for the taxonomy of multi-focal image stacks. A deep CNN based image fusion technique is used to combine relevant information of multi-focal images within a given image stack into a single image, which is more informative and complete than any single image in the given stack. Besides, multi-focal images within a stack are fused along 3 orthogonal directions, and multiple features extracted from the fused images along different directions are combined by canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Because multi-focal image stacks represent the effect of different factors - texture, shape, different instances within the same class and different classes of objects, we embed the deep CNN based image fusion method within a multilinear framework to propose an image fusion based multilinear classifier. The experimental results on nematode multi-focal image stacks demonstrated that the deep CNN image fusion based multilinear classifier can reach a higher classification rate (95.7%) than that by the previous multilinear based approach (88.7%), even we only use the texture feature instead of the combination of texture and shape features as in the previous work. The proposed deep CNN image fusion based multilinear approach shows great potential in building an automated nematode taxonomy system for nematologists. It is effective to classify multi-focal image stacks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. New false color mapping for image fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Walraven, J.

    1996-01-01

    A pixel based colour mapping algorithm is presented that produces a fused false colour rendering of two gray level images representing different sensor modalities. The result-ing fused false colour images have a higher information content than each of the original images and retain sensor-specific

  18. SAR Data Fusion Imaging Method Oriented to Target Feature Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To deal with the difficulty for target outlines extracting precisely due to neglect of target scattering characteristic variation during the processing of high-resolution space-borne SAR data, a novel fusion imaging method is proposed oriented to target feature extraction. Firstly, several important aspects that affect target feature extraction and SAR image quality are analyzed, including curved orbit, stop-and-go approximation, atmospheric delay, and high-order residual phase error. Furthermore, the corresponding compensation methods are addressed as well. Based on the analysis, the mathematical model of SAR echo combined with target space-time spectrum is established for explaining the space-time-frequency change rule of target scattering characteristic. Moreover, a fusion imaging strategy and method under high-resolution and ultra-large observation angle range conditions are put forward to improve SAR quality by fusion processing in range-doppler and image domain. Finally, simulations based on typical military targets are used to verify the effectiveness of the fusion imaging method.

  19. Imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis by electron beam tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, K C S; Ferrett, C G; Tandon, R; Paul, B; Herold, J; Liu, C S C

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To describe the experience of using electron beam tomography (EBT) in imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) to identify early bone and dentine loss which may threaten the viability of the eye.

  20. X-ray Computed Tomography Image Quality Indicator (IQI) Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase one of the program is to identify suitable x-ray Computed Tomography (CT) Image Quality Indicator (IQI) design(s) that can be used to adequately capture CT...

  1. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Already widely accepted in medicine, tomography can also be useful in industry. The theory behind tomography and a demonstration of the technique to inspect a motorcycle carburetor is presented. To demonstrate the potential of computer assisted tomography (CAT) to accurately locate defects in three dimensions, a sectioned 5 cm gate valve with a shrink cavity made visible by the sectioning was tomographically imaged using a Co-60 source. The tomographic images revealed a larger cavity below the sectioned surface. The position of this cavity was located with an in-plane and axial precision of approximately +-1 mm. The volume of the cavity was estimated to be approximately 40 mm 3

  2. Image fusion using sparse overcomplete feature dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumby, Steven P.; Bettencourt, Luis; Kenyon, Garrett T.; Chartrand, Rick; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2015-10-06

    Approaches for deciding what individuals in a population of visual system "neurons" are looking for using sparse overcomplete feature dictionaries are provided. A sparse overcomplete feature dictionary may be learned for an image dataset and a local sparse representation of the image dataset may be built using the learned feature dictionary. A local maximum pooling operation may be applied on the local sparse representation to produce a translation-tolerant representation of the image dataset. An object may then be classified and/or clustered within the translation-tolerant representation of the image dataset using a supervised classification algorithm and/or an unsupervised clustering algorithm.

  3. Meaning of Interior Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2013-01-01

    The classic imaging geometry for computed tomography is for collection of un-truncated projections and reconstruction of a global image, with the Fourier transform as the theoretical foundation that is intrinsically non-local. Recently, interior tomography research has led to theoretically exact relationships between localities in the projection and image spaces and practically promising reconstruction algorithms. Initially, interior tomography was developed for x-ray computed tomography. Then, it has been elevated as a general imaging principle. Finally, a novel framework known as “omni-tomography” is being developed for grand fusion of multiple imaging modalities, allowing tomographic synchrony of diversified features. PMID:23912256

  4. Real-time image fusion involving diagnostic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Lucian G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our article is to give an overview of the current and future possibilities of real-time image fusion involving ultrasound. We present a review of the existing English-language peer-reviewed literature assessing this technique, which covers technical solutions (for ultrasound...

  5. Performance comparison of different graylevel image fusion schemes through a universal image quality index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Hogervorst, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We applied a recently introduced universal image quality index Q that quantifies the distortion of a processed image relative to its original version, to assess the performance of different graylevel image fusion schemes. The method is as follows. First, we adopt an original test image as the

  6. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Sanjiv [Portola Valley, CA; Pritha, Ray [Mountain View, CA

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  7. Imaging in hematology. Part 2: Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhechev, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A dramatic increase of the role of imaging in diagnosis of blood diseases occurred with the development of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At present CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis is routinely employed in diagnostic and staging evaluation. The bone marrow may be imaged by one of several methods, including scintigraphy, CT and MRI. Nuclear imaging at diagnosis can clarify findings of uncertain significance on conventional staging and may be very useful in the setting of large masses to follow responses to therapy nad to evaluate the residual tumor in a large mass that has responded to treatment. Recent developments such as helical CT, single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET) have continued to advance diagnosis and therapy

  8. Perceptual evaluation of different image fusion schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; IJspeert, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    Human perceptual performance was tested with images of nighttime outdoor scenes. The scenes were registered both with a dual band (visual and near infrared) image intensified low-light CCD camera (DII) and with a thermal middle wavelength band (3-5 μm) infrared (IR) camera. Fused imagery was

  9. Perceptual evaluation of different image fusion schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.; Franken, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Human scene recognition performance was tested with images of night-time outdoor scenes. The scenes were registered both with a dual band (visual and near infrared) image intensified low-light CCD camera (DII) and with a thermal middle wavelength band (3–5 mm) infrared (IR) camera. Fused imagery was

  10. Coherence imaging spectro-polarimetry for magnetic fusion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of developments in imaging spectro-polarimetry for magnetic fusion diagnostics. Using various multiplexing strategies, it is possible to construct optical polarization interferometers that deliver images of underlying physical parameters such as flow speed, temperature (Doppler effect) or magnetic pitch angle (motional Stark and Zeeman effects). This paper also describes and presents first results for a new spatial heterodyne interferometric system used for both Doppler and polarization spectroscopy.

  11. Image Fusion Technologies In Commercial Remote Sensing Packages

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wassai, Firouz Abdullah; Kalyankar, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Several remote sensing software packages are used to the explicit purpose of analyzing and visualizing remotely sensed data, with the developing of remote sensing sensor technologies from last ten years. Accord-ing to literature, the remote sensing is still the lack of software tools for effective information extraction from remote sensing data. So, this paper provides a state-of-art of multi-sensor image fusion technologies as well as review on the quality evaluation of the single image or f...

  12. Whole brain imaging with Serial Two-Photon Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P Amato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging entire mouse brains at submicron resolution has historically been a challenging undertaking and largely confined to the province of dedicated atlasing initiatives. The has limited systematic investigations into important areas of neuroscience, such as neural circuits, brain mapping and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we describe in detail Serial Two-Photon (STP tomography, a robust, reliable method for imaging entire brains with histological detail. We provide examples of how the basic methodology can be extended to other imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography, in order to provide unique contrast mechanisms. Furthermore we provide a survey of the research that STP tomography has enabled in the field of neuroscience, provide examples of how this technology enables quantitative whole brain studies, and discuss the current limitations of STP tomography-based approaches

  13. Diagnostic value of sectional images obtained by emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roucayrol, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    It is now possible to obtain clear images of the various planes in and around a structure with ultra-sounds (echotomography), X-rays (computerized tomography) and recently, gamma-rays from radioactive substances (emission tomography). Axial transverse tomography, which is described here, is to conventional scintigraphy what CT scan is to radiography. It provides images of any structure capable of concentrating sufficiently a radioactive substance administered intravenously. These images are perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body. As shown by examples in the liver, lungs and myocardium, lesions which had passed unnoticed with other exploratory techniques can now be demonstrated, and the location, shape and extension of known lesions can be more accurately assessed. Emission tomography already has its place in modern diagnostic procedures side by side with echotomography and CT scan [fr

  14. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guo

    Full Text Available To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors.A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV, the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC, and the local standard deviation (SDlocal. Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation.The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09 and 0.07(± 0.01 for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05 with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00 with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method.With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  15. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Imaging Techniques in Arterial Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Adler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional imaging has become a critical aspect in the evaluation of arterial injuries. In particular, angiography using computed tomography (CT is the imaging of choice. A variety of techniques and options are available when evaluating for arterial injuries. Techniques involve contrast bolus, various phases of contrast enhancement, multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, and maximum intensity projection. After the images are rendered, a variety of features may be seen that diagnose the injury. This article provides a general overview of the techniques, important findings, and pitfalls in cross sectional imaging of arterial imaging, particularly in relation to computed tomography. In addition, the future directions of computed tomography, including a few techniques in the process of development, is also discussed.

  16. Added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound on biopsies of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making.

  17. Added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound on biopsies of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making

  18. Enhanced EDX images by fusion of multimodal SEM images using pansharpening techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, G; Angulo, J; Moreaud, M; Sorbier, L

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the potential interest of image fusion in the context of multimodal scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. In particular, we aim at merging the backscattered electron images that usually have a high spatial resolution but do not provide enough discriminative information to physically classify the nature of the sample, with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images that have discriminative information but a lower spatial resolution. The produced images are named enhanced EDX. To achieve this goal, we have compared the results obtained with classical pansharpening techniques for image fusion with an original approach tailored for multimodal SEM fusion of information. Quantitative assessment is obtained by means of two SEM images and a simulated dataset produced by a software based on PENELOPE. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Cone-beam computed tomography fusion and navigation for real-time positron emission tomography-guided biopsies and ablations: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Mielekamp, Peter; Noordhoek, Niels; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Millo, Corina; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J

    2012-06-01

    To describe a novel technique for multimodality positron emission tomography (PET) fusion-guided interventions that combines cone-beam computed tomography (CT) with PET/CT before the procedure. Subjects were selected among patients scheduled for a biopsy or ablation procedure. The lesions were not visible with conventional imaging methods or did not have uniform uptake on PET. Clinical success was defined by adequate histopathologic specimens for molecular profiling or diagnosis and by lack of enhancement on follow-up imaging for ablation procedures. Time to target (time elapsed between the completion of the initial cone-beam CT scan and first tissue sample or treatment), total procedure time (time from the moment the patient was on the table until the patient was off the table), and number of times the needle was repositioned were recorded. Seven patients underwent eight procedures (two ablations and six biopsies). Registration and procedures were completed successfully in all cases. Clinical success was achieved in all biopsy procedures and in one of the two ablation procedures. The needle was repositioned once in one biopsy procedure only. On average, the time to target was 38 minutes (range 13-54 min). Total procedure time was 95 minutes (range 51-240 min, which includes composite ablation). On average, fluoroscopy time was 2.5 minutes (range 1.3-6.2 min). An integrated cone-beam CT software platform can enable PET-guided biopsies and ablation procedures without the need for additional specialized hardware. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Geometric Dictionary Learning Based Approach for Fluorescence Spectroscopy Image Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqin Zhu; Guanqiu Qi; Yi Chai; Penghua Li

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, sparse representation approaches have been integrated into multi-focus image fusion methods. The fused images of sparse-representation-based image fusion methods show great performance. Constructing an informative dictionary is a key step for sparsity-based image fusion method. In order to ensure sufficient number of useful bases for sparse representation in the process of informative dictionary construction, image patches from all source images are classified into different ...

  1. Bayesian image reconstruction for improving detection performance of muon tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Schultz, Larry J; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-05-01

    Muon tomography is a novel technology that is being developed for detecting high-Z materials in vehicles or cargo containers. Maximum likelihood methods have been developed for reconstructing the scattering density image from muon measurements. However, the instability of maximum likelihood estimation often results in noisy images and low detectability of high-Z targets. In this paper, we propose using regularization to improve the image quality of muon tomography. We formulate the muon reconstruction problem in a Bayesian framework by introducing a prior distribution on scattering density images. An iterative shrinkage algorithm is derived to maximize the log posterior distribution. At each iteration, the algorithm obtains the maximum a posteriori update by shrinking an unregularized maximum likelihood update. Inverse quadratic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Laplacian priors and inverse cubic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Gaussian priors. Receiver operating characteristic studies using simulated data demonstrate that the Bayesian reconstruction can greatly improve the detection performance of muon tomography.

  2. Color image fusion for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in passive and active imaging sensor technology offer the potential to detect weapons that are concealed underneath a person's clothing or carried along in bags. Although the concealed weapons can sometimes easily be detected, it can be difficult to perceive their context, due to the

  3. Discrete Tomography and Imaging of Polycrystalline Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpers, Andreas

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy is commonly considered as the standard application for discrete tomography. While this has yet to be technically realized, new applications with a similar flavor have emerged in materials science. In our group at Ris� DTU (Denmark's National...... Laboratory for Sustainable Energy), for instance, we study polycrystalline materials via synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Several reconstruction problems arise, most of them exhibit inherently discrete aspects. In this talk I want to give a concise mathematical introduction to some of these reconstruction...... problems. Special focus is on their relationship to classical discrete tomography. Several open mathematical questions will be mentioned along the way....

  4. Combined FDG PET/CT imaging for restaging of colorectal cancer patients: impact of image fusion on staging accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunk, H.; Jaeger, U.; Flacke, S.; Hortling, N.; Bucerius, J.; Joe, A.; Reinhardt, M.; Palmedo, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic impact of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-labeled deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) combined with non-contrast computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT modality in restaging colorectal cancer patients. Material and methods: In this retrospective study, 29 consecutive patients with histologically proven colorectal cancer (17 female, 12 male, aged 51-76 years) underwent whole body scans in one session on a dual modality PET-CT system (Siemens Biograph) 90 min. after i.v. administration of 370 MBq 18 F-FDG. The CT imaging was performed with 40 mAs, 130 kV, slice-thickness 5 mm and without i.v. contrast administration. PET and CT images were reconstructed with a slice-thickness of 5 mm in coronal, sagittal and transverse planes. During a first step of analysis, PET and CT images were scored blinded and independently by a group of two nuclear medicine physicians and a group of two radiologists, respectively. For this purpose, a five-point-scale was used. The second step of data-analysis consisted of a consensus reading by both groups. During the consensus reading, first a virtual (meaning mental) fusion of PET and CT images and afterwards the 'real' fusion (meaning coregistered) PET-CT images were also scored with the same scale. The imaging results were compared with histopathology findings and the course of disease during further follow-up. Results: The total number of malignant lesions detected with the combined PET/CT were 86. For FDG-PET alone it was n=68, and for CT alone n=65. Comparing PET-CT and PET, concordance was found in 81 of 104 lesions. Discrepancies predominantly occurred in the lung, where PET alone often showed true positive results in lymph nodes and soft tissue masses, where CT often was false negative. Comparing mental fusion and 'real' co-registered images, concordance was found in 94 of 104 lesions. In 13 lesions or, respectively, in 7 of 29 patients, a relevant information was gathered using fused images

  5. Fast in vivo bioluminescence tomography using a novel pure optical imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence tomography (BLT is a novel optical molecular imaging technique that advanced the conventional planar bioluminescence imaging (BLI into a quantifiable three-dimensional (3D approach in preclinical living animal studies in oncology. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct tumor lesions inside animal body accurately, the prior structural information is commonly obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT. This strategy requires a complicated hybrid imaging system, extensive post imaging analysis and involvement of ionizing radiation. Moreover, the overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. Here, we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic (POBT system and a novel BLT workflow based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. This method can reconstruct the 3D surface of an imaging subject based on a sparse set of planar white-light and bioluminescent images, so that the prior structural information can be offered for 3D tumor lesion reconstruction without the involvement of CT. The performance of this novel technique was evaluated through the comparison with a conventional dual-modality tomographic (DMT system and a commercialized optical imaging system (IVIS Spectrum using three breast cancer xenografts. The results revealed that the new technique offered comparable in vivo tomographic accuracy with the DMT system (P>0.05 in much shorter data analysis time. It also offered significantly better accuracy comparing with the IVIS system (P<0.04 without sacrificing too much time.

  6. Imaging Atherosclerosis with Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of atherosclerosis could potentially move patient management towards individualized triage, treatment, and followup. The newly introduced combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could emerge as a key player in this context. Both...

  7. Three-dimensional multifunctional optical coherence tomography for skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, En; Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Kasaragod, Deepa; Sasaoka, Tomoko; Yamanari, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) visualizes cross-sectional microstructures of biological tissues. Recent developments of multifunctional OCT (MF-OCT) provides multiple optical contrasts which can reveal currently unknown tissue properties. In this contribution we demonstrate multifunctional OCT specially designed for dermatological investigation. And by utilizing it to measure four different body parts of in vivo human skin, three-dimensional scattering OCT, OCT angiography, polarization uniformity tomography, and local birefringence tomography images were obtained by a single scan. They respectively contrast the structure and morphology, vasculature, melanin content and collagen traits of the tissue.

  8. Spectral edge: gradient-preserving spectral mapping for image fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connah, David; Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to image fusion for color display. Our goal is to generate an output image whose gradient matches that of the input as closely as possible. We achieve this using a constrained contrast mapping paradigm in the gradient domain, where the structure tensor of a high-dimensional gradient representation is mapped exactly to that of a low-dimensional gradient field which is then reintegrated to form an output. Constraints on output colors are provided by an initial RGB rendering. Initially, we motivate our solution with a simple "ansatz" (educated guess) for projecting higher-D contrast onto color gradients, which we expand to a more rigorous theorem to incorporate color constraints. The solution to these constrained optimizations is closed-form, allowing for simple and hence fast and efficient algorithms. The approach can map any N-D image data to any M-D output and can be used in a variety of applications using the same basic algorithm. In this paper, we focus on the problem of mapping N-D inputs to 3D color outputs. We present results in five applications: hyperspectral remote sensing, fusion of color and near-infrared or clear-filter images, multilighting imaging, dark flash, and color visualization of magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-tensor imaging.

  9. Optical computed tomography for imaging the breast: first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grable, Richard J.; Ponder, Steven L.; Gkanatsios, Nikolaos A.; Dieckmann, William; Olivier, Patrick F.; Wake, Robert H.; Zeng, Yueping

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare computed tomography optical imaging with traditional breast imaging techniques. Images produced by computed tomography laser mammography (CTLMTM) scanner are compared with images obtained from mammography, and in some cases ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the CTLM procedure, a near infrared laser irradiates the breast and an array of photodiodes detectors records light scattered through the breast tissue. The laser and detectors rotate synchronously around the breast to acquire a series of slice data along the coronal place. The procedure is performed without any breast compression or optical matching fluid. Cross-sectional slices of the breast are produced using a reconstruction algorithm. Reconstruction based on the diffusion theory is used to produce cross-sectional slices of the breast. Multiple slice images are combined to produce a three dimensional volumetric array of the imaged breast. This array is used to derive axial and sagittal images of the breast corresponding to cranio-caudal and medio-lateral images used in mammography. Over 200 women and 3 men have been scanned in clinical trials. The most obvious features seen in images produced by the optical tomography scanner are vascularization and significant lesions. Breast features caused by fibrocystic changes and cysts are less obvious. Breast density does not appear to be a significant factor in the quality of the image. We see correlation of the optical image structure with that seen with traditional breast imaging techniques. Further testing is being conducted to explore the sensitivity and specificity of optical tomography of the breast.

  10. Self-assessed performance improves statistical fusion of image labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, Frederick W.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Allen, Wade M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Expert manual labeling is the gold standard for image segmentation, but this process is difficult, time-consuming, and prone to inter-individual differences. While fully automated methods have successfully targeted many anatomies, automated methods have not yet been developed for numerous essential structures (e.g., the internal structure of the spinal cord as seen on magnetic resonance imaging). Collaborative labeling is a new paradigm that offers a robust alternative that may realize both the throughput of automation and the guidance of experts. Yet, distributing manual labeling expertise across individuals and sites introduces potential human factors concerns (e.g., training, software usability) and statistical considerations (e.g., fusion of information, assessment of confidence, bias) that must be further explored. During the labeling process, it is simple to ask raters to self-assess the confidence of their labels, but this is rarely done and has not been previously quantitatively studied. Herein, the authors explore the utility of self-assessment in relation to automated assessment of rater performance in the context of statistical fusion. Methods: The authors conducted a study of 66 volumes manually labeled by 75 minimally trained human raters recruited from the university undergraduate population. Raters were given 15 min of training during which they were shown examples of correct segmentation, and the online segmentation tool was demonstrated. The volumes were labeled 2D slice-wise, and the slices were unordered. A self-assessed quality metric was produced by raters for each slice by marking a confidence bar superimposed on the slice. Volumes produced by both voting and statistical fusion algorithms were compared against a set of expert segmentations of the same volumes. Results: Labels for 8825 distinct slices were obtained. Simple majority voting resulted in statistically poorer performance than voting weighted by self-assessed performance

  11. Self-assessed performance improves statistical fusion of image labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frederick W., E-mail: frederick.w.bryan@vanderbilt.edu; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Allen, Wade M. [Electrical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Reich, Daniel S. [Translational Neuroradiology Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Landman, Bennett A. [Electrical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); and Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Expert manual labeling is the gold standard for image segmentation, but this process is difficult, time-consuming, and prone to inter-individual differences. While fully automated methods have successfully targeted many anatomies, automated methods have not yet been developed for numerous essential structures (e.g., the internal structure of the spinal cord as seen on magnetic resonance imaging). Collaborative labeling is a new paradigm that offers a robust alternative that may realize both the throughput of automation and the guidance of experts. Yet, distributing manual labeling expertise across individuals and sites introduces potential human factors concerns (e.g., training, software usability) and statistical considerations (e.g., fusion of information, assessment of confidence, bias) that must be further explored. During the labeling process, it is simple to ask raters to self-assess the confidence of their labels, but this is rarely done and has not been previously quantitatively studied. Herein, the authors explore the utility of self-assessment in relation to automated assessment of rater performance in the context of statistical fusion. Methods: The authors conducted a study of 66 volumes manually labeled by 75 minimally trained human raters recruited from the university undergraduate population. Raters were given 15 min of training during which they were shown examples of correct segmentation, and the online segmentation tool was demonstrated. The volumes were labeled 2D slice-wise, and the slices were unordered. A self-assessed quality metric was produced by raters for each slice by marking a confidence bar superimposed on the slice. Volumes produced by both voting and statistical fusion algorithms were compared against a set of expert segmentations of the same volumes. Results: Labels for 8825 distinct slices were obtained. Simple majority voting resulted in statistically poorer performance than voting weighted by self-assessed performance

  12. Compact imaging Bragg spectrometer for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Jaegers, H.; Marchuk, O.

    2004-01-01

    A compact imaging x-ray spectrometer has been designed for tokamaks and stellarators to measure the plasma parameters at different spatial chords. It has been optimized for high spectral resolution and high sensitivity. High spectral resolution is obtained by using solid state detectors and minimizing the imaging errors of the spherical crystals. It is shown, that using spherical crystals the solid angle and hence the throughput can be increased significantly, without compromising the spectral resolution. The design is useful for the measurement of the spectra of He- and H-like ions from Si to Kr. The spectral resolution is sufficient for the measurement of plasma parameters. The temporal resolution is high enough for transport studies by gas puff and laser ablation experiments. The design is based on a modified Johann spectrometer mount, utilizing a spherically bent crystal instead of the cylindrically bent crystal in the traditional Johann mount. The astigmatism of the wavelength selective reflection on the spherical crystal is applied to obtain imaging of an extended plasma source on a two-dimensional detector. For each element, a separate crystal is required, only in few cases, a crystal can be used for the spectra of two elements. For the spectra of most of the He-like ions from Si up to Kr, suitable crystal cuts have been found on quartz, silicon and germanium crystals with Bragg angles in a small interval around the design value of 53.5 deg. All of the crystals have the same radius. They are fixed on a rotational table. The distance to the detector is adjusted by an x-y table to fit to the Rowland circle

  13. An efficient multiple exposure image fusion in JPEG domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbalaguppe, Ramya; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method to fuse multiple images taken with varying exposure times in the JPEG domain. The proposed algorithm finds its application in HDR image acquisition and image stabilization for hand-held devices like mobile phones, music players with cameras, digital cameras etc. Image acquisition at low light typically results in blurry and noisy images for hand-held camera's. Altering camera settings like ISO sensitivity, exposure times and aperture for low light image capture results in noise amplification, motion blur and reduction of depth-of-field respectively. The purpose of fusing multiple exposures is to combine the sharp details of the shorter exposure images with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the longer exposure images. The algorithm requires only a single pass over all images, making it efficient. It comprises of - sigmoidal boosting of shorter exposed images, image fusion, artifact removal and saturation detection. Algorithm does not need more memory than a single JPEG macro block to be kept in memory making it feasible to be implemented as the part of a digital cameras hardware image processing engine. The Artifact removal step reuses the JPEGs built-in frequency analysis and hence benefits from the considerable optimization and design experience that is available for JPEG.

  14. Development and application of PET-MRI image fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jianhua; Zhao Jinhua; Qiao Wenli

    2011-01-01

    The emerging and growing in popularity of PET-CT scanner brings us the convenience and cognizes the advantages such as diagnosis, staging, curative effect evaluation and prognosis for malignant tumor. And the PET-MRI installing maybe a new upsurge when the machine gradually mature, because of the MRI examination without the radiation exposure and with the higher soft tissue resolution. This paper summarized the developing course of image fusion technology and some researches of clinical application about PET-MRI at present, in order to help people to understand the functions and know its wide application of the upcoming new instrument, mainly focuses the application on the central nervous system and some soft tissue lesions. And before PET-MRI popularization, people can still carry out some researches of various image fusion and clinical application on the current equipment. (authors)

  15. Study on Efficiency of Fusion Techniques for IKONOS Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanmei; Yu, Haiyang; Guijun, Yang; Nie, Chenwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Ren, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Many image fusion techniques have been proposed to achieve optimal resolution in the spatial and spectral domains. Six different merging methods were listed in this paper and the efficiency of fusion techniques was assessed in qualitative and quantitative aspect. Both local and global evaluation parameters were used in the spectral quality and a Laplace filter method was used in spatial quality assessment. By simulation, the spectral quality of the images merged by Brovery was demonstrated to be the worst. In contrast, GS and PCA algorithms, especially the Pansharpening provided higher spectral quality than the standard Brovery, wavelet and CN methods. In spatial quality assessment, the CN method represented best compared with that of others, while the Brovery algorithm was worst. The wavelet parameters that performed best achieved acceptable spectral and spatial quality compared to the others

  16. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundermann, E; Lemahieu, I; Desmedt, P [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, University of Ghent, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Simulated annealing image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundermann, E.; Lemahieu, I.; Desmedt, P.

    1994-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images have to be reconstructed from moisy projection data. The noise on the PET data can be modeled by a Poison distribution. In this paper, we present the results of using the simulated annealing technique to reconstruct PET images. Various parameter settings of the simulated annealing algorithm are discussed and optimized. The reconstructed images are of good quality and high contrast, in comparison to other reconstruction techniques. (authors)

  18. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coello, Eduardo; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Bequé, Dirk; Benz, Tobias; Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina; Grandl, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  19. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coello, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.coello@tum.de [GE Global Research, Garching (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Informatikanwendungen in der Medizin & Augmented Reality, Institut für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Sperl, Jonathan I.; Bequé, Dirk [GE Global Research, Garching (Germany); Benz, Tobias [Lehrstuhl für Informatikanwendungen in der Medizin & Augmented Reality, Institut für Informatik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Cozzini, Cristina [GE Global Research, Garching (Germany); Grandl, Susanne [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  20. Preoperative magnetic resonance and intraoperative ultrasound fusion imaging for real-time neuronavigation in brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, F; Del Bene, M; Mattei, L; Lodigiani, L; DeBeni, S; Kolev, V; Vetrano, I; Solbiati, L; Sakas, G; DiMeco, F

    2015-04-01

    Brain shift and tissue deformation during surgery for intracranial lesions are the main actual limitations of neuro-navigation (NN), which currently relies mainly on preoperative imaging. Ultrasound (US), being a real-time imaging modality, is becoming progressively more widespread during neurosurgical procedures, but most neurosurgeons, trained on axial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices, lack specific US training and have difficulties recognizing anatomic structures with the same confidence as in preoperative imaging. Therefore real-time intraoperative fusion imaging (FI) between preoperative imaging and intraoperative ultrasound (ioUS) for virtual navigation (VN) is highly desirable. We describe our procedure for real-time navigation during surgery for different cerebral lesions. We performed fusion imaging with virtual navigation for patients undergoing surgery for brain lesion removal using an ultrasound-based real-time neuro-navigation system that fuses intraoperative cerebral ultrasound with preoperative MRI and simultaneously displays an MRI slice coplanar to an ioUS image. 58 patients underwent surgery at our institution for intracranial lesion removal with image guidance using a US system equipped with fusion imaging for neuro-navigation. In all cases the initial (external) registration error obtained by the corresponding anatomical landmark procedure was below 2 mm and the craniotomy was correctly placed. The transdural window gave satisfactory US image quality and the lesion was always detectable and measurable on both axes. Brain shift/deformation correction has been successfully employed in 42 cases to restore the co-registration during surgery. The accuracy of ioUS/MRI fusion/overlapping was confirmed intraoperatively under direct visualization of anatomic landmarks and the error was surgery and is less expensive and time-consuming than other intraoperative imaging techniques, offering high precision and

  1. Multi-Modality Registration And Fusion Of Medical Image Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassak, P.; Vencko, D.; Cerovsky, I.

    2008-01-01

    Digitalisation of health care providing facilities allows US to maximize the usage of digital data from one patient obtained by various modalities. Complex view on to the problem can be achieved from the site of morphology as well as functionality. Multi-modal registration and fusion of medical image data is one of the examples that provides improved insight and allows more precise approach and treatment. (author)

  2. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.; Gordon, S.; Swindell, W.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for generating a two-dimensional back-projected image of a slice of an object in tomography. The apparatus uses optical techniques to perform the functions of filtering and back projection. Central to the technique is a cylindrical drum which rotates at a fast rate and whose rotational axis tilts at a slower rate. The novel method overcomes the problem of image blurring due to motion which occurs in many tomographic techniques. It also has the advantages of being less expensive and simpler compared to tomography using digital processing techniques which require fast computers. (UK)

  3. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demi, Libertario; Van Sloun, Ruud J G; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization. (fast track communication)

  4. Model-based respiratory motion compensation for emission tomography image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, M; Malandain, G; Koulibaly, P M; Gonzalez-Ballester, M A; Darcourt, J

    2007-01-01

    In emission tomography imaging, respiratory motion causes artifacts in lungs and cardiac reconstructed images, which lead to misinterpretations, imprecise diagnosis, impairing of fusion with other modalities, etc. Solutions like respiratory gating, correlated dynamic PET techniques, list-mode data based techniques and others have been tested, which lead to improvements over the spatial activity distribution in lungs lesions, but which have the disadvantages of requiring additional instrumentation or the need of discarding part of the projection data used for reconstruction. The objective of this study is to incorporate respiratory motion compensation directly into the image reconstruction process, without any additional acquisition protocol consideration. To this end, we propose an extension to the maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm that includes a respiratory motion model, which takes into account the displacements and volume deformations produced by the respiratory motion during the data acquisition process. We present results from synthetic simulations incorporating real respiratory motion as well as from phantom and patient data

  5. Spatial, Temporal and Spectral Satellite Image Fusion via Sparse Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huihui

    Remote sensing provides good measurements for monitoring and further analyzing the climate change, dynamics of ecosystem, and human activities in global or regional scales. Over the past two decades, the number of launched satellite sensors has been increasing with the development of aerospace technologies and the growing requirements on remote sensing data in a vast amount of application fields. However, a key technological challenge confronting these sensors is that they tradeoff between spatial resolution and other properties, including temporal resolution, spectral resolution, swath width, etc., due to the limitations of hardware technology and budget constraints. To increase the spatial resolution of data with other good properties, one possible cost-effective solution is to explore data integration methods that can fuse multi-resolution data from multiple sensors, thereby enhancing the application capabilities of available remote sensing data. In this thesis, we propose to fuse the spatial resolution with temporal resolution and spectral resolution, respectively, based on sparse representation theory. Taking the study case of Landsat ETM+ (with spatial resolution of 30m and temporal resolution of 16 days) and MODIS (with spatial resolution of 250m ~ 1km and daily temporal resolution) reflectance, we propose two spatial-temporal fusion methods to combine the fine spatial information of Landsat image and the daily temporal resolution of MODIS image. Motivated by that the images from these two sensors are comparable on corresponding bands, we propose to link their spatial information on available Landsat- MODIS image pair (captured on prior date) and then predict the Landsat image from the MODIS counterpart on prediction date. To well-learn the spatial details from the prior images, we use a redundant dictionary to extract the basic representation atoms for both Landsat and MODIS images based on sparse representation. Under the scenario of two prior Landsat

  6. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studi...... technical solutions are being pursued to further improve the quality of the images and the data provided, and OCT is being integrated in multimodal imaging devices that would potentially be able to provide a quantum leap to the imaging of skin in vivo....

  7. Radionuclide imaging with coded apertures and three-dimensional image reconstruction from focal-plane tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.T.

    1976-05-01

    Two techniques for radionuclide imaging and reconstruction have been studied;; both are used for improvement of depth resolution. The first technique is called coded aperture imaging, which is a technique of tomographic imaging. The second technique is a special 3-D image reconstruction method which is introduced as an improvement to the so called focal-plane tomography

  8. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  9. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falen, Steven W [Carmichael, CA; Hoefer, Richard A [Newport News, VA; Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; McKisson, John [Hampton, VA; Kross, Brian [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Stolin, Alexander [Newport News, VA; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  10. Research on Methods of Infrared and Color Image Fusion Based on Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Rentao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is significant difference in the imaging features of infrared image and color image, but their fusion images also have very good complementary information. In this paper, based on the characteristics of infrared image and color image, first of all, wavelet transform is applied to the luminance component of the infrared image and color image. In multi resolution the relevant regional variance is regarded as the activity measure, relevant regional variance ratio as the matching measure, and the fusion image is enhanced in the process of integration, thus getting the fused images by final synthesis module and multi-resolution inverse transform. The experimental results show that the fusion image obtained by the method proposed in this paper is better than the other methods in keeping the useful information of the original infrared image and the color information of the original color image. In addition, the fusion image has stronger adaptability and better visual effect.

  11. Image registration/fusion software for PET and CT/MRI by using simultaneous emission and transmission scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Sato, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takeshi; Konishi, Norihiro; Komatsu, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    When PET (positron emission tomography) is used for oncology studies, it is important to register and over-lay PET images with the images of other anatomical modalities, such as those obtained by CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), in order for the lesions to be anatomically located with high accuracy. The Shimadzu SET-2000W Series PET scanners provide simultaneous acquisition of emission and transmission data, which is capable of complete spatial alignment of both functional and attenuation images. This report describes our newly developed image registration/fusion software, which reformats PET emission images to the CT/MRI grid by using the transform matrix obtained by matching PET transmission images with CT/MRI images. Transmission images are registered and fused either automatically or manually, through 3-dimensional rotation and translation, with the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal fused images being monitored on the screen. This new method permits sufficiently accurate registration and efficient data processing with promoting effective use of CT/MRI images of the DICOM format, without using markers in data acquisition or any special equipment, such as a combined PET/CT scanner. (author)

  12. The impact of image fusion in resolving discrepant findings between FDG-PET and MRI/CT in patients with gynaecological cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Chien; Kao, Pan-Fu; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Hong, Ji-Hong; Ng, Koon-Kwan; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Hsueh, Swei

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to prospectively investigate the impact of image fusion in resolving discrepant findings between fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or X-ray computed tomography (CT) in patients with gynaecological cancers. Discrepant findings were defined as lesions where the difference between the FDG-PET and MRI/CT images was assigned a value of at least 2 on a 5-point probability scale. The FDG-PET and MRI/CT images were taken within 1 month of each other. Image fusion between FDG-PET and CT was performed by automatic registration between the two images. During an 18-month period, 34 malignant lesions and seven benign lesions from 32 patients who had undergone either surgical excision or a CT-guided histopathological investigation were included for analysis. Among these cases, image fusion was most frequently required to determine the nature and/or the extent of abdominal and pelvic lesions (28/41, 68%), especially as regards peritoneal seeding (8/41, 20%). Image fusion was most useful in providing better localisation for biopsy (16/41, 39%) and in discriminating between lesions with pathological versus physiological FDG uptake (12/41, 29%). Image fusion changed the original diagnosis based on MRI/CT alone in 9/41 lesions (22%), and the original diagnosis based on FDG-PET alone in 5/41 lesions (12%). It led to alteration of treatment planning (surgery or radiotherapy) in seven of the 32 patients (22%). In patients with gynaecological cancers, the technique of image fusion is helpful in discriminating the nature of FDG-avid lesions, in effectively localising lesions for CT-guided biopsy and in providing better surgical or radiotherapy planning. (orig.)

  13. Image quality and dose in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurik, A.G.; Jessen, K.A.; Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation exposure to the patient during CT is relatively high, and it is therefore important to optimize the dose so that it is as low as possible but still consistent with required diagnostic image quality. There is no established method for measuring diagnostic image quality; therefore, a set of image quality criteria which must be fulfilled for optimal image quality was defined for the retroperitoneal space and the mediastinum. The use of these criteria for assessment of image quality was tested based on 113 retroperitoneal and 68 mediastinal examinations performed in seven different CT units. All the criteria, except one, were found to be usable for measuring diagnostic image quality. The fulfilment of criteria was related to the radiation dose given in the different departments. By examination of the retroperitoneal space the effective dose varied between 5.1 and 20.0 mSv (milli Sievert), and there was a slight correlation between dose and high percent of ''yes'' score for the image quality criteria. For examination of the mediastinum the dose range was 4.4-26.5 mSv, and there was no significant increment of image quality at high doses. The great variation of dose at different CT units was due partly to differences regarding the examination procedure, especially the number of slices and the mAs (milli ampere second), but inherent dose variation between different scanners also played a part. (orig.). With 6 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Multiscale infrared and visible image fusion using gradient domain guided image filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Jin, Weiqi; Li, Li; Han, Zhenghao; Wang, Xia

    2018-03-01

    For better surveillance with infrared and visible imaging, a novel hybrid multiscale decomposition fusion method using gradient domain guided image filtering (HMSD-GDGF) is proposed in this study. In this method, hybrid multiscale decomposition with guided image filtering and gradient domain guided image filtering of source images are first applied before the weight maps of each scale are obtained using a saliency detection technology and filtering means with three different fusion rules at different scales. The three types of fusion rules are for small-scale detail level, large-scale detail level, and base level. Finally, the target becomes more salient and can be more easily detected in the fusion result, with the detail information of the scene being fully displayed. After analyzing the experimental comparisons with state-of-the-art fusion methods, the HMSD-GDGF method has obvious advantages in fidelity of salient information (including structural similarity, brightness, and contrast), preservation of edge features, and human visual perception. Therefore, visual effects can be improved by using the proposed HMSD-GDGF method.

  15. HALO: a reconfigurable image enhancement and multisensor fusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.; Hickman, D. L.; Parker, Steve J.

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary high definition (HD) cameras and affordable infrared (IR) imagers are set to dramatically improve the effectiveness of security, surveillance and military vision systems. However, the quality of imagery is often compromised by camera shake, or poor scene visibility due to inadequate illumination or bad atmospheric conditions. A versatile vision processing system called HALO™ is presented that can address these issues, by providing flexible image processing functionality on a low size, weight and power (SWaP) platform. Example processing functions include video distortion correction, stabilisation, multi-sensor fusion and image contrast enhancement (ICE). The system is based around an all-programmable system-on-a-chip (SoC), which combines the computational power of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) with the flexibility of a CPU. The FPGA accelerates computationally intensive real-time processes, whereas the CPU provides management and decision making functions that can automatically reconfigure the platform based on user input and scene content. These capabilities enable a HALO™ equipped reconnaissance or surveillance system to operate in poor visibility, providing potentially critical operational advantages in visually complex and challenging usage scenarios. The choice of an FPGA based SoC is discussed, and the HALO™ architecture and its implementation are described. The capabilities of image distortion correction, stabilisation, fusion and ICE are illustrated using laboratory and trials data.

  16. Hybrid Histogram Descriptor: A Fusion Feature Representation for Image Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qinghe; Hao, Qiaohong; Chen, Yuqi; Yi, Yugen; Wei, Ying; Dai, Jiangyan

    2018-06-15

    Currently, visual sensors are becoming increasingly affordable and fashionable, acceleratingly the increasing number of image data. Image retrieval has attracted increasing interest due to space exploration, industrial, and biomedical applications. Nevertheless, designing effective feature representation is acknowledged as a hard yet fundamental issue. This paper presents a fusion feature representation called a hybrid histogram descriptor (HHD) for image retrieval. The proposed descriptor comprises two histograms jointly: a perceptually uniform histogram which is extracted by exploiting the color and edge orientation information in perceptually uniform regions; and a motif co-occurrence histogram which is acquired by calculating the probability of a pair of motif patterns. To evaluate the performance, we benchmarked the proposed descriptor on RSSCN7, AID, Outex-00013, Outex-00014 and ETHZ-53 datasets. Experimental results suggest that the proposed descriptor is more effective and robust than ten recent fusion-based descriptors under the content-based image retrieval framework. The computational complexity was also analyzed to give an in-depth evaluation. Furthermore, compared with the state-of-the-art convolutional neural network (CNN)-based descriptors, the proposed descriptor also achieves comparable performance, but does not require any training process.

  17. Image correction for computed tomography to remove crosstalk artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, K.F.

    1990-01-01

    A correction method and apparatus for Computed Tomography (CT) which removes ring and streak artifacts from images by correcting for data contamination by crosstalk errors comprises subtracting from the output S o of a detector, a crosstalk factor derived from outputs of adjacent detectors. The crosstalk factors are obtained by scanning an off-centre phantom. (author)

  18. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-11-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using YF-2-deoxyglucose.

  19. MR imaging and positron emission tomography of cortical heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Theodore, W.H.; Holmes, M.D.; Dorwart, R.H.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Heterotopia of the gray matter is a developmental malformation in which ectopic cortex is found in the white matter of the brain. A case of a 33-year-old man with cortical heterotopia who had a lifelong history of seizures and psychomotor retardation is reported, including the results of cerebral CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography using 18 F-2-deoxyglucose

  20. Application of seismic refraction tomography for subsurface imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seismic refraction tomography involves the measurement of the travel times of seismic refracted raypaths in order to define an image of seismic velocity in the intervening ground. This technique was used to estimate the depth to the fresh basement, estimate thickness of the weathered basement and to determine the ...

  1. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...

  2. Use of computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjoerstad, K.

    1992-01-01

    This is a neurologist's opinion on how computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have improved the doctor's diagnostic possibilities, changed patient/doctor relationship and increased the patients' expectations from diagnostic tests. How should the often conflicting interests of patients, society and doctors be handled? 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  4. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  5. Multimodality imaging: transfer and fusion of SPECT and MRI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesaurek, K.

    1994-01-01

    Image fusion is a technique which offers the best of both worlds. It unites the two basic types of medical images: functional body images(PET or SPECT scans), which provide physiological information, and structural images (CT or MRI), which provide an anatomic map of the body. Control-point based registration technique was developed and used. Tc-99m point sources were used as external markers in SPECT studies while, for MRI and CT imaging only anatomic landmarks were used as a control points. The MRI images were acquired on GE Signa 1.2 system and CT data on a GE 9800 scanner. SPECT studies were performed 1h after intravenous injection of the 740 MBq of the Tc-99m-HMPAO on the triple-headed TRIONIX gamma camera. B-spline and bilinear interpolation were used for the rotation, scaling and translation of the images. In the process of creation of a single composite image, in order to retain information from the individual images, MRI (or CT) image was scaled to one color range and a SPECT image to another. In some situations the MRI image was kept black-and-white while the SPECT image was pasted on top of it in 'opaque' mode. Most errors which propagate through the matching process are due to sample size, imperfection of the acquisition system, noise and interpolations used. Accuracy of the registration was investigated by SPECT-CT study performed on a phantom study. The results has shown that accuracy of the matching process is better, or at worse, equal to 2 mm. (author)

  6. Intranasal dexmedetomidine for sedation for pediatric computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekitarian Filho, Eduardo; Robinson, Fay; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Mason, Keira P

    2015-05-01

    This prospective observational pilot study evaluated the aerosolized intranasal route for dexmedetomidine as a safe, effective, and efficient option for infant and pediatric sedation for computed tomography imaging. The mean time to sedation was 13.4 minutes, with excellent image quality, no failed sedations, or significant adverse events. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01900405. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Muon tomography imaging improvement using optimized limited angle data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Simon, Sean; Kindem, Joel; Luo, Weidong; Sossong, Michael J.; Steiger, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Image resolution of muon tomography is limited by the range of zenith angles of cosmic ray muons and the flux rate at sea level. Low flux rate limits the use of advanced data rebinning and processing techniques to improve image quality. By optimizing the limited angle data, however, image resolution can be improved. To demonstrate the idea, physical data of tungsten blocks were acquired on a muon tomography system. The angular distribution and energy spectrum of muons measured on the system was also used to generate simulation data of tungsten blocks of different arrangement (geometry). The data were grouped into subsets using the zenith angle and volume images were reconstructed from the data subsets using two algorithms. One was a distributed PoCA (point of closest approach) algorithm and the other was an accelerated iterative maximal likelihood/expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm. Image resolution was compared for different subsets. Results showed that image resolution was better in the vertical direction for subsets with greater zenith angles and better in the horizontal plane for subsets with smaller zenith angles. The overall image resolution appeared to be the compromise of that of different subsets. This work suggests that the acquired data can be grouped into different limited angle data subsets for optimized image resolution in desired directions. Use of multiple images with resolution optimized in different directions can improve overall imaging fidelity and the intended applications.

  8. Variabilities of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-, Computed Tomography-, and Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography-Based Tumor and Lymph Node Delineations for Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Kishor; Saraiya, Siddharth; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Jan, Nuzhat; Schuster, Jessica; Schutzer, Matthew; Fahrner, Lester; Groves, Robert; Olsen, Kathryn M; Ford, John C; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2017-09-01

    To investigate interobserver delineation variability for gross tumor volumes of primary lung tumors and associated pathologic lymph nodes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to compare the results with computed tomography (CT) alone- and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT-based delineations. Seven physicians delineated the tumor volumes of 10 patients for the following scenarios: (1) CT only, (2) PET-CT fusion images registered to CT ("clinical standard"), and (3) postcontrast T1-weighted MRI registered with diffusion-weighted MRI. To compute interobserver variability, the median surface was generated from all observers' contours and used as the reference surface. A physician labeled the interface types (tumor to lung, atelectasis (collapsed lung), hilum, mediastinum, or chest wall) on the median surface. Contoured volumes and bidirectional local distances between individual observers' contours and the reference contour were analyzed. Computed tomography- and MRI-based tumor volumes normalized relative to PET-CT-based volumes were 1.62 ± 0.76 (mean ± standard deviation) and 1.38 ± 0.44, respectively. Volume differences between the imaging modalities were not significant. Between observers, the mean normalized volumes per patient averaged over all patients varied significantly by a factor of 1.6 (MRI) and 2.0 (CT and PET-CT) (P=4.10 × 10 -5 to 3.82 × 10 -9 ). The tumor-atelectasis interface had a significantly higher variability than other interfaces for all modalities combined (P=.0006). The interfaces with the smallest uncertainties were tumor-lung (on CT) and tumor-mediastinum (on PET-CT and MRI). Although MRI-based contouring showed overall larger variability than PET-CT, contouring variability depended on the interface type and was not significantly different between modalities, despite the limited observer experience with MRI. Multimodality imaging and combining different imaging characteristics might be the best approach to define

  9. Thought–shape fusion and body image in eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera,1 Patricia Bolaños-Ríos,2 Inmaculada Ruiz-Prieto21Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain; 2Behavioral Sciences Institute, Seville, SpainPurpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships among thought–shape fusion (TSF, specific instruments to assess body image disturbances, and body image quality of life in eating disorder patients in order to improve the understanding of the links between body image concerns and a specific bias consisting of beliefs about the consequences of thinking about forbidden foods.Patients and methods: The final sample included 76 eating disorder patients (mean age 20.13 ± 2.28 years; 59 women and seven men. After having obtained informed consent, the following questionnaires were administered: Body Appreciation Scale (BAS, Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP, Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R and Thought-Shape Fusion Questionnaire (TSF-Q.Results: Significant correlations were found between TSF-Q and body image-related variables. Those with higher scores in TSF showed higher scores in the BSQ (P < 0.0001, Eating Disorder Inventory – Drive for Thinness (EDI-DT (P < 0.0001, and Eating Disorder Inventory – Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-BD (P < 0.0001. The same patients showed lower scores in the BAS (P < 0.0001. With respect to the psychopathological variables, patients with high TSF obtained higher scores in all SCL-90-R subscales as well as in the STAI.Conclusion: The current study shows the interrelations among different body image-related variables, TSF, and body image quality of life.Keywords: cognitive distortions, quality of life, body appreciation, psychopathology, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa

  10. [Research progress of multi-model medical image fusion and recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Lu, Huiling; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ma, Jingxian

    2013-10-01

    Medical image fusion and recognition has a wide range of applications, such as focal location, cancer staging and treatment effect assessment. Multi-model medical image fusion and recognition are analyzed and summarized in this paper. Firstly, the question of multi-model medical image fusion and recognition is discussed, and its advantage and key steps are discussed. Secondly, three fusion strategies are reviewed from the point of algorithm, and four fusion recognition structures are discussed. Thirdly, difficulties, challenges and possible future research direction are discussed.

  11. Robust Tomato Recognition for Robotic Harvesting Using Feature Images Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanshen Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic recognition of mature fruits in a complex agricultural environment is still a challenge for an autonomous harvesting robot due to various disturbances existing in the background of the image. The bottleneck to robust fruit recognition is reducing influence from two main disturbances: illumination and overlapping. In order to recognize the tomato in the tree canopy using a low-cost camera, a robust tomato recognition algorithm based on multiple feature images and image fusion was studied in this paper. Firstly, two novel feature images, the  a*-component image and the I-component image, were extracted from the L*a*b* color space and luminance, in-phase, quadrature-phase (YIQ color space, respectively. Secondly, wavelet transformation was adopted to fuse the two feature images at the pixel level, which combined the feature information of the two source images. Thirdly, in order to segment the target tomato from the background, an adaptive threshold algorithm was used to get the optimal threshold. The final segmentation result was processed by morphology operation to reduce a small amount of noise. In the detection tests, 93% target tomatoes were recognized out of 200 overall samples. It indicates that the proposed tomato recognition method is available for robotic tomato harvesting in the uncontrolled environment with low cost.

  12. Robust Tomato Recognition for Robotic Harvesting Using Feature Images Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanshen; Gong, Liang; Huang, Yixiang; Liu, Chengliang

    2016-01-29

    Automatic recognition of mature fruits in a complex agricultural environment is still a challenge for an autonomous harvesting robot due to various disturbances existing in the background of the image. The bottleneck to robust fruit recognition is reducing influence from two main disturbances: illumination and overlapping. In order to recognize the tomato in the tree canopy using a low-cost camera, a robust tomato recognition algorithm based on multiple feature images and image fusion was studied in this paper. Firstly, two novel feature images, the  a*-component image and the I-component image, were extracted from the L*a*b* color space and luminance, in-phase, quadrature-phase (YIQ) color space, respectively. Secondly, wavelet transformation was adopted to fuse the two feature images at the pixel level, which combined the feature information of the two source images. Thirdly, in order to segment the target tomato from the background, an adaptive threshold algorithm was used to get the optimal threshold. The final segmentation result was processed by morphology operation to reduce a small amount of noise. In the detection tests, 93% target tomatoes were recognized out of 200 overall samples. It indicates that the proposed tomato recognition method is available for robotic tomato harvesting in the uncontrolled environment with low cost.

  13. Enhancement of positron emission tomography-computed tomography image quality using the principle of stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Patel, Chetan; Sarkar, Kaushik; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of higher counts improves visual perception of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) image. Larger radiopharmaceutical doses (implies more radiation dose) are administered to acquire this count in a short time period. However, diagnostic information does not increase after a certain threshold of counts. This study was conducted to develop a post processing method based on principle of “stochastic resonance” to improve visual perception of the PET-CT image having a required threshold counts. PET-CT images (JPEG file format) with low, medium, and high counts in the image were included in this study. The image was corrupted with the addition of Poisson noise. The amplitude of the Poisson noise was adjusted by dividing each pixel by a constant 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32. The best amplitude of the noise that gave best images quality was selected based on high value of entropy of the output image, high value of structural similarity index and feature similarity index. Visual perception of the image was evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians. The variation in structural and feature similarity of the image was not appreciable visually, but statistically images deteriorated as the noise amplitude increases although maintaining structural (above 70%) and feature (above 80%) similarity of input images in all cases. We obtained the best image quality at noise amplitude “4” in which 88% structural and 95% feature similarity of the input images was retained. This method of stochastic resonance can be used to improve the visual perception of the PET-CT image. This can indirectly lead to reduction of radiation dose

  14. Image-reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W; CERN. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    Physics and mathematics for medical imaging In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-rays but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes and nuclear magnetic resonance. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimentional distributions to be reconstructed from projection data acquired by radiation detectors suitably positioned around the patient will be described in detail. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simpleradiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo boichemistry. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function that are cur...

  15. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography for imaging the tympanic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Anke; Walther, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Bornitz, Matthias; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality that enables micrometer-scale contactless subsurface imaging of biological tissue. Endoscopy, as another imaging method, has the potential of imaging tubular organs and cavities and therefore has opened up several application areas not accessible before. The combination of OCT and endoscopy uses the advantages of both methods and consequently allows additional imaging of structures beneath surfaces inside cavities. Currently, visual investigations on the surface of the human tympanic membrane are possible but only with expert eyes. up to now, visual imaging of the outer ear up to the tympanic membrane can be carried out by an otoscope, an operating microscope or an endoscope. In contrast to these devices, endoscopy has the advantage of imaging the whole tympanic membrane with one view. The intention of this research is the development of an endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) device for imaging the tympanic membrane depth-resolved and structures behind it. Detection of fluids in the middle ear, which function as an indicator for otitis media, could help to avoid the application of antibiotics. It is possible to detect a congeries of fluids with the otoscope but the ambition is to the early detection by OCT. The developed scanner head allows imaging in working distances in the range from zero up to 5 mm with a field of view of 2 mm. In the next step, the scanner head should be improved to increase the working distance and the field of view.

  16. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  17. Optical asymmetric watermarking using modified wavelet fusion and diffractive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Isha; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2015-05-01

    In most of the existing image encryption algorithms the generated keys are in the form of a noise like distribution with a uniform distributed histogram. However, the noise like distribution is an apparent sign indicating the presence of the keys. If the keys are to be transferred through some communication channels, then this may lead to a security problem. This is because; the noise like features may easily catch people's attention and bring more attacks. To address this problem it is required to transfer the keys to some other meaningful images to disguise the attackers. The watermarking schemes are complementary to image encryption schemes. In most of the iterative encryption schemes, support constraints play an important role of the keys in order to decrypt the meaningful data. In this article, we have transferred the support constraints which are generated by axial translation of CCD camera using amplitude-, and phase- truncation approach, into different meaningful images. This has been done by developing modified fusion technique in wavelet transform domain. The second issue is, in case, the meaningful images are caught by the attacker then how to solve the copyright protection. To resolve this issue, watermark detection plays a crucial role. For this purpose, it is necessary to recover the original image using the retrieved watermarks/support constraints. To address this issue, four asymmetric keys have been generated corresponding to each watermarked image to retrieve the watermarks. For decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is applied to extract the plain-texts from corresponding retrieved watermarks.

  18. Fusion of PET and MRI for Hybrid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang-Hee; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Young-Bo; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    Recently, the development of the fusion PET-MRI system has been actively studied to meet the increasing demand for integrated molecular and anatomical imaging. MRI can provide detailed anatomical information on the brain, such as the locations of gray and white matter, blood vessels, axonal tracts with high resolution, while PET can measure molecular and genetic information, such as glucose metabolism, neurotransmitter-neuroreceptor binding and affinity, protein-protein interactions, and gene trafficking among biological tissues. State-of-the-art MRI systems, such as the 7.0 T whole-body MRI, now can visualize super-fine structures including neuronal bundles in the pons, fine blood vessels (such as lenticulostriate arteries) without invasive contrast agents, in vivo hippocampal substructures, and substantia nigra with excellent image contrast. High-resolution PET, known as High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), is a brain-dedicated system capable of imaging minute changes of chemicals, such as neurotransmitters and -receptors, with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. The synergistic power of the two, i.e., ultra high-resolution anatomical information offered by a 7.0 T MRI system combined with the high-sensitivity molecular information offered by HRRT-PET, will significantly elevate the level of our current understanding of the human brain, one of the most delicate, complex, and mysterious biological organs. This chapter introduces MRI, PET, and PET-MRI fusion system, and its algorithms are discussed in detail.

  19. Region-based multifocus image fusion for the precise acquisition of Pap smear images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Mijares, Santiago; Bescós, Jesús

    2018-05-01

    A multifocus image fusion method to obtain a single focused image from a sequence of microscopic high-magnification Papanicolau source (Pap smear) images is presented. These images, captured each in a different position of the microscope lens, frequently show partially focused cells or parts of cells, which makes them unpractical for the direct application of image analysis techniques. The proposed method obtains a focused image with a high preservation of original pixels information while achieving a negligible visibility of the fusion artifacts. The method starts by identifying the best-focused image of the sequence; then, it performs a mean-shift segmentation over this image; the focus level of the segmented regions is evaluated in all the images of the sequence, and best-focused regions are merged in a single combined image; finally, this image is processed with an adaptive artifact removal process. The combination of a region-oriented approach, instead of block-based approaches, and a minimum modification of the value of focused pixels in the original images achieve a highly contrasted image with no visible artifacts, which makes this method especially convenient for the medical imaging domain. The proposed method is compared with several state-of-the-art alternatives over a representative dataset. The experimental results show that our proposal obtains the best and more stable quality indicators. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Image reconstruction methods in positron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.; Defrise, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the two decades since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology, medical imaging techniques have become widely established as essential tools in the diagnosis of disease. As a consequence of recent technological and mathematical advances, the non-invasive, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs such as the brain and the heart is now possible, not only for anatomical investigations using X-ray but also for studies which explore the functional status of the body using positron-emitting radioisotopes. This report reviews the historical and physical basis of medical imaging techniques using positron-emitting radioisotopes. Mathematical methods which enable three-dimensional distributions of radioisotopes to be reconstructed from projection data (sinograms) acquired by detectors suitably positioned around the patient are discussed. The extension of conventional two-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithms to fully three-dimensional reconstruction is described in detail. (orig.)

  1. A method based on IHS cylindrical transform model for quality assessment of image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaokun; Jia, Yonghong

    2005-10-01

    Image fusion technique has been widely applied to remote sensing image analysis and processing, and methods for quality assessment of image fusion in remote sensing have also become the research issues at home and abroad. Traditional assessment methods combine calculation of quantitative indexes and visual interpretation to compare fused images quantificationally and qualitatively. However, in the existing assessment methods, there are two defects: on one hand, most imdexes lack the theoretic support to compare different fusion methods. On the hand, there is not a uniform preference for most of the quantitative assessment indexes when they are applied to estimate the fusion effects. That is, the spatial resolution and spectral feature could not be analyzed synchronously by these indexes and there is not a general method to unify the spatial and spectral feature assessment. So in this paper, on the basis of the approximate general model of four traditional fusion methods, including Intensity Hue Saturation(IHS) triangle transform fusion, High Pass Filter(HPF) fusion, Principal Component Analysis(PCA) fusion, Wavelet Transform(WT) fusion, a correlation coefficient assessment method based on IHS cylindrical transform is proposed. By experiments, this method can not only get the evaluation results of spatial and spectral features on the basis of uniform preference, but also can acquire the comparison between fusion image sources and fused images, and acquire differences among fusion methods. Compared with the traditional assessment methods, the new methods is more intuitionistic, and in accord with subjective estimation.

  2. A novel fusion imaging system for endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruionu, Lucian Gheorghe; Saftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Navigation of a flexible endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) probe inside the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is problematic due to the small window size and complex anatomy. The goal of the present study was to test the feasibility of a novel fusion imaging (FI) system which uses...... time was 24.6 ± 6.6 min, while the time to reach the clinical target was 8.7 ± 4.2 min. CONCLUSIONS: The FI system is feasible for clinical use, and can reduce the learning curve for EUS procedures and improve navigation and targeting in difficult anatomic locations....

  3. The imaging science of positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.

    1996-01-01

    To meet the goals of converging molecular imaging with molecular biology and molecular medicine, there is a need to define the strategy and structure for perfecting the accuracy of functional images derived using PET. This also relates directly to how clinical research, diagnostic questions and challenges from the pharmaceutical industry are addressed. In order to exploit the sensitivity and specificity of PET, an integrated, multidisciplinary approach is imperative. The structure to provide this needs to been seen in the context of an institutional approach, collaborations within the academic and industrial sectors and the funding needed to meet the challenges of addressing difficult questions. (orig.)

  4. Reflection tomography from pre-stack migrated images; Tomographie de reflexion a partir des images migrees avant addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, F

    1996-10-29

    The application of reflection tomography to data from complex geological structures is very interesting in the hydrocarbons exploration. Indeed, it contributes to localize the hydrocarbons potential traps. The used reflection tomography method is faced with two major difficulties. Travel time picking is difficult or impossible in seismic time sections. The processing of multiple arrival travel times needs an adequate formulation of reflection tomography. In order to solve the first problem, we adopt the approach of the SMART (Sequential Migration Aided Reflection Tomography) method which is an original method for the implementation of migration velocity analysis. The velocity model is automatically calculated by reflection tomography. The kinematic data set for reflection tomography is constructed from pre-stack depth-migrated images that are interpreted in the chosen migration configuration. For the implementation of the SMART method in the common-offset domain, we propose an original formulation of reflection tomography that takes multiple arrival travel times, which are calculated from common-offset migrated images, into account. In this new formulation, we look for a model such that a modelling, which consists in shooting in this model from the source locations with some ray parameters at the source, matches some emergence conditions: for each offset, the rays emerge at the receiver locations (given by the offset) with the same travel times and the same travel time slopes as observed in the associated common-offset section. These conditions constitute the kinematic data set for tomographic inversion. The common-offset travel time slope is the difference between the ray parameter at the receiver and the ray parameter at the source. Therefore, the ray parameter at the source is an unknown and has to be determined together with the model parameters during inversion. (author)

  5. Dental calculus image based on optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the dental calculus was characterized and imaged by means of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum and calculus were measured as 1.625+/-0.024, 1.534+/-0.029, 1.570+/-0.021 and 1.896+/-0.085, respectively. The dental calculus lead strong scattering property and thus the region can be identified under enamel with SSOCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus was covered by gingiva tissue as in vitro sample for SSOCT imaging.

  6. Small-Animal Imaging Using Diffuse Fluorescence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott C; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) has been developed to image the spatial distribution of fluorescence-tagged tracers in living tissue. This capability facilitates the recovery of any number of functional parameters, including enzymatic activity, receptor density, blood flow, and gene expression. However, deploying DFT effectively is complex and often requires years of know-how, especially for newer mutlimodal systems that combine DFT with conventional imaging systems. In this chapter, we step through the process of using MRI-DFT imaging of a receptor-targeted tracer in small animals.

  7. Practical approach to ultrasonic imaging using diffraction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witten, A.; Tuggle, J.; Waag, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for ultrasonic imaging based on the theory of diffraction tomography is presented. The method utilizes a fixed, circular configuration of transmitters and detectors. This configuration was selected because it avoids many practical limitations associated with the design of a medical imaging device. Practical considerations also motivated the inclusion of effects associated with the transmitter beam pattern rather than pursuing the more conventional approach in which plane-wave illumination is required. In addition, the problem of separately imaging both density and compressibility variations is considered

  8. Practical approach to ultrasonic imaging using diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witten, A.; Tuggle, J.; Waag, R.C.

    1988-04-01

    A technique for ultrasonic imaging based on the theory of diffraction tomography is presented. The method utilizes a fixed, circular configuration of transmitters and detectors. This configuration was selected because it avoids many practical limitations associated with the design of a medical imaging device. Practical considerations also motivated the inclusion of effects associated with the transmitter beam pattern rather than pursuing the more conventional approach in which plane-wave illumination is required. In addition, the problem of separately imaging both density and compressibility variations is considered.

  9. IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF IN VIVOBLOOD VESSELS USING IMAGE FUSION METHODS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Kryger; Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Sørensen, Anders Stengaard

    2009-01-01

    We investigate methods for improving the visual quality of in vivo images of blood vessels in the human forearm. Using a near-infrared light source and a dual CCD chip camera system capable of capturing images at visual and nearinfrared spectra, we evaluate three fusion methods in terms...... of their capability of enhancing the blood vessels while preserving the spectral signature of the original color image. Furthermore, we investigate a possibility of removing hair in the images using a fusion rule based on the "a trous" stationary wavelet decomposition. The method with the best overall performance...... with both speed and quality in mind is the Intensity Injection method. Using the developed system and the methods presented in this article, it is possible to create images of high visual quality with highly emphasized blood vessels....

  10. Analysis and Evaluation of IKONOS Image Fusion Algorithm Based on Land Cover Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia; JING; Yan; BAO

    2015-01-01

    Different fusion algorithm has its own advantages and limitations,so it is very difficult to simply evaluate the good points and bad points of the fusion algorithm. Whether an algorithm was selected to fuse object images was also depended upon the sensor types and special research purposes. Firstly,five fusion methods,i. e. IHS,Brovey,PCA,SFIM and Gram-Schmidt,were briefly described in the paper. And then visual judgment and quantitative statistical parameters were used to assess the five algorithms. Finally,in order to determine which one is the best suitable fusion method for land cover classification of IKONOS image,the maximum likelihood classification( MLC) was applied using the above five fusion images. The results showed that the fusion effect of SFIM transform and Gram-Schmidt transform were better than the other three image fusion methods in spatial details improvement and spectral information fidelity,and Gram-Schmidt technique was superior to SFIM transform in the aspect of expressing image details. The classification accuracy of the fused image using Gram-Schmidt and SFIM algorithms was higher than that of the other three image fusion methods,and the overall accuracy was greater than 98%. The IHS-fused image classification accuracy was the lowest,the overall accuracy and kappa coefficient were 83. 14% and 0. 76,respectively. Thus the IKONOS fusion images obtained by the Gram-Schmidt and SFIM were better for improving the land cover classification accuracy.

  11. Fusion of different modalities of imaging the fist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdenet, J.; Garbuio, P.; Runge, M.; Cardot, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The standard radiographical pictures are not able always to bring out the fracture of one of the fist bones. In an early study it was shown that 40% of patients presenting a suspicion of fracture and in which the radio- image was normal, have had a fracture confirmed with quantification by MRI and scintigraphy. The last one does not allow to specify the localization and consequently we developed a code to fusion entirely automatically the radiologic image and the scintigraphic image using no external marker. The code has been installed on a PC and uses the Matlab environment. Starting from the histogram processing the contours are individualized on the interpolated radio- and scinti-images. For matching there are 3 freedom degrees: one of rotation and 2 of translation (in x and y axes). The internal axes of the forearm was chosen to effect the rotation and translation. The forehand thickness, identical for each modality, allows to match properly the images. We have obtained an anatomic image on which the contour and the hyper-fixating zones of the scintigraphy are added. On a set of 100 examinations we observed 38 fractures while the difference between a fracture of the scaphoid and of another fist bone is confirmed in 93% of cases

  12. Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    multimodal imaging platforms. We have developed peptides that are specific for the FAP active site, conjugated them to the cross- bridged macrocycle 4,11...based pendant arms. Reaction with excess chelator for an extended period finally afforded 5 mg of each product in 95% purity. Additionally 5 mg...proton sponge behavior of the cross- bridged macrocycle14,15. Radiolabeled conjugates can be prepared with a specific activity of 37 MBq (1 mCi)/µg

  13. imaging volcanos with gravity and muon tomography measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourde, Kevin; Gibert, Dominique; Marteau, Jacques; Deroussi, Sébastien; Dufour, Fabrice; de Bremond d'Ars, Jean; Ianigro, Jean-Christophe; Gardien, Serge; Girerd, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Both muon tomography and gravimetry are geohysical methods that provide information on the density structure of the Earth's subsurface. Muon tomography measures the natural flux of cosmic muons and its attenuation produced by the screening effect of the rock mass to image. Gravimetry generally consists in measurements of the vertical component of the local gravity field. Both methods are linearly linked to density, but their spatial sensitivity is very different. Muon tomography essentially works like medical X-ray scan and integrates density information along elongated narrow conical volumes while gravimetry measurements are linked to density by a 3-dimensional integral encompassing the whole studied domain. We show that gravity data are almost useless to constrain the density structure in regions sampled by more than two muon tomography acquisitions. Interestingly the resolution in deeper regions not sampled by muon tomography is significantly improved by joining the two techniques. Examples taken from field experiments performed on La Soufrière of Guadeloupe volcano are discussed.

  14. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  15. Quantitative damage imaging using Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Ruan Min; Zhu Wen-Fa; Chai Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diffraction tomography for quantitative imaging damages of partly through-thickness holes with various shapes in isotropic plates by using converted and non-converted scattered Lamb waves generated numerically. Finite element simulations are carried out to provide the scattered wave data. The validity of the finite element model is confirmed by the comparison of scattering directivity pattern (SDP) of circle blind hole damage between the finite element simulations and the analytical results. The imaging method is based on a theoretical relation between the one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform of the scattered projection and two-dimensional (2D) spatial Fourier transform of the scattering object. A quantitative image of the damage is obtained by carrying out the 2D inverse Fourier transform of the scattering object. The proposed approach employs a circle transducer network containing forward and backward projections, which lead to so-called transmission mode (TMDT) and reflection mode diffraction tomography (RMDT), respectively. The reconstructed results of the two projections for a non-converted S0 scattered mode are investigated to illuminate the influence of the scattering field data. The results show that Lamb wave diffraction tomography using the combination of TMDT and RMDT improves the imaging effect compared with by using only the TMDT or RMDT. The scattered data of the converted A0 mode are also used to assess the performance of the diffraction tomography method. It is found that the circle and elliptical shaped damages can still be reasonably identified from the reconstructed images while the reconstructed results of other complex shaped damages like crisscross rectangles and racecourse are relatively poor. (special topics)

  16. Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle, Ursula; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Departments of Radiation Oncology, University of Freiburg, Robert Koch Str. 3, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang [Nuclear Medicine, University of Freiburg, Robert Koch Str. 3, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ursula.nestle@uniklinik-freiburg.de

    2009-01-07

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required. (topical review)

  17. Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Weber, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2009-01-07

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required.

  18. Pictorial review: Electron beam computed tomography and multislice spiral computed tomography for cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Klessen, Christian; Wiese, Till H.; Hoffmann, Udo; Hamm, Bernd; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) revolutionized cardiac imaging by combining a constant high temporal resolution with prospective ECG triggering. For years, EBCT was the primary technique for some non-invasive diagnostic cardiac procedures such as calcium scoring and non-invasive angiography of the coronary arteries. Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on the other hand significantly advanced cardiac imaging through high volume coverage, improved spatial resolution and retrospective ECG gating. This pictorial review will illustrate the basic differences between both modalities with special emphasis to their image quality. Several experimental and clinical examples demonstrate the strengths and limitations of both imaging modalities in an intraindividual comparison for a broad range of diagnostic applications such as coronary artery calcium scoring, coronary angiography including stent visualization as well as functional assessment of the cardiac ventricles and valves. In general, our examples indicate that EBCT suffers from a number of shortcomings such as limited spatial resolution and a low contrast-to-noise ratio. Thus, EBCT should now only be used in selected cases where a constant high temporal resolution is a crucial issue, such as dynamic (cine) imaging. Due to isotropic submillimeter spatial resolution and retrospective data selection MSCT seems to be the non-invasive method of choice for cardiac imaging in general, and for assessment of the coronary arteries in particular. However, technical developments are still needed to further improve the temporal resolution in MSCT and to reduce the substantial radiation exposure

  19. Research and Realization of Medical Image Fusion Based on Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new medical image fusion technique is presented. The method is based on three-dimensional reconstruction. After reconstruction, the three-dimensional volume data is normalized by three-dimensional coordinate conversion in the same way and intercepted through setting up cutting plane including anatomical structure, as a result two images in entire registration on space and geometry are obtained and the images are fused at last.Compared with traditional two-dimensional fusion technique, three-dimensional fusion technique can not only resolve the different problems existed in the two kinds of images, but also avoid the registration error of the two kinds of images when they have different scan and imaging parameter. The research proves this fusion technique is more exact and has no registration, so it is more adapt to arbitrary medical image fusion with different equipments.

  20. Evaluation of multimodality imaging using image fusion with ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging in an experimental animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paprottka, P M; Zengel, P; Cyran, C C; Ingrisch, M; Nikolaou, K; Reiser, M F; Clevert, D A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging by comparison to multimodality imaging using image fusion with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and conventional grey scale imaging with additional elasticity-ultrasound in an experimental small-animal-squamous-cell carcinoma-model for the assessment of tissue morphology. Human hypopharynx carcinoma cells were subcutaneously injected into the left flank of 12 female athymic nude rats. After 10 days (SD ± 2) of subcutaneous tumor growth, sonographic grey scale including elasticity imaging and MRI measurements were performed using a high-end ultrasound system and a 3T MR. For image fusion the contrast-enhanced MRI DICOM data set was uploaded in the ultrasonic device which has a magnetic field generator, a linear array transducer (6-15 MHz) and a dedicated software package (GE Logic E9), that can detect transducers by means of a positioning system. Conventional grey scale and elasticity imaging were integrated in the image fusion examination. After successful registration and image fusion the registered MR-images were simultaneously shown with the respective ultrasound sectional plane. Data evaluation was performed using the digitally stored video sequence data sets by two experienced radiologist using a modified Tsukuba Elasticity score. The colors "red and green" are assigned for an area of soft tissue, "blue" indicates hard tissue. In all cases a successful image fusion and plan registration with MRI and ultrasound imaging including grey scale and elasticity imaging was possible. The mean tumor volume based on caliper measurements in 3 dimensions was ~323 mm3. 4/12 rats were evaluated with Score I, 5/12 rates were evaluated with Score II, 3/12 rates were evaluated with Score III. There was a close correlation in the fused MRI with existing small necrosis in the tumor. None of the scored II or III lesions was visible by conventional grey scale. The comparison of ultrasound tissue elasticity imaging enables a

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography in Cancer Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ahhyun Stephanie; Vakoc, Benjamin; Blauvelt, David; Chico-Calero, Isabel

    Investigations into the biology of cancer and novel cancer therapies rely on preclinical mouse models and traditional histological endpoints. Drawbacks of this approach include a limit in the number of time points for evaluation and an increased number of animals per study. This has motivated the use of intravital microscopy, which can provide longitudinal imaging of critical tumor parameters. Here, the capabilities of OCT as an intravital microscopy of the tumor microenvironment are summarized, and the state of OCT adoption into cancer research is summarized.

  2. Photons-based medical imaging - Radiology, X-ray tomography, gamma and positrons tomography, optical imaging; Imagerie medicale a base de photons - Radiologie, tomographie X, tomographie gamma et positons, imagerie optique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanet, H.; Dinten, J.M.; Moy, J.P.; Rinkel, J. [CEA Leti, Grenoble (France); Buvat, I. [IMNC - CNRS, Orsay (France); Da Silva, A. [Institut Fresnel, Marseille (France); Douek, P.; Peyrin, F. [INSA Lyon, Lyon Univ. (France); Frija, G. [Hopital Europeen George Pompidou, Paris (France); Trebossen, R. [CEA-Service hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France)

    2010-07-01

    This book describes the different principles used in medical imaging. The detection aspects, the processing electronics and algorithms are detailed for the different techniques. This first tome analyses the photons-based techniques (X-rays, gamma rays and visible light). Content: 1 - physical background: radiation-matter interaction, consequences on detection and medical imaging; 2 - detectors for medical imaging; 3 - processing of numerical radiography images for quantization; 4 - X-ray tomography; 5 - positrons emission tomography: principles and applications; 6 - mono-photonic imaging; 7 - optical imaging; Index. (J.S.)

  3. Multi-focus Image Fusion Using Epifluorescence Microscopy for Robust Vascular Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pelapur, Rengarajan; Prasath, Surya; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2014-01-01

    We are building a computerized image analysis system for Dura Mater vascular network from fluorescence microscopy images. We propose a system that couples a multi-focus image fusion module with a robust adaptive filtering based segmentation. The robust adaptive filtering scheme handles noise without destroying small structures, and the multi focal image fusion considerably improves the overall segmentation quality by integrating information from multiple images. Based on the segmenta...

  4. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  5. Computed Tomography Imaging of the Topographical Anatomy of Canine Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimtrox, R.; Yonkova, P.; Vladova, D.; Kostov, D.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the topographical anatomy of canine prostate gland by computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic imaging purposes. ÐœATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven clinically healthy mongrel male dogs at the age of 3−4 years and body weight of 10−15 kg were submitted to transverse computerized axial tomography (CAT) with cross section thickness of 5 mm. RESULTS: The CT image of canine prostate is visualized throughout the scans of the pelvis in the planes through the first sacral vertebra (S1) dorsally; the bodies of iliac bones laterally and cranially to the pelvic brim (ventrally). The body of prostate appears as an oval homogenous relatively hypo dense finding with soft tissue density. The gland is well differentiated from the adjacent soft tissues. CONCLUSION: By means of CT, the cranial part of prostate gland in adult dogs aged 3−4 years exhibited an abdominal localization. (author)

  6. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K.; Fong, Christopher J.; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L.; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  7. A photoacoustic tomography system for imaging of biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yixiong; Zhang Fan; Xu Kexin; Yao Jianquan; Wang, Ruikang K

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a promising imaging modality in the biomedical optical imaging field. This technology, based on the intrinsic optical properties of tissue and ultrasonic detection, overcomes the resolution disadvantage of pure-optical imaging caused by strong light scattering and the contrast and speckle disadvantages of pure ultrasonic imaging. Here, we report a PAT experimental system constructed in our laboratory. In our system, a Q-switched Nd : YAG pulse laser operated at 532 nm with a 8 ns pulse width is used to generate a photoacoustic signal. By using this system, the two-dimensional distribution of optical absorption in the tissue-mimicking phantom is reconstructed and has an excellent agreement with the original ones. The spatial resolution of the imaging system approaches 100 μm through about 4 cm of highly scattering medium

  8. Image Reconstruction Algorithm For Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko

    2001-01-01

    ). Most image reconstruction algorithms for electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) use sensitivity maps as weighting factors. The computation is fast, involving a simple multiply-and- accumulate (MAC) operation, but the resulting image suffers from blurring due to the soft-field effect of the sensor. This paper presents a low cost iterative method employing proportional thresholding, which improves image quality dramatically. The strategy for implementation, computational cost, and achievable speed is examined when using a personal computer (PC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP). For PC implementation, Watcom C++ 10.6 and Visual C++ 5.0 compilers were used. The experimental results are compared to the images reconstructed by commercially available software. The new algorithm improves the image quality significantly at a cost of a few iterations. This technique can be readily exploited for online applications

  9. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium.

  10. Correlative neuroanatomy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.

    1984-01-01

    Since the development of computed tomography (CT) more than a decade ago, still another form of imaging has become available that provides displays of normal and abnormal human structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is given complete coverage in this book. It describes both CT and MR anatomy that explains basic principles and the current status of imaging the brain and spine. The author uses three-dimensional concepts to provide the reader with a simple means to compare the main structures of the brain, skull and spine. Combining normal, gross neuroanatomic illustrations with CT and MR images of normal and abnormal conditions, the book provides diagnostic guidance. Drawings, photographs and radiologic images are used to help

  11. Matrix-based image reconstruction methods for tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Meng, J.D.

    1984-10-01

    Matrix methods of image reconstruction have not been used, in general, because of the large size of practical matrices, ill condition upon inversion and the success of Fourier-based techniques. An exception is the work that has been done at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for imaging with accelerated radioactive ions. An extension of that work into more general imaging problems shows that, with a correct formulation of the problem, positron tomography with ring geometries results in well behaved matrices which can be used for image reconstruction with no distortion of the point response in the field of view and flexibility in the design of the instrument. Maximum Likelihood Estimator methods of reconstruction, which use the system matrices tailored to specific instruments and do not need matrix inversion, are shown to result in good preliminary images. A parallel processing computer structure based on multiple inexpensive microprocessors is proposed as a system to implement the matrix-MLE methods. 14 references, 7 figures

  12. Imaging with cross-hole seismoelectric tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araji, A.H.; Revil, A.; Jardani, A.; Minsley, Burke J.; Karaoulis, M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a cross-hole imaging approach based on seismoelectric conversions (SC) associated with the transmission of seismic waves from seismic sources located in a borehole to receivers (electrodes) located in a second borehole. The seismoelectric (seismic-to-electric) problem is solved using Biot theory coupled with a generalized Ohm's law with an electrokinetic streaming current contribution. The components of the displacement of the solid phase, the fluid pressure, and the electrical potential are solved using a finite element approach with Perfect Match Layer (PML) boundary conditions for the seismic waves and boundary conditions mimicking an infinite material for the electrostatic problem. We develop an inversion algorithm using the electrical disturbances recorded in the second borehole to localize the position of the heterogeneities responsible for the SC. Because of the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem (inherent to all potential-field problems), regularization is used to constrain the solution at each time in the SC-time window comprised between the time of the seismic shot and the time of the first arrival of the seismic waves in the second borehole. All the inverted volumetric current source densities are aggregated together to produce an image of the position of the heterogeneities between the two boreholes. Two simple synthetic case studies are presented to test this concept. The first case study corresponds to a vertical discontinuity between two homogeneous sub-domains. The second case study corresponds to a poroelastic inclusion (partially saturated by oil) embedded into an homogenous poroelastic formation. In both cases, the position of the heterogeneity is recovered using only the electrical disturbances associated with the SC. That said, a joint inversion of the seismic and seismoelectric data could improve these results.

  13. Imaging using cross-hole seismoelectric tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araji, A.H.; Revil, A.; Jardani, A.; Minsley, B.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new cross-hole imaging approach based on seismoelectric conversions associated with the transmission of seismic waves from seismic sources located in a borehole to receivers electrodes located in a second borehole. The seismoelectric seismic-to-electric problem is solved using Biot theory coupled with a generalized Ohm's law with an electrokinetic coupling term. The components of the displacement of the solid phase, the fluid pressure, and the electrical potential are solved using a finite element approach with PML boundary conditions for the seismic waves and boundary conditions mimicking an infinite material for the electrostatic problem. We have developed an inversion algorithm using the electrical disturbances recorded in the second borehole to localize the position of the heterogeneities responsible for the seismoelectric conversions. Because of the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem, regularization is used to constrain the solution at each time in the seismoelectric time window comprised between the time of the seismic shot and the time of the first arrival of the seismic waves in the second borehole. All the inverted volumetric current source densities are stacked to produce an image of the position of the heterogeneities between the two boreholes. Two simple synthetic case studies are presented to test this concept. The first case study corresponds to a vertical discontinuity between two homogeneous sub-domains. The second case study corresponds to a poroelastic inclusion embedded into an homogenous poroelastic formation. In both cases, the position of the heterogeneity is fairly well-recovered using only the electrical disturbances associated with the seismoelectric conversions. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  14. Submillimeter medical imaging in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, C.; Thirolf, P.G. [LMU, Muenchen (Germany); Habs, D. [LMU, Muenchen (Germany); MPQ, Garching (Germany); Zoglauer, A. [SSL, Berkeley (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, capable to reach submillimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a short exposure time and a low radioactive dose compared to conventional PET. This '{gamma}-PET' technique takes advantage of specific e{sup +} sources which simultaneously with the {beta}{sup +} decay emit an additional photon. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the additional emitted {gamma}, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. Thus the spatial uncertainty introduced by the motion of the e{sup +} or by Compton scattering within the patient can be strongly reduced in the direction normal to the annihilation. MC-simulations and image reconstruction studies have been performed using the library MEGAlib, which we modified to realize an event reconstruction using the {beta}{sup +}{gamma} coincidences. The simulated geometry consists of 4 LaBr{sub 3} scintillator crystals (5 x 5 x 3 cm{sup 3}) read out by a 2D-segmented photomultiplier (64 pixels, each 6 x 6 mm{sup 2}) and 4 double-sided silicon strip detectors (each with 2 x 128 strips, active area of 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, thickness 0.5 mm), positioned around an H{sub 2}O sphere of 6 cm diameter. Inside are two {sup 22}Na point-like test sources, placed at a distance of 0.4 mm. The resolution results in 0.2 mm (FWHM) in each direction, surpassing the performance of conventional PET by about an order of magnitude.

  15. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  16. Cardiac Computed Tomography as an Imaging Modality in Coronary Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliova, Irem; Fries, Peter; Schmidt, Jörg; Schneider, Ulrich; Shalabi, Ahmad; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    Coronary artery fistulae and coronary aneurysms are rare anomalies. When they become symptomatic, they require precise anatomic information to allow for planning of the therapeutic procedure. We report a case in which both fistulae and aneurysm were present. The required information could only be obtained by electrocardiogram-gated computed tomography with reformation. This imaging modality should be considered in every case of fistula or coronary aneurysm. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computed tomography imaging for superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobeli, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Superior semicircular canal dehiscence is a newly described syndrome of sound and/or pressure induced vertigo. Computed tomography (CT) imaging plays an important role in confirmation of a defect in the bone overlying the canal. A high resolution CT technique utilising 0.5 mm or thinner slices and multi-planar reconstructions parallel to the superior semicircular canal is required. Placement of a histogram over a suspected defect can assist CT diagnosis

  18. Image Reconstruction For Bioluminescence Tomography From Partial Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, M.; Zhou, T.; Cheng, J. T.; Cong, W. X.; Wang, Ge

    2007-01-01

    The bioluminescence tomography is a novel molecular imaging technology for small animal studies. Known reconstruction methods require the completely measured data on the external surface, although only partially measured data is available in practice. In this work, we formulate a mathematical model for BLT from partial data and generalize our previous results on the solution uniqueness to the partial data case. Then we extend two of our reconstruction methods for BLT to this case. The first m...

  19. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Smith, Ricardo Luiz; Isotani, Sadao; Alonso, Luis Garcia; Anadao, Carlos Augusto; Prates, Jose Carlos; Lederman, Henrique Manoel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm 2 of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm 2 , 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant

  20. A Geometric Dictionary Learning Based Approach for Fluorescence Spectroscopy Image Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin Zhu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, sparse representation approaches have been integrated into multi-focus image fusion methods. The fused images of sparse-representation-based image fusion methods show great performance. Constructing an informative dictionary is a key step for sparsity-based image fusion method. In order to ensure sufficient number of useful bases for sparse representation in the process of informative dictionary construction, image patches from all source images are classified into different groups based on geometric similarities. The key information of each image-patch group is extracted by principle component analysis (PCA to build dictionary. According to the constructed dictionary, image patches are converted to sparse coefficients by simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (SOMP algorithm for representing the source multi-focus images. At last the sparse coefficients are fused by Max-L1 fusion rule and inverted to fused image. Due to the limitation of microscope, the fluorescence image cannot be fully focused. The proposed multi-focus image fusion solution is applied to fluorescence imaging area for generating all-in-focus images. The comparison experimentation results confirm the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed multi-focus image fusion solution.

  1. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  2. Monotonicity-based electrical impedance tomography for lung imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liangdong; Harrach, Bastian; Seo, Jin Keun

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a monotonicity-based spatiotemporal conductivity imaging method for continuous regional lung monitoring using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The EIT data (i.e. the boundary current-voltage data) can be decomposed into pulmonary, cardiac and other parts using their different periodic natures. The time-differential current-voltage operator corresponding to the lung ventilation can be viewed as either semi-positive or semi-negative definite owing to monotonic conductivity changes within the lung regions. We used these monotonicity constraints to improve the quality of lung EIT imaging. We tested the proposed methods in numerical simulations, phantom experiments and human experiments.

  3. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Burns, H.D.; Kuhar, M.J.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5..mu..g/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 ..mu..g/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15.

  4. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5μg/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 μg/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15

  5. Positron emission tomography: Physics, instrumentation, and image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porenta, G.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources. PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and userfriendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center. (author)

  6. Spatial image modulation to improve performance of computed tomography imaging spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Johnson, William R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography imaging spectrometers ("CTIS"s) having patterns for imposing spatial structure are provided. The pattern may be imposed either directly on the object scene being imaged or at the field stop aperture. The use of the pattern improves the accuracy of the captured spatial and spectral information.

  7. Pathomorphism of spiral tibial fractures in computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    Spiral fractures of the tibia are virtually homogeneous with regard to their pathomorphism. The differences that are seen concern the level of fracture of the fibula, and, to a lesser extent, the level of fracture of the tibia, the length of fracture cleft, and limb shortening following the trauma. While conventional radiographs provide sufficient information about the pathomorphism of fractures, computed tomography can be useful in demonstrating the spatial arrangement of bone fragments and topography of soft tissues surrounding the fracture site. Multiple cross-sectional computed tomography views of spiral fractures of the tibia show the details of the alignment of bone chips at the fracture site, axis of the tibial fracture cleft, and topography of soft tissues that are not visible on standard radiographs. A model of a spiral tibial fracture reveals periosteal stretching with increasing spiral and longitudinal displacement. The cleft in tibial fractures has a spiral shape and its line is invariable. Every spiral fracture of both crural bones results in extensive damage to the periosteum and may damage bellies of the long flexor muscle of toes, flexor hallucis longus as well as the posterior tibial muscle. Computed tomography images of spiral fractures of the tibia show details of damage that are otherwise invisible on standard radiographs. Moreover, CT images provide useful information about the spatial location of the bone chips as well as possible threats to soft tissues that surround the fracture site. Every spiral fracture of the tibia is associated with disruption of the periosteum. 1. Computed tomography images of spiral fractures of the tibia show details of damage otherwise invisible on standard radiographs, 2. The sharp end of the distal tibial chip can damage the tibialis posterior muscle, long flexor muscles of the toes and the flexor hallucis longus, 3. Every spiral fracture of the tibia is associated with disruption of the periosteum.

  8. 3D imaging of nanomaterials by discrete tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenburg, K J; Bals, S; Sijbers, J; Kübel, C; Midgley, P A; Hernandez, J C; Kaiser, U; Encina, E R; Coronado, E A; Van Tendeloo, G

    2009-05-01

    The field of discrete tomography focuses on the reconstruction of samples that consist of only a few different materials. Ideally, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of such a sample should contain only one grey level for each of the compositions in the sample. By exploiting this property in the reconstruction algorithm, either the quality of the reconstruction can be improved significantly, or the number of required projection images can be reduced. The discrete reconstruction typically contains fewer artifacts and does not have to be segmented, as it already contains one grey level for each composition. Recently, a new algorithm, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), has been proposed that can be used effectively on experimental electron tomography datasets. In this paper, we propose discrete tomography as a general reconstruction method for electron tomography in materials science. We describe the basic principles of DART and show that it can be applied successfully to three different types of samples, consisting of embedded ErSi(2) nanocrystals, a carbon nanotube grown from a catalyst particle and a single gold nanoparticle, respectively.

  9. 3D imaging of nanomaterials by discrete tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batenburg, K.J.; Bals, S.; Sijbers, J.; Kuebel, C.; Midgley, P.A.; Hernandez, J.C.; Kaiser, U.; Encina, E.R.; Coronado, E.A.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2009-01-01

    The field of discrete tomography focuses on the reconstruction of samples that consist of only a few different materials. Ideally, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of such a sample should contain only one grey level for each of the compositions in the sample. By exploiting this property in the reconstruction algorithm, either the quality of the reconstruction can be improved significantly, or the number of required projection images can be reduced. The discrete reconstruction typically contains fewer artifacts and does not have to be segmented, as it already contains one grey level for each composition. Recently, a new algorithm, called discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART), has been proposed that can be used effectively on experimental electron tomography datasets. In this paper, we propose discrete tomography as a general reconstruction method for electron tomography in materials science. We describe the basic principles of DART and show that it can be applied successfully to three different types of samples, consisting of embedded ErSi 2 nanocrystals, a carbon nanotube grown from a catalyst particle and a single gold nanoparticle, respectively.

  10. Extended depth of field integral imaging using multi-focus fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Yongri; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Peihua

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for depth of field extension in integral imaging by realizing the image fusion method on the multi-focus elemental images. In the proposed method, a camera is translated on a 2D grid to take multi-focus elemental images by sweeping the focus plane across the scene. Simply applying an image fusion method on the elemental images holding rich parallax information does not work effectively because registration accuracy of images is the prerequisite for image fusion. To solve this problem an elemental image generalization method is proposed. The aim of this generalization process is to geometrically align the objects in all elemental images so that the correct regions of multi-focus elemental images can be exacted. The all-in focus elemental images are then generated by fusing the generalized elemental images using the block based fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that the depth of field of synthetic aperture integral imaging system has been extended by realizing the generation method combined with the image fusion on multi-focus elemental images in synthetic aperture integral imaging system.

  11. Effective Multifocus Image Fusion Based on HVS and BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of multifocus image fusion is to fuse the images taken from the same scene with different focuses to obtain a resultant image with all objects in focus. In this paper, a novel multifocus image fusion method based on human visual system (HVS and back propagation (BP neural network is presented. Three features which reflect the clarity of a pixel are firstly extracted and used to train a BP neural network to determine which pixel is clearer. The clearer pixels are then used to construct the initial fused image. Thirdly, the focused regions are detected by measuring the similarity between the source images and the initial fused image followed by morphological opening and closing operations. Finally, the final fused image is obtained by a fusion rule for those focused regions. Experimental results show that the proposed method can provide better performance and outperform several existing popular fusion methods in terms of both objective and subjective evaluations.

  12. Iterative methods for dose reduction and image enhancement in tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jianwei; Fahimian, Benjamin Pooya

    2012-09-18

    A system and method for creating a three dimensional cross sectional image of an object by the reconstruction of its projections that have been iteratively refined through modification in object space and Fourier space is disclosed. The invention provides systems and methods for use with any tomographic imaging system that reconstructs an object from its projections. In one embodiment, the invention presents a method to eliminate interpolations present in conventional tomography. The method has been experimentally shown to provide higher resolution and improved image quality parameters over existing approaches. A primary benefit of the method is radiation dose reduction since the invention can produce an image of a desired quality with a fewer number projections than seen with conventional methods.

  13. Cone beam computed tomography: A boon for maxillofacial imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Rao Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day to day practice, the radiographic techniques used individually or in combination suffer from some inherent limits of all planar two-dimensional (2D projections such as magnification, distortion, superimposition, and misrepresentation of anatomic structures. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region, heralds a major shift from 2D to three-dimensional (3D approach. It provides a complete 3D view of the maxilla, mandible, teeth, and supporting structures with relatively high resolution allowing a more accurate diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring, and analysis of outcomes than conventional 2D images, along with low radiation exposure to the patient. CBCT has opened up new vistas for the use of 3D imaging as a diagnostic and treatment planning tool in dentistry. This paper provides an overview of the imaging principles, underlying technology, dental applications, and in particular focuses on the emerging role of CBCT in dentistry.

  14. Regularization iteration imaging algorithm for electrical capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Guowei; Liu, Shi; Chen, Hongyan; Wang, Xueyao

    2018-03-01

    The image reconstruction method plays a crucial role in real-world applications of the electrical capacitance tomography technique. In this study, a new cost function that simultaneously considers the sparsity and low-rank properties of the imaging targets is proposed to improve the quality of the reconstruction images, in which the image reconstruction task is converted into an optimization problem. Within the framework of the split Bregman algorithm, an iterative scheme that splits a complicated optimization problem into several simpler sub-tasks is developed to solve the proposed cost function efficiently, in which the fast-iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm is introduced to accelerate the convergence. Numerical experiment results verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in improving the reconstruction precision and robustness.

  15. Imaging of the hip joint. Computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, P.; Genant, H. K.; Jergesen, H. E.; Murray, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors reviewed the applications and limitations of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of the most common hip disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive technique in detecting osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance reflects the histologic changes associated with osteonecrosis very well, which may ultimately help to improve staging. Computed tomography can more accurately identify subchondral fractures than MR imaging and thus remains important for staging. In congenital dysplasia of the hip, the position of the nonossified femoral head in children less than six months of age can only be inferred by indirect signs on CT. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates the cartilaginous femoral head directly without ionizing radiation. Computed tomography remains the imaging modality of choice for evaluating fractures of the hip joint. In some patients, MR imaging demonstrates the fracture even when it is not apparent on radiography. In neoplasm, CT provides better assessment of calcification, ossification, and periosteal reaction than MR imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging, however, represents the most accurate imaging modality for evaluating intramedullary and soft-tissue extent of the tumor and identifying involvement of neurovascular bundles. Magnetic resonance imaging can also be used to monitor response to chemotherapy. In osteoarthrosis and rheumatoid arthritis of the hip, both CT and MR provide more detailed assessment of the severity of disease than conventional radiography because of their tomographic nature. Magnetic resonance imaging is unique in evaluating cartilage degeneration and loss, and in demonstrating soft-tissue alterations such as inflammatory synovial proliferation.

  16. Correction for polychromatic aberration in computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naparstek, A.

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting a computed tomography image for polychromatic aberration caused by the non-linear interaction (i.e. the energy dependent attenuation characteristics) of different body constituents, such as bone and soft tissue, with a polychromatic X-ray beam are described in detail. An initial image is conventionally computed from path measurements made as source and detector assembly scan a body section. In the improvement, each image element of the initial computed image representing attenuation is recorded in a store and is compared with two thresholds, one representing bone and the other soft tissue. Depending on the element value relative to the thresholds, a proportion of the respective constituent is allocated to that element location and corresponding bone and soft tissue projections are determined and stored. An error projection generator calculates projections of polychromatic aberration errors in the raw image data from recalled bone and tissue projections using a multidimensional polynomial function which approximates the non-linear interaction involved. After filtering, these are supplied to an image reconstruction computer to compute image element correction values which are subtracted from raw image element values to provide a corrected reconstructed image for display. (author)

  17. Data fusion of Landsat TM and IRS images in forest classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangxing Wang; Markus Holopainen; Eero Lukkarinen

    2000-01-01

    Data fusion of Landsat TM images and Indian Remote Sensing satellite panchromatic image (IRS-1C PAN) was studied and compared to the use of TM or IRS image only. The aim was to combine the high spatial resolution of IRS-1C PAN to the high spectral resolution of Landsat TM images using a data fusion algorithm. The ground truth of the study was based on a sample of 1,020...

  18. Biodistribution and tumor imaging of an anti-CEA single-chain antibody-albumin fusion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazaki, Paul J.; Kassa, Thewodros; Cheung, Chia-wei; Crow, Desiree M.; Sherman, Mark A.; Bading, James R.; Anderson, Anne-Line J.; Colcher, David; Raubitschek, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Albumin fusion proteins have demonstrated the ability to prolong the in vivo half-life of small therapeutic proteins/peptides in the circulation and thereby potentially increase their therapeutic efficacy. To evaluate if this format can be employed for antibody-based imaging, an anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single-chain antibody(scFv)-albumin fusion protein was designed, expressed and radiolabeled for biodistribution and imaging studies in athymic mice bearing human colorectal carcinoma LS-174T xenografts. The [ 125 I]-T84.66 fusion protein demonstrated rapid tumor uptake of 12.3% injected dose per gram (ID/g) at 4 h that reached a plateau of 22.7% ID/g by 18 h. This was a dramatic increase in tumor uptake compared to 4.9% ID/g for the scFv alone. The radiometal [ 111 In]-labeled version resulted in higher tumor uptake, 37.2% ID/g at 18 h, which persisted at the tumor site with tumor: blood ratios reaching 18:1 and with normal tissues showing limited uptake. Based on these favorable imaging properties, a pilot [ 64 Cu]-positron emission tomography imaging study was performed with promising results. The anti-CEA T84.66 scFv-albumin fusion protein demonstrates highly specific tumor uptake that is comparable to cognate recombinant antibody fragments. The radiometal-labeled version, which shows lower normal tissue accumulation than these recombinant antibodies, provides a promising and novel platform for antibody-based imaging agents

  19. [The value of multimodal imaging by single photon emission computed tomography associated to X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) in the management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma: about 156 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhiri, Aida; El Bez, Intidhar; Slim, Ihsen; Meddeb, Imène; Yeddes, Imene; Ghezaiel, Mohamed; Gritli, Saïd; Ben Slimène, Mohamed Faouzi

    2013-10-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography combined with a low dose computed tomography (SPECT-CT), is a hybrid imaging integrating functional and anatomical data. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the contribution of the SPECTCT over traditional planar imaging of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Post therapy 131IWhole body scan followed by SPECTCT of the neck and thorax, were performed in 156 patients with DTC. Among these 156 patients followed for a predominantly papillary, the use of fusion imaging SPECT-CT compared to conventional planar imaging allowed us to correct our therapeutic approach in 26.9 % (42/156 patients), according to the protocols of therapeutic management of our institute. SPECT-CT is a multimodal imaging providing better identification and more accurate anatomic localization of the foci of radioiodine uptake with impact on therapeutic management.

  20. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Keller, N.A.; Lupton, L.R.; Taylor, T.; Tonner, P.D.

    1984-10-01

    Tomography is a non-intrusive imaging technique being developed at CRNL as an industrial tool for generating quantitative cross-sectional density maps of objects. Of most interest is tomography's ability to: distinguish features within complex geometries where other NDT techniques fail because of the complexity of the geometry; detect/locate small density changes/defects within objects, e.g. void fraction measurements within thick-walled vessels, shrink cavities in castings, etc.; provide quantitative data that can be used in analyses, e.g. of complex processes, or fracture mechanics; and provide objective quantitative data that can be used for (computer-based) quality assurance decisions, thereby reducing and in some cases eliminating the present subjectivity often encountered in NDT. The CRNL program is reviewed and examples are presented to illustrate the potential and the limitations of the technology

  1. THERMAL AND VISIBLE SATELLITE IMAGE FUSION USING WAVELET IN REMOTE SENSING AND SATELLITE IMAGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Ahrari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal remote sensing approach is based on merging different data in different portions of electromagnetic radiation that improves the accuracy in satellite image processing and interpretations. Remote Sensing Visible and thermal infrared bands independently contain valuable spatial and spectral information. Visible bands make enough information spatially and thermal makes more different radiometric and spectral information than visible. However low spatial resolution is the most important limitation in thermal infrared bands. Using satellite image fusion, it is possible to merge them as a single thermal image that contains high spectral and spatial information at the same time. The aim of this study is a performance assessment of thermal and visible image fusion quantitatively and qualitatively with wavelet transform and different filters. In this research, wavelet algorithm (Haar and different decomposition filters (mean.linear,ma,min and rand for thermal and panchromatic bands of Landast8 Satellite were applied as shortwave and longwave fusion method . Finally, quality assessment has been done with quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative parameters such as Entropy, Standard Deviation, Cross Correlation, Q Factor and Mutual Information were used. For thermal and visible image fusion accuracy assessment, all parameters (quantitative and qualitative must be analysed with respect to each other. Among all relevant statistical factors, correlation has the most meaningful result and similarity to the qualitative assessment. Results showed that mean and linear filters make better fused images against the other filters in Haar algorithm. Linear and mean filters have same performance and there is not any difference between their qualitative and quantitative results.

  2. Learnable despeckling framework for optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabi, Saba; Rashedi, Elaheh; Clayton, Anne; Mohebbi-Kalkhoran, Hamed; Chen, Xue-wen; Conforto, Silvia; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a prevalent, interferometric, high-resolution imaging method with broad biomedical applications. Nonetheless, OCT images suffer from an artifact called speckle, which degrades the image quality. Digital filters offer an opportunity for image improvement in clinical OCT devices, where hardware modification to enhance images is expensive. To reduce speckle, a wide variety of digital filters have been proposed; selecting the most appropriate filter for an OCT image/image set is a challenging decision, especially in dermatology applications of OCT where a different variety of tissues are imaged. To tackle this challenge, we propose an expandable learnable despeckling framework, we call LDF. LDF decides which speckle reduction algorithm is most effective on a given image by learning a figure of merit (FOM) as a single quantitative image assessment measure. LDF is learnable, which means when implemented on an OCT machine, each given image/image set is retrained and its performance is improved. Also, LDF is expandable, meaning that any despeckling algorithm can easily be added to it. The architecture of LDF includes two main parts: (i) an autoencoder neural network and (ii) filter classifier. The autoencoder learns the FOM based on several quality assessment measures obtained from the OCT image including signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, equivalent number of looks, edge preservation index, and mean structural similarity index. Subsequently, the filter classifier identifies the most efficient filter from the following categories: (a) sliding window filters including median, mean, and symmetric nearest neighborhood, (b) adaptive statistical-based filters including Wiener, homomorphic Lee, and Kuwahara, and (c) edge preserved patch or pixel correlation-based filters including nonlocal mean, total variation, and block matching three-dimensional filtering.

  3. Data and image fusion for geometrical cloud characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorne, L.R.; Buch, K.A.; Sun, Chen-Hui; Diegert, C.

    1997-04-01

    Clouds have a strong influence on the Earth`s climate and therefore on climate change. An important step in improving the accuracy of models that predict global climate change, general circulation models, is improving the parameterization of clouds and cloud-radiation interactions. Improvements in the next generation models will likely include the effect of cloud geometry on the cloud-radiation parameterizations. We have developed and report here methods for characterizing the geometrical features and three-dimensional properties of clouds that could be of significant value in developing these new parameterizations. We developed and report here a means of generating and imaging synthetic clouds which we used to test our characterization algorithms; a method for using Taylor`s hypotheses to infer spatial averages from temporal averages of cloud properties; a computer method for automatically classifying cloud types in an image; and a method for producing numerical three-dimensional renderings of cloud fields based on the fusion of ground-based and satellite images together with meteorological data.

  4. A color fusion method of infrared and low-light-level images based on visual perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Yan, Minmin; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2014-11-01

    The color fusion images can be obtained through the fusion of infrared and low-light-level images, which will contain both the information of the two. The fusion images can help observers to understand the multichannel images comprehensively. However, simple fusion may lose the target information due to inconspicuous targets in long-distance infrared and low-light-level images; and if targets extraction is adopted blindly, the perception of the scene information will be affected seriously. To solve this problem, a new fusion method based on visual perception is proposed in this paper. The extraction of the visual targets ("what" information) and parallel processing mechanism are applied in traditional color fusion methods. The infrared and low-light-level color fusion images are achieved based on efficient typical targets learning. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The fusion images achieved by our algorithm can not only improve the detection rate of targets, but also get rich natural information of the scenes.

  5. An Integrated Dictionary-Learning Entropy-Based Medical Image Fusion Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanqiu Qi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Image fusion is widely used in different areas and can integrate complementary and relevant information of source images captured by multiple sensors into a unitary synthetic image. Medical image fusion, as an important image fusion application, can extract the details of multiple images from different imaging modalities and combine them into an image that contains complete and non-redundant information for increasing the accuracy of medical diagnosis and assessment. The quality of the fused image directly affects medical diagnosis and assessment. However, existing solutions have some drawbacks in contrast, sharpness, brightness, blur and details. This paper proposes an integrated dictionary-learning and entropy-based medical image-fusion framework that consists of three steps. First, the input image information is decomposed into low-frequency and high-frequency components by using a Gaussian filter. Second, low-frequency components are fused by weighted average algorithm and high-frequency components are fused by the dictionary-learning based algorithm. In the dictionary-learning process of high-frequency components, an entropy-based algorithm is used for informative blocks selection. Third, the fused low-frequency and high-frequency components are combined to obtain the final fusion results. The results and analyses of comparative experiments demonstrate that the proposed medical image fusion framework has better performance than existing solutions.

  6. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, T; Maki, K; Katashima, M

    2010-07-01

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements.

  7. Neutron tomography at IPEN-CNEN/SP: images and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliesi, Reynaldo; Pereira, Marco Antonio Stanojev; Andrade, Marcos Leandro Garcia, E-mail: pugliesi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The neutron tomography is a non destructive testing technique used to inspect the internal structure of a sample by means of tridimensional digital images. Because of the neutron-matter interaction characteristics this technique can be used to inspect hydrogen-rich substances like ceramics, oil, grease, water, rubber, blood and others, even wrapped by thick metal layers. In this way, the information provided by neutrons are complementary to the ones provided by X-rays. The Brazilian Institute for Nuclear Technology IPEN-CNEN/SP has an equipment for neutron tomography which since Nov/2011 is operational and installed at the IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor. This equipment is able to provide high quality tomographs and some important results obtained for Proton Exchange Membranes (PEM) cell, for an archaeological sample and for pottery, will be presented. Furthermore, details of its construction and its versatility, in the sense that by means of small adjustments is possible to obtain images by other neutron imaging techniques, will be also presented. Is very important enhance that the high quality of the obtained images is due to the excellence of the IEA-R1 reactor which is able to furnish neutron beams with adequate intensity for such purpose. (author)

  8. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T; Katashima, M; Maki, K

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements

  9. Remote Sensing Image Fusion Based on the Combination Grey Absolute Correlation Degree and IHS Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui LIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An improved fusion algorithm for multi-source remote sensing images with high spatial resolution and multi-spectral capacity is proposed based on traditional IHS fusion and grey correlation analysis. Firstly, grey absolute correlation degree is used to discriminate non-edge pixels and edge pixels in high-spatial resolution images, by which the weight of intensity component is identified in order to combine it with high-spatial resolution image. Therefore, image fusion is achieved using IHS inverse transform. The proposed method is applied to ETM+ multi-spectral images and panchromatic image, and Quickbird’s multi-spectral images and panchromatic image respectively. The experiments prove that the fusion method proposed in the paper can efficiently preserve spectral information of the original multi-spectral images while enhancing spatial resolution greatly. By comparison and analysis, the proposed fusion algorithm is better than traditional IHS fusion and fusion method based on grey correlation analysis and IHS transform.

  10. Development of computed tomography system and image reconstruction algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairiah Yazid; Mohd Ashhar Khalid; Azaman Ahmad; Khairul Anuar Mohd Salleh; Ab Razak Hamzah

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography is one of the most advanced and powerful nondestructive inspection techniques, which is currently used in many different industries. In several CT systems, detection has been by combination of an X-ray image intensifier and charge -coupled device (CCD) camera or by using line array detector. The recent development of X-ray flat panel detector has made fast CT imaging feasible and practical. Therefore this paper explained the arrangement of a new detection system which is using the existing high resolution (127 μm pixel size) flat panel detector in MINT and the image reconstruction technique developed. The aim of the project is to develop a prototype flat panel detector based CT imaging system for NDE. The prototype consisted of an X-ray tube, a flat panel detector system, a rotation table and a computer system to control the sample motion and image acquisition. Hence this project is divided to two major tasks, firstly to develop image reconstruction algorithm and secondly to integrate X-ray imaging components into one CT system. The image reconstruction algorithm using filtered back-projection method is developed and compared to other techniques. The MATLAB program is the tools used for the simulations and computations for this project. (Author)

  11. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  12. Automatic Solitary Lung Nodule Detection in Computed Tomography Images Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentana, I. W. B.; Jawas, N.; Asri, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    Lung nodule is an early indicator of some lung diseases, including lung cancer. In Computed Tomography (CT) based image, nodule is known as a shape that appears brighter than lung surrounding. This research aim to develop an application that automatically detect lung nodule in CT images. There are some steps in algorithm such as image acquisition and conversion, image binarization, lung segmentation, blob detection, and classification. Data acquisition is a step to taking image slice by slice from the original *.dicom format and then each image slices is converted into *.tif image format. Binarization that tailoring Otsu algorithm, than separated the background and foreground part of each image slices. After removing the background part, the next step is to segment part of the lung only so the nodule can localized easier. Once again Otsu algorithm is use to detect nodule blob in localized lung area. The final step is tailoring Support Vector Machine (SVM) to classify the nodule. The application has succeed detecting near round nodule with a certain threshold of size. Those detecting result shows drawback in part of thresholding size and shape of nodule that need to enhance in the next part of the research. The algorithm also cannot detect nodule that attached to wall and Lung Chanel, since it depend the searching only on colour differences.

  13. Compressed Sensing and Low-Rank Matrix Decomposition in Multisource Images Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel super-resolution multisource images fusion scheme via compressive sensing and dictionary learning theory. Under the sparsity prior of images patches and the framework of the compressive sensing theory, the multisource images fusion is reduced to a signal recovery problem from the compressive measurements. Then, a set of multiscale dictionaries are learned from several groups of high-resolution sample image’s patches via a nonlinear optimization algorithm. Moreover, a new linear weights fusion rule is proposed to obtain the high-resolution image. Some experiments are taken to investigate the performance of our proposed method, and the results prove its superiority to its counterparts.

  14. Head and neck: normal variations and benign findings in FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højgaard, Liselotte; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Loft, Annika

    2014-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography with FDG of the head and neck region is mainly used for the diagnosis of head and neck cancer, for staging, treatment evaluation, relapse, and planning of surgery and radio therapy. This article is a practical guide of imaging techniques, including a detailed protocol for FDG PET in head and neck imaging, physiologic findings, and pitfalls in selected case stories. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fusion imaging of computed tomographic pulmonary angiography and SPECT ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy: initial experience and potential benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Benjamin; Bailey, Dale; Roach, Paul; Bailey, Elizabeth; King, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of fusing ventilation and perfusion data from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ventilation perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy together with computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) data. We sought to determine the accuracy of this fusion process. In addition, we correlated the findings of this technique with the final clinical diagnosis. Thirty consecutive patients (17 female, 13 male) who had undergone both CTPA and SPECT V/Q scintigraphy during their admission for investigation of potential pulmonary embolism were identified retrospectively. Image datasets from these two modalities were co-registered and fused using commercial software. Accuracy of the fusion process was determined subjectively by correlation between modalities of the anatomical boundaries and co-existent pleuro-parenchymal abnormalities. In all 30 cases, SPECT V/Q images were accurately fused with CTPA images. An automated registration algorithm was sufficient alone in 23 cases (77%). Additional linear z-axis scaling was applied in seven cases. There was accurate topographical co-localisation of vascular, parenchymal and pleural disease on the fused images. Nine patients who had positive CTPA performed as an initial investigation had co-localised perfusion defects on the subsequent fused CTPA/SPECT images. Three of the 11 V/Q scans initially reported as intermediate could be reinterpreted as low probability owing to co-localisation of defects with parenchymal or pleural pathology. Accurate fusion of SPECT V/Q scintigraphy to CTPA images is possible. This technique may be clinically useful in patients who have non-diagnostic initial investigations or in whom corroborative imaging is sought. (orig.)

  16. Diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism with computed tomography: imaging update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Anand; Sayer, Charlie; Sheard, Sarah; Grubnic, Sisa; Nair, Arjun; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is recognized as a difficult diagnosis to make. It is potentially fatal if undiagnosed, yet increasing referral rates for imaging and falling diagnostic yields are topics which have attracted much attention. For patients in the emergency department with suspected pulmonary embolism, computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is the test of choice for most physicians, and hence radiology has a key role to play in the patient pathway. This review will outline key aspects of the recent literature regarding the following issues: patient selection for imaging, the optimization of CTPA image quality and dose, preferred pathways for pregnant patients and other subgroups, and the role of CTPA beyond diagnosis. The role of newer techniques such as dual-energy CT and single-photon emission-CT will also be discussed.

  17. Axial positrons emission tomography: from mouse to human brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brard, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Positrons emission tomography is a nuclear imaging technics using nuclear decays. It is used both in clinical and preclinical studies. The later requires the use of small animals such as the mouse. The objective is to obtain the best signal with the best spatial resolution. Yet, a weight ratio between humans and mice indicates the need of a sub-millimeter resolution. A conventional scanner is based on detection modules surrounding the object to image and arranged perpendicularly. This implies a strong relationship between efficiency and spatial resolution. This work focuses on the axial geometry in which detection modules are arranged parallel to the object. This limits the relationship between the figures of merit, leading to both high spatial resolution and efficiency. The simulations of prototypes showed great perspectives in term of sub-millimeter resolution with efficiencies of 15 or 40% according to the scanner's axial extension. These results indicate great perspectives for both clinical and preclinical imaging. (author)

  18. Imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canjau, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Topala, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 90% of oral cancer. Early detection is a cornerstone to improve survival. Interaction of light with tissues may highlight changes in tissue structure and metabolism. We propose optical coherence tomography (OCT), as a non-invasive diagnosis method, being a new high-resolution optical technique that permits tri-dimensional (3-D), real-time imaging of near surface abnormalities in complex tissues. In this study half of the excisional biopsy was directed to the pathologist and the other half was assigned for OCT investigation. Histopathology validated the results. Areas of OSCC of the buccal mucosa were identified in the OCT images. The elements obserced included extensive epithelial down-growth, the disruption of the basement membrane, with areas of erosion, an epithelial layer that was highly variable in thickness and invasion into the sub-epithelial layers. Therefore, OCT appears to be a highly promising imaging modality.

  19. Clinical assessment of SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wen; Luan Zhaosheng; Peng Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Study the methodology of the SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion, and Assessment the Clinical application value. Method: 172 patients who underwent SPECT/CT image fusion during 2001-2003 were studied, 119 men, 53 women. 51 patients underwent 18FDG image +CT, 26 patients underwent 99m Tc-RBC Liver pool image +CT, 43 patients underwent 99mTc-MDP Bone image +CT, 18 patients underwent 99m Tc-MAA Lung perfusion image +CT. The machine is Millium VG SPECT of GE Company. All patients have been taken three steps image: X-ray survey, X-ray transmission and nuclear emission image (Including planer imaging, SPECT or 18 F-FDG of dual head camera) without changing the position of the patients. We reconstruct the emission image with X-ray map and do reconstruction, 18FDG with COSEM and 99mTc with OSEM. Then combine the transmission image and the reconstructed emission image. We use different process parameters in deferent image methods. The accurate rate of SPECT/CT image fusion were statistics, and compare their accurate with that of single nuclear emission image. Results: The nuclear image which have been reconstructed by X-ray attenuation and OSEM are apparent better than pre-reconstructed. The post-reconstructed emission images have no scatter lines around the organs. The outline between different issues is more clear than before. The validity of All post-reconstructed images is better than pre-reconstructed. SPECT/CT image fusion make localization have worthy bases. 138 patients, the accuracy of SPECT/CT image fusion is 91.3% (126/138), whereas 60(88.2%) were found through SPECT/CT image fusion, There are significant difference between them(P 99m Tc- RBC-SPECT +CT image fusion, but 21 of them were inspected by emission image. In BONE 99m Tc -MDP-SPECT +CT image fusion, 4 patients' removed bone(1-6 months after surgery) and their relay with normal bone had activity, their morphologic and density in CT were different from normal bones. 11 of 20 patients who could

  20. Fusion of remote sensing images based on pyramid decomposition with Baldwinian Clonal Selection Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiyan; Xing, Bei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yanyan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel fusion method for remote sensing images based on the contrast pyramid (CP) using the Baldwinian Clonal Selection Algorithm (BCSA), referred to as CPBCSA. Compared with classical methods based on the transform domain, the method proposed in this paper adopts an improved heuristic evolutionary algorithm, wherein the clonal selection algorithm includes Baldwinian learning. In the process of image fusion, BCSA automatically adjusts the fusion coefficients of different sub-bands decomposed by CP according to the value of the fitness function. BCSA also adaptively controls the optimal search direction of the coefficients and accelerates the convergence rate of the algorithm. Finally, the fusion images are obtained via weighted integration of the optimal fusion coefficients and CP reconstruction. Our experiments show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods in terms of both visual effect and objective evaluation criteria, and the fused images are more suitable for human visual or machine perception.

  1. The establishment of the method of three dimension volumetric fusion of emission and transmission images for PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiangsong; He Zuoxiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish the method of three dimension volumetric fusion of emission and transmission images for PET imaging. Methods: The volume data of emission and transmission images acquired with Siemens ECAT HR + PET scanner were transferred to PC computer by local area network. The PET volume data were converted into 8 bit byte type, and scaled to the range of 0-255. The data coordinates of emission and transmission images were normalized by three-dimensional coordinate conversion in the same way. The images were fused with the mode of alpha-blending. The accuracy of image fusion was confirmed by its clinical application in 13 cases. Results: The three dimension volumetric fusion of emission and transmission images clearly displayed the silhouette and anatomic configuration in chest, including chest wall, lung, heart, mediastinum, et al. Forty-eight lesions in chest in 13 cases were accurately located by the image fusion. Conclusions: The volume data of emission and transmission images acquired with Siemens ECAT HR + PET scanner have the same data coordinate. The three dimension fusion software can conveniently used for the three dimension volumetric fusion of emission and transmission images, and also can correctly locate the lesions in chest

  2. Medical Image Fusion Algorithm Based on Nonlinear Approximation of Contourlet Transform and Regional Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the pros and cons of contourlet transform and multimodality medical imaging, here we propose a novel image fusion algorithm that combines nonlinear approximation of contourlet transform with image regional features. The most important coefficient bands of the contourlet sparse matrix are retained by nonlinear approximation. Low-frequency and high-frequency regional features are also elaborated to fuse medical images. The results strongly suggested that the proposed algorithm could improve the visual effects of medical image fusion and image quality, image denoising, and enhancement.

  3. Imaging Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Christian Ring

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the presentation of a patch-stage cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL using optical coherence tomography (OCT. Methods: A patient with a patch caused by CTCL was photographed digitally, OCT-scanned and biopsied. A normal skin area adjacent to the patch was OCT-scanned for comparison, but not biopsied. The OCT image and the histological image were compared. Results: The OCT images illustrated a thickened and hyperreflective stratum corneum. OCT also demonstrated several elongated hyporeflective structures in the dermis. The largest structure was measured to have a width of 0.13 mm. A good immediate correlation was found between histology and OCT imaging of the sample. Conclusion: The aetiology of the elongated structures is thought to be lymphomatous infiltrates. Similar findings have been described in ocular lymphoma and may therefore be an important characteristic of cutaneous lymphoma. It may further be speculated that the differences in OCT images may reflect the biological behaviour of the infiltrate. This observation therefore suggests that OCT imaging may be a relevant tool for the in vivo investigation of mycosis fungoides and other CTCLs, but in order to verify these observed patterns in OCT imaging, further investigations will be required.

  4. Automated breast segmentation in ultrasound computer tomography SAFT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T.; You, W.; Zapf, M.; Tan, W. Y.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis. An essential step before further processing is to remove the water background from the reconstructed images. In this paper we present a fully-automated image segmentation method based on three-dimensional active contours. The active contour method is extended by applying gradient vector flow and encoding the USCT aperture characteristics as additional weighting terms. A surface detection algorithm based on a ray model is developed to initialize the active contour, which is iteratively deformed to capture the breast outline in USCT reflection images. The evaluation with synthetic data showed that the method is able to cope with noisy images, and is not influenced by the position of the breast and the presence of scattering objects within the breast. The proposed method was applied to 14 in-vivo images resulting in an average surface deviation from a manual segmentation of 2.7 mm. We conclude that automated segmentation of USCT reflection images is feasible and produces results comparable to a manual segmentation. By applying the proposed method, reproducible segmentation results can be obtained without manual interaction by an expert.

  5. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  6. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  7. Multi-sensor radiation detection, imaging, and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, Kai [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Glenn Knoll was one of the leaders in the field of radiation detection and measurements and shaped this field through his outstanding scientific and technical contributions, as a teacher, his personality, and his textbook. His Radiation Detection and Measurement book guided me in my studies and is now the textbook in my classes in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley. In the spirit of Glenn, I will provide an overview of our activities at the Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics program reflecting some of the breadth of radiation detection technologies and their applications ranging from fundamental studies in physics to biomedical imaging and to nuclear security. I will conclude with a discussion of our Berkeley Radwatch and Resilient Communities activities as a result of the events at the Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan more than 4 years ago. - Highlights: • .Electron-tracking based gamma-ray momentum reconstruction. • .3D volumetric and 3D scene fusion gamma-ray imaging. • .Nuclear Street View integrates and associates nuclear radiation features with specific objects in the environment. • Institute for Resilient Communities combines science, education, and communities to minimize impact of disastrous events.

  8. Multi-scale analysis of lung computed tomography images

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, I; Fantacci, M E; Preite Martinez, A; Retico, A; De Mitri, I; Donadio, S; Fulcheri, C

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of lung internal nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 project. The three modules of our lung CAD system, a segmentation algorithm for lung internal region identification, a multi-scale dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a multi-scale neural technique for false positive finding reduction, are described. The results obtained on a dataset of low-dose and thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  9. Development of Image Reconstruction Algorithms in electrical Capacitance Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Marron, J. L.; Alberdi Primicia, J.; Barcala Riveira, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) has not obtained a good development in order to be used at industrial level. That is due first to difficulties in the measurement of very little capacitances (in the range of femto farads) and second to the problem of reconstruction on- line of the images. This problem is due also to the small numbers of electrodes (maximum 16), that made the usual algorithms of reconstruction has many errors. In this work it is described a new purely geometrical method that could be used for this purpose. (Author) 4 refs

  10. Some aspects of evaluation of image quality in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travassos, Paulo Cesar Baptista; Peixoto, Jose Guilherme; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Veloso de; Campos, Luciana Tourinho; Magalhaes, Luis Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of CT scanners image quality includes measuring the Hounsfield values, HU, using a table with the limit values. This table does not consider that different devices have different effective energies, which may cause some false results. The evaluation of 90 computerized tomography, by the American College Radiology methodology, showed that some failed devices in the evaluation showed excellent linear fit between the values of the linear attenuation coefficients calculated for the actual energy used, according to the HU values. The analysis of the coefficient of determination suggests that 10 of these devices could have been approved. (author)

  11. Principles of image reconstruction in X-ray computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwierz, G.; Haerer, W.; Ruehrnschopf, E.P.

    1978-01-01

    The presented geometrical interpretation elucidates the convergence behavior of the classical iteration technique in X-ray computer tomography. The filter techniques nowadays used in preference are derived from a concept of linear system theory which excels due to its particular clarity. The one-dimensional form of the filtering is of decisive importance for immediate image reproduction as realized by both Siemens systems, the SIRETOM 2000 head scanner and the SOMATOM whole-body machine, as such unique to date for whole-body machines. The equivalence of discrete and continuous filtering when dealing with frequency-band-limited projections is proved. (orig.) [de

  12. Images to visualize the brain. PET: Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Diagnosis instrument and research tool, Positron Emission Tomography permits advanced technological developments on positron camera, on molecule labelling and principally on very complex 3D image processing. Cyceron Centre in Caen-France works on brain diseases and try to understand the mechanism of observed troubles and to assess the treatment efficiency with PET. Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot of CEA-France establishes a mapping of cognitive functions in PET as vision areas, anxiety regions, brain organization of language, different attention forms, voluntary actions and motor functions

  13. Dosimetry in abdominal imaging by 6-slice computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Sonia Isabel [Hospital de Faro, EPE (Portugal); Abrantes, Antonio Fernando; Ribeiro, Luis Pedro; Almeida, Rui Pedro Pereira [University of Algarve (Portugal). School of Health. Dept. of Radiology

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To determine the effective dose in abdominal computed tomography imaging and to study the influence of patients' characteristics on the received dose. Materials and Methods: Dose values measurements were performed with an ionization chamber on phantoms to check the agreement between dose values and those presented by the computed tomography apparatus, besides their compliance with the recommended reference dose levels. Later, values of dose received by physically able patients submitted to abdominal computed tomography (n = 100) were measured and correlated with their anthropometric characteristics. Finally, the dose to organs was simulated with the Monte Carlo method using the CT-Expo V 1.5 software, and the effect of automatic exposure control on such examinations. Results: The main characteristics directly influencing the dose include the patients' body mass, abdominal perimeter and body mass index, whose correlation is linear and positive. Conclusion: The radiation dose received from abdominal CT scans depends on some patient's characteristics, and it is important to adjust the acquisition parameters to their dimensions (author)

  14. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-02-21

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes.

  15. Multi-Modality Medical Image Fusion Based on Wavelet Analysis and Quality Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Multi-modality medical image fusion has more and more important applications in medical image analysisand understanding. In this paper, we develop and apply a multi-resolution method based on wavelet pyramid to fusemedical images from different modalities such as PET-MRI and CT-MRI. In particular, we evaluate the different fusionresults when applying different selection rules and obtain optimum combination of fusion parameters.

  16. Review of cardiovascular imaging in the journal of nuclear cardiology in 2015. Part 1 of 2: Plaque imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJaroudi, Wael A; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-02-01

    In 2015, many original articles pertaining to cardiovascular imaging with impressive quality were published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology. In a set of 2 articles, we provide an overview of these contributions to facilitate for the interested reader a quick review of the advancements that occurred in the field over this year. In this first article, we focus on arterial plaque imaging, cardiac positron emission tomography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Multispectral medical image fusion in Contourlet domain for computer based diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhateja, Vikrant; Moin, Aisha; Srivastava, Anuja; Bao, Le Nguyen; Lay-Ekuakille, Aimé; Le, Dac-Nhuong

    2016-01-01

    Computer based diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease can be performed by dint of the analysis of the functional and structural changes in the brain. Multispectral image fusion deliberates upon fusion of the complementary information while discarding the surplus information to achieve a solitary image which encloses both spatial and spectral details. This paper presents a Non-Sub-sampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) based multispectral image fusion model for computer-aided diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. The proposed fusion methodology involves color transformation of the input multispectral image. The multispectral image in YIQ color space is decomposed using NSCT followed by dimensionality reduction using modified Principal Component Analysis algorithm on the low frequency coefficients. Further, the high frequency coefficients are enhanced using non-linear enhancement function. Two different fusion rules are then applied to the low-pass and high-pass sub-bands: Phase congruency is applied to low frequency coefficients and a combination of directive contrast and normalized Shannon entropy is applied to high frequency coefficients. The superiority of the fusion response is depicted by the comparisons made with the other state-of-the-art fusion approaches (in terms of various fusion metrics).

  18. Multispectral medical image fusion in Contourlet domain for computer based diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhateja, Vikrant, E-mail: bhateja.vikrant@gmail.com, E-mail: nhuongld@hus.edu.vn; Moin, Aisha; Srivastava, Anuja [Shri Ramswaroop Memorial Group of Professional Colleges (SRMGPC), Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226028 (India); Bao, Le Nguyen [Duytan University, Danang 550000 (Viet Nam); Lay-Ekuakille, Aimé [Department of Innovation Engineering, University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy); Le, Dac-Nhuong, E-mail: bhateja.vikrant@gmail.com, E-mail: nhuongld@hus.edu.vn [Duytan University, Danang 550000 (Viet Nam); Haiphong University, Haiphong 180000 (Viet Nam)

    2016-07-15

    Computer based diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease can be performed by dint of the analysis of the functional and structural changes in the brain. Multispectral image fusion deliberates upon fusion of the complementary information while discarding the surplus information to achieve a solitary image which encloses both spatial and spectral details. This paper presents a Non-Sub-sampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) based multispectral image fusion model for computer-aided diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. The proposed fusion methodology involves color transformation of the input multispectral image. The multispectral image in YIQ color space is decomposed using NSCT followed by dimensionality reduction using modified Principal Component Analysis algorithm on the low frequency coefficients. Further, the high frequency coefficients are enhanced using non-linear enhancement function. Two different fusion rules are then applied to the low-pass and high-pass sub-bands: Phase congruency is applied to low frequency coefficients and a combination of directive contrast and normalized Shannon entropy is applied to high frequency coefficients. The superiority of the fusion response is depicted by the comparisons made with the other state-of-the-art fusion approaches (in terms of various fusion metrics).

  19. Tomography images of the Alpine roots and surrounding upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomerova, Jaroslava; Babuska, Vladislav

    2017-04-01

    Teleseismic body-wave tomography represents powerful tool to study regional velocity structure of the upper mantle and to image velocity anomalies, such as subducted lithosphere plates in collisional zones. In this contribution, we recapitulate 3D models of the upper mantle beneath the Alps, which developed at a collision zone of the Eurasian and African plates. Seismic tomography studies indicate a leading role of the rigid mantle lithosphere that functioned as a major stress guide during the plate collisions. Interactions of the European lithosphere with several micro-plates in the south resulted in an arcuate shape of this mountain range on the surface and in a complicated geometry of the Alpine subductions in the mantle. Early models with one bended lithosphere root have been replaced with more advanced models showing two separate lithosphere roots beneath the Western and Eastern Alps (Babuska et al., Tectonophysics 1990; Lippitsch et al., JGR 2003). The standard isotropic velocity tomography, based on pre-AlpArray data (the currently performed passive seismic experiment in the Alps and surroundings) images the south-eastward dipping curved slab of the Eurasian lithosphere in the Western Alps. On the contrary, beneath the Eastern Alps the results indicate a very steep northward dipping root that resulted from the collision of the European plate with the Adriatic microplate. Dando et al. (2011) interpret high-velocity heterogeneities at the bottom of their regional tomographic model as a graveyard of old subducted lithospheres. High density of stations, large amount of rays and dense ray-coverage of the volume studied are not the only essential pre-requisites for reliable tomography results. A compromise between the amount of pre-processed data and the high-quality of the tomography input (travel-time residuals) is of the high importance as well. For the first time, the existence of two separate roots beneath the Alps has been revealed from carefully pre

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of human tooth optical coherence tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Boya; Meng, Zhuo; Wang, Longzhi; Liu, Tiegen

    2013-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of human tooth. The model is implemented by combining the simulation of a Gaussian beam with simulation for photon propagation in a two-layer human tooth model with non-parallel surfaces through a Monte Carlo method. The geometry and the optical parameters of the human tooth model are chosen on the basis of the experimental OCT images. The results show that the simulated OCT images are qualitatively consistent with the experimental ones. Using the model, we demonstrate the following: firstly, two types of photons contribute to the information of morphological features and noise in the OCT image of a human tooth, respectively. Secondly, the critical imaging depth of the tooth model is obtained, and it is found to decrease significantly with increasing mineral loss, simulated as different enamel scattering coefficients. Finally, the best focus position is located below and close to the dental surface by analysis of the effect of focus positions on the OCT signal and critical imaging depth. We anticipate that this modeling will become a powerful and accurate tool for a preliminary numerical study of the OCT technique on diseases of dental hard tissue in human teeth. (paper)

  1. Computed tomography in the imaging of colonic diverticulitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, O.; Geoghegan, T.; O'Riordain, D.S.; Lyburn, I.D.; Torreggiani, W.C.

    2004-01-01

    Colonic diverticulitis occurs when diverticula within the colon become infected or inflamed. It is becoming an increasingly common cause for hospital admission, particularly in western society, where it is linked to a low fibre diet. Symptoms of diverticulitis include abdominal pain, diarrhoea and pyrexia, however, symptoms are often non-specific and the clinical diagnosis may be difficult. In addition, elderly patients and those taking corticosteroids may have limited findings on physical examination, even in the presence of severe diverticulitis. A high index of suspicion is required in such patients in order to avoid a significant delay in arriving at the correct diagnosis. Imaging plays an important role in establishing an early and correct diagnosis. In the past, contrast enema studies were the principal imaging test used to make the diagnosis. However, such studies lack sensitivity and have limited success in identifying abscesses that may require drainage. Conversely computed tomography (CT) is both sensitive and specific in making a diagnosis of diverticulitis. In addition, it is the imaging technique of choice in depicting complications such as perforation, abscess formation and fistulae. CT-guided drainage of diverticular abscesses helps to reduce sepsis and to permit a one-stage, rather than two-stage, surgical operation. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the role of CT in the imaging of diverticulitis, describe the CT imaging features and complications of this disease, as well as review the impact and rationale of CT imaging and intervention in the overall management of patients with diverticulitis

  2. Computed tomography perfusion imaging denoising using Gaussian process regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Fan; Gonzalez, David Rodriguez; Atkinson, Malcolm; Carpenter, Trevor; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Brain perfusion weighted images acquired using dynamic contrast studies have an important clinical role in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment decisions. However, computed tomography (CT) images suffer from low contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) as a consequence of the limitation of the exposure to radiation of the patient. As a consequence, the developments of methods for improving the CNR are valuable. The majority of existing approaches for denoising CT images are optimized for 3D (spatial) information, including spatial decimation (spatially weighted mean filters) and techniques based on wavelet and curvelet transforms. However, perfusion imaging data is 4D as it also contains temporal information. Our approach using Gaussian process regression (GPR), which takes advantage of the temporal information, to reduce the noise level. Over the entire image, GPR gains a 99% CNR improvement over the raw images and also improves the quality of haemodynamic maps allowing a better identification of edges and detailed information. At the level of individual voxel, GPR provides a stable baseline, helps us to identify key parameters from tissue time-concentration curves and reduces the oscillations in the curve. GPR is superior to the comparable techniques used in this study. (note)

  3. Time reversal imaging, Inverse problems and Adjoint Tomography}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagner, J.; Larmat, C. S.; Capdeville, Y.; Kawakatsu, H.; Fink, M.

    2010-12-01

    With the increasing power of computers and numerical techniques (such as spectral element methods), it is possible to address a new class of seismological problems. The propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media is simulated more and more accurately and new applications developed, in particular time reversal methods and adjoint tomography in the three-dimensional Earth. Since the pioneering work of J. Claerbout, theorized by A. Tarantola, many similarities were found between time-reversal methods, cross-correlations techniques, inverse problems and adjoint tomography. By using normal mode theory, we generalize the scalar approach of Draeger and Fink (1999) and Lobkis and Weaver (2001) to the 3D- elastic Earth, for theoretically understanding time-reversal method on global scale. It is shown how to relate time-reversal methods on one hand, with auto-correlations of seismograms for source imaging and on the other hand, with cross-correlations between receivers for structural imaging and retrieving Green function. Time-reversal methods were successfully applied in the past to acoustic waves in many fields such as medical imaging, underwater acoustics, non destructive testing and to seismic waves in seismology for earthquake imaging. In the case of source imaging, time reversal techniques make it possible an automatic location in time and space as well as the retrieval of focal mechanism of earthquakes or unknown environmental sources . We present here some applications at the global scale of these techniques on synthetic tests and on real data, such as Sumatra-Andaman (Dec. 2004), Haiti (Jan. 2010), as well as glacial earthquakes and seismic hum.

  4. Two-dimensional fusion imaging of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs in patients with clinical scaphoid fracture: an imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Lonsdale, Markus Georg; Jensen, T D

    2009-01-01

    . Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation......BACKGROUND: Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now considered the gold standard in second-line imaging of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative radiographs, bone scintigraphy can be used in patients with pacemakers, metallic implants, or other contraindications to MRI....... CONCLUSION: Image fusion of planar bone scintigrams and radiographs has a significant influence on image interpretation and increases both diagnostic confidence and interobserver agreement....

  5. A Comparison of Accuracy of Image- versus Hardware-based Tracking Technologies in 3D Fusion in Aortic Endografting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, A E; Maurel, B; Davis, M; Constantinou, J; Hamilton, G; Mastracci, T M

    2016-09-01

    Fusion of three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography and intraoperative two-dimensional imaging in endovascular surgery relies on manual rigid co-registration of bony landmarks and tracking of hardware to provide a 3D overlay (hardware-based tracking, HWT). An alternative technique (image-based tracking, IMT) uses image recognition to register and place the fusion mask. We present preliminary experience with an agnostic fusion technology that uses IMT, with the aim of comparing the accuracy of overlay for this technology with HWT. Data were collected prospectively for 12 patients. All devices were deployed using both IMT and HWT fusion assistance concurrently. Postoperative analysis of both systems was performed by three blinded expert observers, from selected time-points during the procedures, using the displacement of fusion rings, the overlay of vascular markings and the true ostia of renal arteries. The Mean overlay error and the deviation from mean error was derived using image analysis software. Comparison of the mean overlay error was made between IMT and HWT. The validity of the point-picking technique was assessed. IMT was successful in all of the first 12 cases, whereas technical learning curve challenges thwarted HWT in four cases. When independent operators assessed the degree of accuracy of the overlay, the median error for IMT was 3.9 mm (IQR 2.89-6.24, max 9.5) versus 8.64 mm (IQR 6.1-16.8, max 24.5) for HWT (p = .001). Variance per observer was 0.69 mm(2) and 95% limit of agreement ±1.63. In this preliminary study, the error of magnitude of displacement from the "true anatomy" during image overlay in IMT was less than for HWT. This confirms that ongoing manual re-registration, as recommended by the manufacturer, should be performed for HWT systems to maintain accuracy. The error in position of the fusion markers for IMT was consistent, thus may be considered predictable. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  6. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Yevich, Steven; Tselikas, Lambros; Deschamps, Frederic [Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Petrover, David [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre, IMPC (France); Baere, Thierry De [Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.

  7. Image fusion using MIM software via picture archiving and communication system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhaoxiang; Jiang Maosong

    2001-01-01

    The preliminary studies of the multimodality image registration and fusion were performed using an image fusion software and a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) to explore the methodology. Original image voluminal data were acquired with a CT scanner, MR and dual-head coincidence SPECT, respectively. The data sets from all imaging devices were queried, retrieved, transferred and accessed via DICOM PACS. The image fusion was performed at the SPECT ICON work-station, where the MIM (Medical Image Merge) fusion software was installed. The images were created by re-slicing original volume on the fly. The image volumes were aligned by translation and rotation of these view ports with respect to the original volume orientation. The transparency factor and contrast were adjusted in order that both volumes can be visualized in the merged images. The image volume data of CT, MR and nuclear medicine were transferred, accessed and loaded via PACS successfully. The perfect fused images of chest CT/ 18 F-FDG and brain MR/SPECT were obtained. These results showed that image fusion technique using PACS was feasible and practical. Further experimentation and larger validation studies were needed to explore the full potential of the clinical use

  8. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  9. New variational image decomposition model for simultaneously denoising and segmenting optical coherence tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Jinming; Bai, Li; Tench, Christopher; Gottlob, Irene; Proudlock, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of diseases of the human retina. Automated analysis of optical coherence tomography images is a challenging task as the images are inherently noisy. In this paper, a novel variational image decomposition model is proposed to decompose an OCT image into three components: the first component is the original image but with the noise completely removed; the second contains the set of edges representing the retinal layer boundaries present in the image; and the third is an image of noise, or in image decomposition terms, the texture, or oscillatory patterns of the original image. In addition, a fast Fourier transform based split Bregman algorithm is developed to improve computational efficiency of solving the proposed model. Extensive experiments are conducted on both synthesised and real OCT images to demonstrate that the proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art speckle noise reduction methods and leads to accurate retinal layer segmentation. (paper)

  10. Data fusion in X-ray computed tomography using a superiorization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrapp, Michael J; Herman, Gabor T

    2014-05-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an important and widespread inspection technique in industrial non-destructive testing. However, large-sized and heavily absorbing objects cause artifacts due to either the lack of penetration of the specimen in specific directions or by having data from only a limited angular range of views. In such cases, valuable information about the specimen is not revealed by the CT measurements alone. Further imaging modalities, such as optical scanning and ultrasonic testing, are able to provide data (such as an edge map) that are complementary to the CT acquisition. In this paper, a superiorization approach (a newly developed method for constrained optimization) is used to incorporate the complementary data into the CT reconstruction; this allows precise localization of edges that are not resolvable from the CT data by itself. Superiorization, as presented in this paper, exploits the fact that the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), often used for CT reconstruction, is resilient to perturbations; i.e., it can be modified to produce an output that is as consistent with the CT measurements as the output of unmodified SART, but is more consistent with the complementary data. The application of this superiorized SART method to measured data of a turbine blade demonstrates a clear improvement in the quality of the reconstructed image.

  11. Adaptive polarization image fusion based on regional energy dynamic weighted average

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong-qiang; PAN Quan; ZHANG Hong-cai

    2005-01-01

    According to the principle of polarization imaging and the relation between Stokes parameters and the degree of linear polarization, there are much redundant and complementary information in polarized images. Since man-made objects and natural objects can be easily distinguished in images of degree of linear polarization and images of Stokes parameters contain rich detailed information of the scene, the clutters in the images can be removed efficiently while the detailed information can be maintained by combining these images. An algorithm of adaptive polarization image fusion based on regional energy dynamic weighted average is proposed in this paper to combine these images. Through an experiment and simulations,most clutters are removed by this algorithm. The fusion method is used for different light conditions in simulation, and the influence of lighting conditions on the fusion results is analyzed.

  12. Fusion method of SAR and optical images for urban object extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yonghong; Blum, Rick S.; Li, Fangfang

    2007-11-01

    A new image fusion method of SAR, Panchromatic (Pan) and multispectral (MS) data is proposed. First of all, SAR texture is extracted by ratioing the despeckled SAR image to its low pass approximation, and is used to modulate high pass details extracted from the available Pan image by means of the á trous wavelet decomposition. Then, high pass details modulated with the texture is applied to obtain the fusion product by HPFM (High pass Filter-based Modulation) fusion method. A set of image data including co-registered Landsat TM, ENVISAT SAR and SPOT Pan is used for the experiment. The results demonstrate accurate spectral preservation on vegetated regions, bare soil, and also on textured areas (buildings and road network) where SAR texture information enhances the fusion product, and the proposed approach is effective for image interpret and classification.

  13. Fundamental image quality limits for microcomputed tomography in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, N.L.; Thornton, M.M.; Holdsworth, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Small-animal imaging has become increasingly more important as transgenic and knockout mice are produced to model human diseases. One imaging technique that has emerged is microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). For live-animal imaging, the precision in the images will be determined by the x-ray dose given to the animal. As a result, we propose a simple method to predict the noise performance of an x-ray micro-CT system as a function of dose and image resolution. An ideal, quantum-noise limited micro-CT scanner, assumed to have perfect resolution and ideal efficiency, was modeled. Using a simplified model, the coefficient of variation (COV) of the linear attenuation coefficient was calculated for a range of entrance doses and isotropic voxel sizes. COV calculations were performed for the ideal case and with simulated imperfections in efficiency and resolution. Our model was validated in phantom studies and mouse images were acquired with a specimen scanner to illustrate the results. A simplified model of noise propagation in the case of isotropic resolution indicates that the COV in the linear attenuation coefficient is proportional to (dose) -1/2 and to the (isotropic voxel size) -2 in the reconstructed volume. Therefore an improvement in the precision can be achieved only by increasing the isotropic voxel size (thereby decreasing the resolution of the image) or by increasing the x-ray dose. For the ideal scanner, a COV of 1% in the linear attenuation coefficient for an image of a mouse exposed to 0.25 Gy is obtained with a minimum isotropic voxel size of 135 μm. However, the same COV is achieved at a dose of 5.0 Gy with a 65 μm isotropic voxel size. Conversely, for a 68 mm diameter rat, a COV of 1% obtained from an image at 5.0 Gy would require an isotropic voxel size of 100 μm. These results indicate that short-term, potentially lethal, effects of ionizing radiation will limit high-resolution live animal imaging. As improvements in detector technology allow the

  14. A neural network image reconstruction technique for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, A.; Guardo, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reconstruction of Images in Electrical Impedance Tomography requires the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem on noisy data. This problem is typically ill-conditioned and requires either simplifying assumptions or regularization based on a priori knowledge. This paper presents a reconstruction algorithm using neural network techniques which calculates a linear approximation of the inverse problem directly from finite element simulations of the forward problem. This inverse is adapted to the geometry of the medium and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) used during network training. Results show good conductivity reconstruction where measurement SNR is similar to the training conditions. The advantages of this method are its conceptual simplicity and ease of implementation, and the ability to control the compromise between the noise performance and resolution of the image reconstruction

  15. Colposcopic imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; McRaven, Michael D.; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Hu, Jianmin; Sun, Cheng; Veazey, Ronald S.; Hope, Thomas J.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution colposcopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides key anatomical measures, such as thickness and minor traumatic injury of vaginal epithelium, of the female reproductive tract noninvasively. This information can be helpful in both fundamental investigations in animal models and disease screenings in humans. We present a fiber-based visible-light OCT and two probe designs for colposcopic application. One probe conducts circular scanning using a DC motor, and the other probe is capable of three-dimensional imaging over a 4.6×4.6-mm2 area using a pair of galvo scanners. Using this colposcopic vis-OCT with both probes, we acquired high-resolution images from whole isolated macaque vaginal samples and identified biopsy lesions.

  16. Projection model for flame chemiluminescence tomography based on lens imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Minggang; Zhuang, Jihui

    2018-04-01

    For flame chemiluminescence tomography (FCT) based on lens imaging, the projection model is essential because it formulates the mathematical relation between the flame projections captured by cameras and the chemiluminescence field, and, through this relation, the field is reconstructed. This work proposed the blurry-spot (BS) model, which takes more universal assumptions and has higher accuracy than the widely applied line-of-sight model. By combining the geometrical camera model and the thin-lens equation, the BS model takes into account perspective effect of the camera lens; by combining ray-tracing technique and Monte Carlo simulation, it also considers inhomogeneous distribution of captured radiance on the image plane. Performance of these two models in FCT was numerically compared, and results showed that using the BS model could lead to better reconstruction quality in wider application ranges.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging in Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kubo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a high-resolution imaging technique that offers microscopic visualization of coronary plaques. The clear and detailed images of OCT generate an intense interest in adopting this technique for both clinical and research purposes. Recent studies have shown that OCT is useful for the assessment of coronary atherosclerotic plaques, in particular the assessment of plaque rupture, erosion, and intracoronary thrombus in patients with acute coronary syndrome. In addition, OCT may enable identifying thin-cap fibroatheroma, the proliferation of vasa vasorum, and the distribution of macrophages surrounding vulnerable plaques. With its ability to view atherosclerotic lesions in vivo with such high resolution, OCT provides cardiologists with the tool they need to better understand the thrombosis-prone vulnerable plaques and acute coronary syndromes. This paper reviews the possibility of OCT for identification of vulnerable plaques in vivo.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography imaging with the SmartPET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cooperrj@ornl.gov; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P.; Mather, A.R. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-21

    The Small Animal Reconstruction Tomograph for Positron Emission Tomography (SmartPET) project is the development of a small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) demonstrator based on the use of High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors and state of the art digital electronics. The experimental results presented demonstrate the current performance of this unique system. By performing high precision measurements of one of the SmartPET HPGe detectors with a range of finely collimated gamma-ray beams the response of the detector as a function of gamma-ray interaction position has been quantified, facilitating the development of parametric Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in detector performance. These algorithms have then been applied to data from PET imaging measurements using two such detectors in conjunction with a specially designed rotating gantry. In this paper we show how the use of parametric PSA approaches allows over 60% of coincident events to be processed and how the nature and complexity of an event has direct implications for the quality of the resulting image.

  19. Geophysical tomography for imaging water movement in welded tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1986-01-01

    Alterant tomography has been evaluated for its ability to delineate in-situ water flow paths in a fractured welded-tuff rock mass. The evaluation involved a field experiment in which tomographs of electromagnetic attenuation factor (or attenuation rate) at 300 MHZ were made before, during, and after the introduction to the rock of two different water-based tracers: a plain water and dye solution, and salt water and dye. Alterant tomographs were constructed by subtracting, cell by cell, the attenuation factors derived from measurements before each tracer was added to the rock mass from the attenuation factors derived after each tracer was added. The alterant tomographs were compared with other evidence of water movement in the rock: borescope logs of fractures, and postexperiment cores used to locate the dye tracer on the fractured surfaces. These comparisons indicate that alterant tomography is suitable for mapping water flow through fractures and that it may be useful in inferring which of the fractures are hydrologically connected in the image plane. The technique appears to be sensitive enough to delineate flow through a single fracture and to define fractures with a spatial resolution of about 10 cm on an imaging scale of a few meters. 9 refs., 3 figs

  20. Sparse image representation for jet neutron and gamma tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, T. [EURATOM-MEdC Association, Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Kiptily, V. [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Padova (Italy); Tiseanu, I.; Zoita, V. [EURATOM-MEdC Association, Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •A new tomographic method for the reconstruction of the 2-D neutron and gamma emissivity on JET. •The method is based on the sparse representation of the reconstructed image in an over-complete dictionary. •Several techniques, based on a priori information are used to regularize this highly limited data set tomographic problem. •The proposed method provides good reconstructions in terms of shapes and resolution. -- Abstract: The JET gamma/neutron profile monitor plasma coverage of the emissive region enables tomographic reconstruction. However, due to the availability of only two projection angles and to the coarse sampling, tomography is a highly limited data set problem. A new reconstruction method, based on the sparse representation of the reconstructed image in an over-complete dictionary, has been developed and applied to JET neutron/gamma tomography. The method has been tested on JET experimental data and significant results are presented. The proposed method provides good reconstructions in terms of shapes and resolution.

  1. Image fusion analysis of 99mTc-HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide SPECT and diagnostic CT using an immobilisation device with external markers in patients with endocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, Michael; Hausler, Florian; Moncayo, Roy; Decristoforo, Clemens; Virgolini, Irene; Bale, Reto; Kovacs, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of multimodality imaging using a novel repositioning device with external markers for fusion of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) images. The additional benefit derived from this methodological approach was analysed in comparison with SPECT and diagnostic CT alone in terms of detection rate, reliability and anatomical assignment of abnormal findings with SPECT. Fifty-three patients (30 males, 23 females) with known or suspected endocrine tumours were studied. Clinical indications for somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy (SPECT/CT image fusion) included staging of newly diagnosed tumours (n=14) and detection of unknown primary tumour in the presence of clinical and/or biochemical suspicion of neuroendocrine malignancy (n=20). Follow-up studies after therapy were performed in 19 patients. A mean activity of 400 MBq of 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr 3 -octreotide was given intravenously. SPECT using a dual-detector scintillation camera and diagnostic multi-detector CT were sequentially performed. To ensure reproducible positioning, patients were fixed in an individualised vacuum mattress with modality-specific external markers for co-registration. SPECT and CT data were initially interpreted separately and the fused images were interpreted jointly in consensus by nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology physicians. SPECT was true-positive (TP) in 18 patients, true-negative (TN) in 16, false-negative (FN) in ten and false-positive (FP) in nine; CT was TP in 18 patients, TN in 21, FP in ten and FN in four. With image fusion (SPECT and CT), the scan result was TP in 27 patients (50.9%), TN in 25 patients (47.2%) and FN in one patient, this FN result being caused by multiple small liver metastases; sensitivity was 95% and specificity, 100%. The difference between SPECT and SPECT/CT was statistically as significant as the difference between CT and SPECT/CT image fusion (P<0

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography Technology and Quality Improvement Methods for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of Skin: A Short Review

    OpenAIRE

    Adabi, Saba; Turani, Zahra; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Clayton, Anne; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) delivers 3-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution method, OCT images experience some artifacts that lead to misapprehension of tissue structures. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are 3 major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the conseque...

  3. A computerized tomography system for transcranial ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sai Chun; Clement, Gregory T

    Hardware for tomographic imaging presents both challenge and opportunity for simplification when compared with traditional pulse-echo imaging systems. Specifically, point diffraction tomography does not require simultaneous powering of elements, in theory allowing just a single transmit channel and a single receive channel to be coupled with a switching or multiplexing network. In our ongoing work on transcranial imaging, we have developed a 512-channel system designed to transmit and/or receive a high voltage signal from/to arbitrary elements of an imaging array. The overall design follows a hierarchy of modules including a software interface, microcontroller, pulse generator, pulse amplifier, high-voltage power converter, switching mother board, switching daughter board, receiver amplifier, analog-to-digital converter, peak detector, memory, and USB communication. Two pulse amplifiers are included, each capable of producing up to 400Vpp via power MOSFETS. Switching is based around mechanical relays that allow passage of 200V, while still achieving switching times of under 2ms, with an operating frequency ranging from below 100kHz to 10MHz. The system is demonstrated through ex vivo human skulls using 1MHz transducers. The overall system design is applicable to planned human studies in transcranial image acquisition, and may have additional tomographic applications for other materials necessitating a high signal output.

  4. Noise and contrast detection in computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Moores, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    A discrete representation of the reconstruction process is used in an analysis of noise in computed tomography (CT) images. This model is consistent with the method of data collection in actual machines. An expression is derived which predicts the variance on the measured linear attenuation coefficient of a single pixel in an image. The dependence of the variance on various CT scanner design parameters such as pixel size, slice width, scan time, number of detectors, etc., is then described. The variation of noise with sampling area is theoretically explained. These predictions are in good agreement with a set of experimental measurements made on a range of CT scanners. The equivalent sampling aperture of the CT process is determined and the effect of the reconstruction filter on the variance of the linear attenuation coefficient is also noted, in particular, the choice and its consequences for reconstructed images and noise behaviour. The theory has been extended to include contrast detail behaviour, and these predictions compare favourably with experimental measurements. The theory predicts that image smoothing will have little effect on the contrast-detail detectability behaviour of reconstructed images. (author)

  5. Three dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging: advantages and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Michelle L; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Xu, Juan; Kim, Jongsick; Kagemann, Larry; Folio, Lindsey S; Schuman, Joel S

    2010-11-01

    Three dimensional (3D) ophthalmic imaging using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized assessment of the eye, the retina in particular. Recent technological improvements have made the acquisition of 3D-OCT datasets feasible. However, while volumetric data can improve disease diagnosis and follow-up, novel image analysis techniques are now necessary in order to process the dense 3D-OCT dataset. Fundamental software improvements include methods for correcting subject eye motion, segmenting structures or volumes of interest, extracting relevant data post hoc and signal averaging to improve delineation of retinal layers. In addition, innovative methods for image display, such as C-mode sectioning, provide a unique viewing perspective and may improve interpretation of OCT images of pathologic structures. While all of these methods are being developed, most remain in an immature state. This review describes the current status of 3D-OCT scanning and interpretation, and discusses the need for standardization of clinical protocols as well as the potential benefits of 3D-OCT scanning that could come when software methods for fully exploiting these rich datasets are available clinically. The implications of new image analysis approaches include improved reproducibility of measurements garnered from 3D-OCT, which may then help improve disease discrimination and progression detection. In addition, 3D-OCT offers the potential for preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Approaches for improving image quality in magnetic induction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimaitijiang, Y; Roula, M A; Kahlert, J

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a contactless and non-invasive method for imaging the passive electrical properties of objects. Measuring the weak signal produced by eddy currents within biological soft tissues can be challenging in the presence of noise and the large signals resulting from the direct excitation–detection coil coupling. To detect haemorrhagic stroke in the brain, for instance, high measurement accuracy is required to enable images with enough contrast to differentiate between normal and haemorrhaged brain tissues. The reconstructed images are often very sensitive to inevitable measurement noise from the environment, system instabilities and patient-related artefacts such as movement and sweating. We propose methods for mitigating signal noise and improving image reconstruction. We evaluated and compared the use of a range wavelet transforms for signal denoising. Adaptive regularization methods including L-curve, generalized cross validation (GCV) and noise estimation were also compared. We evaluated all these described methods with measurements of in vitro tissues resembling a peripheral haemorrhagic cerebral stroke created by placing a bio-membrane package filled with 10 ml blood in a swine brain of 100 ml. We show that wavelet packet denoising combined with adaptive regularization can improve the quality of reconstructed images

  7. Gallium tomoscintigraphic imaging of esophageal cancer using emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Takao; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Kan; Maeda, Hisato; Taguchi, Mitsuo

    1983-01-01

    Emission computed tomography (ECT) was clinically evaluated in 67 Ga imaging of esophageal cancer. ECT system used in this study is equipped with opposed dual large-field-of-view cameras (GCA 70A-S, Toshiba Co.). Data were acquired by rotating the two cameras 180 0 about the longitudinal axis of the patient. Total acquisition time was about 12 minutes. Multiple slices of transaxial, sagittal and coronal sections were reconstructed in a 64 x 64 matrix form using convolution algorithms. In three out of six cases studied the tumor uptake was not detected on conventional images, because the lesion was small, concentration of activity was poor or the lesion activity was overlapped with the neighbouring activities distributed to normal organs such as sternum, vertebra, liver and hilus. On ECT images, by contrast, abnormal uptake of the tumors was definitively detected in all the six cases. ECT imaging was also useful in estimating the effect of treatment by the decrease in 67 Ga concentration. We have devised a special technique to repeat ECT scan with a thin tube filled with 67 Ga solution inserted through the esophagus. By this technique, comparing paired images with and without the tube activity, exact location of the uptake against the esophagus and extraesophageal extension of the disease could be accurately evaluated in a three-dimensional field of view. ECT in gallium scanning is expected to be of great clinical value to elevate the confidence level of diagnosis in detecting, localizing and following up the diseases. (author)

  8. Extended feature-fusion guidelines to improve image-based multi-modal biometrics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brown, Dane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The feature-level, unlike the match score-level, lacks multi-modal fusion guidelines. This work demonstrates a practical approach for improved image-based biometric feature-fusion. The approach extracts and combines the face, fingerprint...

  9. Parameters related to the image quality in computed tomography -CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, T.C.; Silva, T.A.; Mourão, A.P.; Silva, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Quality control programs in computed tomography, CT, should be continuously reviewed to always ensure the best image quality with the lowest possible dose for the patient in the diagnostic process. The quality control in CT aims to design and implement a set of procedures that allows the verification of their operating conditions within the specified requirements for its use. In Brazil, the Ministry of Health (MOH), the Technical Rules (Resolution NE in 1016.) - Radiology Medical - 'Equipment and Safety Performance' establishes a reference to the analysis of tests on TC. A large number of factors such as image noise, slice thickness (resolution of the Z axis), low contrast resolution and high contrast resolution and the radiation dose can be affected by the selection of technical parameters in exams. The purpose of this study was to investigate how changes in image acquisition protocols modify its quality and determine the advantages and disadvantages between the different aspects of image quality, especially the reduction of patient radiation dose. A preliminary procedure is to check the operating conditions of the CT measurements were performed on a scanner with 64-MDCT scanner (GE Healthcare, BrightSpeed) in the service of the Molecular Imaging Center (Cimol) of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG). When performing the image quality tests we used a simulator, Catphan-600, this device has five modules, and in each you can perform a series of tests. Different medical imaging practices have different requirements for acceptable image quality. The results of quality control tests showed that the analyzed equipment is in accordance with the requirements established by current regulations. [pt

  10. Color camera computed tomography imaging spectrometer for improved spatial-spectral image accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor); Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Johnson, William R. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography imaging spectrometers ("CTIS"s) having color focal plane array detectors are provided. The color FPA detector may comprise a digital color camera including a digital image sensor, such as a Foveon X3.RTM. digital image sensor or a Bayer color filter mosaic. In another embodiment, the CTIS includes a pattern imposed either directly on the object scene being imaged or at the field stop aperture. The use of a color FPA detector and the pattern improves the accuracy of the captured spatial and spectral information.

  11. Comparative study of ultrasound imaging, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in gynecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hisaaki; Hoshihara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Mitsunao; Suda, Yoshio; Takenaka, Eiichi; Sasa, Hidenori.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 18 patients who were operated at the National Defense Medical College Hospital and confirmed by pathological diagnosis. We compared ultrasound imaging, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the patients. MRI was useful to diagnose enlargement of the uterine cavity and a small amount of ascites and to understand orientation of the pelvic organs. Ultrasound imaging is the most useful examination to diagnose gynecological diseases. But when it is difficult to diagnose by ultrasound imaging alone, we should employ either CT or MRI, or preferably both. (author)

  12. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  13. Experimental measurement of oil–water two-phase flow by data fusion of electrical tomography sensors and venturi tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yinyan; Deng, Yuchi; Zhang, Maomao; Yu, Peining; Li, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Oil–water two-phase flows are commonly found in the production processes of the petroleum industry. Accurate online measurement of flow rates is crucial to ensure the safety and efficiency of oil exploration and production. A research team from Tsinghua University has developed an experimental apparatus for multiphase flow measurement based on an electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) sensor, an electrical resistance tomography (ERT) sensor, and a venturi tube. This work presents the phase fraction and flow rate measurements of oil–water two-phase flows based on the developed apparatus. Full-range phase fraction can be obtained by the combination of the ECT sensor and the ERT sensor. By data fusion of differential pressures measured by venturi tube and the phase fraction, the total flow rate and single-phase flow rate can be calculated. Dynamic experiments were conducted on the multiphase flow loop in horizontal and vertical pipelines and at various flow rates. (paper)

  14. Inversion techniques in the Soft X-Ray tomography of fusion plasmas: towards real-time applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynář, Jan; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Bonheure, G.; Murari, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2010), s. 733-741 ISSN 1536-1055. [Workshop on Fusion Data Processing, Validation and Ananlyses/6th./. Madrid, 25.01.2010-27.01.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055; GA ČR GA202/09/1467; GA MŠk LA08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma tomography * real - time control * soft-X-ray diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.654, year: 2010 http://www.new.ans.org/store/j_10922

  15. Fusion of infrared and visible images based on BEMD and NSDFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pan; Huang, Zhanhua; Lei, Hai

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new fusion method based on the adaptive multi-scale decomposition of bidimensional empirical mode decomposition (BEMD) and the flexible directional expansion of nonsubsampled directional filter banks (NSDFB) for visible-infrared images. Compared with conventional multi-scale fusion methods, BEMD is non-parametric and completely data-driven, which is relatively more suitable for non-linear signals decomposition and fusion. NSDFB can provide direction filtering on the decomposition levels to capture more geometrical structure of the source images effectively. In our fusion framework, the entropies of the two patterns of source images are firstly calculated and the residue of the image whose entropy is larger is extracted to make it highly relevant with the other source image. Then, the residue and the other source image are decomposed into low-frequency sub-bands and a sequence of high-frequency directional sub-bands in different scales by using BEMD and NSDFB. In this fusion scheme, two relevant fusion rules are used in low-frequency sub-bands and high-frequency directional sub-bands, respectively. Finally, the fused image is obtained by applying corresponding inverse transform. Experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion algorithm can obtain state-of-the-art performance for visible-infrared images fusion in both aspects of objective assessment and subjective visual quality even for the source images obtained in different conditions. Furthermore, the fused results have high contrast, remarkable target information and rich details information that are more suitable for human visual characteristics or machine perception.

  16. Accuracy evaluation of fusion of CT, MR, and SPECT images using commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongioj, Valeria; Brusa, Anna; Loi, Gianfranco; Pignoli, Emanuele; Gramaglia, Alberto; Scorsetti, Marta; Bombardieri, Emilio; Marchesini, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A problem for clinicians is to mentally integrate information from multiple diagnostic sources, such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), whose images give anatomic and metabolic information. Methods and Materials: To combine this different imaging procedure information, and to overlay correspondent slices, we used commercially available software packages (SRS PLATO and IFS). The algorithms utilize a fiducial-based coordinate system (or frame) with 3 N-shaped markers, which allows coordinate transformation of a clinical examination data set (9 spots for each transaxial section) to a stereotactic coordinate system. The N-shaped markers were filled with fluids visible in each modality (gadolinium for MR, calcium chloride for CT, and 99m Tc for SPECT). The frame is relocatable, in the different acquisition modalities, by means of a head holder to which a face mask is fixed so as to immobilize the patient. Position errors due to the algorithms were obtained by evaluating the stereotactic coordinates of five sources detectable in each modality. Results: SPECT and MR position errors due to the algorithms were evaluated with respect to CT: Δx was ≤ 0.9 mm for MR and ≤ 1.4 mm for SPECT, Δy was ≤ 1 mm and ≤ 3 mm for MR and SPECT, respectively. Maximal differences in distance between estimated and actual fiducial centers (geometric mismatch) were in the order of the pixel size (0.8 mm for CT, 1.4 mm for MR, and 1.8 mm for SPECT). In an attempt to distinguish necrosis from residual disease, the image fusion protocol was studied in 35 primary or metastatic brain tumor patients. Conclusions: The image fusion technique has a good degree of accuracy as well as the potential to improve the specificity of tissue identification and the precision of the subsequent treatment planning

  17. Gaussian process tomography for the analysis of line-integrated measurements in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dong

    2014-01-01

    In nuclear fusion research, a variety of diagnostics have been devised for the measurements of different physical quantities, such as electromagnetic radiation in different wavelength intervals. The radiation, including the soft X-ray spectral range, H α emission as well as others, can be recorded by specifically designed detectors with different sampling frequencies. Commonly, only the line-integrated observations are possible due to the fact that the detectors have to view the plasma from a position outside of the plasma. Therefore, tomography algorithms have been developed to infer the local information of the targeted physical variable from a number of line-integrated data. This thesis presents a Bayesian Gaussian Process Tomographic (GPT) method applied to both soft X-ray and bolometer systems. For the ill-posed inversion problem of reconstructing a 2D emissivity distribution from a number of noisy line-integrated data, Bayesian probability theory can provide a posterior probability distribution about many possible solutions centered at a single most probable solution. The combination of Gaussian Process (GP) prior and multivariate normal (MVN) likelihood enables the posterior probability to be a MVN distribution which provides both the solution and its associated uncertainty. The GP prior enforces the regularization on smoothness by adjusting the length-scale defined in a covariance function. Particularly, a non-stationary GP has been developed to improve the accuracy of reconstruction by using locally adaptive length-scales to take into account the varying smoothness at different positions. The parameters embedded in the model assumption can be optimized through maximizing a joint probability of them based on a Bayesian Occam's razor formalism. In contrast with other tomographic techniques, this method is analytic and non-iterative, thus it can be fast enough for real-time applications under an approximate optimization state. The uncertainty of the

  18. Log-Gabor Energy Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion in NSCT Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal medical image fusion is a powerful tool in clinical applications such as noninvasive diagnosis, image-guided radiotherapy, and treatment planning. In this paper, a novel nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT based method for multimodal medical image fusion is presented, which is approximately shift invariant and can effectively suppress the pseudo-Gibbs phenomena. The source medical images are initially transformed by NSCT followed by fusing low- and high-frequency components. The phase congruency that can provide a contrast and brightness-invariant representation is applied to fuse low-frequency coefficients, whereas the Log-Gabor energy that can efficiently determine the frequency coefficients from the clear and detail parts is employed to fuse the high-frequency coefficients. The proposed fusion method has been compared with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT, the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT, and the dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT based image fusion methods and other NSCT-based methods. Visually and quantitatively experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion method can obtain more effective and accurate fusion results of multimodal medical images than other algorithms. Further, the applicability of the proposed method has been testified by carrying out a clinical example on a woman affected with recurrent tumor images.

  19. Quality Assurance of Serial 3D Image Registration, Fusion, and Segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, Michael; Brock, Kristy K.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy relies on images to plan, guide, and assess treatment. Image registration, fusion, and segmentation are integral to these processes; specifically for aiding anatomic delineation, assessing organ motion, and aligning targets with treatment beams in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Future developments in image registration will also improve estimations of the actual dose delivered and quantitative assessment in patient follow-up exams. This article summarizes common and emerging technologies and reviews the role of image registration, fusion, and segmentation in radiotherapy processes. The current quality assurance practices are summarized, and implications for clinical procedures are discussed

  20. Pixel-level multisensor image fusion based on matrix completion and robust principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuozheng; Deller, J. R.; Fleet, Blair D.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired digital images are often corrupted by a lack of camera focus, faulty illumination, or missing data. An algorithm is presented for fusion of multiple corrupted images of a scene using the lifting wavelet transform. The method employs adaptive fusion arithmetic based on matrix completion and self-adaptive regional variance estimation. Characteristics of the wavelet coefficients are used to adaptively select fusion rules. Robust principal component analysis is applied to low-frequency image components, and regional variance estimation is applied to high-frequency components. Experiments reveal that the method is effective for multifocus, visible-light, and infrared image fusion. Compared with traditional algorithms, the new algorithm not only increases the amount of preserved information and clarity but also improves robustness.

  1. Multislice spiral computed tomography imaging in congenital inner ear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Han, Ping; Liang, Bo; Tian, Zhi-liang; Lei, Zi-qiao; Kong, Wei-jia; Feng, Gan-sheng

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of congenital inner ear malformations. Forty-four patients with sensorineural hearing loss were examined on a Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens) CT scanner. The 3-dimensional reconstructions and multiplanar reformation (MPR) were performed using the volume-rendering technique (VRT) on the workstation. Of the 44 patients examined for this study, 25 patients were found to be normal and 19 patients (36 ears) were diagnosed with congenital inner ear malformations. Of the malformations, the axial, MPR, and VRT images can all display the site and degree in 33 of the ears. Volume-rendering technique images were superior to the axial images in displaying the malformations in 3 ears with small lateral semicircular canal malformations. The common malformations were Michel deformity (1 ear), common cavity deformity (3 ears), incomplete partition I (3 ears), incomplete partition II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears), vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears), enlarged vestibular aqueduct (16 ears, 6 of which had other malformations), and internal auditory canal malformation (8 ears, all accompanied by other malformations). Multislice spiral CT allows a comprehensively assessment of various congenital inner ear malformations through high-quality MPR and VRT reconstructions. Volume-rendering technique images can display the site and degree of the malformation 3-dimensionally and intuitionisticly. This is very useful to the cochlear implantation.

  2. Medical images fusion for application in treatment planning systems in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, Renato Assenci

    2006-01-01

    Software for medical images fusion was developed for utilization in CAT3D radiotherapy and MNPS radiosurgery treatment planning systems. A mutual information maximization methodology was used to make the image registration of different modalities by measure of the statistical dependence between the voxels pairs. The alignment by references points makes an initial approximation to the non linear optimization process by downhill simplex method for estimation of the joint histogram. The coordinates transformation function use a trilinear interpolation and search for the global maximum value in a 6 dimensional space, with 3 degree of freedom for translation and 3 degree of freedom for rotation, by making use of the rigid body model. This method was evaluated with CT, MR and PET images from Vanderbilt University database to verify its accuracy by comparison of transformation coordinates of each images fusion with gold-standard values. The median of images alignment error values was 1.6 mm for CT-MR fusion and 3.5 mm for PET-MR fusion, with gold-standard accuracy estimated as 0.4 mm for CT-MR fusion and 1.7 mm for PET-MR fusion. The maximum error values were 5.3 mm for CT-MR fusion and 7.4 mm for PET-MR fusion, and 99.1% of alignment errors were images subvoxels values. The mean computing time was 24 s. The software was successfully finished and implemented in 59 radiotherapy routine services, of which 42 are in Brazil and 17 are in Latin America. This method does not have limitation about different resolutions from images, pixels sizes and slice thickness. Besides, the alignment may be accomplished by axial, coronal or sagittal images. (author)

  3. An X-Ray computed tomography/positron emission tomography system designed specifically for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, John M; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W; Packard, Nathan J; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D; Lindfors, Karen K

    2010-02-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging.

  4. Potential Measurement Errors Due to Image Enlargement in Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uji, Akihito; Murakami, Tomoaki; Muraoka, Yuki; Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Yoshitake, Shin; Dodo, Yoko; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of interpolation and super-resolution (SR) algorithms on quantitative and qualitative assessments of enlarged optical coherence tomography (OCT) images was investigated in this report. Spectral-domain OCT images from 30 eyes in 30 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) and 20 healthy eyes in 20 consecutive volunteers were analyzed. Original image (OR) resolution was reduced by a factor of four. Images were then magnified by a factor of four with and without application of one of the following algorithms: bilinear (BL), bicubic (BC), Lanczos3 (LA), and SR. Differences in peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, photoreceptor layer status, and parallelism (reflects the complexity of photoreceptor layer alterations) were analyzed in each image type. The order of PSNRs from highest to lowest was SR > LA > BC > BL > non-processed enlarged images (NONE). The PSNR was statistically different in all groups. The NONE, BC, and LA images resulted in significantly thicker RNFL measurements than the OR image. In eyes with DME, the photoreceptor layer, which was hardly identifiable in NONE images, became detectable with algorithm application. However, OCT photoreceptor parameters were still assessed as more undetectable than in OR images. Parallelism was not statistically different in OR and NONE images, but other image groups had significantly higher parallelism than OR images. Our results indicated that interpolation and SR algorithms increased OCT image resolution. However, qualitative and quantitative assessments were influenced by algorithm use. Additionally, each algorithm affected the assessments differently. PMID:26024236

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography Technology and Quality Improvement Methods for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of Skin: A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabi, Saba; Turani, Zahra; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Clayton, Anne; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) delivers 3-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution method, OCT images experience some artifacts that lead to misapprehension of tissue structures. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are 3 major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the consequence of deficiencies of optical components. In this short review, we summarize some of the image enhancement algorithms for OCT images which address the abovementioned artifacts. PMID:28638245

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Technology and Quality Improvement Methods for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of Skin: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Adabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT delivers 3-dimensional images of tissue microstructures. Although OCT imaging offers a promising high-resolution method, OCT images experience some artifacts that lead to misapprehension of tissue structures. Speckle, intensity decay, and blurring are 3 major artifacts in OCT images. Speckle is due to the low coherent light source used in the configuration of OCT. Intensity decay is a deterioration of light with respect to depth, and blurring is the consequence of deficiencies of optical components. In this short review, we summarize some of the image enhancement algorithms for OCT images which address the abovementioned artifacts.

  7. Krypton for computed tomography lung ventilation imaging: preliminary animal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of krypton ventilation imaging with intraindividual comparison to xenon ventilation computed tomography (CT). In a first step, attenuation of different concentrations of xenon and krypton was analyzed in a phantom setting. Thereafter, 7 male New Zealand white rabbits (4.4-6.0 kg) were included in an animal study. After orotracheal intubation, an unenhanced CT scan was obtained in end-inspiratory breath-hold. Thereafter, xenon- (30%) and krypton-enhanced (70%) ventilation CT was performed in random order. After a 2-minute wash-in of gas A, CT imaging was performed. After a 45-minute wash-out period and another 2-minute wash-in of gas B, another CT scan was performed using the same scan protocol. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured. Unenhanced and krypton or xenon data were registered and subtracted using a nonrigid image registration tool. Enhancement was quantified and statistically analyzed. One animal had to be excluded from data analysis owing to problems during intubation. The CT scans in the remaining 6 animals were completed without complications. There were no relevant differences in oxygen saturation or heart rate between the scans. Xenon resulted in a mean increase of enhancement of 35.3 ± 5.5 HU, whereas krypton achieved a mean increase of 21.9 ± 1.8 HU in enhancement (P = 0.0055). The use of krypton for lung ventilation imaging appears to be feasible and safe. Despite the use of a markedly higher concentration of krypton, enhancement is significantly worse when compared with xenon CT ventilation imaging, but sufficiently high for CT ventilation imaging studies.

  8. Improved medical image fusion based on cascaded PCA and shift invariant wavelet transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reena Benjamin, J; Jayasree, T

    2018-02-01

    In the medical field, radiologists need more informative and high-quality medical images to diagnose diseases. Image fusion plays a vital role in the field of biomedical image analysis. It aims to integrate the complementary information from multimodal images, producing a new composite image which is expected to be more informative for visual perception than any of the individual input images. The main objective of this paper is to improve the information, to preserve the edges and to enhance the quality of the fused image using cascaded principal component analysis (PCA) and shift invariant wavelet transforms. A novel image fusion technique based on cascaded PCA and shift invariant wavelet transforms is proposed in this paper. PCA in spatial domain extracts relevant information from the large dataset based on eigenvalue decomposition, and the wavelet transform operating in the complex domain with shift invariant properties brings out more directional and phase details of the image. The significance of maximum fusion rule applied in dual-tree complex wavelet transform domain enhances the average information and morphological details. The input images of the human brain of two different modalities (MRI and CT) are collected from whole brain atlas data distributed by Harvard University. Both MRI and CT images are fused using cascaded PCA and shift invariant wavelet transform method. The proposed method is evaluated based on three main key factors, namely structure preservation, edge preservation, contrast preservation. The experimental results and comparison with other existing fusion methods show the superior performance of the proposed image fusion framework in terms of visual and quantitative evaluations. In this paper, a complex wavelet-based image fusion has been discussed. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method enhances the directional features as well as fine edge details. Also, it reduces the redundant details, artifacts, distortions.

  9. Improved detection probability of low level light and infrared image fusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuxiang; Fu, Rongguo; Zhang, Junju; Wang, Wencong; Chang, Benkang

    2018-02-01

    Low level light(LLL) image contains rich information on environment details, but is easily affected by the weather. In the case of smoke, rain, cloud or fog, much target information will lose. Infrared image, which is from the radiation produced by the object itself, can be "active" to obtain the target information in the scene. However, the image contrast and resolution is bad, the ability of the acquisition of target details is very poor, and the imaging mode does not conform to the human visual habit. The fusion of LLL and infrared image can make up for the deficiency of each sensor and give play to the advantages of single sensor. At first, we show the hardware design of fusion circuit. Then, through the recognition probability calculation of the target(one person) and the background image(trees), we find that the trees detection probability of LLL image is higher than that of the infrared image, and the person detection probability of the infrared image is obviously higher than that of LLL image. The detection probability of fusion image for one person and trees is higher than that of single detector. Therefore, image fusion can significantly enlarge recognition probability and improve detection efficiency.

  10. The assessment of multi-sensor image fusion using wavelet transforms for mapping the Brazilian Savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weimar Acerbi, F.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Multi-sensor image fusion using the wavelet approach provides a conceptual framework for the improvement of the spatial resolution with minimal distortion of the spectral content of the source image. This paper assesses whether images with a large ratio of spatial resolution can be fused, and

  11. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.H.; Barber, D.C.; Freeston, I.L.

    1983-01-01

    Tomography images of a body are constructed by placing a plurality of surface electrodes at spaced intervals on the body, causing currents to flow in the body (e.g. by applying a potential between each pair of electrodes in turn, or by induction), and measuring the potential between pairs of electrodes, calculating the potential expected in each case on the assumption that the body consists of a medium of uniform impedance, plotting the isopotentials corresponding to the calculated results to create a uniform image of the body, obtaining the ratio between the measured potential and the calculated potential in each case, and modifying the image in accordance with the respective ratios by increasing the assumed impedance along an isopotential in proportion to a ratio greater than unity or decreasing the assumed impedance in proportion to a ratio less than unity. The modified impedances along the isopotentials for each pair of electrodes are superimposed. The calculations are carried out using a computer and the plotting is carried out by a visual display unit and/or a print-out unit. (author)

  12. CT, MRI and PET image fusion using the ProSoma 3D simulation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.A.; Nisbet, A.; Reise, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Multi-modality imaging is involved in almost all oncology applications focusing on the extent of disease and target volume delineation. Commercial image fusion software packages are becoming available but require comprehensive evaluation to ensure reliability of fusion and the underpinning registration algorithm particularly for radiotherapy. The present work seeks to assess such accuracy for a number of available registration methods provided by the commercial package ProSoma. A NEMA body phantom was used in evaluating CT, MR and PET images. In addition, discussion is provided concerning the choice and geometry of fiducial markers in phantom studies and the effect of window-level on target size, in particular in regard to the application of multi modality imaging in treatment planning. In general, the accuracy of fusion of multi-modality images was within 0.5-1.5 mm of actual feature diameters and < 2 ml volume of actual values, particularly in CT images. (author)

  13. Ant Colony Clustering Algorithm and Improved Markov Random Fusion Algorithm in Image Segmentation of Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New medical imaging technology, such as Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, has been widely used in all aspects of medical diagnosis. The purpose of these imaging techniques is to obtain various qualitative and quantitative data of the patient comprehensively and accurately, and provide correct digital information for diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation after surgery. MR has a good imaging diagnostic advantage for brain diseases. However, as the requirements of the brain image definition and quantitative analysis are always increasing, it is necessary to have better segmentation of MR brain images. The FCM (Fuzzy C-means algorithm is widely applied in image segmentation, but it has some shortcomings, such as long computation time and poor anti-noise capability. In this paper, firstly, the Ant Colony algorithm is used to determine the cluster centers and the number of FCM algorithm so as to improve its running speed. Then an improved Markov random field model is used to improve the algorithm, so that its antinoise ability can be improved. Experimental results show that the algorithm put forward in this paper has obvious advantages in image segmentation speed and segmentation effect.

  14. Ultrasonic Tomography Imaging for Liquid-Gas Flow Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jaysuman PUSPPANATHAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out to measure two-phase liquid – gas flow regime by using a dual functionality ultrasonic transducer. Comparing to the common separated transmitter–receiver ultrasonic pairs transducer, the dual functionality ultrasonic transceiver is capable to produce the same measurable results hence further improvises and contributes to the hardware design improvement and system accuracy. Due to the disadvantages and the limitations of the separated ultrasonic transmitter–receiver pair, this paper presents a non-invasive ultrasonic tomography system using ultrasonic transceivers as an alternative approach. Implementation of ultrasonic transceivers, electronic measurement circuits, data acquisition system and suitable image reconstruction algorithms, the measurement of a liquid/gas flow was realized.

  15. Electrical Resistance Tomography for Subsurface Imaging. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) noninvasively maps the 3-D resistivity field in the subsurface. It can be used on a scale from feet to kilometers. The 3-D resistivity field can be used to infer subsurface hydrogeological features and provides good resolution mapping of confining layers of various types. ERT imaging has been used for real-time monitoring and process control of remediation processes such as soil heating, pump and treat, steam injection, electrokinetics, Dynamic Underground Stripping (TechID 7), Hydrous Pyrolysis/Oxidation (TechID 1519) and more. ERT can be deployed via rapid and inexpensive installation of electrodes using a Cone Penetrometer (TechID 243). Additional applications are described under TechID 140 (Tanks) and TechID 2120 (Injected Subsurface Barriers); see also the related technology TechID 2121 (EIT)

  16. Study for a novel tomography technique using an imaging plate

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, H; Matsubayashi, M

    1999-01-01

    A sinogram is directly recorded onto an imaging plate for neutron tomography, which has excellent capability to detect neutrons. A sinogram-recording-system and outline of the data processing are explained briefly. A tomogram of a test object is reconstructed and shown as the preliminary result. The linearity of CT values was experimentally confirmed up to 1.6 cm sup - sup 1 of effective total macroscopic cross section, but about 10% lower CT value was observed at 2.7 cm sup - sup 1. The linearity limitation and statistical character of CT values are discussed with regard to the dynamic range of the system as well as the effect of background components.

  17. Image Fusion of CT and MR with Sparse Representation in NSST Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal image fusion techniques can integrate the information from different medical images to get an informative image that is more suitable for joint diagnosis, preoperative planning, intraoperative guidance, and interventional treatment. Fusing images of CT and different MR modalities are studied in this paper. Firstly, the CT and MR images are both transformed to nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST domain. So the low-frequency components and high-frequency components are obtained. Then the high-frequency components are merged using the absolute-maximum rule, while the low-frequency components are merged by a sparse representation- (SR- based approach. And the dynamic group sparsity recovery (DGSR algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of the SR-based approach. Finally, the fused image is obtained by performing the inverse NSST on the merged components. The proposed fusion method is tested on a number of clinical CT and MR images and compared with several popular image fusion methods. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed fusion method can provide better fusion results in terms of subjective quality and objective evaluation.

  18. SAR and Infrared Image Fusion in Complex Contourlet Domain Based on Joint Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yiquan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the problems of the large grayscale difference between infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images and their fusion image not being fit for human visual perception, we propose a fusion method for SAR and infrared images in the complex contourlet domain based on joint sparse representation. First, we perform complex contourlet decomposition of the infrared and SAR images. Then, we employ the KSingular Value Decomposition (K-SVD method to obtain an over-complete dictionary of the low-frequency components of the two source images. Using a joint sparse representation model, we then generate a joint dictionary. We obtain the sparse representation coefficients of the low-frequency components of the source images in the joint dictionary by the Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP method and select them using the selection maximization strategy. We then reconstruct these components to obtain the fused low-frequency components and fuse the high-frequency components using two criteria——the coefficient of visual sensitivity and the degree of energy matching. Finally, we obtain the fusion image by the inverse complex contourlet transform. Compared with the three classical fusion methods and recently presented fusion methods, e.g., that based on the Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT and another based on sparse representation, the method we propose in this paper can effectively highlight the salient features of the two source images and inherit their information to the greatest extent.

  19. Imaging cerebral haemorrhage with magnetic induction tomography: numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharni, M; Ledger, P D; Armitage, D W; Holder, D S; Griffiths, H

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a new electromagnetic imaging modality which has the potential to image changes in the electrical conductivity of the brain due to different pathologies. In this study the feasibility of detecting haemorrhagic cerebral stroke with a 16-channel MIT system operating at 10 MHz was investigated. The finite-element method combined with a realistic, multi-layer, head model comprising 12 different tissues, was used for the simulations in the commercial FE package, Comsol Multiphysics. The eddy-current problem was solved and the MIT signals computed for strokes of different volumes occurring at different locations in the brain. The results revealed that a large, peripheral stroke (volume 49 cm(3)) produced phase changes that would be detectable with our currently achievable instrumentation phase noise level (17 m degrees ) in 70 (27%) of the 256 exciter/sensor channel combinations. However, reconstructed images showed that a lower noise level than this, of 1 m degrees , was necessary to obtain good visualization of the strokes. The simulated MIT measurements were compared with those from an independent transmission-line-matrix model in order to give confidence in the results.

  20. Image reconstruction in computerized tomography using the convolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Rebelo, A.M. de.

    1984-03-01

    In the present work an algoritin was derived, using the analytical convolution method (filtered back-projection) for two-dimensional or three-dimensional image reconstruction in computerized tomography applied to non-destructive testing and to the medical use. This mathematical model is based on the analytical Fourier transform method for image reconstruction. This model consists of a discontinuous system formed by an NxN array of cells (pixels). The attenuation in the object under study of a colimated gamma ray beam has been determined for various positions and incidence angles (projections) in terms of the interaction of the beam with the intercepted pixels. The contribution of each pixel to beam attenuation was determined using the weight function W ij which was used for simulated tests. Simulated tests using standard objects with attenuation coefficients in the range of 0,2 to 0,7 cm -1 were carried out using cell arrays of up to 25x25. One application was carried out in the medical area simulating image reconstruction of an arm phantom with attenuation coefficients in the range of 0,2 to 0,5 cm -1 using cell arrays of 41x41. The simulated results show that, in objects with a great number of interfaces and great variations of attenuation coefficients at these interfaces, a good reconstruction is obtained with the number of projections equal to the reconstruction matrix dimension. A good reconstruction is otherwise obtained with fewer projections. (author) [pt

  1. Imaging Cellular Proliferation in Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer remains a major public health problem worldwide. Imaging plays an important role in the assessment of disease at all its clinical phases, including staging, restaging after definitive therapy, evaluation of therapy response, and prognostication. Positron emission tomography with a number of biologically targeted radiotracers has been demonstrated to have potential diagnostic and prognostic utility in the various clinical phases of this prevalent disease. Given the remarkable biological heterogeneity of prostate cancer, one major unmet clinical need that remains is the non-invasive imaging-based characterization of prostate tumors. Accurate tumor characterization allows for image-targeted biopsy and focal therapy as well as facilitates objective assessment of therapy effect. PET in conjunction with radiotracers that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis may be helpful to fulfill this necessity. We review briefly the preclinical and pilot clinical experience with the two major cellular proliferation radiotracers, [18F]-3’-deoxy-3’-fluorothymidine and [18F]-2’-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil in prostate cancer.

  2. Comparison of Volumes between Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images using Dynamic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Eun; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Jung, Woo Hyun; Choi, Byeong Don [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between the volumes acquired with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)images with a reconstruction image-filtering algorithm and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with dynamic phantom. The 4DCT images were obtained from the computerized imaging reference systems (CIRS) phantom using a computed tomography (CT) simulator. We analyzed the volumes for maximum intensity projection (MIP), minimum intensity projection (MinIP) and average intensity projection (AVG) of the images obtained with the 4DCT scanner against those acquired from CBCT images with CT ranger tools. Difference in volume for node of 1, 2 and 3 cm between CBCT and 4DCT was 0.54⁓2.33, 5.16⁓8.06, 9.03⁓20.11 ml in MIP, respectively, 0.00⁓1.48, 0.00⁓8.47, 1.42⁓24.85 ml in MinIP, respectively and 0.00⁓1.17, 0.00⁓2.19, 0.04⁓3.35 ml in AVG, respectively. After a comparative analysis of the volumes for each nodal size, it was apparent that the CBCT images were similar to the AVG images acquired using 4DCT.

  3. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in vascular surgical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelzang, R.L.; Fisher, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is now universally accepted as an extremely useful tool in the investigation of disease throughout the body. CT has revolutionized the practice of medicine in virtually every specialty. In vascular surgery the routine use of CT in a variety of problems has changed the way diagnoses are made. It allows prompt recognition of conditions that were difficult if not impossible to diagnose using older techniques. Nowhere is this concept better epitomized than in the realm of vascular surgical emergencies. In these cases, life or limb threatening conditions such as hemorrhage, prosthetic graft infection, or vascular occlusion exist as the result of aneurysm, trauma, dissection, tumor, or previous arterial surgery. Prompt and appropriate diagnosis of the immediate problem and its cause is afforded by the use of contrast enhanced CT. This frequently obviates the need for angiography and eliminates less accurate tests such as plain films, barium studies, nuclear medicine scans, and/or ultrasound. In the past several years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body has become a practical reality. The technique offers promise in the imaging of many disease processes. In the neural axis it has become a preferred modality due to inherently higher contrast resolution and freedom from artifacts. Progress in body imaging has been slower due to problems with motion artifact but early results in cardiovascular imaging demonstrate that MRI offers theoretical advantages over CT that may make it the imaging test of choice in vascular disease. This paper identifies those vascular surgical emergencies in which CT and MRI are most useful and clarifies and illustrates the diagnostic features of the various conditions encountered

  4. Fluorinated tracers for imaging cancer with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Olivier; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Luxen, Andre; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Rigo, Pierre; Hustinx, Roland

    2004-01-01

    2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is currently the only fluorinated tracer used in routine clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Fluorine-18 is considered the ideal radioisotope for PET imaging owing to the low positron energy (0.64 MeV), which not only limits the dose rate to the patient but also results in a relatively short range of emission in tissue, thereby providing high-resolution images. Further, the 110-min physical half-life allows for high-yield radiosynthesis, transport from the production site to the imaging site and imaging protocols that may span hours, which permits dynamic studies and assessment of potentially fairly slow metabolic processes. The synthesis of fluorinated tracers as an alternative to FDG was initially tested using nucleophilic fluorination of the molecule, as performed when radiolabelling with iodine-124 or bromide-76. However, in addition to being long, with multiple steps, this procedure is not recommended for bioactive molecules containing reactive groups such as amine or thiol groups. Radiochemical yields are also often low. More recently, radiosynthesis from prosthetic group precursors, which allows easier radiolabelling of biomolecules, has led to the development of numerous fluorinated tracers. Given the wide availability of 18 F, such tracers may well develop into important routine tracers. This article is a review of the literature concerning fluorinated radiotracers recently developed and under investigation for possible PET imaging in cancer patients. Two groups can be distinguished. The first includes ''generalist'' tracers, i.e. tracers amenable to use in a wide variety of tumours and indications, very similar in this respect to FDG. These are tracers for non-specific cell metabolism, such as protein synthesis, amino acid transport, nucleic acid synthesis or membrane component synthesis. The second group consists of ''specific'' tracers for receptor expression (i.e. oestrogens or somatostatin), cell

  5. An object-oriented framework for medical image registration, fusion, and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yang-Ming; Cochoff, Steven M

    2006-06-01

    An object-oriented framework for image registration, fusion, and visualization was developed based on the classic model-view-controller paradigm. The framework employs many design patterns to facilitate legacy code reuse, manage software complexity, and enhance the maintainability and portability of the framework. Three sample applications built a-top of this framework are illustrated to show the effectiveness of this framework: the first one is for volume image grouping and re-sampling, the second one is for 2D registration and fusion, and the last one is for visualization of single images as well as registered volume images.

  6. High energy positron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shengzu

    2003-01-01

    The technique of High Energy Positron Imaging (HEPI) is the new development and extension of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). It consists of High Energy Collimation Imaging (HECI), Dual Head Coincidence Detection Imaging (DHCDI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We describe the history of the development and the basic principle of the imaging methods of HEPI in details in this paper. Finally, the new technique of the imaging fusion, which combined the anatomical image and the functional image together are also introduced briefly

  7. Target localization on standard axial images in computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis for functional neurosurgery - a technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, A.-A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique for marking functional neurosurgery target on computed tomography (CT) axial image is described. This permits the use of standard axial image for computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis in functional neurosurgery. (Author)

  8. Multi-Scale Pixel-Based Image Fusion Using Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed ur Rehman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel scheme to perform the fusion of multiple images using the multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD algorithm is proposed. Standard multi-scale fusion techniques make a priori assumptions regarding input data, whereas standard univariate empirical mode decomposition (EMD-based fusion techniques suffer from inherent mode mixing and mode misalignment issues, characterized respectively by either a single intrinsic mode function (IMF containing multiple scales or the same indexed IMFs corresponding to multiple input images carrying different frequency information. We show that MEMD overcomes these problems by being fully data adaptive and by aligning common frequency scales from multiple channels, thus enabling their comparison at a pixel level and subsequent fusion at multiple data scales. We then demonstrate the potential of the proposed scheme on a large dataset of real-world multi-exposure and multi-focus images and compare the results against those obtained from standard fusion algorithms, including the principal component analysis (PCA, discrete wavelet transform (DWT and non-subsampled contourlet transform (NCT. A variety of image fusion quality measures are employed for the objective evaluation of the proposed method. We also report the results of a hypothesis testing approach on our large image dataset to identify statistically-significant performance differences.

  9. Multi-focus image fusion with the all convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao-ben; Gao, She-sheng

    2018-01-01

    A decision map contains complete and clear information about the image to be fused, which is crucial to various image fusion issues, especially multi-focus image fusion. However, in order to get a satisfactory image fusion effect, getting a decision map is very necessary and usually difficult to finish. In this letter, we address this problem with convolutional neural network (CNN), aiming to get a state-of-the-art decision map. The main idea is that the max-pooling of CNN is replaced by a convolution layer, the residuals are propagated backwards by gradient descent, and the training parameters of the individual layers of the CNN are updated layer by layer. Based on this, we propose a new all CNN (ACNN)-based multi-focus image fusion method in spatial domain. We demonstrate that the decision map obtained from the ACNN is reliable and can lead to high-quality fusion results. Experimental results clearly validate that the proposed algorithm can obtain state-of-the-art fusion performance in terms of both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  10. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A; Foran, Bernadette H; Hatton, Matthew Q; Wild, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3 He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3 He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3 He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p 3 He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3 He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3 He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  11. Comparison of radiation absorbed dose in target organs in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography and computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjnoush M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: The objective of this study was to measure and compare the tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, salivary glands, eye and skin in maxillofacial imaging with panoramic, conventional linear tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and computed tomography (CT."nMaterials and Methods: Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD were implanted in 14 sites of RANDO phantom to measure average tissue absorbed dose in thyroid gland, parotid glands, submandibular glands, sublingual gland, lenses and buccal skin. The Promax (PLANMECA, Helsinki, Finland unit was selected for Panoramic, conventional linear tomography and cone beam computed tomography examinations and spiral Hispeed/Fxi (General Electric,USA was selected for CT examination. The average tissue absorbed doses were used for the calculation of the equivalent and effective doses in each organ."nResults: The average absorbed dose for Panoramic ranged from 0.038 mGY (Buccal skin to 0.308 mGY (submandibular gland, linear tomography ranged from 0.048 mGY (Lens to 0.510 mGY (submandibular gland,CBCT ranged from 0.322 mGY (thyroid glad to 1.144 mGY (Parotid gland and in CT ranged from 2.495 mGY (sublingual gland to 3.424 mGY (submandibular gland. Total effective dose in CBCT is 5 times greater than Panoramic and 4 times greater than linear tomography, and in CT, 30 and 22 times greater than Panoramic and linear tomography, respectively. Total effective dose in CT is 6 times greater than CBCT."nConclusion: For obtaining 3-dimensional (3D information in maxillofacial region, CBCT delivers the lower dose than CT, and should be preferred over a medical CT imaging. Furthermore, during maxillofacial imaging, salivary glands receive the highest dose of radiation.

  12. Prediction of the microsurgical window for skull-base tumors by advanced three-dimensional multi-fusion volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Saito, Akihiko; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko; Ishida, Go

    2011-01-01

    The surgery of skull base tumors (SBTs) is difficult due to the complex and narrow surgical window that is restricted by the cranium and important structures. The utility of three-dimensional multi-fusion volumetric imaging (3-D MFVI) for visualizing the predicted window for SBTs was evaluated. Presurgical simulation using 3-D MFVI was performed in 32 patients with SBTs. Imaging data were collected from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography. Skull data was processed to imitate actual bone resection and integrated with various structures extracted from appropriate imaging modalities by image-analyzing software. The simulated views were compared with the views obtained during surgery. All craniotomies and bone resections except opening of the acoustic canal in 2 patients were performed as simulated. The simulated window allowed observation of the expected microsurgical anatomies including tumors, vasculatures, and cranial nerves, through the predicted operative window. We could not achieve the planned tumor removal in only 3 patients. 3-D MFVI afforded high quality images of the relevant microsurgical anatomies during the surgery of SBTs. The intraoperative deja-vu effect of the simulation increased the confidence of the surgeon in the planned surgical procedures. (author)

  13. Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network Algorithm for Fusion of Multimodality Brain Images with Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha SRINIVASAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the review of medical imaging techniques, an important fact that emerged is that radiologists and physicians still are in a need of high-resolution medical images with complementary information from different modalities to ensure efficient analysis. This requirement should have been sorted out using fusion techniques with the fused image being used in image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy and non-invasive diagnosis. Aim: This paper focuses on Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN Algorithm for fusion of multimodality brain images and the fused image is further analyzed using subjective (human perception and objective (statistical measures for the quality analysis. Material and Methods: The modalities used in fusion are CT, MRI with subtypes T1/T2/PD/GAD, PET and SPECT, since the information from each modality is complementary to one another. The objective measures selected for evaluation of fused image were: Information Entropy (IE - image quality, Mutual Information (MI – deviation in fused to the source images and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR – noise level, for analysis. Eight sets of brain images with different modalities (T2 with T1, T2 with CT, PD with T2, PD with GAD, T2 with GAD, T2 with SPECT-Tc, T2 with SPECT-Ti, T2 with PET are chosen for experimental purpose and the proposed technique is compared with existing fusion methods such as the Average method, the Contrast pyramid, the Shift Invariant Discrete Wavelet Transform (SIDWT with Harr and the Morphological pyramid, using the selected measures to ascertain relative performance. Results: The IE value and SNR value of the fused image derived from dual channel PCNN is higher than other fusion methods, shows that the quality is better with less noise. Conclusion: The fused image resulting from the proposed method retains the contrast, shape and texture as in source images without false information or information loss.

  14. Data Fusion and Fuzzy Clustering on Ratio Images for Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsupervised approach to change detection via synthetic aperture radar (SAR images becomes more and more popular. The three-step procedure is the most widely used procedure, but it does not work well with the Yellow River Estuary dataset obtained by two synthetic aperture radars. The difference of the two radars in imaging techniques causes severe noise, which seriously affects the difference images generated by a single change detector in step two, producing the difference image. To deal with problem, we propose a change detector to fuse the log-ratio (LR and the mean-ratio (MR images by a context independent variable behavior (CIVB operator and can utilize the complement information in two ratio images. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed change detector, the change detector will be compared with three other change detectors, namely, the log-ratio (LR, mean-ratio (MR, and the wavelet-fusion (WR operator, to deal with three datasets with different characteristics. The four operators are applied not only in a widely used three-step procedure but also in a new approach. The experiments show that the false alarms and overall errors of change detection are greatly reduced, and the kappa and KCC are improved a lot. And its superiority can also be observed visually.

  15. Analyzer-based imaging of spinal fusion in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M E; Beavis, R C; Allen, L A; Fiorella, David; Schueltke, E; Juurlink, B H; Chapman, L D; Zhong, Z

    2008-01-01

    Analyzer-based imaging (ABI) utilizes synchrotron radiation sources to create collimated monochromatic x-rays. In addition to x-ray absorption, this technique uses refraction and scatter rejection to create images. ABI provides dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging techniques. Twenty-one adult male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups to undergo the following interventions: (1) non-injured control, (2) decortication alone, (3) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and (4) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and interspinous wiring. Surgical procedures were performed at the L5-6 level. Animals were killed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the intervention and the spine muscle blocks were excised. Specimens were assessed for the presence of fusion by (1) manual testing, (2) conventional absorption radiography and (3) ABI. ABI showed no evidence of bone fusion in groups 1 and 2 and showed solid or possibly solid fusion in subjects from groups 3 and 4 at 6 weeks. Metal artifacts were not present in any of the ABI images. Conventional absorption radiographs did not provide diagnostic quality imaging of either the graft material or fusion masses in any of the specimens in any of the groups. Synchrotron-based ABI represents a novel imaging technique which can be used to assess spinal fusion in a small animal model. ABI produces superior image quality when compared to conventional radiographs

  16. Analyzer-based imaging of spinal fusion in an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. E.; Beavis, R. C.; Fiorella, David; Schültke, E.; Allen, L. A.; Juurlink, B. H.; Zhong, Z.; Chapman, L. D.

    2008-05-01

    Analyzer-based imaging (ABI) utilizes synchrotron radiation sources to create collimated monochromatic x-rays. In addition to x-ray absorption, this technique uses refraction and scatter rejection to create images. ABI provides dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging techniques. Twenty-one adult male Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups to undergo the following interventions: (1) non-injured control, (2) decortication alone, (3) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and (4) decortication with iliac crest bone grafting and interspinous wiring. Surgical procedures were performed at the L5-6 level. Animals were killed at 2, 4 and 6 weeks after the intervention and the spine muscle blocks were excised. Specimens were assessed for the presence of fusion by (1) manual testing, (2) conventional absorption radiography and (3) ABI. ABI showed no evidence of bone fusion in groups 1 and 2 and showed solid or possibly solid fusion in subjects from groups 3 and 4 at 6 weeks. Metal artifacts were not present in any of the ABI images. Conventional absorption radiographs did not provide diagnostic quality imaging of either the graft material or fusion masses in any of the specimens in any of the groups. Synchrotron-based ABI represents a novel imaging technique which can be used to assess spinal fusion in a small animal model. ABI produces superior image quality when compared to conventional radiographs.

  17. A Remote Sensing Image Fusion Method based on adaptive dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongdi; Che, Zongxi

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses using a remote sensing fusion method, based on' adaptive sparse representation (ASP)', to provide improved spectral information, reduce data redundancy and decrease system complexity. First, the training sample set is formed by taking random blocks from the images to be fused, the dictionary is then constructed using the training samples, and the remaining terms are clustered to obtain the complete dictionary by iterated processing at each step. Second, the self-adaptive weighted coefficient rule of regional energy is used to select the feature fusion coefficients and complete the reconstruction of the image blocks. Finally, the reconstructed image blocks are rearranged and an average is taken to obtain the final fused images. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to other traditional remote sensing image fusion methods in both spectral information preservation and spatial resolution.

  18. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  19. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Using Radiolabeled Inorganic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  20. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of primary intracranial histiocytic sarcoma in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, B.T.; Park, C.; Yoo, J.H.; Gu, S.H.; Jang, D.P.; Kim, Y.B.; Woo, E.J.; Kim, D.Y.; Cho, Z.H.; Park, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    A 10-year-old, neutered male, Maltese dog presented with a three week history of intention tremor, right hind limb rigidity, poor coordination, and occasional circling to the left. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, a mass was identified in the right occipital lobe and cerebellum. Three weeks after the initial MRI scan, we performed an sup(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) of the brain. The FDG-PET demonstrated areas of hypermetabolism in the right occipital lobe, cerebellum, pons, and medulla oblongata. When the standardized uptake value was calculated, the hypermetabolic lesion was higher than the gray matter values. The anatomical location of the hypermetabolic lesion was more precisely identified by the PET-MRI fusion images. The dog was definitively diagnosed as a primary histiocytic sarcoma of the brain. This is the first report of PET findings of an intracranial histiocytic sarcoma in a dog

  1. X-ray micro-tomography system for small-animal imaging with zoom-in imaging capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Sang Chul; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2004-01-01

    Since a micro-tomography system capable of μm-resolution imaging cannot be used for whole-body imaging of a small laboratory animal without sacrificing its spatial resolution, it is desirable for a micro-tomography system to have local imaging capability. In this paper, we introduce an x-ray micro-tomography system capable of high-resolution imaging of a local region inside a small animal. By combining two kinds of projection data, one from a full field-of-view (FOV) scan of the whole body and the other from a limited FOV scan of the region of interest (ROI), we have obtained zoomed-in images of the ROI without any contrast anomalies commonly appearing in conventional local tomography. For experimental verification of the zoom-in imaging capability, we have integrated a micro-tomography system using a micro-focus x-ray source, a 1248 x 1248 flat-panel x-ray detector, and a precision scan mechanism. The mismatches between the two projection data caused by misalignments of the scan mechanism have been estimated with a calibration phantom, and the mismatch effects have been compensated in the image reconstruction procedure. Zoom-in imaging results of bony tissues with a spatial resolution of 10 lp mm -1 suggest that zoom-in micro-tomography can be greatly used for high-resolution imaging of a local region in small-animal studies

  2. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Vinekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research.

  3. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  4. Dissolution-Enlarged Fractures Imaging Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siami-Irdemoosa, Elnaz

    In recent years the electrical imaging techniques have been largely applied to geotechnical and environmental investigations. These techniques have proven to be the best geophysical methods for site investigations in karst terrain, particularly when the overburden soil is clay-dominated. Karst is terrain with a special landscape and distinctive hydrological system developed by dissolution of rocks, particularly carbonate rocks such as limestone and dolomite, made by enlarging fractures into underground conduits that can enlarge into caverns, and in some cases collapse to form sinkholes. Bedding planes, joints, and faults are the principal structural guides for underground flow and dissolution in almost all karstified rocks. Despite the important role of fractures in karst development, the geometry of dissolution-enlarged fractures remain poorly unknown. These features are characterized by an strong contrast with the surrounding formations in terms of physical properties, such as electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used as the primary geophysical tool to image the subsurface in a karst terrain in Greene County, Missouri. Pattern, orientation and density of the joint sets were interpreted from ERT data in the investigation site. The Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Wave (MASW) method and coring were employed to validate the interpretation results. Two sets of orthogonal visually prominent joints have been identified in the investigation site: north-south trending joint sets and west-east trending joint sets. However, most of the visually prominent joint sets are associated with either cultural features that concentrate runoff, natural surface drainage features or natural surface drainage.

  5. Carbon-11-methionine positron emission tomography imaging of chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong [Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Medical Imaging, Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, 263-8555, Chiba (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Tamura, Katsumi; Sagou, Kenji; Kandatsu, Susumu [Clinical Diagnosis Section, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tian, Mei; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Tanada, Shuji [Department of Medical Imaging, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that arises from notochord remnants. This is the first trial to investigate the utility of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of chordoma before and after carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifteen patients with chordoma were investigated with MET-PET before and after CIRT and the findings analyzed visually and quantitatively. Tumor MET uptake was evaluated by tumor-to-nontumor ratio (T/N ratio). In 12 (80%) patients chordoma was clearly visible in the baseline MET-PET study with a mean T/N ratio of 3.3{+-}1.7. The MET uptake decreased significantly to 2.3{+-}1.4 after CIRT (P<0.05). A significant reduction in tumor MET uptake of 24% was observed after CIRT. Fourteen (93%) patients showed no local recurrence after CIRT with a median follow-up time of 20 months. This study has demonstrated that MET-PET is feasible for imaging of chordoma. MET-PET could provide important tumor metabolic information for the therapeutic monitoring of chordoma after CIRT. (orig.)

  6. Carbon-11-methionine positron emission tomography imaging of chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hong; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Tamura, Katsumi; Sagou, Kenji; Kandatsu, Susumu; Tian, Mei; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Tanada, Shuji; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2004-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that arises from notochord remnants. This is the first trial to investigate the utility of 11 C-methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the imaging of chordoma before and after carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT). Fifteen patients with chordoma were investigated with MET-PET before and after CIRT and the findings analyzed visually and quantitatively. Tumor MET uptake was evaluated by tumor-to-nontumor ratio (T/N ratio). In 12 (80%) patients chordoma was clearly visible in the baseline MET-PET study with a mean T/N ratio of 3.3±1.7. The MET uptake decreased significantly to 2.3±1.4 after CIRT (P<0.05). A significant reduction in tumor MET uptake of 24% was observed after CIRT. Fourteen (93%) patients showed no local recurrence after CIRT with a median follow-up time of 20 months. This study has demonstrated that MET-PET is feasible for imaging of chordoma. MET-PET could provide important tumor metabolic information for the therapeutic monitoring of chordoma after CIRT. (orig.)

  7. Clinical application of positron emission tomography imaging in urologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua; Wu Guangyuan

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an advanced noninvasive molecular imaging modality that is being investigated for use in the differentiation, diagnosis, and guiding therapy ora variety of cancer types. FDG PET has the unique clinical value in the differentiation, diagnosis, and monitoring therapy of prostate, such as bladder, renal, and testicle cancer. However, high false-positive and false-negative findings are observed in the detection of these tumors with FDG PET. 11 C-Choline (CH) and 11 C-acetate (AC) can overcome the pitfall of FDG, and appear to be more successful than FGD in imaging prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The short half-life of 11 C prevents the widespread use of CH and AC and 18 F-fluorocholine (FCH) and 18 F-fluoroacetate (FAC) seem to be potential tracers. Potential clinical value of the new PET tracers, such as 3'-deoxy-3'- 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), 18 F-fluorodihydrotestosterone (FDHT), and 9-(4- 18 F-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)-guanine( 18 F-FHBG) in the detection of urologic tumors, can deserve further study. (authors)

  8. [Diagnosis. Radiological study. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Because of its low cost, availability in primary care and ease of interpretation, simple X-ray should be the first-line imaging technique used by family physicians for the diagnosis and/or follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, this technique should only be used if there are sound indications and if the results will influence decision-making. Despite the increase of indications in patients with rheumatological disease, the role of ultrasound in patients with osteoarthritis continues to be limited. Computed tomography (CT) is of some -although limited- use in osteoarthritis, especially in the study of complex joints (such as the sacroiliac joint and facet joints). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has represented a major advance in the evaluation of joint cartilage and subchondral bone in patients with osteoarthritis but, because of its high cost and diagnostic-prognostic yield, this technique should only be used in highly selected patients. The indications for ultrasound, CT and MRI in patients with osteoarthritis continue to be limited in primary care and often coincide with situations in which the patient may require hospital referral. Patient safety should be bourne in mind. Patients should be protected from excessive ionizing radiation due to unnecessary repeat X-rays or inadequate views or to requests for tests such as CT, when not indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Electrical impedance tomography imaging using a priori ultrasound data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Manuchehr

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different imaging systems (e.g. electrical, magnetic, and ultrasound rely on a wide variety of physical properties, and the datasets obtained from such systems provide only partial information about the unknown true state. One approach is to choose complementary imaging systems, and to combine the information to achieve a better representation. Methods This paper discusses the combination of ultrasound and electrical impedance tomography (EIT information. Ultrasound reflection signals are good at locating sharp acoustic density changes associated with the boundaries of objects. Some boundaries, however, may be indeterminable due to masking from intermediate boundaries or because they are outside the ultrasound beam. Conversely, the EIT data contains relatively low-quality information, but it includes the whole region enclosed by the electrodes. Results Results are shown from a narrowband level-set method applied to 2D and 3D EIT incorporating limited angle ultrasound time of flight data. Conclusion The EIT reconstruction is shown to be faster and more accurate using the additional edge information from both one and four transducer ultrasound systems.

  10. A stochastic approach for automatic registration and fusion of left atrial electroanatomic maps with 3D CT anatomical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristoforetti, Alessandro; Mase, Michela; Faes, Luca; Centonze, Maurizio; Greco, Maurizio Del; Antolini, Renzo; Nollo, Giandomenico; Ravelli, Flavia

    2007-01-01

    The integration of electroanatomic maps with highly resolved computed tomography cardiac images plays an important role in the successful planning of the ablation procedure of arrhythmias. In this paper, we present and validate a fully-automated strategy for the registration and fusion of sparse, atrial endocardial electroanatomic maps (CARTO maps) with detailed left atrial (LA) anatomical reconstructions segmented from a pre-procedural MDCT scan. Registration is accomplished by a parameterized geometric transformation of the CARTO points and by a stochastic search of the best parameter set which minimizes the misalignment between transformed CARTO points and the LA surface. The subsequent fusion of electrophysiological information on the registered CT atrium is obtained through radial basis function interpolation. The algorithm is validated by simulation and by real data from 14 patients referred to CT imaging prior to the ablation procedure. Results are presented, which show the validity of the algorithmic scheme as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of the integration process. The obtained results encourage the application of the integration method in post-intervention ablation assessment and basic AF research and suggest the development for real-time applications in catheter guiding during ablation intervention

  11. Solving the problem of imaging resolution: stochastic multi-scale image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Mallants, Dirk; Gilyazetdinova, Dina; Gerke, Kiril

    2016-04-01

    rocks) and RFBR grant 15-34-20989 (data fusion). References: 1. Karsanina, M.V., Gerke, K.M., Skvortsova, E.B., Mallants, D. Universal spatial correlation functions for describing and reconstructing soil microstructure. PLoS ONE 10(5): e0126515 (2015). 2. Gerke, K.M., Karsanina, M.V., Mallants, D. Universal stochastic multiscale image fusion: an example application for shale rock. Scientific Reports 5: 15880 (2015). 3. Gerke, K.M., Karsanina, M.V., Vasilyev, R.V., Mallants, D. Improving pattern reconstruction using correlation functions computed in directions. Europhys. Lett. 106(6), 66002 (2014). 4. Gerke, K.M., Karsanina, M.V. Improving stochastic reconstructions by weighting correlation functions in an objective function. Europhys. Lett. 111, 56002 (2015).

  12. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillam, John E.; Rafecas, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  13. Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstruction for novel imaging scenarios in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillam, John E. [The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences and The Brain and Mind Centre, Camperdown (Australia); Rafecas, Magdalena, E-mail: rafecas@imt.uni-luebeck.de [University of Lubeck, Institute of Medical Engineering, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2016-02-11

    Emission imaging incorporates both the development of dedicated devices for data acquisition as well as algorithms for recovering images from that data. Emission tomography is an indirect approach to imaging. The effect of device modification on the final image can be understood through both the way in which data are gathered, using simulation, and the way in which the image is formed from that data, or image reconstruction. When developing novel devices, systems and imaging tasks, accurate simulation and image reconstruction allow performance to be estimated, and in some cases optimized, using computational methods before or during the process of physical construction. However, there are a vast range of approaches, algorithms and pre-existing computational tools that can be exploited and the choices made will affect the accuracy of the in silico results and quality of the reconstructed images. On the one hand, should important physical effects be neglected in either the simulation or reconstruction steps, specific enhancements provided by novel devices may not be represented in the results. On the other hand, over-modeling of device characteristics in either step leads to large computational overheads that can confound timely results. Here, a range of simulation methodologies and toolkits are discussed, as well as reconstruction algorithms that may be employed in emission imaging. The relative advantages and disadvantages of a range of options are highlighted using specific examples from current research scenarios.

  14. Acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region for biomedical prototyping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurer, Maria Ines; Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes da; Santa Barbara, Ailton; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Oliveira, Marilia Gerhardt de; Silva, Daniela Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical prototyping has resulted from a merger of rapid prototyping and imaging diagnosis technologies. However, this process is complex, considering the necessity of interaction between biomedical sciences and engineering. Good results are highly dependent on the acquisition of computed tomography images and their subsequent manipulation by means of specific software. The present study describes the experience of a multidisciplinary group of researchers in the acquisition and manipulation of computed tomography images of the maxillofacial region aiming at biomedical prototyping for surgical purposes. (author)

  15. CT and MR image fusion using two different methods after prostate brachytherapy: impact on post-implant dosimetric assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servois, V.; El Khoury, C.; Lantoine, A.; Ollivier, L.; Neuenschwander, S.; Chauveinc, L.; Cosset, J.M.; Flam, T.; Rosenwald, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    To study different methods of CT and MR images fusion in patient treated by brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. To compare the results of the dosimetric study realized on CT slices and images fusion. Fourteen cases of patients treated by 1125 were retrospectively studied. The CT examinations were realized with continuous section of 5 mm thickness, and MR images were obtained with a surface coil with contiguous section of 3 mm thickness. For the images fusion process, only the T2 weighted MR sequence was used. Two processes of images fusion were realized for each patient, using as reference marks the bones of the pelvis and the implanted seeds. A quantitative and qualitative appreciation was made by the operators, for each patient and both methods of images fusion. The dosimetric study obtained by a dedicated software was realized on CT images and all types of images fusion. The usual dosimetric indexes (D90, V 100 and V 150) were compared for each type of image. The quantitative results given by the software of images fusion showed a superior accuracy to the one obtained by the pelvic bony reference marks. Conversely, qualitative and quantitative results obtained by the operators showed a better accuracy of the images fusion based on iodine seeds. For two patients out of three presenting a D90 inferior to 145 Gy on CT examination, the D90 was superior to this norm when the dosimetry was based on images fusion, whatever the method used. The images fusion method based on implanted seed matching seems to be more precise than the one using bony reference marks. The dosimetric study realized on images fusion could allow to rectify possible errors, mainly due to difficulties in surrounding prostate contour delimitation on CT images. (authors)

  16. Live-cell imaging of conidial anastomosis tube fusion during colony initiation in Fusarium oxysporum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smija M Kurian

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum exhibits conidial anastomosis tube (CAT fusion during colony initiation to form networks of conidial germlings. Here we determined the optimal culture conditions for this fungus to undergo CAT fusion between microconidia in liquid medium. Extensive high resolution, confocal live-cell imaging was performed to characterise the different stages of CAT fusion, using genetically encoded fluorescent labelling and vital fluorescent organelle stains. CAT homing and fusion were found to be dependent on adhesion to the surface, in contrast to germ tube development which occurs in the absence of adhesion. Staining with fluorescently labelled concanavalin A indicated that the cell wall composition of CATs differs from that of microconidia and germ tubes. The movement of nuclei, mitochondria, vacuoles and lipid droplets through fused germlings was observed by live-cell imaging.

  17. In vivo breast sound-speed imaging with ultrasound tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Cuiping [KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE; Duric, Neb [KARMANOS CANCER INSTITUTE; Littrup, Peter [KARMONOS CANCER INSTITUTE

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For all four breast types from fatty to dense, the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m{center_dot} s) {sup -1}) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4 fold compared to the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422 {+-} 9 mls (mean{+-} SD) and1487 {+-} 21 mls, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions (1548{+-}17 mls) was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513{+-}27 mls) (one-sided p

  18. Survey of image quality and patient dose for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto, Fernando Mecca

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the dose index and the image quality in seventeen computed tomography scanners installed in radiology departments at the city of Rio de Janeiro. The American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom (Gammex, 464) was used for the image quality evaluation. The following parameters were investigated according to the procedure manual of the ACR phantom: CT number calibration, exactitude of the slice thickness, low and high contrast resolution, uniformity, noise and artifacts. Despite of the CT number accuracy, only one scanner passed in the test. The low contrast resolution and the uniformity criteria were not accomplished in two different scanners. The conformity for the criteria established for slice width and high contrast was not verified in 16% and 11 % of the equipment respectively. The noise, expressed as a standard deviation measured in the center of the image in an adult abdomen protocol, ranged from 2.8 to 9.5. The ACR criteria of the accreditation program were not accomplished in the sample evaluated. Some parameters failed are essential to assure the diagnostic accuracy. For the head scans CTDI 100,VOL values varied between 9 and 109 mGy and the DLP from 160 to 2000 mGy cm for adults. Values for abdomen scans varied between 8 and 94 mGy and the DLP from 180 to 3700 mGy cm for adults, and CTDI 100,VOL from 3 to 54 mGy and DLP from 46 to 1300 mGy cm for children. Similar ranges were found for hi-resolution chest scans. These results are compatibles with those from reported literature and indicate a large potential for optimization and dose reduction, specially in pediatric patients. (author)

  19. Image fusion between whole body FDG PET images and whole body MRI images using a full-automatic mutual information-based multimodality image registration software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Yoshitada; Fujibuchi, Toshiou; Isobe, Tomoko; Kazama, Toshiki; Ito, Hisao

    2006-01-01

    We attempted image fusion between whole body PET and whole body MRI of thirty patients using a full-automatic mutual information (MI) -based multimodality image registration software and evaluated accuracy of this method and impact of the coregistrated imaging on diagnostic accuracy. For 25 of 30 fused images in body area, translating gaps were within 6 mm in all axes and rotating gaps were within 2 degrees around all axes. In head and neck area, considerably much gaps caused by difference of head inclination at imaging occurred in 16 patients, however these gaps were able to decrease by fused separately. In 6 patients, diagnostic accuracy using PET/MRI fused images was superior compared by PET image alone. This work shows that whole body FDG PET images and whole body MRI images can be automatically fused using MI-based multimodality image registration software accurately and this technique can add useful information when evaluating FDG PET images. (author)

  20. Usefulness of CT based SPECT Fusion Image in the lung Disease : Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Kim, Tae Hyung; Shin, Ji Yun

    2012-01-01

    Recently, SPECT/CT system has been applied to many diseases, however, the application is not extensively applied at pulmonary disease. Especially, in case that, the pulmonary embolisms suspect at the CT images, SPECT is performed. For the accurate diagnosis, SPECT/CT tests are subsequently undergoing. However, without SPECT/CT, there are some limitations to apply these procedures. With SPECT/CT, although, most of the examination performed after CT. Moreover, such a test procedures generate unnecessary dual irradiation problem to the patient. In this study, we evaluated the amount of unnecessary irradiation, and the usefulness of fusion images of pulmonary disease, which independently acquired from SPECT and CT. Using NEMA PhantomTM (NU2-2001), SPECT and CT scan were performed for fusion images. From June 2011 to September 2010, 10 patients who didn't have other personal history, except lung disease were selected (male: 7, female: 3, mean age: 65.3±12.7). In both clinical patient and phantom data, the fusion images scored higher than SPECT and CT images. The fusion images, which is combined with pulmonary vessel images from CT and functional images from SPECT, can increase the detection possibility in detecting pulmonary embolism in the resin of lung parenchyma. It is sure that performing SPECT and CT in integral SPECT/CT system were better. However, we believe this protocol can give more informative data to have more accurate diagnosis in the hospital without integral SPECT/CT system.

  1. Mosaicing of single plane illumination microscopy images using groupwise registration and fast content-based image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preibisch, Stephan; Rohlfing, Torsten; Hasak, Michael P.; Tomancak, Pavel

    2008-03-01

    Single Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM; Huisken et al., Nature 305(5686):1007-1009, 2004) is an emerging microscopic technique that enables live imaging of large biological specimens in their entirety. By imaging the living biological sample from multiple angles SPIM has the potential to achieve isotropic resolution throughout even relatively large biological specimens. For every angle, however, only a relatively shallow section of the specimen is imaged with high resolution, whereas deeper regions appear increasingly blurred. In order to produce a single, uniformly high resolution image, we propose here an image mosaicing algorithm that combines state of the art groupwise image registration for alignment with content-based image fusion to prevent degrading of the fused image due to regional blurring of the input images. For the registration stage, we introduce an application-specific groupwise transformation model that incorporates per-image as well as groupwise transformation parameters. We also propose a new fusion algorithm based on Gaussian filters, which is substantially faster than fusion based on local image entropy. We demonstrate the performance of our mosaicing method on data acquired from living embryos of the fruit fly, Drosophila, using four and eight angle acquisitions.

  2. Non-destructive testing of layer-to-layer fusion of a 3D print using ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsen, Niels M.; Maria, Michael; Feuchter, Thomas; Podoleanu, Adrian; Bang, Ole

    2017-06-01

    Within the last decade, 3D printing has moved from a costly approach of building mechanical items to the present state-of-the-art phase where access to 3D printers is now common, both in industry and in private places. The plastic printers are the most common type of 3D printers providing prints that are light, robust and of lower cost. The robustness of the structure printed is only maintained if each layer printed is properly fused to its previously printed layers. In situations where the printed component has to accomplish a key mechanical role there is a need to characterize its mechanical strength. This may only be revealed by in-depth testing in order to discover unwanted air-gaps in the structure. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an in-depth imaging method, that is sensitive to variations in the refractive index and therefore can resolve with high resolution translucid samples. We report on volume imaging of a 3D printed block made with 100% PLA fill. By employing ultrahigh resolution OCT (UHR-OCT) we show that some parts of the PLA volume reveal highly scattering interfaces which likely correspond to transitions from one layer to another. In doing so, we document that UHR-OCT can act as a powerful tool that can be used in detecting fractures between layers stemming from insufficient fusion between printed structure layers. UHR-OCT can therefore serve as an useful assessment method of quality of 3D prints.

  3. Image retrieval by information fusion based on scalable vocabulary tree and robust Hausdorff distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Chang; Yu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Xiaoming; Yu, Boyang

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, Scalable Vocabulary Tree (SVT) has been shown to be effective in image retrieval. However, for general images where the foreground is the object to be recognized while the background is cluttered, the performance of the current SVT framework is restricted. In this paper, a new image retrieval framework that incorporates a robust distance metric and information fusion is proposed, which improves the retrieval performance relative to the baseline SVT approach. First, the visual words that represent the background are diminished by using a robust Hausdorff distance between different images. Second, image matching results based on three image signature representations are fused, which enhances the retrieval precision. We conducted intensive experiments on small-scale to large-scale image datasets: Corel-9, Corel-48, and PKU-198, where the proposed Hausdorff metric and information fusion outperforms the state-of-the-art methods by about 13, 15, and 15%, respectively.

  4. Research on multi-source image fusion technology in haze environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, GuoDong; Piao, Yan; Li, Bing

    2017-11-01

    In the haze environment, the visible image collected by a single sensor can express the details of the shape, color and texture of the target very well, but because of the haze, the sharpness is low and some of the target subjects are lost; Because of the expression of thermal radiation and strong penetration ability, infrared image collected by a single sensor can clearly express the target subject, but it will lose detail information. Therefore, the multi-source image fusion method is proposed to exploit their respective advantages. Firstly, the improved Dark Channel Prior algorithm is used to preprocess the visible haze image. Secondly, the improved SURF algorithm is used to register the infrared image and the haze-free visible image. Finally, the weighted fusion algorithm based on information complementary is used to fuse the image. Experiments show that the proposed method can improve the clarity of the visible target and highlight the occluded infrared target for target recognition.

  5. Visualization of intracranial vessel anatomy using high resolution MRI and a simple image fusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasel, C.

    2005-01-01

    A new technique for fusion and 3D viewing of high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and morphological MR sequences is reported. Scanning and image fusion was possible within 20 min on a standard 1.5 T MR-scanner. The procedure was successfully performed in 10 consecutive cases with excellent visualization of wall and luminal aspects of the intracranial segments of the internal carotid artery, the vertebrobasilar system and the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery

  6. Visualization of intracranial vessel anatomy using high resolution MRI and a simple image fusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasel, C. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: christian.nasel@perfusion.at

    2005-04-01

    A new technique for fusion and 3D viewing of high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and morphological MR sequences is reported. Scanning and image fusion was possible within 20 min on a standard 1.5 T MR-scanner. The procedure was successfully performed in 10 consecutive cases with excellent visualization of wall and luminal aspects of the intracranial segments of the internal carotid artery, the vertebrobasilar system and the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral artery.

  7. Information fusion in signal and image processing major probabilistic and non-probabilistic numerical approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    The area of information fusion has grown considerably during the last few years, leading to a rapid and impressive evolution. In such fast-moving times, it is important to take stock of the changes that have occurred. As such, this books offers an overview of the general principles and specificities of information fusion in signal and image processing, as well as covering the main numerical methods (probabilistic approaches, fuzzy sets and possibility theory and belief functions).

  8. Adaptive structured dictionary learning for image fusion based on group-sparse-representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiajie; Sun, Bin; Luo, Chengwei; Wu, Yuzhong; Xu, Limei

    2018-04-01

    Dictionary learning is the key process of sparse representation which is one of the most widely used image representation theories in image fusion. The existing dictionary learning method does not use the group structure information and the sparse coefficients well. In this paper, we propose a new adaptive structured dictionary learning algorithm and a l1-norm maximum fusion rule that innovatively utilizes grouped sparse coefficients to merge the images. In the dictionary learning algorithm, we do not need prior knowledge about any group structure of the dictionary. By using the characteristics of the dictionary in expressing the signal, our algorithm can automatically find the desired potential structure information that hidden in the dictionary. The fusion rule takes the physical meaning of the group structure dictionary, and makes activity-level judgement on the structure information when the images are being merged. Therefore, the fused image can retain more significant information. Comparisons have been made with several state-of-the-art dictionary learning methods and fusion rules. The experimental results demonstrate that, the dictionary learning algorithm and the fusion rule both outperform others in terms of several objective evaluation metrics.

  9. Detail-enhanced multimodality medical image fusion based on gradient minimization smoothing filter and shearing filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingbin; Mei, Wenbo; Du, Huiqian

    2018-02-13

    In this paper, a detail-enhanced multimodality medical image fusion algorithm is proposed by using proposed multi-scale joint decomposition framework (MJDF) and shearing filter (SF). The MJDF constructed with gradient minimization smoothing filter (GMSF) and Gaussian low-pass filter (GLF) is used to decompose source images into low-pass layers, edge layers, and detail layers at multiple scales. In order to highlight the detail information in the fused image, the edge layer and the detail layer in each scale are weighted combined into a detail-enhanced layer. As directional filter is effective in capturing salient information, so SF is applied to the detail-enhanced layer to extract geometrical features and obtain directional coefficients. Visual saliency map-based fusion rule is designed for fusing low-pass layers, and the sum of standard deviation is used as activity level measurement for directional coefficients fusion. The final fusion result is obtained by synthesizing the fused low-pass layers and directional coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed method with shift-invariance, directional selectivity, and detail-enhanced property is efficient in preserving and enhancing detail information of multimodality medical images. Graphical abstract The detailed implementation of the proposed medical image fusion algorithm.

  10. Label fusion based brain MR image segmentation via a latent selective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Guo, Xiantang; Zhu, Kai; Liao, Hengxu

    2018-04-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation is an effective approach and increasingly popular for automatically labeling objects of interest in medical images. Recently, segmentation methods based on generative models and patch-based techniques have become the two principal branches of label fusion. However, these generative models and patch-based techniques are only loosely related, and the requirement for higher accuracy, faster segmentation, and robustness is always a great challenge. In this paper, we propose novel algorithm that combines the two branches using global weighted fusion strategy based on a patch latent selective model to perform segmentation of specific anatomical structures for human brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. In establishing this probabilistic model of label fusion between the target patch and patch dictionary, we explored the Kronecker delta function in the label prior, which is more suitable than other models, and designed a latent selective model as a membership prior to determine from which training patch the intensity and label of the target patch are generated at each spatial location. Because the image background is an equally important factor for segmentation, it is analyzed in label fusion procedure and we regard it as an isolated label to keep the same privilege between the background and the regions of interest. During label fusion with the global weighted fusion scheme, we use Bayesian inference and expectation maximization algorithm to estimate the labels of the target scan to produce the segmentation map. Experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm is more accurate and robust than the other segmentation methods.

  11. Application of Multimodality Imaging Fusion Technology in Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant Tumors under the Precision Medicine Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun-Yi; Chen, Xian-Xia; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2016-12-20

    The arrival of precision medicine plan brings new opportunities and challenges for patients undergoing precision diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors. With the development of medical imaging, information on different modality imaging can be integrated and comprehensively analyzed by imaging fusion system. This review aimed to update the application of multimodality imaging fusion technology in the precise diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors under the precision medicine plan. We introduced several multimodality imaging fusion technologies and their application to the diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumors in clinical practice. The data cited in this review were obtained mainly from the PubMed database from 1996 to 2016, using the keywords of "precision medicine", "fusion imaging", "multimodality", and "tumor diagnosis and treatment". Original articles, clinical practice, reviews, and other relevant literatures published in English were reviewed. Papers focusing on precision medicine, fusion imaging, multimodality, and tumor diagnosis and treatment were selected. Duplicated papers were excluded. Multimodality imaging fusion technology plays an important role in tumor diagnosis and treatment under the precision medicine plan, such as accurate location, qualitative diagnosis, tumor staging, treatment plan design, and real-time intraoperative monitoring. Multimodality imaging fusion systems could provide more imaging information of tumors from different dimensions and angles, thereby offing strong technical support for the implementation of precision oncology. Under the precision medicine plan, personalized treatment of tumors is a distinct possibility. We believe that multimodality imaging fusion technology will find an increasingly wide application in clinical practice.

  12. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  13. [Accuracy of morphological simulation for orthognatic surgery. Assessment of a 3D image fusion software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic, A; Schouman, T; Scolozzi, P

    2013-08-06

    The CT/CBCT data allows for 3D reconstruction of skeletal and untextured soft tissue volume. 3D stereophotogrammetry technology has strongly improved the quality of facial soft tissue surface texture. The combination of these two technologies allows for an accurate and complete reconstruction. The 3D virtual head may be used for orthognatic surgical planning, virtual surgery, and morphological simulation obtained with a software dedicated to the fusion of 3D photogrammetric and radiological images. The imaging material include: a multi-slice CT scan or broad field CBCT scan, a 3D photogrammetric camera. The operative image processing protocol includes the following steps: 1) pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT scan and 3D photogrammetric image acquisition; 2) 3D image segmentation and fusion of untextured CT/CBCT skin with the preoperative textured facial soft tissue surface of the 3D photogrammetric scan; 3) image fusion of the pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT data set virtual osteotomies, and 3D photogrammetric soft tissue virtual simulation; 4) fusion of virtual simulated 3D photogrammetric and real postoperative images, and assessment of accuracy using a color-coded scale to measure the differences between the two surfaces. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Two-Dimensional Image Fusion of Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Radiographs in Patients with Clinical Scaphoid Fracture: An Imaging Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Jensen, T.D.

    2008-01-01

    . Bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive for the detection of fractures, but exact localization of scintigraphic lesions may be difficult and can negatively affect diagnostic accuracy. Purpose: To investigate the influence of image fusion of planar bone scintigraphy and radiographs on image interpretation......Background: Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now considered the gold standard in second-line imaging of patients with suspected scaphoid fracture and negative radiographs, bone scintigraphy can be used in patients with pacemakers, metallic implants, or other contraindications to MRI....... Conclusion: Image fusion of planar bone scintigrams and radiographs has a significant influence on image interpretation and increases both diagnostic confidence and interobserver agreement Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/3...

  15. Image fusion in craniofacial virtual reality modeling based on CT and 3dMD photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Pengfei; Yu, Hongbo; Cheng, Huanchong; Shen, Shunyao; Shen, Steve G F

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of building a craniofacial virtual reality model by image fusion of 3-dimensional (3D) CT models and 3 dMD stereophotogrammetric facial surface. A CT scan and stereophotography were performed. The 3D CT models were reconstructed by Materialise Mimics software, and the stereophotogrammetric facial surface was reconstructed by 3 dMD patient software. All 3D CT models were exported as Stereo Lithography file format, and the 3 dMD model was exported as Virtual Reality Modeling Language file format. Image registration and fusion were performed in Mimics software. Genetic algorithm was used for precise image fusion alignment with minimum error. The 3D CT models and the 3 dMD stereophotogrammetric facial surface were finally merged into a single file and displayed using Deep Exploration software. Errors between the CT soft tissue model and 3 dMD facial surface were also analyzed. Virtual model based on CT-3 dMD image fusion clearly showed the photorealistic face and bone structures. Image registration errors in virtual face are mainly located in bilateral cheeks and eyeballs, and the errors are more than 1.5 mm. However, the image fusion of whole point cloud sets of CT and 3 dMD is acceptable with a minimum error that is less than 1 mm. The ease of use and high reliability of CT-3 dMD image fusion allows the 3D virtual head to be an accurate, realistic, and widespread tool, and has a great benefit to virtual face model.

  16. Net-based data transfer and automatic image fusion of metabolic (PET) and morphologic (CT/MRI) images for radiosurgical planning of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Przetak, C.; Schmuecking, M.; Klener, G.; Surber, G.; Hamm, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The main purpose of radiosurgery in comparison to conventional radiotherapy of brain tumors is to reach a higher radiation dose in the tumor and sparing normal brain tissue as much as possible. To reach this aim it is crucial to define the target volume extremely accurately. For this purpose, MRI and CT examinations are used for radiotherapy planning. In certain cases, however, metabolic information obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) may be useful to achieve a higher therapeutic accuracy by sparing important brain structures. This can be the case, i.e. in low grade astrocytomas for exact delineation of vital tumor as well as in differentiating scaring tissue from tumor recurrence and edema after operation. For this purpose, radiolabeled aminoacid analogues (e.g. C-11 methionine) and recently O-2-[ 18 F] Fluorethyl-L-Tyrosin (F-18 FET) have been introduced as PET tracers to detect the area of highest tumor metabolism which allows to obtain additional information as compared to FDG-PET that reflects the local glucose metabolism. In these cases, anatomical and metabolic data have to be combined with the technique of digital image fusion to exactly determine the target volume, the isodoses and the area where the highest dose has to be applied. Materials: We have set up a data transfer from the PET Center of the Zentralklinik Bad Berka with the Department of Stereotactic Radiation at the Helios Klinik Erfurt (distance approx. 25 km) to enable this kind of image fusion. PET data (ECAT EXACT 47, Siemens/CTI) are transferred to a workstation (NOVALIS) in the Dept. of Stereotactic Radiation to be co-registered with the CT or MRI data of the patient. All PET images are in DICOM format (obtained by using a HERMES computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden) and can easily be introduced into the NOVALIS workstation. The software uses the optimation of mutual information to achieve a good fusion quality. Sometimes manual corrections have to be performed to get an

  17. Spectrum of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Yoshiko; Maeda, Tetsuo; Murakami, Koji; Kaji, Yasushi; Kita, Masato; Suzuki, Kayo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in a variety of benign, malignant, and borderline malignant ovarian tumors. It is advantageous to become familiar with the wide variety of FDG-PET/CT findings of this entity. Benign ovarian tumors generally have faint uptake, whereas endometriomas, fibromas, and teratomas show mild to moderate uptake. Malignant ovarian tumors generally have intense uptake, whereas tumors with a small solid component often show minimal uptake.

  18. Imaging multipole gravity anomaly sources by 3D probability tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alaia, Raffaele; Patella, Domenico; Mauriello, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We present a generalized theory of the probability tomography applied to the gravity method, assuming that any Bouguer anomaly data set can be caused by a discrete number of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and octopoles. These elementary sources are used to characterize, in an as detailed as possible way and without any a priori assumption, the shape and position of the most probable minimum structure of the gravity sources compatible with the observed data set, by picking out the location of their centres and peculiar points of their boundaries related to faces, edges and vertices. A few synthetic examples using simple geometries are discussed in order to demonstrate the notably enhanced resolution power of the new approach, compared with a previous formulation that used only monopoles and dipoles. A field example related to a gravity survey carried out in the volcanic area of Mount Etna (Sicily, Italy) is presented, aimed at imaging the geometry of the minimum gravity structure down to 8 km of depth bsl

  19. Imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis by electron beam tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, K C S; Ferrett, C G; Tandon, R; Paul, B; Herold, J; Liu, C S C

    2005-08-01

    To describe the experience of using electron beam tomography (EBT) in imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) to identify early bone and dentine loss which may threaten the viability of the eye. Seven patients with an OOKP in one eye underwent EBT. The OOKP lamina dimensions were measured on EBT and compared to the manual measurements at the time of surgery. There was a high degree of resolution of the OOKP lamina noted with EBT. In particular, it identified three patients with a marked degree of thinning of the lamina edges. Two of these patients had OOKP that were allografts. The mean time from surgery to examination was 3.6 years (range 1.2-5 years) while the mean age of the patients was 56 years (range 31-79 years). It is important to monitor regularly the dimensions and stability of the OOKP lamina as it will help detect cases that are at risk of extrusion of the optical cylinder and consequent endophthalmitis. Prophylactic measures can then be taken to prevent such serious complications from occurring. In this series, the authors found EBT to have excellent resolution and speed and they would support regular scanning of the OOKP lamina in all patients.

  20. Benefits of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz S.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: working out the methods of visualization of information obtained during optical coherent tomography in normal skin and in series of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. OCS1300SS (made in Thorlabs, USA was used in which the source of emission of radiation was a super-luminiscent diode with mean wavelength of 1325 nm. 12 patients with different skin conditions and 5 virtually healthy volunteers were examined with ОСТ procedure in OPD and IPD settings. High resolution USG numerical system DUB (TPM GmbH, Germany was used for comparative USG assessment. Results. ОСТ demonstrated considerably more detailed picture of the objects scanned compared to USG investigation. Image obtained with the help of ОСТ contains vital information about sizes of macro-morphological elements, status of vascular elements and their density in different depths of the skin. Conclusion. Additional results obtained from ОСТ of the skin lesions in plane section improves attraction for ОСТ in practical dermatology.

  1. Image-reconstruction algorithms for positron-emission tomography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.N.C.

    1982-01-01

    The positional uncertainty in the time-of-flight measurement of a positron-emission tomography system is modelled as a Gaussian distributed random variable and the image is assumed to be piecewise constant on a rectilinear lattice. A reconstruction algorithm using maximum-likelihood estimation is derived for the situation in which time-of-flight data are sorted as the most-likely-position array. The algorithm is formulated as a linear system described by a nonseparable, block-banded, Toeplitz matrix, and a sine-transform technique is used to implement this algorithm efficiently. The reconstruction algorithms for both the most-likely-position array and the confidence-weighted array are described by similar equations, hence similar linear systems can be used to described the reconstruction algorithm for a discrete, confidence-weighted array, when the matrix and the entries in the data array are properly identified. It is found that the mean square-error depends on the ratio of the full width at half the maximum of time-of-flight measurement over the size of a pixel. When other parameters are fixed, the larger the pixel size, the smaller is the mean square-error. In the study of resolution, parameters that affect the impulse response of time-of-flight reconstruction algorithms are identified. It is found that the larger the pixel size, the larger is the standard deviation of the impulse response. This shows that small mean square-error and fine resolution are two contradictory requirements

  2. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  3. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  4. Quantitative imaging of tumor vasculature using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are often more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We hypothesized that MSOT could reveal both tumor vascular density and function based on modulation of blood oxygenation. We performed MSOT on nude mice (n=8) bearing subcutaneous xenograft PC3 tumors using an inVision 256 (iThera Medical). The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified from 21% to 100% and back. After imaging, Hoechst 33348 was injected to indicate vascular perfusion and permeability. Tumors were then extracted for histopathological analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The acquired data was analyzed to extract a bulk measurement of blood oxygenation (SO2MSOT) from the whole tumor using different approaches. The tumors were also automatically segmented into 5 regions to investigate the effect of depth on SO2MSOT. Baseline SO2MSOT values at 21% and 100% oxygen breathing showed no relationship with ex vivo measures of vascular density or function, while the change in SO2MSOT showed a strong negative correlation to Hoechst intensity (r=- 0.92, p=0.0016). Tumor voxels responding to oxygen challenge were spatially heterogeneous. We observed a significant drop in SO2 MSOT value with tumor depth following a switch of respiratory gas from air to oxygen (0.323+/-0.017 vs. 0.11+/-0.05, p=0.009 between 0 and 1.5mm depth), but no such effect for air breathing (0.265+/-0.013 vs. 0.19+/-0.04, p=0.14 between 0 and 1.5mm depth). Our results indicate that in subcutaneous prostate tumors, baseline SO2MSOT levels do not correlate to tumor vascular density or function while the magnitude of the response to oxygen

  5. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, David C.; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  6. Infrared and visible image fusion using discrete cosine transform and swarm intelligence for surveillance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramanandham, Nirmala; Rajendiran, Kishore

    2018-01-01

    A novel image fusion technique is presented for integrating infrared and visible images. Integration of images from the same or various sensing modalities can deliver the required information that cannot be delivered by viewing the sensor outputs individually and consecutively. In this paper, a swarm intelligence based image fusion technique using discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain is proposed for surveillance application which integrates the infrared image with the visible image for generating a single informative fused image. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used in the fusion process for obtaining the optimized weighting factor. These optimized weighting factors are used for fusing the DCT coefficients of visible and infrared images. Inverse DCT is applied for obtaining the initial fused image. An enhanced fused image is obtained through adaptive histogram equalization for a better visual understanding and target detection. The proposed framework is evaluated using quantitative metrics such as standard deviation, spatial frequency, entropy and mean gradient. The experimental results demonstrate the outperformance of the proposed algorithm over many other state- of- the- art techniques reported in literature.

  7. Artificial intelligence (AI)-based relational matching and multimodal medical image fusion: generalized 3D approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajdic, Stevan M.; Katz, Henry E.; Downing, Andrew R.; Brooks, Michael J.

    1994-09-01

    A 3D relational image matching/fusion algorithm is introduced. It is implemented in the domain of medical imaging and is based on Artificial Intelligence paradigms--in particular, knowledge base representation and tree search. The 2D reference and target images are selected from 3D sets and segmented into non-touching and non-overlapping regions, using iterative thresholding and/or knowledge about the anatomical shapes of human organs. Selected image region attributes are calculated. Region matches are obtained using a tree search, and the error is minimized by evaluating a `goodness' of matching function based on similarities of region attributes. Once the matched regions are found and the spline geometric transform is applied to regional centers of gravity, images are ready for fusion and visualization into a single 3D image of higher clarity.

  8. Infrared and visible image fusion based on robust principal component analysis and compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Song, Minghui; Peng, Yuanxi

    2018-03-01

    Current infrared and visible image fusion methods do not achieve adequate information extraction, i.e., they cannot extract the target information from infrared images while retaining the background information from visible images. Moreover, most of them have high complexity and are time-consuming. This paper proposes an efficient image fusion framework for infrared and visible images on the basis of robust principal component analysis (RPCA) and compressed sensing (CS). The novel framework consists of three phases. First, RPCA decomposition is applied to the infrared and visible images to obtain their sparse and low-rank components, which represent the salient features and background information of the images, respectively. Second, the sparse and low-rank coefficients are fused by different strategies. On the one hand, the measurements of the sparse coefficients are obtained by the random Gaussian matrix, and they are then fused by the standard deviation (SD) based fusion rule. Next, the fused sparse component is obtained by reconstructing the result of the fused measurement using the fast continuous linearized augmented Lagrangian algorithm (FCLALM). On the other hand, the low-rank coefficients are fused using the max-absolute rule. Subsequently, the fused image is superposed by the fused sparse and low-rank components. For comparison, several popular fusion algorithms are tested experimentally. By comparing the fused results subjectively and objectively, we find that the proposed framework can extract the infrared targets while retaining the background information in the visible images. Thus, it exhibits state-of-the-art performance in terms of both fusion effects and timeliness.

  9. Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Image Fusion Guided Lumbosacral Plexus Block – A Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strid, JM; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial with crossover design. MR datasets will be acquired and uploaded in an advanced US system (Epiq7, Phillips, Amsterdam, Netherlands). All volunteers will receive SSPS blocks with lidocaine added gadolinium contrast guided by US/MR image fusion and by US one week......Background and aims Ultrasound (US) guided lumbosacral plexus block (Supra Sacral Parallel Shift [SSPS]) offers an alternative to general anaesthesia and perioperative analgesia for hip surgery.1 The complex anatomy of the lumbosacral region hampers the accuracy of the block, but it may be improved...... by guidance of US and magnetic resonance (MR) image fusion and real-time 3D electronic needle tip tracking.2 We aim to estimate the effect and the distribution of lidocaine after SSPS guided by US/MR image fusion compared to SSPS guided by ultrasound. Methods Twenty-four healthy volunteers will be included...

  10. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  11. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Nevzat; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, David D.; Clark, Deborah J.; Danly, Chris R.; Day, Robert D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary; Hsu, Albert H.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Loomis, Eric N.; Mares, Danielle; Martinson, Drew D.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Munson, Carter; Murphy, Thomas J.; Oertel, John A.; Polk, Paul J.; Schmidt, Derek W.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Wilde, Carl H.; Wilke, Mark D.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Atkinson, Dennis P.; Bower, Dan E.; Drury, Owen B.; Dzenitis, John M.; Felker, Brian; Fittinghoff, David N.; Frank, Matthias; Liddick, Sean N.; Moran, Michael J.; Roberson, George P.; Weiss, Paul; Buckles, Robert A.; Cradick, Jerry R.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lutz, Steve S.; Malone, Robert M.; Traille, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic (CH) capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (10-12 MeV) neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  12. Predicted extracapsular invasion of hilar lymph node metastasis by fusion positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Takashi; Hata, Yoshinobu; Otsuka, Hajime; Koezuka, Satoshi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Tochigi, Nobumi; Shiraga, Nobuyuki; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae; Iyoda, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative detection of hilar lymph node metastasis, particularly with extracapsular invasion, may affect the surgical procedure in patients with lung cancer, as the preoperative estimation of hilar lymph node metastasis is unsatisfactory. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fusion positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is able to predict extracapsular invasion of hilar lymph node metastasis. Between April, 2007 and April, 2013, 509 patients with primary lung cancer underwent surgical resection at our institution, among whom 28 patients exhibiting hilar lymph node metastasis (at stations 10 and 11) were enrolled in this study. A maximum lymph node standardized uptake value of >2.5 in PET scans was interpreted as positive. A total of 17 patients had positive preoperative PET/CT findings in their hilar lymph nodes, while the remaining 11 had negative findings. With regard to extracapsular nodal invasion, the PET/CT findings (P=0.0005) and the histological findings (squamous cell carcinoma, P=0.05) were found to be significant predictors in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, the PET/CT findings were the only independent predictor (P=0.0004). The requirement for extensive pulmonary resection (sleeve lobectomy, bilobectomy or pneumonectomy) was significantly more frequent in the patient group with positive compared with the group with negative PET/CT findings (76 vs. 9%, respectively, P=0.01). Therefore, the PET/CT findings in the hilar lymph nodes were useful for the prediction of extracapsular invasion and, consequently, for the estimation of possible extensive pulmonary resection.

  13. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the normal equine carpus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser-Hotz, B.; Sartoretti-Schefer, S.; Weiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    A normal equine carpus was used for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The structures outlined were identified and described. The two techniques were compared. This anatomic description could be helpful as a basis for clinical exams

  14. Evaluation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors by multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, Fabiano Elias; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao; Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Pelizon, Christina Helena de Toledo

    2005-01-01

    This article presents three cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical manifestations and pathological features, along with differential diagnoses, with special emphasis on multislice computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. (author)

  15. Optimization of coronary optical coherence tomography imaging using the attenuation-compensated technique: a validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teo, Jing Chun; Foin, Nicolas; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Fam, Jiang Ming; Wong, Philip; Low, Fatt Hoe; Leo, Hwa Liang; Mari, Jean-Martial; Joner, Michael; Girard, Michael J A; Virmani, Renu; Bezerra, HG.; Costa, MA.; Guagliumi, G.; Rollins, AM.; Simon, D.; Gutiérrez-Chico, JL.; Alegría-Barrero, E.; Teijeiro-Mestre, R.; Chan, PH.; Tsujioka, H.; de Silva, R.; Otsuka, F.; Joner, M.; Prati, F.; Virmani, R.; Narula, J.; Members, WC.; Levine, GN.; Bates, ER.; Blankenship, JC.; Bailey, SR.; Bittl, JA.; Prati, F.; Guagliumi, G.; Mintz, G.S.; Costa, Marco; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Roleder, T.; Jąkała, J.; Kałuża, GL.; Partyka, Ł.; Proniewska, K.; Pociask, E.; Girard, MJA.; Strouthidis, NG.; Ethier, CR.; Mari, JM.; Mari, JM.; Strouthidis, NG.; Park, SC.; Girard, MJA.; van der Lee, R.; Foin, N.; Otsuka, F.; Wong, P.K.; Mari, J-M.; Joner, M.; Nakano, M.; Vorpahl, M.; Otsuka, F.; Taniwaki, M.; Yazdani, SK.; Finn, AV.; Nakano, M.; Yahagi, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Taniwaki, M.; Otsuka, F.; Ladich, ER.; Girard, MJ.; Ang, M.; Chung, CW.; Farook, M.; Strouthidis, N.; Mehta, JS.; Foin, N.; Mari, JM.; Nijjer, S.; Sen, S.; Petraco, R.; Ghione, M.; Liu, X.; Kang, JU.; Virmani, R.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Burke, AP.; Farb, A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Yahagi, K.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Otsuka, F.; Finn, AV.; Davis, HR.; Joner, M.; Kume, T.; Akasaka, T.; Kawamoto, T.; Watanabe, N.; Toyota, E.; Neishi, Y.; Rieber, J.; Meissner, O.; Babaryka, G.; Reim, S.; Oswald, M.E.; Koenig, A.S.; Tearney, G. J.; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Adriaenssens, T.; Barlis, P.; Bezerra, HG.; Yabushita, H.; Bouma, BE.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; Guo, J.; Sun, L.; Chen, Y.D.; Tian, F.; Liu, HB.; Chen, L.; Kawasaki, M.; Bouma, BE.; Bressner, J. E.; Houser, S. L.; Nadkarni, S. K.; MacNeill, BD.; Jansen, CHP.; Onthank, DC.; Cuello, F.; Botnar, RM.; Wiethoff, AJ.; Warley, A.; von Birgelen, C.; Hartmann, A. M.; Kubo, T.; Akasaka, T.; Shite, J.; Suzuki, T.; Uemura, S.; Yu, B.; Habara, M.; Nasu, K.; Terashima, M.; Kaneda, H.; Yokota, D.; Ko, E.; Virmani, R.; Burke, AP.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Farb, A.; Takarada, S.; Imanishi, T.; Kubo, T.; Tanimoto, T.; Kitabata, H.; Nakamura, N.; Hattori, K.; Ozaki, Y.; Ismail, TF.; Okumura, M.; Naruse, H.; Kan, S.; Nishio, R.; Shinke, T.; Otake, H.; Nakagawa, M.; Nagoshi, R.; Inoue, T.; Sinclair, H.D.; Bourantas, C.; Bagnall, A.; Mintz, G.S.; Kunadian, V.; Tearney, G. J.; Yabushita, H.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; van Soest, G.; Goderie, T.; Regar, E.; Koljenović, S.; Leenders, GL. van; Gonzalo, N.; Xu, C.; Schmitt, JM.; Carlier, SG.; Virmani, R.; van der Meer, FJ; Faber, D.J.; Sassoon, DMB.; Aalders, M.C.; Pasterkamp, G.; Leeuwen, TG. van; Schmitt, JM.; Knuttel, A.; Yadlowsky, M.; Eckhaus, MA.; Karamata, B.; Laubscher, M.; Leutenegger, M.; Bourquin, S.; Lasser, T.; Lambelet, P.; Vermeer, K.A.; Mo, J.; Weda, J.J.A.; Lemij, H.G.; Boer, JF. de

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To optimize conventional coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) images using the attenuation-compensated technique to improve identification of plaques and the external elastic lamina (EEL) contour. METHOD The attenuation-compensated technique was optimized via manipulating contrast

  16. Image alignment for tomography reconstruction from synchrotron X-ray microscopic images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Chieh Cheng

    Full Text Available A synchrotron X-ray microscope is a powerful imaging apparatus for taking high-resolution and high-contrast X-ray images of nanoscale objects. A sufficient number of X-ray projection images from different angles is required for constructing 3D volume images of an object. Because a synchrotron light source is immobile, a rotational object holder is required for tomography. At a resolution of 10 nm per pixel, the vibration of the holder caused by rotating the object cannot be disregarded if tomographic images are to be reconstructed accurately. This paper presents a computer method to compensate for the vibration of the rotational holder by aligning neighboring X-ray images. This alignment process involves two steps. The first step is to match the "projected feature points" in the sequence of images. The matched projected feature points in the x-θ plane should form a set of sine-shaped loci. The second step is to fit the loci to a set of sine waves to compute the parameters required for alignment. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms two previously proposed methods, Xradia and SPIDER. The developed software system can be downloaded from the URL, http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~chengchc/SCTA or http://goo.gl/s4AMx.

  17. Image alignment for tomography reconstruction from synchrotron X-ray microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chang-Chieh; Chien, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Hwu, Yeukuang; Ching, Yu-Tai

    2014-01-01

    A synchrotron X-ray microscope is a powerful imaging apparatus for taking high-resolution and high-contrast X-ray images of nanoscale objects. A sufficient number of X-ray projection images from different angles is required for constructing 3D volume images of an object. Because a synchrotron light source is immobile, a rotational object holder is required for tomography. At a resolution of 10 nm per pixel, the vibration of the holder caused by rotating the object cannot be disregarded if tomographic images are to be reconstructed accurately. This paper presents a computer method to compensate for the vibration of the rotational holder by aligning neighboring X-ray images. This alignment process involves two steps. The first step is to match the "projected feature points" in the sequence of images. The matched projected feature points in the x-θ plane should form a set of sine-shaped loci. The second step is to fit the loci to a set of sine waves to compute the parameters required for alignment. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms two previously proposed methods, Xradia and SPIDER. The developed software system can be downloaded from the URL, http://www.cs.nctu.edu.tw/~chengchc/SCTA or http://goo.gl/s4AMx.

  18. An acceleration system for Laplacian image fusion based on SoC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liwen; Zhao, Hongtu; Qu, Xiujie; Wei, Tianbo; Du, Peng

    2018-04-01

    Based on the analysis of Laplacian image fusion algorithm, this paper proposes a partial pipelining and modular processing architecture, and a SoC based acceleration system is implemented accordingly. Full pipelining method is used for the design of each module, and modules in series form the partial pipelining with unified data formation, which is easy for management and reuse. Integrated with ARM processor, DMA and embedded bare-mental program, this system achieves 4 layers of Laplacian pyramid on the Zynq-7000 board. Experiments show that, with small resources consumption, a couple of 256×256 images can be fused within 1ms, maintaining a fine fusion effect at the same time.

  19. 78 FR 38716 - Scientific Information Request on Imaging Tests for the Staging of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ...), positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT fusion), or positron emission tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI fusion)) from medical device manufacturers... available or materials that can be made public. Materials that are considered confidential; marketing...

  20. First image from a combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindseil, Geron A; Gilbert, Kyle M; Scholl, Timothy J; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2011-07-01

    Combining positron emission tomography and MRI modalities typically requires using either conventional MRI with a MR-compatible positron emission tomography system or a modified MR system with conventional positron emission tomography. A feature of field-cycled MRI is that all magnetic fields can be turned off rapidly, enabling the use of conventional positron emission tomography detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. In this demonstration, two photomultiplier tube-based positron emission tomography