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Sample records for tomography guided photodynamic

  1. Outpatient photodynamic-guided diagnosis of carcinoma in situ with flexible cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Karin; Glenthøj, Anders; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær

    2017-01-01

    ), without compromising the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ (CIS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients were included. After BCG instillation for CIS, bladder biopsies were obtained using photodynamic-guided flexible cystoscopy. Two weeks later, patients underwent the conventional inpatient procedure....... An external pathologist reviewed the biopsy samples. Pain and quality of life (QoL) symptom score were recorded. RESULTS: Post-BCG biopsies showed only CIS in 10 patients; high-grade Ta or T1 tumour in three patients, who were referred for cystectomy; and normal or low-grade tumour tissue in 18 patients...... patients. Quality of biopsies did not differ between the two procedures. Pain scores for outpatients were low, and median QoL symptom score was significantly lower than for inpatients (24 vs 33, p = 0.02). Hospital length of stay was significantly longer for inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: Outpatient photodynamic...

  2. A dual-targeting upconversion nanoplatform for two-color fluorescence imaging-guided photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    The targetability of a theranostic probe is one of the keys to assuring its theranostic efficiency. Here we show the design and fabrication of a dual-targeting upconversion nanoplatform for two-color fluorescence imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT). The nanoplatform was prepared from 3-aminophenylboronic acid functionalized upconversion nanocrystals (APBA-UCNPs) and hyaluronated fullerene (HAC60) via a specific diol-borate condensation. The two specific ligands of aminophenylboronic acid and hyaluronic acid provide synergistic targeting effects, high targetability, and hence a dramatically elevated uptake of the nanoplatform by cancer cells. The high generation yield of (1)O2 due to multiplexed Förster resonance energy transfer between APBA-UCNPs (donor) and HAC60 (acceptor) allows effective therapy. The present nanoplatform shows great potential for highly selective tumor-targeted imaging-guided PDT.

  3. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes.

  4. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes

  5. Analysis of photodynamic cream effect in dental caries using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, P. S.; Freitas, A. Z.; de Sant´Anna, G. R.

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect in the enamel demineralization of low-intensity infrared laser (λ=810 nm, 100 mW/cm2, 90 sec, 4.47 J/cm2, 9 J) with or without photodynamic cream fluorinated or not fluorinated, using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Background data: Lasers can be used as tools for the prevention of tooth enamel demineralization. All enamel specimens (n= 105) were analyzed using OCT at baseline, and randomly assigned into seven groups (n=15): C (+), laser application; C(-), no treatment; (F), acid fluoride gel; cream (IV); cream and neutral fluoride (IVF); cream and laser (IVL); and cream with neutral fluoride+ laser (IVFL). The specimens were submitted to all kind of treatments before demineralizing pH cycling challenge and were reanalyzed. ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparative analysis (p <0.01) demonstrated a greater delta attenuation between baseline and post challenge for C + (0.034 +/- 0.011) compared to IVF (0.016 +/- 0.007) F (0.018 +/- 0.010) IVFL (0.019 +/- 0.008), and IVL (0.014 +/- 0.010). The cream laser group (IVL) also showed lower delta (0.014 +/- 0.010) compared to C - (0.025 +/- 0.008). The OCT technique demonstrated that cream associated with laser showed the lowest quantitative enamel mineral looses after cariogenic challenge.

  6. Minimally invasive neuronavigator-guided microsurgery and photodynamic therapy for gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yezhong; Lei, Ting; Wang, Zhi

    2009-06-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of neuronavigator-guided microsurgery and keyhole technique for the resection of gliomas, a total of 60 patients with gliomas were exactly located by using neuronavigator during microsurgery. Forty deep-seated gliomas were resected through a keyhole operative approach. Thirty out of the 60 cases were subjected to photodynamic therapy (PDT) after tumor resection. The therapeutic effectiveness of all the cases was recorded and analyzed. The results showed that glioma was totally resected in 52 cases (86.7%), subtotally in 5 (8.3%), and most partially in 3 (5%). Neurological deficits occurred postoperatively in 4 cases. One patient died of multiple system organ failure 4 days after operation. It was concluded that the application of minimally invasive technique could dramatically decrease surgical complications following resection of glioma, and its combination with PDT could obviously improve the quality of life of patients and prolong the survival time.

  7. In vivo 808 nm image-guided photodynamic therapy based on an upconversion theranostic nanoplatform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Que, Ivo; Kong, Xianggui; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Chang, Yulei; Wang, Tong Tong; Chan, Alan; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii) realizing in vivo NIR 808 nm image-guided PDT with both excitation (980 nm) and emission (808 nm) light falling in the biological window of tissues, which minimized auto-fluorescence, reduced light scatting and improved the imaging contrast and depth, and thus guaranteed noninvasive diagnostic accuracy. In vivo and ex vivo tests demonstrated its favorable bio-distribution, tumor-selectivity and high therapeutic efficacy. Owing to the effective ligand exchange strategy and the excellent intrinsic photophysical properties of C60, 1O2 production yield was improved, suggesting that a low 980 nm irradiation dosage (351 J cm-2) and a short treatment time (15 min) were sufficient to perform NIR (980 nm) to NIR (808 nm) image-guided PDT. Our work enriches the understanding of UCNP-based PDT nanophotosensitizers and highlights their potential use in future NIR image-guided noninvasive deep cancer therapy.A new strategy for efficient in vivo image-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated utilizing a ligand-exchange constructed upconversion-C60 nanophotosensitizer. This theranostic platform is superior to the currently reported nanophotosensitizers in (i) directly bonding photosensitizer C60 to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) by a smart ligand-exchange strategy, which greatly shortened the energy transfer distance and enhanced the 1O2 production, resulting in the improvement of the therapeutic effect; (ii

  8. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Leden, Edwin van der

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations

  9. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; van der Leden, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  10. A study of MRI-guided diffuse fluorescence molecular tomography for monitoring PDT effects in pancreas cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-06-01

    Over the last several decades little progress has been made in the therapy and treatment monitoring of pancreas adenocarcinoma, a devastating and aggressive form of cancer that has a 5-year patient survival rate of 3%. Currently, investigations for the use of interstitial Verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) are being undertaken in both orthotopic xenograft mouse models and in human clinical trials. In the mouse models, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been used as a measure of surrogate response to Verteporfin PDT; however, MR imaging alone lacks the molecular information required to assess the metabolic function and growth rates of the tumor immediately after treatment. We propose the implementation of MR-guided fluorescence tomography in conjunction with a fluorescently labeled (IR-Dye 800 CW, LI-COR) epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a molecular measure of surrogate response. To demonstrate the effectiveness of MR-guided diffuse fluorescence tomography for molecular imaging, we have used the AsPC-1 (+EGFR) human pancreatic adenocarcinoma in an orthotopic mouse model. EGF IRDye 800CW was injected 48 hours prior to imaging. MR image sequences were collected simultaneously with the fluorescence data using a MR-coupled diffuse optical tomography system. Image reconstruction was performed multiple times with varying abdominal organ segmentation in order to obtain a optimal tomographic image. It is shown that diffuse fluorescence tomography of the orthotopic pancreas model is feasible, with consideration of confounding fluorescence signals from the multiple organs and tissues surrounding the pancreas. MR-guided diffuse fluorescence tomography will be used to monitor EGF response after photodynamic therapy. Additionally, it provide the opportunity to individualize subsequent therapies based on response to PDT as well as to evaluate the success of combination therapies, such as PDT with chemotherapy, antibody therapy or even radiation.

  11. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AT PHOTODYNAMIC/PHOTOTHERMAL TREATMENT IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA YU. YANINA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Temporal changes in structure and refractive-index distribution of adipose tissue at photodynamic/photothermal treatment were studied with OCT in vitro. Ethanol–water solutions of indocyanine green (ICG and brilliant green (BG were used for fat tissue staining. CW laser diode (808 nm and LED light source (442 and 597 nm were used for irradiation of stained tissue slices. The data received supporting the hypothesis that photodynamic/photothermal treatment, induces fat cell lipolysis during a certain period of time after light exposure.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy to Guide Photodynamic Therapy of Head and Neck Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Dominic J.; Karakullukcu, M. Baris; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Kanick, Stephen Chad; van Veen, Robert P. L.; Amelink, Arjen; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Tan, I. Bing

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to other interstitial applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT), optical guidance or monitoring in the head and neck is at a very early stage of development. The present paper reviews the use of optical approaches, in particular optical spectroscopy, that have been used or have the

  13. Photodynamic Molecular Beacons: An Image-Guided Therapeutic Approach to Breast Cancer Vertebral Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    uptake. Prog Clin Biol Res. 1984;; 170: 629-­36. 14. Wilson BC, Firnau G, Jeeves WP, Brown KL, Burns-­McCormick DM . Chromatographic analysis and...Photosensitizer-­conjugated human serum albumin nanoparticles for effective photodynamic therapy. Theranostics. 2011;; 1: 230-­9. 24. Ferreira CL, Yapp DT, Crisp

  14. A new stereotactic apparatus guided by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huk, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The accurate information provided by computer tomography about existence, shape, and localization of intracranial neoplasms in an early phase and in inaccessible regions have improved the diagnostics greatly, so that these lie far ahead of the therapeutic possibilities for brain tumors. To reduce this wide margin we have developed a new targeting device which makes a stereotactic approach to central lesions under sight-control by computed tomography within the computed tomography-scanner possible. With the help of this simple device we are now able to perform stereotactic procedures for tumor biopsy guided by computed tomography, needling and drainage of abscesses and cysts, and finally for the implantation of radioactive material for the interstitial radiotherapy of inoperable cysts and tumors. (orig.) [de

  15. Smart activatable and traceable dual-prodrug for image-guided combination photodynamic and chemo-therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang; Yuan, Youyong; Mao, Duo; Wu, Wenbo; Liu, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Activatable photosensitizers (PSs) and chemo-prodrugs are highly desirable for anti-cancer therapy to reduce systemic toxicity. However, it is difficult to integrate both together into a molecular probe for combination therapy due to the complexity of introducing PS, singlet oxygen quencher, chemo-drug, chemo-drug inhibitor and active linker at the same time. To realize activatable PS and chemo-prodrug combination therapy, we develop a smart therapeutic platform in which the chemo-prodrug serves as the singlet oxygen quencher for the PS. Specifically, the photosensitizing activity and fluorescence of the PS (TPEPY-SH) are blocked by the chemo-prodrug (Mitomycin C, MMC) in the probe. Meanwhile, the cytotoxicity of MMC is also inhibited by the electron-withdrawing acyl at the nitrogen position next to the linker. Upon glutathione activation, TPEPY-S-MMC can simultaneously release active PS and MMC for combination therapy. The restored fluorescence of TPEPY-SH is also used to report the activation for both PS and MMC as well as to guide the photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent developments in guided wave travel time tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zon, Tim van; Volker, Arno [TNO, Stieltjesweg 1, P.O. box 155 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-02-18

    The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections. Guided wave tomography had been developed to create a map of the wall thickness using the travel times of guided waves. It can be used for both monitoring and for inspection of pipe-segments that are difficult to access, for instance at the location of pipe-supports. An important outcome of the tomography is the minimum remaining wall thickness, as this is critical in the scheduling of a replacement of the pipe-segment. In order to improve the sizing accuracy we have improved the tomography scheme. A number of major improvements have been realized allowing to extend the application envelope to pipes with a larger wall thickness and to larger distances between the transducer rings. Simulation results indicate that the sizing accuracy has improved and that is now possible to have a spacing of 8 meter between the source-ring and the receiver-ring. Additionally a reduction of the number of sensors required might be possible as well.

  17. Development of a guidance guide for dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent questions from users of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated in the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (LCI - IPEN), on how to properly apply the factors indicated in their calibration certificates, a guide was prepared guidance for dosimetry in computed tomography. The guide includes guidance prior knowledge of half value layer (HVL), as it is necessary to know the effective beam energy for application quality for correction factor (kq). The evaluation of HVL in TC scanners becomes a difficult task due to system geometry and therefore a survey was conducted of existing methodologies for the determination of HVL in clinical beams Computed Tomography, taking into account technical, practical and economic factors. In this work it was decided to test a Tandem System consists of absorbing covers made in the workshop of IPEN, based on preliminary studies due to low cost and good response. The Tandem system consists of five cylindrical absorbing layers of 1mm, 3mm, 5mm, 7mm and 10mm aluminum and 3 cylindrical absorbing covers 15mm, 25mm and acrylic 35mm (PMMA) coupled to the ionization chamber of commercial pencil type widely used in quality control tests in dosimetry in clinical beams Computed tomography. Through Tandem curves it was possible to assess HVL values and from the standard curve pencil-type ionization chamber, Kq find the appropriate beam. The elaborate Guide provides information on how to build the calibration curve on the basis of CSR, to find the Kq and information for construction Tandem curve, to find values close to CSR. (author)

  18. Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Dual-Modality Imaging-Guided Photothermal and Photodynamic Dual-Therapy with Magnetic Porphyrin-Metal Organic Framework Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Yu-Hao; Chen, Yang; Wang, Man-Man; Wang, Xue-Sheng; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2017-03-01

    Phototherapy shows some unique advantages in clinical application, such as remote controllability, improved selectivity, and low bio-toxicity, than chemotherapy. In order to improve the safety and therapeutic efficacy, imaging-guided therapy seems particularly important because it integrates visible information to speculate the distribution and metabolism of the probe. Here we prepare biocompatible core-shell nanocomposites for dual-modality imaging-guided photothermal and photodynamic dual-therapy by the in situ growth of porphyrin-metal organic framework (PMOF) on Fe3O4@C core. Fe3O4@C core was used as T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) agent. The optical properties of porphyrin were well remained in PMOF, and PMOF was therefore selected for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescence imaging. Fluorescence and MR dual-modality imaging-guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy was confirmed with tumour-bearing mice as model. The high tumour accumulation of Fe3O4@C@PMOF and controllable light excitation at the tumour site achieved efficient cancer therapy, but low toxicity was observed to the normal tissues. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4@C@PMOF was a promising dual-imaging guided PTT and PDT dual-therapy platform for tumour diagnosis and treatment with low cytotoxicity and negligible in vivo toxicity.

  19. Near infrared imaging-guided photodynamic therapy under an extremely low energy of light by galactose targeted amphiphilic polypeptide micelle encapsulating BODIPY-Br2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Ruan, Zheng; Li, Tuanwei; Yuan, Pan; Yan, Lifeng

    2016-10-18

    Near infrared (NIR) imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) is attractive, especially the utilization of one dye as both a photosensitizer and fluorescent probe, and the as-synthesized BODIPY-Br 2 molecule is a candidate. Here, a galactose targeted amphiphilic copolymer of a polypeptide was synthesized and its micelles work as nanocarriers for BODIPY for targeting the NIR imaging-guided PDT of hepatoma cancer cells. At the same time, BODIPY could light up the cytoplasm for real-time imaging and kill cancer cells when the light was switched on. In vitro tests performed on both HepG2 and HeLa cells confirmed that the as-prepared PMAGP-POEGMA-PLys-B micelles showed efficient cell suppression of the cells with galactose receptors in the presence of light under an extremely low energy density (6.5 J cm -2 ). This protocol highlights the potential of polypeptides as biodegradable carriers for NIR image-guided and confined targeting photodynamic therapy.

  20. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  1. A Highly Efficient and Photostable Photosensitizer with Near-Infrared Aggregation-Induced Emission for Image-Guided Photodynamic Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenbo; Mao, Duo; Hu, Fang; Xu, Shidang; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Cheng, Xiamin; Yuan, Youyong; Ding, Dan; Kong, Deling; Liu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which relies on photosensitizers (PS) and light to generate reactive oxygen species to kill cancer cells or bacteria, has attracted much attention in recent years. PSs with both bright emission and efficient singlet oxygen generation have also been used for image-guided PDT. However, simultaneously achieving effective 1 O 2 generation, long wavelength absorption, and stable near-infrared (NIR) emission with low dark toxicity in a single PS remains challenging. In addition, it is well known that when traditional PSs are made into nanoparticles, they encounter quenched fluorescence and reduced 1 O 2 production. In this contribution, these challenging issues have been successfully addressed through designing the first photostable photosensitizer with aggregation-induced NIR emission and very effective 1 O 2 generation in aggregate state. The yielded nanoparticles show very effective 1 O 2 generation, bright NIR fluorescence centered at 820 nm, excellent photostability, good biocompatibility, and negligible dark in vivo toxicity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments prove that the nanoparticles are excellent candidates for image-guided photodynamic anticancer therapy. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Computed tomography - guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shin Yu; Deheinzelin, Daniel; Younes, Riad N.; Chojniak, Rubens

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the experience of a radiology department in the use of computed tomography-guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary nodules, by evaluating diagnostic yield and incidence of complications. This is a retrospective analysis of 52 consecutive patients who underwent lung lesion biopsy guided by computed tomography, performed between May 1997 and May 2000. Thirty-five patients were male and 17 were female, with ages ranging from 5 to 85 years (median, 62 years). The size of the lesions ranged from 1.8 to 15 cm (median, 5.4 cm). In a total of 52 biopsies of lung lesions, 51 biopsies (98.1%) supplied appropriate material for histopathological diagnosis, with 9 diagnosed (17.3%) as benign and 42 (80.8%) as malignant lesions. Specific diagnosis was obtained in 44 (84.6%) biopsies: 4 benign (9.1%) and 40 (90.9%) malignant lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the cutting needle biopsies for determining presence of malignancy were 96.8%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Complications occurred in 9 cases (17.3%), including 6 cases (11.5%) of small pneumothorax, 1 (1.9%) of hemoptysis, 1 (1.9%) of pulmonary hematoma, and 1 (1.9%) of thoracic wall hematoma. All had spontaneous resolution. There were no complications requiring subsequent intervention. The high sensitivity and specificity of the method and the low rate of complications have established cutting needle biopsy as an efficient and safe tool for the diagnosis of lung lesions. In our hospital, cutting needle biopsy is considered a reliable procedure for the evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. (author)

  3. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  4. Guided wave tomography in anisotropic media using recursive extrapolation operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Arno

    2018-04-01

    Guided wave tomography is an advanced technology for quantitative wall thickness mapping to image wall loss due to corrosion or erosion. An inversion approach is used to match the measured phase (time) at a specific frequency to a model. The accuracy of the model determines the sizing accuracy. Particularly for seam welded pipes there is a measurable amount of anisotropy. Moreover, for small defects a ray-tracing based modelling approach is no longer accurate. Both issues are solved by applying a recursive wave field extrapolation operator assuming vertical transverse anisotropy. The inversion scheme is extended by not only estimating the wall loss profile but also the anisotropy, local material changes and transducer ring alignment errors. This makes the approach more robust. The approach will be demonstrated experimentally on different defect sizes, and a comparison will be made between this new approach and an isotropic ray-tracing approach. An example is given in Fig. 1 for a 75 mm wide, 5 mm deep defect. The wave field extrapolation based tomography clearly provides superior results.

  5. Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Decisions in Retinoblastoma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sameh E; VandenHoven, Cynthia; MacKeen, Leslie D; Héon, Elise; Gallie, Brenda L

    2017-06-01

    Assess the role of handheld optical coherence tomography (OCT) in guiding management decisions during diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of eyes affected by retinoblastoma. Retrospective, noncomparative, single-institution case series. All children newly diagnosed with retinoblastoma from January 2011 to December 2015 who had an OCT session during their active treatment at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, Canada. The OCT sessions for fellow eyes of unilateral retinoblastoma without any suspicious lesion and those performed more than 6 months after the last treatment were excluded. Data collected included age at presentation, sex, family history, RB1 mutation status, 8th edition TNMH cancer staging and International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (IIRC), and number of OCT sessions per eye. Details of each session were scored for indication-related details (informative or not) and assessed for guidance (directive or not), diagnosis (staging changed, new tumors found or excluded), treatment (modified, stopped, or modality shifted), or follow-up modified. Frequency of OCT-guided management decisions, stratified by indication and type of guidance (confirmatory vs. influential). Sixty-three eyes of 44 children had 339 OCT sessions over the course of clinical management (median number of OCT scans per eye, 5; range, 1-15). The age at presentation and presence of a heritable RB1 mutation significantly correlated with an increased number of OCT sessions. Indications included evaluation of post-treatment scar (55%) or fovea (16%), and posterior pole scanning for new tumors (11%). Of all sessions, 92% (312/339) were informative; 19 of 27 noninformative sessions had large, elevated lesions; of these, 14 of 19 were T2a or T2b (IIRC group C or D) eyes. In 94% (293/312) of the informative sessions, OCT directed treatment decisions (58%), diagnosis (16%), and follow-up (26%). Optical coherence tomography influenced and changed management from pre

  6. Prevention of bladder tumor implantion after fluorescence-guided TUR with photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrahmoune, Saoussen; Bezdetnaya, Lina; de Witte, Peter; Leroux, Agnès; Dumas, Dominique; Guillemin, François; D'Hallewin, Marie Ange

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of bladder cancer is very high, due to its high recurrence rate in superficial bladder cancer (30 to 85%), which is the staging of approximately 80% of the patients at first diagnosis. Risk of recurrence and progression is associated with grade, stage, presence of concomitant carcinoma in situ, size and number of lesions, as well as time to first recurrence. Recurrences can be partly attributed to new occurrences but also to residual tumors after resection. Incomplete tumor removal has been observed in 30 to 50% of TUR's, especially when dealing with T1 or poorly visible malignant or pre-malignant disease1. Fluorescence guided resection with 5 amino levulinic acid (ALA) or its hexyl ester derivative (Hexvix, has now unequivocally been demonstrated to increase detection rate and a growing number of studies indicate this has a positive impact on recurrence and progression ratesImplantation of viable tumor cells, dispersed during resection, is a third factor influencing bladder cancer recurrence. The aim of early intravesical therapy is to interfere with cell viability and thus reduce implantation risks.

  7. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure.

  8. Computerized tomography-guided neurolytic splanchnic nerve block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriquet, Franco; De Martini, Giuseppe; Roy, Maria Teresa; Pretrolesi, Fabio; Martinoli, Carlo; Cariati, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Franco.

    1997-01-01

    Computerized tomography-guided neurolytic splanchnic nerve block is a technique for relieving abdominal cancer pain; the goal is the alcoholic neurolytic interruption of the sensitive structures in retroperitoneal space. Computerized tomography yields accurate anatomical detailing and the course for needle placement and alcohol spread. January, 1993, to July, 1996, twenty-one bilateral splanchnic nerve blocks were performed through the posterior access. Forty-eight hours after alcoholism. 14 patients (66%) had complete pain regression; 52% of the patients needed no analgesics for 6 to 54 days and only 9 patients (42%) needed another low opioid therapy. Complications included hypotension and diarrhea in all cases. One had a cardiac arrest and diet 8 days after the procedure. There were no other complications. The whole procedure usually lasted 60 min (range: 45 to 90 min). Splanchnic nerve neurolysis is a useful treatment in the patients with severe chronic abdominal pain. It is used as a second line treatment when large lesions change celia anatomy and complicate the percutaneous block of the celiac plexus. Endosulfan, Malathion and Methyl parathion, on the metabolic rate of the estuarine clam, Villorita cyprinoides var. cochinensis, have been investigated. The animals exposed to the lower sublethal concentrations of Endosulfan, Malthion and Methyl parathion consumed oxygen at the rate of 1.60, 1.98 and 2.09 ml. 0 2 g - 1 h -1 respectively, while at the higher concentrations of the pesticides, consumption of oxygen by the animal dropped to nearly half the control value. When compared to Malathion and Methyl parathion. Endosulfan induced animals recorded a greater reduction in her percentage deviation (from control) of oxygen consumption, possibly due to hypoxia induced by the pollutants

  9. Experimental Results of Guided Wave Travel Time Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Arno; Mast, Arjan; Bloom, Joost

    2010-02-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Both economical and social requirements are pushing the industry to even higher levels of availability, reliability and safety of installations. The concept of predictive maintenance using permanent sensors that monitor the integrity of an installation is an interesting addition to the current method of periodic inspections reducing uncertainty and extending inspection intervals. Guided wave travel time tomography is a promising method to monitor the wall thickness quantitatively over large areas. Obviously the robustness and reliability of such a monitoring system is of paramount importance. Laboratory experiments have been carried out on a 10″ pipe with a nominal wall thickness of 8 mm. Multiple, inline defects have been created with a realistic morphology. The depth of the defects was increased stepwise from 0.5 mm to 2 mm. Additionally the influences of the presence of liquid inside the pipe and surface roughness have been evaluated as well. Experimental results show that this method is capable of providing quantitative wall thickness information over a distance of 4 meter, with a sufficient accuracy such that results can be used for trending. The method has no problems imaging multiple defects.

  10. Ultrasonic guided wave tomography for wall thickness mapping in pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Carson L.

    Corrosion and erosion damage pose fundamental challenges to operation of oil and gas infrastructure. In order to manage the life of critical assets, plant operators must implement inspection programs aimed at assessing the severity of wall thickness loss (WTL) in pipelines, vessels, and other structures. Maximum defect depth determines the residual life of these structures and therefore represents one of the key parameters for robust damage mitigation strategies. In this context, continuous monitoring with permanently installed sensors has attracted significant interest and currently is the subject of extensive research worldwide. Among the different monitoring approaches being considered, significant promise is offered by the combination of guided ultrasonic wave technology with the principles of model based inversion under the paradigm of what is now referred to as guided wave tomography (GWT). Guided waves are attractive because they propagate inside the wall of a structure over a large distance. This can yield significant advantages over conventional pulse-echo thickness gage sensors that provide insufficient area coverage -- typically limited to the sensor footprint. While significant progress has been made in the application of GWT to plate-like structures, extension of these methods to pipes poses a number of fundamental challenges that have prevented the development of sensitive GWT methods. This thesis focuses on these challenges to address the complex guided wave propagation in pipes and to account for parametric uncertainties that are known to affect model based inversion and which are unavoidable in real field applications. The main contribution of this work is the first demonstration of a sensitive GWT method for accurately mapping the depth of defects in pipes. This is achieved by introducing a novel forward model that can extract information related to damage from the complex waveforms measured by pairs of guided wave transducers mounted on the pipe

  11. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (HUCAM/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Cassiano Antonio de Morais. Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2017-03-15

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  12. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous gastrostomy: initial experience at a cancer center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Santos, Erich Frank Vater; Guerra, Luiz Felipe Alves; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens; Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo

    2017-01-01

    Gastrostomy is indicated for patients with conditions that do not allow adequate oral nutrition. To reduce the morbidity and costs associated with the procedure, there is a trend toward the use of percutaneous gastrostomy, guided by endoscopy, fluoroscopy, or, most recently, computed tomography. The purpose of this paper was to review the computed tomography-guided gastrostomy procedure, as well as the indications for its use and the potential complications. (author)

  13. Guided mass spectrum labelling in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, D., E-mail: daniel.haley@materials.ox.ac.uk [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Plack Straße 1, Düsseldorf (Germany); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Choi, P.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Plack Straße 1, Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a valuable near-atomic scale imaging technique, which yields mass spectrographic data. Experimental correctness can often pivot on the identification of peaks within a dataset, this is a manual process where subjectivity and errors can arise. The limitations of manual procedures complicate APT experiments for the operator and furthermore are a barrier to technique standardisation. In this work we explore the capabilities of computer-guided ranging to aid identification and analysis of mass spectra. We propose a fully robust algorithm for enumeration of the possible identities of detected peak positions, which assists labelling. Furthermore, a simple ranking scheme is developed to allow for evaluation of the likelihood of each possible identity being the likely assignment from the enumerated set. We demonstrate a simple, yet complete work-chain that allows for the conversion of mass-spectra to fully identified APT spectra, with the goal of minimising identification errors, and the inter-operator variance within APT experiments. This work chain is compared to current procedures via experimental trials with different APT operators, to determine the relative effectiveness and precision of the two approaches. It is found that there is little loss of precision (and occasionally gain) when participants are given computer assistance. We find that in either case, inter-operator precision for ranging varies between 0 and 2 “significant figures” (2σ confidence in the first n digits of the reported value) when reporting compositions. Intra-operator precision is weakly tested and found to vary between 1 and 3 significant figures, depending upon species composition levels. Finally it is suggested that inconsistencies in inter-operator peak labelling may be the largest source of scatter when reporting composition data in APT. - Highlights: • Demonstration of a complete, but simple, automation chain for APT spectra analysis. • Algorithm for

  14. Guided mass spectrum labelling in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, D.; Choi, P.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a valuable near-atomic scale imaging technique, which yields mass spectrographic data. Experimental correctness can often pivot on the identification of peaks within a dataset, this is a manual process where subjectivity and errors can arise. The limitations of manual procedures complicate APT experiments for the operator and furthermore are a barrier to technique standardisation. In this work we explore the capabilities of computer-guided ranging to aid identification and analysis of mass spectra. We propose a fully robust algorithm for enumeration of the possible identities of detected peak positions, which assists labelling. Furthermore, a simple ranking scheme is developed to allow for evaluation of the likelihood of each possible identity being the likely assignment from the enumerated set. We demonstrate a simple, yet complete work-chain that allows for the conversion of mass-spectra to fully identified APT spectra, with the goal of minimising identification errors, and the inter-operator variance within APT experiments. This work chain is compared to current procedures via experimental trials with different APT operators, to determine the relative effectiveness and precision of the two approaches. It is found that there is little loss of precision (and occasionally gain) when participants are given computer assistance. We find that in either case, inter-operator precision for ranging varies between 0 and 2 “significant figures” (2σ confidence in the first n digits of the reported value) when reporting compositions. Intra-operator precision is weakly tested and found to vary between 1 and 3 significant figures, depending upon species composition levels. Finally it is suggested that inconsistencies in inter-operator peak labelling may be the largest source of scatter when reporting composition data in APT. - Highlights: • Demonstration of a complete, but simple, automation chain for APT spectra analysis. • Algorithm for

  15. Computer tomography guided lung biopsy using interactive breath-hold control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Krag-Andersen, Shella; Naqibullah, Matiullah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interactive breath-hold control (IBC) may improve the accuracy and decrease the complication rate of computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy, but this presumption has not been proven in a randomized study. Methods: Patients admitted for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomized...

  16. Computerized Tomography and its Applications : a Guided Tour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    1992-01-01

    We present a review of the mathematical principles of computerized tomography. Topics treated include the role of the Radon transform and related transforms, inversion formulas, uniqueness, ill-posedness and stability, practical reconstruction algorithms, and various generalizations such as

  17. Comparison tomography relocation hypocenter grid search and guided grid search method in Java island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdian, S. W.; Adu, N.; Palupi, I. R.; Raharjo, W.

    2016-01-01

    The main data in this research is earthquake data recorded from 1952 to 2012 with 9162 P wave and 2426 events are recorded by 30 stations located around Java island. Relocation hypocenter processed using grid search and guidded grid search method. Then the result of relocation hypocenter become input for tomography pseudo bending inversion process. It can be used to identification the velocity distribution in subsurface. The result of relocation hypocenter by grid search and guided grid search method after tomography process shown in locally and globally. In locally area grid search method result is better than guided grid search according to geological reseach area. But in globally area the result of guided grid search method is better for a broad area because the velocity variation is more diverse than the other one and in accordance with local geological research conditions. (paper)

  18. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of deep seated bone lesions in two dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Sakaida, M.; Yamada, M.; Akiyama, H.; Takai, Y.; Sakai, H.; Maruo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous core needle biopsies were undertaken for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma in the pelvis (case 1) and myeloma (case 2) in the seventh lumber vertebra which were difficult to targeted by palpation, ultrasound or fluoroscopy. In both cases, enough tissue for pathological diagnosis were obtained without any complication. CT-guided biopsy was thought to be a safe, easy and effective technique for the evaluation of the deep seated bone lesion

  19. Development of low-cost devices for image-guided photodynamic therapy treatment of oral cancer in global health settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Rudd, Grant; Daly, Liam; Hempstead, Joshua; Liu, Yiran; Khan, Amjad P.; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Thomas, Richard; Rizvi, Imran; Arnason, Stephen; Cuckov, Filip; Hasan, Tayyaba; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a light-based modality that shows promise for adaptation and implementation as a cancer treatment technology in resource-limited settings. In this context PDT is particularly well suited for treatment of pre-cancer and early stage malignancy of the oral cavity, that present a major global health challenge, but for which light delivery can be achieved without major infrastructure requirements. In recent reports we demonstrated that a prototype low-cost batterypowered 635nm LED light source for ALA-PpIX PDT achieves tumoricidal efficacy in vitro and vivo, comparable to a commercial turn-key laser source. Here, building on these reports, we describe the further development of a prototype PDT device to enable intraoral light delivery, designed for ALA- PDT treatment of precancerous and cancerous lesions of the oral cavity. We evaluate light delivery via fiber bundles and customized 3D printed light applicators for flexible delivery to lesions of varying size and position within the oral cavity. We also briefly address performance requirements (output power, stability, and light delivery) and present validation of the device for ALA-PDT treatment in monolayer squamous carcinoma cell cultures.

  20. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Jeng Tyng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and Methods In the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results In all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible.

  1. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Almeida, Maria Fernanda Arruda; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka Matushita; Chojniak, Rubens; Coimbra, Felipe Jose Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and methods: in the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results: in all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion: Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible. (author)

  2. Feasibility of Computed Tomography-Guided Methods for Spatial Normalization of Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Hanna; Choi, Jae Yong; Lee, Seung Ha; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Lee, Myung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization is a prerequisite step for analyzing positron emission tomography (PET) images both by using volume-of-interest (VOI) template and voxel-based analysis. Magnetic resonance (MR) or ligand-specific PET templates are currently used for spatial normalization of PET images. We used computed tomography (CT) images acquired with PET/CT scanner for the spatial normalization for [18F]-N-3-fluoropropyl-2-betacarboxymethoxy-3-beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (FP-CIT) PET images and compared target-to-cerebellar standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) values with those obtained from MR- or PET-guided spatial normalization method in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We included 71 healthy controls and 56 patients with PD who underwent [18F]-FP-CIT PET scans with a PET/CT scanner and T1-weighted MR scans. Spatial normalization of MR images was done with a conventional spatial normalization tool (cvMR) and with DARTEL toolbox (dtMR) in statistical parametric mapping software. The CT images were modified in two ways, skull-stripping (ssCT) and intensity transformation (itCT). We normalized PET images with cvMR-, dtMR-, ssCT-, itCT-, and PET-guided methods by using specific templates for each modality and measured striatal SUVR with a VOI template. The SUVR values measured with FreeSurfer-generated VOIs (FSVOI) overlaid on original PET images were also used as a gold standard for comparison. The SUVR values derived from all four structure-guided spatial normalization methods were highly correlated with those measured with FSVOI (P normalization methods provided reliable striatal SUVR values comparable to those obtained with MR-guided methods. CT-guided methods can be useful for analyzing dopamine transporter PET images when MR images are unavailable.

  3. A Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Biopsy and Positron Emission Tomography with Integrated Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...... had both procedures performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 27 patients considered to be potential candidates for resection of NSCLC underwent PET/CT and EUS-FNA. Diagnoses were confirmed either by open thoracotomy, mediastinoscopy or clinical follow-up. Advanced lung cancer was defined as tumour...

  4. Optical coherence tomography in guided surgery of GI cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Abelevich, Alexander I.; Zagaynov, Vladimir E.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Denisenko, Arkady N.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Kutis, Irina S.

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a new high spatial resolution, real-time optical imaging modality, known from prior pilot studies for its high sensitivity to invasive cancer. We reported our results in an OCT feasibility study for accurate determination of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. The OCT study enrolled 19 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and 24 patients with distal esophageal carcinoma (14 squamous cell carcinomas, 10 adenocarcinomas). During pre-surgery planning endoscopy we performed in vivo OCT imaging of the tumor border at four dial clock axes (12, 3, 6 and 9 o"clock). The OCT border then was marked by an electrocoagulator, or by a methylene blue tattoo. A cold biopsy (from the esophagus) was performed at visual and OCT borders and compared with visual and OCT readings. 27 post-surgery excised specimens were analyzed. OCT borders matched the histopathology in 94% cases in the rectum and 83.3% in the esophagus. In the cases of a mismatch between the OCT and histology borders, a deep tumor invasion occurred in the muscle layer (esophagus, rectum). Because of its high sensitivity to mucosal cancer, OCT can be used for pre-surgery planning and surgery guidance of the proximal border for esophageal carcinoma and the distal border for rectal carcinoma. However, deep invasion in the rectum or esophageal wall has to be controlled by alternative diagnostic modalities.

  5. Quantification of thickness loss in a liquid-loaded plate using ultrasonic guided wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jing; Ratassepp, Madis; Fan, Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave tomography (GWT) provides an attractive solution to map thickness changes from remote locations. It is based on the velocity-to-thickness mapping employing the dispersive characteristics of selected guided modes. This study extends the application of GWT on a liquid-loaded plate. It is a more challenging case than the application on a free plate, due to energy of the guided waves leaking into the liquid. In order to ensure the accuracy of thickness reconstruction, advanced forward models are developed to consider attenuation effects using complex velocities. The reconstruction of the thickness map is based on the frequency-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) method, and its accuracy is discussed using different frequencies and defect dimensions. Validation experiments are carried out on a water-loaded plate with an irregularly shaped defect using S0 guided waves, showing excellent performance of the reconstruction algorithm.

  6. Three-dimensional digitizer (neuronavigator): new equipment for computed tomography-guided stereotaxic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, E; Watanabe, T; Manaka, S; Mayanagi, Y; Takakura, K

    1987-06-01

    A new device was invented as an adjunct for computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotaxic or open neurosurgery. It is composed of a multijoint three-dimensional digitizer (sensor arm) and a microcomputer, which indicates the place of the sensor arm tip on preoperative CT images. Computed tomography scan is performed preoperatively with three markers placed on the nasion and ears. At surgery, after fixing the patient's head and the sensor arm, sampling of the standard points was done to translate the position of the tip of the sensor arm onto the CT images displayed on a computer screen. In this way positional data from conventional preoperative CT scan can be directly transferred into the surgical field. This system has the unique feature of introducing CT-guided stereotaxis into conventional open neurosurgery.

  7. Cranial radiotherapy guided by computed tomography with or without fields conformation in pediatric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Diego; Caussa, Lucas; Murina, Patricia; Zunino, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Many malignancies in children can be cured by radiotherapy, acute toxicity and the significant effect of delayed treatment are worrying for the patient, family and society. Therefore, the end of the pediatric radiotherapy is to maintain or improve the cure rate of cancer, diminishing the aftermath of treatment. The goal of this study is to measure differences in doses to the healthy tissue of the central nervous system with two radiotherapy techniques, both guided by computed tomography [es

  8. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  9. Uncommon primary tumors of the orbit diagnosed by computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Amoedo, Mauricio Kauark; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: almirgvb@yahoo.com.br [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Neves, Flavia Branco Cerqueira Serra [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Oftalmologia

    2014-11-15

    Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective alternative method for evaluating selected intra-orbital lesions where the preoperative diagnosis is important for the therapeutic planning. The authors describe two cases of patients with uncommon primary orbital tumors whose diagnosis was obtained by means of computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy, with emphasis on the technical aspects of the procedure. (author)

  10. Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography: A Guide for the General Radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadsmoore, Clare; Newman, David; MacIver, Duncan; Pawaroo, Davina

    2015-11-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in Canada and worldwide. Whilst advances in anatomical imaging to detect and monitor malignant disease have continued over the last few decades, limitations remain. Functional imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET), has improved the sensitivity and specificity in detecting malignant disease. In combination with computed tomography (CT), PET is now commonly used in the oncology setting and is an integral part of many cancer patients' pathways. Although initially the CT component of the study was purely for attenuation of the PET imaging and to provide anatomical coregistration, many centers now combine the PET study with a diagnostic quality contrast enhanced CT to provide one stop staging, thus refining the patient's pathway. The commonest tracer used in everyday practice is FDG (F18-fluorodeoxyglucose). There are many more tracers in routine clinical practice and those with emerging roles, such as 11C-choline, useful in the imaging of prostate cancer; 11C-methionine, useful in imaging brain tumours; C11-acetate, used in imaging hepatocellular carcinomas; 18F-FLT, which can be used as a marker of cellular proliferation in various malignancies; and F18-DOPA and various 68Ga-somatostatin analogues, used in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. In this article we concentrate on FDG PETCT as this is the most commonly available and widely utilised tracer now used to routinely stage a number of cancers. PETCT alters the stage in approximately one-third of patients compared to anatomical imaging alone. Increasingly, PETCT is being used to assess early metabolic response to treatment. Metabolic response can be seen much earlier than a change in the size/volume of the disease which is measured by standard CT imaging. This can aid treatment decisions in both in terms of modifying therapy and in addition to providing important prognostic information. Furthermore, it is helpful in patients with distorted anatomy from surgery

  11. Guided-wave tomography imaging plate defects by laser-based ultrasonic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Pil; Lim, Ju Young; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Contact-guided-wave tests are impractical for investigating specimens with limited accessibility and rough surfaces or complex geometric features. A non-contact setup with a laser-ultrasonic transmitter and receiver is quite attractive for guided-wave inspection. In the present work, we developed a non-contact guided-wave tomography technique using the laser-ultrasonic technique in a plate. A method for Lamb-wave generation and detection in an aluminum plate with a pulsed laser-ultrasonic transmitter and Michelson-interferometer receiver was developed. The defect shape and area in the images obtained using laser scanning, showed good agreement with the actual defect. The proposed approach can be used as a non-contact online inspection and monitoring technique.

  12. Self-assembled nanoparticles based on PEGylated conjugated polyelectrolyte and drug molecules for image-guided drug delivery and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youyong; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-10

    A drug delivery system based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) has been developed to serve as a polymeric photosensitizer and drug carrier for combined photodynamic and chemotherapy. The amphiphilic brush copolymer can self-assemble into micellar nanopaticles (NPs) in aqueous media with hydrophobic conjugated polyelectrolyte backbone as the core and hydrophilic PEG as the shell. The NPs have an average diameter of about 100 nm, with the absorption and emission maxima at 502 and 598 nm, respectively, making them suitable for bioimaging applications. Moreover, the CPE itself can serve as a photosensitizer, which makes the NPs not only a carrier for drug but also a photosensitizing unit for photodynamic therapy, resulting in the combination of chemo- and photodynamic therapy for cancer. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for the combination therapy to U87-MG cells is 12.7 μg mL(-1), which is much lower than that for the solely photodynamic therapy (25.5 μg mL(-1)) or chemotherapy (132.8 μg mL(-1)). To improve the tumor specificity of the system, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) tripeptide as the receptor to integrin αvβ3 overexpressed cancer cells was further incorporated to the surface of the NPs. The delivery system based on PEGylated CPE is easy to fabricate, which integrates the merits of targeted cancer cell image, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy, making it promising for cancer treatment.

  13. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection: “Live Flash” Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Angela Pimenta; Fernandes, Renato Gil dos Santos Pinto; Neves, David Cintra Henriques Silva; Patrício, Lino Manuel Ribeiro; de Aguiar, José Eduardo Chambel

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence tomography (OCT) is a light-based imaging modality which shows tremendous potential in the setting of coronary imaging. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent cause of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnosis of SCAD is made mainly with invasive coronary angiography, although adjunctive imaging modalities such as computed tomography angiography, IVUS, and OCT may increase the diagnostic yield. The authors describe a clinical case of a young woman admitted with the diagnosis of ACS. The ACS was caused by SCAD detected in the coronary angiography and the angioplasty was guided by OCT. OCT use in the setting of SCAD has been already described and the true innovation in this case was this unique use of OCT. The guidance of angioplasty with live and short images was very useful as it allowed clearly identifying the position of the guidewires at any given moment without the use of prohibitive amounts of contrast. PMID:26989520

  14. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for Staging of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer without Mediastinal Involvement at Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naur, Therese Maria Henriette; Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staging of lung cancer is essential to the treatment, which is curative only in cases of localized disease. Previous studies have suggested that endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is unnecessary when positron emission tomography-computed tomog...

  15. Comparison of the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and medical computed tomography: implications for clinical diagnostics with guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Marcus; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Orentlicher, Gary; Wahl, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and medical-grade CT in the context of evaluating the diagnostic value and accuracy of fiducial marker localization for reference marker-based guided surgery systems. Cadaver mandibles with attached radiopaque gutta-percha markers, as well as glass balls and composite cylinders of known dimensions, were measured manually with a highly accurate digital caliper. The objects were then scanned using a medical-grade CT scanner (Philips Brilliance 64) and five different CBCT scanners (Sirona Galileos, Morita 3D Accuitomo 80, Vatech PaX-Reve3D, 3M Imtech Iluma, and Planmeca ProMax 3D). The data were then imported into commercially available software, and measurements were made of the scanned markers and objects. CT and CBCT measurements were compared to each other and to the caliper measurements. The difference between the CBCT measurements and the caliper measurements was larger than the difference between the CT measurements and the caliper measurements. Measurements of the cadaver mandible and the geometric reference markers were highly accurate with CT. The average absolute errors of the human mandible measurements were 0.03 mm for CT and 0.23 mm for CBCT. The measurement errors of the geometric objects based on CT ranged between 0.00 and 0.12 mm, compared to an error range between 0.00 and 2.17 mm with the CBCT scanners. CT provided the most accurate images in this study, closely followed by one CBCT of the five tested. Although there were differences in the distance measurements of the hard tissue of the human mandible between CT and CBCT, these differences may not be of clinical significance for most diagnostic purposes. The fiducial marker localization error caused by some CBCT scanners may be a problem for guided surgery systems.

  16. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et al. Photodynamic therapy. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 1998; 90(12):889–905. [PubMed Abstract] Gudgin Dickson EF, Goyan RL, Pottier RH. New directions in photodynamic therapy. Cellular and Molecular Biology 2002; 48(8):939–954. [PubMed Abstract] Capella ...

  17. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results: Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paraesthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. (author)

  18. Incidental finding of a left over guide wire on a positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Kok Hooi; Lee, Phong Teck; Buch, Mamta; Rammohan, Kandadai Seshadri

    2012-01-01

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used cannulate vessels for radiographical procedures. Loss of a guide wire into the circulation is a rare and preventable complication. It is often noticed by chance during routine radiographs. However, there is a lack of reported cases of incidental fin dings of leftover guide wire on a PET scan. An intravascular foreign body should be retrieved as soon as the diagnosis is made, to prevent complications such as embolisation or vascular damage by fractured wires. Interventional radiology is the method of choice for retrieval. We report a rare case of the coincidental finding of a lost guide wire on a PET scan. A 37 year old man presented with psychotic episodes, thigh weakness, weight gain, increased appetite and leg cramps. He was subsequently diagnosed with cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic secretion from a right lung tumour. He subsequently underwent a staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The lung tumour had no uptake on PET bit had increased activity uptake on octreotide scanning. These appearances were suggestive of with carcinoid tumour. The PET scan also revealed an incidental finding of a leftover guide wire used during peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC) recently. The wire extended from right atrium to inferior vena cava. It also showed a high uptake in the adrenal glands, indicating hyperplasia, which was most likely due to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. He underwent a percutaneous wire retrieval via the right femoral vein in a cardiac catheterisation laboratory and was transferred to a thoracic surgical unit for lung tumor resection

  19. Incidental finding of a left over guide wire on a positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Kok Hooi; Lee, Phong Teck; Buch, Mamta; Rammohan, Kandadai Seshadri

    2012-12-15

    The Seldinger technique is commonly used cannulate vessels for radiographical procedures. Loss of a guide wire into the circulation is a rare and preventable complication. It is often noticed by chance during routine radiographs. However, there is a lack of reported cases of incidental fin dings of leftover guide wire on a PET scan. An intravascular foreign body should be retrieved as soon as the diagnosis is made, to prevent complications such as embolisation or vascular damage by fractured wires. Interventional radiology is the method of choice for retrieval. We report a rare case of the coincidental finding of a lost guide wire on a PET scan. A 37 year old man presented with psychotic episodes, thigh weakness, weight gain, increased appetite and leg cramps. He was subsequently diagnosed with cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic secretion from a right lung tumour. He subsequently underwent a staging positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The lung tumour had no uptake on PET bit had increased activity uptake on octreotide scanning. These appearances were suggestive of with carcinoid tumour. The PET scan also revealed an incidental finding of a leftover guide wire used during peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC) recently. The wire extended from right atrium to inferior vena cava. It also showed a high uptake in the adrenal glands, indicating hyperplasia, which was most likely due to adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation. He underwent a percutaneous wire retrieval via the right femoral vein in a cardiac catheterisation laboratory and was transferred to a thoracic surgical unit for lung tumor resection.

  20. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: macellomaciel@me.com [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results: Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paraesthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. (author)

  1. Guiding flying-spot laser transepithelial phototherapeutic keratectomy with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yokogawa, Hideaki; Tang, Maolong; Chamberlain, Winston; Zhang, Xinbo; Huang, David

    2017-04-01

    To analyze transepithelial phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) results using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and develop a model to guide the laser dioptric and depth settings. Casey Eye Institute, Portland, Oregon, USA. Prospective nonrandomized case series. Patients with superficial corneal opacities and irregularities had transepithelial PTK with a flying-spot excimer laser by combining wide-zone myopic and hyperopic astigmatic ablations. Optical coherence tomography was used to calculate corneal epithelial lenticular masking effects, guide refractive laser settings, and measure opacity removal. The laser ablation efficiency and the refractive outcome were investigated using multivariate linear regression models. Twenty-six eyes of 20 patients received PTK to remove opacities and irregular astigmatism due to scar, dystrophy, radial keratotomy, or previous corneal surgeries. The uncorrected distance visual acuity and corrected distance visual acuity were significantly improved (P laser ablation depths were 31.3% (myopic ablation) and 63.0% (hyperopic ablation) deeper than the manufacturer's nomogram. The spherical equivalent of the corneal epithelial lenticular masking effect was 0.73 diopter ± 0.61 (SD). The refractive outcome highly correlated to the laser settings and epithelial lenticular masking effect (Pearson R = 0.96, P < .01). The ablation rate of granular dystrophy opacities appeared to be slower. Smoothing ablation under masking fluid was needed to prevent focal steep islands in these cases. The OCT-measured ablation depth efficiency could guide opacity removal. The corneal epithelial lenticular masking effect could refine the spherical refractive nomogram to achieve a better refractive outcome after transepithelial ablation. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomography fluoroscopy-guided placement of iliosacral screws in patients with unstable posterior pelvic fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Toshihiro; Ogawa, Ken-Ichi; Doi, Takeshi; Munetomo, Kazuo; Miyasho, Koji; Hiraki, Takao; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of the computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided placement of iliosacral screws in patients with unstable posterior pelvic fractures. Six patients (four women and two men; mean age 55.8 years; range 35-77 years) with unstable posterior pelvic fractures underwent iliosacral screw placement under CT fluoroscopy guidance between November 2007 and August 2008. Unstable pelvic ring injury (AO types B and C) was the indication for this procedure. In all the six patients except one, CT fluoroscopy-guided placement had been technically successful. In one patient, a second screw had been inserted, with a tilt to the caudal site, and slightly advanced into the extrasacral body; afterward, it could be exchanged safely for a shorter screw. Five patients and one patient underwent placement of two screws and one screw, respectively. The mean duration of the procedure was 15.0 min (range 9-30 min) per screw; the duration was 12.3 min and 18.2 min for the first and second screws, respectively. No complications requiring treatment occurred during or after the procedure. The mean clinical and radiologic follow-up period was 14 months (range 6-21 months). All pelvic injuries had healed satisfactorily, without complication, and all patients are now doing well clinically and can walk. CT fluoroscopy-guided placement of iliosacral screws is a safe and effective treatment in patients with unstable posterior pelvic fractures. (orig.)

  3. User-guided segmentation for volumetric retinal optical coherence tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Chao, Jennifer R.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Despite the existence of automatic segmentation techniques, trained graders still rely on manual segmentation to provide retinal layers and features from clinical optical coherence tomography (OCT) images for accurate measurements. To bridge the gap between this time-consuming need of manual segmentation and currently available automatic segmentation techniques, this paper proposes a user-guided segmentation method to perform the segmentation of retinal layers and features in OCT images. With this method, by interactively navigating three-dimensional (3-D) OCT images, the user first manually defines user-defined (or sketched) lines at regions where the retinal layers appear very irregular for which the automatic segmentation method often fails to provide satisfactory results. The algorithm is then guided by these sketched lines to trace the entire 3-D retinal layer and anatomical features by the use of novel layer and edge detectors that are based on robust likelihood estimation. The layer and edge boundaries are finally obtained to achieve segmentation. Segmentation of retinal layers in mouse and human OCT images demonstrates the reliability and efficiency of the proposed user-guided segmentation method. PMID:25147962

  4. Ultrasound guided electrical impedance tomography for 2D free-interface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guanghui; Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2017-07-01

    The free-interface detection problem is normally seen in industrial or biological processes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique with advantages of high-speed and low cost, and is a promising solution for free-interface detection problems. However, due to the ill-posed and nonlinear characteristics, the spatial resolution of EIT is low. To deal with the issue, an ultrasound guided EIT is proposed to directly reconstruct the geometric configuration of the target free-interface. In the method, the position of the central point of the target interface is measured by a pair of ultrasound transducers mounted at the opposite side of the objective domain, and then the position measurement is used as the prior information for guiding the EIT-based free-interface reconstruction. During the process, a constrained least squares framework is used to fuse the information from different measurement modalities, and the Lagrange multiplier-based Levenberg-Marquardt method is adopted to provide the iterative solution of the constraint optimization problem. The numerical results show that the proposed ultrasound guided EIT method for the free-interface reconstruction is more accurate than the single modality method, especially when the number of valid electrodes is limited.

  5. Ultrasound guided electrical impedance tomography for 2D free-interface reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Guanghui; Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The free-interface detection problem is normally seen in industrial or biological processes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique with advantages of high-speed and low cost, and is a promising solution for free-interface detection problems. However, due to the ill-posed and nonlinear characteristics, the spatial resolution of EIT is low. To deal with the issue, an ultrasound guided EIT is proposed to directly reconstruct the geometric configuration of the target free-interface. In the method, the position of the central point of the target interface is measured by a pair of ultrasound transducers mounted at the opposite side of the objective domain, and then the position measurement is used as the prior information for guiding the EIT-based free-interface reconstruction. During the process, a constrained least squares framework is used to fuse the information from different measurement modalities, and the Lagrange multiplier-based Levenberg–Marquardt method is adopted to provide the iterative solution of the constraint optimization problem. The numerical results show that the proposed ultrasound guided EIT method for the free-interface reconstruction is more accurate than the single modality method, especially when the number of valid electrodes is limited. (paper)

  6. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Liver Cancer Using Respiratory-Correlated Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Mueller, Gerd; Sauer, Otto; Flentje, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching of the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. Results: The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 ± 4 mm and 5 ± 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion

  7. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Lung Biopsy: A Valuable Alternative to Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurban, L.A.; Gomersall, L.; Weir, J.; Wade, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy nowadays is the most preferred method of guidance to perform percutaneous lung biopsy of pulmonary masses. Conventional fluoroscopy is an increasingly forgotten technique that still can be used to perform lung biopsies, with many advantages. Purpose: To compare the accuracy, safety, and effective dose (ED) of conventional fluoroscopy-guided needle lung biopsy (FNLB) with CT-guided needle lung biopsy procedures (CTNLB) reported in the literature. Material and Methods: 100 consecutive patients who underwent FNLB were reviewed retrospectively. Using the final histological diagnoses and the clinical and radiological course of the disease as references, the accuracy and sensitivity of FNLB were calculated. The complication rates of FNLB were assessed. Using computer software (XDOSE), the ED was calculated. The accuracy, complication rates, and the ED of FNLB were compared with CTNLB reported in the literature. Results: The overall accuracy rate and sensitivity of FNLB were both 87%, which are comparable to the range of accuracies reported in the literature for CTNLB (74-97%). The complication rates of FNLB were also comparable to the complication rates reported for CTNLB. The commonest complication was pneumothorax, at a rate of 25%. The ED of FNLB was small, significantly lower than reported in the literature for CT-guided procedures. The mean ED of FNLB was 0.029 mSv, which is approximately equivalent to one chest X-ray. Conclusion: Conventional fluoroscopy is an accurate, safe, and low-dose alternative modality to CT to obtain an image-guided histological diagnosis of pulmonary lesions

  8. Computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of lung lesions in fourteen cats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Mori, T.; Yamada, M.; Sakaida, M.; Yonemaru, K.; Murakami, M.; Sakai, H.; Maruo, K.

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle aspirates (FNA) or core biopsies of lung lesions were performed in nine dogs and five cats. A clinical diagnosis was obtained in twelve of fourteen animals (85%), namely 80% FNA and 100% core biopsies. Eight animals had other mass (es) apart from the lung, and five were diagnosed to metastases. In only one case, the lung mass was histopathologically diagnosed as a malignant primary tumor. Iatrogenic complications through the lung biopsies were noted in four animals, and three showed mild pneumothorax on CT images and one was bleeding from the needle. However, between fifteen and thirty minutes after the biopsy, no animal indicated signs of pneumothorax or hemorrhage

  9. Enhancing early bladder cancer detection with fluorescence-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. T.; Xie, T. Q.; Du, C. W.; Bastacky, S.; Meyers, S.; Zeidel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the possibility of enhancing early bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). After the intravesical instillation of a 10% solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid, simultaneous fluorescence imaging (excitation of 380-420 nm, emission of 620-700 nm) and OCT are performed on rat bladders to identify the photochemical and morphological changes associated with uroepithelial tumorigenesis. The preliminary results of our ex vivo study reveal that both fluorescence and OCT can identify early uroepithelial cancers, and OCT can detect precancerous lesions (e.g., hyperplasia) that fluorescence may miss. This suggests that a cystoscope combining 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and OCT imaging has the potential to enhance the efficiency and sensitivity of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  10. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  11. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic bloc...

  12. The using of megavoltage computed tomography in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tharavichitkul, Ekkasit; Janla-or, Suwapim; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Supawongwattana, Bongkot; Chitapanarux, Imjai [Division of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Galalae, Razvan M. [Faculty of Medicine, Christian-Albrecht University (Campus Kiel), Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We present a case of cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. In radiation therapy part, the combination of the whole pelvic helical tomotherapy plus image-guided brachytherapy with megavoltage computed tomography of helical tomotherapy was performed. We propose this therapeutic approach could be considered in a curative setting in some problematic situation as our institution.

  13. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-02-21

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes.

  14. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a newly emerging modal- ... Porphyrins are a ubiquitous class of naturally occurring heterocyclic ..... mechanism leading to tumor necrosis. ... The vascular endothelium may be the main target of tumor.

  15. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous catheter drainage of primary and secondary iliopsoas abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantasdemir, M.; Kara, B.; Cebi, D.; Selcuk, N.D.; Numan, F.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To report our experience with computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) of iliopsoas abscesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-two iliopsoas abscesses in 21 patients (11 women, 10 men) aged between 18 and 66 years (mean 36 years) were treated with PCD. Abdominal CT demonstrated the iliopsoas abscesses, which were definitively determined by Gram staining and aspirate cultures. Twenty of the 22 iliopsoas abscesses were primary and two were secondary. All PCD procedures were performed under local anaesthesia using a single-step trocar technique (n=19) or Seldinger technique (n=3). RESULTS: PCD was an effective treatment in 21 out of the 22 iliopsoas abscesses. Recurrence was seen in three abscesses as minimal residual collections. Two of them resolved spontaneously with anti-tuberculous regimen. One required percutaneous needle aspiration. The procedure failed in a diabetic patient with a secondary abscess, who died due to sepsis. The length of time that catheters remained in place ranged from 21 to 75 days (mean 59.7 days). Complications included catheter dislocation in four abscesses, which required removal of dislocated catheters and indwelling new ones. CONCLUSION: CT-guided PCD is a safe and effective front-line treatment of iliopsoas abscesses. Surgery should be reserved for failure of PCD and presence of contraindications to PCD

  16. Computer tomography urography assisted real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy on renal calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, You-Qiang; Wu, Jie-Ying; Li, Teng-Cheng; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Liang, Guan-Can; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Hong, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Wei-Zhong; Zang, Zhi-Jun; Di, Jin-Ming

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of pre-designed route on computer tomography urography (CTU) in the ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus.From August 2013 to May 2016, a total of 100 patients diagnosed with complex renal calculus in our hospital were randomly divided into CTU group and control group (without CTU assistance). CTU was used to design a rational route for puncturing in CTU group. Ultrasound was used in both groups to establish a working trace in the operation areas. Patients' perioperative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded.All operations were successfully performed, without transferring to open surgery. Time of channel establishment in CTU group (6.5 ± 4.3 minutes) was shorter than the control group (10.0 ± 6.7 minutes) (P = .002). In addition, there was shorter operation time, lower rates of blood transfusion, secondary operation, and less establishing channels. The incidence of postoperative complications including residual stones, sepsis, severe hemorrhage, and perirenal hematoma was lower in CTU group than in control group.Pre-designing puncture route on CTU images would improve the puncturing accuracy, lessen establishing channels as well as improve the security in the ultrasound-guided PCNL for complex renal calculus, but at the cost of increased radiation exposure.

  17. Efficacy of computed tomography guided radiofrequency ablation forosteoid osteomas in 31 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Eu Gene; Oh, Joo Han; Cho, Hwan Seong; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To present the clinical outcome of computed tomography (CT) guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for osteoid osteoma. Thirty-one patients (M:F = 23:8, mean age: 20 years, range: 4-54 years) who underwent RFA for clinically suspected osteoid osteoma from May 2004 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. RFA was done in all cases under CT guidance by one of three radiologists in our department. Electronic medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed in all patients. Lesions were located in femur (n = 20), tibia (n = 5), fibula (n = 2), humerus (n = 3), talus (n = 2), and calcaneus (n = 1). On discharge, 27 of 33 cases showed complete remission of pain (82%). One major complication (compartment syndrome) and 2 minor complications (reactive synovitis, minimal skin burn at electrode insertion site) were observed. On the last follow-up (0-78 months, mean: 12.6 months) 27 of 33 cases were successfully treated (82%) and had no more complaints. 3 cases presented remaining pain (9%). In 3 cases relapse occurred (9%) and RFA was repeated in 1 case. The repeated treatment was successful. CT-guided RFA is an effective method for the treatment of osteoid osteoma.

  18. Just-in-time tomography (JiTT): a new concept for image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, G; Rowlands, J A [Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2005-11-07

    Soft-tissue target motion is one of the main concerns in high-precision radiation therapy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been developed recently to image soft-tissue targets in the treatment room and guide the radiation therapy treatment. However, due to its relatively long image acquisition time the CBCT approach cannot provide images of the target at the instant of the treatment and thus it is not adequate for imaging targets with intrafraction motion. In this note, a new approach for image-guided radiation therapy-just-in-time tomography (JiTT)-is proposed. Differing from CBCT, JiTT takes much less time to generate the needed tomographical, beam's-eye-view images of the treatment target at the right moment to guide the radiation therapy treatment. (note)

  19. Just-in-time tomography (JiTT): a new concept for image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, G; Rowlands, J A

    2005-01-01

    Soft-tissue target motion is one of the main concerns in high-precision radiation therapy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been developed recently to image soft-tissue targets in the treatment room and guide the radiation therapy treatment. However, due to its relatively long image acquisition time the CBCT approach cannot provide images of the target at the instant of the treatment and thus it is not adequate for imaging targets with intrafraction motion. In this note, a new approach for image-guided radiation therapy-just-in-time tomography (JiTT)-is proposed. Differing from CBCT, JiTT takes much less time to generate the needed tomographical, beam's-eye-view images of the treatment target at the right moment to guide the radiation therapy treatment. (note)

  20. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  1. Success rates for computed tomography-guided musculoskeletal biopsies performed using a low-dose technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Levine, Benjamin D.; Seeger, Leanne L.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [UCLA Health System, Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To evaluate the success rate of a low-dose (50 % mAs reduction) computed tomography (CT) biopsy technique. This protocol was adopted based on other successful reduced-CT radiation dose protocols in our department, which were implemented in conjunction with quality improvement projects. The technique included a scout view and initial localizing scan with standard dose. Additional scans obtained for further guidance or needle adjustment were acquired by reducing the tube current-time product (mAs) by 50 %. The radiology billing data were searched for CT-guided musculoskeletal procedures performed over a period of 8 months following the initial implementation of the protocol. These were reviewed for the type of procedure and compliance with the implemented protocol. The compliant CT-guided biopsy cases were then retrospectively reviewed for patient demographics, tumor pathology, and lesion size. Pathology results were compared to the ultimate diagnoses and were categorized as diagnostic, accurate, or successful. Of 92 CT-guided procedures performed during this period, two were excluded as they were not biopsies (one joint injection and one drainage), 19 were excluded due to non-compliance (operators neglected to follow the protocol), and four were excluded due to lack of available follow-up in our electronic medical records. A total of 67 compliant biopsies were performed in 63 patients (two had two biopsies, and one had three biopsies). There were 32 males and 31 females with an average age of 50 (range, 15-84 years). Of the 67 biopsies, five were non-diagnostic and inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); five were diagnostic but inaccurate and thus unsuccessful (7 %); 57 were diagnostic and accurate thus successful (85 %). These results were comparable with results published in the radiology literature. The success rate of CT-guided biopsies using a low-dose protocol is comparable to published rates for conventional dose biopsies. The implemented low-dose protocol

  2. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy: experience from 1,300 procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Isberner, Rony Klaus; Viana, Luciana Marinho; Yu, Liao Shin; Aita, Alessandro Amorim; Soares, Fernando Augusto [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia e Patologia

    2006-01-15

    Context and objective: computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy is widely accepted as effective and safe for diagnosis in many settings. Accuracy depends on target organ and needle type. Cutting needles present advantages over fine needles. This study presents experience from CT guided biopsies performed at an oncology center. Design and setting: retrospective study at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo.Methods: 1,300 consecutive CT guided biopsies performed between July 1994 and February 2000 were analyzed. Nodules or masses were suspected as primary malignancy in 845 cases (65%) or metastatic lesion in 455 (35%). 628 lesions were thoracic, 281 abdominal, 208 retroperitoneal, 134 musculoskeletal and 49 head/neck. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist or under his supervision: 765 (59%) with 22-gauge fine-needle/aspiration technique and 535 (41%) with automated 16 or 18-gauge cutting-needle biopsy. Results: adequate samples were obtained in 70-92% of fine-needle and 93-100% of cutting-needle biopsies. The specific diagnosis rates were 54-67% for fine-needle and 82-100% for cutting-needle biopsies, according to biopsy site. For any site, sample adequacy and specific diagnosis rate were always better for cutting-needle biopsy. Among 530 lung biopsies, there were 84 pneumothorax (16%) and two hemothorax (0.3%) cases, with thoracic drainage in 24 (4.9%). Among abdominal and retroperitoneal biopsies, there were two cases of major bleeding and one of peritonitis. Conclusion: both types of needle showed satisfactory results, but cutting-needle biopsy should be used when specific diagnosis is desired without greater incidence of complications. (author)

  3. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Already widely accepted in medicine, tomography can also be useful in industry. The theory behind tomography and a demonstration of the technique to inspect a motorcycle carburetor is presented. To demonstrate the potential of computer assisted tomography (CAT) to accurately locate defects in three dimensions, a sectioned 5 cm gate valve with a shrink cavity made visible by the sectioning was tomographically imaged using a Co-60 source. The tomographic images revealed a larger cavity below the sectioned surface. The position of this cavity was located with an in-plane and axial precision of approximately +-1 mm. The volume of the cavity was estimated to be approximately 40 mm 3

  4. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  5. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  6. US-guided diffuse optical tomography for breast lesions: the reliability of clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Ji Youn; Youn, Jung Hyun; Kim, Myung Hyun; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Soo Jin; Sohn, Yu-Mee; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Eun-Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To prospectively assess the reliability of US-guided diffuse optical tomography (US-DOT) using interobserver agreement for the diagnosis of breast lesions with individual real-time imaging and to assess the interobserver agreement of conventional sonography (US) combined with US-DOT for differentiation between benignity and malignancy breast lesions. An Institutional Review Board approved this study, and all subjects provided written informed consent. 122 breast lesions in 111 patients evaluated with US-guided core biopsy were included. Assessments with US and US-DOT for cases subjected to biopsy were obtained by two radiologists using individual real-time imaging prior to biopsy and were prospectively recorded by each performer. With DOT, the total haemoglobin concentration (THC) for each breast lesion was measured. Histopathological results from US-guided biopsies were used as a reference standard. To assess measurement interobserver agreement, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman plot were used for THC in US-DOT and the kappa values and ROC analysis were used to evaluate the diagnostic performances of the US BI-RADS final assessment in US and combined US and US-DOT. Of 122 US-guided core biopsied lesions, 83 (68.0%) were diagnosed as benign, and 39 (32.0%) as malignant. Excellent correlation was seen in the THC in US-DOT (ICC score 0.796; 95% confidence interval, 0.708-0.857). The interobserver agreement in BI-RADS final assessment with US and US-DOT (almost perfect; {kappa} = 0.8618) was improved compared with that of US (substantial agreement, {kappa} = 0.6574). However, the overall areas under the ROC curve did not show significant differences between US and combined US and US-DOT, 0.8894 and 0.8975, respectively (P = 0.981). The reliability of THC in US-DOT showed excellent correlation in overall real-time performance. Although the inter-observer agreement for BI-RADS final assessment of US was improved by using US-DOT, the

  7. Computed-tomography-guided anatomic standardization for quantitative assessment of dopamine transporter SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Kota [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Integrative Brain Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan); Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Integrative Brain Imaging Center, Tokyo (Japan); Sumida, Kaoru; Sone, Daichi; Kimura, Yukio; Sato, Noriko [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Mukai, Youhei; Murata, Miho [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-03-15

    For the quantitative assessment of dopamine transporter (DAT) using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (DaTscan), anatomic standardization is preferable for achieving objective and user-independent quantification of striatal binding using a volume-of-interest (VOI) template. However, low accumulation of DAT in Parkinson's disease (PD) would lead to a deformation error when using a DaTscan-specific template without any structural information. To avoid this deformation error, we applied computed tomography (CT) data obtained using SPECT/CT equipment to anatomic standardization. We retrospectively analyzed DaTscan images of 130 patients with parkinsonian syndromes (PS), including 80 PD and 50 non-PD patients. First we segmented gray matter from CT images using statistical parametric mapping 12 (SPM12). These gray-matter images were then anatomically standardized using the diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm. Next, DaTscan images were warped with the same parameters used in the CT anatomic standardization. The target striatal VOIs for decreased DAT in PD were generated from the SPM12 group comparison of 20 DaTscan images from each group. We applied these VOIs to DaTscan images of the remaining patients in both groups and calculated the specific binding ratios (SBRs) using nonspecific counts in a reference area. In terms of the differential diagnosis of PD and non-PD groups using SBR, we compared the present method with two other methods, DaTQUANT and DaTView, which have already been released as software programs for the quantitative assessment of DaTscan images. The SPM12 group comparison showed a significant DAT decrease in PD patients in the bilateral whole striatum. Of the three methods assessed, the present CT-guided method showed the greatest power for discriminating PD and non-PD groups, as it completely separated the two groups. CT-guided anatomic standardization using

  8. Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Sedlmair, Martin; Ritter, Christine; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 × 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner’s isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at ≥150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r 2 = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

  9. Surgical positioning of orthodontic mini-implants with guides fabricated on models replicated with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Hun; Choi, Yong-Suk; Hwang, Eui-Hwan; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Nelson, Gerald

    2007-04-01

    This article illustrates a new surgical guide system that uses cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to replicate dental models; surgical guides for the proper positioning of orthodontic mini-implants were fabricated on the replicas, and the guides were used for precise placement. The indications, efficacy, and possible complications of this method are discussed. Patients who were planning to have orthodontic mini-implant treatment were recruited for this study. A CBCT system (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen, Kyoto, Japan) was used to acquire virtual slices of the posterior maxilla that were 0.1 to 0.15 mm thick. Color 3-dimensional rapid prototyping was used to differentiate teeth, alveolus, and maxillary sinus wall. A surgical guide for the mini-implant was fabricated on the replica model. Proper positioning for mini-implants on the posterior maxilla was determined by viewing the CBCT images. The surgical guide was placed on the clinical site, and it allowed precise pilot drilling and accurate placement of the mini-implant. CBCT imaging allows remarkably lower radiation doses and thinner acquisition slices compared with medical computed tomography. Virtually reproduced replica models enable precise planning for mini-implant positions in anatomically complex sites.

  10. Image-guided modified deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) corneal transplant using intraoperative optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yuankai K.; LaBarbera, Michael; Ehlers, Justis P.; Srivastava, Sunil K.; Dupps, William J.

    2015-03-01

    Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) is an alternative to full-thickness corneal transplant and has advantages including the absence of allograft rejection; shortened duration of topical corticosteroid treatment and reduced associated risk of glaucoma, cataract, or infection; and enables use of grafts with poor endothelial quality. DALK begins by performing a trephination of approximately 80% stromal thickness, as measured by pachymetry. After removal of the anterior stoma, a needle is inserted into the residual stroma to inject air or viscoelastic to dissect Descemet's membrane. These procedures are inherently difficult and intraoperative rates of Descemet's membrane perforation between 4-39% have been reported. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high-resolution images of tissue microstructures in the cornea, including Descemet's membrane, and allows quantitation of corneal layer thicknesses. Here, we use crosssectional intraoperative OCT (iOCT) measurements of corneal thickness during surgery and a novel micrometeradjustable biopsy punch to precision-cut the stroma down to Descemet's membrane. Our prototype cutting tool allows us to establish a dissection plane at the corneal endothelium interface, mitigates variability in cut-depths as a result of tremor, reduces procedure complexity, and reduces complication rates. iOCT-guided modified DALK procedures were performed on 47 cadaveric porcine eyes by non-experts and achieved a perforation rate of ~5% with a mean corneal dissection time care.

  11. Creating vascular models by postprocessing computed tomography angiography images: a guide for anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govsa, Figen; Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Sirinturk, Suzan; Eraslan, Cenk; Alagoz, Ahmet Kemal

    2017-08-01

    A new application of teaching anatomy includes the use of computed tomography angiography (CTA) images to create clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) printed models. The purpose of this article is to review recent innovations on the process and the application of 3D printed models as a tool for using under and post-graduate medical education. Images of aortic arch pattern received by CTA were converted into 3D images using the Google SketchUp free software and were saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model mode polylactic acid material was printed. A two-vessel left aortic arch was identified consisting of the brachiocephalic trunk and left subclavian artery. The life-like 3D models were rotated 360° in all axes in hand. The early adopters in education and clinical practices have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D printed anatomical models for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between the anatomical structures. Printed vascular models are used to assist in preoperative planning, develop intraoperative guidance tools, and to teach patients surgical trainees in surgical practice.

  12. [Fluoroscopy dose reduction of computed tomography guided chest interventional radiology using real-time iterative reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Mihara, Yoshiyuki; Ino, Kenji; Sato, Jiro

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose reduction to patients and radiologists in computed tomography (CT) guided examinations for the thoracic region using CT fluoroscopy. Image quality evaluation of the real-time filtered back-projection (RT-FBP) images and the real-time adaptive iterative dose reduction (RT-AIDR) images was carried out on noise and artifacts that were considered to affect the CT fluoroscopy. The image standard deviation was improved in the fluoroscopy setting with less than 30 mA on 120 kV. With regard to the evaluation of artifact visibility and the amount generated by the needle attached to the chest phantom, there was no significant difference between the RT-FBP images with 120 kV, 20 mA and the RT-AIDR images with low-dose conditions (greater than 80 kV, 30 mA and less than 120 kV, 20 mA). The results suggest that it is possible to reduce the radiation dose by approximately 34% at the maximum using RT-AIDR while maintaining image quality equivalent to the RT-FBP images with 120 V, 20 mA.

  13. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided ethanol injection in aldosterone-producing adrenocortical adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, R.; Savastano, S.; Tommaselli, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility, safety and effectiveness of percutaneous computed tomography-guided ethanol injection (PEI-CT) was investigated in a patient affected by aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). A 42-year-old male patient with typical features of hyperaldosteronism presented a solitary left adrenal adenoma measuring 2 cm, with a normal contralateral gland, evidenced by both CT scan and adrenal [ 75 Se-19]-nor-cholesterol scintigraphy. After normalization of potassium plasma levels, 4 ml of sterile 95% ethanol with 0.5 ml of 80% iothalamate sodium was injected. The procedure was completed in about 30 min. No severe pain or local complication was noted. Five hour after PEI, a fourfold and a twofold increase in aldosterone and cortisol plasma levels were observed, respectively. After 11 days on a normal sodium and potassium diet, normal potassium plasma levels and reduced aldosterone plasma levels were present, with reappearance of an aldosterone postural response. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone plasma levels normalized 1 month later, with reappearance also of a plasma renin activity postural response and maintenance of normal potassium plasma levels on a high sodium and normal potassium diet. The patient has remained hypertensive, although lower antihypertensive drug dosages have been employed. After 17 months, normal biochemical, hormonal and morphological findings were present. The authors suggested PEI-CT as a further alternative approach to surgery in the management of carefully selected patients with APA. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Artifact reduction method in ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography using exogenous contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Biswal, Nrusingh; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-04-01

    In diffuse optical tomography (DOT), a typical perturbation approach requires two sets of measurements obtained at the lesion breast (lesion or target site) and a contra-lateral location of the normal breast (reference site) for image reconstruction. For patients who have a small amount of breast tissue, the chest-wall underneath the breast tissue at both sites affects the imaging results. In this group of patients, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at the lesion and reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch which can generate artifacts or affect the reconstructed quantitative absorption coefficient of the lesion. Also, for patients who have a single breast due to prior surgery, the contra-lateral reference is not available. To improve the DOT performance or overcome its limitation, we introduced a new method based on an exogenous contrast agent and demonstrate its performance using animal models. Co-registered ultrasound was used to guide the lesion localization. The results have shown that artifacts caused by background mismatch can be reduced significantly by using this new method.

  15. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, H.H.; Gordon, S.; Swindell, W.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for generating a two-dimensional back-projected image of a slice of an object in tomography. The apparatus uses optical techniques to perform the functions of filtering and back projection. Central to the technique is a cylindrical drum which rotates at a fast rate and whose rotational axis tilts at a slower rate. The novel method overcomes the problem of image blurring due to motion which occurs in many tomographic techniques. It also has the advantages of being less expensive and simpler compared to tomography using digital processing techniques which require fast computers. (UK)

  16. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogo, Takeshi, E-mail: ogo.takeshi.hp@mail.ncvc.go.jp [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Department of Advanced Mediccal Research for Pulmonary Hypertension, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, Tetsuya [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Sanda, Yoshihiro [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Morita, Yoshiaki [Department of Radiology, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao [Division of Pulmonary Circulation, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan); Yasuda, Satoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Centre, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  17. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent advancement in CT enables distal CTEpH lesions to be visualized. • We investigated the efficacy and safety of BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT. • BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated area detector CT is effective and safe in patients with CTEpH . • These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. - Abstract: Background: Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. Methods: We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1 year after BPA. Results: Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1 year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. Conclusions: BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment.

  18. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transfer to oxygen, the cytotoxic singlet oxygen (102) resulting ... reactions. Thus, the available wavelengths for photodynamic sensitizers are 600-850 nm (red light). .... a: squamous cell carcinoma of a 78-year-old man. b: 1 week after PDT, .... relying on the heme's PDT action and (ii) noncancerous objects (i.e., healthy ...

  19. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Keller, N.A.; Lupton, L.R.; Taylor, T.; Tonner, P.D.

    1984-10-01

    Tomography is a non-intrusive imaging technique being developed at CRNL as an industrial tool for generating quantitative cross-sectional density maps of objects. Of most interest is tomography's ability to: distinguish features within complex geometries where other NDT techniques fail because of the complexity of the geometry; detect/locate small density changes/defects within objects, e.g. void fraction measurements within thick-walled vessels, shrink cavities in castings, etc.; provide quantitative data that can be used in analyses, e.g. of complex processes, or fracture mechanics; and provide objective quantitative data that can be used for (computer-based) quality assurance decisions, thereby reducing and in some cases eliminating the present subjectivity often encountered in NDT. The CRNL program is reviewed and examples are presented to illustrate the potential and the limitations of the technology

  20. Efficacy and safety of balloon pulmonary angioplasty for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension guided by cone-beam computed tomography and electrocardiogram-gated area detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tsuji, Akihiro; Fukui, Shigefumi; Ueda, Jin; Sanda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Yoshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Konagai, Nao; Yasuda, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a disease characterized by chronic obstructive thrombus and pulmonary hypertension. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA), an emerging alternative catheter-based treatment for inoperable patients with CTEPH, has not yet been standardised, especially for lesion assessment in distal pulmonary arteries. Recent advancement in computed tomography enables distal CTEPH lesions to be visualized. We retrospectively studied 80 consecutive patients with inoperable CTEPH who received BPA guided by cone-beam computed tomography (CT) (CBCT) or electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated area detector CT (ADCT) for target lesion assessment. We collected clinical and hemodynamic data, including procedural complications, before BPA and at 3 months and 1year after BPA. Three hundred eight-five BPA sessions (4.8 sessions/patient) were performed for the lesions of subsegmental arteries (1155 lesions), segmental arteries (738 lesions), and lobar arteries (4 lesions) identified by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT. Significant improvements in the symptoms, 6-min walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide level, exercise capacity, and haemodynamics were observed 3 months and 1year after BPA. No cases of death or cardiogenic shock with a low rate of severe wire perforation (0.3%) and severe reperfusion oedema (0.3%) were observed. BPA guided by CBCT or ECG-gated ADCT is effective and remarkably safe in patients with CTEPH . These new advanced CT techniques may be useful in pre-BPA target lesion assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Value of computed tomography for evaluating the injection site in endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Nishio, Takeshi; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Yasuda, Chikao; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) safely and effectively relieves pain associated with intra-abdominal malignancies when the neurolytic is accurately injected. We applied contrast medium to evaluate the ethanol injection sites in patients who received EUS-CPN due to abdominal pain caused by malignancies. We injected, under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), ethanol containing 10% contrast medium into the celiac plexus of patients with intra-abdominal pain due to malignancies. Immediately after the endoscopic therapy, patients underwent computed tomography (CT) to confirm the injection site. Images of distribution of injected solutions were classified into three groups. Injected solution dispersed in unilateral and bilateral anterocrural space was defined as ''unilateral injection'' or bilateral injection'', respectively. Injected solution located out of the anterocrural space was defined as ''inappropriate injection''. Pre- and postprocedure pain was assessed using a standard analog scale. Before and 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the procedure, pain scores were evaluated. From April 2003 to May 2005, 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Improvement of pain score in the ''bilateral injection'' and ''unilateral injection'' groups was significantly superior to the change in the ''inappropriate injection'' group. Although EUS-CPN was effective in eight of 13 patients (61.5%), additional EUS-CPN to the ''inappropriate injection group'' increased the response rate to 84.6%. Injection of ethanol to the anterocrural space by EUS-CPN produced adequate pain relief. Immediate examination by CT for confirmation of injection sites after EUS-CPN would increase the likelihood of induction of pain relief. (author)

  2. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  3. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  4. Systematic study of target localization for bioluminescence tomography guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingjing; Zhang, Bin; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Reyes, Juvenal; Lu, Zhihao; Brock, Malcolm V.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To overcome the limitation of CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) in guiding radiation for soft tissue targets, the authors developed a spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for the small animal radiation research platform. The authors systematically assessed the performance of the BLT system in terms of target localization and the ability to resolve two neighboring sources in simulations, tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo environments. Methods: Multispectral measurements acquired in a single projection were used for the BLT reconstruction. The incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient algorithm with an iterative permissible region shrinking strategy was employed as the optimization scheme to reconstruct source distributions. Simulation studies were conducted for single spherical sources with sizes from 0.5 to 3 mm radius at depth of 3–12 mm. The same configuration was also applied for the double source simulation with source separations varying from 3 to 9 mm. Experiments were performed in a standalone BLT/CBCT system. Two self-illuminated sources with 3 and 4.7 mm separations placed inside a tissue-mimicking phantom were chosen as the test cases. Live mice implanted with single-source at 6 and 9 mm depth, two sources at 3 and 5 mm separation at depth of 5 mm, or three sources in the abdomen were also used to illustrate the localization capability of the BLT system for multiple targets in vivo. Results: For simulation study, approximate 1 mm accuracy can be achieved at localizing center of mass (CoM) for single-source and grouped CoM for double source cases. For the case of 1.5 mm radius source, a common tumor size used in preclinical study, their simulation shows that for all the source separations considered, except for the 3 mm separation at 9 and 12 mm depth, the two neighboring sources can be resolved at depths from 3 to 12 mm. Phantom experiments illustrated that 2D bioluminescence imaging failed to distinguish two sources

  5. Systematic study of target localization for bioluminescence tomography guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jingjing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Shaanxi 710119 (China); Zhang, Bin; Reyes, Juvenal; Wong, John W.; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin, E-mail: kwang27@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Iordachita, Iulian I. [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Lu, Zhihao [Department of Oncology and Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Key laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research, Department of GI Oncology, Peking University, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing 100142 (China); Brock, Malcolm V. [Department of Oncology and Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To overcome the limitation of CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) in guiding radiation for soft tissue targets, the authors developed a spectrally resolved bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for the small animal radiation research platform. The authors systematically assessed the performance of the BLT system in terms of target localization and the ability to resolve two neighboring sources in simulations, tissue-mimicking phantom, and in vivo environments. Methods: Multispectral measurements acquired in a single projection were used for the BLT reconstruction. The incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient algorithm with an iterative permissible region shrinking strategy was employed as the optimization scheme to reconstruct source distributions. Simulation studies were conducted for single spherical sources with sizes from 0.5 to 3 mm radius at depth of 3–12 mm. The same configuration was also applied for the double source simulation with source separations varying from 3 to 9 mm. Experiments were performed in a standalone BLT/CBCT system. Two self-illuminated sources with 3 and 4.7 mm separations placed inside a tissue-mimicking phantom were chosen as the test cases. Live mice implanted with single-source at 6 and 9 mm depth, two sources at 3 and 5 mm separation at depth of 5 mm, or three sources in the abdomen were also used to illustrate the localization capability of the BLT system for multiple targets in vivo. Results: For simulation study, approximate 1 mm accuracy can be achieved at localizing center of mass (CoM) for single-source and grouped CoM for double source cases. For the case of 1.5 mm radius source, a common tumor size used in preclinical study, their simulation shows that for all the source separations considered, except for the 3 mm separation at 9 and 12 mm depth, the two neighboring sources can be resolved at depths from 3 to 12 mm. Phantom experiments illustrated that 2D bioluminescence imaging failed to distinguish two sources

  6. Preliminary Results of Emergency Computed Tomography-Guided Ventricular Drain Placement-Precision for the Most Difficult Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andreas; Wagner, Franca; Söll, Nicole; Hakim, Arsany; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, Andreas; Z'Graggen, Werner J

    2018-04-05

    External ventricular drainage (EVD) catheter placement is one of the most commonly performed neurosurgical procedures. The study's objective was to compare a computed tomography (CT) bolt scan-guided approach for the placement of EVDs with conventional landmark-based insertion. In this retrospective case-control study, we analyzed patients undergoing bolt-kit EVD catheter placement, either CT-guided or landmark-based, between 2013 and 2016. The CT bolt scan-guided approach was based on a dose-reduced CT scan after bolt fixation with immediate image reconstruction along the axis of the bolt to evaluate the putative insertion axis. If needed, angulation of the bolt was corrected and the procedure repeated before the catheter was inserted. Primary endpoint was the accuracy of insertion. Secondary endpoints were the overall number of attempts, duration of intervention, complication rates, and cumulative radiation dose. In total, 34 patients were included in the final analysis. In the group undergoing CT-guided placement, the average ventricle width was significantly smaller (P = 0.04) and average midline shift significantly more pronounced (P = 0.01). CT-guided placement resulted in correct positioning of the catheter in the ipsilateral frontal horn in all 100% of the cases compared with landmark-guided insertion (63%; P = 0.01). Application of the CT-guided approach increased the number of total CT scans (3.6 ± 1.9) and the overall radiation dose (3.34 ± 1.61 mSv) compared with the freehand insertion group (1.84 ± 2.0 mSv and 1.55 ± 1.66 mSv). No differences were found for the other secondary outcome parameters. CT-guided bolt-kit EVD catheter placement is feasible and accurate in the most difficult cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging breast adipose and fibroglandular tissue molecular signatures by using hybrid MRI-guided near-infrared spectral tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksby, Ben; Pogue, Brian W.; Jiang, Shudong; Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Kogel, Christine; Tosteson, Tor D.; Weaver, John; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided near-infrared spectral tomography was developed and used to image adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue of 11 normal female subjects, recruited under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Images of hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water fraction, and subcellular scattering were reconstructed and show that fibroglandular fractions of both blood and water are higher than in adipose tissue. Variation in adipose and fibroglandular tissue composition between individuals was not significantly different across the scattered and dense breast categories. Combined MR and near-infrared tomography provides fundamental molecular information about these tissue types with resolution governed by MR T1 images. hemoglobin | magnetic resonance imaging | water | fat | oxygen saturation

  8. C-arm cone beam computed tomography needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alda L; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Chinndurai, Ponraj; Rohm, Esther; Hall, Andrew F; Wallace, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    Retrospective review. To report our early clinical experience using C-arm cone beam computed tomography (C-arm CBCT) with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. C-arm CBCT is advanced three-dimensional (3-D) imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat panel based angiography systems. The imaging information provided by C-arm CBCT allows for the acquisition and reconstruction of "CT-like" images in flat panel based angiography/interventional suites. As part of the evolution of this technology, enhancements allowing the overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real time fluoroscopy. We report our early clinical experience with C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance during vertebroplasty. This is a retrospective review of 10 consecutive oncology patients who underwent vertebroplasty of 13 vertebral levels using C-arm CBCT with fluoroscopic overlay for needle guidance from November 2007 to December 2008. Procedural data including vertebral level, approach (transpedicular vs. extrapedicular), access (bilateral vs. unilateral) and complications were recorded. Technical success with the overlay technology was assessed based on accuracy which consisted of 4 measured parameters: distance from target to needle tip, distance from planned path to needle tip, distance from midline to needle tip, and distance from the anterior 1/3 of the vertebral body to needle tip. Success within each parameter required that the distance between the needle tip and parameter being evaluated be no more than 5 mm on multiplanar CBCT or fluoroscopy. Imaging data for 12 vertebral levels was available for review. All vertebral levels were treated using unilateral access and 9 levels were treated with an extrapedicular approach. Technical success rates were 92% for both distance from planned path and distance from midline to final needle tip, 100% when distance from needle tip to the anterior 1

  9. Development of a guidance guide for dosimetry in computed tomography; Desenvolvimento de um guia orientativo para dosimetria em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontes, Ladyjane Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Due to frequent questions from users of ionization chambers pencil type calibrated in the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (LCI - IPEN), on how to properly apply the factors indicated in their calibration certificates, a guide was prepared guidance for dosimetry in computed tomography. The guide includes guidance prior knowledge of half value layer (HVL), as it is necessary to know the effective beam energy for application quality for correction factor (kq). The evaluation of HVL in TC scanners becomes a difficult task due to system geometry and therefore a survey was conducted of existing methodologies for the determination of HVL in clinical beams Computed Tomography, taking into account technical, practical and economic factors. In this work it was decided to test a Tandem System consists of absorbing covers made in the workshop of IPEN, based on preliminary studies due to low cost and good response. The Tandem system consists of five cylindrical absorbing layers of 1mm, 3mm, 5mm, 7mm and 10mm aluminum and 3 cylindrical absorbing covers 15mm, 25mm and acrylic 35mm (PMMA) coupled to the ionization chamber of commercial pencil type widely used in quality control tests in dosimetry in clinical beams Computed tomography. Through Tandem curves it was possible to assess HVL values and from the standard curve pencil-type ionization chamber, Kq find the appropriate beam. The elaborate Guide provides information on how to build the calibration curve on the basis of CSR, to find the Kq and information for construction Tandem curve, to find values close to CSR. (author)

  10. Cone-beam computed tomography fusion and navigation for real-time positron emission tomography-guided biopsies and ablations: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Mielekamp, Peter; Noordhoek, Niels; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Millo, Corina; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J

    2012-06-01

    To describe a novel technique for multimodality positron emission tomography (PET) fusion-guided interventions that combines cone-beam computed tomography (CT) with PET/CT before the procedure. Subjects were selected among patients scheduled for a biopsy or ablation procedure. The lesions were not visible with conventional imaging methods or did not have uniform uptake on PET. Clinical success was defined by adequate histopathologic specimens for molecular profiling or diagnosis and by lack of enhancement on follow-up imaging for ablation procedures. Time to target (time elapsed between the completion of the initial cone-beam CT scan and first tissue sample or treatment), total procedure time (time from the moment the patient was on the table until the patient was off the table), and number of times the needle was repositioned were recorded. Seven patients underwent eight procedures (two ablations and six biopsies). Registration and procedures were completed successfully in all cases. Clinical success was achieved in all biopsy procedures and in one of the two ablation procedures. The needle was repositioned once in one biopsy procedure only. On average, the time to target was 38 minutes (range 13-54 min). Total procedure time was 95 minutes (range 51-240 min, which includes composite ablation). On average, fluoroscopy time was 2.5 minutes (range 1.3-6.2 min). An integrated cone-beam CT software platform can enable PET-guided biopsies and ablation procedures without the need for additional specialized hardware. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.H.; Barber, D.C.; Freeston, I.L.

    1983-01-01

    Tomography images of a body are constructed by placing a plurality of surface electrodes at spaced intervals on the body, causing currents to flow in the body (e.g. by applying a potential between each pair of electrodes in turn, or by induction), and measuring the potential between pairs of electrodes, calculating the potential expected in each case on the assumption that the body consists of a medium of uniform impedance, plotting the isopotentials corresponding to the calculated results to create a uniform image of the body, obtaining the ratio between the measured potential and the calculated potential in each case, and modifying the image in accordance with the respective ratios by increasing the assumed impedance along an isopotential in proportion to a ratio greater than unity or decreasing the assumed impedance in proportion to a ratio less than unity. The modified impedances along the isopotentials for each pair of electrodes are superimposed. The calculations are carried out using a computer and the plotting is carried out by a visual display unit and/or a print-out unit. (author)

  12. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Ryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Kim, Joshua P.; Zheng, Weili [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri, E-mail: churst2@hfhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0

  13. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Using Synthetic Computed Tomography Images in Brain Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Ryan G.; Kim, Joshua P.; Zheng, Weili; Chetty, Indrin J.; Glide-Hurst, Carri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of synthetic computed tomography (CT) (synCT) derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images supports MR-only treatment planning. We evaluated the accuracy of synCT and synCT-generated digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) relative to CT and determined their performance for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) and CT simulation (CT-SIM) images were acquired of an anthropomorphic skull phantom and 12 patient brain cancer cases. SynCTs were generated using fluid attenuation inversion recovery, ultrashort echo time, and Dixon data sets through a voxel-based weighted summation of 5 tissue classifications. The DRRs were generated from the phantom synCT, and geometric fidelity was assessed relative to CT-generated DRRs through bounding box and landmark analysis. An offline retrospective analysis was conducted to register cone beam CTs (n=34) to synCTs and CTs using automated rigid registration in the treatment planning system. Planar MV and KV images (n=37) were rigidly registered to synCT and CT DRRs using an in-house script. Planar and volumetric registration reproducibility was assessed and margin differences were characterized by the van Herk formalism. Results: Bounding box and landmark analysis of phantom synCT DRRs were within 1 mm of CT DRRs. Absolute planar registration shift differences ranged from 0.0 to 0.7 mm for phantom DRRs on all treatment platforms and from 0.0 to 0.4 mm for volumetric registrations. For patient planar registrations, the mean shift differences were 0.4 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.6 to 1.6 mm), 0.0 ± 0.5 mm (range, −0.9 to 1.2 mm), and 0.1 ± 0.3 mm (range, −0.7 to 0.6 mm) for the superior-inferior (S-I), left-right (L-R), and anterior-posterior (A-P) axes, respectively. The mean shift differences in volumetric registrations were 0.6 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.2 to 1.6 mm), 0.2 ± 0.4 mm (range, −0.3 to 1.2 mm), and 0.2 ± 0

  14. Percutaneous transthoracic computed tomography-guided AICD insertion in a patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Darra T

    2011-02-01

    Percutaneous pulmonary venous atrial puncture was performed under computed tomography guidance to successfully place an automated implantable cardiac defibrillator into a 26-year-old patient with extracardiac Fontan conduit who had presented with two out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. The procedure avoided the need for lead placement at thoracotomy.

  15. Osteoid osteomas in common and in technically challenging locations treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylona, Sophia; Patsoura, Sofia; Karapostolakis, Georgios; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Anastasia; Thanos, Loukas

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the treatment of osteoid osteomas in common and in technically challenging locations. Twenty-three patients with osteoid osteomas in common (nine cases) and technically challenging [14 cases: intra-articular (n = 7), spinal (n = 5), metaphyseal (n = 2)] positions were treated with CT-guided RF ablation. Therapy was performed under conscious sedation with a seven-array expandable RF electrode for 8-10 min at 80-110 C and power of 90-110 W. The patients went home under instruction. A brief pain inventory (BPI) score was calculated before and after (1 day, 4 weeks, 6 months and 1 year) treatment. All procedures were technically successful. Primary clinical success was 91.3% (21 of total 23 patients), despite the lesions' locations. BPI score was dramatically reduced after the procedure, and the decrease in BPI score was significant (P < 0.001, paired t-test; n - 1 = 22) for all periods during follow up. Two patients had persistent pain after 1 month and were treated successfully with a second procedure (secondary success rate 100%). No immediate or delayed complications were observed. CT-guided RF ablation is safe and highly effective for treatment of osteoid osteomas, even in technically difficult positions. (orig.)

  16. Computed tomography-guided interstitial high dose rate brachytherapy for centrally located liver tumours: a single institution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselis, Nikolaos; Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiation Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Kolotas, Christos [Hirslanden Medical Center, Institute for Radiotherapy, Aarau (Switzerland); Milickovic, Natasa; Baltas, Dimos [Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial (IRT) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BRT) in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary liver malignancies. This report updates and expands our previously described experience with this treatment technique. Forty-one patients with 50 tumours adjacent to the liver hilum and bile duct bifurcation were treated in 59 interventions of CT-guided IRT HDR BRT. The tumours were larger than 4 cm with a median volume of 84 cm{sup 3} (38-1,348 cm{sup 3}). The IRT HDR BRT delivered a median total physical dose of 20.0 Gy (7.0-32.0 Gy) in twice daily fractions of median 7.0 Gy (4.0-10.0 Gy) in 19 patients and in once daily fractions of median 8.0 Gy (7.0-14.0 Gy) in 22 patients. With a median follow-up of 12.4 months, the local control for metastatic hepatic tumours was 89 %, 73 % and 63 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. The local control for primary hepatic tumours was 90 %, 81 % and 50 % at 6, 12 and 18 months respectively. Severe side effects occurred in 5.0 % of interventions with no treatment-related deaths. CT-guided IRT HDR BRT is a promising procedure for the radiation treatment of centrally located liver malignancies. (orig.)

  17. 3D artificial bones for bone repair prepared by computed tomography-guided fused deposition modeling for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Ye, Xiaojian; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Yuyun; Xu, Guohua; He, Dannong

    2014-09-10

    The medical community has expressed significant interest in the development of new types of artificial bones that mimic natural bones. In this study, computed tomography (CT)-guided fused deposition modeling (FDM) was employed to fabricate polycaprolactone (PCL)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and PCL 3D artificial bones to mimic natural goat femurs. The in vitro mechanical properties, in vitro cell biocompatibility, and in vivo performance of the artificial bones in a long load-bearing goat femur bone segmental defect model were studied. All of the results indicate that CT-guided FDM is a simple, convenient, relatively low-cost method that is suitable for fabricating natural bonelike artificial bones. Moreover, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones prepared by CT-guided FDM have more close mechanics to natural bone, good in vitro cell biocompatibility, biodegradation ability, and appropriate in vivo new bone formation ability. Therefore, PCL/HA 3D artificial bones could be potentially be of use in the treatment of patients with clinical bone defects.

  18. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors: results and correlation with surgical specimen analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Grigio, Henrique Ramos; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Pinto, Paula Nicole Vieira; Tyng, Chiang J.; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Aguiar Junior, Samuel; Lopes, Ademar, E-mail: chojniak@uol.com.br [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors in obtaining appropriate samples for histological analysis, and compare its diagnosis with the results of the surgical pathology as available. Materials and Methods: The authors reviewed medical records, imaging and histological reports of 262 patients with soft-tissue tumors submitted to CT-guided core needle biopsy in an oncologic reference center between 2003 and 2009. Results: Appropriate samples were obtained in 215 (82.1%) out of the 262 patients. The most prevalent tumors were sarcomas (38.6%), metastatic carcinomas (28.8%), benign mesenchymal tumors (20.5%) and lymphomas (9.3%). Histological grading was feasible in 92.8% of sarcoma patients, with the majority of them (77.9%) being classified as high grade tumors. Out of the total sample, 116 patients (44.3%) underwent surgical excision and diagnosis confirmation. Core biopsy demonstrated 94.6% accuracy in the identification of sarcomas, with 96.4% sensitivity and 89.5% specificity. A significant intermethod agreement about histological grading was observed between core biopsy and surgical resection (p < 0.001; kappa = 0.75). Conclusion: CT-guided core needle biopsy demonstrated a high diagnostic accuracy in the evaluation of soft tissue tumors as well as in the histological grading of sarcomas, allowing an appropriate therapeutic planning (author)

  19. Feasibility of optimizing the dose distribution in lung tumors using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography guided dose prescriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Miften, M.M.; Zhou, S.; Bell, M.; Munley, M.T.; Whiddon, C.S.; Craciunescu, O.; Baydush, A.H.; Wong, T.; Rosenman, J.G.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Marks, L.B.

    2004-01-01

    The information provided by functional images may be used to guide radiotherapy planning by identifying regions that require higher radiation dose. In this work we investigate the dosimetric feasibility of delivering dose to lung tumors in proportion to the fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose activity distribution from positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). The rationale for delivering dose in proportion to the tumor FDG-PET activity distribution is based on studies showing that FDG uptake is correlated to tumor cell proliferation rate, which is shown to imply that this dose delivery strategy is theoretically capable of providing the same duration of local control at all voxels in tumor. Target dose delivery was constrained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) maps of normal lung perfusion, which restricted irradiation of highly perfused lung and imposed dose-function constraints. Dose-volume constraints were imposed on all other critical structures. All dose-volume/function constraints were considered to be soft, i.e., critical structure doses corresponding to volume/function constraint levels were minimized while satisfying the target prescription, thus permitting critical structure doses to minimally exceed dose constraint levels. An intensity modulation optimization methodology was developed to deliver this radiation, and applied to two lung cancer patients. Dosimetric feasibility was assessed by comparing spatially normalized dose-volume histograms from the nonuniform dose prescription (FDG-PET proportional) to those from a uniform dose prescription with equivalent tumor integral dose. In both patients, the optimization was capable of delivering the nonuniform target prescription with the same ease as the uniform target prescription, despite SPECT restrictions that effectively diverted dose from high to low perfused normal lung. In one patient, both prescriptions incurred similar critical structure dosages, below dose-volume/function limits

  20. Reliability of implant placement with stereolithographic surgical guides generated from computed tomography: clinical data from 94 implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Ahmet Ersan; Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Ozan, Oguz; McGlumphy, Edwin A

    2008-08-01

    Dental implant placement requires precise planning with regard to anatomic limitations and restorative goals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the match between the positions and axes of the planned and placed implants using stereolithographic (SLA) surgical guides. Ninety-four implants were placed using SLA surgical guides generated from computed tomography (CT) between 2005 and 2006. Radiographic templates were used for all subjects during CT imaging. After obtaining three-dimensional CT images, each implant was virtually placed on the CT images. SLA surgical guides, fabricated using an SLA machine with a laser beam to polymerize the liquid photo-polymerized resin, were used during implant placement. A new CT scan was taken for each subject following implant placement. Special software was used to fuse the images of the planned and placed implants, and the locations and axes were compared. Compared to the planned implants, the placed implants showed angular deviation of 4.9 degrees+/-2.36 degrees, whereas the mean linear deviation was 1.22+/-0.85 mm at the implant neck and 1.51+/-1 mm at the implant apex. Compared to the implant planning, the angular deviation and linear deviation at the neck and apex of the placed maxillary implants were 5.31 degrees+/-0.36 degrees, 1.04+/-0.56 mm, and 1.57+/-0.97 mm, respectively, whereas corresponding figures for placed mandibular implants were 4.44 degrees+/-0.31 degrees, 1.42+/-1.05 mm, and 1.44+/-1.03 mm, respectively. SLA surgical guides using CT data may be reliable in implant placement and make flapless implant placement possible.

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography-guided interventional procedure for diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schernthaner, M.; Helbich, T.H.; Fueger, B.J.; Memarsadeghi, M.; Stiglbauer, A.; Linhart, H.G.; Doan, A.; Pinker, K.; Brader, P.; Margreiter, M.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly established in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in addition to transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). The use of T2-weighted imaging allows an exact delineation of the zonal anatomy of the prostate and its surrounding structures. Other MR imaging tools, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging or diffusion-weighted imaging allow an inference of the biochemical characteristics (multiparametric MRI). Prostate cancer, which could only be diagnosed using MR imaging or lesions suspected as being prostate cancer, which are localized in the anterior aspect of the prostate and were missed with repetitive TRUS biopsy, need to undergo MR guided biopsy. Recent studies have shown a good correlation between MR imaging and histopathology of specimens collected by MR-guided biopsy. Improved lesion targeting is therefore possible with MR-guided biopsy. So far data suggest that MR-guided biopsy of the prostate is a promising alternative diagnostic tool to TRUS-guided biopsy. (orig.) [de

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in three-dimensional brain positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H; Slosman, D O

    2003-01-01

    Reliable attenuation correction represents an essential component of the long chain of modules required for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative brain positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this work we demonstrate the proof of principle of segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided attenuation and scatter corrections in 3D brain PET. We have developed a method for attenuation correction based on registered T1-weighted MRI, eliminating the need of an additional transmission (TX) scan. The MR images were realigned to preliminary reconstructions of PET data using an automatic algorithm and then segmented by means of a fuzzy clustering technique which identifies tissues of significantly different density and composition. The voxels belonging to different regions were classified into air, skull, brain tissue and nasal sinuses. These voxels were then assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients as reported in the ICRU 44 report followed by Gaussian smoothing and additio...

  3. Microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided small-incision lenticule extraction: New surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Namrata; Urkude, Jayanand; Chaniyara, Manthan; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2017-10-01

    We describe the surgical technique of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided small-incision lenticule extraction. The technique enables manual tracking of surgical instruments and identification of the desired dissection plane. It also helps discern the relation between the dissector and the intrastromal lenticule. The dissection plane becomes hyperreflective on dissection, ensuring complete separation of the intrastromal lenticule from the overlying and underlying stroma. Inadvertent posterior plane entry, cap-lenticule adhesion, incomplete separation of the lenticule, creation of a false plane, and lenticule remnants may be recognized intraoperatively so corrective steps can be taken immediately. In cases with a hazy overlying cap, microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT enables localization and extraction of the lenticule. The technique is helpful for inexperienced surgeons, especially in cases with low amplitudes of refractive errors, ie, thin lenticules. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed tomography-guided bupivacaine and corticosteroid injection for the treatment of symptomatic calcification in the great toe tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatoprak O

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Omer Karatoprak,1 Sinan Karaca,2 Mehmet Nuri Erdem,3 Ozgur Karaman,2 Azmi Hamzaoglu41Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital Atasehir, Istanbul, Turkey; 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Kolan International Hospital Sisli, Istanbul, Turkey; 4Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Istanbul Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul TurkeyBackground: Calcification in the great toe tendon is a rare disorder that is characterized by the deposition of calcium on degenerative collagen fibrils.Case presentations: In this report, we present two cases of calcific tendonitis: one in the adductor hallucis and the other in the flexor hallucis longus tendon. We preferred computed tomography-guided steroid injection in our cases because of pain unresponsive to conservative treatment. Patients were free of symptoms at the follow-up visit, 4 weeks after injection.Conclusion: Calcification of the hallux tendons is a rare disorder. Treatment of tendonitis consists of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Local anesthetic and steroid injection may be considered in cases unresponsive to conservative treatment. Because of the anatomic location of tendons, injection could be difficult. Computed tomography guidance may improve the success rate of injections.Keywords: bupivacaine, calcification, great toe tendons, corticosteroid injection

  5. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic masses using pneumodissection; Biopsia percutanea de massas pancreaticas guiada por tomografia computadorizada com pneumodisseccao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Almeida, Maria Fernanda Arruda; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Martins, Eduardo Bruno Lobato; Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka Matushita; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: chiangjengtyng@gmail.com [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Coimbra, Felipe Jose Fernandez [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia Abdominal

    2013-05-15

    Objective: to describe the technique of computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of pancreatic tumors with pneumodissection. Materials and methods: in the period from June 2011 to May 2012, seven computed tomography guided percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic tumors utilizing pneumodissection were performed in the authors' institution. All the procedures were performed with an automatic biopsy gun and coaxial system with Tru-core needles. The biopsy specimens were histologically assessed. Results: in all the cases the pancreatic mass could not be directly approached by computed tomography without passing through major organs and structures. The injection of air allowed the displacement of adjacent structures and creation of a safe coaxial needle pathway toward the lesion. Biopsy was successfully performed in all the cases, yielding appropriate specimens for pathological analysis. Conclusion: Pneumodissection is a safe, inexpensive and technically easy approach to perform percutaneous biopsy in selected cases where direct access to the pancreatic tumor is not feasible. (author)

  6. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    imaging in small- animal on-Medical Physics, Vol. 34, No. 12, December 2007cology models,” Mol. Imag. 3, 55–62 2004. 8E. B. Walters, K. Panda , J. A...publication 8 October 2007; published 28 November 2007 Cone-beam microcomputed tomography microCT is one of the most popular choices for small animal ...imaging which is becoming an important tool for studying animal models with transplanted diseases. Region-of-interest ROI imaging techniques in CT, which

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction of positron emission tomography data in PET/MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view (FoV). MR-AC methods can be divided into three main categories: segmentation-, atlas- and PET-based. This review aims to...

  8. [Value of the optical coherence tomography in the treatment guided of the stent failure. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Enrico; Tellez, Alejandro; Ochoa, Jorge; Ortíz, José E

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of bare metal and drug-eluting stents, the surgical revascularization have declined considerably, however the thrombosis and in-stent restenosis are important complications of these devices. There are several factors that predispose to thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Conventional angiography has serious limitations to determine the causes of stent failure. Optical coherence tomography is a very sensitive technique to determine the cause of thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Validating atlas-guided DOT: a comparison of diffuse optical tomography informed by atlas and subject-specific anatomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert J; Caffini, Matteo; Dubb, Jay; Fang, Qianqian; Custo, Anna; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Fischl, Bruce; Wells, William; Dan, Ippeita; Boas, David A

    2012-09-01

    We describe the validation of an anatomical brain atlas approach to the analysis of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Using MRI data from 32 subjects, we compare the diffuse optical images of simulated cortical activation reconstructed using a registered atlas with those obtained using a subject's true anatomy. The error in localization of the simulated cortical activations when using a registered atlas is due to a combination of imperfect registration, anatomical differences between atlas and subject anatomies and the localization error associated with diffuse optical image reconstruction. When using a subject-specific MRI, any localization error is due to diffuse optical image reconstruction only. In this study we determine that using a registered anatomical brain atlas results in an average localization error of approximately 18 mm in Euclidean space. The corresponding error when the subject's own MRI is employed is 9.1 mm. In general, the cost of using atlas-guided DOT in place of subject-specific MRI-guided DOT is a doubling of the localization error. Our results show that despite this increase in error, reasonable anatomical localization is achievable even in cases where the subject-specific anatomy is unavailable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Hopital Pellegrin, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Nice (France); Boileau, Pascal [Hopital Archet 2, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nice (France)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements {+-} SD decreased from 7.8 {+-} 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 {+-} 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 {+-} 17.2 to 15.1 {+-} 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  11. Chest Computed Tomography (CT) Immediately after CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy as a Predictor of Overt Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Tae June; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kang, Young Ae; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Jae Ho

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the correlation between pneumothorax detected by immediate post-transthoracic needle aspiration-biopsy (TTNB) chest computed tomography (CT) and overt pneumothorax detected by chest PA, and investigated factors that might influence the correlation. Methods Adult patients who had undergone CT-guided TTNB for lung lesions from May 2003 to June 2007 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were included. Immediate post-TTNB CT and chest PA follow-up at 4 and 16 hours after CT-guided TTNB were performed in 934 patients. Results Pneumothorax detected by immediate chest CT (CT-pneumothorax) was found in 237 (25%) and overt pneumothorax was detected by chest PA follow-up in 92 (38.8%) of the 237 patients. However, overt pneumothorax was found in 18 (2.6%) of the 697 patients without CT-pneumothorax. The width and depth of CT-pneumothorax were predictive risk factors for overt pneumothorax. Conclusions CT-pneumothorax is very sensitive for predicting overt pneumothorax, and the width and depth on CT-pneumothorax are reliable risk factors for predicting overt pneumothorax. PMID:19949733

  12. A Dual Reporter Iodinated Labeling Reagent for Cancer Positron Emission Tomography Imaging and Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The combination of early diagnosis and complete surgical resection offers the greatest prospect of curative cancer treatment. An iodine-124/fluorescein-based dual-modality labeling reagent, 124I-Green, constitutes a generic tool for one-step installation of a positron emission tomography (PET) and a fluorescent reporter to any cancer-specific antibody. The resulting antibody conjugate would allow both cancer PET imaging and intraoperative fluorescence-guided surgery. 124I-Green was synthesized in excellent radiochemical yields of 92 ± 5% (n = 4) determined by HPLC with an improved one-pot three-component radioiodination reaction. The A5B7 carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific antibody was conjugated to 124I-Green. High tumor uptake of the dual-labeled A5B7 of 20.21 ± 2.70, 13.31 ± 0.73, and 10.64 ± 1.86%ID/g was observed in CEA-expressing SW1222 xenograft mouse model (n = 3) at 24, 48, and 72 h post intravenous injection, respectively. The xenografts were clearly visualized by both PET/CT and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. These encouraging results warrant the further translational development of 124I-Green for cancer PET imaging and fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:29388770

  13. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-10-28

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery.

  14. Computed tomography- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults: a new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Browaeys, Patrick; Nouri, Yasir; Ibba, Caroline; Hauger, Olivier; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Boileau, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of computed tomography (CT)- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation for the treatment of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis in adults. Ten consecutive adult patients (four men and six women; mean age: 57.1 [range, 44-78 years]) were prospectively treated by percutaneous screw fixation for low-grade (six grade 1 and four grade 2) isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5. For each patient, two 4.0-mm Asnis III cannulated screws were placed to fix the pars interarticularis defects. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia by using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Post-operative outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. The procedure time ranged from 45 to 60 min. The mean screw length was 27 mm (range, 24-32 mm). The VAS and ODI measurements ± SD decreased from 7.8 ± 0.9 preoperatively to 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last 2-year follow-up, and from 62.3 ± 17.2 to 15.1 ± 6.0, respectively (P < 0.001 in both cases). Neither slip progression nor screw failure was noted. This feasibility study showed that CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous screw fixation could be a rapid, safe and effective method of treating low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. (orig.)

  15. Three-dimensional computed tomography-guided monotherapeutic pararectal brachytherapy of prostate cancer with seminal vesicle invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutrouvelis, Panos; Lailas, Niko; Hendricks, Fred; Gil-Montero, Guillermo; Sehn, James; Katz, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To treat patients with prostate cancer and seminal vesicle invasion with monotherapeutic three dimensional computed tomography (3-DCT)-guided posterior pararectal brachytherapy. Methods and materials: Three hundred and sixty two patients with clinical stage T1 a,b or T2 a,b of prostate cancer were referred for 3-DCT-guided brachytherapy. Each underwent further staging with 3-D CT-guided pararectal biopsy of the seminal vesicles under local anesthesia during the pre-treatment CT-planning. Forty-three patients (12%) were upstaged to T3 cNoMo disease. In the set of 43 patients, Eight had Gleason's score≤6, 24 Gleason's score=7, and 11 patients ≥8. Initial PSA was 20 in 18 patients. Of the 43 patients, 37 patients were treated monotherapeutically with 3-D CT-guided brachytherapy. No patients received hormone therapy after the implant. The prescribed dosage to the seminal vesicles and prostate is 120 Gy with Pd-103 seeds and 144 Gy with 1-125 seeds. Results: The prescribed dosage was achieved in all 37 patient's throughout the seminal vesicles whose range of target radiation extended 5-10 mm outside the target in the adjacent fat as calculated with post-implant CT-dosimetry with Varian Brachy Vision or MMS software. Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) outcome data were available in 34 patients treated with monotherapy and follow up ranged from 12-56 months (median, 24 months). Decreased PSA levels were stratified into six groups based on the presenting Gleason's score and initial PSA. In the first group (with Gleason's score≤6 and initial PSA 20 ng/ml), PSA decreased to less than 0.5 ng/ml in four out of eight patients (50%). All of the patients in the fourth group (with Gleason's score≥8 and initial PSA 20 ng/ml). There were no patients with Gleason's score of 1-6 and greater than 20 ng/ml initial PSA. Patients, irrespective of the Gleason's score and PSA, had an overall response of decreased PSA (less than 1 ng/ml) of 79%. Conclusion: 3-D CT-guided

  16. Handheld single photon emission computed tomography (handheld SPECT) navigated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery of computer tomography-guided radioactively marked pulmonary lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Putora, Paul Martin; Schneider, Tino; Zeisel, Christoph; Brutsche, Martin; Baty, Florent; Markus, Alexander; Kick, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive marking can be a valuable extension to minimally invasive surgery. The technique has been clinically applied in procedures involving sentinel lymph nodes, parathyroidectomy as well as interventions in thoracic surgery. Improvements in equipment and techniques allow one to improve the limits. Pulmonary nodules are frequently surgically removed for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons; here video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is the preferred technique. VATS might be impossible with nodules that are small or located deep in the lung. In this study, we examined the clinical application and safety of employing the newly developed handheld single photon emission tomography (handheld SPECT) device in combination with CT-guided radioactive marking of pulmonary nodules. In this pilot study, 10 subjects requiring surgical resection of a pulmonary nodule were included. The technique involved CT-guided marking of the target nodule with a 20-G needle, with subsequent injection of 25-30 MBq (effective: 7-14 MBq) Tc-99m MAA (Macro Albumin Aggregate). Quality control was made with conventional SPECT-CT to confirm the correct localization and exclude possible complications related to the puncture procedure. VATS was subsequently carried out using the handheld SPECT to localize the radioactivity intraoperatively and therefore the target nodule. A 3D virtual image was superimposed on the intraoperative visual image for surgical guidance. In 9 of the 10 subjects, the radioactive application was successfully placed directly in or in the immediate vicinity of the target nodule. The average size of the involved nodules was 9 mm (range 4-15). All successfully marked nodules were subsequently completely excised (R0) using VATS. The procedure was well tolerated. An asymptomatic clinically insignificant pneumothorax occurred in 5 subjects. Two subjects were found to have non-significant discrete haemorrhage in the infiltration canal of the needle. In a single subject, the

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction of positron emission tomography data in PET/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view (FoV). MR-AC methods can be divided into three main categories: segmentation-, atlas- and PET-based. This review aims to provide a comprehensive list of the state of the art MR-AC approaches as well as their pros and cons. The main sources of artifacts such as body-truncation, metallic implants and hardware correction will be presented. Finally, this review will discuss the current status of MR-AC approaches for clinical applications. PMID:26952727

  18. Computed tomography-guided cryoablation of local recurrence after primary resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pusceddu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimal management of local recurrences after primary resection of pancreatic cancer still remains to be clarified. A 58-yearold woman developed an isolated recurrence of pancreatic cancer six year after distal pancreatectomy. Re-resection was attempted but the lesion was deemed unresectable at surgery. Then chemotherapy was administrated without obtaining a reduction of the tumor size nor an improvement of the patient’s symptoms. Thus the patient underwent percutaneous cryoablation under computed tomography (CT-guidance obtaining tumor necrosis and a significant improvement in the quality of life. A CT scan one month later showed a stable lesion with no contrast enhancement. While the use of percutaneous cryoblation has widened its applications in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, it has never been described for the treatment of local pancreatic cancer recurrence after primary resection. Percutaneous cryoablation deserves further studies in the multimodality treatment of local recurrence after primary pancreatic surgery.

  19. High frame-rate MR-guided near-infrared tomography system to monitor breast hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiu; Jiang, Shudong; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-02-01

    A near-infrared (NIR) tomography system with spectral-encoded sources at two wavelength bands was built to quantify the temporal contrast at 20 Hz bandwidth, while imaging breast tissue. The NIR system was integrated with a magnetic resonance (MR) machine through a custom breast coil interface, and both NIR data and MR images were acquired simultaneously. MR images provided breast tissue structural information for NIR reconstruction. Acquisition of finger pulse oximeter (PO) plethysmogram was synchronized with the NIR system in the experiment to offer a frequency-locked reference. The recovered absorption coefficients of the breast at two wavelengths showed identical temporal frequency as the PO output, proving this multi-modality design can recover the small pulsatile variation of absorption property in breast tissue related to the heartbeat. And it also showed the system's ability on novel contrast imaging of fast flow signals in deep tissue.

  20. PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY OF CONDYLOMATA ACUMINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Galkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliably established a causal role of human papillomavirus in the formation of condylomata acuminate. In 10% of people with the human papilloma virus develops condylomata acuminate, which can be transformed into malignant tumors. The most common treatment of condylomata acuminate is a conservative treatment, namely, the local chemical or physical destruction of the lesions and immunotherapy. With the ineffectiveness of conservative treatment resort to surgical excision. At the same time the traditional methods of treatment condylomata acuminate associated with high rates of recurrence. Moreover, these treatments are often associated with significant risk of bleeding, ulceration and scarring. The emergence of new methods of diagnosis and treatment of condylomata acuminate – fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy has opened up new opportunities to improve the treatment of this pathology. Topical administration of photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy is more convenient and less phototoxic and broaden the range of clinical applications of this technology in the medical dermatology. An increasing amount of evidence that photodynamic therapy with topical application of the photosensitizer is highly effective in the treatment of a variety of benign skin diseases, including condylomata acuminataca, for which traditional methods are ineffective treatment. However, many parameters of photodynamic therapy of this disease has not yet been optimized. It is necessary to conduct large-scale clinical studies on the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy of condylomata acuminatain order to standardize the treatment parameters.

  1. Fatal paradoxical pulmonary air embolism complicating percutaneous computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Rajesh; Singh, Virendra; Isaac, Rethish; John, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with left upper zone haziness on chest X-ray and an infiltrative lesion with a pleural mass in the left upper lobe on CT scan was scheduled for CT-guided percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy. During the procedure, the patient had massive haemoptysis and cardiorespiratory arrest and could not be revived. Post-mortem CT showed air in the right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery and also in the left atrium and aorta. A discussion on paradoxical air embolism following percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy is presented Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  2. Bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. G.; Durand, D. B.; Adler, H.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence-image-guided OCT (FIG-OCT) system is described, and its ability to enhance the sensitivity and specificity is examined in an animal bladder cancer model. Total 97 specimens were examined by fluorescence imaging, OCT and histological microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of FIG-OCT is 100% and 93% respectively, compared to 79% and 53% for fluorescence imaging, while the OCT examination time has been dramatically decreased by 3~4 times. In combination of endoscopic OCT, FIG-OCT is a promising technique for effective early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  3. mTHPC-mediated photodynamic diagnosis of malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, A.

    2001-03-01

    Radical tumor resection is the basis for prolonged survival of patients suffering from malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiform. We have carried out a phase II study involving 22 patients with malignant brain tumors to assess the feasibility and the effectiveness of the combination of intraoperative photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) mediated by the second generation photosensitizer meta-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC). In addition, intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed. Several commercially available fluorescence diagnostic systems were investigated for their applicability for clinical practice. We have adapted and optimized a diagnostic system which includes a surgical microscope, an excitation light source (filtered to 370-440 nm), a video camera detection system, and a spectrometer for clear identification of the mTHPC fluorescence emission at 652 nm. Especially in regions of faint fluorescence it turned out to be essential to maximize the spectral information by optimizing and matching the spectral properties of all components, such as excitation source, camera and color filters. In summary, based on 138 tissue samples derived from 22 tumor specimens we have been able to achieve a sensitivity of 87.9 % and a specificity of 95.7 %. This study demonstrates that mTHPC-mediated intraoperative fluorescence-guided resection followed by photodynamic therapy is a feasible concept. (author)

  4. Photodynamic activity of polycyclic hydrocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S S

    1963-01-01

    Exposure of Paramecium caudatum to suspensions of 3,4-benzopyrene, followed by long wave ultraviolet irradiation, results in cell death at times related, inter alia, to carcinogen concentration. Prior to death, the cells exhibit progressive immobilization and blebbing. This photodynamic response is a sensitized photo-oxidation, as it is oxygen-dependent and inhibited by anti-oxidants, such as butylated hydroxy anisole and ..cap alpha..-tocopherol. Protection is also afforded by other agents, including Tweens, tryptophan and certain fractions of plasma proteins. No evidence was found for the involvement of peroxides or sulfhydryl groups. The correlations between photodynamic toxicity and carcinogenicity in a large series of polycyclic hydrocarbons is under investigation. Assays of air extracts for photodynamic toxicity are in progress. Significant toxicity has been found in oxygenated besides aromatic fractions.

  5. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  6. Anatomical image-guided fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction using kernel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhao, Yue; Fite, Brett Z.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an important in vivo imaging modality to visualize physiological and pathological processes in small animals. However, FMT reconstruction is ill-posed and ill-conditioned due to strong optical scattering in deep tissues, which results in poor spatial resolution. It is well known that FMT image quality can be improved substantially by applying the structural guidance in the FMT reconstruction. An approach to introducing anatomical information into the FMT reconstruction is presented using the kernel method. In contrast to conventional methods that incorporate anatomical information with a Laplacian-type regularization matrix, the proposed method introduces the anatomical guidance into the projection model of FMT. The primary advantage of the proposed method is that it does not require segmentation of targets in the anatomical images. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the proposed approach’s feasibility. Numerical simulation results indicate that the proposed kernel method can separate two FMT targets with an edge-to-edge distance of 1 mm and is robust to false-positive guidance and inhomogeneity in the anatomical image. For the phantom experiments with two FMT targets, the kernel method has reconstructed both targets successfully, which further validates the proposed kernel method. PMID:28464120

  7. Diagnostic yield and complications of transthoracic computed tomography-guided biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Pedersen, Malene Roland Vils; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    , the tissue material was found to be sufficient. In 32% of the biopsies, a complication arose, mostly pneumothorax (30%), but chest drainage was needed in only 15% of the 520 cases. Patients with more than ten cigarette pack-years had a complication risk that was twice as high at that of patients with fewer...... packyears. We found that the risk of pneumothorax increased the further the lesion was from the skin surface, the smaller the lesions were and when the patient was biopsied in a lateral position. We also found a higher risk of complications in females than in males. CONCLUSIONS: CT-guided biopsy...... is an excellent tool for analysing pulmonary lesions. The present study clearly shows that the risk of developing a pneumothorax is significantly increased among smokers and former smokers with more than ten pack-years....

  8. Positron emission tomography radiopharmaceutical studies in humans: a guide to regulations for academic researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ian N; Whelan, Mark; Baxendale, Roy; Gilbert, Fiona J; Matthews, Paul P; Aigbirhio, Franklin I

    2012-09-01

    All clinical trials are covered by a series of regulations that seek to protect the rights, safety and welfare of participating patients. The regulations covering PET studies are especially complex to interpret because of the specialized nature of the language of the regulations and of PET studies themselves. It is often unclear whether the application demands that the radiotracer used be treated as an investigational medical product. This paper is intended to act as a general guide for UK researchers planning to perform PET research in humans by clarifying key aspects of the regulations that may affect the study and/or the radiopharmaceutical manufacturing process, providing links to useful information sources, introducing the concept of a UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) PET expert panel and outlining the value of sharing investigational medical product dossiers.

  9. Computed-tomography-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, Federico, E-mail: federico.collettini@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Singh, Anju [Department of Medical Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schnapauff, Dirk [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Powerski, Maciej Janusz [Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate technical feasibility and clinical outcome of computed tomography-guided high-dose-rate-brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of metastases adjacent to the liver hilum. Materials and methods: Between November 2007 and May 2012, 32 consecutive patients with 34 metastases adjacent to the liver hilum (common bile duct or hepatic bifurcation ≤5 mm distance) were treated with CT-HDRBT. Treatment was performed by CT-guided applicator placement and high-dose-rate brachytherapy with an iridium-192 source. MRI follow-up was performed 6 weeks and every 3 months post intervention. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS). Results: Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up time of 18.75 months (range: 3–56 months). Mean tumor diameter was 4.3 cm (range: 1.3–10.7 cm). One major complication was observed. Four (11.8%) local recurrences were observed after a local tumor control of 5, 8, 9 and 10 months, respectively. Twenty-two patients (68.75%) experienced a systemic tumor progression during the follow up period. Mean TTP was 12.9 months (range: 2–56 months). Nine patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 20.24 months. Conclusion: Minimally invasive CT-HDRBT is a safe and effective option also for unresectable liver metastases adjacent to the liver hilum that would have been untreatable by thermal ablation.

  10. Individualized treatment of craniovertebral junction malformation guided by intraoperative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianfeng; Wang, Peng; Chen, LiFeng; Ma, Xiaodong; Bu, Bo; Yu, Xinguang

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to report our preliminary experience of intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) using a mobile scanner with integrated neuronavigation system (NNS). The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and potential utility of iCT with integrated NNS in individualized treatment of craniovertebral junction malformation (CVJM). The surgical management of congenital craniovertebral anomalies is complex due to the relative difficulty in accessing the region, critical relationships of neurovascular structures, and the intricate biomechanical issues involved. We reported our first 19 complex CVJM cases including 11 male and 8 female patients from January, 2009 to June, 2009 (mean age, 33.9 y; age range, 13 to 58 y). A sliding gantry 40-slice CT scanner was installed in a preexisting operating room. Image data was transferred directly from the scanner into the NNS using an automated registration system. We applied this technology to transoral odontoidectomy in 17 patients. Moreover, with the extra help of iCT integrated with NNS, odontoidectomy through posterior midline approach, and transoral atlantal lateral mass resection were, for the first time, performed for treatment of complex CVJM. NNS was found to correlate well with the intraoperative findings, and the recalibration was uneven in all cases with an accuracy of 1.6 mm (1.6: 1.2 to 2.0). All patients were clinically evaluated by Nurick grade criteria, and neurological deficits were monitored after 3 months of surgery. Fifteen patients (79%) were improved by at least 1 Nurick grade, whereas the grade did not change in 4 patients (21%). iCT scanning with integrated NNS was both feasible and beneficial for the surgical management of complex CVJM. In this unusual patient population, the technique seemed to be valuable in negotiating complex anatomy and achieving a safe and predictable decompression.

  11. Prosthesis-guided implant restoration of an auricular defect using computed tomography and 3-dimensional photographic imaging technologies: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuming; Leng, Xu; Zheng, Yaqi; Zhang, Dapeng; Wu, Guofeng

    2015-02-01

    The concept of prosthesis-guided implantation has been widely accepted for intraoral implant placement, although clinicians do not fully appreciate its use for facial defect restoration. In this clinical report, multiple digital technologies were used to restore a facial defect with prosthesis-guided implantation. A simulation surgery was performed to remove the residual auricular tissue and to ensure the correct position of the mirrored contralateral ear model. The combined application of computed tomography and 3-dimensional photography preserved the position of the mirrored model and facilitated the definitive implant-retained auricular prosthesis. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optical Coherence Tomography for Retinal Surgery: Perioperative Analysis to Real-Time Four-Dimensional Image-Guided Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; Keller, Brenton; Viehland, Christian; Shen, Liangbo; Seider, Michael I; Izatt, Joseph A; Toth, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Magnification of the surgical field using the operating microscope facilitated profound innovations in retinal surgery in the 1970s, such as pars plana vitrectomy. Although surgical instrumentation and illumination techniques are continually developing, the operating microscope for vitreoretinal procedures has remained essentially unchanged and currently limits the surgeon's depth perception and assessment of subtle microanatomy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionized clinical management of retinal pathology, and its introduction into the operating suite may have a similar impact on surgical visualization and treatment. In this article, we review the evolution of OCT for retinal surgery, from perioperative analysis to live volumetric (four-dimensional, 4D) image-guided surgery. We begin by briefly addressing the benefits and limitations of the operating microscope, the progression of OCT technology, and OCT applications in clinical/perioperative retinal imaging. Next, we review intraoperative OCT (iOCT) applications using handheld probes during surgical pauses, two-dimensional (2D) microscope-integrated OCT (MIOCT) of live surgery, and volumetric MIOCT of live surgery. The iOCT discussion focuses on technological advancements, applications during human retinal surgery, translational difficulties and limitations, and future directions.

  13. Image Guided Virtual Autopsy: An Adjunct with Radiographic and Computed Tomography Modalities - An Important Tool in Forensic Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The forensic examination of dead bodies is very helpful in order to identify the person, cause of death, gender, and solving the mysterious cases. It includes a number of techniques, out of which autopsy is the primary investigation that is performed in every medicolegal case. Because of mutilation technologies, traditional autopsy technique is most disturbing in terms of emotions and rituals of relatives. The use of radiology in forensic science comprises performance, interpretation, and reporting of radiographs that is helpful in detecting those changes that are not clinically visible. Forensic radiology plays an important role for identification of humans in mass disasters, criminal investigations, and evaluation of cause of death. The introduction of radiological modalities in autopsy techniques is a complementary tool for forensic identification and is known as virtual autopsy. The advance imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is used in virtual autopsy in order to visualize and reconstruct the internal organs to know the site, type, and depth of injury. This review elaborates the role of maxillofacial imaging in image-guided virtual autopsy.

  14. Two-step reconstruction method using global optimization and conjugate gradient for ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a promising method for characterizing malignant and benign lesions in the female breast. We introduce a new two-step algorithm for DOT inversion in which the optical parameters are estimated with the global optimization method, genetic algorithm. The estimation result is applied as an initial guess to the conjugate gradient (CG) optimization method to obtain the absorption and scattering distributions simultaneously. Simulations and phantom experiments have shown that the maximum absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reconstructed with less than 10% and 25% errors, respectively. This is in contrast with the CG method alone, which generates about 20% error for the absorption coefficient and does not accurately recover the scattering distribution. A new measure of scattering contrast has been introduced to characterize benign and malignant breast lesions. The results of 16 clinical cases reconstructed with the two-step method demonstrates that, on average, the absorption coefficient and scattering contrast of malignant lesions are about 1.8 and 3.32 times higher than the benign cases, respectively.

  15. The use of computerised tomography guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, K A

    2012-02-01

    The evaluation of a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) has changed over the years with increased access to percutaneous computerised tomography (CT) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA), where bronchoscopy is unhelpful. The aim of our study was to evaluate the sample adequacy, diagnostic and complication rate of CT-FNA of a SPN at our academic teaching hospital over an 18 month period. CT-FNA was performed by a radiologist, with a cytopathologist in attendance to confirm the adequacy of the sample obtained. The size of the nodule, sample material and adequacy, diagnosis and complications were recorded. A total of 101 patients were included, 54 male and the mean age was 68 +\\/- 11 years. The mean size of the SPN was 2.3 cm (range 1-11 cm). 56 (56%) patients had a right SPN, 45 (45%) had a left SPN. CT-FNA was diagnostic in 80 (80%) patients and non-diagnostic in 21 (20%) patients. The sample was insufficient for immunocytochemistry, although the morphological appearance was diagnostic in 20 (25%) of the 80 patients. Pneumothorax occurred in 26\\/101 (26%) patients post CT-FNA, of these 7 (27%) required chest drain insertion, while 19 (73%) were managed conservatively. CT FNA is a useful tool for the diagnosis of a SPN, with our diagnostic accuracy comparable to that reported in the literature. However, CT-FNA may not provide adequate sample volume to perform ancillary testing and has a moderate complication rate.

  16. Computed tomography-guided needle aspiration and biopsy of pulmonary lesions - A single-center experience in 1000 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulou, Loukia S.; Tsagouli, Paraskevi; Thanos, Loukas [Dept. of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' , Athens (Greece)], e-mail: ploukia@hotmail.com; Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Program of Outcomes Research, Div. of Infectious Diseases, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown Univ., RI, and Div. of Infectious Diseases, Rhode Island Hospital, Rhode Island (United States); Politi, Dimitra [Dept. of Cythopathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece); Trigidou, Rodoula [Dept. of Pathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Computed tomography (CT)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) and biopsies are well-established, minimally invasive diagnostic tools for pulmonary lesions. Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of 1000 consecutive lung CT-guided FNA and/or core needle biopsies (CNB), the main outcome measures being diagnostic yield, and complication rates. Material and Methods: Patients considered eligible were those referred to our department for lung lesions. The choice of FNA, CNB, or both was based upon the radiologist's judgment. Diagnostic yield was defined as the probability of having a definite result by cytology/histology. Results: The study included 733 male patients and 267 female patients, with a mean (SD) age of 66.4 (11.4) years. The mean (SD) lesion size was 3.7 (2.4) cm in maximal diameter. Six hundred and forty-one (64%) patients underwent an FNA procedure, 245 (25%) a CNB, and 114 (11%) had been subjected to both. The diagnostic yield was 960/994 (96.6%); this decreased significantly with the use of CNB only (odds ratio [OR] 0.32; 95% CI 0.12 - 0.88; P = 0.03), while it increased with lesion size (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.03 - 1.79; P = 0.03 per cm increase). In 506 patients (52.7%), a malignant process was diagnosed by cytopathology/histology. The complication rate reached 97/1000 (9.7%); complications included: hemorrhage, 62 (6.2%); pneumothorax, 28 (2.8%); hemorrhage and pneumothorax, 5 (0.5%); and hemoptysis, 2 (0.2%). It was not significantly affected by the type of procedure or localization of the lesion. The overall risk for complications was three times higher for lesions <4 cm (OR 3.26; 95% CI 1.96 - 5.42; P < 0.001). Conclusion: CT-guided lung biopsy has a high diagnostic yield using FNA, CNB, or both. The CNB procedure alone will not suffice. Complication rates were acceptable and correlated inversely with lesion size, not localization or type of procedure.

  17. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Macfeeters-Hamilton Centre for Neuro-oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chung, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.chung.md@gmail.com [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  18. The Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image Guided Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Initial Clinical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Winnie; Cho, Young-Bin; Ansell, Steve; Laperriere, Normand; Ménard, Cynthia; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Zadeh, Gelareh; Kongkham, Paul; Bernstein, Mark; Jaffray, David A.; Chung, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure the inter- and intrafraction uncertainties for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK). Methods and Materials: Using a novel CBCT system adapted to the GK radiosurgery treatment unit, CBCT images were acquired immediately before and after treatment for each treatment session within the context of a research ethics board–approved prospective clinical trial. Patients were immobilized in the Leksell coordinate frame (LCF) for both volumetric CBCT imaging and GK-SRS delivery. The relative displacement of the patient's skull to the stereotactic reference (interfraction motion) was measured for each CBCT scan. Differences between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans were used to determine the intrafraction motion. Results: We analyzed 20 pre- and 17 post-treatment CBCT scans in 20 LCF patients treated with SRS. The mean translational pretreatment setup error ± standard deviation in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudal directions was −0.19 ± 0.32, 0.06 ± 0.27, and −0.23 ± 0.2 mm, with a maximum of −0.74, −0.53, and −0.68 mm, respectively. After an average time between the pre- and post-treatment CBCT scans of 82 minutes (range 27-170), the mean intrafraction error ± standard deviation for the LCF was −0.03 ± 0.05, −0.03 ± 0.18, and −0.03 ± 0.12 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and craniocaudual direction, respectively. Conclusions: Using CBCT on a prototype image guided GK Perfexion unit, we were able to measure the inter- and intrafraction positional changes for GK-SRS using the invasive frame. In the era of image guided radiation therapy, the use of CBCT image guidance for both frame- and non–frame-based immobilization systems could serve as a useful quality assurance tool. Our preliminary measurements can guide the application of achievable thresholds for inter- and intrafraction

  19. WE-FG-BRA-06: Systematic Study of Target Localization for Bioluminescence Tomography Guided Radiation Therapy for Preclinical Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Reyes, J; Wong, J; Wang, K [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yu, J [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Shaanxi (China); Iordachita, I [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Liu, Z [Department of Oncology, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of GI Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing (China); Brock, M [Department of Oncology, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Patterson, M [McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To overcome the limitation of CT/CBCT in guiding radiation for soft tissue targets, we developed a bioluminescence tomography(BLT) system for preclinical radiation research. We systematically assessed the system performance in target localization and the ability of resolving two sources in simulations, phantom and in vivo environments. Methods: Multispectral images acquired in single projection were used for the BLT reconstruction. Simulation studies were conducted for single spherical source radius from 0.5 to 3 mm at depth of 3 to 12 mm. The same configuration was also applied for the double sources simulation with source separations varying from 3 to 9 mm. Experiments were performed in a standalone BLT/CBCT system. Two sources with 3 and 4.7 mm separations placed inside a tissue-mimicking phantom were chosen as the test cases. Live mice implanted with single source at 6 and 9 mm depth, 2 sources with 3 and 5 mm separation at depth of 5 mm or 3 sources in the abdomen were also used to illustrate the in vivo localization capability of the BLT system. Results: Simulation and phantom results illustrate that our BLT can provide 3D source localization with approximately 1 mm accuracy. The in vivo results are encouraging that 1 and 1.7 mm accuracy can be attained for the single source case at 6 and 9 mm depth, respectively. For the 2 sources study, both sources can be distinguished at 3 and 5 mm separations at approximately 1 mm accuracy using 3D BLT but not 2D bioluminescence image. Conclusion: Our BLT/CBCT system can be potentially applied to localize and resolve targets at a wide range of target sizes, depths and separations. The information provided in this study can be instructive to devise margins for BLT-guided irradiation and suggests that the BLT could guide radiation for multiple targets, such as metastasis. Drs. John W. Wong and Iulian I. Iordachita receive royalty payment from a licensing agreement between Xstrahl Ltd and Johns Hopkins University.

  20. Optical coherence tomography image-guided smart laser knife for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin B; Estrada, Arnold D; Milner, Thomas E

    2018-03-01

    Surgical oncology can benefit from specialized tools that enhance imaging and enable precise cutting and removal of tissue without damage to adjacent structures. The combination of high-resolution, fast optical coherence tomography (OCT) co-aligned with a nanosecond pulsed thulium (Tm) laser offers advantages over conventional surgical laser systems. Tm lasers provide superior beam quality, high volumetric tissue removal rates with minimal residual thermal footprint in tissue, enabling a reduction in unwanted damage to delicate adjacent sub-surface structures such as nerves or micro-vessels. We investigated such a combined Tm/OCT system with co-aligned imaging and cutting beams-a configuration we call a "smart laser knife." A blow-off model that considers absorption coefficients and beam delivery systems was utilized to predict Tm cut depth, tissue removal rate and spatial distribution of residual thermal injury. Experiments were performed to verify the volumetric removal rate predicted by the model as a function of average power. A bench-top, combined Tm/OCT system was constructed using a 15W 1940 nm nanosecond pulsed Tm fiber laser (500 μJ pulse energy, 100 ns pulse duration, 30 kHz repetition rate) for removing tissue and a swept source laser (1310 ± 70 nm, 100 kHz sweep rate) for OCT imaging. Tissue phantoms were used to demonstrate precise surgery with blood vessel avoidance. Depth imaging informed cutting/removal of targeted tissue structures by the Tm laser was performed. Laser cutting was accomplished around and above phantom blood vessels while avoiding damage to vessel walls. A tissue removal rate of 5.5 mm 3 /sec was achieved experimentally, in comparison to the model prediction of approximately 6 mm 3 /sec. We describe a system that combines OCT and laser tissue modification with a Tm laser. Simulation results of the tissue removal rate using a simple model, as a function of average power, are in good agreement with experimental

  1. Macular laser photocoagulation guided by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography versus fluorescein angiography for diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego-Pinazo R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gallego-Pinazo1,2, Ana Marina Suelves-Cogollos1, Rosa Dolz-Marco1, J Fernando Arevalo3, Salvador García-Delpech1, J Luis Mullor4, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,2,51Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 3Retina and Vitreous Service, Clinical Ophthalmology Center, Caracas, Venezuela; 4Unit of Experimental Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 5University of Valencia, Faculty of Medicine, Valencia, SpainBackground: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fluorescein angiography (FA in the guidance of macular laser photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema.Methods: This was a prospective interventional clinical comparative pilot study. Forty eyes from 24 consecutive patients with diabetic macular edema were allocated to receive laser photocoagulation guided by SD-OCT or FA. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, central macular thickness, and retinal volume were assessed at baseline and two months after treatment.Results: Subjects treated using FA-guided laser improved BCVA from the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR 0.52 ± 0.2 to 0.37 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 397.25 ± 139.1 to 333.50 ± 105.7 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.61 ± 1.6 to 10.94 ± 1.4 mm3 (P < 0.001. Subjects treated using SD-OCT guided laser had improved BCVA from 0.48 ± 0.2 to 0.33 ± 0.2 logMAR (P < 0.001, and decreased mean central macular thickness from 425.90 ± 149.6 to 353.4 ± 140 µm (P < 0.001 and retinal volume from 12.38 ± 2.1 to 11.53 ± 1.1 mm3 (P < 0.001. No significant differences between the groups were found in two-month BCVA (P = 0.505, two-month central macular thickness (P = 0.660, or two-month retinal volume (P = 0.582.Conclusion: The short-term results of this pilot study

  2. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal and gastric cancer, bladder cancer and other types of malignant tumors, and palliative care (including tumor pleuritis, gastrointestinal tumors and others. Photodynamic therapy delivers results which are not available for other methods of cancer therapy. Thus, photodynamic therapy allows to avoid gross scars (that is very important, for example, in gynecology for treatment of patients of reproductive age with cervical and vulvar cancer, delivers good cosmetic effect for skin tumors, allows minimal trauma for intact tissue surrounding tumor. Photodynamic therapy is also used in other fields of medicine, such as otorhinolaryngology, dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, for treatment of papilloma virus infection and purulent wounds as antibacterial therapy.

  3. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 4. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) - Basic Principles. Bhaskar G Maiya. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 4 April 2000 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/04/0006-0018 ...

  4. Positron emission tomography-guided magnetic resonance spectroscopy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh-Bahaei, Nasim; Sajjadi, S Ahmad; Manavaki, Roido; McLean, Mary; O'Brien, John T; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether the level of metabolites in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a representative marker of underlying pathological changes identified in positron emission tomographic (PET) images in Alzheimer disease (AD). We performed PET-guided MRS in cases of probable AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC). All participants were imaged by 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET followed by 3T MRS. PET images were assessed both visually and using standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs). MRS voxels were placed in regions with maximum abnormality on amyloid (Aβ+) and FDG (hypometabolic) areas on PET scans. Corresponding normal areas were selected in controls. The ratios of total N-acetyl (tNA) group, myoinositol (mI), choline, and glutamate + glutamine over creatine (Cr) were compared between these regions. Aβ + regions had significantly higher (p = 0.02) mI/Cr and lower tNA/Cr (p = 0.02), whereas in hypometabolic areas only tNA/Cr was reduced (p = 0.003). Multiple regression analysis adjusting for sex, age, and education showed mI/Cr was only associated with 11 C-PiB SUVR (p < 0.0001). tNA/Cr, however, was associated with both PiB (p = 0.0003) and 18 F-FDG SUVR (p = 0.006). The level of mI/Cr was not significantly different between MCI and AD (p = 0.28), but tNA/Cr showed significant decline from HC to MCI to AD (p = 0.001, p = 0.04). mI/Cr has significant temporal and spatial associations with Aβ and could potentially be considered as a disease state biomarker. tNA is an indicator of early neurodegenerative changes and might have a role as disease stage biomarker and also as a valuable surrogate marker for treatment response. Ann Neurol 2018;83:771-778. © 2018 American Neurological Association.

  5. Photodynamic therapy for basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargnoli, Maria Concetta; Peris, Ketty

    2015-11-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy is an effective and safe noninvasive treatment for low-risk basal cell carcinoma, with the advantage of an excellent cosmetic outcome. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy in basal cell carcinoma is supported by substantial research and clinical trials. In this article, we review the procedure, indications and clinical evidences for the use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

  6. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for systematic nodal staging of lung cancer in patients with N0 disease by computed tomography and integrated positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Philip; Grosu, Horiana; Eapen, George A; Rodriguez, Macarena; Lazarus, Donald; Ost, David; Jimenez, Carlos A; Morice, Rodolfo; Bandi, Venkata; Tamara, Luis; Cornwell, Lorraine; Green, Linda; Zhu, Angela; Casal, Roberto F

    2015-03-01

    Data regarding the sensitivity of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for staging of lung cancer in patients with radiographic N0 disease is scant and inconsistent. With increasing use of nonoperative ablative therapies, studies focusing on the performance characteristics of EBUS-TBNA in this population are important. To evaluate the sensitivity and negative predictive value (NPV) of EBUS-TBNA in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and radiographic N0 disease both by computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT. This was a retrospective review of EBUS-TBNA performed for lung cancer staging at two major academic centers from 2009 to 2014. Patients with radiographic N0 disease (lymph nodes [LN]≤1 cm in the short axis and maximum standardized uptake value≤2.5 by PET-CT) were included. Primary outcome was sensitivity and NPV of EBUS-TBNA. Two hundred twenty patients with radiographic N0 disease underwent EBUS-TBNA, and 734 LN were sampled (median 3, range 1-6). Median LN diameter was 0.72 cm. One hundred patients (45.5%) underwent surgery, and 120 patients (54.5%) had nonsurgical therapy. N status was up-staged in 49 patients (22.3%): 18 by EBUS-TBNA (N1=11, N2=6, N3=1), 27 by surgery (N1 intralobar=16, N1 extralobar=3, N2=8 [5 LN in stations 4 and 7, and 3 LN in stations 5-6), and 4 by imaging follow-up (N1=2, N2=2). Overall false-negative rate of EBUS was 14.1% (sensitivity, 36.7%; specificity, 100%; and NPV, 84.7%). False-negative rate was 27 and 3.3% in surgical and nonsurgical populations, respectively. Excluding patients with occult disease "outside" the reach of EBUS, the overall false-negative rate of EBUS-TBNA was 5.5% (sensitivity, 60%; specificity, 100%; and NPV, 93.4%). This is the largest report of EBUS-TBNA in patients with N0 disease by "integrated" PET-CT. The majority of false-negative EBUS results were in LN stations outside its reach. In our study, both sensitivity and NPV of

  7. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korevaar Erik W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D to three-dimensional (3D-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV, absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. Results With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. Conclusion The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on

  8. Four-dimensional volume-of-interest reconstruction for cone-beam computed tomography-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Moiz; Balter, Peter; Pan, Tinsu

    2011-10-01

    Data sufficiency are a major problem in four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) on linear accelerator-integrated scanners for image-guided radiotherapy. Scan times must be in the range of 4-6 min to avoid undersampling artifacts. Various image reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to accommodate undersampled data acquisitions, but these algorithms are computationally expensive, may require long reconstruction times, and may require algorithm parameters to be optimized. The authors present a novel reconstruction method, 4D volume-of-interest (4D-VOI) reconstruction which suppresses undersampling artifacts and resolves lung tumor motion for undersampled 1-min scans. The 4D-VOI reconstruction is much less computationally expensive than other 4D-CBCT algorithms. The 4D-VOI method uses respiration-correlated projection data to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) image inside a VOI containing the moving tumor, and uncorrelated projection data to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) image outside the VOI. Anatomical motion is resolved inside the VOI and blurred outside the VOI. The authors acquired a 1-min. scan of an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing a moving water-filled sphere. The authors also used previously acquired 1-min scans for two lung cancer patients who had received CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The same raw data were used to test and compare the 4D-VOI reconstruction with the standard 4D reconstruction and the McKinnon-Bates (MB) reconstruction algorithms. Both the 4D-VOI and the MB reconstructions suppress nearly all the streak artifacts compared with the standard 4D reconstruction, but the 4D-VOI has 3-8 times greater contrast-to-noise ratio than the MB reconstruction. In the dynamic chest phantom study, the 4D-VOI and the standard 4D reconstructions both resolved a moving sphere with an 18 mm displacement. The 4D-VOI reconstruction shows a motion blur of only 3 mm, whereas the MB reconstruction shows a motion blur of 13 mm

  9. Computed Tomography Number Changes Observed During Computed Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Mei; Yang, Cungeng; Chen, Xiaojian; Xu, Shouping; Moraru, Ion; Lang, Jinyi; Schultz, Christopher; Li, X. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate CT number (CTN) changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and organ at risk (OAR) according to daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography scans acquired using a CT-on-rails during daily CT-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for 15 patients with stage II to IVa squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were analyzed. The GTV, parotid glands, spinal cord, and nonspecified tissue were generated on each selected daily CT. The changes in CTN distributions and the mean and mode values were collected. Pearson analysis was used to assess the correlation between the CTN change, organ volume reduction, and delivered radiation dose. Results: Volume and CTN changes for GTV and parotid glands can be observed during radiation therapy delivery for HNC. The mean (±SD) CTNs in GTV and ipsi- and contralateral parotid glands were reduced by 6 ± 10, 8 ± 7, and 11 ± 10 Hounsfield units, respectively, for all patients studied. The mean CTN changes in both spinal cord and nonspecified tissue were almost invisible (<2 Hounsfield units). For 2 patients studied, the absolute mean CTN changes in GTV and parotid glands were strongly correlated with the dose delivered (P<.001 and P<.05, respectively). For the correlation between CTN reductions and delivered isodose bins for parotid glands, the Pearson coefficient varied from −0.98 (P<.001) in regions with low-dose bins to 0.96 (P<.001) in high-dose bins and were patient specific. Conclusions: The CTN can be reduced in tumor and parotid glands during the course of radiation therapy for HNC. There was a fair correlation between CTN reduction and radiation doses for a subset of patients, whereas the correlation between CTN reductions and volume reductions in GTV and parotid glands were weak. More studies are needed to understand the mechanism for the radiation-induced CTN changes

  10. Substantial dose reduction in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT)-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, G.; Fasser, M.; Jaschke, W.; Bale, R.; Schullian, P.; Zangerl, A.; Puelacher, W.; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of the radiation exposure involved in image-guided craniofacial and skull base surgery is an important goal. The purpose was to evaluate the influence of low-dose protocols in modern multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on target registration errors (TREs). Materials and Methods: An anthropomorphic skull phantom with target markers at the craniofacial bone and the anterior skull base was scanned in Sensation Open (40-slice), LightSpeed VCT (64-slice) and Definition Flash (128-slice). Identical baseline protocols (BP) at 120 kV/100 mAs were compared to the following low-dose protocols (LD) in care dose/dose modulation: (LD-I) 100 kV/35ref. mAs, (LD-II) 80 kV/40 - 41ref. mAs, and (LD-III) 80 kV/15 - 17ref. mAs. CTDIvol and DLP were obtained. TREs using an optical navigation system were calculated for all scanners and protocols. Results were statistically analyzed in SPSS and compared for significant differences (p ≤ 0.05). Results: CTDIvol for the Sensation Open/LightSpeed VCT/Definition Flash showed: (BP) 22.24 /32.48 /14.32 mGy; (LD-I) 4.61 /3.52 /1,62 mGy; (LD-II) 3.15 /2.01 /0.87 mGy; and (LD-III) na/0.76 /0.76 mGy. Differences between the BfS (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz) reference CTDIvol of 9 mGy and the lowest CTDIvol were approximately 3-fold for Sensation Open, and 12-fold for the LightSpeed VCT and Definition Flash. A total of 33 registrations and 297 TRE measurements were performed. In all MSCT scanners, the TREs did not significantly differ between the low-dose and the baseline protocols. Conclusion: Low-dose protocols in modern MSCT provided substantial dose reductions without significant influence on TRE and should be strongly considered in image-guided surgery. (orig.)

  11. Dosimetric consequences of the shift towards computed tomography guided target definition and planning for breast conserving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V; Maduro, John H; Korevaar, Erik W; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    The shift from conventional two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D)-conformal target definition and dose-planning seems to have introduced volumetric as well as geometric changes. The purpose of this study was to compare coverage of computed tomography (CT)-based breast and boost planning target volumes (PTV), absolute volumes irradiated, and dose delivered to the organs at risk with conventional 2D and 3D-conformal breast conserving radiotherapy. Twenty-five patients with left-sided breast cancer were subject of CT-guided target definition and 3D-conformal dose-planning, and conventionally defined target volumes and treatment plans were reconstructed on the planning CT. Accumulated dose-distributions were calculated for the conventional and 3D-conformal dose-plans, taking into account a prescribed dose of 50 Gy for the breast plans and 16 Gy for the boost plans. With conventional treatment plans, CT-based breast and boost PTVs received the intended dose in 78% and 32% of the patients, respectively, and smaller volumes received the prescribed breast and boost doses compared with 3D-conformal dose-planning. The mean lung dose, the volume of the lungs receiving > 20 Gy, the mean heart dose, and volume of the heart receiving > 30 Gy were significantly less with conventional treatment plans. Specific areas within the breast and boost PTVs systematically received a lower than intended dose with conventional treatment plans. The shift towards CT-guided target definition and planning as the golden standard for breast conserving radiotherapy has resulted in improved target coverage at the cost of larger irradiated volumes and an increased dose delivered to organs at risk. Tissue is now included into the breast and boost target volumes that was never explicitly defined or included with conventional treatment. Therefore, a coherent definition of the breast and boost target volumes is needed, based on clinical data confirming tumour control probability and normal

  12. Proposal of a technical guide for the evaluation and management of the solitary pulmonary nodule in function of the radiological characteristics obtained by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinton Hidalgo, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    A guide is proposed to guide clinical personnel in early diagnosis, assessment and management of the solitary pulmonary nodule, with high potential of to develop lung cancer, in function of the radiological characteristics obtained by computed tomography. The management of patients with diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule is standardized with the purpose of to unify diagnostic criteria in a multidisciplinary and institutional environment. Tomographic radiological characteristics are described to allow the suspicion of the solitary pulmonary nodule benignity or malignity. A flow diagram is developed to guide the physician to an adequate monitoring, control and eventual therapeutic treatment. A clear and structured perspective of the diagnostic and therapeutic process is provided to the treating physician and patient [es

  13. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous trephine removal of the nidus in osteoid osteoma patients: experience of a single center in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrilli, Marcelo; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Garcia Filho, Reynaldo Jesus, E-mail: andrezasenerchia@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Oncologia Pediatrica

    2015-07-15

    Objective: to report the results of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous resection of the nidus in 18 cases of osteoid osteoma. Materials and methods: the medical records of 18 cases of osteoid osteoma in children, adolescents and young adults, who underwent CT-guided removal of the nidus between November, 2004 and March, 2009 were reviewed retrospectively for demographic data, lesion site, clinical outcome and complications after procedure. Results: clinical follow-up was available for all cases at a median of 29 months (range 6-60 months). No persistence of pre-procedural pain was noted on 17 patients. Only one patient experienced recurrence of symptoms 12 months after percutaneous resection, and was successfully retreated by the same technique, resulting in a secondary success rate of 18/18 (100%). Conclusion: CT-guided removal or destruction of the nidus is a safe and effective alternative to surgical resection of the osteoid osteoma nidus. (author)

  14. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Tomohisa; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located ≤1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  15. Image-guided intraocular injection using multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in rodent ophthalmological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrones, Benjamin D.; Benavides, Oscar R.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Intraocular injections are routinely performed for delivery of anti-VEGF and anti-inflammatory therapies in humans. While these injections are also performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the injection location and volume are not well-controlled and reproducible. We overcome limitations of conventional injections methods by developing a multimodality, long working distance, non-contact optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) system for retinal imaging before and after injections. Our OCT+cSLO system combines a custom-built spectraldomain OCT engine (875+/-85 nm) with 125 kHz line-rate with a modified commercial cSLO with a maximum frame-rate of 30 fps (512 x 512 pix.). The system was designed for an overlapping OCT+cSLO field-of-view of 1.1 mm with a 7.76 mm working distance to the pupil. cSLO excitation light sources and filters were optimized for simultaneous GFP and tdTomato imaging. Lateral resolution was 3.02 µm for OCT and 2.74 μm for cSLO. Intravitreal injections of 5%, 10%, and 20% intralipid with Alex Fluor 488 were manually injected intraocularly in C57BL/6 mice. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. OCT enables quantitative analysis of injection location and volumes whereas complementary cSLO improves specificity for identifying fluorescently labeled injected compounds and transgenic cells. The long working distance of our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections and may be applied for imaging of ophthalmic surgical dynamics and real-time image-guided injections.

  16. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Qi, X. Sharon; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  17. Prognostic Factors Influencing the Development of an Iatrogenic Pneumothorax for Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Upper Renal Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B.K.; Kim, C.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of upper renal tumors is considered a minimally invasive treatment, but this technique may cause pneumothorax. Purpose: To assess retrospectively the prognostic factors influencing the development of iatrogenic pneumothorax for RF ablation of upper renal tumors. Material and Methods: Computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation was performed in 24 patients (21 men, three women; age range 31-77 years, mean age 53.3 years) with 28 upper renal tumors. Various factors for pneumothorax-complicated (PC) upper renal tumors and non-pneumothoracic (NP) upper renal tumors were compared during RF ablation to determine which of the factors were involved in the development of pneumothorax. Results: Among 28 upper renal tumors in 24 patients, a pneumothorax occurred accidentally in six patients with eight tumors and intentionally in two patients with two tumors. This complication was treated with conservative management, instead of tube drainage. PC upper renal tumors had shorter distance from the lung or from the costophrenic line to the tumor, a larger angle between the costophrenic line and the tumor, and a higher incidence of intervening lung tissue than NP upper renal tumors (P<0.01). Intervening lung tissue was more frequently detected on CT images obtained with the patient in the prone position than on CT images obtained with the patient in the supine position. Conclusion: The presence of intervening lung tissue and the close proximity between an upper renal tumor and the lung are high risk factors for developing an iatrogenic pneumothorax. Pre-ablation CT scan should be performed in the prone position to exactly evaluate intervening lung tissue

  18. Impact of Computed Tomography Image Quality on Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Based on Soft Tissue Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrow, Natalya V.; Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Qi, X. Sharon [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, Colorado (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), different computed tomography (CT) modalities with varying image quality are being used to correct for interfractional variations in patient set-up and anatomy changes, thereby reducing clinical target volume to the planning target volume (CTV-to-PTV) margins. We explore how CT image quality affects patient repositioning and CTV-to-PTV margins in soft tissue registration-based IGRT for prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four CT-based IGRT modalities used for prostate RT were considered in this study: MV fan beam CT (MVFBCT) (Tomotherapy), MV cone beam CT (MVCBCT) (MVision; Siemens), kV fan beam CT (kVFBCT) (CTVision, Siemens), and kV cone beam CT (kVCBCT) (Synergy; Elekta). Daily shifts were determined by manual registration to achieve the best soft tissue agreement. Effect of image quality on patient repositioning was determined by statistical analysis of daily shifts for 136 patients (34 per modality). Inter- and intraobserver variability of soft tissue registration was evaluated based on the registration of a representative scan for each CT modality with its corresponding planning scan. Results: Superior image quality with the kVFBCT resulted in reduced uncertainty in soft tissue registration during IGRT compared with other image modalities for IGRT. The largest interobserver variations of soft tissue registration were 1.1 mm, 2.5 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.2 mm for kVFBCT, kVCBCT, MVFBCT, and MVCBCT, respectively. Conclusions: Image quality adversely affects the reproducibility of soft tissue-based registration for IGRT and necessitates a careful consideration of residual uncertainties in determining different CTV-to-PTV margins for IGRT using different image modalities.

  19. Distributed Kalman filtering compared to Fourier domain preconditioned conjugate gradient for laser guide star tomography on extremely large telescopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Luc; Massioni, Paolo; Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the performance and cost of two computationally efficient Fourier-based tomographic wavefront reconstruction algorithms for wide-field laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO). The first algorithm is the iterative Fourier domain preconditioned conjugate gradient (FDPCG) algorithm developed by Yang et al. [Appl. Opt.45, 5281 (2006)], combined with pseudo-open-loop control (POLC). FDPCG's computational cost is proportional to N log(N), where N denotes the dimensionality of the tomography problem. The second algorithm is the distributed Kalman filter (DKF) developed by Massioni et al. [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A28, 2298 (2011)], which is a noniterative spatially invariant controller. When implemented in the Fourier domain, DKF's cost is also proportional to N log(N). Both algorithms are capable of estimating spatial frequency components of the residual phase beyond the wavefront sensor (WFS) cutoff frequency thanks to regularization, thereby reducing WFS spatial aliasing at the expense of more computations. We present performance and cost analyses for the LGS multiconjugate AO system under design for the Thirty Meter Telescope, as well as DKF's sensitivity to uncertainties in wind profile prior information. We found that, provided the wind profile is known to better than 10% wind speed accuracy and 20 deg wind direction accuracy, DKF, despite its spatial invariance assumptions, delivers a significantly reduced wavefront error compared to the static FDPCG minimum variance estimator combined with POLC. Due to its nonsequential nature and high degree of parallelism, DKF is particularly well suited for real-time implementation on inexpensive off-the-shelf graphics processing units.

  20. An analysis of brachytherapy with computed tomography-guided permanent implantation of Iodine-125 seeds for recurrent nonkeratin nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen X

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xinying Shen,1,2 Yong Li,2 Yanfang Zhang,2 Jian Kong,2 Yanhao Li1 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Interventional Radiology, Shenzhen People’s Hospital, The Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China Background: 125I seed implantation is a new method in treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, and it is worthwhile to evaluate its feasibility. In this study, we performed brachytherapy with computed tomography (CT-guided permanent implantation of 125I seeds in the treatment of patients with the recurrence of NPC.Methods: A total 30 patients (20 male and ten female at the median age of 55 (range 25–80 years were diagnosed with recurrent nonkeratin NPC, with a total 38 lesions and a short disease-free interval (median ~11 months after primary radiotherapy alone or combined with chemotherapy. Patients received CT scan, starting from 2 months after the treatment. Follow-up was conducted for ~2–38 months to observe the local control rate and overall survival rate. We also analyzed the possible correlation between survival periods and the status of recurrent tumors.Results: The local control rates at 6, 12, 24, 30, and 36 months after the procedure of 125I seed implantation were 86.8%, 73.7%, 26.3%, 15.8%, and 5.3%, respectively. The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 80.0% (24/30, 30.0% (9/30, and 6.7% (2/30, respectively, with a median survival period of 18 months (17.6±8.6 months. Interestingly, the survival periods of the patients who had primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy were 15.8±7.9 and 24.3±7.9 months, respectively. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that χ2 (log rank was 7.555, with very significant difference (P<0.01. The survival periods of patients in tumor stages I, II, III, and IV were 25.4±8.7, 19.8±9.4, 16.1±4.5, and 12.8±7.8 months, respectively, with

  1. Nanodrug applications in photodynamic therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Paszko, Edyta

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed over last century and is now becoming a more widely used medical tool having gained regulatory approval for the treatment of various diseases such as cancer and macular degeneration. It is a two-step technique in which the delivery of a photosensitizing drug is followed by the irradiation of light. Activated photosensitizers transfer energy to molecular oxygen which results in the generation of reactive oxygen species which in turn cause cells apoptosis or necrosis. Although this modality has significantly improved the quality of life and survival time for many cancer patients it still offers significant potential for further improvement. In addition to the development of new PDT drugs, the use of nanosized carriers for photosensitizers is a promising approach which might improve the efficiency of photodynamic activity and which can overcome many side effects associated with classic photodynamic therapy. This review aims at highlighting the different types of nanomedical approaches currently used in PDT and outlines future trends and limitations of nanodelivery of photosensitizers.

  2. Preoperative Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Hookwire Localization of Metallic Marker Clips in the Breast with a Radial Approach: Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, T.; Kasami, M.; Uchida, Y.; Sanuki, J.; Kimura, K.; Tanaka, K.; Takahashi, K. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Pathology, and Dept. of Breast Surgery, Shizuoka Cancer Center Hospital, Naga-izumi, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Hookwire localization is the current standard technique for radiological marking of nonpalpable breast lesions. Stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (SVAB) is of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to replace surgical biopsy. Wire localization for metallic marker clips placed after SVAB is needed. Purpose: To describe a method for performing computed tomography (CT)-guided hookwire localization using a radial approach for metallic marker clips placed percutaneously after SVAB. Material and Methods: Nineteen women scheduled for SVAB with marker-clip placement, CT-guided wire localization of marker clips, and, eventually, surgical excision were prospectively entered into the study. CT-guided wire localization was performed with a radial approach, followed by placement of a localizing marker-clip surgical excision. Feasibility and reliability of the procedure and the incidence of complications were examined. Results: CT-guided wire localization surgical excision was successfully performed in all 19 women without any complications. The mean total procedure time was 15 min. The median distance on CT image from marker clip to hookwire was 2 mm (range 0-3 mm). Conclusion: CT-guided preoperative hookwire localization with a radial approach for marker clips after SVAB is technically feasible.

  3. Preoperative computed tomography-guided percutaneous hookwire localization of metallic marker clips in the breast with a radial approach: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, T; Kasami, M; Uchida, Y; Sanuki, J; Kimura, K; Tanaka, K; Takahashi, K

    2007-06-01

    Hookwire localization is the current standard technique for radiological marking of nonpalpable breast lesions. Stereotactic directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (SVAB) is of sufficient sensitivity and specificity to replace surgical biopsy. Wire localization for metallic marker clips placed after SVAB is needed. To describe a method for performing computed tomography (CT)-guided hookwire localization using a radial approach for metallic marker clips placed percutaneously after SVAB. Nineteen women scheduled for SVAB with marker-clip placement, CT-guided wire localization of marker clips, and, eventually, surgical excision were prospectively entered into the study. CT-guided wire localization was performed with a radial approach, followed by placement of a localizing marker-clip surgical excision. Feasibility and reliability of the procedure and the incidence of complications were examined. CT-guided wire localization surgical excision was successfully performed in all 19 women without any complications. The mean total procedure time was 15 min. The median distance on CT image from marker clip to hookwire was 2 mm (range 0-3 mm). CT-guided preoperative hookwire localization with a radial approach for marker clips after SVAB is technically feasible.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity

  5. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39–86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4–58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4–58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive

  6. Emerging Endoscopic and Photodynamic Techniques for Bladder Cancer Detection and Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of emerging techniques, namely, photodynamic diagnosis (PDD, narrow band imaging (NBI, Raman spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, virtual cystoscopy, and endoscopic microscopy for its use in the diagnosis and surveillance of bladder cancer. The technology, clinical evidence and future applications of these approaches are discussed with particular emphasis on PDD and NBI. These approaches show promise to optimise cystoscopy and transurethral resection of bladder tumours.

  7. Photodynamic therapy in endodontics: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alessandra Cesar; De Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli; Steier, Liviu; Weber, João Batista Blessmann

    2015-03-01

    Recently, several in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated promising results about the use of photodynamic therapy during root canal system disinfection. However, there is no consensus on a standard protocol for its incorporation during root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize the results of research on photodynamic therapy in endodontics published in peer-reviewed journals. A review of pertinent literature was conducted using the PubMed database, and data obtained were categorized into sections in terms of relevant topics. Studies conducted in recent years highlighted the antimicrobial potential of photodynamic therapy in endodontics. However, most of these studies were not able to confirm a significant improvement in root canal disinfection for photodynamic therapy as a substitute for current disinfection methods. Its indication as an excellent adjunct to conventional endodontic therapy is well documented, however. Data suggest the need for protocol adjustments or new photosensitizer formulations to enhance photodynamic therapy predictability in endodontics.

  8. Evaluation of every other day-cone beam computed tomography in image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoung Suk; Ahn, Jong Ho; Kim, Jong Sik; Song, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography(CBCT) in Image Guided Radiation Therapy(IGRT), Set-up error can be reduced but exposure dose of the patient due to CBCT will increase. Through this study, we are to evaluate by making a scenario with the implementation period of CBCT as every other day. Of prostate cancer patients, 9 patients who got a Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy(IMRT) with CBCT in IGRT were analyzed. Based on values corrected by analyzing set-up error by using CBCT every day during actual treatment, we created a scenario that conducts CBCT every other day. After applying set-up error values of the day not performing CBCT in the scenario to the treatment planning system(Pinnacle 9.2, Philips, USA) by moving them from the treatment iso-center during actual treatment, we established re-treatment plan under the same conditions as actual treatment. Based on this, the dose distribution of normal organs and Planning Target Volume(PTV) was compared and analyzed. In the scenario that performs CBCT every other day based on set-up error values when conducting CBCT every day, average X-axis : 0.2±0.73 mm , Y-axis : 0.1±0.58 mm , Z-axis : -1.3±1.17 mm difference was shown. This was applied to the treatment planning to establish re-treatment plan and dose distribution was evaluated and as a result, Dmean : -0.17 Gy, D99% : -0.71 Gy of PTV difference was shown in comparison with the result obtained when carrying out CBCT every day. As for normal organs, V66 : 1.55% of rectal wall, V66 : -0.76% of bladder difference was shown. In case of a CBCT perform every other day could reduce exposure dose and additional treatment time. And it is thought to be able to consider the application depending on the condition of the patient because the difference in the dose distribution of normal organs, PTV is not large

  9. The clinical feasibility and effect of online cone beam computer tomography-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin; Bai Sen; Chen Nianyong; Xu Feng; Jiang Xiaoqin; Li Yan; Xu Qingfeng; Shen Yali; Zhang Hong; Gong Youling; Zhong Renming; Jiang Qingfeng

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Online adaptive correction in image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy appeared to be a promising approach for precision radiation treatment in head and neck tumors. This protocol was designed to evaluate the clinical feasibility and effect of online cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance in IMRT of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Methods and materials: The Elekta Synergy system, which integrates an X-ray volumetric imager (XVI), was used to deliver radiation treatment for 22 cases of NPC. The acquired CBCT was registered to the planning CT for online and offline analysis. The systematic and random setup errors, as well as planning target volume (PTV) margin, were calculated at different correction threshold levels. The impact of online setup correction on dosimetry was evaluated by simulation of pre-correction errors. Results: The correction-of-setup-errors frequencies for 1, 2 and 3 mm thresholds were 41.3-53.9%, 12.7-21.2% and 6.3-10.3%, respectively. Online correction was effective at the 2 mm threshold level for all three axes. The pre-correction systematic errors for the whole group ranged 1.1-1.3 mm, and the random errors were also 1.1-1.3 mm. After online correction, the systematic and random errors ranged 0.4-0.5 mm and 0.7-0.8 mm, respectively, in the three directions. The PTV margins for the pre-correction, pretreatment and post-treatment positions were 3.5-4.2 mm, 1.6-1.8 mm and 2.5-3.2 mm, respectively, in three directions. Analysis of hypothetical dosimetric change due to a translational isocenter shift of 3 mm showed that if no correction was applied, the mean maximum dose to both the brain stem and spinal cord would be increased by 10 Gy, the mean dose to the left and right parotids would be increased by 7.8 and 8.5 Gy, respectively, and the dose to target volumes would be decreased: 4 Gy for 95% GTV and 5.6 Gy for 95% CTV 60. Conclusions: CBCT-based online correction increased the accuracy of IMRT for NPC and

  10. Priori mask guided image reconstruction (p-MGIR) for ultra-low dose cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C.; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Kahler, Darren L.; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the compressed sensing (CS) based iterative reconstruction method has received attention because of its ability to reconstruct cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with good quality using sparsely sampled or noisy projections, thus enabling dose reduction. However, some challenges remain. In particular, there is always a tradeoff between image resolution and noise/streak artifact reduction based on the amount of regularization weighting that is applied uniformly across the CBCT volume. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel low-dose CBCT reconstruction algorithm framework called priori mask guided image reconstruction (p-MGIR) that allows reconstruction of high-quality low-dose CBCT images while preserving the image resolution. In p-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume was mathematically modeled as a combination of two regions: (1) where anatomical structures are complex, and (2) where intensities are relatively uniform. The priori mask, which is the key concept of the p-MGIR algorithm, was defined as the matrix that distinguishes between the two separate CBCT regions where the resolution needs to be preserved and where streak or noise needs to be suppressed. We then alternately updated each part of image by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively, where one minimization was focused on preserving the edge information of the first part while the other concentrated on the removal of noise/artifacts from the latter part. To evaluate the performance of the p-MGIR algorithm, a numerical head-and-neck phantom, a Catphan 600 physical phantom, and a clinical head-and-neck cancer case were used for analysis. The results were compared with the standard Feldkamp-Davis-Kress as well as conventional CS-based algorithms. Examination of the p-MGIR algorithm showed that high-quality low-dose CBCT images can be reconstructed without compromising the image resolution. For both phantom and the patient cases, the p-MGIR is able to achieve a clinically

  11. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous ozone injection of the Gasserian ganglion for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An JX

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Xiong An,1,2 Hui Liu,1 Ruo-Wen Chen,1,2 Yong Wang,1 Wen-Xing Zhao,1 Derek Eastwood,3 John P Williams4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine & Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University & Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Weifang Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pain Services, Wirral University Teaching Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UK; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of computed tomography (CT-guided percutaneous ozone injection for refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed in the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a university hospital pain center. Patients and methods: A total of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of refractory trigeminal neuralgia were enrolled. All patients were treated with a percutaneous ozone injection and one patient was excluded. There were 21 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (group A and seven patients with painful trigeminal neuropathy caused by post-herpetic neuralgia (group B. The percutaneous injection was an oxygen–ozone mixture at an ozone concentration of 30 mg/­mL into the Gasserian ganglion performed under CT guidance. The number of ­procedures performed varied from one to as many as 16. Outcomes were evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS pain scores. Results: The combined VAS scores were 7.11 ± 1.23 pretreatment, 2.86 ± 1.69 posttreatment (P < 0.05 and 3.25 ± 2.01 after 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05. In group A, the VAS scores were 7.10 ± 1.04 pretreatment and 2.90 ± 1.84 posttreatment (P < 0.05. In group B, the VAS scores were 7.14 ± 1.77 pretreatment and 2.71 ± 1.25 posttreatment (P < 0.05. After 6-months follow-up, the VAS score was 3.38

  12. Personalized Assessment of kV Cone Beam Computed Tomography Doses in Image-guided Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yibao [Beijing Key Lab of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Yan Yulong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Bao Shanglian [Beijing Key Lab of Medical Physics and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing (China); Deng Jun, E-mail: jun.deng@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative method for the estimation of kV cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) doses in pediatric patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-two children were retrospectively analyzed in subgroups of different scanned regions: one group in the head-and-neck and the other group in the pelvis. Critical structures in planning CT images were delineated on an Eclipse treatment planning system before being converted into CT phantoms for Monte Carlo simulations. A benchmarked EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions of kVCBCT scans with full-fan high-quality head or half-fan pelvis protocols predefined by the manufacturer. Based on planning CT images and structures exported in DICOM RT format, occipital-frontal circumferences (OFC) were calculated for head-and-neck patients using DICOMan software. Similarly, hip circumferences (HIP) were acquired for the pelvic group. Correlations between mean organ doses and age, weight, OFC, and HIP values were analyzed with SigmaPlot software suite, where regression performances were analyzed with relative dose differences (RDD) and coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: kVCBCT-contributed mean doses to all critical structures decreased monotonically with studied parameters, with a steeper decrease in the pelvis than in the head. Empirical functions have been developed for a dose estimation of the major organs at risk in the head and pelvis, respectively. If evaluated with physical parameters other than age, a mean RDD of up to 7.9% was observed for all the structures in our population of 42 patients. Conclusions: kVCBCT doses are highly correlated with patient size. According to this study, weight can be used as a primary index for dose assessment in both head and pelvis scans, while OFC and HIP may serve as secondary indices for dose estimation in corresponding regions. With the proposed empirical functions, it is possible

  13. Computed tomography guided navigation assisted percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteoma in a 7-year-old patient: the low dose approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Tappero, Carlo; Bogdanovic, Daniel; Stamm, Anna-Christina [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Ziebarth, Kai [Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Osteoid osteoma (OO) is a benign tumour that can cause severe pain and functional limitation to children and young adults; the treatment of choice is image-guided ablation. Due to the very small size of the lesion, detection and accurate needle placement may be challenging. Computed tomography (CT) offers very detailed imaging of the skeleton and is the modality of choice for the detection of small OO and for ablation guidance. Nevertheless, CT-guided positioning of the ablation applicator is linked to significant radiation exposure, particularly for the paediatric population. This case describes the successful use of a novel CT-based navigation system that offers the possibility of accurate ablation with only minimal radiation exposure in a paediatric patient. (orig.)

  14. First-in-Man Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Revascularization of Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion Using a Wearable Computer: Proof of Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opolski, Maksymilian P; Debski, Artur; Borucki, Bartosz A; Szpak, Marcin; Staruch, Adam D; Kepka, Cezary; Witkowski, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of successful computed tomography-guided percutaneous revascularization of a chronically occluded right coronary artery using a wearable, hands-free computer with a head-mounted display worn by interventional cardiologists in the catheterization laboratory. The projection of 3-dimensional computed tomographic reconstructions onto the screen of virtual reality glass allowed the operators to clearly visualize the distal coronary vessel, and verify the direction of the guide wire advancement relative to the course of the occluded vessel segment. This case provides proof of concept that wearable computers can improve operator comfort and procedure efficiency in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography, sonography, and sonographically guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of axillary lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer: comparison of diagnostic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Yu-Mee; Hong, Il Ki; Han, Kyunghwa

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with that of sonography and sonographically guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for determining the preoperative axillary lymph node (ALN) status and to evaluate the factors related to false-negative PET-CT, sonographic, and FNA results in ALN staging of invasive ductal carcinoma. From March 2009 to July 2012, 226 patients had a diagnosis of primary breast cancer. Among these patients, 107 constituted the study population after exclusion of transferred patients and patients with breast cancer other than invasive ductal carcinoma. The diagnostic performance of the modalities was compared with pathologic reports. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the relationship between clinicopathologic factors (symptoms, T stage, hormone receptors, and histologic grade), false-negative results, and true-negative results on PET-CT, sonography, and FNA. Of the 107 patients, 45 (42.1%) had positive results on final pathologic analysis of ALNs. Sonographically guided FNA had a significantly higher specificity, positive predictive value, accuracy, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve than sonography and PET-CT (P < .01). When sonography and PET-CT were combined, the sensitivity was significantly improved (P = .019) compared with sonography alone. When FNA and PET-CT were combined, the sensitivity and negative predictive value were significantly increased compared with each modality (P < .01). Sonographically guided FNA was found to be an excellent diagnostic tool for preoperative evaluation of the ALN status. To obviate the step of sentinel lymph node biopsy for determining the ALN status, combined evaluation of ALNs by these modalities may be more complementary than the use of a single modality. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Accurate pre-surgical determination for self-drilling miniscrew implant placement using surgical guides and cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Ken; Kawaguchi, Misuzu; Tabuchi, Masako; Goto, Shigemi

    2010-12-01

    Miniscrew implants have proven to be effective in providing absolute orthodontic anchorage. However, as self-drilling miniscrew implants have become more popular, a problem has emerged, i.e. root contact, which can lead to perforation and other root injuries. To avoid possible root damage, a surgical guide was fabricated and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to incorporate guide tubes drilled in accordance with the planned direction of the implants. Eighteen patients (5 males and 13 females; mean age 23.8 years; minimum 10.7, maximum 45.5) were included in the study. Forty-four self-drilling miniscrew implants (diameter 1.6, and length 8 mm) were placed in interradicular bone using a surgical guide procedure, the majority in the maxillary molar area. To determine the success rates, statistical analysis was undertaken using Fisher's exact probability test. CBCT images of post-surgical self-drilling miniscrew implant placement showed no root contact (0/44). However, based on CBCT evaluation, it was necessary to change the location or angle of 52.3 per cent (23/44) of the guide tubes prior to surgery in order to obtain optimal placement. If orthodontic force could be applied to the screw until completion of orthodontic treatment, screw anchorage was recorded as successful. The total success rate of all miniscrews was 90.9 per cent (40/44). Orthodontic self-drilling miniscrew implants must be inserted carefully, particularly in the case of blind placement, since even guide tubes made on casts frequently require repositioning to avoid the roots of the teeth. The use of surgical guides, fabricated using CBCT images, appears to be a promising technique for placement of orthodontic self-drilling miniscrew implants adjacent to the dental roots and maxillary sinuses.

  17. Photodynamic therapy of intraocular cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravier, N.; Duvournau, Y.; Querec, M.A.; Pechereau, A.; Patrice, T.

    1992-01-01

    The most common intraocular tumors are choroidal malignant melanomas (70%) and retinoblastomas (13%). Each time that visual acuity is preserved, various conservative treatments are considered relative to the potential risk of metastatic disease during enucleation. In addition to standard techniques, photodynamic therapy is a potentially attractive new approach limited in its effects to the area of the treated tumor. The purpose of this preclinical study is to determine a reference dose-effect for single laser doses and to study effects of fractionation of the laser dose. (author). 9 refs., 1 tab

  18. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Justin C; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm ‘the common mask guided image reconstruction’ (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and ‘well’ solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the

  19. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Li, Jonathan G; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-12-07

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm 'the common mask guided image reconstruction' (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and 'well' solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the algorithm

  20. Visibility of solid and liquid fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography: an esophageal phantom study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Herk, Marcel B.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is used in operable and inoperable esophageal cancer patients. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial marker placement allows improved translation of the disease extent on endoscopy to computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning and enables image-guided RT. However, microscopic tumor extent at the time of RT planning is unknown. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution (10-30µm) imaging modality with the potential for accurately determining the longitudinal disease extent. Visibility of fiducial markers on OCT is crucial for integrating OCT findings with the RT planning CT. We investigated the visibility on OCT (NinePoint Medical, Inc.) of 13 commercially available solid (Visicoil, Gold Anchor, Flexicoil, Polymark, and QLRAD) and liquid (BioXmark, Lipiodol, and Hydrogel) fiducial markers of different diameter. We designed and manufactured a set of dedicated Silicone-based esophageal phantoms to perform imaging in a controlled environment. The esophageal phantoms consist of several layers with different TiO2 concentrations to simulate the scattering properties of a typical healthy human esophagus. Markers were placed at various depths (0.5, 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0mm). OCT imaging allowed detection of all fiducial markers and phantom layers. The signal to background ratio was 6-fold higher for the solid fiducial markers than the liquid fiducial markers, yet OCT was capable of visualizing all 13 fiducial markers at all investigated depths. We conclude that RT fiducial markers can be visualized with OCT. This allows integration of OCT findings with CT for image-guided RT.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Grebenkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of treatment for precancer and early cervical cancer by photodynamic therapy in 12 patients with primary diagnosis H-SIL (CIN II–III and cancer in situ is described. Chlo-rine photosensitizer Photolon was given intravenously at a dose of 0.75–1.15 mg/kg body weight. 2.5 h later the treatment with polyposition laser exposure (light dose – 150 J/cm2, light power density – 400–500 mW/cm2 was made. Thirty days later conization of the cervix with endocervical curettage assessing therapeutic response of cervical tumor tissue was per-formed. According to histological data complete response was in 4 patients, minute foci of CIN I were determined in 7 patients, 1 patient had foci of CIN II. 8 of 10 HPV-positive patients had complete eradication of HPV after treatment. There were no serious adverse events after light exposure. Marked therapeutic response, high anti-viral activity and good feasibility allow to consider photodynamic therapy as alternative organ-sparing treatment of early cancer and pre-cancer of cervix. 

  2. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  3. Evaluation of a novel Seldinger-needle for computed tomography guided interventions: initial experiences; Evaluierung einer neuen Seldinger-Nadel fuer computertomografisch gesteuerte Interventionen: Erste Erfahrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plumhans, C.; Mahnken, A.; Iwa, R.; Behrendt, F.F.; Sebastian, K.; Guenther, R.W.; Honnef, D. [Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate a new Seldinger puncture device for computed tomography-guided interventions under difficult conditions, to analyze applicability, and to investigate assets and drawbacks. From November 2007 to March 2008, we performed CT-guided interventions in 16 patients (7 women, 9 men; mean age 62 years old) using a new 20G-Seldinger needle (Sika-Med, Wiehl, Germany). This novel needle serves as a guide for many different interventional devices due to a guide wire welded on the proximal needle end. It allows continuous application of anesthesia via four tiny holes at the distal needle end until the region of interest is reached. Each intervention was subject to difficult interventional conditions. The indications for intervention were drainage (n = 7), Trucut biopsy of tumor (n = 8) and radiofrequency ablation (n = 1). Handling, success, advantages, drawbacks, complications and patient tolerance were noted after each procedure. A pain scale from 1 - 10 was used to grade the pain level during the intervention. All interventions were performed successfully and no severe complications were observed. Patient tolerance was very good resulting in a mean pain score of 2 {+-} 1. Regions with dangerous and difficult access were successfully reached with the new Seldinger needle in 15 of 16 cases by dilatation of the puncture tract and continuous administration of local anesthesia via the system. Furthermore, different devices such as Trucut systems and a drainage catheter were able to be inserted without complication via the needle. With a proximal removable luer-lock connection, liquid material was able to be aspirated in six cases. Under difficult interventional conditions, the use of a Seldinger needle as a reliable technique for CT-guided interventions can provide a safe and successful procedure. (orig.)

  4. Computed Tomography-Guided Core-Needle Biopsy Specimens Demonstrate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutations in Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.M.; Chang, J.W.C.; Cheung, Y.C.; Lin, G.; Hsieh, J.J.; Hsu, T.; Huang, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Target therapy with a new class of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors shows improved clinical response in EGFR gene-mutated lung cancers. Purpose: To evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT)-guided core-needle biopsy specimens for the assessment of EGFR gene mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and Methods: Seventeen (nine males, eight females) patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent CT-guided core-needle biopsy of the lung tumor prior to treatment with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib. There were no life-threatening complications of biopsy. The specimens were sent fresh-frozen for EGFR mutation analysis and histopathological study. Results: There were 12 (70.6%) EGFR gene mutants and five (29.4%) nonmutants. The objective response rate to gefitinib therapy was 73.3% (11 of 15 patients), with 91.7% (11 of 12 mutants) for the mutant group and 0% for the nonmutant group. Conclusion: CT-guided core-needle biopsy of advanced NSCLC enables the acquisition of sufficient tissue for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  5. Short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer: A multi-center retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Min; Ye, Xin; Yang, Xia; Zheng, Aimin; Huang, Guang Hui; Wei, Zhigang [Dept. of Oncology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated with Shandong University, Jinan (China); Fan, Wei Jun [Imaging and Interventional Center, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Kaixian [Dept. of Oncology, Teng Zhou Central People' s Hospital Affiliated with Jining Medical College, Tengzhou (China); Bi, Jing Wang [Dept. of Oncology, Jinan Military General Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Jinan (China)

    2016-11-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the short-term outcomes and safety of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) of solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer. From May 2010 to April 2014, 31 patients with unilateral adrenal metastasis from lung cancer who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous MWA were enrolled. This study was conducted with approval from local Institutional Review Board. Clinical outcomes and complications of MWA were assessed. Their tumors ranged from 1.5 to 5.4 cm in diameter. After a median follow-up period of 11.1 months, primary efficacy rate was 90.3% (28/31). Local tumor progression was detected in 7 (22.6%) of 31 cases. Their median overall survival time was 12 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 44.3%. Median local tumor progression-free survival time was 9 months. Local tumor progression-free survival rate was 77.4%. Of 36 MWA sessions, two (5.6%) had major complications (hypertensive crisis). CT-guided percutaneous MWA may be fairly safe and effective for treating solitary adrenal metastasis from lung cancer.

  6. Conventional multi-slice computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) for computer-aided implant placement. Part II: reliability of mucosa-supported stereolithographic guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisan, Volkan; Karabuda, Zihni Cüneyt; Pişkin, Bülent; Özdemir, Tayfun

    2013-12-01

    Deviations of implants that were placed by conventional computed tomography (CT)- or cone beam CT (CBCT)-derived mucosa-supported stereolithographic (SLA) surgical guides were analyzed in this study. Eleven patients were randomly scanned by a multi-slice CT (CT group) or a CBCT scanner (CBCT group). A total of 108 implants were planned on the software and placed using SLA guides. A new CT or CBCT scan was obtained and merged with the planning data to identify the deviations between the planned and placed implants. Results were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and multiple regressions (p < .05). Mean angular and linear deviations in the CT group were 3.30° (SD 0.36), and 0.75 (SD 0.32) and 0.80 mm (SD 0.35) at the implant shoulder and tip, respectively. In the CBCT group, mean angular and linear deviations were 3.47° (SD 0.37), and 0.81 (SD 0.32) and 0.87 mm (SD 0.32) at the implant shoulder and tip, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between the CT and CBCT groups (p = .169 and p = .551, p = .113 for angular and linear deviations, respectively). Implant placement via CT- or CBCT-derived mucosa-supported SLA guides yielded similar deviation values. Results should be confirmed on alternative CBCT scanners. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Outcomes of microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography-guided center-sparing internal limiting membrane peeling for myopic traction maculopathy: a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Atul; Ravani, Raghav; Mehta, Aditi; Simakurthy, Sriram; Dhull, Chirakshi

    2017-07-04

    To evaluate the outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (I-OCT)-guided traction removal and center-sparing internal limiting membrane (cs-ILM) peeling. Nine eyes with myopic traction maculopathy as diagnosed on SD-OCT underwent PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling and were evaluated prospectively for resolution of central macular thickness (CMT) and improvement in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and complications, if any, were noted. All patients were followed up for more than 9 months. Resolution of the macular retinoschisis was seen in all nine eyes on SD-OCT. At 36 weeks, there was a significant improvement in mean BCVA from the preoperative BCVA (P = 0.0089) along with a reduction in the CMT from 569.77 ± 263.19 to 166.0 ± 43.91 um (P = 0.0039). None of the eyes showed worsening of BCVA or development of full-thickness macular hole in the intraoperative or follow-up period. PPV with I-OCT-guided cs-ILM peeling helps in complete removal of traction, resolution of retinoschisis and good functional recovery with low intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paronyan, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant strain Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread multiresistant bacteria. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms by photosensitizers (PS) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effectiveness of new PS cationic porphyrin Zn-TBut4PyP was tested on two strains of S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus). It is shown that Zn-TBut4PyP has high photodynamic activity against both strains

  9. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  10. The photodynamic and non-photodynamic actions of porphyrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Afonso

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrias are a family of inherited diseases, each associated with a partial defect in one of the enzymes of the heme biosynthetic pathway. In six of the eight porphyrias described, the main clinical manifestation is skin photosensitivity brought about by the action of light on porphyrins, which are deposited in the upper epidermal layer of the skin. Porphyrins absorb light energy intensively in the UV region, and to a lesser extent in the long visible bands, resulting in transitions to excited electronic states. The excited porphyrin may react directly with biological structures (type I reactions or with molecular oxygen, generating excited singlet oxygen (type II reactions. Besides this well-known photodynamic action of porphyrins, a novel light-independent effect of porphyrins has been described. Irradiation of enzymes in the presence of porphyrins mainly induces type I reactions, although type II reactions could also occur, further increasing the direct non-photodynamic effect of porphyrins on proteins and macromolecules. Conformational changes of protein structure are induced by porphyrins in the dark or under UV light, resulting in reduced enzyme activity and increased proteolytic susceptibility. The effect of porphyrins depends not only on their physico-chemical properties but also on the specific site on the protein on which they act. Porphyrin action alters the functionality of the enzymes of the heme biosynthetic pathway exacerbating the metabolic deficiencies in porphyrias. Light energy absorption by porphyrins results in the generation of oxygen reactive species, overcoming the protective cellular mechanisms and leading to molecular, cell and tissue damage, thus amplifying the porphyric picture.

  11. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  12. Photodynamic action of the methylene blue: mutagenesis and sinergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, M.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two aspects of photodynamic therapy were studied: the associated mutagenesis and the interactions with physical agents, in order to increase its biological effects. The photodynamic action with methylene blue in the mutagenesis and sinergism is studied. (L.M.J.)

  13. Photodynamic therapy: a review of applications in neurooncology and neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Anatoly B.; Berezhnaya, Elena; Kovaleva, Vera; Neginskaya, Marya; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Sharifulina, Svetlana

    2015-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect is a promising adjuvant modality for diagnosis and treatment of brain cancer. It is of importance that the bright fluorescence of most photosensitizers provides visualization of brain tumors. This is successfully used for fluorescence-guided tumor resection according to the principle "to see and to treat." Non-oncologic application of PDT effect for induction of photothrombotic infarct of the brain tissue is a well-controlled and reproducible stroke model, in which a local brain lesion is produced in the predetermined brain area. Since normal neurons and glial cells may also be damaged by PDT and this can lead to unwanted neurological consequences, PDT effects on normal neurons and glial cells should be comprehensively studied. We overviewed the current literature data on the PDT effect on a range of signaling and epigenetic proteins that control various cell functions, survival, necrosis, and apoptosis. We hypothesize that using cell-specific inhibitors or activators of some signaling proteins, one can selectively protect normal neurons and glia, and simultaneously exacerbate photodynamic damage of malignant gliomas.

  14. Combine TV-L1 model with guided image filtering for wide and faint ring artifacts correction of in-line x-ray phase contrast computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dongjiang; Qu, Gangrong; Hu, Chunhong; Zhao, Yuqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    In practice, mis-calibrated detector pixels give rise to wide and faint ring artifacts in the reconstruction image of the In-line phase-contrast computed tomography (IL-PC-CT). Ring artifacts correction is essential in IL-PC-CT. In this study, a novel method of wide and faint ring artifacts correction was presented based on combining TV-L1 model with guided image filtering (GIF) in the reconstruction image domain. The new correction method includes two main steps namely, the GIF step and the TV-L1 step. To validate the performance of this method, simulation data and real experimental synchrotron data are provided. The results demonstrate that TV-L1 model with GIF step can effectively correct the wide and faint ring artifacts for IL-PC-CT.

  15. Comparisons of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Imaging for Detection of Internal Mammary Lymph Node Metastases in Patients With Breast Cancer and Pathologic Correlation by Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Lee, Ah Won

    2015-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and ultrasound imaging (US) with pathologic results obtained by US-guided biopsy and to evaluate the role of US in detecting internal mammary lymph node (LN) metastases in patients with breast cancer. Between January 2008 and December 2012, 37 patients with breast cancer (median age, 51.4 years; range, 40-79 years) underwent US-guided biopsy for suspected internal mammary LN metastases. Medical records, radiologic images, and reports were reviewed and correlated with pathologic results. The positive internal mammary LN metastasis rate was 78.4%. All biopsies were performed safely without major complications. Only 8.1% of obtained samples were unsatisfactory. There were statistically significant differences in lesion size (P = .0002), standardized uptake value on PET/CT (P = .0015), biopsy methods (P = .002), and specimen adequacy (P = .007) between metastatic and benign groups. Of the clinical factorsreviewed, only concurrent distant metastasis was correlated with internal mammary LN metastasis (P< .0001). Sensitivities for detecting internal mammary LN metastases were 76.7%, 96.7%, and 92.9% for initial US examinations, initial US combined with second-look US for initially missed cases, and PET/CT, respectively (P= .017). In a subgroup analysis, the only significant difference found was in sensitivities between initial and combined US (P = .019). In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve for PET/CT using standardized uptake criteria (0.87) was higher than that for US using size criteria (0.83); however, this difference was not significant. Although PET/CT is the best noninvasive method for evaluating internal mammary LN metastases, US is also useful if internal mammary LN evaluation is routine during standard US surveillance of patients with breast cancer. Additionally, US-guided biopsies could be

  16. Photodynamic therapy for periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weersink, Robert A.

    2002-05-01

    Periodontal disease is a family of chronic inflammatory conditions caused by bacterial infections.' It is manifested in red, swollen gingiva (gums) and can lead to destruction of the connective tissue and bone that hold teeth in place. Conventional treatments typically require some form of invasive surgery, depending on the disease stage at time of detection. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is the use of light-activated drugs (photosensitizers) for treatment of a variety of conditions 2 such as solid tumors, pre-malignancies, macular degeneration and actinic keratitis. There have been a number of studies of PDT as an antibacterial agent. 3'4 Depending on the photosensitizer and strain of bacteria, significant killing (several LOGS) can be achieved.

  17. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    CT (CBCT) can be used for MRI-only image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and for verifying the correctness of the corresponding pCT. Material and methods. Six patients receiving palliative cranial RT were included in the study. Each patient had three-dimensional (3D) T1W MRI, a CBCT and a CT for reference...

  18. Computed-Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsies of Suspected Malignant Lymphomas: Impact of Biopsy, Lesion, and Patient Parameters on Diagnostic Yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, V.; Zaehringer, M.; Krug, B.; Wesselmann, C.; Haferkamp, K.; Wickenhauser, C.; Lackner, K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic yield of core needle biopsy in patients with malignant lymphoma. Material and Methods: Computed-tomography-guided core needle biopsies in patients with malignant lymphoma performed in the period 1996 to 2001 were evaluated retrospectively. A biopsy was considered as 'fully diagnostic' if a histological diagnosis, including the histologic subtype in the event of malignant lymphoma, was achieved and the clinical course and CT follow-up of at least 6 months confirmed the biopsy results. A biopsy was regarded as 'partly diagnostic' if histological work-up defined malignant lymphoma but not the histological subtype, and if histological diagnosis bore therapeutic relevance. Diagnostic yield was correlated with features such as size of specimen, location and depth of the target lesion, and experience of the investigator. Results: 45 biopsies were performed in 40 patients. With respect to definite histopathological diagnosis, 31 biopsies (68.9%) were diagnostic and 14 (31.1%) non-diagnostic. In 4 cases (8.8%), biopsies yielded partly diagnostic results, since therapy could be scheduled after biopsy without final sub-classification. Statistical analysis of biopsy parameters revealed that sample sizes were significantly larger in the diagnostic group. Conclusion: CT-guided biopsy can be considered as an alternative for lymphoma diagnosis and should be the first interventional procedure. The most important parameter for diagnostic success is the size of the specimen

  19. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Takeshi; Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57–93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 ± 13 (SD) min (range 24–78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7–812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  20. Radiation Exposure of Interventional Radiologists During Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Renal Cryoablation and Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: Direct Measurement in a Clinical Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, Yusuke, E-mail: wckyh140@yahoo.co.jp; Hiraki, Takao, E-mail: takaoh@tc4.so-net.ne.jp; Gobara, Hideo, E-mail: gobara@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Iguchi, Toshihiro, E-mail: i10476@yahoo.co.jp; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu, E-mail: hirofujiwar@gmail.com; Kawabata, Takahiro, E-mail: tkhr-kwbt@yahoo.co.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan); Yamauchi, Takatsugu, E-mail: me9248@hp.okayama-u.ac.jp; Yamaguchi, Takuya, E-mail: me8738@hp.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Hospital, Central Division of Radiology (Japan); Kanazawa, Susumu, E-mail: susumu@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Okayama University Medical School, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    IntroductionComputed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation and lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have received increasing attention as promising cancer therapies. Although radiation exposure of interventional radiologists during these procedures is an important concern, data on operator exposure are lacking.Materials and MethodsRadiation dose to interventional radiologists during CT fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation (n = 20) and lung RFA (n = 20) was measured prospectively in a clinical setting. Effective dose to the operator was calculated from the 1-cm dose equivalent measured on the neck outside the lead apron, and on the left chest inside the lead apron, using electronic dosimeters. Equivalent dose to the operator’s finger skin was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter rings.ResultsThe mean (median) effective dose to the operator per procedure was 6.05 (4.52) μSv during renal cryoablation and 0.74 (0.55) μSv during lung RFA. The mean (median) equivalent dose to the operator’s finger skin per procedure was 2.1 (2.1) mSv during renal cryoablation, and 0.3 (0.3) mSv during lung RFA.ConclusionRadiation dose to interventional radiologists during renal cryoablation and lung RFA were at an acceptable level, and in line with recommended dose limits for occupational radiation exposure.

  1. Radiation Exposure of Interventional Radiologists During Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Renal Cryoablation and Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: Direct Measurement in a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yusuke; Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Kawabata, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Takatsugu; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation and lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have received increasing attention as promising cancer therapies. Although radiation exposure of interventional radiologists during these procedures is an important concern, data on operator exposure are lacking. Radiation dose to interventional radiologists during CT fluoroscopy-guided renal cryoablation (n = 20) and lung RFA (n = 20) was measured prospectively in a clinical setting. Effective dose to the operator was calculated from the 1-cm dose equivalent measured on the neck outside the lead apron, and on the left chest inside the lead apron, using electronic dosimeters. Equivalent dose to the operator's finger skin was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeter rings. The mean (median) effective dose to the operator per procedure was 6.05 (4.52) μSv during renal cryoablation and 0.74 (0.55) μSv during lung RFA. The mean (median) equivalent dose to the operator's finger skin per procedure was 2.1 (2.1) mSv during renal cryoablation, and 0.3 (0.3) mSv during lung RFA. Radiation dose to interventional radiologists during renal cryoablation and lung RFA were at an acceptable level, and in line with recommended dose limits for occupational radiation exposure.

  2. ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY GUIDED FINE NEEDLE ASPIRATION CYTOLOGY IN DIAGNOSING INTRA-ABDOMINAL LESIONS- A 6-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN MANIPUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Konjengbam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC is a widely used method, which is accurate and safe in a readily palpable masses. But, in those inaccessible lesions and deeper organs are safely aspirated using fine needle radiological procedure like ultrasound or computed tomography guided. The aim of the study is to assess the utility of FNAC in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal lesions and different pattern of lesions in particular to the sites. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study was done in the Department of Pathology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS, Imphal, between June 2010 and June 2016. The study included 128 intra-abdominal masses. Giemsa and Papanicolaou’s stains were used. The cytological diagnosis was correlated with clinical and radiological data to arrive at a final diagnosis. RESULTS Reports on FNAC smears were retrospectively analysed, which had been done in various anatomic sites- liver (70 cases, colon (19 cases, gallbladder (17 cases, mesenteric lymph nodes (12 cases, ovary (3 cases, adrenals (2 cases and 1 case each of pancreas, peritoneal wall, pelvic, suprapubic and flank masses. The mean age was 42.16 years with M:F of 1.3:1. The diagnostic yield was 85.2% in combination for Ultrasound Guided (USG and Computed Tomography (CT guided aspiration. The smears were classified as benign neoplastic, malignant neoplastic, non-neoplastic, inconclusive and unsatisfactory for interpretation. There were 79 (61.7% malignant neoplastic lesion, 5 (3.9% benign neoplastic lesion, 25 (19.5% non-neoplastic lesion, one (0.7% inconclusive lesions and 18 (14.1% unsatisfactory smears. The liver and the colon were the most common sites. Adenocarcinomas and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC were the most common malignant lesions comprising of 35 (44.3% and 25 (31.6% of the total malignant lesions diagnosed. CONCLUSION Intra-abdominal FNA is a simple, economical and a safe procedure with high sensitivity, specificity and

  3. Prostate contouring uncertainty in megavoltage computed tomography images acquired with a helical tomotherapy unit during image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William Y.; Chiu, Bernard; Bauman, Glenn S.; Lock, Michael; Rodrigues, George; Ash, Robert; Lewis, Craig; Fenster, Aaron; Battista, Jerry J.; Van Dyk, Jake

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the image-guidance capabilities of megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT), this article compares the interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty in kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) used for radiotherapy planning with MVCT acquired with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Five prostate-cancer patients were evaluated. Each patient underwent a KVCT and an MVCT study, a total of 10 CT studies. For interobserver variability analysis, four radiation oncologists, one physicist, and two radiation therapists (seven observers in total) contoured the prostate and seminal vesicles (SV) in the 10 studies. The intraobserver variability was assessed by asking all observers to repeat the contouring of 1 patient's KVCT and MVCT studies. Quantitative analysis of contour variations was performed by use of volumes and radial distances. Results: The interobserver and intraobserver contouring uncertainty was larger in MVCT compared with KVCT. Observers consistently segmented larger volumes on MVCT where the ratio of average prostate and SV volumes was 1.1 and 1.2, respectively. On average (interobserver and intraobserver), the local delineation variability, in terms of standard deviations [Δσ = √(σ 2 MVCT - σ 2 KVCT )], increased by 0.32 cm from KVCT to MVCT. Conclusions: Although MVCT was inferior to KVCT for prostate delineation, the application of MVCT in prostate radiotherapy remains useful

  4. Immediate and intermediate-term results of optical coherence tomography guided atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease: Initial results from the VISION trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawich, Ian; Paixao, Andre R.M.; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Rollefson, William A.; Mego, David M.; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency rates for percutaneous peripheral arterial interventions are suboptimal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal while preserving the tunica media and adventitia. Methods: The VISION study is a multicenter prospective study of patients with peripheral arterial disease undergoing OCT guided atherectomy with the Pantheris™ device. In 11 patients enrolled in a single center, we report procedural and clinical outcomes, at 30 days and 6 months. Results: The mean age was 63 ± 11 years and 73% (n = 8) were men. The target lesion was in the superficial femoral artery in 82% (n = 9) of the patients. Mean stenosis severity was 87% ± 10% and mean lesion length was 39 ± 31 mm. Procedural success was observed in all patients with no device related complications. Mean post-atherectomy stenosis was 18% ± 15%. Almost all excised tissue consisted of intimal plaque (94%). At 30 days, significant improvements in Rutherford class, VascuQoL scores and ABI were observed, 0.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7 (p = 0.01), 4.9 ± 1.9 vs. 3.6 ± 1.5 (p = 0.03) and 1.04 ± 0.19 vs. 0.80 ± 0.19 (p < 0.01) respectively. At 6 months, there were significant improvements in Rutherford class (1.0 ± 1.0 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.01) and ABI (0.93 ± 0.19 versus 0.80 ± 0.19, p = 0.02) but not in VascuQoL scores (3.7 ± 1.4 versus 3.6 ± 1.5, p = 0.48). Target lesion revascularization occurred in 18% (n = 2) of the patients. Conclusion: OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural success, no device related complications and encouraging results up to 6 months. Histological analysis suggested little injury to the media and adventitia. Larger studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of this approach. - Highlights: • OCT- guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal and preserving the tunica media and adventitia. • OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural

  5. Immediate and intermediate-term results of optical coherence tomography guided atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease: Initial results from the VISION trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawich, Ian; Paixao, Andre R.M. [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos [Citizens Memorial Heart and Vascular Institute, Bolivar, MO (United States); University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Lendel, Vasili; Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Rollefson, William A.; Mego, David M. [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Cilingiroglu, Mehmet, E-mail: Cilingiroglumehmet@gmail.com [Arkansas Heart Hospital, Peripheral Vascular Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Koc University, School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Background: Long-term patency rates for percutaneous peripheral arterial interventions are suboptimal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal while preserving the tunica media and adventitia. Methods: The VISION study is a multicenter prospective study of patients with peripheral arterial disease undergoing OCT guided atherectomy with the Pantheris™ device. In 11 patients enrolled in a single center, we report procedural and clinical outcomes, at 30 days and 6 months. Results: The mean age was 63 ± 11 years and 73% (n = 8) were men. The target lesion was in the superficial femoral artery in 82% (n = 9) of the patients. Mean stenosis severity was 87% ± 10% and mean lesion length was 39 ± 31 mm. Procedural success was observed in all patients with no device related complications. Mean post-atherectomy stenosis was 18% ± 15%. Almost all excised tissue consisted of intimal plaque (94%). At 30 days, significant improvements in Rutherford class, VascuQoL scores and ABI were observed, 0.9 ± 0.8 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7 (p = 0.01), 4.9 ± 1.9 vs. 3.6 ± 1.5 (p = 0.03) and 1.04 ± 0.19 vs. 0.80 ± 0.19 (p < 0.01) respectively. At 6 months, there were significant improvements in Rutherford class (1.0 ± 1.0 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.01) and ABI (0.93 ± 0.19 versus 0.80 ± 0.19, p = 0.02) but not in VascuQoL scores (3.7 ± 1.4 versus 3.6 ± 1.5, p = 0.48). Target lesion revascularization occurred in 18% (n = 2) of the patients. Conclusion: OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural success, no device related complications and encouraging results up to 6 months. Histological analysis suggested little injury to the media and adventitia. Larger studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of this approach. - Highlights: • OCT- guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal and preserving the tunica media and adventitia. • OCT guided atherectomy resulted in high procedural

  6. Developing an automated database for monitoring ultrasound- and computed tomography-guided procedure complications and diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Jones, Lisa P; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W; Kolansky, Ana S; Hilton, Susan; Zafar, Hanna M

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring complications and diagnostic yield for image-guided procedures is an important component of maintaining high quality patient care promoted by professional societies in radiology and accreditation organizations such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Joint Commission. These outcome metrics can be used as part of a comprehensive quality assurance/quality improvement program to reduce variation in clinical practice, provide opportunities to engage in practice quality improvement, and contribute to developing national benchmarks and standards. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and successful implementation of an automated web-based software application to monitor procedural outcomes for US- and CT-guided procedures in an academic radiology department. The open source tools PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL were used to extract relevant procedural information from the Radiology Information System (RIS), auto-populate the procedure log database, and develop a user interface that generates real-time reports of complication rates and diagnostic yield by site and by operator. Utilizing structured radiology report templates resulted in significantly improved accuracy of information auto-populated from radiology reports, as well as greater compliance with manual data entry. An automated web-based procedure log database is an effective tool to reliably track complication rates and diagnostic yield for US- and CT-guided procedures performed in a radiology department.

  7. Porphyrin-based Nanostructure-Dependent Photodynamic and Photothermal Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng S.

    This thesis presents the investigation of nanostructure-dependent phototherapy. We reviewed the liposomal structures for delivery of photosensitizers, and introduced a novel class of phototransducing liposomes called "porphysomes". Porphysomes are self-assembled from high packing density of pyropheophorbide alpha-conjugated phospholipids, resulting in extreme self-quenching of porphyrin fluorescence and comparable optical absorption to gold nanoparticles for high photothermal efficiency. We demonstrated this self-assembly of porphyrin-lipid conjugates converts a singlet oxygen generating mechanism (photodynamic therapy PDT activity) of porphyrin to photothermal mechanism (photothermal therapy PTT activity). The efficacy of porphysome-enhanced PTT was then evaluated on two pre-clinical animal models. We validated porphysome-enabled focal PTT to treat orthotopic prostate cancer using MRI-guided focal laser placement to closely mimic the current clinic procedure. Furthermore, porphysome-enabled fluorescence-guided transbronchial PTT of lung cancer was demonstrated in rabbit orthotopic lung cancer models, which led to the development of an ultra-minimally invasive therapy for early-stage peripheral lung cancer. On the other hand, the nanostructure-mediated conversion of PDT to PTT can be switched back by nanoparticle dissociation. By incorporating folate-conjugated phospholipids into the formulation, porphysomes were internalized into cells rapidly via folate receptor-mediated endocytosis and resulted in efficient disruption of nanostructures, which turned back on the photodynamic activity of densely packed porphyrins, making a closed loop of conversion between PDT and PTT. The multimodal imaging and therapeutic features of porphysome make it ideal for future personalized cancer treatments.

  8. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  9. Malignant pleural mesothelioma segmentation for photodynamic therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahim, Wael; Mestiri, Makram; Betrouni, Nacim; Hamrouni, Kamel

    2018-04-01

    Medical imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) combined with computer-aided diagnostic processing have already become important part of clinical routine specially for pleural diseases. The segmentation of the thoracic cavity represents an extremely important task in medical imaging for different reasons. Multiple features can be extracted by analyzing the thoracic cavity space and these features are signs of pleural diseases including the malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) which is the main focus of our research. This paper presents a method that detects the MPM in the thoracic cavity and plans the photodynamic therapy in the preoperative phase. This is achieved by using a texture analysis of the MPM region combined with a thoracic cavity segmentation method. The algorithm to segment the thoracic cavity consists of multiple stages. First, the rib cage structure is segmented using various image processing techniques. We used the segmented rib cage to detect feature points which represent the thoracic cavity boundaries. Next, the proposed method segments the structures of the inner thoracic cage and fits 2D closed curves to the detected pleural cavity features in each slice. The missing bone structures are interpolated using a prior knowledge from manual segmentation performed by an expert. Next, the tumor region is segmented inside the thoracic cavity using a texture analysis approach. Finally, the contact surface between the tumor region and the thoracic cavity curves is reconstructed in order to plan the photodynamic therapy. Using the adjusted output of the thoracic cavity segmentation method and the MPM segmentation method, we evaluated the contact surface generated from these two steps by comparing it to the ground truth. For this evaluation, we used 10 CT scans with pathologically confirmed MPM at stages 1 and 2. We obtained a high similarity rate between the manually planned surface and our proposed method. The average value of Jaccard index

  10. Biophysical aspects of photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzeniene, Asta; Nielsen, Kristian Pagh; Moan, Johan

    2006-01-01

    Over the last three decades photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed to a useful clinical tool, a viable alternative in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Several disciplines have contributed to this development: chemistry in the development of new photosensitizing agents, biology in the elucidation of cellular processes involved in PDT, pharmacology and physiology in identifying the mechanisms of distribution of photosensitizers in an organism, and, last but not least, physics in the development of better light sources, dosimetric concepts and construction of imaging devices, optical sensors and spectroscopic methods for determining sensitizer concentrations in different tissues. Physics and biophysics have also helped to focus on the role of pH for sensitizer accumulation, dose rate effects, oxygen depletion, temperature, and optical penetration of light of different wavelengths into various types of tissue. These are all important parameters for optimally effective PDT. The present review will give a brief, physically based, overview of PDT and then discuss some of the main biophysical aspects of this therapeutic modality.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjehpour, Masoud; Julius, Clark E.; Hartman, Donald L.

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy was used to treat 111 lesions in 27 cases with squamous and basal cell carcinoma. There were 82 squamous cell carcinomas and 29 basal cell carcinomas. Photofrin was administered intravenously at either 1.0 mg/kg or 0.75 mg/kg. An argon/dye laser was used to deliver 630 nm light to the lesion superficially at either 215 J/cm2 or 240 J/cm2. In some cases the laser light was delivered both superficially and interstitially. The laser light was delivered two to four days after the Photofrin injection. There were 105 complete responses and 5 partial responses. One patient was lost to follow-up. Among partial responses were basal cell carcinoma on the tip of the nose and morphea basal cell carcinoma of the left cheek. Another partial response occurred in a basal cell carcinoma patient where insufficient margins were treated due to the proximity to the eye. When 0.75 mg/kg drug dose was used, the selectivity of tumor necrosis was improved. Decreased period of skin photosensitivity was documented in some cases.

  12. Dye Sensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold S. Freeman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photofrin® was first approved in the 1990s as a sensitizer for use in treating cancer via photodynamic therapy (PDT. Since then a wide variety of dye sensitizers have been developed and a few have been approved for PDT treatment of skin and organ cancers and skin diseases such as acne vulgaris. Porphyrinoid derivatives and precursors have been the most successful in producing requisite singlet oxygen, with Photofrin® still remaining the most efficient sensitizer (quantum yield = 0.89 and having broad food and drug administration (FDA approval for treatment of multiple cancer types. Other porphyrinoid compounds that have received approval from US FDA and regulatory authorities in other countries include benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA, meta-tetra(hydroxyphenylchlorin (m-THPC, N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6, and precursors to endogenous protoporphyrin IX (PpIX: 1,5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, methyl aminolevulinate (MAL, hexaminolevulinate (HAL. Although no non-porphyrin sensitizer has been approved for PDT applications, a small number of anthraquinone, phenothiazine, xanthene, cyanine, and curcuminoid sensitizers are under consideration and some are being evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on the nature of PDT, dye sensitizers that have been approved for use in PDT, and compounds that have entered or completed clinical trials as PDT sensitizers.

  13. Setting ventilation parameters guided by electrical impedance tomography in an animal trial of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplik, Michael; Biener, Ingeborg; Leonhardt, Steffen; Rossaint, Rolf

    2014-03-01

    Since mechanical ventilation can cause harm to lung tissue it should be as protective as possible. Whereas numerous options exist to set ventilator parameters, an adequate monitoring is lacking up to date. The Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) provides a non-invasive visualization of ventilation which is relatively easy to apply and commercially available. Although there are a number of published measures and parameters derived from EIT, it is not clear how to use EIT to improve clinical outcome of e.g. patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe disease with a high mortality rate. On the one hand, parameters should be easy to obtain, on the other hand clinical algorithms should consider them to optimize ventilator settings. The so called Global inhomogeneity (GI) index bases on the fact that ARDS is characterized by an inhomogeneous injury pattern. By applying positive endexpiratory pressures (PEEP), homogeneity should be attained. In this study, ARDS was induced by a double hit procedure in six pigs. They were randomly assigned to either the EIT or the control group. Whereas in the control group the ARDS network table was used to set the PEEP according to the current inspiratory oxygen fraction, in the EIT group the GI index was calculated during a decremental PEEP trial. PEEP was kept when GI index was lowest. Interestingly, PEEP was significantly higher in the EIT group. Additionally, two of these animals died ahead of the schedule. Obviously, not only homogeneity of ventilation distribution matters but also limitation of over-distension.

  14. Absolute electrical impedance tomography (aEIT) guided ventilation therapy in critical care patients: simulations and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaï, Mouloud A; Mahfouf, Mahdi; Mohamad-Samuri, Suzani; Panoutsos, George; Brown, Brian H; Mills, Gary H

    2010-05-01

    Thoracic electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive, radiation-free monitoring technique whose aim is to reconstruct a cross-sectional image of the internal spatial distribution of conductivity from electrical measurements made by injecting small alternating currents via an electrode array placed on the surface of the thorax. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the fundamentals of EIT and demonstrate the principles of mechanical ventilation, lung recruitment, and EIT imaging on a comprehensive physiological model, which combines a model of respiratory mechanics, a model of the human lung absolute resistivity as a function of air content, and a 2-D finite-element mesh of the thorax to simulate EIT image reconstruction during mechanical ventilation. The overall model gives a good understanding of respiratory physiology and EIT monitoring techniques in mechanically ventilated patients. The model proposed here was able to reproduce consistent images of ventilation distribution in simulated acutely injured and collapsed lung conditions. A new advisory system architecture integrating a previously developed data-driven physiological model for continuous and noninvasive predictions of blood gas parameters with the regional lung function data/information generated from absolute EIT (aEIT) is proposed for monitoring and ventilator therapy management of critical care patients.

  15. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  16. Non-real-time computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol injection therapy for heapocellular carcinoma undetectable by ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazushige; Ohkawara, Tohru; Minami, Masahito; Sawa, Yoshihiko; Morinaga, Osamu; Kohli, Yoshihiro; Ohkawara, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of non-real-time CT-guided percutaneous ethanol injection therapy (PEIT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, 37 lesions) untreatable by ultrasonography-guided (US)-PEIT. The HCC lesion was localized on the lipiodol CT image with a graduated grid system. We advanced a 21 G or 22 G needle in a stepwise fashion with intermittent localization scans using a tandem method to position the tip of the needle in the lesion. Ethanol containing contrast medium was injected with monitoring scans obtained after incremental volumes of injection, until perfusion of the lesion was judged to be complete. A total of 44 CT-PEIT procedures were performed. The average number of needle passes from the skin to the liver in each CT-PEIT procedure was 2.3, the average amount of ethanol injected was 14.4 ml, and the average time required was 49.3 minutes. Complete perfusion of the lesion by ethanol on monitoring CT images was achieved in all lesions with only a single or double CT-PEIT procedure without severe complication. Local recurrence was detected only in 5 lesions. At present, it is more time-consuming to perform CT-PEIT than US-PEIT because conventional CT guidance is not real-time imaging. However, it is expected that this limitation of CT-PEIT will be overcome in the near future with the introduction of CT fluoroscopy. In conclusion, CT-PEIT should prove to be a feasible, acceptable treatment for challenging cases of HCC undetectable by US. (author)

  17. In vivo assessment of the gastric mucosal tolerance dose after single fraction, small volume irradiation of liver malignancies by computed tomography-guided, high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Pech, Maciej; Boehmig, Michael; Ruehl, Ricarda; Peters, Nils; Wieners, Gero; Steinberg, Johannes; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter; Ricke, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance dose of gastric mucosa for single-fraction computed tomography (CT)-guided, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 patients treated by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy of liver malignancies in segments II and/or III were included. Dose planning was performed upon a three-dimensional CT data set acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. All patients received gastric protection post-treatment. For further analysis, the contours of the gastric wall were defined in every CT slice using Brachyvision Software. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for each treatment and correlated with clinical data derived from questionnaires assessing Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). All patients presenting symptoms of upper GI toxicity were examined endoscopically. Results: Summarizing all patients the minimum dose applied to 1 ml of the gastric wall (D 1ml ) ranged from 6.3 to 34.2 Gy; median, 14.3 Gy. Toxicity was present in 18 patients (55%). We found nausea in 16 (69%), emesis in 9 (27%), cramping in 13 (39%), weight loss in 12 (36%), gastritis in 4 (12%), and ulceration in 5 patients (15%). We found a threshold dose D 1ml of 11 Gy for general gastric toxicity and 15.5 Gy for gastric ulceration verified by an univariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: For a single fraction, small volume irradiation we found in the upper abdomen a threshold dose D 1ml of 15.5 Gy for the clinical endpoint ulceration of the gastric mucosa. This in vivo assessment is in accordance with previously published tolerance data

  18. Determinants of Local Progression After Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Unresectable Lung Tumors: 9-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Tomohisa; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Hamamoto, Shinichi; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Miki, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the local control rate and contributing factors to local progression after computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for unresectable lung tumor. This study included 138 lung tumors in 72 patients (56 men and 16 women; age 70.0 ± 11.6 years (range 31-94); mean tumor size 2.1 ± 1.2 cm [range 0.2-9]) who underwent lung RFA between June 2000 and May 2009. Mean follow-up periods for patients and tumors were 14 and 12 months, respectively. The local progression-free rate and survival rate were calculated to determine the contributing factors to local progression. During follow-up, 44 of 138 (32%) lung tumors showed local progression. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall local control rates were 61, 57, 57, and 38%, respectively. The risk factors for local progression were age (≥70 years), tumor size (≥2 cm), sex (male), and no achievement of roll-off during RFA (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size ≥2 cm as the only independent factor for local progression (P = 0.003). For tumors <2 cm, 17 of 68 (25%) showed local progression, and the 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall local control rates were 77, 73, and 73%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified that age ≥70 years was an independent determinant of local progression for tumors <2 cm in diameter (P = 0.011). The present study showed that 32% of lung tumors developed local progression after CT-guided RFA. The significant risk factor for local progression after RFA for lung tumors was tumor size ≥2 cm.

  19. Imaging regional variation of cellular proliferation in gliomas using 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]fluorothymidine positron-emission tomography: an image-guided biopsy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, S.J.; Fryer, T.D.; Cleij, M.C.; Dean, A.F.; Joseph, J.; Salvador, R.; Wang, D.D.; Hutchinson, P.J.; Clark, J.C.; Burnet, N.G.; Pickard, J.D.; Aigbirhio, F.I.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare regional variations in uptake of 3'-deoxy-3'- [ 18 F]-fluorothymidine (FLT) images using positron-emission tomography (PET) with measures of cellular proliferation from biopsy specimens obtained by image-guided brain biopsies. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with a supratentorial glioma that required an image-guided brain biopsy were imaged preoperatively with dynamic PET after the administration of FLT. Maps of FLT irreversible uptake rate (K i ) and standardized uptake value (SUV) were calculated. These maps were co-registered to a gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) sequence that was used for biopsy guidance, and the mean and maximum K i and SUV determined for each biopsy site. These values were correlated with the MIB-1 labelling index (a tissue marker of proliferation) from these biopsy sites. Results: A total of 57 biopsy sites were studied. Although all measures correlated with MIB-1 labelling index, K i max provided the best correlation (Pearson coefficient, r = 0.68; p i mean (±SD) was significantly higher than in normal tissue (3.3 ± 1.7 x 10 -3 ml plasma /min/ml tissue versus 1.2 ± 0.7 x 10 -3 ml plasma /min/ml tissue ; p = 0.001). High-grade gliomas showed heterogeneous uptake with a mean K i of 7.7 ± 4 x 10 -3 ml plasma /min/ml tissue . A threshold K i mean of 1.8 x 10 -3 differentiates between normal tissue and tumour (sensitivity 84%, specificity 88%); however, the latter threshold underestimated the extent of tumour in half the cases. SUV closely agreed with K i measurements. Conclusion: FLT PET is a useful marker of cellular proliferation that correlates with regional variation in cellular proliferation; however, it is unable to identify the margin of gliomas

  20. Immediate and intermediate-term results of optical coherence tomography guided atherectomy in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease: Initial results from the VISION trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Ian; Paixao, Andre R M; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Lendel, Vasili; Rodriguez-Araujo, Gerardo; Rollefson, William A; Mego, David M; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    Long-term patency rates for percutaneous peripheral arterial interventions are suboptimal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) guided atherectomy may yield superior patency by optimizing plaque removal while preserving the tunica media and adventitia. The VISION study is a multicenter prospective study of patients with peripheral arterial disease undergoing OCT guided atherectomy with the Pantheris™ device. In 11 patients enrolled in a single center, we report procedural and clinical outcomes, at 30days and 6months. The mean age was 63±11years and 73% (n=8) were men. The target lesion was in the superficial femoral artery in 82% (n=9) of the patients. Mean stenosis severity was 87%±10% and mean lesion length was 39±31mm. Procedural success was observed in all patients with no device related complications. Mean post-atherectomy stenosis was 18%±15%. Almost all excised tissue consisted of intimal plaque (94%). At 30days, significant improvements in Rutherford class, VascuQoL scores and ABI were observed, 0.9±0.8 vs. 3.1±0.7 (p=0.01), 4.9±1.9 vs. 3.6±1.5 (p=0.03) and 1.04±0.19 vs. 0.80±0.19 (patherectomy resulted in high procedural success, no device related complications and encouraging results up to 6months. Histological analysis suggested little injury to the media and adventitia. Larger studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The value of ultrasound with ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy compared to computed tomography in the detection of regional metastases in the clinically negative neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takes, Robert P.; Righi, Paul; Meeuwis, Cees A.; Manni, Johannes J.; Knegt, Paul; Marres, Henri A.M.; Spoelstra, Hubert A.A.; Boer, Maarten F. de; Mey, Andel G.L. van der; Bruaset, I.; Ball, Valerie; Weisberger, Edward; Radpour, Shokri; Kruyt, Rene H.; Joosten, Frank B.M.; Lameris, Johan S.; Oostayen, Jacques A. van; Kopecky, Kenyon; Caldemeyer, Karen; Henzen-Logmans, Sonja C.; Wiersma-van Tilburg, J.M.; Bosman, Fred T.; Krieken, J. Han J.M. van; Hermans, Jo; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck oncologists have not reached consensus regarding the role of contemporary imaging techniques in the evaluation of the clinically negative neck in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The purpose of the present study was to compare the accuracy of ultrasound with guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (UGFNAB) and computed tomography (CT) in detecting lymph node metastasis in the clinically negative neck. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four neck sides of patients with HNSCC were examined preoperatively by ultrasound/UGFNAB and CT at one of five participating tertiary care medical centers. The findings were correlated with the results of histopathologic examination of the neck specimen. Results: Ultrasound with guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy was characterized by a sensitivity of 48%, specificity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 79%. Three cases had nondiagnostic aspirations using UGFNAB and were excluded. CT demonstrated a sensitivity of 54%, specificity of 92%, and overall accuracy of 77%. UGFNAB detected two additional metastases not visualized on CT, whereas CT detected no metastases not seen on UGFNAB. The results of UGFNAB were similar between the participating centers. Conclusions: Approximately one half of the clinically occult nodal metastases in our patient group were identified by both CT and UGFNAB. Overall, UGFNAB and CT demonstrated comparable accuracy. The sensitivity of CT was slightly better than UGFNAB, but the latter remained characterized by a superior specificity. The results of CT and UGFNAB did not appear to be supplementary. The choice of imaging modality for staging of the clinically negative neck depends on tumor site, T-stage, and experience and preference of the head and neck oncologist. If CT is required for staging of the primary tumor, additional staging of the neck by UGFNAB does not provide significant additional value

  2. Feasibility of computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy in producing state-of-the-art clinical management in Chinese lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Yang, Jin-Ji; Fang, Liang-Yi; Huang, Min-Min; Yan, Hong-Hong; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Xu, Chong-Rui; Wu, Yi-Long

    2014-03-01

    A satisfactory biopsy determines the state-of-the-art management of lung cancer in this era of personalized medicine. This study aimed to investigate the suitability and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided core needle biopsy in clinical management. A cohort of 353 patients with clinically suspected lung cancer was enrolled in the study. Patient factors and biopsy variables were recorded. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement were detected in tumor specimens. Adequacy of biopsic obtainment for clinical trial screening and tissue bank establishment were reviewed. Overall diagnostic accuracy of malignancy achieved 98.5%. The median biopsy time of the cohort was 20 minutes. In patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 99.3% (287/289) were diagnosed as specific histologic subtypes, and two patients (0.7%) were determined as NSCLC not otherwise specified (NOS). EGFR mutations were analyzed in 81.7% (236/289) of patients with NSCLC, and 98.7% (233/236) showed conclusive results. EML4-ALK gene fusion was tested in 43.9% (127/289) of NSCLC patients, and 98.4% (125/127) showed conclusive results: 6.4% (8/125) of those had gene fusion. Ninety-six NSCLC patients participated in clinical trial screening and provided mandatory tumor slides for molecular profiling. Pathological evaluation was fulfilled in 90 patients (93.8%); 99.4% (320/322) of patients with malignancy provided extra tissue for the establishment of a tumor bank. CT-guided core needle biopsy provided optimal clinical management in this era of translational medicine. The biopsic modality should be prioritized in selected lung cancer patients.

  3. Early Chest Computed Tomography Scan to Assist Diagnosis and Guide Treatment Decision for Suspected Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Yann-Erick; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Tubach, Florence; Brun, Anne-Laure; Rammaert, Blandine; Hausfater, Pierre; Naccache, Jean-Marc; Ray, Patrick; Choquet, Christophe; Carette, Marie-France; Mayaud, Charles; Leport, Catherine; Duval, Xavier

    2015-10-15

    Clinical decision making relative to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis is difficult. Chest radiograph is key in establishing parenchymal lung involvement. However, radiologic performance may lead to misdiagnosis, rendering questionable the use of chest computed tomography (CT) scan in patients with clinically suspected CAP. To assess whether early multidetector chest CT scan affects diagnosis and management of patients visiting the emergency department with suspected CAP. A total of 319 prospectively enrolled patients with clinically suspected CAP underwent multidetector chest CT scan within 4 hours. CAP diagnosis probability (definite, probable, possible, or excluded) and therapeutic plans (antibiotic initiation/discontinuation, hospitalization/discharge) were established by emergency physicians before and after CT scan results. The adjudication committee established the final CAP classification on Day 28. Chest radiograph revealed a parenchymal infiltrate in 188 patients. CAP was initially classified as definite in 143 patients (44.8%), probable or possible in 172 (53.8%), and excluded in 4 (1.2%). CT scan revealed a parenchymal infiltrate in 40 (33%) of the patients without infiltrate on chest radiograph and excluded CAP in 56 (29.8%) of the 188 with parenchymal infiltrate on radiograph. CT scan modified classification in 187 (58.6%; 95% confidence interval, 53.2-64.0), leading to 50.8% definite CAP and 28.8% excluded CAP, and 80% of modifications were in accordance with adjudication committee classification. Because of CT scan, antibiotics were initiated in 51 (16%) and discontinued in 29 (9%), and hospitalization was decided in 22 and discharge in 23. In CAP-suspected patients visiting the emergency unit, early CT scan findings complementary to chest radiograph markedly affect both diagnosis and clinical management. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01574066).

  4. Ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of invasive breast carcinoma: Does tumour total haemoglobin concentration contribute to the prediction of axillary lymph node status?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qingli, E-mail: qinglizhu@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Xiao, Mengsu, E-mail: xiaomengsu_2000@sina.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); You, Shanshan, E-mail: shanshan_0531@sina.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zhang.jing1029@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Jiang, Yuxin, E-mail: yuxinjiangxh@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Lai, Xingjian, E-mail: lxjpumch@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Dai, Qing, E-mail: qingdai_2000@yahoo.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Shuaifuyuan 1, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To prospectively study the ultrasound-guided near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) findings of the total haemoglobin concentration (THC) detected in invasive breast carcinomas and its contribution to the prediction of axillary lymph node (LN) status. Methods: A total of 195 invasive breast carcinomas were prospectively studied with DOT before surgery. Lumpectomy or mastectomy with full axillary nodal dissection was performed. Tumour size and THC level were correlated with LN status by a logistic regression analysis. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients (63.59%) was LN(-) and 71 (36.41%) was LN(+). The average THC was significantly higher in the LN(+) group than in the LN(-) group (252.94 {+-} 69.19 {mu}mol/L versus 203.86 {+-} 83.13 {mu}mol/L, P = 0.01). A multivariate analysis showed an independent relationship between the probability of axillary metastasis, elevated THC level (P = 0.01), and tumour size (P = 0.001). The odds ratio with THC {>=} 140 {mu}mol/L was 13.651 (1.781-104.560), whereas that of tumour size with a 1 cm increment was only 1.777 (1.283-2.246). Conclusions: The THC level and the tumour size are independent and preoperative predictors of axillary nodal status; these variables may improve the diagnosis of patients with lymph node metastasis.

  5. Comparative Investigation of Guided Fuzzy Clustering and Mean Shift Clustering for Edge Detection in Electrical Resistivity Tomography Images of Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Wil; Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jon; Bai, Li

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical surveying using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used as a rapid non-intrusive method to investigate mineral deposits [1]. One of the key challenges with this approach is to find a robust automated method to assess and characterise deposits on the basis of an ERT image. Recent research applying edge detection techniques has yielded a framework that can successfully locate geological interfaces in ERT images using a minimal assumption data clustering technique, the guided fuzzy clustering method (gfcm) [2]. Non-parametric clustering techniques are statistically grounded methods of image segmentation that do not require any assumptions about the distribution of data under investigation. This study is a comparison of two such methods to assess geological structure based on the resistivity images. In addition to gfcm, a method called mean-shift clustering [3] is investigated with comparisons directed at accuracy, computational expense, and degree of user interaction. Neither approach requires the number of clusters as input (a common parameter and often impractical), rather they are based on a similar theory that data can be clustered based on peaks in the probability density function (pdf) of the data. Each local maximum in these functions represents the modal value of a particular population corresponding to a cluster and as such the data are assigned based on their relationships to these model values. The two methods differ in that gfcm approximates the pdf using kernel density estimation and identifies population means, assigning cluster membership probabilities to each resistivity value in the model based on its distance from the distribution averages. Whereas, in mean-shift clustering, the density function is not calculated, but a gradient ascent method creates a vector that leads each datum towards high density distributions iteratively using weighted kernels to calculate locally dense regions. The only parameter needed in both methods

  6. Portable Intraoperative Computed Tomography Scan in Image-Guided Surgery for Brain High-grade Gliomas: Analysis of Technical Feasibility and Impact on Extent of Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Palmucci, Stefano; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Paratore, Sabrina; Attinà, Giancarlo; Sortino, Giuseppe; Albanese, Vincenzo; Certo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard among image-guided techniques for glioma surgery. Scant data are available on the role of intraoperative computed tomography (i-CT) in high-grade glioma (HGG) surgery. To verify the technical feasibility and usefulness of portable i-CT in image-guided surgical resection of HGGs. This is a retrospective series control analysis of prospectively collected data. Twenty-five patients (Group A) with HGGs underwent surgery using i-CT and 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence. A second cohort of 25 patients (Group B) underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery but without i-CT. We used a portable 8-slice CT scanner and, in both groups, neuronavigation. Extent of tumor resection (ETOR) and pre- and postoperative Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores were measured; the impact of i-CT on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was also analyzed. In 8 patients (32%) in Group A, i-CT revealed residual tumor, and in 4 of them it helped to also resect pathological tissue detached from the main tumor. EOTR in these 8 patients was 97.3% (96%-98.6%). In Group B, residual tumor was found in 6 patients, whose tumor's mean resection was 98% (93.5-99.7). The Student t test did not show statistically significant differences in EOTR in the 2 groups. The KPS score decreased from 67 to 69 after surgery in Group A and from 74 to 77 in Group B (P = .07 according to the Student t test). Groups A and B did not show statistically significant differences in OS and PFS (P = .61 and .46, respectively, by the log-rank test). No statistically significant differences in EOTR, KPS, PFS, and OS were observed in the 2 groups. However, i-CT helped to verify EOTR and to update the neuronavigator with real-time images, as well as to identify and resect pathological tissue in multifocal tumors. i-CT is a feasible and effective alternative to intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Portable i-CT can provide useful

  7. Optical coherence tomography compared with intravascular ultrasound and with angiography to guide coronary stent implantation (ILUMIEN III: OPTIMIZE PCI): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ziad A; Maehara, Akiko; Généreux, Philippe; Shlofmitz, Richard A; Fabbiocchi, Franco; Nazif, Tamim M; Guagliumi, Giulio; Meraj, Perwaiz M; Alfonso, Fernando; Samady, Habib; Akasaka, Takashi; Carlson, Eric B; Leesar, Massoud A; Matsumura, Mitsuaki; Ozan, Melek Ozgu; Mintz, Gary S; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Stone, Gregg W

    2016-11-26

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is most commonly guided by angiography alone. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance has been shown to reduce major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) after PCI, principally by resulting in a larger postprocedure lumen than with angiographic guidance. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides higher resolution imaging than does IVUS, although findings from some studies suggest that it might lead to smaller luminal diameters after stent implantation. We sought to establish whether or not a novel OCT-based stent sizing strategy would result in a minimum stent area similar to or better than that achieved with IVUS guidance and better than that achieved with angiography guidance alone. In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older undergoing PCI from 29 hospitals in eight countries. Eligible patients had one or more target lesions located in a native coronary artery with a visually estimated reference vessel diameter of 2·25-3·50 mm and a length of less than 40 mm. We excluded patients with left main or ostial right coronary artery stenoses, bypass graft stenoses, chronic total occlusions, planned two-stent bifurcations, and in-stent restenosis. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1; with use of an interactive web-based system in block sizes of three, stratified by site) to OCT guidance, IVUS guidance, or angiography-guided stent implantation. We did OCT-guided PCI using a specific protocol to establish stent length, diameter, and expansion according to reference segment external elastic lamina measurements. All patients underwent final OCT imaging (operators in the IVUS and angiography groups were masked to the OCT images). The primary efficacy endpoint was post-PCI minimum stent area, measured by OCT at a masked independent core laboratory at completion of enrolment, in all randomly allocated participants who had primary outcome data. The primary safety endpoint was procedural

  8. Iridium complexes for the application of photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHI Min

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy can destruct tumor cells by singlet oxygen which is generated via a photodynamic reaction of the photosensitizer under a specfic excitation wavelength.Due to the heavy atom effect of metal iridium,iridiumcomplexes are excited by suitable light and then reach their excited triple state through intersystem crossing.The excited iridium complexes transfer energy to oxygen molecules to produce singlet oxygen for photodynamic therapy.

  9. Treating Melanoma Metastases with a Novel Photodynamic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0270 TITLE: Treating Melanoma Metastases with a Novel Photodynamic Approach PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jin Xie...Metastases with a Novel Photodynamic Approach 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Treating Melanoma Metastases with a Novel Photodynamic Approach 5b. GRANT NUMBER...ligand and after systemic injection, home to tumors in the lung. X-ray of relatively low doses can then be applied externally to the lung area to

  10. Photodynamic therapy in treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, O F; Rabinovich, I M; Guseva, A V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elaborate the rationale for the application of photodynamic therapy in complex treatment of patient with severe oral lichen planus. Complex clinical and laboratory examination and treatment was performed in 54 patients divided on 3 groups. Diagnosis of oral lichen planus was based on clinical, histological and immunohistochemical features. Group 1 received standard treatment, in the second group photodynamic therapy was conducted in addition to conventional treatment, patients in the third group received only photodynamic therapy. The study results proved photodynamic therapy to be useful tool in complex treatment of severe oral lichen planus.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for hair removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H. M. Ali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unwanted hair is one of the most common medical problems affecting women of reproductive age inducing a lot of psychological stress and threatening their femininity and self-esteem. Old methods of removing unwanted hair include shaving, waxing, chemical depilation, and electrolysis, all of which have temporary results. However laser-assisted hair removal is the most efficient method of long-term hair removal currently available. It is desirable to develop a reduced cost photodynamic therapy (PDT system whose properties should include high efficiency and low side-effects. Method: Mice skin tissues were used in this study and divided into six groups such as controls, free methylene blue (MB incubation, liposome methylene blue (MB incubation, laser without methylene blue (MB, free methylene blue (MB for 3 and 4 hrs and laser, liposome methylene blue (MB for 3 hrs and laser. Methylene blue (MBwas applied to wax epilated areas. The areas were irradiated with CW He-Ne laser system that emits orange-red light with wavelength 632.8 nm and 10 mW at energy density of 5 J/ cm2 for 10 minutes. The UV-visible absorption spectrum was collected by Cary spectrophotometer. Results: Methylene blue (MB is selectively absorbed by actively growing hair follicles due to its cationic property. Methylene blue (MBuntreated sections showed that hair follicle and sebaceous gland are intact and there is no change due to the laser exposure. Free methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed that He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles, leaving an intact epidermis. Treated section with free methylene blue (MB for 4 hrs showed degeneration and necrosis in hair follicle, leaving an intact epidermis. Liposomal methylene blue (MB sections incubated for 3 hrs showed He:Ne laser induced destruction in hair follicles with intradermal leucocytic infiltration. Conclusions: Low power CW He:Ne laser and methylene blue (MB offered a successful PDT system

  12. Photodynamic therapy for recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Anja; Khan, Muhammad K; Lippert, Burkard M

    2014-06-05

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a benign condition of the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract. It is characterised by recurrent papillomatous lesions and is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Frequent recurrence and rapid papilloma growth are common and in part responsible for the onset of potentially life-threatening symptoms. Most patients afflicted by the condition will require repeated surgical treatments to maintain their airway, and these may result in scarring and voice problems. Photodynamic therapy introduces a light-sensitising agent, which is administered either orally or by injection. This substance (called a photo-sensitiser) is selectively retained in hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue, including papilloma. It is then activated by light of a specific wavelength and may be used as a sole or adjuvant treatment for RRP. To assess the effects of photodynamic therapy in the management of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) in children and adults. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Trials Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; Cambridge Scientific Abstracts; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 27 January 2014. Randomised controlled trials utilising photodynamic therapy as sole or adjuvant therapy in participants of any age with proven RRP versus control intervention. Primary outcome measures were symptom improvement (respiratory distress/dyspnoea and voice quality), quality of life improvement and recurrence-free interval. Secondary outcomes included reduction in the frequency of surgical intervention, reduction in disease volume and adverse effects of treatment.   We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Meta-analysis was not possible and results are presented descriptively. We included one trial with a total of 23

  13. Multimodality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy for image-guided feedback of intraocular injections in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Oscar R.; Terrones, Benjamin D.; Leeburg, Kelsey C.; Mehanathan, Sankarathi B.; Levine, Edward M.; Tao, Yuankai K.

    2018-02-01

    Rodent models are robust tools for understanding human retinal disease and function because of their similarities with human physiology and anatomy and availability of genetic mutants. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been well-established for ophthalmic imaging in rodents and enables depth-resolved visualization of structures and image-based surrogate biomarkers of disease. Similarly, fluorescence confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO) has demonstrated utility for imaging endogenous and exogenous fluorescence and scattering contrast in the mouse retina. Complementary volumetric scattering and en face fluorescence contrast from OCT and cSLO, respectively, enables cellular-resolution longitudinal imaging of changes in ophthalmic structure and function. We present a non-contact multimodal OCT+cSLO small animal imaging system with extended working distance to the pupil, which enables imaging during and after intraocular injection. While injections are routinely performed in mice to develop novel models of ophthalmic diseases and screen novel therapeutics, the location and volume delivered is not precisely controlled and difficult to reproduce. Animals were imaged using a custom-built OCT engine and scan-head combined with a modified commercial cSLO scan-head. Post-injection imaging showed structural changes associated with retinal puncture, including the injection track, a retinal elevation, and detachment of the posterior hyaloid. When combined with imagesegmentation, we believe OCT can be used to precisely identify injection locations and quantify injection volumes. Fluorescence cSLO can provide complementary contrast for either fluorescently labeled compounds or transgenic cells for improved specificity. Our non-contact OCT+cSLO system is uniquely-suited for concurrent imaging with intraocular injections, which may be used for real-time image-guided injections.

  14. High and intermediate risk prostate cancer treated with three-dimensional computed tomography-guided brachytherapy: 2-8-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutrouvelis, Panos G.; Gillenwater, Jay; Lailas, Niko; Hendricks, Fred; Katz, Stuart; Sehn, James; Gil-Montero, Guillermo; Khawand, Nabil

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To report post-brachytherapy results in high and intermediate risk patients of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and materials: From June 1994 to June 2000, 356 consecutive high and intermediate risk patients were treated with three-dimensional computed tomography-guided stereotactic pararectal brachytherapy. The age was 42-90 years (median, 68 years), the initial prostate volume was 14-180 cm 3 (median, 59 cm 3 ), and initial PSA was 1.7-143 ng/ml (median, 10.5 ng/ml). Three hundred forty-eight patients were available for follow-up for 2 - 8 years (median, 4.5 years). Two hundred eighty patients had one or more high risk factors (PSA >20 ng/ml, Gleason>7, Stage T2b, T3a, or T3b). Sixty-eight patients had only one intermediate risk factor (PSA 10-20 ng/ml or Gleason=7). Patients with both intermediate risks were considered high risk. The high-risk group was further stratified into subgroups with similar risk profile. A dose of 144 Gy with 125 I or 120 Gy with 103 Pd was achieved in 90-100% of the target. Thirty (30) patients (9%) had prior transurethral resection and 229 (64%) were treated with 3 months neoadjuvant androgen ablation. Results: Biochemical disease-free survival was 92% of 280 high risk patients and 96% of 68 intermediate risk patients. Seven patients (2%) required catheterization during the first year for urinary retention, nine patients (3%) required TUR 1-3 years post-implant, three patients (1%) developed grade 1 or 2 incontinence after a second TUR, and four patients (1%) developed grade 3 rectal complications. Conclusion: This method produces a high level of biochemical control 2-8 years (median 4.5 years). Morbidity is acceptable regardless of risk profile or initial prostate volume

  15. Dosimetric Advantages of Four-Dimensional Adaptive Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors Using Online Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsolia, Asif; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Kestin, Larry L.; Grills, Inga S.; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares multiple planning techniques designed to improve accuracy while allowing reduced planning target volume (PTV) margins though image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Free-breathing planning and 4D-CBCT scans were obtained in 8 patients with lung tumors. Four plans were generated for each patient: 3D-conformal, 4D-union, 4D-offline adaptive with a single correction (offline ART), and 4D-online adaptive with daily correction (online ART). For the 4D-union plan, the union of gross tumor volumes from all phases of the 4D-CBCT was created with a 5-mm expansion applied for setup uncertainty. For offline and online ART, the gross tumor volume was delineated at the mean position of tumor motion from the 4D-CBCT. The PTV margins were calculated from the random components of tumor motion and setup uncertainty. Results: Adaptive IGRT techniques provided better PTV coverage with less irradiated normal tissues. Compared with 3D plans, mean relative decreases in PTV volumes were 15%, 39%, and 44% using 4D-union, offline ART, and online ART planning techniques, respectively. This resulted in mean lung volume receiving ≥ 20Gy (V20) relative decreases of 21%, 23%, and 31% and mean lung dose relative decreases of 16%, 26%, and 31% for the 4D-union, 4D-offline ART, and 4D-online ART, respectively. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using CBCT is feasible for the treatment of patients with lung tumors and significantly decreases PTV volume and dose to normal tissues, allowing for the possibility of dose escalation. All analyzed 4D planning strategies resulted in improvements over 3D plans, with 4D-online ART appearing optimal

  16. Photodynamic therapy of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; Leite, Marieli F. M.; Trujillo, Jose R.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors, especially in Gynecology. The photodynamic reaction is based on the production of reactive oxygen species after the activation of a photosensitizer. Advantages of the PDT in comparison to the surgical resection are: ambulatory treatment and tissue recovery highly satisfactory, through a non-invasive procedure. The cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades I and II presents potential indications for PDT. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PDT for the diagnostics and treatment of CIN I and II. The equipment and the photosensitizer are produced in Brazil with a representative low cost. It is possible to visualize the fluorescence of the cervix and to treat the lesions, without side effects. The proposed clinical protocol shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  17. INTRAOPERATIVE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR METASTATIC PERITONEAL TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Suleimanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to the cytoreductive treatment of malignant tumors of the abdominal organs. The actuality of the issue is determined both by increase of the incidence of abdominal cancer in Russia and in majority of developed countries and by high rate diagnosis on late stages of disease. The methods of treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis, based on possible effects on the secondary peritoneal tumors after surgical cytoreduction to reduce the risk of local recurrence and disease progression are described. These methods of additional intraoperative specific antitumor action include intraoperative radiation therapy, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy characterized by differences in difficulty of performance, mechanisms of effect on tumor and healthy tissues, efficiency. Benefits, opportunities and possibilities of application of intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IOPDT for secondary peritoneal tumors are described in details, the results of a number of domestic and foreign clinical studies are shown, the successful application of intraoperative photodynamic therapy in clinical oncology, which allows reducing the risk of secondary tumor lesions of the peritoneum significantly, is demonstrated. Photodynamic therapy – a method with high efficiency and almost no side effects and complications, based on the ability of photosensitizer to accumulate selectively and retain in the high proliferative tissues. The advantages of this type of treatment of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis are a selective effect on the peritoneal carcinomatosis and on visually detected tumor tissue, high efficiency in patients with malignant tumors of the abdominal cavity and pelvis combined with surgical cytoreduction, minimal effect on normal organs and tissues of the patient, well tolerated procedure.

  18. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek Kumar; Jolly Sinha; Neelu Verma; Kamal Nayan; C S Saimbi; Amitandra K Tripathi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is...

  19. Lung tumor reproducibility with active breath control (ABC) in image-guided radiotherapy based on cone-beam computed tomography with two registration methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xin; Zhong Renming; Bai Sen; Xu Qingfeng; Zhao Yaqin; Wang Jin; Jiang Xiaoqin; Shen Yali; Xu Feng; Wei Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the inter- and intrafraction tumor reproducibility with active breath control (ABC) utilizing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and compare validity of registration with two different regions of interest (ROI). Methods and materials: Thirty-one lung tumors in 19 patients received conventional or stereotactic body radiotherapy with ABC. During each treatment, patients had three CBCT scanned before and after online position correction and after treatment. These CBCT images were aligned to the planning CT using the gray scale registration of tumor and bony registration of the thorax, and tumor position uncertainties were then determined. Results: The interfraction systematic and random translation errors in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were 3.6, 4.8, and 2.9 mm; 2.5, 4.5, and 3.5 mm, respectively, with gray scale alignment; 1.9, 4.3, 2.0 mm and 2.5, 4.4, 2.9 mm, respectively, with bony alignment. The interfraction systematic and random rotation errors with gray scale and bony alignment groups ranged from 1.4 o to 3.0 o and 0.8 o to 2.3 o , respectively. The intrafraction systematic and random errors with gray scale registration in LR, SI, AP directions were 0.9, 2.0, 1.8 mm and 1.5, 1.7, 2.9 mm, respectively, for translation; 1.5 o , 0.9 o , 1.0 o and 1.2 o , 2.2 o , 1.8 o , respectively, for rotation. The translational errors in SI direction with bony alignment were significantly larger than that of gray scale (p < 0.05). Conclusions: With CBCT guided online correction the interfraction positioning errors can be markedly reduced. The intrafraction errors were not diminished by the use of ABC. Rotation errors were not very remarkable both inter- and intrafraction. Gray scale alignment of tumor may provide a better registration in SI direction.

  20. Perfusion computed tomography-guided intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke beyond 4.5 hours: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bermejo, Pablo; Calleja, Ana I; Pérez-Fernández, Santiago; Cortijo, Elisa; del Monte, José M; García-Porrero, Miguel; Fe Muñoz, M; Fernández-Herranz, Rosario; Arenillas, Juan F

    2012-01-01

    Extending the therapeutic window of intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke beyond the established 4.5-hour limit is of critical importance in order to increase the proportion of thrombolysed stroke patients. In this setting, the capacity of MRI to select acute stroke patients for reperfusion therapies in delayed time windows has been and is being tested in clinical trials. However, whether the more available and cost-effective perfusion computed tomography (PCT) may be useful to select candidates for delayed intravenous thrombolysis remains largely unexplored. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PCT-guided intravenous thrombolysis beyond 4.5 h after stroke onset. We prospectively studied all consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in our stroke unit between January 2008 and December 2010. Patients treated within 0- 4.5 h were treated according to non-contrast CT (NCCT) criteria. Beyond 4.5 h, patients received intravenous tPA according to PCT criteria, i.e. an infarct core on cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps not exceeding one third of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory and tissue at risk as defined by mean transit time-CBV mismatch greater than 20%. Predetermined primary endpoints were symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation and favorable long-term outcome, while early neurological improvement and MCA recanalization were considered secondary endpoints. Statistical analysis included bivariate comparisons between the two groups for each endpoint and logistic regression models when significance was found in bivariate analyses. This study was approved by our local ethics committee. A total of 245 patients received intravenous thrombolysis. After the groups were matched by baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 172 patients treated at 4.5 h were finally included. Early and late groups were comparable regarding baseline variables; only cardioembolic etiology

  1. Intraoperative photodynamic treatment for high-grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, C.; Reyns, N.; Deleporte, P.; Mordon, S.; Vermandel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor. Its incidence is estimated at 5 to 7 new cases each year for 100 000 inhabitants. Despite reference treatment, including surgery, radiation oncology and chemotherapy, GBM still has a very poor prognosis (median survival of 15 months). Because of a systematic relapse of the tumor, the main challenge is to improve local control. In this context, PhotoDynamic Therapy (PDT) may offer a new treatment modality. GBM recurrence mainly occurs inside the surgical cavity borders. Thus, a new light applicator was designed for delivering light during a PDT procedure on surgical cavity borders after Fluorescence Guided Resection. This device combines an inflatable balloon and a light source. Several experimentations (temperature and impermeability tests, homogeneity of the light distribution and ex-vivo studies) were conducted to characterize the device. An abacus was created to determine illumination time from the balloon volume in order to reach a therapeutic fluence value inside the borders of the surgical cavity. According to our experience, cavity volumes usually observed in the neurosurgery department lead to an acceptable average lighting duration, from 20 to 40 minutes. Thus, extra-time needed for PDT remains suitable with anesthesia constraints. A pilot clinical trial is planned to start in 2017 in our institution. In view of the encouraging results observed in preclinical or clinical, this intraoperative PDT treatment can be easily included in the current standard of care.

  2. pH-Responsive Magnetic Mesoporous Silica-Based Nanoplatform for Synergistic Photodynamic Therapy/Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiang-Long; Jing, Feng; Lin, Ben-Lan; Cui, Sheng; Yu, Ru-Tong; Shen, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Ting-Wei

    2018-05-02

    By overcoming drug resistance and subsequently enhancing the treatment, the combination therapy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and chemotherapy has promising potential for cancer treatment. However, the major challenge is how to establish an advanced nanoplatform that can be efficiently guided to tumor sites and can then stably release both chemotherapy drugs and a photosensitizer simultaneously and precisely. In this study, which considered the possibility and targeting efficiency of a magnetic targeting strategy, a novel Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 (DOX)@HSA(Ce6) nanoplatform was successfully built; this platform could be employed as an efficient synergistic antitumor nanoplatform with magnetic guidance for highly specific targeting and retention. Doxorubicin (DOX) molecules were loaded into mesoporous silica with high loading capability, and the mesoporous channels were blocked by a polydopamine coating. Human serum albumin (HSA) was conjugated to the outer surface to increase the biocompatibility and blood circulation time, as well as to provide a vehicle for loading photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6). The sustained release of DOX under acidic conditions and the PDT induced by red light exerted a synergistic inhibitory effect on glioma cells. Our experiments demonstrated that the pH-responsive Fe 3 O 4 @mSiO 2 (DOX)@HSA(Ce6) nanoplatform was guided to the tumor region by magnetic targeting and that the nanoplatform suppressed glioma tumor growth efficiently, implying that the system is a highly promising photodynamic therapy/chemotherapy combination nanoplatform with synergistic effects for cancer treatment.

  3. The use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of keratoacanthomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Galkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on treatment of keratoacanthomas using photodynamic therapy. The defining characteristic of keratoacanthoma among epithelial tumors is a rapid spontaneous regression in the case of typical keratoacanthoma and long-term persistence, recurrence and common malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma in the case of atypical keratoacanthoma. In recent years, photodynamic therapy which is an effective method of treatment of different types of cancer and pre-cancer diseases of the skin including actinic keratosis, Bowen’s disease, basal cell carcinoma, is increasingly used in clinical practice. There are few data for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of keratoacanthoma. The analysis of the literature shows that using of photodynamic therapy in the set of treatment modalities in patients with keratoacanthoma improves the efficacy and reduces the terms of the therapy. In all investigations except one there was complete tumor regression in 100% patients with keratoacanthoma who underwent photodynamic therapy. In one study complete tumor regression was observed in 66.7% of patients with atypical keratoacanthoma after photodynamic therapy. The follow-up of patients in all analyzed studies accounted for at least 2-3 years. During this time none of the patients had evidence for recurrence. This approach has minimal restrictions for application. Thus, photodynamic therapy may become a therapeutic alternative to surgical treatment of keratoacanthoma with good clinical and cosmetic results.

  4. Photodynamic treatment of Herpes simplex virus infection in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lytle, C.D.; Hester, L.D.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of photodynamic action on in vitro herpes simplex virus infections of CV-1 monkey kidney fibroblasts or human skin fibroblasts were determined using proflavine sulfate and white fluorescent lamps. Photodynamic treatment of confluent cell monolayers prior to virus infection inactivated cell capacity, i.e. the capacity of the treated cells to support subsequent virus growth as measured by plaque formation. The capacity of human cells was more sensitive to inactivation than the capacity of monkey cells when 6 μM proflavine was used. Treated cell monolayers recovered the capacity to support virus plaque formation when virus infection was delayed four days after the treatment. Experiments in which the photodynamically treated monolayers were infected with UV-irradiated virus demonstrated that this treatment induced Weigle reactivation in both types of cells. This reactivation occurred for virus infection just after treatment or 4 days later. A Luria-Latarjet-type experiment was also performed in which cultures infected with unirradiated virus were photodynamically treated at different times after the start of infection. The results showed that for the first several hours of the virus infection the infected cultures were more sensitive to inactivation by photodynamic treatment than cell capacity. By the end of the eclipse period the infected cultures were less sensitive to inactivation than cell capacity. Results from extracellular inactivation of virus growth in monkey cells at 6 μM proflavine indicated that at physiological pH the virus has a sensitivity to photodynamic inactivation similar to that for inactivation of cell capacity. The combined data indicated that photodynamic treatment of the cell before or after virus infection could prevent virus growth. Thus, photodynamic inactivation of infected and uninfected cells may be as important as inactivation of virus particles when considering possible mechanisms in clinical photodynamic therapy for herpes

  5. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  6. Photodynamic dosimetry in the treatment of periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. However, the translation of in vitro work to in vivo clinical efficacy has been difficult due to the number of variables present in any given patient. Parameters such as photosensitizer concentration, duration of light therapy and amount of light delivered to the target tissue all play a role in the dose response of PDT in vivo. In this 121 patient study we kept all parameters the same except for light dose which was delivered at either 150 mW or 220 mW. This clearly demonstrated the clinical benefits of a higher light dose in the treatment of periodontitis.

  7. Phthalocyanines as sensitizers for photodynamic water disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, N.; Slivka, L.; Kaliya, O.; Lukyanets, E.; Negrimovsky, V.; Vorozhtsov, G. [Organic Intermediates and Dyes Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Nedachin, E.; Artemova, T.; Ivanova, L.; Lavrova, D. [A.N. Sysin Research Inst. of Human Ecology and Environmental Health of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    New octapyridiniomethyl-substituted phthalocyanines of Al and Zn have been synthesized. These octacationic complexes are readily soluble in water, show monomeric behavior and sensitize formation of singlet oxygen efficiently. They are of high photodynamic potential in killing both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in contrast to negatively charged sulfonated derivatives, which are substantially less effective, particularly towards coliform bacteria in natural or sewage water. The present study confirms that cationic phthalocyanines represent a class of photosensitizing agents with an efficient antibacterial activity. (orig.)

  8. Photodynamic therapy using aminolevulinic acid (ALA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachor, Ruediger; Reich, Ella D.; Miller, Kurt; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1994-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality for a variety of cancers. Since no ideal photosensitizer is available yet, new photosensitizers are being sought. A new concept of PDT is the use of endogenous photosensitizers. ALA is a metabolite in heme synthesis. It is a precursor of protoporphyrin IX, a potent photosensitizer. After administration of ALA it is transformed by the cells to protoporphyrin IX. The goal of our study was to examine dark toxicity of ALA and its phototoxic potential in two different human cell lines.

  9. Imaging of basal cell carcinoma by high-definition optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boone, M A L M; Norrenberg, S; Jemec, G B E

    2012-01-01

    With the continued development of noninvasive therapies for basal cell carcinoma (BCC) such as photodynamic therapy and immune therapies, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring become increasingly relevant. High-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) is a high-resolution imaging tool, wit......, with micrometre resolution in both transversal and axial directions, enabling visualization of individual cells up to a depth of around 570 μm, and filling the imaging gap between conventional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM)....

  10. Photodynamic therapy in dentistry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Hare; Ozcakir-Tomruk, Ceyda; Tanalp, Jale; Yilmaz, Selçuk

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize recent developments regarding photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the field of dentistry. A review of pertinent literature was carried out in PubMED to determine the current position of PDT applications in dentistry. One hundred thirteen relevant articles were retrieved from PubMED by inserting the keywords "photodynamic therapy", "dentistry", "periodontology", "oral surgery", and "endodontics". It is anticipated that this overview will create a specific picture in the practitioner's mind regarding the current status and use of PDT. In spite of different results and suggestions brought about by different researchers, PDT can be considered as a promising and less invasive technique in dentistry. PDT seems to be an effective tool in the treatment of localized and superficial infections. Within the limitations of the present review, it can be concluded that although PDT cannot replace antimicrobial therapy at its current stage, it may be used as an adjunctive tool for facilitating the treatment of oral infections. Oral infections (such as mucosal and endodontic infections, periodontal diseases, caries, and peri-implantitis) are among the specific targets where PDT can be applied. Further long-term clinical studies are necessary in establishing a more specific place of the technique in the field of dentistry.

  11. Potentiation of the photodynamic action of hypericin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Constance Lay Lay; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Olivo, Malini

    2008-01-01

    Hypericin (HY) is an interesting photosensitizer with dark activity and photodynamic therapy (PDT) effects via p53-independent pathway. In photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder cancer using HY, very high sensitivity and specificity were reported, in comparison with its counterpart, 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA). HY was tested for the detection of human gastric cancer. It was also studied for treating some cancers and age-related macular degeneration and showed some promising findings. Several strategies to enhance the efficacy of HY-PDD and HY-PDT are reviewed. Using fractionated light dosing, fractionated drug dosing, hyperthermia, adjuvants such as oxygen carrier/antiangiogenesis, chemical modifications, and formulation approaches to enhance the PDT effects of HY are topics of this review. Despite cutting-edge technology approach such as preparing transferring-mediated targeting HY liposomes and nanoparticles of HY, such preparations did not always offer the desired enhanced treatment effects. It turns out that simple solutions of HY, especially those prepared without using plasma protein, were more successful in enhancing the delivery of HY for in vitro and in vivo systems. Thus, the HY-PDT with these formulations performed better. It is anticipated that HY-PDD and HY-PDT can be enhanced and optimized with the right combination of light dosimetry and drug dose in an effective formulation containing a suitable adjuvant. Hyperoxygenation and hyperthermia can also be used to further enhance the efficacy of HY-PDT.

  12. Drug Carrier for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Ayane Debele

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a non-invasive combinatorial therapeutic modality using light, photosensitizer (PS, and oxygen used for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. When PSs in cells are exposed to specific wavelengths of light, they are transformed from the singlet ground state (S0 to an excited singlet state (S1–Sn, followed by intersystem crossing to an excited triplet state (T1. The energy transferred from T1 to biological substrates and molecular oxygen, via type I and II reactions, generates reactive oxygen species, (1O2, H2O2, O2*, HO*, which causes cellular damage that leads to tumor cell death through necrosis or apoptosis. The solubility, selectivity, and targeting of photosensitizers are important factors that must be considered in PDT. Nano-formulating PSs with organic and inorganic nanoparticles poses as potential strategy to satisfy the requirements of an ideal PDT system. In this review, we summarize several organic and inorganic PS carriers that have been studied to enhance the efficacy of photodynamic therapy against cancer.

  13. Fighting fish parasites with photodynamically active chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, D-P; Schmidl, J; Hilbig, R; Oberle, M; Wedekind, H; Richter, P

    2016-06-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin) was used in a phototoxic reaction against a number of fish ectoparasites such as Ichtyobodo, Dactylogyrus, Trichodina, and Argulus. Chlorophyllin is applied to the water at concentrations of several micrograms per milliliter for a predefined incubation time, and afterwards, the parasites are exposed to simulated solar radiation. Application in the dark caused only little damage to the parasites; likewise, light exposure without the addition of the photosensitizer was ineffective. In Ichthyobodo, 2 μg/mL proved sufficient with subsequent simulated solar radiation to almost quantitatively kill the parasites, while in Dactylogyrus, a concentration of about 6 μg/mL was necessary. The LD50 value for this parasite was 1.02 μg/mL. Trichodina could be almost completely eliminated at 2 μg/mL. Only in the parasitic crustacean Argulus, no killing could be achieved by a photodynamic reaction using chlorophyllin. Chlorophyllin is non-toxic, biodegradable, and can be produced at low cost. Therefore, we propose that chlorophyllin (or other photodynamic substances) are a possible effective countermeasure against several ectoparasites in ponds and aquaculture since chemical remedies are either forbidden and/or ineffective.

  14. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  15. Enhanced photodynamic efficacy of zinc phthalocyanine by conjugating to heptalysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linsen; Luo, Zhipu; Chen, Zhuo; Chen, Jincan; Zhou, Shanyong; Xu, Peng; Hu, Ping; Wang, Jundong; Chen, Naisheng; Huang, Jinling; Huang, Mingdong

    2012-11-21

    Zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) is a promising photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy, but faces some challenges: ZnPc is insoluble in water and thus requires either special formulation of ZnPc by, e.g., liposome or Cremophor EL, or chemical modification of Pc ring to enhance its bioavailability and photodynamic efficacy. Here, we conjugated monosubstituted ZnPc-COOH with a series of oligolysine moieties with different numbers of lysine residues (ZnPc-(Lys)(n) (n = 1, 3, 5, 7, 9) to improve the water solubility of the ZnPc conjugates. We measured the photosensitizing efficacies and the cellular uptakes of this series of conjugates on a normal and a cancerous cell line. In addition, we developed a sensitive in situ method to distinguish the difference in photodynamic efficacy among conjugates. Our results showed that ZnPc-(Lys)(7) has the highest photodynamic efficacy compared to the other conjugates investigated.

  16. Different light sources in photodynamic therapy for use in photorejuvenation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Kets, V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently emerged as a treatment modality for photorejuvenation of the skin. This study is a preliminary investigation into the effect of different light sources to activate hypericin, a plant-derived photosensitizer...

  17. Photodynamic action of methylene blue: mutagenesis and synergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capella, M.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The associated mutagenesis and the interactions with physical agents in order to potencialize its biological effects are studied. The induction of mutation in bacterias due to photodynamic action of methylene blue is presented as well as the induction of single breaks in bacterial DNA and the relationship between the repair systems, especially the SOS one. The interaction of the photodynamic therapy with low intensity electric current is discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Graphene-based nanovehicles for photodynamic medical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Yan Li,1 Haiqing Dong,1 Yongyong Li,1 Donglu Shi1,2 1Shanghai East Hospital, The Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nano Science (iNANO, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2The Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Graphene and its derivatives such as graphene oxide (GO have been widely explored as promising drug delivery vehicles for improved cancer treatment. In this review, we focus on their applications in photodynamic therapy. The large specific surface area of GO facilitates efficient loading of the photosensitizers and biological molecules via various surface functional groups. By incorporation of targeting ligands or activatable agents responsive to specific biological stimulations, smart nanovehicles are established, enabling tumor-triggering release or tumor-selective accumulation of photosensitizer for effective therapy with minimum side effects. Graphene-based nanosystems have been shown to improve the stability, bioavailability, and photodynamic efficiency of organic photosensitizer molecules. They have also been shown to behave as electron sinks for enhanced visible-light photodynamic activities. Owing to its intrinsic near infrared absorption properties, GO can be designed to combine both photodynamic and photothermal hyperthermia for optimum therapeutic efficiency. Critical issues and future aspects of photodynamic therapy research are addressed in this review. Keywords: graphene, nanovehicle, photodynamic therapy, photosensitizer, hyperthermia

  19. Use of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of bovine subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Lívia Helena; de Souza, José Carlos Pereira; de Lima, Carlos José; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Andreani, Dora Inés Kozusny; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Zângaro, Renato Amaro

    2018-03-01

    Bovine mastitis is a disease that causes a severe drawback in dairy production. Conventional treatments with antibiotic could leave antibiotic residues in the milk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of bovine subclinical mastitis to develop an in vivo therapeutic protocol that could be used in routine farm practice, favoring the early return to production. Forty cows with subclinical mastitis (n = 40) were divided into 4 groups (control, photodynamic therapy - PDT, light irradiation - LED, and photosensitizer - PS). Control group received no treatment, PDT group received application of 1.0 mL of 2.5% toluidine blue photosensitizer followed by LED irradiation at λ = 635 nm, the LED group was treated with LED irradiation alone, and the PS group received only 2.5% toluidine blue dye. LED irradiation was applied to the mammary gland by means of an acrylic light guide coupled to the LED equipment. The PDT and LED groups were irradiated with 200 J/cm 2 at three different positions inside the mammary gland. Milk samples were collected at 0 h, 12 h, 24 h after treatment for microbial identification and total bacterial count. The treatment of the PDT group showed significant difference p bovine mastitis. There was no need to separate the animal from production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  1. Scope of photodynamic therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Sinha, Jolly; Verma, Neelu; Nayan, Kamal; Saimbi, C S; Tripathi, Amitandra K

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease results from inflammation of the supporting structure of the teeth and in response to chronic infection caused by various periodontopathic bacteria. The mechanical removal of this biofilm and adjunctive use of antibacterial disinfectants and antibiotics have been the conventional methods of periodontal therapy. However, the removal of plaque and the reduction in the number of infectious organisms can be impaired in sites with difficult access. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful laser-initiated photochemical reaction, involving the use of a photoactive dye (photosensitizer) activated by light of a specific wavelength in the presence of oxygen. Application of PDT in periodontics such as pocket debridement, gingivitis, and aggressive periodontitis continue to evolve into a mature clinical treatment modality and is considered as a promising novel approach for eradicating pathogenic bacteria in periodontitis.

  2. Photodynamic therapy: the role of paraptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Cho, Won-Jin; Kim, Hyeong-Reh

    2018-02-01

    Apoptosis is a pathway to cell death frequently observed after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Sub-cellular photodamage to mitochondria, lysosomes, the ER, or combinations of these targets, can lead to apoptotic death. We have recently investigated another pathway to cell death after PDT termed `paraptosis'. This is characterized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization, does not involve caspase activation or nuclear fragmentation, requires a brief interval of continued protein synthesis and appears to derive from ER stress. Determinants and further characteristics of PDT-derived paraptosis are explored in the A549 non small-cell lung cancer cell line and in cells derived from head and neck cancer tissues. We provide evidence that ER photodamage and JNK pathway activation are involved in PDT-mediated paraptosis.

  3. Endoscopic and Photodynamic Therapy of Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2016-12-01

    Most patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) have unresectable disease. Endoscopic bile duct drainage is one of the major objectives of palliation of obstructive jaundice. Stent implantation using endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is considered to be the standard technique. Unilateral versus bilateral stenting is associated with different advantages and disadvantages; however, a standard approach is still not defined. As there are various kinds of stents, there is an ongoing discussion on which stent to use in which situation. Palliation of obstructive jaundice can be augmented through the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Studies have shown a prolonged survival for the combinations of PDT and different stent applications as well as combinations of PDT and additional systemic chemotherapy. More well-designed studies are needed to better evaluate and standardize endoscopic treatment of unresectable CCA.

  4. INTRAOPERATIVE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Results of application of a new technology of intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IOFDT in patients with peritoneal mesothelioma developed at P. Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute are presented. The study included 8 patients. 3 patients underwent surgery in various amount: 1 – limited peritonectomy in the volume of tumor foci resection and resection of a large omentum, 1 – limited peritonectomy in the volume of tumor foci resection and atypical resection of the right lobe of the liver, 1 – only resection of the large omentum due to the fact that the tumor was located only in a large omentum and no signs of lesions of the parietal peritoneum was revealed by intraoperative revision. Surgical intervention in these patients was concluded by IOPDT. The remaining 5 patients underwent only IOPDT. After the treatment, two patients underwent additional courses of laparoscopic IOPDT. Of the 8 patients enrolled in the study, 4 died from the underlying disease, 1 from cardiovascular disease with recurrence of the disease, 1 from cardiovascular disease without signs of recurrence, 2 were monitored for 6 months and 146 months (12 years. Thus, in the group of patients with peritoneal mesothelioma, the maximum observation period was 146.44 months, the median survival was 48.4 months, the total specific 1-year survival was 85.7±13.2%, the three-year survival was 68.5±18.6%, the 5-year survival was 45.7 ± 22.4 %. The average life expectancy after treatment of patients with repeated courses of laparoscopic IOPDT was 87 months, without repeated courses – 35.8 months. Thus, life expectancy was higher in patients with repeated courses of laparoscopic IOPDT. Small sample size caused to the rarity of this pathology does not allow for statistically significant conclusions. However, the results of the study indicate the prospects of multi-course intraoperative photodynamic therapy in patients with peritoneal mesothelioma.

  5. Candida albicans biofilm development in vitro for photodynamic therapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Luis Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a phototherapy based on the use of a photo sensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light with resonant wavelength of absorption of the PS and biological systems that can raise awareness, generating reactive oxygen species. Studies show that PDT has a lethal effect on Candida albicans. The biofilm formed by C. albicans is the cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, with a proven resistance to antifungal agents, and the removal of the catheter colonized almost always is necessary. However, few studies in literature report the behavior and response of biofilm organized by C. albicans against PDT. The aims of this study were to develop a methodology for in vitro biofilm formation of C. albicans, evaluate the sensitivity of the biofilm of C. albicans to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using PS as the methylene blue (MB) and hypocrellin B: La +3 (HBL a+3 ) and analyze the biofilm by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS were dissolved in solution of PBS, and the MB had two different concentrations tested in the biofilm: 100μM and 1mM; HBLa +3 only one of 10μM. The irradiation of both dyes with the microorganism was done by two different LEDs, one with red emission at λ = 630nm ± 20nm and the other one blue emission at λ = 460nm ± 30nm. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation of each sample with biofilm and suspension of the microorganism in the yeast form to verify the susceptibility of the front PDT. The yeast showed 100% reduction using both PS, but at different times of irradiation (30s to HBLa +3 and 6 min for the MB at 100μM). When the therapy was applied in biofilm, the MB 100μM did not show any significant reduction, while at concentration of 1mM was reduced by 100% after 6 min of irradiation. The HBLa +3 biofilm group showed a lower reduction in the concentration of 10μM in

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention With Nobori Stent Implantation in Patients With Non-ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (OCTACS) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Maehara, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    (s). A final OCT was performed in case of reintervention. Six-month OCT follow-up was available in 85 patients. Twenty-three (46%) OCT-guided patients had additional postdilation or stenting. The percentage of acutely malapposed struts was substantially lower in the OCT-guided group (3.4% [interquartile range......, 0.3-7.6] versus 7.8% [interquartile range, 2.3-19.4]; Pinterquartile range, 1.2-9.8] versus 9.0% [interquartile range, 5.5-14.5], P

  7. Computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubashov, I.B.

    1985-01-01

    Operating principle is described for the devices of computerized tomography used in medicine for diagnosis of brain diseases. Computerized tomography is considered as a part of computerized diagnosis, as a part of information science. It is shown that computerized tomography is a real existed field of investigations in medicine and industrial production

  8. Progress toward development of photodynamic vaccination against infectious/malignant diseases and photodynamic mosquitocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kwang Poo; Kolli, Bala K.; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Ng, Dennis K. P.; Wong, Clarence T. T.; Manna, Laura; Corso, Raffaele; Shih, Neng-Yao; Elliott, Robert; Jiang, X. P.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Fu, Guo-Liang

    2018-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses photosensitizers (PS) that are excited with light to generate ROS in the presence of oxygen for treating various diseases. PS also has the potential use as photodynamic insecticides (PDI) and for light-inactivation of Leishmania for photodynamic vaccination (PDV). PDT-inactivated Leishmania are non-viable, but remain immunologically competent as whole-cell vaccines against leishmaniasis, and as a universal carrier for delivery of add-on vaccines against other infectious and malignant diseases. We have screened novel PS, including Zn- and Si-phthalocyanines (PC) for differential PDT activities against Leishmania, insect and mammalian cells in vitro to assess their PDI and PDV potential. Here, Zn-PC were conjugated with various functional groups. The conjugates were examined for uptake by cells as a prerequisite for their susceptibility to light-inactivation. PDT sensitivity was found to vary with cell types and PS used. PDI potential of several PS was demonstrated by their mosquito larvicidal PDT activities in vitro. PDT-inactivated Leishmania were stored frozen for PDV in several ongoing studies: [1] Open label trial with 20 sick dogs for immunotherapy of canine leishmaniasis after chemotherapy in Naples, Italy. Clinical follow-up for >3 years indicate that the PDV prolongs their survival; [2] PDV of murine models with a human lung cancer vaccine showed dramatic tumor suppression; [3] Open label trial of multiple PDV via compassionate access to 4 advanced cancer patients showed no clinically adverse effects. Two subjects remain alive. Genetic modifications of Leishmania are underway to further enhance their safety and efficacy for PDV by installation of activable mechanisms for self-destruction and spontaneous light-emission.

  9. Liposomal photosensitizers: potential platforms for anticancer photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Muehlmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy is a well-established and clinically approved treatment for several types of cancer. Antineoplastic photodynamic therapy is based on photosensitizers, i.e., drugs that absorb photons translating light energy into a chemical potential that damages tumor tissues. Despite the encouraging clinical results with the approved photosensitizers available today, the prolonged skin phototoxicity, poor selectivity for diseased tissues, hydrophobic nature, and extended retention in the host organism shown by these drugs have stimulated researchers to develop new formulations for photodynamic therapy. In this context, due to their amphiphilic characteristic (compatibility with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances, liposomes have proven to be suitable carriers for photosensitizers, improving the photophysical properties of the photosensitizers. Moreover, as nanostructured drug delivery systems, liposomes improve the efficiency and safety of antineoplastic photodynamic therapy, mainly by the classical phenomenon of extended permeation and retention. Therefore, the association of photosensitizers with liposomes has been extensively studied. In this review, both current knowledge and future perspectives on liposomal carriers for antineoplastic photodynamic therapy are critically discussed.

  10. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  11. Magnetic resonance tomography-guided interventional procedure for diagnosis of prostate cancer; MRT-gezielte interventionelle Verfahren zur Abklaerung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schernthaner, M.; Helbich, T.H.; Fueger, B.J.; Memarsadeghi, M.; Stiglbauer, A.; Linhart, H.G.; Doan, A.; Pinker, K.; Brader, P. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Division fuer Molekulare und Gender-Bildgebung, Wien (Austria); Margreiter, M. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Univ.-Klinik fuer Urologie, Wien (Austria)

    2011-11-15

    In recent years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly established in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in addition to transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS). The use of T2-weighted imaging allows an exact delineation of the zonal anatomy of the prostate and its surrounding structures. Other MR imaging tools, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging or diffusion-weighted imaging allow an inference of the biochemical characteristics (multiparametric MRI). Prostate cancer, which could only be diagnosed using MR imaging or lesions suspected as being prostate cancer, which are localized in the anterior aspect of the prostate and were missed with repetitive TRUS biopsy, need to undergo MR guided biopsy. Recent studies have shown a good correlation between MR imaging and histopathology of specimens collected by MR-guided biopsy. Improved lesion targeting is therefore possible with MR-guided biopsy. So far data suggest that MR-guided biopsy of the prostate is a promising alternative diagnostic tool to TRUS-guided biopsy. (orig.) [German] Neben dem transrektalen Ultraschall (TRUS) hat sich in den letzten Jahren die MRT als nichtinvasive Methode zur Bildgebung von Prostatatumoren etabliert. Mittels T2-gewichteter Sequenzen ist eine exakte anatomische Darstellung der Prostata und ihrer umliegenden Strukturen moeglich. Andere MRT-Techniken ermoeglichen Rueckschluesse auf das biologische Verhalten des Tumors: dynamische kontrastmittelverstaerkte T1-gewichtete Sequenzen zur Darstellung der Angiogenese, diffusionsgewichtete Aufnahmen zur Beurteilung der Zelldichte und die Spektroskopie zur Bestimmung von Gewebemetaboliten wie Cholin und Kreatin (multiparametrische Bildgebung). Prostatatumoren, die nur mittels MRT nachweisbar sind oder verdaechtige Tumoren, die hauptsaechlich anterior in der Prostata lokalisiert sind und in wiederholten TRUS-gezielten Biopsien verfehlt wurden, benoetigen eine MRT-gezielte Biopsie zur Diagnosesicherung. Die bisherigen

  12. Fullerene C60 and graphene photosensibiles for photodynamic virus inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, I.; Hvorostovsky, A.; Kiselev, V.; Zarubaev, V.; Kiselev, O.; Piotrovsky, L.; Anfimov, P.; Krisko, T.; Muraviova, T.; Rylkov, V.; Starodubzev, A.; Sirotkin, A.; Grishkanich, A.; Kudashev, I.; Kancer, A.; Kustikova, M.; Bykovskaya, E.; Mayurova, A.; Stupnikov, A.; Ruzankina, J.; Afanasyev, M.; Lukyanov, N.; Redka, D.; Paklinov, N.

    2018-02-01

    A solid-phase photosensitizer based on aggregated C60 fullerene and graphene oxide for photodynamic inactivation of pathogens in biological fluids was studied. The most promising technologies of inactivation include the photodynamic effect, which consists in the inactivation of infectious agents by active oxygen forms (including singlet oxygen), formed when light is activated by the photosensitizer introduced into the plasma. Research shows features of solid-phase systems based on graphene and fullerene C60 oxide, which is a combination of an effective inactivating pathogens (for example, influenza viruses) reactive oxygen species formed upon irradiation of the photosensitizer in aqueous and biological fluids, a high photostability fullerene coatings and the possibility of full recovery photosensitizer from the biological environment after the photodynamic action.

  13. Ultrasound-guided image fusion with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical utility for imaging and interventional diagnostics of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clevert, D.A.; Helck, A.; Paprottka, P.M.; Trumm, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Zengel, P.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal ultrasound is often the first-line imaging modality for assessing focal liver lesions. Due to various new ultrasound techniques, such as image fusion, global positioning system (GPS) tracking and needle tracking guided biopsy, abdominal ultrasound now has great potential regarding detection, characterization and treatment of focal liver lesions. Furthermore, these new techniques will help to improve the clinical management of patients before and during interventional procedures. This article presents the principle and clinical impact of recently developed techniques in the field of ultrasound, e.g. image fusion, GPS tracking and needle tracking guided biopsy and discusses the results based on a feasibility study on 20 patients with focal hepatic lesions. (orig.) [de

  14. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  15. "Smart" theranostic lanthanide nanoprobes with simultaneous up-conversion fluorescence and tunable T1-T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast and near-infrared activated photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Das, Gautom Kumar; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Xu, Qing Chi; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Bhakoo, Kishore K; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang

    2014-11-07

    The current work reports a type of "smart" lanthanide-based theranostic nanoprobe, NaDyF4:Yb(3+)/NaGdF4:Yb(3+),Er(3+), which is able to circumvent the up-converting poisoning effect of Dy(3+) ions to give efficient near infrared (980 nm) triggered up-conversion fluorescence, and offers not only excellent dark T2-weighted MR contrast but also tunable bright and T1-weighted MR contrast properties. Due to the efficient up-converted energy transfer from the nanocrystals to chlorin e6 (Ce6) photosensitizers loaded onto the nanocrystals, cytotoxic singlet oxygen was generated and photodynamic therapy was demonstrated. Therefore, the current multifunctional nanocrystals could be potentially useful in various image-guided diagnoses where bright or dark MRI contrast could be selectively tuned to optimize image quality, but also as an efficient and more penetrative near-infrared activated photodynamic therapy agent.

  16. Computed tomography of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmannskog, F.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Aakhus, T.; Bergan, A.; Fausa, O.; Elgjo, K.

    1980-01-01

    The findings by computed tomography in 203 cases of suspected pancreatic tumours, pancreatitis or peripancreatic abnormalities were evaluated. The appearances of the normal and the diseased pancreas are described. Computed tomography is highly accurate in detecting pancreatic masses, but can not differentiate neoplastic from inflammatory disease. The only reliable signs of pancreatic carcinoma are a focal mass in the pancreas, together with liver metastasis. When a pancreatic mass is revealed by computed tomography, CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas is recommended. Thus the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures and explorative laparotomy may be avoided in some patients. (Auth.)

  17. Light emitting fabric technologies for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge; Cochrane, Cédric; Tylcz, Jean Baptiste; Betrouni, Nacim; Mortier, Laurent; Koncar, Vladan

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered to be a promising method for treating various types of cancer. A homogeneous and reproducible illumination during clinical PDT plays a determinant role in preventing under- or over-treatment. The development of flexible light sources would considerably improve the homogeneity of light delivery. The integration of optical fiber into flexible structures could offer an interesting alternative. This paper aims to describe different methods proposed to develop Side Emitting Optical Fibers (SEOF), and how these SEOF can be integrated in a flexible structure to improve light illumination of the skin during PDT. Four main techniques can be described: (i) light blanket integrating side-glowing optical fibers, (ii) light emitting panel composed of SEOF obtained by micro-perforations of the cladding, (iii) embroidery-based light emitting fabric, and (iv) woven-based light emitting fabric. Woven-based light emitting fabrics give the best performances: higher fluence rate, best homogeneity of light delivery, good flexibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. New Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy in Gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SG Bown

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT in gastroenterology to date have used porfimer sodium as the photosensitizing agent. For destroying small lesions in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract in inoperable patients, it has proved to be most effective, but attempts to achieve circumferential mucosal ablation, as in the treatment of Barrett’s esophagus, have led to a high incidence of strictures, and all patients have cutaneous photosensitivity, which can last up to three months. Two new photosensitizers are of particular interest to gastroenterologists. PDT with metatetrahydroxyphenyl chlorin produces a similar biological effect as PDT with porfimer sodium, but the light doses required are much smaller, and cutaneous photosensitivity lasts only two to three weeks. Further, it can be used with percutaneous light delivery to destroy localized pancreatic cancers. The photosensitizing agent 5-amino levulinic acid, converted in vivo into the photoactive derivative protoporphyrin IX, sensitizes the mucosa much more than the underlying layers. This makes it feasible to destroy areas of abnormal mucosa without damaging the underlying muscle and is, therefore, better for treating Barrett’s esophagus. Detailed clinical studies are required to establish the real role of PDT with the use of these and other new photosensitizers.

  19. Photodynamic antimicrobial polymers for infection control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin P McCoy

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections pose both a major risk to patient wellbeing and an economic burden on global healthcare systems, with the problem compounded by the emergence of multidrug resistant and biocide tolerant bacterial pathogens. Many inanimate surfaces can act as a reservoir for infection, and adequate disinfection is difficult to achieve and requires direct intervention. In this study we demonstrate the preparation and performance of materials with inherent photodynamic, surface-active, persistent antimicrobial properties through the incorporation of photosensitizers into high density poly(ethylene (HDPE using hot-melt extrusion, which require no external intervention except a source of visible light. Our aim is to prevent bacterial adherence to these surfaces and eliminate them as reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, thus presenting a valuable advance in infection control. A two-layer system with one layer comprising photosensitizer-incorporated HDPE, and one layer comprising HDPE alone is also described to demonstrate the versatility of our approach. The photosensitizer-incorporated materials are capable of reducing the adherence of viable bacteria by up to 3.62 Log colony forming units (CFU per square centimeter of material surface for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and by up to 1.51 Log CFU/cm(2 for Escherichia coli. Potential applications for the technology are in antimicrobial coatings for, or materials comprising objects, such as tubing, collection bags, handrails, finger-plates on hospital doors, or medical equipment found in the healthcare setting.

  20. Novel Photodynamics in Phytochrome & Cyanobacteriochrome Photosensory Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Delmar

    2015-03-01

    The photodynamics of recently characterized phytochrome and cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors are discussed. Phytochromes are red/far-red photosensory proteins that utilize the photoisomerization of a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore to detect the red to far-red light ratio. Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are distantly related cyanobacterial photosensors with homologous bilin-binding GAF domains, but exhibit greater spectral diversity. The excited-state mechanisms underlying the initial photoisomerization in the forward reactions of the cyanobacterial photoreceptor Cph1 from Synechocystis, the RcaE CBCR from Fremyella diplosiphon, and Npr6012g4 CBCR from Nostoc punctiforme were contrasted via multipulse pump-dump-probe transient spectroscopy. A rich excited-state dynamics are resolved involving a complex interplay of excited-state proton transfer, photoisomerization, multilayered inhomogeneity, and reactive intermediates, and Le Chatelier redistribution. NpR6012g4 exhibits a high quantum yield for its forward photoreaction (40%) that was ascribed to the activity of hidden, productive ground-state intermediates via a ``second chance initiation dynamics'' (SCID) mechanism. This work was supported by a grant from the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy (DOE DE-FG02-09ER16117).

  1. Photodynamic inactivation of pathogens causing infectious keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carole; Wolf, G.; Walther, M.; Winkler, K.; Finke, M.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bischoff, Markus; Seitz, B.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance requires new approaches also for the treatment of infectious keratitis. Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) using the photosensitizer (PS) Chlorin e6 (Ce6) was investigated as an alternative to antibiotic treatment. An in-vitro cornea model was established using porcine eyes. The uptake of Ce6 by bacteria and the diffusion of the PS in the individual layers of corneal tissue were investigated by fluorescence. After removal of the cornea's epithelium Ce6-concentrations tested in liquid culture against different concentrations of Ce6 (1 - 512 μM) using 10 minutes irradiation (E = 18 J/cm2 ). This demonstrated that a complete inactivation of the pathogen strains were feasible whereby SA was slightly more susceptible than PA. 3909 mutants of the Keio collection of Escherichia coli (E.coli) were screened for potential resistance factors. The sensitive mutants can be grouped into three categories: transport mutants, mutants in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and mutants in the bacterial SOS-response. In conclusion PDI is seen as a promising therapy concept for infectious keratitis.

  2. Corneal endothelial glutathione after photodynamic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, D.S.; Riley, M.V.; Csukas, S.; Green, K.

    1982-01-01

    Rabbit corneal endothelial cells perfused with 5 X 10(-6)M rose bengal and exposed to incandescent light demonstrated no alteration of either total of or percent oxidized glutathione after 1 hr. Addition of 5400 U/ml catalase to the perfusing solution had no effect on total glutathione levels but caused a marked reduction in percent oxidized glutathione in corneas exposed to light as well as in those not exposed to light. Substitution of sucrose for glucose in the perfusing solution had no effect on total or percent oxidized glutathione. Perfusion of rabbit corneal endothelium with 0.5 mM chlorpromazine and exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light resulted in no change in total glutathione content. A marked reduction in percent oxidized glutathione occurred, however, in corneas perfused with 0.5 mM chlorpromazine both in the presence and absence of UV light. It is concluded that photodynamically induced swelling of corneas is not the result of a failure of the glutathione redox system

  3. Photodynamic therapy in head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H Nelke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a special type of treatment involving the use of a photosensitizer or a photosensitizing agent along with a special type of light, which, combined together, induces production of a form of oxygen that is used to kill surrounding cells in different areas of the human body. Specification of the head and neck region requires different approaches due to the surrounding of vital structures. PDT can also be used to treat cells invaded with infections such as fungi, bacteria and viruses. The light beam placed in tumor sites activates locally applied drugs and kills the cancer cells. Many studies are taking place in order to invent better photosensitizers, working on a larger scale and to treat deeply placed and larger tumors. It seems that PDT could be used as an alternative surgical treatment in some tumor types; however, all clinicians should be aware that the surgical approach is still the treatment of choice. PDT is a very accurate and effective therapy, especially in early stages of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, and can greatly affect surgical outcomes in cancerous patients. We present a detailed review about photosensitizers, their use, and therapeutic advantages and disadvantages.

  4. ``Smart'' theranostic lanthanide nanoprobes with simultaneous up-conversion fluorescence and tunable T1-T2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast and near-infrared activated photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Das, Gautom Kumar; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Xu, Qing Chi; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Bhakoo, Kishore K.; Tamil Selvan, Subramanian; Tan, Timothy Thatt Yang

    2014-10-01

    The current work reports a type of ``smart'' lanthanide-based theranostic nanoprobe, NaDyF4:Yb3+/NaGdF4:Yb3+,Er3+, which is able to circumvent the up-converting poisoning effect of Dy3+ ions to give efficient near infrared (980 nm) triggered up-conversion fluorescence, and offers not only excellent dark T2-weighted MR contrast but also tunable bright and T1-weighted MR contrast properties. Due to the efficient up-converted energy transfer from the nanocrystals to chlorin e6 (Ce6) photosensitizers loaded onto the nanocrystals, cytotoxic singlet oxygen was generated and photodynamic therapy was demonstrated. Therefore, the current multifunctional nanocrystals could be potentially useful in various image-guided diagnoses where bright or dark MRI contrast could be selectively tuned to optimize image quality, but also as an efficient and more penetrative near-infrared activated photodynamic therapy agent.The current work reports a type of ``smart'' lanthanide-based theranostic nanoprobe, NaDyF4:Yb3+/NaGdF4:Yb3+,Er3+, which is able to circumvent the up-converting poisoning effect of Dy3+ ions to give efficient near infrared (980 nm) triggered up-conversion fluorescence, and offers not only excellent dark T2-weighted MR contrast but also tunable bright and T1-weighted MR contrast properties. Due to the efficient up-converted energy transfer from the nanocrystals to chlorin e6 (Ce6) photosensitizers loaded onto the nanocrystals, cytotoxic singlet oxygen was generated and photodynamic therapy was demonstrated. Therefore, the current multifunctional nanocrystals could be potentially useful in various image-guided diagnoses where bright or dark MRI contrast could be selectively tuned to optimize image quality, but also as an efficient and more penetrative near-infrared activated photodynamic therapy agent. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01717j

  5. Guided Endodontic Access in Maxillary Molars Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography and Computer-aided Design/Computer-aided Manufacturing System: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Mendes, Sônia T de O; Barbosa, Camila de Freitas M; Santa-Rosa, Caroline C; Machado, Vinícius C

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a guided endodontic technique that facilitates access to root canals of molars presenting with pulp calcifications. A 61-year-old woman presented to our service with pain in the upper left molar region. The second and third left molars showed signs of apical periodontitis confirmed by the cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans brought to us by the patient at the initial appointment. Conventional endodontic treatment was discontinued given the difficulty in locating the root canals. Intraoral scanning and the CBCT scans were used to plan the access to the calcified canals by means of implant planning software. Guides were fabricated through rapid prototyping and allowed for the correct orientation of a cylindrical drill used to provide access through the calcifications. Second to that, the root canals were prepared with reciprocating endodontic instruments and rested for 2 weeks with intracanal medication. Subsequently, canals were packed with gutta-percha cones using the hydraulic compression technique. Permanent restorations of the access cavities were performed. By comparing the tomographic images, the authors observed a drastic reduction of the periapical lesions as well as the absence of pain symptoms after 3 months. This condition was maintained at the 1-year follow-up. The guided endodontic technique in maxillary molars was shown to be a fast, safe, and predictable therapy and can be regarded as an excellent option for the location of calcified root canals, avoiding failures in complex cases. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interventional management of intractable sympathetically mediated pain by computed tomography-guided catheter implantation for block and neuroablation of the thoracic sympathetic chain: technical approach and review of 322 procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal-Kozlowski, K; Lorke, D E; Habermann, C R; Schulte am Esch, J; Beck, H

    2011-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of computed tomography-guided placement of percutaneous catheters in close proximity to the thoracic sympathetic chain by rating pain intensity and systematically reviewing charts and computed tomography scans. Interventions were performed 322 times in 293 patients of mean (SD) age 59.4 (17.0) years, and male to female ratio 105:188, with postherpetic neuralgia (n = 103, 35.1%), various neuralgias (n = 88, 30.0%), complex regional pain syndrome (n = 69, 23.6%), facial pain (n = 17, 5.8%), ischaemic limb pain (n = 7, 2.4%), phantom limb pain (n = 4, 1.4%), pain following cerebrovascular accident (n = 2, 0.7%), syringomyelia (n = 2, 0.7%) and palmar hyperhidrosis (n = 1, 0.3%). The interventions were associated with a total of 23 adverse events (7.1% of all procedures): catheter dislocation (n = 9, 2.8%); increase in pain intensity (n = 8, 2.5%); pneumothorax (n = 3, 0.9%); local infection (n = 2, 0.6%); and puncture of the spinal cord (n = 1, 0.3%). Continuous infusion of 10 ml.h(-1) ropivacaine 0.2% through the catheters decreased median (IQR [range]) pain scores from 8 (6-9 [2-10]) to 2 (1-3 [0-10]) (p < 0.0001). Chemical neuroablation was necessary in 137 patients (46.8%). We conclude that this procedure leads to a significant reduction of pain intensity in otherwise obstinate burning or stabbing pain and is associated with few hazards. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Optical coherence tomography for the diagnosis, monitoring and guiding of treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowatt, Graham; Hernández, Rodolfo; Castillo, Mayret; Lois, Noemi; Elders, Andrew; Fraser, Cynthia; Aremu, Olatunde; Amoaku, Winfried; Burr, Jennifer; Lotery, Andrew; Ramsay, Craig; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2014-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of sight impairment in the UK. In neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD), vision worsens rapidly (over weeks) due to abnormal blood vessels developing that leak fluid and blood at the macula. To determine the optimal role of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in diagnosing people newly presenting with suspected nAMD and monitoring those previously diagnosed with the disease. Databases searched: MEDLINE (1946 to March 2013), MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations (March 2013), EMBASE (1988 to March 2013), Biosciences Information Service (1995 to March 2013), Science Citation Index (1995 to March 2013), The Cochrane Library (Issue 2 2013), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (inception to March 2013), Medion (inception to March 2013), Health Technology Assessment database (inception to March 2013). Types of studies: direct/indirect studies reporting diagnostic outcomes. time domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) or spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). clinical evaluation, visual acuity, Amsler grid, colour fundus photographs, infrared reflectance, red-free images/blue reflectance, fundus autofluorescence imaging, indocyanine green angiography, preferential hyperacuity perimetry, microperimetry. Reference standard: fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA). Risk of bias was assessed using quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies, version 2. Meta-analysis models were fitted using hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic curves. A Markov model was developed (65-year-old cohort, nAMD prevalence 70%), with nine strategies for diagnosis and/or monitoring, and cost-utility analysis conducted. NHS and Personal Social Services perspective was adopted. Costs (2011/12 prices) and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were discounted (3.5%). Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. In pooled estimates of diagnostic studies

  8. Visibility of fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography for registration with CT: An esophageal phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J A; de Bruin, Martijn; Faber, Dirk J; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; van Herk, Marcel; de Boer, Johannes F

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is of interest to visualize microscopic esophageal tumor extensions to improve tumor delineation for radiation therapy (RT) planning. Fiducial marker placement is a common method to ensure target localization during planning and treatment. Visualization of these fiducial markers on OCT permits integrating OCT and computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning via image registration. We studied the visibility of 13 (eight types) commercially available solid and liquid fiducial markers in OCT images at different depths using dedicated esophageal phantoms and evaluated marker placement depth in clinical practice. We designed and fabricated dedicated esophageal phantoms, in which three layers mimic the anatomical wall structures of a healthy human esophagus. We successfully implanted 13 commercially available fiducial markers that varied in diameter and material property at depths between 0.5 and 3.0 mm. The resulting esophageal phantoms were imaged with OCT, and marker visibility was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using the contrast-to-background-noise ratio (CNR). The CNR was defined as the difference between the mean intensity of the fiducial markers and the mean intensity of the background divided by the standard deviation of the background intensity. To determine whether, in current clinical practice, the implanted fiducial markers are within the OCT visualization range (up to 3.0 mm depth), we retrospectively measured the distance of 19 fiducial markers to the esophageal lumen on CT scans of 16 esophageal cancer patients. In the esophageal phantoms, all the included fiducial markers were visible on OCT at all investigated depths. Solid fiducial markers were better visible on OCT than liquid fiducial markers with a 1.74-fold higher CNR. Although fiducial marker identification per type and size was slightly easier for superficially implanted fiducial markers, we observed no difference in the ability of OCT to

  9. Active and passive control of zinc phthalocyanine photodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, Divya; Huijser, Jannetje Maria; Savolainen, Janne; Steen, Gerrit Willem; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report on the ultrafast photodynamics of the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and manipulation thereof. Two approaches are followed: active control via pulse shaping and passive control via strategic manipulation in the periphery of the molecular structure. The objective of

  10. A novel diode laser system for photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samsøe, E.; Andersen, P. E.; Petersen, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a novel diode laser system for photodynamic therapy is demonstrated. The system is based on linear spatial filtering and optical phase conjugate feedback from a photorefractive BaTiO3 crystal. The spatial coherence properties of the diode laser are significantly improved. The system...

  11. The Reaction Microscope: Imaging and Pulse Shaping Control in Photodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenborg, A.; Lehmann, C.S.; Irimia, D.; Roeterdink, W.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we review the current capabilities and potential of advanced single-particle imaging techniques to study photodynamics in isolated molecules. These reaction microscopes are able to measure the full three-dimensional energy and angular distribution of (correlated) particles such as electrons

  12. Efficiency of photodynamic treatment in patients with early gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. V. Filonenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The experience of photodynamic therapy for early gastric cancer is described in the article. The treatment results in 68 patients who were excluded for convenient surgical treatment because of advanced age or severe co-morbidity are represented. 63 patients had single tumor, 5 patients – 2 tumors. Four Russian agents: photogem, photosens, radaсhlorin and alasens, were used for photodynamic therapy. The treatment session was performed under local anesthesia during routine endoscopy with diode laser with wavelength consistent with photosensitizer (photogem – 630 nm, photosens – 670 nm, alasens-induced protoporphyrin IX – 635 nm, radaсhlorin – 662 nm. The short-term results were analyzed 1 month after treatment according to endoscopy, morphological study, CT, ultrasound or endosonography. For 73 lesions complete regression was observed in 53 (72.6% and partial regression in 20 tumors (27.4%. The efficacy of photodynamic therapy was shown to be directly associated with tumor size. Thus, for tumors up to 1 cm regression occurred in 100% of cases, up to 1.5 cm – in 70.8%, up to 3 cm – in 65.2%, up to 5 cm – in 58.3%. The median survival rates accounted for 7.31 years, 3-year survival – 83±5%, 5-year - 69±8%. The experience showed that the developed method of photodynamic therapy was promising in treatment for early gastric cancer as an alternative to surgery. 

  13. Photodynamic therapy: A new vista in management of periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Doshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT for periodontitis. This review also elucidates application of photodynamic therapy for noninvasive management of periodontitis without leading to bacterial resistance. Background: Periodontal diseases are one of the major causes of tooth loss in adults and are considered primarily an anaerobic bacterial infections caused by the so-called red complex species. Bacteria present in a biofilm community, enzymes, endotoxins, and other cytotoxic factors lead to tissue destruction and initiate chronic inflammation. Since many years pioneers have been working to provide logical and cost-effective therapy for management of periodontitis. Periodontal researchers have found that PDT is advantageous to suppress anaerobic bacteria. Clinical Significance: Applications of PDT in dentistry are growing rapidly. PDT application has an adjunctive benefit besides mechanical treatment at sites with difficult access. Necessity for flap surgery may be reduced, patient comfort may increase, and treatment time may decrease. The application of photosensitizing dyes and their excitation by visible light enables effective killing of periodonto-pathogens. The introduction of laser along with photosensitizers has brought a revolutionary change. Conclusion: The application of photodynamic therapy in management of periodontal diseases is very valuable. The therapy should be combined with nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Proper clinical application of photodynamic therapy can and will help patients who are systemically compromised and cannot undergo surgical therapy.

  14. Nanobody-photosensitizer conjugates for targeted photodynamic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heukers, Raimond; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P; Oliveira, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces cell death through light activation of a photosensitizer (PS). Targeted delivery of PS via monoclonal antibodies has improved tumor selectivity. However, these conjugates have long half-lives, leading to relatively long photosensitivity in patients. In an attempt

  15. Weather conditions and daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S R; Fabricius, S; Heydenreich, J

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an attractive therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancers and actinic keratoses (AKs). Daylight-mediated methyl aminolaevulinate PDT (daylight-PDT) is a simple and painless treatment procedure for PDT. All daylight-PDT studies have been performed in the Nordic countries...

  16. Uniform irradiation of irregularly shaped cavities for photodynamic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, A. I.; van Gemert, M. J.; van der Meulen, F. W.; Gijsbers, G. H.; Beek, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    It is difficult to achieve a uniform light distribution in irregularly shaped cavities. We have conducted a study on the use of hollow 'integrating' moulds for more uniform light delivery of photodynamic therapy in irregularly shaped cavities such as the oral cavity. Simple geometries such as a

  17. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer:Initial experience of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To describe the introduction and evaluate efficacy of photodynamic diagnosis with Hexvix fordetecting tumours and abnormal mucosal lesions during transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT). Subjects and methods: Prospective study of consecutive eligible patients who underwent TURBT with aidof ...

  18. Identification of neutrophils as important effector cells in photodynamic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.A. de Vree (Wil)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPhotodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality, which is at present widely used on an experimental basis for the treatment of cancer patients. It is based on the light induced excitation of light sensitive chemical compounds localized in malignant tissue. These so-called

  19. An upconversion nanoparticle - Zinc phthalocyanine based nanophotosensitizer for photodynamic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, L.; Kong, X.; Liu, X.; Tu, L.; Zhang, Y.; Chang, Y.; Liu, K.; Shen, D.; Zhao, H.; Zhang, H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in NIR triggering upconversion-based photodynamic therapy have led to substantial improvements in upconversion-based nanophotosensitizers. How to obtain the high efficiency of singlet oxygen generation under low 980 nm radiation dosage still remains a challenge. A highly efficient

  20. Photodynamic Therapy in Treatment of Oral Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Diana; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common chronic immunologic mucocutaneous disorder. Although there are many presenting treatments, some of them proved its failure. Recently, the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been expanding due to its numerous advantages, as it is safe, convenient, and non-invasive and has toxic effect towards selective tissues. This article provides comprehensive review on OLP, its etiology, clinical features and recent non-pharmacological treatments. We also describe the topical PDT and its mechanisms. Our purpose was to evaluate the efficacy of PDT in treatment of OLP through collecting the data of the related clinical studies. We searched in PubMed website for the clinical studies that were reported from 2000 to 2014 using specific keywords: “photodynamic therapy” and “treatment of oral lichen planus”. Inclusion criteria were English publications only were concerned. In the selected studies of photodynamic treatment, adult patients (more than 20 years) were conducted and the OLP lesions were clinically and histologically confirmed. Exclusion criteria were classical and pharmacological treatments of OLP were excluded and also the using of PDT on skin lesions of lichen planus. We established five clinical studies in this review where all of them reported improvement and effectiveness of PDT in treatment of OLP lesions. The main outcome of comparing the related clinical studies is that the photodynamic is considered as a safe, effective and promising treatment modality for OLP. PMID:25883701

  1. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium together with a semiconductor laser was approved in Japan in October 2003 as a less invasive therapy for early-stage lung cancer. The author believes that the principle of PDT would be applicable for controlling the invading front of malignant brain tumors and verified its efficacy through experiments using glioma cell lines and glioma xenograft models. An investigator-initiated clinical study was jointly conducted with Tokyo Women's Medical University with the support of the Japan Medical Association. Patient enrollment was started in May 2009 and a total of 27 patients were enrolled by March 2012. Of 22 patients included in efficacy analysis, 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma showed progression-free survival of 12 months, progression-free survival at the site of laser irradiation of 20 months, 1-year survival of 100%, and overall survival of 24.8 months. In addition, the safety analysis of the 27 patients showed that adverse events directly related to PDT were mild. PDT was approved in Japan for health insurance coverage as a new intraoperative therapy with the indication for malignant brain tumors in September 2013. Currently, the post-marketing investigation in the accumulated patients has been conducted, and the preparation of guidelines, holding training courses, and dissemination of information on the safe implementation of PDT using web sites and videos, have been promoted. PDT is expected to be a breakthrough for the treatment of malignant glioma as a tumor cell-selective less invasive therapy for the infiltrated functional brain area.

  2. Salvage photodynamic therapy for recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succo, Giovanni; Rosso, S; Fadda, G L; Fantini, M; Crosetti, Erika

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of photodynamic therapy (NP-PDT) in the palliative management of recurrent/persistent nasopharyngeal cancer (NFC). Six patients with persistent/recurrent NPC underwent PDT with palliative intent. NP-PDT was delivered by three different methods depending on the localization, size and depth of the lesion: type I NP-PDT: transnasal direct illumination of postero-superior recurrence; type II NP-PDT: transnasal direct illumination of the whole nasopharynx; type III NP-PDT: transoral direct or interstitial illumination of lateral recurrence. In this case, the ENT-magnetic navigation system (MNS) was extremely useful in identifying the tumor and its distance from the ICA. Both patients treated with NP-PDT type I are free from disease at 38 and 71 months after treatment; both patients treated with NP-PDT type II experienced further local and loco-regional recurrence of disease within 16 months; one died of the disease while the second underwent a second palliative treatment, NP-PDT type I, and is currently living with the disease; of the two patients who underwent NP-PDT type III, one died as a result of regional and systemic recurrence without local recurrence while the second experienced a superficial recurrence. He underwent a second NP-PDT type III treatment and is currently free from disease at 21 months. NP-PDT is a non-invasive and simple treatment modality that may have an important role in the treatment of selected cases of persistent/recurrent NPC in its early stage, not suitable for a conventional therapeutic protocol. Coupling NP-PDT with the ENT-MNS can be an effective strategy to obtain more precise light delivery within the tumor, particularly in lateral and parapharyngeal localization. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quality Assurance of Onboard Megavoltage Computed Tomography Imaging and Target Localization Systems for On- and Off-Line Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Pouliot, Jean

    2008-01-01

    We reviewed the quality assurance procedures that have been used to test fan- and cone-beam megavoltage-based in-room imaging systems. Phantom-based tests have been used to establish the geometric accuracy and precision of megavoltage-based systems. However, the clinical implementation of any system is accompanied by challenges that are best tested in a clinical setting using clinical images. To objectively judge and monitor image quality, a set of standard tests and phantoms can be used. The image noise and spatial and contrast resolution have been assessed using standard computed tomography phantoms. The dose to the patient resulting from the imaging procedure can be determined using calculations or measurements. The off-line use of patient images is of interest for the evaluation of dosimetric changes throughout the treatment course. The accuracy of the dosimetric calculations based on the megavoltage images has been tested for the fan- and cone-beam systems. Some of the described tests are typically performed before the clinical implementation of the imaging system; others are suited to monitor the system's performances

  4. Ultrasound guided fluorescence molecular tomography with improved quantification by an attenuation compensated born-normalization and in vivo preclinical study of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Berti, Romain; Abran, Maxime; Lesage, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging, having the advantages of low-cost and non-invasiveness over MRI and X-ray CT, was reported by several studies as an adequate complement to fluorescence molecular tomography with the perspective of improving localization and quantification of fluorescent molecular targets in vivo. Based on the previous work, an improved dual-modality Fluorescence-Ultrasound imaging system was developed and then validated in imaging study with preclinical tumor model. Ultrasound imaging and a profilometer were used to obtain the anatomical prior information and 3D surface, separately, to precisely extract the tissue boundary on both sides of sample in order to achieve improved fluorescence reconstruction. Furthermore, a pattern-based fluorescence reconstruction on the detection side was incorporated to enable dimensional reduction of the dataset while keeping the useful information for reconstruction. Due to its putative role in the current imaging geometry and the chosen reconstruction technique, we developed an attenuation compensated Born-normalization method to reduce the attenuation effects and cancel off experimental factors when collecting quantitative fluorescence datasets over large area. Results of both simulation and phantom study demonstrated that fluorescent targets could be recovered accurately and quantitatively using this reconstruction mechanism. Finally, in vivo experiment confirms that the imaging system associated with the proposed image reconstruction approach was able to extract both functional and anatomical information, thereby improving quantification and localization of molecular targets

  5. Daylight photodynamic therapy with methyl aminolevulinate cream as a convenient, similarly effective, nearly painless alternative to conventional photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubel, D M; Spelman, L; Murrell, D F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) of actinic keratosis (AK) has shown preliminary efficacy and safety results comparable to conventional photodynamic therapy (c-PDT), using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) cream. OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate the efficacy and safety of DL-PDT vs. c...

  6. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.; Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E.; Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R.; Birk, E.; Atar, E.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  7. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A. [Soreq NRC, Radiation Protection Domain (Israel); Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel); Birk, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Atar, E., E-mail: elia@clalit.org.il [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  8. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Cohen, D; Bruckheimer, E; Bachar, G N; Konstantinovsky, R; Birk, E; Atar, E

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT. Effective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms. The effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590% for upper lung, 639 and 525% for mid-lung, and 461 and 251% for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762% for liver and 513 and 608% for kidney biopsies. Based on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  9. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamezawa, H; Arimura, H; Ohki, M; Shirieda, K; Kameda, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems

  10. SU-E-J-243: Possibility of Exposure Dose Reduction of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in An Image Guided Patient Positioning System by Using Various Noise Suppression Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamezawa, H [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Fujimoto General Hospital, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki (Japan); Arimura, H; Ohki, M [Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Shirieda, K; Kameda, N [Fujimoto General Hospital, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the possibility of exposure dose reduction of the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in an image guided patient positioning system by using 6 noise suppression filters. Methods: First, a reference dose (RD) and low-dose (LD)-CBCT (X-ray volume imaging system, Elekta Co.) images were acquired with a reference dose of 86.2 mGy (weighted CT dose index: CTDIw) and various low doses of 1.4 to 43.1 mGy, respectively. Second, an automated rigid registration for three axes was performed for estimating setup errors between a planning CT image and the LD-CBCT images, which were processed by 6 noise suppression filters, i.e., averaging filter (AF), median filter (MF), Gaussian filter (GF), bilateral filter (BF), edge preserving smoothing filter (EPF) and adaptive partial median filter (AMF). Third, residual errors representing the patient positioning accuracy were calculated as an Euclidean distance between the setup error vectors estimated using the LD-CBCT image and RD-CBCT image. Finally, the relationships between the residual error and CTDIw were obtained for 6 noise suppression filters, and then the CTDIw for LD-CBCT images processed by the noise suppression filters were measured at the same residual error, which was obtained with the RD-CBCT. This approach was applied to an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom and two cancer patients. Results: For the phantom, the exposure dose could be reduced from 61% (GF) to 78% (AMF) by applying the noise suppression filters to the CBCT images. The exposure dose in a prostate cancer case could be reduced from 8% (AF) to 61% (AMF), and the exposure dose in a lung cancer case could be reduced from 9% (AF) to 37% (AMF). Conclusion: Using noise suppression filters, particularly an adaptive partial median filter, could be feasible to decrease the additional exposure dose to patients in image guided patient positioning systems.

  11. Micro-Computed-Tomography-Guided Analysis of In Vitro Structural Modifications in Two Types of 45S5 Bioactive Glass Based Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhauser, Fabian; Ciraldo, Francesca; Balasubramanian, Preethi; Senger, Anne-Sophie; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2017-11-23

    Three-dimensional 45S5 bioactive glass (BG)-based scaffolds are being investigated for bone regeneration. Besides structural properties, controlled time-dependent alteration of scaffold morphology is crucial to achieve optimal scaffold characteristics for successful bone repair. There is no in vitro evidence concerning the dependence between structural characteristics and dissolution behavior of 45S5 BG-based scaffolds of different morphology. In this study, the dissolution behavior of scaffolds fabricated by the foam replica method using polyurethane foam (Group A) and maritime sponge Spongia Agaricina (Group B) as sacrificial templates was analyzed by micro-computed-tomography (µCT). The scaffolds were immersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium for 56 days under static cell culture conditions and underwent µCT-analysis initially, and after 7, 14, and 56 days. Group A showed high porosity (91%) and trabecular structure formed by macro-pores (average diameter 692 µm ± 72 µm). Group-B-scaffolds were less porous (51%), revealing an optimal pore size distribution within the window of 110-500 µm pore size diameter, combined with superior mechanical stability. Both groups showed similar structural alteration upon immersion. Surface area and scaffold volume increased whilst density decreased, reflecting initial dissolution followed by hydroxycarbonate-apatite-layer-formation on the scaffold surfaces. In vitro- and/or in vivo-testing of cell-seeded BG-scaffolds used in this study should be performed to evaluate the BG-scaffolds' time-dependent osteogenic properties in relation to the measured in vitro structural changes.

  12. Comparison of setup accuracy between exactrac X-ray 6 dimensions and cone-beam computed tomography for intracranial and pelvic image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Kaoru; Furukawa, Kengo; Fujimoto, Sachie; Akagi, Yukio; Koyama, Tadashi; Hirokawa, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the setup difference measured with ExacTrac X-ray 6D (ETX6D) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for non-invasive fractionated radiotherapy. Setup data were collected on a Novalis Tx treatment unit for both a head phantom and patients with intracranial tumors and a pelvic phantom and patients with prostate cancer. Initially, setup was done for a phantom using ETX6D. Secondly, a treatment couch was shifted or rotated by each already known value. Thirdly, ETX6D and CBCT scans were obtained. Finally, setup difference was determined: the registrations of ETX6D images with the corresponding digitally reconstructed radiographs using ETX6D fusion, and registrations of CBCT images with the planning CT using online 6D fusion. The setup difference between ETX6D and CBCT was compared. The impact of shifts and rotations on the difference was evaluated. Patients' setup data was similarly analyzed. In phantom experiments, the root mean square (RMS) of difference of the shift and rotation was less than 0.45 mm for translations, and 0.17 degrees for rotations. In intracranial patients' data, the RMS of that was 0.55 mm and 0.44 degree, respectively. In prostate cancer patients' data, the RMS of that was 0.77 mm and 0.79 degree, respectively. In this study, we observed modest setup differences between ETX6D and CBCT. These differences were generally less than 1.00 mm for translations, and 1.00 degrees for rotations, respectively. (author)

  13. 2D-3D radiograph to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) registration for C-arm image-guided robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen Pei; Otake, Yoshito; Azizian, Mahdi; Wagner, Oliver J; Sorger, Jonathan M; Armand, Mehran; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-08-01

    C-arm radiographs are commonly used for intraoperative image guidance in surgical interventions. Fluoroscopy is a cost-effective real-time modality, although image quality can vary greatly depending on the target anatomy. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans are sometimes available, so 2D-3D registration is needed for intra-procedural guidance. C-arm radiographs were registered to CBCT scans and used for 3D localization of peritumor fiducials during a minimally invasive thoracic intervention with a da Vinci Si robot. Intensity-based 2D-3D registration of intraoperative radiographs to CBCT was performed. The feasible range of X-ray projections achievable by a C-arm positioned around a da Vinci Si surgical robot, configured for robotic wedge resection, was determined using phantom models. Experiments were conducted on synthetic phantoms and animals imaged with an OEC 9600 and a Siemens Artis zeego, representing the spectrum of different C-arm systems currently available for clinical use. The image guidance workflow was feasible using either an optically tracked OEC 9600 or a Siemens Artis zeego C-arm, resulting in an angular difference of Δθ:∼ 30°. The two C-arm systems provided TRE mean ≤ 2.5 mm and TRE mean ≤ 2.0 mm, respectively (i.e., comparable to standard clinical intraoperative navigation systems). C-arm 3D localization from dual 2D-3D registered radiographs was feasible and applicable for intraoperative image guidance during da Vinci robotic thoracic interventions using the proposed workflow. Tissue deformation and in vivo experiments are required before clinical evaluation of this system.

  14. Implications for high-precision dose radiation therapy planning or limited surgical resection after percutaneous computed tomography-guided lung nodule biopsy using a tract sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M. de Groot, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Precision radiation therapy such as stereotactic body radiation therapy and limited resection are being used more frequently to treat intrathoracic malignancies. Effective local control requires precise radiation target delineation or complete resection. Lung biopsy tracts (LBT on computed tomography (CT scans after the use of tract sealants can mimic malignant tract seeding (MTS and it is unclear whether these LBTs should be included in the calculated tumor volume or resected. This study evaluates the incidence, appearance, evolution, and malignant seeding of LBTs. Methods and materials: A total of 406 lung biopsies were performed in oncology patients using a tract sealant over 19 months. Of these patients, 326 had follow-up CT scans and were included in the study group. Four thoracic radiologists retrospectively analyzed the imaging, and a pathologist examined 10 resected LBTs. Results: A total of 234 of 326 biopsies (72%, including primary lung cancer [n = 98]; metastases [n = 81]; benign [n = 50]; and nondiagnostic [n = 5] showed an LBT on CT. LBTs were identified on imaging 0 to 3 months after biopsy. LBTs were typically straight or serpiginous with a thickness of 2 to 5 mm. Most LBTs were unchanged (92% or decreased (6.3% over time. An increase in LBT thickness/nodularity that was suspicious for MTS occurred in 4 of 234 biopsies (1.7%. MTS only occurred after biopsy of metastases from extrathoracic malignancies, and none occurred in patients with lung cancer. Conclusions: LBTs are common on CT after lung biopsy using a tract sealant. MTS is uncommon and only occurred in patients with extrathoracic malignancies. No MTS was found in patients with primary lung cancer. Accordingly, potential alteration in planned therapy should be considered only in patients with LBTs and extrathoracic malignancies being considered for stereotactic body radiation therapy or wedge resection.

  15. Micro-Computed-Tomography-Guided Analysis of In Vitro Structural Modifications in Two Types of 45S5 Bioactive Glass Based Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Westhauser

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional 45S5 bioactive glass (BG-based scaffolds are being investigated for bone regeneration. Besides structural properties, controlled time-dependent alteration of scaffold morphology is crucial to achieve optimal scaffold characteristics for successful bone repair. There is no in vitro evidence concerning the dependence between structural characteristics and dissolution behavior of 45S5 BG-based scaffolds of different morphology. In this study, the dissolution behavior of scaffolds fabricated by the foam replica method using polyurethane foam (Group A and maritime sponge Spongia Agaricina (Group B as sacrificial templates was analyzed by micro-computed-tomography (µCT. The scaffolds were immersed in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium for 56 days under static cell culture conditions and underwent µCT-analysis initially, and after 7, 14, and 56 days. Group A showed high porosity (91% and trabecular structure formed by macro-pores (average diameter 692 µm ± 72 µm. Group-B-scaffolds were less porous (51%, revealing an optimal pore size distribution within the window of 110–500 µm pore size diameter, combined with superior mechanical stability. Both groups showed similar structural alteration upon immersion. Surface area and scaffold volume increased whilst density decreased, reflecting initial dissolution followed by hydroxycarbonate-apatite-layer-formation on the scaffold surfaces. In vitro- and/or in vivo-testing of cell-seeded BG-scaffolds used in this study should be performed to evaluate the BG-scaffolds’ time-dependent osteogenic properties in relation to the measured in vitro structural changes.

  16. Use of positron emission tomography scan response to guide treatment change for locally advanced gastric cancer: the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Elizabeth; Shah, Manish A; Schöder, Heiko; Strong, Vivian E; Coit, Daniel G; Brennan, Murray F; Kelsen, David P; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Tang, Laura H; Capanu, Marinela; Rizk, Nabil P; Allen, Peter J; Bains, Manjit S; Ilson, David H

    2016-08-01

    Early metabolic response on 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is PET non-responders have poor outcomes whether continuing chemotherapy or proceeding directly to surgery. Use of PET may identify early treatment failure, sparing patients from inactive therapy and allowing for crossover to alternative therapies. We examined the effectiveness of PET directed switching to salvage chemotherapy in the PET non-responders. Patients with locally advanced resectable FDG-avid gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma received bevacizumab 15 mg/kg, epirubicin 50 mg/m(2), cisplatin 60 mg/m(2) day 1, and capecitabine 625 mg/m(2) bid (ECX) every 21 days. PET scan was obtained at baseline and after cycle 1. PET responders, (i.e., ≥35% reduction in FDG uptake at the primary tumor) continued ECX + bev. Non-responders switched to docetaxel 30 mg/m(2), irinotecan 50 mg/mg(2) day 1 and 8 plus bevacizumab every 21 days for 2 cycles. Patients then underwent surgery. The primary objective was to improve the 2-year disease free survival (DFS) from 30% (historical control) to 53% in the non-responders. Twenty evaluable patients enrolled before the study closed for poor accrual. Eleven were PET responders and the 9 non-responders switched to the salvage regimen. With a median follow-up of 38.2 months, the 2-year DFS was 55% [95% confidence interval (CI), 30-85%] in responders compared with 56% in the non-responder group (95% CI, 20-80%, P=0.93). The results suggest that changing chemotherapy regimens in PET non-responding patients may improve outcomes. Results from this pilot trial are hypothesis generating and suggest that PET directed neoadjuvant therapy merits evaluation in a larger trial.

  17. Assessment of three-dimensional setup errors in image-guided pelvic radiotherapy for uterine and cervical cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography and its effect on planning target volume margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patni, Nidhi; Burela, Nagarjuna; Pasricha, Rajesh; Goyal, Jaishree; Soni, Tej Prakash; Kumar, T Senthil; Natarajan, T

    2017-01-01

    To achieve the best possible therapeutic ratio using high-precision techniques (image-guided radiation therapy/volumetric modulated arc therapy [IGRT/VMAT]) of external beam radiation therapy in cases of carcinoma cervix using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). One hundred and five patients of gynecological malignancies who were treated with IGRT (IGRT/VMAT) were included in the study. CBCT was done once a week for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and daily in IGRT/VMAT. These images were registered with the planning CT scan images and translational errors were applied and recorded. In all, 2078 CBCT images were studied. The margins of planning target volume were calculated from the variations in the setup. The setup variation was 5.8, 10.3, and 5.6 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral direction. This allowed adequate dose delivery to the clinical target volume and the sparing of organ at risks. Daily kV-CBCT is a satisfactory method of accurate patient positioning in treating gynecological cancers with high-precision techniques. This resulted in avoiding geographic miss.

  18. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  19. Changes in visual function and thickness of macula after photodynamic therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Okada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Kyoko Okada, Mariko Kubota-Taniai, Masayasu Kitahashi, Takayuki Baba, Yoshinori Mitamura, Shuichi YamamotoDepartment of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanPurpose: To determine the correlation between the changes in the central retinal sensitivity and the changes in the foveal thickness (FT after photodynamic therapy (PDT for age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: Nineteen eyes of 19 patients with choroidal neovasularizations (CNVs secondary to AMD were studied. The pretreatment values of the central retinal sensitivity determined by Micro Perimeter 1 (MP1; Nidek Technologies, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, and optical coherence tomography (OCT-determined FT were compared to the postoperative values at three and six months after PDT.Results: At six months, the retinal sensitivity within the central 10° was significantly improved (P = 0.02 and the FT was significantly thinner (P = 0.016. The BCVA, however, did not change significantly (P = 0.80. The changes in the retinal sensitivities were significantly correlated with the changes in the decrease in the FT (r = -0.59, P = 0.012 within the central 10° at six months after PDT.Conclusion: Significant improvements in retinal sensitivities within the central 10° and a decrease in FT were observed even though the BCVA was not significantly improved. The measurement of retinal sensitivity by MP1 may be a better method to assess central visual function than the conventional visual acuity after PDT.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, fundus-related microperimetry, optical coherence tomography, photodynamic therapy

  20. Experience of treating late cerebral lungcancer metastasis using photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Ryabova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment outcomes for a patient with solitary brain metastasis after long-term relapse-free follow-up of invasive lung carcinoma were presented. Brain metastasis without other signs of disease progression was diagnosed 10 years after combined modality treatment for stage II lung cancer. Removal of intracerebral metastasis with intraoperative photodynamic therapy was performed. Histology microspecimens of the primary tumor and metastasis were similar. No signs of disease progression in the brain 9 months after surgery were found. This case demonstrates that it is important to increase cancer suspicion for patients with long-term relapse-free follow-up. The use of intraoperative photodynamic therapy with photoditazine as a sensitizer in the treatment of cerebral metastases results in a favorable anti-tumor effect, thus improving life quality of patients

  1. Photodynamic Processes in Fluoride Crystals Doped with Ce3+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated studies of photoelectric phenomena and their associated photodynamic processes in LiCaAlF6, LiLuF4, LiYF4, LiY0,5Lu0,5F4, SrAlF5 crystals doped with Ce3+ ions have been carried out using the combination of the methods of optical and dielectric spectroscopy. The numerical values of the basic parameters of photodynamic processes and their spectral dependence in 240 – 310 nm spectral range are evaluated. It has been shown that the most probable process, which leads to the photoionization of Ce3+ ions in LiYxLu1-xF4:Ce3+ (x=0; 0,5; 1 and LiCaAlF6:Ce3+ crystals, is excited-state absorption to the states of mixed configurations of Ce3+ ions localized near/in the conduction band of crystal.

  2. Evaluation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) procedures using microfluidic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedrych, Elzbieta, E-mail: ejedrych@ch.pw.edu.pl [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 300-664 Warsaw (Poland); Pawlicka, Zuzanna; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew [Department of Microbioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 300-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-01-10

    A hybrid PDMS/glass microfluidic system for evaluation of the efficiency of photodynamic therapy is presented. 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was used as a precursor of photosensitizer. The geometry of the microdevice presented in this paper enables to test different concentrations of the photosensitizer in a single assay. The viability of the A549 cells was determined 24 h after PDT procedure (irradiation with light which induced a photosensitizer accumulated in carcinoma cells, {lambda} = 625 nm). The presented results confirmed the possibility to perform the photodynamic therapy process in vitro in microscale and the possibility to assess its effectiveness. Moreover, because two identical microstructures on a single chip were performed, the microchip can be used for examination simultaneously various cell lines (carcinoma and normal) or various photosensitizers.

  3. A Photosensitizer-Loaded DNA Origami Nanosystem for Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Ma, Xiaowei; Xue, Xiangdong; Jiang, Qiao; Song, Linlin; Dai, Luru; Zhang, Chunqiu; Jin, Shubin; Yang, Keni; Ding, Baoquan; Wang, Paul C; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-03-22

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers an alternative for cancer treatment by using ultraviolet or visible light in the presence of a photosensitizer and molecular oxygen, which can produce highly reactive oxygen species that ultimately leading to the ablation of tumor cells by multifactorial mechanisms. However, this technique is limited by the penetration depth of incident light, the hypoxic environment of solid tumors, and the vulnerability of photobleaching reduces the efficiency of many imaging agents. In this work, we reported a cellular level dual-functional imaging and PDT nanosystem BMEPC-loaded DNA origami for photodynamic therapy with high efficiency and stable photoreactive property. The carbazole derivative BMEPC is a one- and two-photon imaging agent and photosensitizer with large two-photon absorption cross section, which can be fully excited by near-infrared light, and is also capable of destroying targets under anaerobic condition by generating reactive intermediates of Type I photodynamic reactions. However, the application of BMEPC was restricted by its poor solubility in aqueous environment and its aggregation caused quenching. We observed BMEPC-loaded DNA origami effectively reduced the photobleaching of BMEPC within cells. Upon binding to DNA origami, the intramolecular rotation of BMEPC became proper restricted, which intensify fluorescence emission and radicals production when being excited. After the BMEPC-loaded DNA origami are taken up by tumor cells, upon irradiation, BMEPC could generate free radicals and be released due to DNA photocleavage as well as the following partially degradation. Apoptosis was then induced by the generation of free radicals. This functional nanosystem provides an insight into the design of photosensitizer-loaded DNA origami for effective intracellular imaging and photodynamic therapy.

  4. Photodynamic dye adsorption and release performance of natural zeolite

    OpenAIRE

    Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Clinoptilolite type of zeolite (CZ) is a promising material for biomedicine and pharmaceutics due to its non-toxicity, thermal stability, expanded surface area, and exceptional ability to adsorb various atoms and organic molecules into micropores. Using multiphoton microscopy, we demonstrated that individual CZ particles produce two-photon excited luminescence and second harmonic generation signal at femtosecond laser excitation, and adsorb photo-dynamically active dyes such as hypericin and ...

  5. Photodynamic action on some pathogenic microorganisms of oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Ilya S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2001-10-01

    The work is devoted to an analysis of pre-clinical and clinical experiments on photodynamic action of HeNe laser radiation in aggregate with a cation thiazinium dye Methylene Blue (MB) on a mix of pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic aerobic bacteria being activators of pyoinflammatory diseases of oral cavity. Concentration of photosensitizes at which there is no own bactericidal influence on dying microflora, and parameters of influence at which the efficiency of irradiated microflora defeat reaches 99 % are determined.

  6. Improvement of photodynamic activity of aluminium sulphophthalocyanine due to biotinylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerovich, Irina G.; Jerdeva, Victoria V.; Derkacheva, Valentina M.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Lukyanets, Eugeny A.; Kogan, Eugenia A.; Savitsky, Alexander P.

    2003-09-01

    The photodynamic activity of dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine in vitro and in vivo were studied. It was obtained that in vitro dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine provides the effective damage of small cell lung carcinoma OAT-75. In vivo dibiotinylated aluminium sulphophthalocyanine causes destruction of tumor (Erlich carcinoma), results in total necrosis of tumor tissue and expresses vascular damage (trombosis and destruction of vascular walls) even in concentration 0.25 mg/kg of a body weight.

  7. Calreticulin as cancer treatment adjuvant: combination with photodynamic therapy and photodynamic therapy-generated vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen eKorbelik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Calreticulin is recognized as one of pivotal damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP molecules alerting the host of the presence of distressed cells. In this role, calreticulin becomes exposed on the surface of tumor cells treated by several types of cancer therapy including photodynamic therapy (PDT. The goal of the present study was to examine the potential of externally added calreticulin for augmenting antitumor effect mediated by PDT. Recombinant calreticulin was found to bind to mouse SCCVII tumor cells treated by PDT. Compared to the outcome with PDT alone, cure-rates of SCCVII tumors grown in immunocompetent C3H/HeN mice were elevated when calreticulin (0.4 mg/mouse was injected peritumorally immediately after PDT. Such therapeutic gain with PDT plus calreticulin combination was not obtained with SCCVII tumors growing in immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. In PDT vaccine protocol, where PDT-treated SCCVII cells are used for vaccination of SCCVII tumor-bearing mice, adding recombinant calreticulin to cells before their injection produced improved therapeutic effect. The expression of calreticulin gene was reduced in PDT-treated cells, while no changes were observed with the expression of this gene in tumor, liver, and spleen tissues in PDT vaccine-treated mice. These findings reveal that externally added recombinant calreticulin can boost antitumor responses elicited by PDT or PDT-generated vaccines, and can thus serve as an effective adjuvant for cancer treatment with PDT and probably other cancer cell stress-inducing modalities.

  8. Photodynamic Therapy Plus Chemotherapy Compared with Photodynamic Therapy Alone in Hilar Nonresectable Cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentrup, Robert; Winkelmann, Nicola; Mitroshkin, Andrey; Prager, Matthias; Voderholzer, Winfried; Schachschal, Guido; Jürgensen, Christian; Büning, Carsten

    2016-05-23

    Standard treatments are not available for hilar nonresectable cholangiocarcinoma (NCC). It is unknown whether combination therapy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) plus systemic chemotherapy is superior to PDT alone. We retrospectively reviewed 68 patients with hilar NCC treated with either PDT plus chemotherapy (PTD-C) or PDT monotherapy (PDT-M). The primary endpoint was the mean overall survival rate. Secondary endpoints included the 1-year survival rate, risk of cholangitic complications, and outcomes, which were evaluated according to the chemotherapy protocol. More than 90% of the study population had advanced hilar NCC Bismuth type III or IV. In the PDT-M group (n=35), the mean survival time was 374 days compared with 520 days in the PDT-C group (n=33, p=0.021). The 1-year survival rate was significantly higher in the PDT-C group compared with the PDT-M group (88% vs 58%, p=0.001) with a significant reduction of mortality (hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.07 to 0.58; p=0.003). Gemcitabine monotherapy resulted in a shorter survival time compared with the gemcitabine combination therapy (mean, 395 days vs 566 days; p=0.09). Cholangitic complications were observed at a similar frequency in the PDT-C and PDT-M groups. Combining repeated PDT with a gemcitabine-based combination therapy might offer a significant survival benefit in patients with hilar NCC.

  9. Hypericin encapsulated in solid lipid nanoparticles: phototoxicity and photodynamic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adriel M; Pizzol, Carine Dal; Monteiro, Fabíola B F; Creczynski-Pasa, Tânia B; Andrade, Gislaine P; Ribeiro, Anderson O; Perussi, Janice R

    2013-08-05

    The hydrophobicity of some photosensitizers can induce aggregation in biological systems, which consequently reduces photodynamic activity. The conjugation of photosensitizers with nanocarrier systems can potentially be used to overcome this problem. The objective of this study was to prepare and characterise hypericin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Hy-SLN) for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT). SLN were prepared using the ultrasonication technique, and their physicochemical properties were characterised. The mean particle size was found to be 153 nm, with a low polydispersity index of 0.28. One of the major advantages of the SLN formulation is its high entrapment efficiency (EE%). Hy-SLN showed greater than 80% EE and a drug loading capacity of 5.22% (w/w). To determine the photodynamic efficiency of Hy before and after encapsulation in SLN, the rate constants for the photodecomposition of two (1)O2 trapping reagents, DPBF and AU, were determined. These rate constants exhibited an increase of 60% and 50% for each method, respectively, which is most likely due to an increase in the lifetime of the triplet state caused by the increase in solubility. Hy-SLN presented a 30% increase in cell uptake and a correlated improvement of 26% in cytotoxicity. Thus, all these advantages suggest that Hy-loaded SLN has potential for use in PDT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Photodynamic inactivation of foodborne bacteria by eosin Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, E; Dos Santos, A R; Fiori da Silva, A; Ribeiro, L H; Favero, M E; Campanerut-Sá, P A Z; de Freitas, C F; Caetano, W; Hioka, N; Mikcha, J M G

    2018-03-25

    The aim of this study was evaluate the effect of photodynamic inactivation mediated by eosin Y in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ATCC 14028, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Bacteria (10 7 CFU per ml) were incubated with eosin Y at concentrations ranging from 0·1 to 10 μmol l -1 , irradiated by green LED (λ max 490-570 nm) for 5, 10 and 15 min and the cellular viability was determined. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was completely inactivated when treated with 10 μmol l -1 eosin Y for 10 min. Treatments reduced B. cereus and Salm. Typhimurium counts to 2·7 log CFU per ml and 1·7 log CFU per ml, respectively. Escherichia coli counts were slightly reduced. Staphylococcus aureus presented the highest sensitivity, being completely inactivated by eosin Y at 5 μmol l -1 and 5 min of illumination. The reduction of cellular viability of photoinactivated Staph. aureus was also demonstrated by flow cytometry and morphological changes were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Eosin Y in combination with LED produced bacterial inactivation, being a potential candidate for photodynamic inactivation. This study evidenced the efficacy of photodynamic inactivation as a novel and promising alternative to bacterial control. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Photodynamic effect of light-emitting diode light on cell growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    Photodynamic effect of LED light on cell growth inhibition induced by methylene blue. 231. J. Biosci. ... high costs make PDT inaccessible for many institutions .... After 48 h at room temperature, 20 mature ... decrease in turbidity of the medium and the increase in %T ..... Mechanistic study of the photodynamic inactivation of.

  12. Natural extracellular nanovesicles and photodynamic molecules: is there a future for drug delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Matsubara, Takao; Murata, Hiroaki; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Iessi, Elisabetta; Di Raimo, Rossella; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Fais, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    Photodynamic molecules represent an alternative approach for cancer therapy for their property (i) to be photo-reactive; (ii) to be not-toxic for target cells in absence of light; (iii) to accumulate specifically into tumour tissues; (iv) to be activable by a light beam only at the tumour site and (v) to exert cytotoxic activity against tumour cells. However, to date their clinical use is limited by the side effects elicited by systemic administration. Extracellular vesicles are endogenous nanosized-carriers that have been recently introduced as a natural delivery system for therapeutic molecules. We have recently shown the ability of human exosomes to deliver photodynamic molecules. Therefore, this review focussed on extracellular vesicles as a novel strategy for the delivery of photodynamic molecules at cancer sites. This completely new approach may enhance the delivery and decrease the toxicity of photodynamic molecules, therefore, represent the future for photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  14. Illustrated computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    This book provides the following information: basic aspects of computed tomography; atlas of computed tomography of the normal adult; clinical application of computed tomography; and radiotherapy planning and computed tomography

  15. Photodynamic therapy combined with antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment for recalcitrant chronic central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asahi MG

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Masumi G Asahi,1 Andrew T Chon,1 Esmeralda Gallemore,1 Ron P Gallemore1,2 1Clinical Research Department, Retina Macula Institute, Torrance, CA, USA; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Purpose: To determine whether combination photodynamic therapy (PDT and antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapy is effective in the management of chronic central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC recalcitrant to conventional therapy. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of eight patients with chronic CSC unresponsive to topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, focal photocoagulation, anti-VEGF alone, or PDT alone. All patients were evaluated with a full ophthalmic examination, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT, fluorescein angiography (FA, and most with indocyanine green angiography (ICGA followed by treatment with half-fluence PDT and intravitreal anti-VEGF injection (seven bevacizumab, one aflibercept. Patients were seen in follow-up 1 month after treatment. Results: All eight patients achieved complete resolution in subretinal fluid following combination treatment. Average duration of CSC prior to initiation of combination therapy was 7.5 months. Mean central macular thickness on OCT decreased significantly from 401.2±52.7 µm to 297.9±18.2 µm (p=0.0010 by 4 months after treatment (1.63±1.18 months. Seven of eight patients were followed up for an average of 13 months with no recurrence during that time. One case recurred at 8 months and was treated with repeat combination at that time. Frank choroidal neovascularization (CNV was not identified in these cases on FA or ICGA studies. Eight of eight patients showed significant improvement in vision from a logMAR of 0.1125±0.099 to 0.0125±0.064 (p=0.019. Conclusion: Combination PDT and anti-VEGF is effective for chronic CSC which has failed conventional therapy. Associated CNV and/or inflammation may be reasons for greater success in

  16. Optical tomography of tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimnyakov, D A; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2002-01-01

    Methods of optical tomography of biological tissues are considered, which include pulse-modulation and frequency-modulation tomography, diffusion tomography with the use of cw radiation sources, optical coherent tomography, speckle-correlation tomography of nonstationary media, and optoacoustic tomography. The method for controlling the optical properties of tissues is studied from the point of view of increasing a probing depth in optical coherent tomography. The modern state and prospects of the development of optical tomography are discussed. (review)

  17. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.; Davis, J.; Morgan, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray or gamma-ray transmission computed tomography (CT) is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that produces two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without the need to physically section it. CT is also known by the acronym CAT, for computerised axial tomography. This review article presents a brief historical perspective on CT, its current status and the underlying physics. The mathematical fundamentals of computed tomography are developed for the simplest transmission CT modality. A description of CT scanner instrumentation is provided with an emphasis on radiation sources and systems. Examples of CT images are shown indicating the range of materials that can be scanned and the spatial and contrast resolutions that may be achieved. Attention is also given to the occurrence, interpretation and minimisation of various image artefacts that may arise. A final brief section is devoted to the principles and potential of a range of more recently developed tomographic modalities including diffraction CT, positron emission CT and seismic tomography. 57 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs

  18. Doppler Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T. R.

    I review the method of Doppler tomography which translates binary-star line profiles taken at a series of orbital phases into a distribution of emission over the binary. I begin with a discussion of the basic principles behind Doppler tomography, including a comparison of the relative merits of maximum entropy regularisation versus filtered back-projection for implementing the inversion. Following this I discuss the issue of noise in Doppler images and possible methods for coping with it. Then I move on to look at the results of Doppler Tomography applied to cataclysmic variable stars. Outstanding successes to date are the discovery of two-arm spiral shocks in cataclysmic variable accretion discs and the probing of the stream/magnetospheric interaction in magnetic cataclysmic variable stars. Doppler tomography has also told us much about the stream/disc interaction in non-magnetic systems and the irradiation of the secondary star in all systems. The latter indirectly reveals such effects as shadowing by the accretion disc or stream. I discuss all of these and finish with some musings on possible future directions for the method. At the end I include a tabulation of Doppler maps published in refereed journals.

  19. Lower Extremity Revascularization Using Optical Coherence Tomography-Guided Directional Atherectomy: Final Results of the EValuatIon of the PantheriS OptIcal COherence Tomography ImagiNg Atherectomy System for Use in the Peripheral Vasculature (VISION) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Arne G; Bennett, J Gray; Crowder, William H; Dohad, Suhail; Janzer, Sean F; George, Jon C; Tedder, Barry; Davis, Thomas P; Cawich, Ian M; Gammon, Roger S; Muck, Patrick E; Pigott, John P; Dishmon, Dwight A; Lopez, Lou A; Golzar, Jaafer A; Chamberlin, Jack R; Moulton, Michael J; Zakir, Ramzan M; Kaki, Amir K; Fishbein, Gary J; McDaniel, Huey B; Hezi-Yamit, Ayala; Simpson, John B; Desai, Arjun

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel optical coherence tomography (OCT)-guided atherectomy catheter in treating patients with symptomatic femoropopliteal disease. The VISION trial ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01937351) was a single-arm, multicenter, global investigational device exemption study enrolling 158 subjects (mean age 67.2±10.5 years; 87 men) across 20 participating sites. In this cohort, 198 lesions were treated with an average length of 53±40 mm using the Pantheris catheter alone or Pantheris + adjunctive therapy. The primary safety endpoint was the composite of major adverse events (MAEs) through 6 months (objective performance goal 43.2%). Technical success (primary efficacy outcome) was defined as the percent of target lesions with a residual diameter stenosis ≤50% after treatment with the Pantheris device alone (objective performance goal 87.0%). Procedural success was defined as reduction in stenosis to ≤30% after Pantheris ± adjunctive therapy. Tissue specimens retrieved from each treated lesion were histologically analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and precision of OCT image guidance. The primary efficacy outcome was achieved in 192 (97.0%) of the 198 lesions treated with the Pantheris catheter. Across all lesions, mean diameter stenosis was reduced from 78.7%±15.1% at baseline to 30.3%±11.8% after Pantheris alone (patherectomy specimens confirmed atherectomy for femoropopliteal disease is safe and effective. Additionally, the precision afforded by OCT guidance leads to greater removal of plaque during atherectomy while sparing the adventitia.

  20. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  1. Effective photodynamic therapy against microbial populations in human deep tissue abscess aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidaris, Constantine G; Foster, Thomas H; Waldman, David L; Mathes, Edward J; McNamara, Joanne; Curran, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    The primary therapy for deep tissue abscesses is drainage accompanied by systemic antimicrobial treatment. However, the long antibiotic course required increases the probability of acquired resistance, and the high incidence of polymicrobial infections in abscesses complicates treatment choices. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective against multiple classes of organisms, including those displaying drug resistance, and may serve as a useful adjunct to the standard of care by reduction of abscess microbial burden following drainage. Aspirates were obtained from 32 patients who underwent image-guided percutaneous drainage of the abscess cavity. The majority of the specimens (24/32) were abdominal, with the remainder from liver and lung. Conventional microbiological techniques and nucleotide sequence analysis of rRNA gene fragments were used to characterize microbial populations from abscess aspirates. We evaluated the sensitivity of microorganisms to methylene blue-sensitized PDT in vitro both within the context of an abscess aspirate and as individual isolates. Most isolates were bacterial, with the fungus Candida tropicalis also isolated from two specimens. We examined the sensitivity of these microorganisms to methylene blue-PDT. Complete elimination of culturable microorganisms was achieved in three different aspirates, and significant killing (P abscess treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dynamics of HPV viral loads reflect the treatment effect of photodynamic therapy in genital warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhili; Liu, Lishi; Zhang, Wenjing; Liu, Hui; Li, Junpeng; Jiang, Lifen; Zeng, Kang

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has demonstrated good clinical cure rates and low recurrence rates in the treatment of genital warts. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and viral load assays can reflect the status of persistent or latent infection and serve as a predictor of infection clearance. Specimens from 41 patients with HPV infection were obtained, and the HPV genotypes and viral load were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Traditional treatment, such as radiofrequency, microwave, or surgical therapy, was used to remove the visible lesions, and then PDT treatment was performed every week. HPV DNA testing was performed at every patient visit and the frequency of PDT treatment was determined by changes in HPV viral loads. HPV viral loads decreased significantly after PDT treatment. There were significant differences in HPV viral loads between pretherapy and three or six rounds of PDT treatment. Significant differences were also observed between single and multiple type HPV infection after six rounds of PDT treatment. Patients with single type HPV infection had significantly higher rates of negative HPV DNA test results, as compared with patients with multiple infections after six rounds of PDT treatment; however, there was no difference in recurrence rates between the two groups. Dynamic monitoring of HPV genotypes and viral loads can be used to guide PDT treatment and indicate PDT treatment efficacy in eliminating HPV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescence Imaging Assisted Photodynamic Therapy Using Photosensitizer-Linked Gold Quantum Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Lakshmi V; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-06-23

    Fluorescence imaging assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a viable two-in-one clinical tool for cancer treatment and follow-up. While the surface plasmon effect of gold nanorods and nanoparticles has been effective for cancer therapy, their emission properties when compared to gold nanoclusters are weak for fluorescence imaging guided PDT. In order to address the above issues, we have synthesized a near-infrared-emitting gold quantum cluster capped with lipoic acid (L-AuC with (Au)18(L)14) based nanoplatform with excellent tumor reduction property by incorporating a tumor-targeting agent (folic acid) and a photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX), for selective PDT. The synthesized quantum cluster based photosensitizer PFL-AuC showed 80% triplet quantum yield when compared to that of the photosensitizer alone (63%). PFL-AuC having 60 μg (0.136 mM) of protoporphyrin IX was sufficient to kill 50% of the tumor cell population. Effective destruction of tumor cells was evident from the histopathology and fluorescence imaging, which confirm the in vivo PDT efficacy of PFL-AuC.

  4. A Medical Manipulator System with Lasers in Photodynamic Therapy of Port Wine Stains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stains (PWS are a congenital malformation and dilation of the superficial dermal capillary. Photodynamic therapy (PDT with lasers is an effective treatment of PWS with good results. However, because the laser density is uneven and nonuniform, the treatment is carried out manually by a doctor thus providing little accuracy. Additionally, since the treatment of a single lesion can take between 30 and 60 minutes, the doctor can become fatigued after only a few applications. To assist the medical staff with this treatment method, a medical manipulator system (MMS was built to operate the lasers. The manipulator holds the laser fiber and, using a combination of active and passive joints, the fiber can be operated automatically. In addition to the control input from the doctor over a human-computer interface, information from a binocular vision system is used to guide and supervise the operation. Clinical results are compared in nonparametric values between treatments with and without the use of the MMS. The MMS, which can significantly reduce the workload of doctors and improve the uniformity of laser irradiation, was safely and helpfully applied in PDT treatment of PWS with good therapeutic results.

  5. A Guide to Computed Tomography System Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    particularly where anomalies are not known or expected, where nonimaging measurements of deviations from a norm defy experience or expectation, or...point. 2.9 Archival Requirements Archival requirements usually involve hardcopy, tape, and/or optical disk. These dictate a small subsystem choice, but...some kind of scintillating X-ray crystal, e.g., cadmium tungstate or bismuth germanate that is optically coupled to a photoconversion device like a

  6. Computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caille, J.M.; Salamon, G.

    1980-01-01

    As X-ray Ct becomes more commonplace, other techniques of investigation using roughly comparable hardware and software have appeared. Positron-Emission Tomography already provides indispensable physiological and physio-pathological information. Similarly, in the histo-chemical field, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance seems very promising. Some of these new techniques will no doubt shortly be considered as essential as CT in establishing accurate diagnoses non-invasively. (orig./VJ) [de

  7. Computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, M.; Resnick, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has matured into a reliable and prominent tool for study of the muscoloskeletal system. When it was introduced in 1973, it was unique in many ways and posed a challenge to interpretation. It is in these unique features, however, that its advantages lie in comparison with conventional techniques. These advantages will be described in a spectrum of important applications in orthopedics and rheumatology

  8. Encapsulation of curcumin in polymeric nanoparticles for antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffersson Krishan Trigo Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Curcumin (CUR has been used as photosensitizer in antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT. However its poor water solubility, instability, and scarce bioavalibility hinder its in vivo application. The aim of this study was to synthesize curcumin in polymeric nanoparticles (NP and to evaluate their antimicrobial photodynamic effect and cytoxicity. CUR in anionic and cationic NP was synthesized using polylactic acid and dextran sulfate by the nanoprecipitation method. For cationic NP, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was added. CUR-NP were characterized by physicochemical properties, photodegradation, encapsulation efficiency and release of curcumin from nanoparticles. CUR-NP was compared with free CUR in 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as a photosensitizer for aPDT against planktonic and biofilms (mono-, dual- and triple-species cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The cytotoxicity effect of formulations was evaluated on keratinocytes. Data were analysed by parametric (ANOVA and non-parametric (Kruskal-Wallis tests (α = 0.05. CUR-NP showed alteration in the physicochemical properties along time, photodegradation similar to free curcumin, encapsulation efficiency up to 67%, and 96% of release after 48h. After aPDT planktonic cultures showed reductions from 0.78 log10 to complete eradication, while biofilms showed no antimicrobial effect or reductions up to 4.44 log10. Anionic CUR-NP showed reduced photoinactivation of biofilms. Cationic CUR-NP showed microbicidal effect even in absence of light. Anionic formulations showed no cytotoxic effect compared with free CUR and cationic CUR-NP and NP. The synthesized formulations improved the water solubility of CUR, showed higher antimicrobial photodynamic effect for planktonic cultures than for biofilms, and the encapsulation of CUR in anionic NP reduced the cytotoxicity of 10% DMSO used for free CUR.

  9. Photodynamic action of methylene blue in osteosarcoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiemin; Lai, Xiaoping; Wang, Xinna; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Zhang, Hongwei; Xu, Chuanshan

    2014-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor which threatens the life of young people worldwide. To explore alternative strategy for combating osteosarcoma, a light-emitting diode (LED) that activates methylene blue (MB) was used in the present study to investigate cell death of osteosarcoma-derived UMR106 cells. Photocytotoxicity in UMR106 cells was investigated 24h after photodynamic activation of MB using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay and light microscopy. Apoptosis induction was observed 24h after photodynamic treatment using a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with Hoechst 33342 staining. The change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was analyzed using a flow cytometry with rhodamine 123 staining. MB under red light irradiation caused a drug-concentration (0-100μM) and light-dose (0-32J/cm(2)) dependent cytotoxicity in UMR106 cells. The SRB assay and light microscopy observed a significant decrease in the number of UMR106 cells attached to the bottom of culture well after LED light-activated MB (100μM, 32J/cm(2)). Nuclear shrinkage, chromatin condensation and fragmentation were found in the treated cells by nuclear staining. In addition, flow cytometry showed that the MMP in UMR106 cells was rapidly reduced by photo-activated MB (100μM, 32J/cm(2)). Photodynamic action of MB under LED irradiation could remarkably kill osteosarcoma cells and induce cell apoptosis as well as MMP collapse. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Recurrence and Cosmetic Results After Topical Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alican Kazandı

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Photodynamic therapy (FDT is a photochemotherapy modality which is used frequently and effectively in the treatment of actinic keratosis, Bowen disease and basal cell carcinomas. This study was performed to determine cure rates, cosmetic outcome and recurrence rates after aminolevulinic acid (ALA-based photodynamic therapy for skin lesions showing complete response to treatment procedure. Material and Method: Sixty-eight patients (27 females and 41 males with 78 lesions were included in the study. Among them, 25 were actinic keratosis (AK, 8 were actinic cheilitis (AC, 30 were basal cell carcinomas (BCC, 3 were Bowen disease, 10 were intraepidermal epithelioma (IEE, one lesion was parapsoriasis and one lesion was verruca plantaris. Six to 8 hours after topical administration of ALA (20%, the lesions were exposed to light from a broad-band light source. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from 74 lesions for histopathological control. Results: At the end of the second month of treatment, fifty-six (72% of seventy-eight lesions showed complete clinical response, whereas fourty-seven of 74 lesions (63.5% exhibited complete histopathological clearance. A total of 9 recurrences (16% was observed during a median follow-up of 36 months. Recurrence rates were 3 (14% in AK, 1 (17% in AC, 1 (8% in superficial BCC, 3 (75% nodular BCC and 1 (12.5% in IEE. Cosmetic outcome was excellent and good in 42 lesions (89%, fair in 3 lesions (6% and poor in 2 lesions (5%. Conclusion: Topical photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive, effective and cosmetic modality of treatment in the selected skin lesions, as an alternative to the conventional procedures.

  11. Photodynamic therapy potentiates the paracrine endothelial stimulation by colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, María Julia; Florencia Pansa, María; Emanuel Vera, Renzo; Belén Rumie Vittar, Natalia; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence is a major problem and is often the ultimate cause of death. In this context, the tumor microenvironment influences tumor progression and is considered as a new essential feature that clearly impacts on treatment outcome, and must therefore be taken into consideration. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), oxygen, light and drug-dependent, is a novel treatment modality when CRC patients are inoperable. Tumor vasculature and parenchyma cells are both potential targets of PDT damage modulating tumor-stroma interactions. In biological activity assessment in photodynamic research, three-dimensional (3D) cultures are essential to integrate biomechanical, biochemical, and biophysical properties that better predict the outcome of oxygen- and drug-dependent medical therapies. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect of methyl 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT using a light emitting diode for the treatment of CRC cells in a scenario that mimics targeted tissue complexity, providing a potential bridge for the gap between 2D cultures and animal models. Since photodynamic intervention of the tumor microenvironment can effectively modulate the tumor-stroma interaction, it was proposed to characterize the endothelial response to CRC paracrine communication, if one of these two populations is photosensitized. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the dialogue between endothelial and tumor populations when subjected to lethal PDT conditions induces an increase in angiogenic phenotype, and we think that it should be carefully considered for the development of PDT therapeutic protocols.

  12. Encapsulation of curcumin in polymeric nanoparticles for antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo Gutierrez, Jeffersson Krishan; Zanatta, Gabriela Cristina; Ortega, Ana Laura Mira; Balastegui, Maria Isabella Cuba; Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Barbugli, Paula Aboud

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has been used as photosensitizer in antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (aPDT). However its poor water solubility, instability, and scarce bioavalibility hinder its in vivo application. The aim of this study was to synthesize curcumin in polymeric nanoparticles (NP) and to evaluate their antimicrobial photodynamic effect and cytoxicity. CUR in anionic and cationic NP was synthesized using polylactic acid and dextran sulfate by the nanoprecipitation method. For cationic NP, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was added. CUR-NP were characterized by physicochemical properties, photodegradation, encapsulation efficiency and release of curcumin from nanoparticles. CUR-NP was compared with free CUR in 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a photosensitizer for aPDT against planktonic and biofilms (mono-, dual- and triple-species) cultures of Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The cytotoxicity effect of formulations was evaluated on keratinocytes. Data were analysed by parametric (ANOVA) and non-parametric (Kruskal-Wallis) tests (α = 0.05). CUR-NP showed alteration in the physicochemical properties along time, photodegradation similar to free curcumin, encapsulation efficiency up to 67%, and 96% of release after 48h. After aPDT planktonic cultures showed reductions from 0.78 log10 to complete eradication, while biofilms showed no antimicrobial effect or reductions up to 4.44 log10. Anionic CUR-NP showed reduced photoinactivation of biofilms. Cationic CUR-NP showed microbicidal effect even in absence of light. Anionic formulations showed no cytotoxic effect compared with free CUR and cationic CUR-NP and NP. The synthesized formulations improved the water solubility of CUR, showed higher antimicrobial photodynamic effect for planktonic cultures than for biofilms, and the encapsulation of CUR in anionic NP reduced the cytotoxicity of 10% DMSO used for free CUR. PMID:29107978

  13. The diverse roles of glutathione-associated cell resistance against hypericin photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodossis A. Theodossiou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The diverse responses of different cancers to treatments such as photodynamic therapy of cancer (PDT have fueled a growing need for reliable predictive markers for treatment outcome. In the present work we have studied the differential response of two phenotypically and genotypically different breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, MCF7 and MDA-MB-231, to hypericin PDT (HYP-PDT. MDA-MB-231 cells were 70% more sensitive to HYP PDT than MCF7 cells at LD50. MCF7 were found to express a substantially higher level of glutathione peroxidase (GPX4 than MDA-MB-231, while MDA-MB-231 differentially expressed glutathione-S-transferase (GSTP1, mainly used for xenobiotic detoxification. Eighty % reduction of intracellular glutathione (GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, largely enhanced the sensitivity of the GSTP1 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells to HYP-PDT, but not in MCF7 cells. Further inhibition of the GSH reduction however by carmustine (BCNU resulted in an enhanced sensitivity of MCF7 to HYP-PDT. HYP loading studies suggested that HYP can be a substrate of GSTP for GSH conjugation as BSO enhanced the cellular HYP accumulation by 20% in MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in MCF7 cells. Studies in solutions showed that L-cysteine can bind the GSTP substrate CDNB in the absence of GSTP. This means that the GSTP-lacking MCF7 may use L-cysteine for xenobiotic detoxification, especially during GSH synthesis inhibition, which leads to L-cysteine build-up. This was confirmed by the lowered accumulation of HYP in both cell lines in the presence of BSO and the L-cysteine source NAC. NAC reduced the sensitivity of MCF7, but not MDA-MB-231, cells to HYP PDT which is in accordance with the antioxidant effects of L-cysteine and its potential as a GSTP substrate. As a conclusion we have herein shown that the different GSH based cell defense mechanisms can be utilized as predictive markers for the outcome of PDT and as a guide for selecting optimal combination strategies. Keywords

  14. Three-dimensional illumination procedure for photodynamic therapy of dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-ming; Zhang, Feng-juan; Dong, Fei; Zhou, Ya

    2014-09-01

    Light dosimetry is an important parameter that affects the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, the irregular morphologies of lesions complicate lesion segmentation and light irradiance adjustment. Therefore, this study developed an illumination demo system comprising a camera, a digital projector, and a computing unit to solve these problems. A three-dimensional model of a lesion was reconstructed using the developed system. Hierarchical segmentation was achieved with the superpixel algorithm. The expected light dosimetry on the targeted lesion was achieved with the proposed illumination procedure. Accurate control and optimization of light delivery can improve the efficacy of PDT.

  15. Liquid crystal nanoparticles for delivery of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Delehanty, James B.

    2018-02-01

    The main principle of photodynamic therapy (PDT) is to kill malignant cells by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PDT appeared highly effective when ROS can be produced in subcellular location such as plasma membrane. The plasma membrane maintains the structural integrity of the cell and regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis, trafficking, and apoptotic pathways, could be one of the best points to kill the cancer cells. Previously, we have developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs. Here we highlight the utility of this LCNP for membrane targeted delivery and imaging for a photosensitizer (PS) for PDT applications.

  16. Cutaneous leishmaniasis responds to daylight-activated photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enk, C D; Nasereddin, A; Alper, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is endemic in Israel, with hundreds of new cases reported in recent years. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is highly effective for treatment of CL, but requires equipment available only at specialized centres. Daylight-activated PDT (DA-PDT) abolishes the need...... application of a thick layer of 16% methyl aminolaevulinate and 30-min occlusion, the lesions were exposed to daylight for 2·5 h. Treatment sessions were repeated at weekly intervals until clinical and microbiological cure. Control lesions were either treated with cryotherapy or left untreated. RESULTS...

  17. Uniform irradiation of irregularly shaped cavities for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rem, A I; van Gemert, M J; van der Meulen, F W; Gijsbers, G H; Beek, J F

    1997-03-01

    It is difficult to achieve a uniform light distribution in irregularly shaped cavities. We have conducted a study on the use of hollow 'integrating' moulds for more uniform light delivery of photodynamic therapy in irregularly shaped cavities such as the oral cavity. Simple geometries such as a cubical box, a sphere, a cylinder and a 'bottle-neck' geometry have been investigated experimentally and the results have been compared with computed light distributions obtained using the 'radiosity method'. A high reflection coefficient of the mould and the best uniform direct irradiance possible on the inside of the mould were found to be important determinants for achieving a uniform light distribution.

  18. Supramolecular approach for target transport of photodynamic anticancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejík, Z.; Kaplánek, R.; Bříza, T.; Králová, Jarmila; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2012), s. 106-116 ISSN 1061-0278 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA ČR GA203/09/1311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : photodynamic therapy * photosensitisers * targeted transport * combination therapy * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.546, year: 2012

  19. PET-NECK: a multicentre randomised Phase III non-inferiority trial comparing a positron emission tomography-computerised tomography-guided watch-and-wait policy with planned neck dissection in the management of locally advanced (N2/N3) nodal metastases in patients with squamous cell head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, Hisham; McConkey, Chris C; Rahman, Joy K; Wong, Wai-Lup; Smith, Alison F; Nutting, Chris; Hartley, Andrew Gj; Hall, Peter; Hulme, Claire; Patel, Dharmesh K; Zeidler, Sandra Ventorin von; Robinson, Max; Sanghera, Bal; Fresco, Lydia; Dunn, Janet A

    2017-04-01

    Planned neck dissection (ND) after radical chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains controversial. Thirty per cent of ND specimens show histological evidence of tumour. Consequently, a significant proportion of clinicians still practise planned ND. Fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)-computerised tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated high negative predictive values for persistent nodal disease, providing a possible alternative paradigm to ND. Evidence is sparse and drawn mainly from retrospective single-institution studies, illustrating the need for a prospective randomised controlled trial. To determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of PET-CT-guided surveillance, compared with planned ND, in a multicentre, prospective, randomised setting. A pragmatic randomised non-inferiority trial comparing PET-CT-guided watch-and-wait policy with the current planned ND policy in HNSCC patients with locally advanced nodal metastases and treated with radical CRT. Patients were randomised in a 1 : 1 ratio. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS) and cost-effectiveness [incremental cost per incremental quality-adjusted life-year (QALY)]. Cost-effectiveness was assessed over the trial period using individual patient data, and over a lifetime horizon using a decision-analytic model. Secondary outcomes were recurrence in the neck, complication rates and quality of life. The recruitment of 560 patients was planned to detect non-inferior OS in the intervention arm with a 90% power and a type I error of 5%, with non-inferiority defined as having a hazard ratio (HR) of no higher than 1.50. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed by Cox's proportional hazards model. Thirty-seven head and neck cancer-treating centres (43 NHS hospitals) throughout the UK. Patients with locally advanced nodal metastases of oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, oral or occult HNSCC receiving

  20. Effect of Factor XIII-A G185T Polymorphism on Visual Prognosis after Photodynamic Therapy for Neovascular Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Macular degenerations represent leading causes of central blindness or low vision in developed countries. Most of these severe visual disabilities are due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD and pathologic myopia (PM, both of which are frequently complicated by subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV. Photodynamic therapy with verteporfin (PDT-V is still employed for CNV treatment in selected cases or in combined regimen. In Caucasian patients, the common polymorphism G185T of factor XIII-A gene (FXIII-A-G185T; rs5985 has been described as predictor of poor angiographic CNV responsiveness to PDT-V. Nevertheless, the prognostic implications of this pharmacogenetic determinant on long-term visual outcome after a PDT-V regimen have not been evaluated. We retrospectively selected Caucasian patients presenting with treatment-naive CNV and receiving standardized PDT-V protocol for two years. The study population included patients affected by subfoveal CNV secondary to AMD or PM. We assessed the correlations between the polymorphic allele T of FXIII-A-G185T and: (1 total number of photodynamic treatments; and (2 change in visual acuity from baseline to the end of the follow-up period. Considering a total study population of 412 patients with neovascular AMD or PM, the carriers of 185 T-allele of FXIII-A (GT or TT genotype received a higher number of photodynamic treatments than patients without it (GG wild-type genotype (p < 0.01; mean number of PDT-V: 5.51 vs. 3.76, respectively. Moreover, patients with 185 T-allele of FXIII-A had a more marked worsening of visual acuity at 24 months than those with the GG-185 wild genotype (p < 0.01; mean difference in logMAR visual acuity: 0.22 vs. 0.08, respectively. The present findings show that the G185T polymorphism of the FXIII-A gene is associated with significant differences in the long-term therapeutic outcomes of patients treated with standardized PDT-V protocol. The comprehensive appraisal of

  1. Swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography for choroidal neovascularization after bevacizumab and photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse J. Jung

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: We report the first SS-OCTA images of successfully treated extrafoveal NV after combination PDT and ant-VEGF therapy. Early treatment of extrafoveal NV may improve our ability to treat mixed type 1 and 2 NV before these neovascular complexes mature from repetitive anti-VEGF treatment.

  2. Arrangement for guiding transport cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent relates especially to x-ray equipment such as that used for computerized tomography, and in particular to an arrangement for guiding and supporting a plurality of power transmission cables and cooling hoses in a flexible manner. (U.K.)

  3. 22 years of photodynamic therapy in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Heng

    2005-07-01

    The development of laser medicine in China is correlated with the development of laser science in China. The first Chinese ruby laser was created in 1961. Chinese pharmacists produced the Chinese HpD in 1981 and the first case of PDT was treated using Chinese HpD and Chinese laser equipment in the same year in Beijing. Its success brought attention establishing a research group supported by the government in 1982. A systemic research on PDT was then carried out and obvious results were achieved. The step taken for PDT also accelerated the researches on other kinds of laser medicine and surgery. Since 1982, thousands of patients of malignant tumors including tumors of the lung, esophagus, cardia, stomach, rectum, bladder, other urinary genital organs, face and mouth, eyes, ENT, head and neck, breast, and skin were treated using PDT in China. HpD fluorescence was examined in some centers. Except the superficial tumor cases, PDT procedures were done through the endoscopes. Since 1990"s, imaging guided percutaneous PDT was adopted in the organs cannot be reached by the endoscopes, such as liver cancer, peripheral lung cancer and others. PDT can be used for non-malignant cases such as occlusion of blood vessels, for example, we invented the treatment of port wine stains by PDT. Regular surgical operation combined with PDT for cerebral glioma showed to be a very good combination. HpD has been approved by the Chinese Government as a photosensitizer, so it is legal to be used in PDT. There are some second generation photosensitizers under studying in China, such as Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME) etc. Lasers used for PDT now are mostly the diode laser of 630nm for the cancers. Research studies for PDT in China may be focalized on the aspects as new photosensitizers; the dosimetry in laser irradiation; atoptosis induced by PDT; preclinical and clinical studies for PDT new indications and new technologies.

  4. Photodynamic toxicity of hematoporphyrin derivatives to human keratinocytes in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, H; Reinhold, C; Artuc, M

    Human keratinocytes in culture were able to take up hematoporphyrin derivatives (HPDs) used during photodynamic chemotherapy of tumors. In the absence of light, HPDs showed no cytotoxic effects to keratinocytes. However, after irradiation with visible light, HPDs induced immediate cytotoxicity as measured by the neutral red uptake assay. On the other hand, cell attachment as measured by protein estimation was not affected. When the cells treated with HPDs and irradiated with light were cultured for a further 72 h, they partially lost their ability to attach to the collagen surface. Most of the cells remaining attached after 72 h were no longer viable following treatment with HPDs and light. All parameters measured depended on the intracellular concentration of HPDs used (7-50 ng/10(5) cells) and the time of irradiation (0-30 min). These results suggest that human keratinocytes are a good model to study cytotoxic effects of photodynamically active drugs. Further, keratinocytes were unable to recover after damage caused by HPDs and light.

  5. Complexing Methylene Blue with Phosphorus Dendrimers to Increase Photodynamic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Dabrzalska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of photodynamic therapy is limited mainly due to low selectivity, unfavorable biodistribution of photosensitizers, and long-lasting skin sensitivity to light. However, drug delivery systems based on nanoparticles may overcome the limitations mentioned above. Among others, dendrimers are particularly attractive as carriers, because of their globular architecture and high loading capacity. The goal of the study was to check whether an anionic phosphorus dendrimer is suitable as a carrier of a photosensitizer—methylene blue (MB. As a biological model, basal cell carcinoma cell lines were used. We checked the influence of the MB complexation on its singlet oxygen production ability using a commercial fluorescence probe. Next, cellular uptake, phototoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, and cell death were investigated. The MB-anionic dendrimer complex (MB-1an was found to generate less singlet oxygen; however, the complex showed higher cellular uptake and phototoxicity against basal cell carcinoma cell lines, which was accompanied with enhanced ROS production. Owing to the obtained results, we conclude that the photodynamic activity of MB complexed with an anionic dendrimer is higher than free MB against basal cell carcinoma cell lines.

  6. The mechanisms of photodynamic action for treating of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Akopov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current views on mechanisms of therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy for treating of cancer patients are represented. The history of formation and development of the method is described. The main requirements for agents used as photosensitizers are listed. Detailed review of main photosensitizers used in clinical practice in Russia and in foreign countries with their chemical structure, main spectral characteristics was performed. Methods of its application, therapeutic dose ranges, indications, specifi c pharmacokinetic properties and side-effects are briefl y outlined. Advantages and disadvantages of the most popular modern photosensitizers, main mechanisms of entry of photosensitizers of different chemical structure into cancer cells are observed. Three main possible component of anti-tumor effect: direct damage of cancer cells, impairment of vascular stroma of tumor and elimination of tumor due to immune cells are shown and closely discussed. Necrosis and apotosis of neovascular net which are main development trends of anti-tumor action for photodynamic therapy are noticed. 

  7. Photodynamic therapy on bacterial reduction in dental caries: in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Alessandra; Araujo Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Amaral, Marcello Magri; Zanardi de Freitas, Anderson; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    The reduction of pathogenic microorganisms in supragingival plaque is one of the principal factors in caries prevention and control. A large number of microorganisms have been reported to be inactivated in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model to investigate the effects of PDT on bacterial reduction in induced dental caries. Twenty four rats were orally inoculated with Streptococcus mutans cells (ATCC 25175) for three consecutive days. The animals were fed with a cariogenic diet and water with 10% of sucrose ad libitum, during all experimental period. Caries lesion formation was confirmed by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) 5 days after the beginning of the experiment. Then, the animals were randomly divided into two groups: Control Group: twelve animals were untreated by either light or photosensitizer; and PDT Group: twelve animals were treated with 100μM of methylene blue for 5min and irradiated by a Light Emitting Diode (LED) at λ = 640+/-30nm, fluence of 172J/cm2, output power of 240mW, and exposure time of 3min. Microbiological samples were collected before, immediately after, 3, 7 and 10 days after treatment and the number of total microaerophiles was counted. OCT images showed areas of enamel demineralization on rat molars. Microbiological analysis showed a significant bacterial reduction after PDT. Furthermore, the number of total microaerophiles in PDT group remained lower than control group until 10 days posttreatment. These findings suggest that PDT could be an alternative approach to reduce bacteria in dental caries.

  8. Homogeneous Photodynamical Analysis of Kepler's Multiply-Transiting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozzine, Darin

    To search for planets more like our own, NASA s Kepler Space Telescope ( Kepler ) discovered thousands of exoplanet candidates that cross in front of ( transit ) their parent stars (e.g., Twicken et al. 2016). The Kepler exoplanet data represent an incredible observational leap forward as evidenced by hundreds of papers with thousands of citations. In particular, systems with multiple transiting planets combine the determination of physical properties of exoplanets (e.g., radii), the context provided by the system architecture, and insights from orbital dynamics. Such systems are the most information-rich exoplanetary systems (Ragozzine & Holman 2010). Thanks to Kepler s revolutionary dataset, understanding these Multi-Transiting Systems (MTSs) enables a wide variety of major science questions. In conclusion, existing analyses of MTSs are incomplete and suboptimal and our efficient and timely proposal will provide significant scientific gains ( 100 new mass measurements and 100 updated mass measurements). Furthermore, our homogeneous analysis enables future statistical analyses, including those necessary to characterize the small planet mass-radius relation with implications for understanding the formation, evolution, and habitability of planets. The overarching goal of this proposal is a complete homogeneous investigation of Kepler MTSs to provide detailed measurements (or constraints) on exoplanetary physical and orbital properties. Current investigations do not exploit the full power of the Kepler data; here we propose to use better data (Short Cadence observations), better methods (photodynamical modeling), and a better statistical method (Bayesian Differential Evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo) in a homogenous analysis of all 700 Kepler MTSs. These techniques are particularly valuable for understanding small terrestrial planets. We propose to extract the near-maximum amount of information from these systems through a series of three research objectives

  9. Photodynamic effect of aluminium and zinc tetrasulfophthalocyanines on melanoma cancer cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maduray, K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium and zinc tetrasulfophthalocyanines were activated with a 672nm wavelength laser to investigate the photodynamic effects on melanoma cancer, dermal fibroblast and epidermal keratinocyte cells. Aluminium tetrasulfophthalocyanine was more...

  10. Intensified photodynamic therapy of actinic keratoses with fractional CO2 laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Haak, C S; Thaysen-Petersen, D

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL) is effective for thin actinic keratoses (AKs) in field-cancerized skin. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing (AFXL) creates vertical channels that facilitate MAL uptake and may improve PDT efficacy....

  11. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  12. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation: a bright new technique to kill resistant microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses photosensitizers (non-toxic dyes) that are activated by absorption of visible light to form reactive oxygen species (including singlet oxygen) that can oxidize biomolecules and destroy cells. Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (aPDI) can treat localized infections. aPDI neither causes any resistance to develop in microbes, nor is affected by existing drug resistance status. We discuss some recent developments in aPDI. New photosensitizers including polycat...

  13. Device for fluorescent control and photodynamic therapy of age-related macula degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Budzinskaya, M. V.; Ermakova, N. A.; Shevchik, S. A.; Kharnas, Sergey S.

    2004-07-01

    Age-related macula degeneration (AMD) is a wide spread disease the appearance of which leads to poor eyesight and blindness. A method of treatment is not determined until today. Traditional methods, such as laser coagulation and surgical operations are rather traumatic for eye and often bring to complications. That's why recently a photodynamic method of AMD treatment is studied. Based on photodynamic occlusion of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with minimal injury to overlying neurosensory retina what increases the efficiency.

  14. The synergistic effect of nanoparticles in photodynamic therapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Na; Tu Yu; Zhang Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a novel treatment: based on nanoparticles that combines radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy. With this approach, the application of traditional photodynamic therapies only to surface treatment can be solved, so that the therapeutic effect can be improved; the approach also could guarantee the effectiveness of treatment and reduce radiation doses, so it can effectively control the complications of radiotherapy, This new modality will open a new chapter for cancer therapy. (authors)

  15. Development of Singlet Oxygen Luminescence Kinetics during the Photodynamic Inactivation of Green Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bornhütter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies show the feasibility of photodynamic inactivation of green algae as a vital step towards an effective photodynamic suppression of biofilms by using functionalized surfaces. The investigation of the intrinsic mechanisms of photodynamic inactivation in green algae represents the next step in order to determine optimization parameters. The observation of singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics proved to be a very effective approach towards understanding mechanisms on a cellular level. In this study, the first two-dimensional measurement of singlet oxygen kinetics in phototrophic microorganisms on surfaces during photodynamic inactivation is presented. We established a system of reproducible algae samples on surfaces, incubated with two different cationic, antimicrobial potent photosensitizers. Fluorescence microscopy images indicate that one photosensitizer localizes inside the green algae while the other accumulates along the outer algae cell wall. A newly developed setup allows for the measurement of singlet oxygen luminescence on the green algae sample surfaces over several days. The kinetics of the singlet oxygen luminescence of both photosensitizers show different developments and a distinct change over time, corresponding with the differences in their localization as well as their photosensitization potential. While the complexity of the signal reveals a challenge for the future, this study incontrovertibly marks a crucial, inevitable step in the investigation of photodynamic inactivation of biofilms: it shows the feasibility of using the singlet oxygen luminescence kinetics to investigate photodynamic effects on surfaces and thus opens a field for numerous investigations.

  16. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  17. Electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Beatriz; Hermosa, Cecilia; Abella, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Continuous assessment of respiratory status is one of the cornerstones of modern intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring systems. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT), although with some constraints, may play the lead as a new diagnostic and guiding tool for an adequate optimization of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients. EIT may assist in defining mechanical ventilation settings, assess distribution of tidal volume and of end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and contribute to titrate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)/tidal volume combinations. It may also quantify gains (recruitment) and losses (overdistention or derecruitment), granting a more realistic evaluation of different ventilator modes or recruitment maneuvers, and helping in the identification of responders and non-responders to such maneuvers. Moreover, EIT also contributes to the management of life-threatening lung diseases such as pneumothorax, and aids in guiding fluid management in the critical care setting. Lastly, assessment of cardiac function and lung perfusion through electrical impedance is on the way. PMID:29430443

  18. Intraoperative delineation of brain tumors with special attention of photodynamic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, G.M.

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation gives an overview of the intraoperative techniques of detection of malignant gliomas with special attention of photodynamic diagnosis. The exact identification of infiltrating parts of the malignoma allows the neurosurgeon to perform a resection as complete as possible with sparing eloquent areas. The quality of the m-THPC-induced fluorescence and the influence of the fluorescence-guided resection on the extent of resection are evaluated by histology and on early postoperative MR-imagings. 22 patients suffering from malignant brain tumors receive m-THPC (Foscan: 0,15 mg/kg KG) intravenously four days before operation. After excitation with violet-blue light (370 to 440 nm) tumor-associated red fluorescence is observed either by the naked eye, either by a standard CCD camera and verified by analysis of fluorescence spectra. The surgeon removes fluorescing tissue whenever it is considered safely possible. 138 biopsis are taken of fluorescing and non fluorescing areas in order to correlate them with history. Furthermore the presence of residual enhancement on early postoperative MR-imaging and its congruence in localization with the intraoperative fluorescence are studied. Histological analysis demonstrate 87,9 % sensitivity and 95,7 % specificity for predicting the presence of malignant tissue from visible m-THPC-fluorescence. In 75 % further fluorescence-guided resection is performed. The percentage of postoperative MR-Imagings without residual enhancement after application of PDD rises distinctly. A sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 84,6 % are evaluated in the correlation between the presence of m-THPC-fluorescence after resection and the presence of residual enhancement on postoperative MRI. The anatomical localization of the residual tumor on imaging corresponds with the localization of the intraoperative residual fluorescence in all cases. m-THPC-guided resection is a safe and selective method to detect intraoperatively infiltrating

  19. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  20. Photodynamic therapy: Theoretical and experimental approaches to dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic species generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT), and 1O 2 reactions with biological targets define the photodynamic dose at the most fundamental level. We have developed a theoretical model for rigorously describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of oxygen (3O 2) consumption and transport and microscopic 1O 2 dose deposition during PDT in vivo. Using experimentally established physiological and photophysical parameters, the mathematical model allows computation of the dynamic variation of hemoglobin-3O 2 saturation within vessels, irreversible photosensitizer degradation due to photobleaching, therapy-induced blood flow decrease and the microscopic distributions of 3O2 and 1O 2 dose deposition under various irradiation conditions. mTHPC, a promising photosensitizer for PDT, is approved in Europe for the palliative treatment of head and neck cancer. Using the theoretical model and informed by intratumor sensitizer concentrations and distributions, we calculated photodynamic dose depositions for mTHPC-PDT. Our results demonstrate that the 1O 2 dose to the tumor volume does not track even qualitatively with long-term tumor responses. Thus, in this evaluation of mTHPC-PDT, any PDT dose metric that is proportional to singlet oxygen creation and/or deposition would fail to predict the tumor response. In situations like this one, other reporters of biological response to therapy would be necessary. In addition to the case study of mTHPC-PDT, we also use the mathematical model to simulate clinical photobleaching data, informed by a possible blood flow reduction during treatment. In a recently completed clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma received topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and were irradiated with 633 nm light at 10-150 mW cm-2 . Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photobleaching in the lesion and the adjacent perilesion normal margin was monitored by

  1. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Brian C; Patterson, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components-light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT. (topical review)

  2. Physical and mathematical modeling of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürgermeister, Lisa; López, Fernando Romero; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is a promising method to treat local bacterial infections. The therapy is painless and does not cause bacterial resistances. However, there are gaps in understanding the dynamics of the processes, especially in periodontal treatment. This work describes the advances in fundamental physical and mathematical modeling of aPDT used for interpretation of experimental evidence. The result is a two-dimensional model of aPDT in a dental pocket phantom model. In this model, the propagation of laser light and the kinetics of the chemical reactions are described as coupled processes. The laser light induces the chemical processes depending on its intensity. As a consequence of the chemical processes, the local optical properties and distribution of laser light change as well as the reaction rates. The mathematical description of these coupled processes will help to develop treatment protocols and is the first step toward an inline feedback system for aPDT users.

  3. Factors related to pain during routine photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Nielsen, J S; Lophaven, S

    2011-01-01

    between pain-reducing intervention and diagnosis, pre-treatment, gender or age was found. CONCLUSIONS: Pain-reducing intervention was required in 44% of the PDT treatments. Intervention was particularly required when treating lesions in areas suited for PDT therapy for cosmetic reasons such as the scalp......BACKGROUND: Pain may be a limiting factor in the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The consequences of the pain i.e. the resources spent on pain-intervention during routine PDT therapy are poorly described. OBJECTIVES: To describe the consequences of pain during PDT by describing the use of pain......-reducing interventions in routine use. We studied the frequency as well as level of pain-reducing intervention. METHODS: Descriptive data from PDT treated patients. The level of pain-reducing intervention was graded 0, no intervention; +, cold water spray and ++, pause or nerve block. RESULTS: Data from 983 PDT...

  4. Photodynamic dye adsorption and release performance of natural zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Dong, Chen-Yuan; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2017-03-01

    Clinoptilolite type of zeolite (CZ) is a promising material for biomedicine and pharmaceutics due to its non-toxicity, thermal stability, expanded surface area, and exceptional ability to adsorb various atoms and organic molecules into micropores. Using multiphoton microscopy, we demonstrated that individual CZ particles produce two-photon excited luminescence and second harmonic generation signal at femtosecond laser excitation, and adsorb photo-dynamically active dyes such as hypericin and methylene blue. Furthermore, the release of hypericin from CZ pores in the presence of biomolecules is shown, and CZ can be considered as an effective material for drug delivery and controlled release in biological systems. The results may open new perspectives in application of CZ in biomedical imaging, and introducing of the optical approaches into the clinical environment.

  5. Photodynamic Detection of Peritoneal Metastases Using 5-Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Yonemura

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, peritoneal metastasis (PM was considered as a terminal stage of cancer. From the early 1990s, however, a new comprehensive treatment consisting of cytoreductive surgery and perioperative chemotherapy has been established to improve long-term survival for selected patients with PM. Among prognostic indicators after the treatment, completeness of cytoreduction is the most independent predictors of survival. However, peritoneal recurrence is a main cause of recurrence, even after complete cytoreduction. As a cause of peritoneal recurrence, small PM may be overlooked at the time of cytoreductive surgery (CRS, therefore, development of a new method to detect small PM is desired. Recently, photodynamic diagnosis (PDD was developed for detection of PM. The objectives of this review were to evaluate whether PDD using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA could improve detection of small PM.

  6. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian C; Patterson, Michael S

    2008-05-07

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components -- light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT.

  7. Photodynamic therapy of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) high grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Belotto, Renata; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the precursor of invasive cervical cancer and associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that has been used for the treatment of tumors. PDT is based on the accumulation of a photosensitizer in target cells that will generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species upon illumination, inducing the death of abnormal tissue and PDT with less damaging to normal tissues than surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy and seems to be a promising alternative procedure for CIN treatment. The CIN high grades (II and III) presents potential indications for PDT due the success of PDT for CIN low grade treatment. The patients with CIN high grade that were treated with new clinic protocol shows lesion regression to CIN low grade 60 days after the treatment. The new clinical protocol using for treatment of CIN high grade shows great potential to become a public health technique.

  8. Colonic cancer cell polyamine synthesis after photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briand, G.; Foultier, M.T.; Patrice, T.; Perret, C.; Combre, A.; Etourneau, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    PhotoDynamic Therapy is a new concept for cancer treatment based on the interaction between light and a sensitizer, hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) selectively retained by tumor cells which becomes toxic after light exposure. This effect decreases cell growth, through complex pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether cellular polyamines, Put (Putrescine), Spd (Spermidine) and Spm (Spermine) were modified after PDT or not. These cations of small molecular weight are essential for cell growth and differentiation of normal and neoplastic cells. In this study intracellular contents of Put, Spd and Spm were determined on 2 sublines of rat colonic cancer cells cloned from the same rat cancer and forming progressive (PROb) and regressive (REGb) tumors. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs

  9. Photoirradiation system for solid tumors in photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, L.; Stolik, S.; Rosa, J.M. de la

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical procedure which induces cell death for destroying cancerous tissues mostly. This is accomplished by photochemical reaction produced by the combined action of three elements: photo sensitizer, light and oxygen. One aspect of the development of PDT is focused on the treatment of solid and deep tumors, where a set of delivering-light probes are placed into the tumor mass. However, this technique still has several challenges, for although certain parameters involved in the procedure may be adjusted, the complex geometry and non-homogeneity of a tumor difficult to establish the appropriate treatment planning. This paper addresses an overview of interstitial PDT and presents our proposal of photo irradiation system. (Author)

  10. Absence of bacterial resistance following repeat exposure to photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedigo, Lisa A.; Gibbs, Aaron J.; Scott, Robert J.; Street, Cale N.

    2009-06-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria necessitates exploration of alternative approaches to treat hospital and community acquired infections. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial pathogens develop resistance to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) during repeated sub-lethal challenge. Antibiotic sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus and antibiotic sensitive E. coli were subjected to repeat PDT treatments using a methylene blue photosensitizer formulation and 670 nm illumination from a non-thermal diode laser. Parameters were adjusted such that kills were antibiotic resistance strains. Furthermore, repeated sub-lethal exposure does not induce resistance to subsequent PDT treatments. The absence of resistance formation represents a significant advantage of PDT over traditional antibiotics.

  11. Photodynamic therapy of cancer — Challenges of multidrug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT of cancer is a two-step drug-device combination modality, which involves the topical or systemic administration of a photosensitizer followed by light illumination of cancer site. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the light illumination of photosensitizer (PS can lead to the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS and consequently destroy cancer. Similar to many other anticancer therapies, PDT is also subject to intrinsic cancer resistance mediated by multidrug resistance (MDR mechanisms. This paper will review the recent progress in understanding the interaction between MDR transporters and PS uptake. The strategies that can be used in a clinical setting to overcome or bypass MDR will also be discussed.

  12. Photodynamic therapy of cancer with the photosensitizer PHOTOGEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Sukhin, Garry M.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Belous, T. A.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Smirnov, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    The first clinical trials of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in Russia were started in P. A. Hertzen Moscow Research Oncology Institute in October of 1992. Up to now, 61 patients with primary or recurrent malignant tumors of the larynx (3), trachea (1), bronchus (11), nose (1), mouth (3), esophagus (12), vagina and uterine cervix (3), bladder (2), skin (6), and cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases of breast cancer and melanomas (6) have been treated by PDT with the photosensitizer Photogem. At least partial tumor response was observed in all of the cases, but complete remission indicating no evident tumors has been reached in 51% of the cases. Among 29 patients with early and first stage cancer 14 patients had multifocal tumors. Complete remission of tumors in this group reached 86%.

  13. The physics, biophysics and technology of photodynamic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Brian C [Division of Biophysics and Bioimaging, Ontario Cancer Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9 (Canada); Patterson, Michael S [Department of Medical Physics, Juravinski Cancer Centre and Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 699 Concession Street, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada)], E-mail: wilson@uhnres.utoronto.ca, E-mail: mike.patterson@jcc.hhsc.ca

    2008-05-07

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses light-activated drugs to treat diseases ranging from cancer to age-related macular degeneration and antibiotic-resistant infections. This paper reviews the current status of PDT with an emphasis on the contributions of physics, biophysics and technology, and the challenges remaining in the optimization and adoption of this treatment modality. A theme of the review is the complexity of PDT dosimetry due to the dynamic nature of the three essential components-light, photosensitizer and oxygen. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the problem and in developing instruments to measure all three, so that optimization of individual PDT treatments is becoming a feasible target. The final section of the review introduces some new frontiers of research including low dose rate (metronomic) PDT, two-photon PDT, activatable PDT molecular beacons and nanoparticle-based PDT. (topical review)

  14. Structural and functional imaging for vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Buhong; Gu, Ying; Wilson, Brian C.

    2017-02-01

    Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) has been widely used for the prevention or treatment of vascular-related diseases, such as localized prostate cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, port wine stains, esophageal varices and bleeding gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. In this study, the fundamental mechanisms of vascular responses during and after V-PDT will be introduced. Based on the V-PDT treatment of blood vessels in dorsal skinfold window chamber model, the structural and functional imaging, which including white light microscopy, laser speckle imaging, singlet oxygen luminescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging for evaluating vascular damage will be presented, respectively. The results indicate that vessel constriction and blood flow dynamics could be considered as the crucial biomarkers for quantitative evaluation of vascular damage. In addition, future perspectives of non-invasive optical imaging for evaluating vascular damage of V-PDT will be discussed.

  15. Endodontic treatment associated with photodynamic therapy: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmino, Ramon Targino; Brandt, Lorenna Mendes Temóteo; Ribeiro, Gustavo Leite; Dos Santos, Katia Simone Alves; Catão, Maria Helena Chaves de Vasconccelos; Gomes, Daliana Queiroga de Castro

    2016-09-01

    The complete elimination of bacteria inside the root canal is a difficult task, and inconsistent removal of the innermost layer of contaminated dentin leaves bacteria behind. PDT is an adjunct to conventional endodontic treatment due to its potential to reduce bacteria and its biocompatibility. Report a case of endodontic treatment associated with Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). A patient with chronic dentoalveolar abscess with radiolucent lesion next to the apexes of teeth 11 and 21 was submitted to conventional endodontic treatment associated with PDT. The canals were filled after two PDT sessions with an interval of 15days between applications. After six months, total regression of apical periodontitis and no fistula or associated symptoms were observed. The treatment proposed is a viable option for the clinician as it is easy to perform, has relatively low-cost and allows the improvement of symptoms in a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based carbon dots for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haozhe; Zheng, Xiaohua; Liu, Shi; Zheng, Min; Xie, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yu, Meng; Shuai, Xintao

    2018-06-01

    The development of a simple and straightforward strategy to synthesize multifunctional carbon dots for photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been an emerging focus. In this work, diketopyrrolopyrrole-based fluorescent carbon dots (DPP CDs) were designed and synthesized through a facile one-pot hydrothermal method by using diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) and chitosan (CTS) as raw materials. DPP CDs not only maintained the ability of DPP to generate singlet oxygen (1O2) but also have excellent hydrophilic properties and outstanding biocompatibility. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that DPP CDs greatly inhibited the growth of tumor cells under laser irradiation (540 nm). This study highlights the potential of the rational design of CDs for efficient cancer therapy.

  17. An effective zinc phthalocyanine derivative for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhuo, E-mail: zchen@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Jincan [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Li, Linsen [Department of Biochemistry, Shenyang Medical College, Shenyang, Liaoning 110034 (China); Hu, Ping; Chen, Song [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Huang, Mingdong, E-mail: mhuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry and Danish-Chinese Centre for Proteases and Cancer, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is a common clinical problem. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria posts a severe challenge to medical practice worldwide. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) uses laser light at specific wavelength to activate oxygen molecule in the human tissue into reactive oxygen species as antimicrobial agent. This activation of oxygen by laser light is mediated through a photosensitizer. Two key properties for potent photosensitizer are its absorbance of light in the infrared region (630–700 nm), which promotes tissue penetration depth, and the selective accumulation on bacteria instead of human tissue. We herein report a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5}) and its antimicrobial effects in vitro and in an animal infection model. This photosensitizer has strong capability to kill bacteria at 670 nm. Chemically, it is a water-soluble and cationic photosensitizer carrying positive charge under physiological pH, and can specifically target to bacteria which usually bears negative charges on its surface. Compared with anionic ZnPc counterparts, ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} shows a higher phototoxicity toward bacteria. PACT studies of ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} in experimental infection animal model showed a significant bacteria inhibition compared to controls, and high selectivity of ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} toward bacteria. These findings suggest ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} is a promising antimicrobial photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases. - Highlights: • Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with water-soluble zinc phthalocyanine derivative offers a promising measure to deal with antibiotic resistance of bacteria. • The use of portable LED light sources that are battery-powered and with low cost may make possible the deployment of systems that can be used for wound decontamination. • ZnPc-(Lys){sub 5} is a potent photosensitizer for treatment of infectious diseases.

  18. An effective zinc phthalocyanine derivative for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Jincan; Li, Linsen; Hu, Ping; Chen, Song; Huang, Mingdong

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common clinical problem. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria posts a severe challenge to medical practice worldwide. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) uses laser light at specific wavelength to activate oxygen molecule in the human tissue into reactive oxygen species as antimicrobial agent. This activation of oxygen by laser light is mediated through a photosensitizer. Two key properties for potent photosensitizer are its absorbance of light in the infrared region (630–700 nm), which promotes tissue penetration depth, and the selective accumulation on bacteria instead of human tissue. We herein report a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-(Lys) 5 ) and its antimicrobial effects in vitro and in an animal infection model. This photosensitizer has strong capability to kill bacteria at 670 nm. Chemically, it is a water-soluble and cationic photosensitizer carrying positive charge under physiological pH, and can specifically target to bacteria which usually bears negative charges on its surface. Compared with anionic ZnPc counterparts, ZnPc-(Lys) 5 shows a higher phototoxicity toward bacteria. PACT studies of ZnPc-(Lys) 5 in experimental infection animal model showed a significant bacteria inhibition compared to controls, and high selectivity of ZnPc-(Lys) 5 toward bacteria. These findings suggest ZnPc-(Lys) 5 is a promising antimicrobial photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases. - Highlights: • Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with water-soluble zinc phthalocyanine derivative offers a promising measure to deal with antibiotic resistance of bacteria. • The use of portable LED light sources that are battery-powered and with low cost may make possible the deployment of systems that can be used for wound decontamination. • ZnPc-(Lys) 5 is a potent photosensitizer for treatment of infectious diseases

  19. The Influence of Photodynamic Therapy on Tumor Cell S180

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouran Sadat Tayebi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Today cancer is the second important factor of the death in the world. Most of the cancer patients are treated with standard therapies, including surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. These standard therapies are most efficient on the primary tumor, but in the case of disseminated disease, they are often not effective. Treatment of disease that has disseminated from the primary tumor and metastasized to distant sites has promoted the investigation of immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer, and has been a major area of research over the last couple of decades. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy, standard therapies, are the main treatments for majority of cancer patients. Our studies demonstrate that ALA-HMME-PDT has a role in enhanced the quality of life and lengthens survival in mice infected by sarcoma 180. The reported method is hardly implemented but it possible in any clinical situation where PDT is needed. These therapies are most efficient in bearing the tumor in its first process of formation. Currently, the hot topic of discussion and research in the cancer arena is photodynamic Therapy (PDT. This type of therapy is an emerging channel of treatment that is very successful in eradicating cancer, with few side effects. The effectiveness of photodynamic therapy on the sarcoma treating process in mice by using ALA and HMME photosensitizers is investigated by this study. Many factors help us determine effectiveness of PDT including concentration of the sensitizer, absorption of light energy and accessibility of molecular oxygen in the target tissue during light irradiation, besides intrinsic sensitivity of target tissue.

  20. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS AND PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN COMBINED TREATMENT OF CHOLANGIOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shiryaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the pilot study of combined treatment for non-resectable cholangiocarcinoma complicated with obstructive jaundice are represented this paper. Method included percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, endoscopic fluorescence diagnosis, photodynamic therapy of tumor stricture, and stenting of bile ducts. Fourteen patients who underwent the treatment in the surgery department clinic of I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University were enrolled in the study. Fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy were carried out using photosensitizers photosens (0.5 mg/kg, fotolon (1 mg/kg, and radachlorin (1 mg/kg. The average light dose for one session was 115±5 J/cm2. Fluorescence diagnosis using endoscopic video-fluorescence system for endoscopy and minimally invasive surgery allowed to obtain videoassisted fluorescence image of the tumor and to measure level of photosensitizer fluorescence in tumor in all patients. Malignant tumor was confirmed by morphological study in 12 patients, biopsy of material for morphological study failed in 2 patients with Klatskin tumor. The preliminary results of combined minimally invasive treatment were assessed as promising. The survival time in 4 patients after treatment accounted for 21, 17, 13 and 11 months, respectively. For now 5 patients are under follow-up. Follow-up periods are 13 and 19 months in 2 of them and from 4 to 6 months in 3 of them. Five patients with multiple distant metastases before the treatment died in 3±1 months after therapy. The average lifetime in the treatment group is 9.5 months up to date, however the duration is expected to belonger because 5 of 14 patients are alive.

  1. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  2. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photostimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl2. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT. PMID

  3. Photodynamic inactivation using curcuminoids and Photogem on caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Yulli R.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Inada, Natalia M.; Souza, Larissa M.; Afonso, Ana; de Souza, Clovis W. O.; Oliveira, Kleber T.; Anibal, Fernanda F.

    2018-02-01

    Resistance to various anthelmintic drugs is reported in many animals and can become a severe problem for human and animal health. In this study, Photogem® and three curcuminoids compounds (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin) were used as photosensitizers in the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) in the helminth model Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the ability of this procedure to worm life cycle. Initially, the presence and location of the photosensitizers in the worm's body were verified by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Curcumin was deposited in the digestive tract and Photogem® along the body of the animal in the incubation time of 12 hours with the photosensitizer. Subsequently, a PDI procedure using a LED device was performed to illuminate the worms treated with the photosensitizers. The worms were observed by optical microscopy until 48 hours after the PDI to verify the changes in motility, the presence of eggs and larvae and the number of live worms. Curcuminoids tested separately and in combination and two light doses of 30 J/m2 no changes were observed in the life cycle of the worm at concentrations of 2 mM and 1 mM. However, in treatment with Photogem® and a light dose of 100 J/m2 a reduction in motility and reproduction of the worm with 0.2 mg/mL was observed after 6 hours of exposure, in addition to the death of most worms at concentrations of 6, 4, and 2 mg/mL. We suggest, therefore, that photodynamic inactivation with Photogem® may present an anthelmintic effect against C. elegans, but there is a need for studies on helminths with parasitic activity.

  4. Modeling the oxygen microheterogeneity of tumors for photodynamic therapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Swartz, Harold

    2000-03-01

    Photodynamic theory of tumors uses optical excitation of a sensitizing drug within tissue to produce large deposits of singlet oxygen, which are thought to ultimately cause the tumor destruction. Predicting dose deposition of singlet oxygen in vivo is challenging because measurement of this species in vivo is not easily achieved. But it is possible to follow the concentration of oxygen in vivo, and so measuring the oxygen concentration transients during PDT may provide a viable method of estimating the delivered dose of singlet oxygen. However modeling the microscopic heterogeneity of the oxygen distribution within a tumor is non-trivial, and predicting the microscopic dose deposition requires further study, but this study present the framework and initial calibration needed or modeling oxygen transport in complex geometries. Computational modeling with finite elements provides a versatile structure within which oxygen diffusion and consumption can be modeled within realistic tissue geometries. This study develops the basic tools required to simulate a tumor region, and examines the role of (i) oxygen supply and consumption rates, (ii) inter- capillary spacing, (iii) photosensitizer distribution, and (iv) differences between simulated tumors and those derived directly from histology. The result of these calculations indicate that realistic tumor tissue capillary networks can be simulated using the finite element method, without excessive computational burden for 2D regions near 1 mm2, and 3D regions near 0.1mm3. These simulations can provide fundamental information about tissue and ways to implement appropriate oxygen measurements. These calculations suggest that photodynamic therapy produces the majority of singlet oxygen in and near the blood vessels, because these are the sites of highest oxygen tension. These calculations support the concept that tumor vascular regions are the major targets for PDT dose deposition.

  5. Smart pH-responsive upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced tumor cellular internalization and near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Chunhong; Su, Lin; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A smart pH-responsive photodynamic therapy system based on upconversion nanoparticle loaded PEG coated polymeric lipid vesicles (RB-UPPLVs) was designed and prepared. These RB-UPPLVs which are promising agents for deep cancer photodynamic therapy applications can achieve enhanced tumor cellular internalization and near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic therapy.

  6. Photodynamic therapy as a local therapeutic adjunct for the treatment of vertebral metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Albert; Burch, Shane; Akens, Margarete; Won, Emily; Lo, Victor; Wise-Milestone, Lisa; Bisland, Stuart; Theriault, Aimee; Niu, Carolyn; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari

    2013-03-01

    Metastatic cancer causes the majority of tumors in bone, most frequently detected in the spinal column. Skeletal complications cause pain and neurologic impairment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used to treat a variety of cancers. Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) strategies may allow targeted light application essential for PDT within bone structures. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an update on pre-clinical status as well as early clinical experience of a Phase I clinical trial on vertebral PDT. A pre-clinical (rnu/rnu rat) vertebral metastasis model of osteolytic (MT-1 breast cancer) was optimized and used to evaluate the effect of vertebral PDT. PDT alone and in combination with other standard local (radiation therapy, RT) and systemic (bisphosphonates, BP) therapies was evaluated through bioluminescence imaging, micro-CT based stereology, histology, and biomechanical testing. Single PDT treatment (photosensitizer BPD-MA, 690nm light) ablated tumor tissue in targeted vertebrae. PDT led to significant increases in bone structural properties, with greatest benefits observed from combined BP+PDT therapy: 76% and 19% increases in bone volume fraction in treated tumor-bearing and healthy untreated controls, respectively. Similar synergistic improvements (but of lesser magnitude) were found in combined PDT+RT treatments. The safety and feasibility of MIS+PDT were evaluated in scale-up animal studies, refining surgical technique for clinical translation. Following appropriate institutional review board as well as Health Canada approval, 5 patients (light only control group) have undergone protocoled treatment to date. These patients have guided further refinement of human therapeutic application from a laser delivery and vertebral bone access perspective.

  7. The exploitation of inflammation in photodynamic therapy of pleural cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Richard W.; Miller, Joann; Houser, Cassandra L.; Klampatsa, Astero; Jenkins, Tim; Cengel, Keith A.; Albelda, Steven M.; Busch, Theresa M.

    2017-02-01

    The onset of inflammation is a well-known physiology in tumors treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT). After PDT, the release of danger signals causes an influx of neutrophils, activation of dendritic cells, and an eventual initiation of the adaptive immune response. However, inflammation also lies at a crucial fulcrum for treatment outcome, as it can stimulate the expression of resistance factors. Therefore, effective treatment with PDT requires an understanding of the holistic contribution of inflammation. Within, we outline two means of studying tumor inflammation in the setting of PDT. Experiments are conducted in murine models of mesothelioma, including those that incorporate surgery prior to PDT or pleural propagation of the disease. First, we use a chemiluminescent agent, luminol, to detect the influx of neutrophils by in vivo molecular imaging. This longitudinal approach allows for the repeated non-invasive monitoring of PDT-induced neutrophil influx. Data clearly identify protocol-specific differences in tumor-associated neutrophil activity. Second, we describe the application of cone-beam CT to detect the fibrosis associated with murine orthotropic mesothelioma models. This approach incorporates novel methods in image segmentation to accurately identify diffuse disease in the thoracic cavity. These studies lay the foundation for future research to correlate long-term response with local PDT-induced inflammation. Such methods in monitoring of inflammation or tumor burden will enable characterization of the consequences of combinatorial therapy (e.g., intraoperative PDT). Resulting data will guide the selection of pharmacological agents or molecular imaging techniques that respectively exploit inflammation for therapeutic or monitoring purposes.

  8. Small laser spot versus standard laser spot photodynamic therapy for idiopathic choroidal neovascularization: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-xin; Tao, Yong

    2012-12-01

    Idiopathic choroidal neovascularization (ICNV) affects young patients and thus may have a significant impact on vision and life quality over a patient's lifespan. This study was designed to compare the visual outcome and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage after photodynamic therapy (PDT) with small laser spot and PDT with standard laser spot for idiopathic choroidal neovascularization (ICNV). This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty-two patients with ICNV were enrolled and randomly divided into a study group (small laser spot PDT, n = 27) and a control group (standard laser spot PDT, n = 25). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), optic coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) findings were the main measurements. The patients were followed up 1 week, 1, 3, 6, 9 months and 1 year after PDT. BCVA improvement was statistically significantly higher in the study group than the control group at 6-month ((25.53 ± 15.01) letters vs. (14.71 ± 11.66) letters, P = 0.025) and 9-month follow-ups ((27.53 ± 17.78) letters vs. (15.59 ± 12.21) letters, P = 0.039). At 3- and 6-month follow-ups, the quadrants of RPE damage between the two groups varied significantly (P laser spot PDT group than in the standard laser spot PDT group for ICNV.

  9. Photoacoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) refers to imaging that is based on the photoacoustic effect. Although the photoacoustic effect as a physical phenomenon was first reported on by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880 [1], PAT as an imaging technology was developed only after the advent of ultrasonic transducers, computers, and lasers [2-31]. A review on biomedical photoacoustics is available [32]. The motivation for PAT is to combine optical-absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution for deep imaging in the optical quasi-diffusive or diffusive regime. In PAT, the tissue is irradiated by usually a short-pulsed laser beam to achieve a thermal and acoustic impulse response (Fig. 19.1). Locally absorbed light is converted into heat, which is further converted to a pressure rise via thermo-elastic expansion. The initial pressure rise - determined by the local optical absorption coefficient (μ â ), fluence (ψ) and other thermal and mechanical properties - propagates as an ultrasonic wave, which is referred to as a photoacoustic wave.

  10. Axial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, K.A.; Lewis, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to axial tomography, sometimes referred to as cross-sectional x-ray. The apparatus described may utilize the conventional x-ray or ultrasonic source and detector and scanning mechanism for producing the plurality of sets of radiation detector output signals. It has the means for storing the detector output signals in analog form with the signals of one set overlying the signals of another set so that signals resulting from radiation through a zone of the object being examined are summed at a corresponding zone in the storage device, typically an electronic storage tube. The summed signals are read from the storage device with a radially inversely proportional reader producing a second signal for storage, again typically in an electronic storage tube. These signals stored in the second storage device are read with Laplacian relation, with the resultant sigal being a video signal that may be connected to a TV monitor for display of the sectional image. In alternative embodiments, optical film systems and electrostatic systems are utilized. (JTA)

  11. Fourier domain preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm for atmospheric tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Vogel, Curtis R; Ellerbroek, Brent L

    2006-07-20

    By 'atmospheric tomography' we mean the estimation of a layered atmospheric turbulence profile from measurements of the pupil-plane phase (or phase gradients) corresponding to several different guide star directions. We introduce what we believe to be a new Fourier domain preconditioned conjugate gradient (FD-PCG) algorithm for atmospheric tomography, and we compare its performance against an existing multigrid preconditioned conjugate gradient (MG-PCG) approach. Numerical results indicate that on conventional serial computers, FD-PCG is as accurate and robust as MG-PCG, but it is from one to two orders of magnitude faster for atmospheric tomography on 30 m class telescopes. Simulations are carried out for both natural guide stars and for a combination of finite-altitude laser guide stars and natural guide stars to resolve tip-tilt uncertainty.

  12. Histological responses of cutaneous vascular lesions following photodynamic therapy with talaporfin sodium: a chicken comb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takafumi; Nakajima, Tatsuo; Ogata, Hisao; Kishi, Kazuo

    2009-09-01

    Mono-L-aspartyl chlorin e6 (Talaporfin sodium) is a novel photosensitizer, and is currently being used in photodynamic therapy for various malignant tumors in combination with irradiation with a 664 nm laser. An interesting characteristic of Talaporfin sodium is that the skin photosensitivity after injection of this agent disappears faster than any other existing photosensitizers. This study examined the vascular events that occurred postirradiation in the chicken comb as a capillary malformation model after photosensitization with Talaporfin sodium. A single intravenous bolus injections of Talaporfin sodium was administered to the chickens, and a 1 cm diameter area of the comb of each animal was irradiated with a 664 nm visible red laser. The gross changes in the chicken combs were recorded for 7-14 days after photodynamic therapy. For the histological examination, HE, PTAH and Azan stained sections were analyzed. All treated chicken combs had blanched after photodynamic therapy. Microscopy demonstrated an absence of erythrocytes and the vessel lumina were obliterated, leaving the normal overlying epidermis completely intact. Concomitantly with selective destruction of the capillaries in the target area, moderate invasion of inflammatory cells and a slight increase in the stroma were observed. In the chicken comb model, photodynamic therapy with Talaporfin sodium effectively achieved selective destruction of the microvasculature while leaving the epidermis intact. Our results strongly suggest that photodynamic therapy with Talaporfin sodium could be a feasible method to treat dermal hypervascular lesions.

  13. Silicon quantum dots delivered phthalocyanine for fluorescence guided photodynamic therapy of tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao-Jiao; Chang, Qi; Bao, Mei-Mei; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2017-08-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21374074, 21422404, and U1532108) and the Undergraduate Training Program for Innovation and Entrepreneurship of Soochow University, China (Grant No. 2016xj010).

  14. Photosensitizer conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for simultaneous in vitro magneto-fluorescent imaging guided photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiujjaman, Md; Revuri, Vishnu; Nurunnabi, Md; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-Kyu

    2015-04-04

    In this study, photosensitizer conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were strategically designed and prepared for simultaneous PDT and dual-mode fluorescence/MR imaging. The MRI contrast agent Fe3O4 was modified by APTES to functionalize the surface and further to link with heparin-pheophorbide-A conjugates.

  15. Algorithmic fundamentals of computerized tomography and of transverse analogue tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckmann, K.

    1981-01-01

    Computerized tomography and transverse analogue tomography are two different approaches to the same goal, namely, transverse tomography. The algorithm is discussed and compared. Transverse tomography appears capable of further development, judging by this comparison. (orig.) [de

  16. Mitochondria-targeted cationic porphyrin-triphenylamine hybrids for enhanced two-photon photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerer, Fabien; Poyer, Florent; Fourmois, Laura; Chen, Su; Garcia, Guillaume; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Maillard, Philippe; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence

    2018-01-01

    The proof of concept for two-photon activated photodynamic therapy has already been achieved for cancer treatment but the efficiency of this approach still heavily relies on the availability of photosensitizers combining high two-photon absorption and biocompatibility. In this line we recently reported on a series of porphyrin-triphenylamine hybrids which exhibit high singlet oxygen production quantum yield as well as high two-photon absorption cross-sections but with a very poor cellular internalization. We present herein new photosensitizers of the same porphyrin-triphenylamine hybrid series but bearing cationic charges which led to strongly enhanced water solubility and thus cellular penetration. In addition the new compounds have been found localized in mitochondria that are preferential target organelles for photodynamic therapy. Altogether the strongly improved properties of the new series combined with their specific mitochondrial localization lead to a significantly enhanced two-photon activated photodynamic therapy efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  18. What is Computed Tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging What is Computed Tomography? Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Chest X ray Image back to top Computed Tomography (CT) Although also based on the variable absorption ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  20. Review of muon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hanliang; Jiao Xiaojing

    2010-01-01

    As a new detection technology, Muon tomography has some potential benefits, such as being able to form a three- dimensional image, without radiation, low cost, fast detecting etc. Especially, muon tomography will play an important role in detecting nuclear materials. It introduces the theory of Muon tomography, its advantages and the Muon tomography system developed by decision sciences corporation and Los Alamos national laboratory. (authors)

  1. Effect of wavelength, epidermal thickness and skin type on the required dose for photodynamic therapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Wavelength, Epidermal Thickness and Skin Type on the Required Dose for Photodynamic Therapy A.E. Karsten1,2 1CSIR National Laser Centre, Biophotonics Group, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa 2Physics Department, Faculty of Natural... a certain depth in the skin. For most laser treatments and diagnostics apllications, wavelengths ranging between 600 and 1 000 nm are used. 1.1 Photodynamic therapy (PDT) In South Africa, as in many other countries, cancer is a major health...

  2. Biomedical applications of nano-titania in theranostics and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, F U; Zhao, C; Jiang, H; Wang, X

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most abundantly used nanomaterials for human life. It is used in sunscreen, photovoltaic devices, biomedical applications and as a food additive and environmental scavenger. Nano-TiO2 in biomedical applications is well documented. It is used in endoprosthetic implants and early theranostics of neoplastic and non-neoplastic maladies as a photodynamic therapeutic agent and as vehicles in nano-drug delivery systems. Herein, we focus on the recent advancements and applications of nano-TiO2 in bio-nanotechnology, nanomedicine and photodynamic therapy (PDT).

  3. Portable instrument that integrates irradiation with fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopies during clinical photodynamic therapy of cutaneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, W. J.; Oseroff, A. R.; Foster, T. H.

    2006-06-01

    We report a portable clinical instrument for delivering photodynamic therapy (PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivers the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performs reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument is being used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, blood volume, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation during a pilot clinical trial of 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 633nm PDT treatment laser is collected between 655 and 800nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programable time points, white light reflectance spectra between 475 and 800nm are acquired. Fluorescence spectra are corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provide information on blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Monitoring blood oxygenation and implicit dose metrics such as photosensitizer photobleaching during PDT allows the improved interpretation of clinical results and is helping to guide the treatment protocol for an anticipated low-irradiance PDT clinical trial of BCC.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  5. Emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emission Computed Tomography is a technique used for producing single or multiple cross-sectional images of the distribution of radionuclide labelled agents in vivo. The techniques of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) are described with particular regard to the function of the detectors used to produce images and the computer techniques used to build up images. (UK)

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  8. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Positron Emission Tomography Instrumentation, Generator Systems for Positron Emitters, Reconstruction Algorithms, Cerebral Glucose Consumption: Methodology and Validation, Cerebral Blood Flow Tomography Using Xenon-133 Inhalation: Methods and Clinical Applications, PET Studies of Stroke, Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography, and Use of PET in Oncology

  9. Photodynamic tissue adhesion with chlorin(e6) protein conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, J; Veloso, A A; Tolentino, F; Hasan, T; Hamblin, M R

    1999-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that a photodynamic laser-activated tissue solder would perform better in sealing scleral incisions when the photosensitizer was covalently linked to the protein than when it was noncovalently mixed. Conjugates and mixtures were prepared between the photosensitizer chlorin(e6) and various proteins (albumin, fibrinogen, and gelatin) in different ratios and used to weld penetrating scleral incisions made in human cadaveric eyes. A blue-green (488-514 nm) argon laser activated the adhesive, and the strength of the closure was measured by increasing the intraocular pressure until the wound showed leakage. Both covalent conjugates and noncovalent mixtures showed a light dose-dependent increase in leaking pressure. A preparation of albumin chlorin(e6) conjugate with additional albumin added (2.5 protein to chlorin(e6) molar ratio) showed significantly higher weld strength than other protein conjugates and mixtures. This is the first report of dye-protein conjugates as tissue solders. These conjugates may have applications in ophthalmology.

  10. The effect of laser unit on photodynamic therapy spot size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari-Shahrezaei, Siamak; Binder, Susanne; Stur, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effect of the laser unit on photodynamic therapy (PDT) spot size. A calibrated Gullstrand-type model eye was used for this study. The axial length of the model eye was set to different values ranging from 22.2 to 27.0 mm, and the actual spot size from the laser console was recorded for treating a spot of 4 mm in the center of the artificial fundus using two different laser units (Coherent Opal laser; Coherent Inc, Santa Clara, California, USA and Zeiss Visulas laser; Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, California, USA) and two indirect contact laser lenses (Volk PDT laser lens and Volk Area Centralis lens; Volk Optical Inc, Mentor, Ohio, USA). From myopia to hyperopia, the total deviation from the intended spot size was -22.5% to -7.5% (Opal laser and PDT laser lens), and -17.5% to +2.5% (Visulas laser and PDT laser lens), -12.5% to +7.5% (Opal laser and Area Centralis lens), and -7.5% to +10% (Visulas laser and Area Centralis lens). The used laser unit has a significant effect on PDT spot size in this model. These findings may be important for optimizing PDT of choroidal neovascular lesions.

  11. Extended rhodamine photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Kellie S; Linder, Michelle K; Kryman, Mark W; Detty, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Extended thio- and selenorhodamines with a linear or angular fused benzo group were prepared. The absorption maxima for these compounds fell between 640 and 700nm. The extended rhodamines were evaluated for their potential as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy in Colo-26 cells. These compounds were examined for their photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence, and ability to generate singlet oxygen), for their dark and phototoxicity toward Colo-26 cells, and for their co-localization with mitochondrial-specific agents in Colo-26 and HUT-78 cells. The angular extended rhodamines were effective photosensitizers toward Colo-26 cells with 1.0Jcm(-2) laser light delivered at λmax±2nm with values of EC50 of (2.8±0.4)×10(-7)M for sulfur-containing analogue 6-S and (6.4±0.4)×10(-8)M for selenium-containing analogue 6-Se. The linear extended rhodamines were effective photosensitizers toward Colo-26 cells with 5 and 10Jcm(-2) of broad-band light (EC50's⩽2.4×10(-7)M). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of oral leukoplakia with photodynamic therapy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranzena Panneer Selvam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: Oral leukoplakia (OL is the most common potentially malignant disorder that may transform into oral carcinoma. By treating leukoplakia in its incipient stage, the risk of occurrence of oral carcinoma can be prevented. In this aspect, photodynamic therapy (PDT can serve as a useful treatment modality. The aim of the study is to treat patients with OL using PDT in which 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA is used as a photosensitizer. Materials and Methods: Five patients with OL were included in the study. They were treated with 10% ALA mediated PDT (light source: Xenon lamp, power: 0.1 W, wavelength: 630 ± 5 nm, total dose: 100 J/cm 2 per session for 6-8 sessions. Follow-up was done for a period of 1 year. Results: One month (4 weeks after ALA-PDT, the response was evaluated based on clinical examination. It was as follows: Complete response: Two patients; partial response: Two patients; and no response: One patient. There was no recurrence in any of the cases. Conclusion: There was satisfactory reduction in the size of the OL lesion without any side-effects. Thus, ALA mediated PDT seems to be a promising alternative for the treatment of OL.

  13. Light-driven photosensitizer uptake increases Candida albicans photodynamic inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Silva, Ana P da; Kurachi, Cristina; Guimarães, Francisco E G

    2017-11-01

    Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) is based on the use of a photosensitizer (PS) and light that results mainly in the production of reactive oxygen species, aiming to produce microorganism cell death. PS incubation time and light dose are key protocol parameters that influence PDI response; the correct choice of them can increase the efficiency of inactivation. The results of this study show that a minor change in the PDI protocol, namely light-driven incubation leads to a higher photosensitizer and more uniform cell uptake inside the irradiated zone. Furthermore, as the uptake increases, the damage caused by PDI also increases. The proposed light-driven incubation prior to the inactivation illumination dose has advantages when compared to the traditional PDI treatments since it can be more selective and effective. Using a violet light as pre-illumination (light-driven incubation) source and a red-light system as PDI source, it was possible to demonstrate that when compared to the traditional protocol of dark incubation, the pre-illuminated cell culture showed an inactivation increase of 7 log units. These in vitro results performed in Candida albicans cells may result in the introduction of a new protocol for PDI. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Development and optimization of a diode laser for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyun Soo

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrated the development of a laser system for cancer treatment with photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on a 635 nm laser diode. In order to optimize efficacy in PDT, the ideal laser system should deliver a homogeneous nondivergent light energy with a variable spot size and specific wavelength at a stable output power. We developed a digital laser beam controller using the constant current method to protect the laser diode resonator from the current spikes and other fluctuations, and electrical faults. To improve the PDT effects, the laser system should deliver stable laser energy in continuous wave (CW), burst mode and super burst mode, with variable irradiation times depending on the tumor type and condition. The experimental results showed the diode laser system described herein was eminently suitable for PDT. The laser beam was homogeneous without diverging and the output power increased stably and in a linear manner from 10 mW to 1500 mW according to the increasing input current. Variation between the set and delivered output was less than 7%. The diode laser system developed by the author for use in PDT was compact, user-friendly, and delivered a stable and easily adjustable output power at a specific wavelength and user-set emission modes.

  15. Molecular photosensitisers for two-photon photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolze, F; Jenni, S; Sour, A; Heitz, V

    2017-11-30

    Two-photon excitation has attracted the attention of biologists, especially after the development of two-photon excited microscopy in the nineties. Since then, new applications have rapidly emerged such as the release of biologically active molecules and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using two-photon excitation. PDT, which requires a light-activated drug (photosensitiser), is a clinically approved and minimally invasive treatment for cancer and for non-malignant diseases. This feature article focuses on the engineering of molecular two-photon photosensitisers for PDT, which should bring important benefits to the treatment, increase the treatment penetration depth with near-infrared light excitation, improve the spatial selectivity and reduce the photodamage to healthy tissues. After an overview of the two-photon absorption phenomenon and the methods to evaluate two-photon induced phototoxicity on cell cultures, the different classes of photosensitisers described in the literature are discussed. The two-photon PDT performed with historical one-photon sensitisers are briefly presented, followed by specifically engineered cyclic tetrapyrrole photosensitisers, purely organic photosensitisers and transition metal complexes. Finally, targeted two-photon photosensitisers and theranostic agents that should enhance the selectivity and efficiency of the treatment are discussed.

  16. Photodynamic therapy and diagnosis: Principles and comparative aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Jane; de Queiroz, Genilson Fernandes; Golding, Jon P

    2018-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an evolving method of treating superficial tumours that is non-invasive and carries minimal risk of toxicity. It combines tumour-selective photosensitiser dyes, tissue oxygen and targeted illumination to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the tumour. In addition to directly acting on tumour cells, PDT damages and restricts tumour microvasculature, and causes a local inflammatory response that stimulates an immune response against the tumour. Unlike surgery or radiotherapy, the surrounding extracellular matrix is unaffected by PDT; thus, tissue healing is excellent and PDT seldom causes scars. This, combined with the ease of light application, has made PDT a popular treatment for cancers and pre-cancerous conditions in human beings. Moreover, because photosensitiser dyes are fluorescent and selectively accumulate in tumour tissues, they can additionally be used to visualise and discriminate tumour from normal tissues, thereby improving the accuracy of tumour surgery. In veterinary practice, PDT has been used successfully for treatment of superficial squamous cell carcinomas of the feline nasal planum; urinary tract, urinary bladder and prostate neoplasia in dogs; and equine sarcoids. The purpose of this article is to provide a comparative review of the current literature on PDT in human and veterinary medicine, and to establish a basis for future development of PDT in veterinary medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy in the Management of Onychomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robres, P; Aspiroz, C; Rezusta, A; Gilaberte, Y

    2015-12-01

    Onychomycosis, or fungal infection of the nails, is one of the most prevalent fungal diseases in the general population. Treatment is of limited effectiveness, tedious, and must be administered for long periods. Furthermore, systemic antifungal agents are associated with adverse effects. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may prove to be a viable alternative in the treatment of superficial skin infections, including onychomycosis. We review articles relating to the usefulness of PDT in onychomycosis in both in vitro and in vivo settings and discuss the potential and limitations of various photosensitizing agents. In vivo, methylene blue and 5-aminolevulinic acid have led to cure rates in 80% and 43% of cases, respectively, at 12 months. Finally, based on data in the literature and our own experience, we propose a protocol of 3 PDT sessions, separated by an interval of 1 or 2 weeks, using methyl aminolevulinate 16% as a photosensitizing agent and red light (λ=630 nm, 37 J.cm(-2)). Each session is preceded by the topical application of urea 40% over several days. Clinical trials are needed to optimize PDT protocols and to identify those patients who will benefit most from this treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  18. Four-year clinical experience in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Mironov, Andrei F.; Markichev, Nikolai A.; Riabov, Michail V.

    1996-12-01

    The analysis of the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating malignant neoplasms of skin, breasts, tongue, oral mucose, lower lip, larynx, stomach, bladder, rectum and other locations has been made. During 1992 - 1996 867 tumoral foci in 222 patients have been treated with PDT. All patients were previously treated with conventional techniques or they were not treated due to contraindications either because of severe accompanying diseases or because of old age. A part of the patients had PDT because of recurrences or intradermal metastases in 1 - 2 years after surgical, radial or combined treatment. Up to now we have follow-up control data within 2 months and 4 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 93.7% of patients including complete regression of tumors in 64.9% and partial in 28.8%. Currently this new perspective technique of treating malignant neoplasms is successfully being used in Russia; new photosensitizers and light sources for PDT and fluorescent tumor diagnostics are being developed as well.

  19. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel O. L. Bacellar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS, which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research.

  20. Predictive analysis of photodynamic therapy applied to esophagus cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; del Campo-Gutiérrez, M.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2008-04-01

    The use of optical techniques in medicine has revolutionized in many cases the medical praxis, providing new tools for practitioners or improving the existing ones in the fight against diseases. The application of this technology comprises mainly two branches, characterization and treatment of biological tissues. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides a solution for malignant tissue destruction, by means of the inoculation of a photosensitizer and irradiation by an optical source. The key factor of the procedure is the localization of the damage to avoid collateral harmful effects. The volume of tissue destroyed depends on the type of photosensitizer inoculated, both on its reactive characteristics and its distribution inside the tissue, and also on the specific properties of the optical source, that is, the optical power, wavelength and exposition time. In this work, a model for PDT based on the one-dimensional diffusion equation, extensible to 3D, to estimate the optical distribution in tissue, and on photosensitizer parameters to take into account the photobleaching effect is proposed. The application to esophagus cancer allows the selection of the right optical source parameters, like irradiance, wavelength or exposition time, in order to predict the area of tissue destruction.

  1. [Current status and prospect of photodynamic therapy in laryngeal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Jiang, J Q

    2018-04-07

    Laryngeal diseases are closely related to the swallowing and speech function of the patients.Protecting and restoring laryngeal function, while curing lesions, is vital to patients' quality of life.Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive method which is widely used in the treatment of tumor, precancerous lesions, and inflammatory diseases.In recent years, it has been shown to have a protective effect on normal structures. This article reviews the clinical outcomes of laryngeal diseases treated with PDT since 1990 in order to evaluate its efficacy and significance. The complete remission rate of early-stage laryngeal tumors and precancerous lesions after PDT is 77.6%(249/321), and a promising effect on recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis has been observed thus far. The prolonged adverse effects of the first-generation photosensitizers have limited the application of PDT. With the improvement of photosensitizers and treatment strategies, PDT promises to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment method for laryngeal diseases.

  2. Development of Smart Phthalocyanine-based Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Yun Sang

    Phthalocyanines are versatile functional dyes that have shown great potential in cancer theranostics, especially in photodynamic therapy (PDT). This research work aims to develop "smart" phthalocyanine-based photosensitizers for targeted PDT. This thesis describes the synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, photophysical properties, and in vitro photodynamic activities of several series of carefully designed phthalocyanine-based photosensitizers. Chapter 1 presents an overview of PDT, including its historical development, photophysical mechanisms, and biological mechanisms. Various classes of photosensitizers are introduced with emphasis putting on phthalocyanines, which exhibit ideal characteristics of photosensitizers for PDT. In recent years, several approaches have been used to develop photosensitizers with higher tumor selectivity and minimal skin photosensitivity after PDT. Activatable photosensitizers can provide a "turn on" mechanism to offer an additional control of the specificity of treatment. Photosensitizers can also work cooperatively with the tumor-targeting groups or anticancer drugs so as to achieve targeted or dual therapy, which can enhance the efficacy of PDT. The novel approaches mentioned above have been widely used and combined to form multi-functional photosensitizing agents. These novel concepts and development of PDT are discussed and illustrated with relevant examples at the end of this chapter. To minimize the prolonged skin photosensitivity, photosensitizers that can only be activated by tumor-associated stimuli have been developed. Due to the abnormal metabolism in tumor tissues, their surface usually exhibits a lower pH compared to that of the normal tissues. Also, the pH difference between the intracellular and the physiological environment provides a pH-activation mechanism. Chapter 2 presents the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of a pH-responsive zinc(II) phthalocyanine tetramer, in which the phthalocyanine units

  3. Core - shell upconversion nanoparticle - semiconductor heterostructures for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Qing Qing; Rengaramchandran, Adith; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Zhang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) with diverse chemical compositions have been attracting greater attention in recent years. However, it has been a challenge to develop CSNPs with different crystal structures due to the lattice mismatch of the nanocrystals. Here we report a rational design of core-shell heterostructure consisting of NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) as the core and ZnO semiconductor as the shell for potential application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The core-shell architecture (confirmed by TEM and STEM) enables for improving the loading efficiency of photosensitizer (ZnO) as the semiconductor is directly coated on the UCN core. Importantly, UCN acts as a transducer to sensitize ZnO and trigger the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce cancer cell death. We also present a firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter gene based molecular biosensor (ARE-FLuc) to measure the antioxidant signaling response activated in cells during the release of ROS in response to the exposure of CSNPs under 980 nm NIR light. The breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and 4T1) exposed to CSNPs showed significant release of ROS as measured by aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and ARE-FLuc luciferase assays, and ~45% cancer cell death as measured by MTT assay, when illuminated with 980 nm NIR light.

  4. Photodynamic therapy for melanoma: efficacy and immunologic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the fastest growing cancers and if it cannot be completely surgically removed the prognosis is bleak. Melanomas are known to be particularly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Various types of immunotherapy have however been investigated with mixed reports of success. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has also been tested against melanoma, again with mixed effects as the melanin pigment is thought to act as both an optical shield and as an antioxidant. We have been investigating PDT against malignant melanoma in mouse models. We have compared B16F10 melanoma syngenic to C57BL/6 mice and S91 Cloudman melanoma syngenic to DBA2 mice. We have tested the hypothesis that S91 will respond better than B16 because of higher expression of immunocritical molecules such as MHC-1, tyrosinase, tyrosinase related protein-2 gp100, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Some of these molecules can act as tumor rejection antigens that can be recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells that have been stimulated by PDT. Moreover it is possible that DBA2 mice are intrinsically better able to mount an anti-tumor immune response than C57BL/6 mice. We are also studying intratumoral injection of photosensitzers such as benzoporphyrin monoacid ring A and comparing this route with the more usual route of intravenous administration.

  5. Daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy in Spain: advantages and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, L; García-Gavín, J; Gilaberte, Y

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an option for the treatment of actinic keratosis, Bowen disease, and certain types of basal cell carcinoma. It is also used to treat various other types of skin condition, including inflammatory and infectious disorders. The main disadvantages of PDT are the time it takes to administer (both for the patient and for health professionals) and the pain associated with treatment. Daylight-mediated PDT has recently been reported to be an alternative to the conventional approach. Several studies have shown it to be similar in efficacy to and better tolerated than classic PDT for the treatment of mild to moderate actinic keratosis. Nevertheless, most of these studies are from northern Europe, and no data have been reported from southern Europe. The present article reviews the main studies published to date, presents the treatment protocol, and summarizes our experience with a group of treated patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Photodynamic therapy platform for glioblastoma and intrabronchial tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsila, Lasse; Alanko, Jukka-Pekka; Kaivosoja, Visa; Uibu, Toomas

    2018-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is bringing new, effective, and less invasive, possibilities for cancer treatment. ML7710 (Modulight Inc.) medical laser system offers a platform for performing PDT for multiple indications and drugs. Latest avenue is glioblastoma treatment with 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA-5) and 635-nm light, where clinical trials are about to begin. Preliminary work suggests major advantages in treatment control, including active in-situ feedback. ML7710 platform has already proven itself for clinical work with intrabronchial obstructive tumors. Preliminary result with 10 patients show that intrabronchial tumors, that strongly affect both the survival and the performance of the patient, can be significantly reduced with ML7710 operated at 665 nm and sodium chlorine E6 photosensitizer. The aim in most of the patients has been a palliative recanalization of the bronchial lumen in order to alleviate the symptoms such as breathlessness and hemoptysis. The illumination dose for the target area was 50-75 J/cm2. All the patients have received multimodality cancer treatment using other intrabronchial interventions, radiotherapy and chemotherapy as needed. In most of the patients, satisfactory treatment results were achieved and it was possible to restart chemotherapy in several patients. In one patient with local cancer a complete remission was established. PDT has also the advantage that it is possible to give PDT after a maximum dose of radiation therapy has already been used and fewer side effects if used in locally advanced intraluminar lung cancer.

  7. Photodynamic Therapy and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezel L. Griffin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most common malignancy among the Caucasian population. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is gaining popularity for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC, Bowen’s disease (BD and actinic keratosis (AK. A topical or systemic exogenous photosensitiser, results in selective uptake by malignant cells. Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX is produced then activated by the introduction of a light source. Daylight-mediated MAL (methyl aminolaevulinate PDT for AKs has the advantage of decreased pain and better patient tolerance. PDT is an effective treatment for superficial BCC, BD and both individual and field treatment of AKs. Excellent cosmesis can be achieved with high patient satisfaction. Variable results have been reported for nodular BCC, with improved outcomes following pretreatment and repeated PDT cycles. The more aggressive basisquamous, morphoeic infiltrating subtypes of BCC and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC are not suitable for PDT. Prevention of “field cancerization” in organ transplant recipients on long-term immunosuppression and patients with Gorlin syndrome (naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a promising development. The optimisation of PDT techniques with improved photosensitiser delivery to target tissues, new generation photosensitisers and novel light sources may expand the future role of PDT in NMSC management.

  8. Combined laser and photodynamic treatment in extensive purulent wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovieva, A. B.; Tolstih, P. I.; Melik-Nubarov, N. S.; Zhientaev, T. M.; Kuleshov, I. G.; Glagolev, N. N.; Ivanov, A. V.; Karahanov, G. I.; Tolstih, M. P.; Timashev, P. S.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used for the treatment of festering wounds and trophic ulcers. An important advantage of PDT is its ability to affect bacterial cultures that are resistant to antibiotics. However the use of PDT alone does not usually guarantee a stable antiseptic effect and cannot prevent an external infection of wounds and burns. In this work attention is focused on the healing of the extensive soft tissues wounds with combined laser therapy (LT) and PDT treatment. At the first stage of this process festering tissues (for example spacious purulent wounds with area more than 100 cm2) were illuminated with high-energy laser beam (with power 20 W) in continues routine. The second stage involves “softer” PDT affect, which along with the completion stages of destruction pathological cells, stimulating the process of wound granulation and epithelization. Also, according to our previous results, photosensitizer (photoditazin) is introduced inside the wound with different amphiphilic polymers for increasing the PDT efficacy.

  9. Early and Late Onset Side Effects of Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Borgia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT is a non-invasive treatment successfully used for neoplastic, inflammatory and infectious skin diseases. One of its strengths is represented by the high safety profile, even in elderly and/or immuno-depressed subjects. PDT, however, may induce early and late onset side effects. Erythema, pain, burns, edema, itching, desquamation, and pustular formation, often in association with each other, are frequently observed in course of exposure to the light source and in the hours/days immediately after the therapy. In particular, pain is a clinically relevant short-term complication that also reduces long-term patient satisfaction. Rare complications are urticaria, contact dermatitis at the site of application of the photosensitizer, and erosive pustular dermatosis. Debated is the relationship between PDT and carcinogenesis: the eruptive appearance of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in previously treated areas has been correlated to a condition of local and/or systemic immunosuppression or to the selection of PDT-resistant SCC. Here we review the literature, with particular emphasis to the pathogenic hypotheses underlying these observations.

  10. Subretinal Hemorrhage after Photodynamic Therapy for Juxtapapillary Retinal Capillary Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Baba

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old Japanese woman presented with a juxtapapillary retinal capillary hemangioma (RCH in her left eye. Twelve months after the initial examination, the size of the hemangioma had increased and the exudation from the RCH involved the macula. Her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA had decreased from 0.8 to 0.3. A total of five intravitreal injections of bevacizumab (IVB; 1.25 mg was given but the RCH did not respond. A photodynamic therapy (PDT was done using multiple laser spots to avoid damaging the optic nerve head. After the first PDT, the subfoveal fluid was reduced but not completely gone. One week after the second PDT, a massive subretinal hemorrhage developed. The subretinal hemorrhage was successfully displaced by injecting intraocular sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 gas. At the 3-year follow-up examination, no subretinal hemorrhage or fluid was observed at the macula and the BCVA remained at 0.05. Our case was resistant to the combination of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and PDT and had a rare massive subretinal hemorrhage. A further collection of RCH cases treated with anti-VEGF and PDT that would justify this treatment is necessary.

  11. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroz, Pawel, E-mail: pmroz@partners.org [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Yaroslavsky, Anastasia [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Boston University College of Engineering, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kharkwal, Gitika B [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Hamblin, Michael R. [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT.

  12. Verteporfin: a milestone in opthalmology and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S B; Mellish, K J

    2001-02-01

    During the past year, a photosensitiser named benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) has been approved in 26 countries under the generic name verteporfin (Visudynetrade mark, Novartis), for the treatment of patients with a certain type of the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by photodynamic therapy (PDT). AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world, with approximately half a million new cases of the wet form per year. The approval of Visudynetrade mark therapy represents a major milestone in ophthalmology since AMD was previously untreatable by any modality which would preserve existing vision. It was also a milestone in the development of PDT, not only because it represented the first breakthrough in the use of PDT to treat an otherwise untreatable condition, but also because it represented the first mass market for a PDT treatment where prospects of a substantial financial return on many years of investment appear to be likely. In this article, we look at the background to the development of BPD, primarily for its use in AMD, but also in other applications.

  13. A quaternary ammonium modified coumarin derivative for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Shaona; Gu, Ying; Zhao, Yuxia

    2018-02-01

    A new cationic modified coumarin derivative, 7-diethylamino-3-(3-(4-(trimethylbenzenaminium iodide) phenyl) acryloyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (1), was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. It had a strong intramolecular charge transfer absorption band around 460 nm with large molar extinction coefficients of 3.94 × 104 M-1 cm-1 in DMF and 3.86 × 104 M-1 cm-1 in PBS, respectively. Moreover, a moderate singlet oxygen quantum yield of 0.16 was obtained for 1 in DMF. Using methylene blue (MB) under a 630 nm laser as reference, the in vitro antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) activity of 1 against three strains, gram positive bacteria methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), negative bacteria acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) and fungus Candida albicans (C. albicans), was carried out by irradiation with a 457 nm laser. It was shown that 1 had no dark toxicity to these bacteria when its concentration was up to 100 μM, while under the 457 nm laser it could kill them effectively with an over 3 log CFU/ml decrease of the bacterial viability with its concentration up to 5 μM. The aPDT capability of 1 against MRSA and A. baumannii was equivalent to that of MB. For C. albicans, 1 exhibited much better aPDT effect than MB.

  14. Advances in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Nasim; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2017-08-01

    The alarming worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance amongst microbial pathogens necessitates a search for new antimicrobial techniques, which will not be affected by, or indeed cause resistance themselves. Light-mediated photoinactivation is one such technique that takes advantage of the whole spectrum of light to destroy a broad spectrum of pathogens. Many of these photoinactivation techniques rely on the participation of a diverse range of nanoparticles and nanostructures that have dimensions very similar to the wavelength of light. Photodynamic inactivation relies on the photochemical production of singlet oxygen from photosensitizing dyes (type II pathway) that can benefit remarkably from formulation in nanoparticle-based drug delivery vehicles. Fullerenes are a closed-cage carbon allotrope nanoparticle with a high absorption coefficient and triplet yield. Their photochemistry is highly dependent on microenvironment, and can be type II in organic solvents and type I (hydroxyl radicals) in a biological milieu. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles act as a large band-gap semiconductor that can carry out photo-induced electron transfer under ultraviolet A light and can also produce reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We discuss some recent studies in which quite remarkable potentiation of microbial killing (up to six logs) can be obtained by the addition of simple inorganic salts such as the non-toxic sodium/potassium iodide, bromide, nitrite, and even the toxic sodium azide. Interesting mechanistic insights were obtained to explain this increased killing.

  15. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W; Moriyama, L T; Bagnato, V S

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed. (review)

  16. Evaluation of actual vs expected photodynamic therapy spot size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchod, Tushar M; Brucker, Alexander J; Liu, Chengcheng; Cukras, Catherine A; Hopkins, Tim B; Ying, Gui-Shuang

    2009-05-01

    To determine the accuracy of the photodynamic therapy (PDT) laser spot size on the retina as generated by 2 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved lasers. Prospective observational case series. Fundus photographs were taken of 1 eye of each of 10 subjects with the WinStation 4000 fundus photography system (OIS; Ophthalmic Imaging Systems, Sacramento, California, USA); disc size was calculated using OIS software. Slit-lamp photographs were taken of the PDT laser spot focused on the retina adjacent to the optic disc, using various spot sizes in combination with 3 different contact lenses and 2 different lasers. Spot size at the retina was determined by measuring the ratio of disc diameter to spot diameter in Adobe Photoshop (San Jose, California, USA) and applying this ratio to the OIS disc measurements. Spot size at the retina averaged 87% of expected spot size for the Coherent Opal laser (Coherent Inc, Santa Clara, California, USA) and 104% of expected spot size for the Zeiss Visulas laser (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc, Dublin, California, USA)(P = .002). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that percentage of expected spot size decreased with larger spot diameter (P = .01 for Coherent laser; P = .02 for Zeiss laser). PDT spot size at the retina appears to be consistently smaller than expected for the Coherent laser while the spot size was consistently within 10% of expected size for the Zeiss laser. The deviation from expected size increased with larger spot size using the Coherent laser.

  17. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be localized in various organelles such as mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes and this sub-cellular location governs much of the signaling that occurs after PDT. There is an acute stress response that leads to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and causes the production of cytokines and stress response mediators. Enzymes (particularly protein kinases) are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses center on mitochondria and frequently lead to induction of apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspase activation and release of cytochrome c. Certain specific proteins (such as Bcl-2) are damaged by PDT-induced oxidation thereby increasing apoptosis, and a build-up of oxidized proteins leads to an ER-stress response that may be increased by proteasome inhibition. Autophagy plays a role in either inhibiting or enhancing cell death after PDT

  18. Photodynamic therapy improves the ultraviolet-irradiated hairless mice skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Ana Elisa S.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-03-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) sunlight causes premature skin aging. In light of this fact, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging modality for treating cancer and other skin conditions, however its response on photoaged skin has not been fully illustrated by means of histopathology. For this reason, the aim of this study was analyze whether PDT can play a role on a mouse model of photoaging. Hence, SKH-1 hairless mice were randomly allocated in two groups, UV and UV/PDT. The mice were daily exposed to an UV light source (280-400 nm: peak at 350 nm) for 8 weeks followed by a single PDT session using 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) topically. After the proper photosensitizer accumulation within the tissue, a non-coherent red (635 nm) light was performed and, after 14 days, skin samples were excised and processed for light microscopy, and their sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's Trichrome. As a result, we observed a substantial epidermal thickening and an improvement in dermal collagen density by deposition of new collagen fibers on UV/PDT group. These findings strongly indicate epidermal and dermal restoration, and consequently skin restoration. In conclusion, this study provides suitable evidences that PDT improves the UV-irradiated hairless mice skin, supporting this technique as an efficient treatment for photoaged skin.

  19. Photodynamic therapy in early esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Pasquale; Dal Fante, Marco; Mancini, Andrea; Massetti, Renato; Meroni, Emmanuele

    1995-03-01

    From 1/1985 to 7/1993, 18 patients underwent endoscopic photodynamic therapy (PDT) for early stage esophageal squamous cell carcinoma -- as two patients had two synchronous esophageal cancers, 20 lesions were treated. Tumors were staged as Tis in 7 cases and T1 in 13. The average light energy delivered was 50 J/cm2 and 70 J/cm2 for the treatment of Tis and T1, respectively. To obtain a more uniform distribution of laser light in 12 cases the irradiation was performed through the wall of a transparent tube previously placed over the endoscope and advanced into the stomach. The overall results show a complete response in 14/20 (70%) tumors. Three patients developed a local recurrence, 6, 12, and 14 months after therapy. After a follow-up of 5 to 75 months, there was no evidence of disease in 10/18 patients (56%). The actuarial survival rate was 95%, 79%, and 26% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Complications were skin reaction in one patient and esophageal stenosis at the treatment site, that gradually responded to endoscopic bougienage, in 2 patients. Endoscopic PDT proved to be safe and effective in the treatment of superficial carcinoma of the esophagus.

  20. Absolute densities in exoplanetary systems. Photodynamical modelling of Kepler-138.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara, J. M.; Díaz, R. F.; Dorn, C.; Bonfils, X.; Udry, S.

    2018-04-01

    In favourable conditions, the density of transiting planets in multiple systems can be determined from photometry data alone. Dynamical information can be extracted from light curves, providing modelling is done self-consistently, i.e. using a photodynamical model, which simulates the individual photometric observations instead of the more generally used transit times. We apply this methodology to the Kepler-138 planetary system. The derived planetary bulk densities are a factor of two more precise than previous determinations, and we find a discrepancy in the stellar bulk density with respect to a previous study. This leads, in turn, to a discrepancy in the determination of masses and radii of the star and the planets. In particular, we find that interior planet, Kepler-138 b, has a size in between Mars and the Earth. Given our mass and density estimates, we characterize the planetary interiors using a generalized Bayesian inference model. This model allows us to quantify for interior degeneracy and calculate confidence regions of interior parameters such as thicknesses of the core, the mantle, and ocean and gas layers. We find that Kepler-138 b and Kepler-138 d have significantly thick volatile layers, and that the gas layer of Kepler-138 b is likely enriched. On the other hand, Kepler-138 c can be purely rocky.